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Beautiful

Making Good

Dreamers THE CHANGING LOOK OF GREENVILLE IS AT THE HANDS OF A FEW DYNAMIC TRIOS

HOW THREE WOMEN CRAFTED THE BEST ARTISAN SHOW IN THE SOUTHEAST

Family Moves

THE LEGACY OF THE PEACE FAMILY CONTINUES THROUGH A FORMIDABLE FEMALE TRIUMVIRATE

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Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690, Harry V. Roser, Broker-in-Charge and Cliffs Realty Sales, SC, LLC, 341 Keowee Baptist Church Road, Six Mile, SC 29682, Marc H. Wilson, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Walnut Cove Realty, 158 Walnut Valley Parkway, Arden, NC 28704, Dotti Smith, Broker-in-Charge.

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the

S EVE N

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YUM However carefully we watch our calories, there are times when nothing satisfies like a mac & cheese … infused with bacon and fried chicken. Or a smoky BBQ brisket cocktail or sultry lobster bisque. Here, in the glorious Carolina mountains near Asheville, Greenville and Clemson are the seven clubs that are The Cliffs, and chefs certain to stir the soul. There is not one that’s best, but whichever you choose to call home, all seven are yours to enjoy. Come, be our guest and discover why we say, “There’s life, and then there’s living.”

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The Word on the Street… in 29605

5

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AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong Owner, Broker in Charge 864-325-2112

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Joan@AugustaRoad.com *Greenville’s Number One Realtor, for the past FOUR years. Source: MLS Sales Volume, 2015, 2014, 2013 & 2012

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FIRST

Glance

Fields of Gold: Where: The rolling expanse of a former Aiken, South Carolina, plantation is now the beautiful grounds of equestrian-welcoming bed and breakfast Magnolia Shadows. What: Italian expat Andrea Cerofolini exchanged his busy city life for a backcountry dream. For the story, see page 46. Photograph by Katie Fiedler

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Challenge your body. Change your life. bonsecours.com

SEPTEMBER 2016 / 5

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864.233.5900

119 North Main St.

Greenville, SC 8/18/16 11:24 AM


“HILARIOUS!” The New York Times

SEPT 27- OCT 2 ON SALE NOW! AN EVENING WITH

CHRIS THILE SEPTEMBER 13

BRANFORD MARSALIS

WITH SPECIAL GUEST KURT ELLING

OCTOBER 4

AN EVENING WITH

RON WHITE OCTOBER 6

KEB’ MO’ BAND OCTOBER 13

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY TODAY! Learn more at peacecenter.org/events

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

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Contents

8 7

MAKERS’ MARK

10 17

EDITOR’S NOTE THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

23

ON THE TOWN

35

WEDDINGS

41

TOWNBUZZ

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Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

Local creatives bring the ’artbeat back to the Brandon Mill; Aiken B&B Magnolia Shadows boards you and your steed in style; a ninety-year-old nana proves you’re never too old to wake surf; a Warrior’s Wedding, and more.

TOWN PROFILE

Dame of the South Carolina Children’s Theatre, director Debbie Bell inspires with her passion for performance.

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STYLE CENTRAL

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MAN ABOUT TOWN

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At the forefront of the craft movement, Makers Collective founders Lib Ramos, Erin Godbey, and Jen Moreau provide Southeastern artisans an outlet at the everanticipated Indie Craft Parade. / by Kathryn Davé & Heidi Coryell Williams // photography by Eli Warren

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BENEVOLENCE BEYOND MEASURE

Cousins Betty Stall, Genevieve Sakas Manly, and Mary Sterling may be genteel Southern ladies, but these community-minded matriarchs are the backbone behind some of our city’s most beloved establishments. / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

Dress rehearsal takes on new meaning with these fashionable finds; Shindig’s classic selection shines through the centuries; and our top boutique picks for a night on the town.

Held hostage by a serpentine fiend, the Man gets stuck in a slithery situation.

EAT & DRINK

Snack on green goodness at Kitchen Sync; Bake Room’s luscious bread fills Upstate bellies; and bartender Evan Leihy crafts cocktails with a personal flair.

105

DINING GUIDE

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TOWNSCENE

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SECOND GLANCE

Got plans? You do now.

Depth of Field, at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, honors iconic American documentary pioneer Walker Evans.

THIS PAGE: These silver and gold rings from local designer Leandra Hill Metal Works will be available at the Indie Craft Parade this month. For more, see “Makers’ Mark,” page 78. Photograph courtesy of Leandra Hill Metal Works

COVER: GCCA’s Liz Rundorff Smith, Cherington Love Shucker, and Marlowe Whitaker are the tenacious trio behind Greenville’s only creative arts center. For more, see “Home Is Where the Art Is,” page 42. Photograph by Eli Warren

September

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Distinctive looks inside and out. The 2016 GLC300 SUV Go ahead, touch it. Take in the materials, stitching and shapes. Feel the precision of its controls, from the touchpad on its sweeping console to its aircraft-style vents. Venture through widened rear doors and check out the spacious, 40/20/40-split rear seats. Even your luggage rides in luxury, with a standard power liftgate to ease loading. Starting at $38,950.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter

Photograph by Cat her i ne Tolber t

))) For digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

On Account of Three

W

hen Lib Ramos had a notion to celebrate the work of indie makers—talented artisans who craft inspired, functional pieces—she wondered if she was crazy. In fact, she asked as much to cocollaborator Erin Godbey. That was seven years ago. Now, as the Indie Craft Parade preps for its seventh expo, it stands as one of the best artisan shows in the Southeast, with vendors from Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte, Asheville, Durham, Charleston, and other cities joining Greenville’s superb lot. Jen Moreau, co-owner of Greenville’s Dapper Ink, rounds out the threesome now formally known as the Makers Collective (see “Makers’ Mark,” page 78). Creation involves direction, drive, and focus—the highest idea of who we can be and what we can accomplish. It also begins with desire—a hope for something different, a wish for positive change. When we connect aspiration and intention, big things happen. Before the birth of the Makers Collective, another formidable trio was pushing Greenville to a higher plane. Betty Stall, Genevieve Sakas Manly, and Mary Sterling are cousins whose Peace family paved the way for Greenville to shine on a national stage (see “Benevolence Beyond Measure,” page 88). From the development of the Peace Center and Upcountry History Museum, to investing in the talented drama students at the SC Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, to countless other contributions, these kindred have quietly worked for the betterment of Greenville. Today, we reap the rewards of their decisions to act. Like these women, Cherington Love Shucker didn’t wait. The Greenville Center for Creative Arts, our city’s first arts center in the Village of West Greenville, lives in the former Brandon Mill, abandoned for years after textiles left for good (see “Home Is Where the Art Is,” page 42). Along with colleagues Liz Rundorff Smith and Marlowe Whitaker, Shucker and crew aren’t just manning a place where folks can practice and display art. They are bringing attention, and revitalization, to a long-neglected place. Three is a powerful number. Its symbolism extends to religion, war, sports, pop culture, and even luck. But these enterprising females aren’t living on a dream—they are making them come true.

Peace family cousins Betty Stall, Genevieve Sakas Manly, and Mary Sterling continue a legacy of giving; Stall and other family members were instrumental in the conception and construction of Greenville’s beloved Peace Center cultural complex, which opened in November 1990.

Photograph cour tesy of the Peace Center

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @lbknobel

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WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO IN FALL?

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR LAURA LINEN STYLE EDITOR

The sound of the wind rustling the drying leaves summons not only fun memories of raking those leaves with my sister while my parents went to UGA football games, but also searching for cool new denim styles and new boots, of course! And going to the football games.

Abby Moore Keith EDITORIAL ASSISTANT CONTRIBUTING EDITORS RUTA FOX M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka Heidi Coryell Williams

Changing leaves, apple cider doughnuts, and fall fashion.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Kathryn Davé, Kathleen Nalley Moore & Stephanie Trotter

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Katie Fiedler, Whitney Fincannon, TJ Grandy, Josh Jones, Jake Knight, Cameron Reynolds, Spencer Stanton, & Eli Warren EDITORIAL INTERNS Hayden Arrington Olivia McCall EDITOR-AT-L ARGE ANDREW HUANG Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER

LET'S MAKE SOMETHING GOOD. Your new go-to coffee spot, indispensable caterer, happy hour home, and the place

I usually look forward to the air. It’s more crisp, and it tastes cleaner. I know fall’s usually considered a waning season of life, but I find myself coming back to life after the misery and torpor brought on by summer heat and humidity.

where you get your sandwich just the way you like it. And the sweets, they're to die for. HOLLY WHATLEY, EXECUTIVE PASTRY CHEF

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair MICHAEL ALLEN MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Johnston, Annie Langston , Nicole Mularski, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com DANIELLE CAR DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER

The beautiful changing leaves and Clemson football!

The lower humidity and a nice cool breeze.

KRISTI FORTNER EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Definitely apple picking at Sky Top Orchard! They have the BEST apple cider doughnuts there, too. And sweater weather, but that’s expected.

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

1 NORTH LAURENS STREET GREENVILLE, SC 29601 CAVIARANDBANANAS.COM

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 9) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

120 E. Round Hill Road | Green Valley | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 23 acres | MLS 1317041

101 Woodland Way | Alta Visa Area | $1,550,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1322062

111 Rockingham Road | Parkins Mill | $2,250,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1312091

221 Cureton Street | Augusta Road Area | $967,500 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1313889

20 Ferncreek Lane | 3+ acres | $979,500 3 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath

607 McDaniel Avenue | Alta Vista | $998,500 4 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath | MLS 13063041

401 Crepe Myrtle Ct. | Willow Creek | $489,000 4 bedooms, 4 full baths | MLS 1319890

17 W. Prentiss Avenue | Augusta Road Area | $895,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1316669

114 Woodland Way | Alta Vista | $954,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1327445

213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $785,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

12 Landsdown | Alta Vista | $463,500 3 bedooms, 3 full baths

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CON NDER

2-A Edge Ct. | North Main Area | $265,000 3 bedooms, 2 full baths, 1 half baths | MLS 1323060

16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 29601 www.wycheco.com 864.270.2440

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Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

864-270-2440 mwyche@wycheco.com

864-640-1929 lmcdonald@wycheco.com

Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

864-630-0826 bjohnson@wycheco.com

864-201-6001 swithington@wycheco.com

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A vibrant mixed-use development is taking shape on more than 1,000 acres of untouched real estate within the city of Greenville. A smart, flexible plan comprises diverse housing at varying price points, thriving commercial districts and an array of recreational amenities.

Garden photo by Promotion Imaging, LLC

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Photograph courtesy of The Peace Center

Fostering a walkable environment, Verdae’s vision ranges from corporate headquarters and niche offices to a village square filled with specialty retailers, local restaurants and professional services, all interconnected by pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, a lush central park and abundant greenspace. It’s happening at Verdae.

Verdae Development Visit Our New Corporate & Sales Office 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

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September 2016 Photograph courtesy of The Peace Center

AN EVENING WITH CHRIS THILE For a guy from California, musician Chris Thile has certainly made himself comfortable in the world of bluegrass and folk. And he’s got plenty of street cred under his belt; Thile has been a longtime member of acoustic trio Nickel Creek as well as Punch Brothers, and is slated to take over A Prairie Home Companion after Garrison Keillor’s retirement this year. With an arsenal of talents that include the mandolin, vocals, piano, and more, this songwriter is guaranteed to impress. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, Sept 13, 7:30pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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List z

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / THE VOLUNTEER

BRANDI CARLILE

z Self-taught on both the piano and guitar, singer and songwriter Brandi Carlile has struck gold with fans for her folksy sound, gritty vocals, and commanding lyrical storytelling. Carlile has already mastered the realms of country, rock, and alternative music, receiving critical praise across the board from NPR to the Grammy Awards. She will be joined at this special outdoor concert by acoustic and soft-rock maven Greg Holden.

Centre Stage’s collection of plays “Fringe Series” is proud to debut the world premiere of The Volunteer, written by C. Kay “Andy” Landis. Inside the confines of a high-security women’s prison, a dedicated graduate student and a hardened inmate come face to face for a psychology research project. But there’s more on each of their minds than simply “getting to know you,” and when things go on lockdown for the night, the game of deception begins.

FIDELITY MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES

Photograph courtesy of The Orange Peel

Paying homage to the drivein days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks outdoors in scenic Falls Park. More social than Netflix and less irritating than the sticky floors of the movie theater, it’s the best way to settle under the stars and welcome autumn. Grab some fare from the food trucks on site, but leave Fido at home. Falls Park on the Reedy, Greenville. Sept 7–28. Wed, 8pm. Free. (864) 467-4485, greenvillesc.gov/210/Fidelity-Moonlight-Movies

Center Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Sept 13–21. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

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Photograph courtesy of the Greenville Little Theatre

The Meadow, 12 Old Charlotte Hwy, Asheville, NC. Sat, Sept 10, 7pm. Advance, $30; doors, $35. (828) 398-1837, theorangepeel.net

Photograph by Wofford Jones, courtesy of Centre Stage

THE


FOOTLOOSE THE MUSICAL

A town that bans loud music might be helpful when the next over-played pop single hits the airwaves, but give us dancing or give us death. When fasttalking bad boy Ren moves to the small town of Bomont, he teaches the town how to cut loose— much to the chagrin of the town’s uptight minister. Featuring original songs like “Somebody’s Eyes” along with ’80s hits “Holding Out for a Hero” and “Let’s Hear it for the Boy,” it won’t be long before you’re a little footloose yourself.

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville Little Theatre

Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Sept 16–Oct 2. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

EUPHORIA

There are some things that go hand-in-hand in the Upstate: rich, robust wines seem to taste their best when complemented by some of Greenville’s most appetizing and delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef experiences, cooking panels, and tastings, the festival has plenty to please your senses. Locations, times vary. Prices vary. Thurs–Sun, Sept 22–25. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

SOUTHERN HOME & GARDEN SHOW

Ladies, you may have to work around your husband as he plants himself on the couch for an 8-hour football binge during home improvement season, but there’s no better place to snap up a few fresh ideas than the Southern Home & Garden Show. Whether you’re looking to expand your closets, install a pool, put on a new roof, or simply give your home a little facelift, you’re guaranteed to leave with some design inspiration. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Sept 16–18. Fri–Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 12–5pm. Adults, $7; seniors, $5; under 12, free. (864) 254-0135, southernhomeandgardenshow.com

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z You may feel like paying $10 for a Chipotle burrito is torture enough—not to mention $2 for guacamole is basically highway robbery—but imagine having to shell out a few bucks just to use the toilet. Such is the case in this darkly comedic play written by Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann. A fictional city suffering a water shortage finds itself at the mercy of a moneyhungry company that charges citizens under a pay-to-pee policy. Bobby Strong becomes an unlikely hero in the tale, launching a risky revolution to relieve the bladder pressure of his hometown. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. $35. Sept 16–Oct 8. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

FARM FRESH FAIR

z The word “entrepreneur” does not typically draw to mind a farmland teeming with animals and greenery. Nevertheless, the Farm Fresh Fair is dedicated to opening doors for the purveyors of handcrafted goods, homemade eats, and everything organic. Benefitting the Upstate’s Habitat for Humanity programs, the crisp fall day will feature antique shopping, artisan crafts, farm fare, and even live music. Pick up some eats or just a home accent—it is all in the good faith of shopping local. The Farm at Rabon Creek, 125 Phillips Ln, Fountain Inn. Sept 17–18. Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 11am–4pm. Adults, $5; juniors, $2. thefarmatraboncreek.com Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

INDIE CRAFT PARADE

z Much more exciting than sitting at home and painstakingly trying to stay inside the lines of your adult coloring book, the Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the Southeast, with media ranging from paper goods to leather to unique wearables. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so join the Parade! Huguenot Mill, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Sept 17–18. Sat, 9am–6pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. $2. makerscollective.org/indiecraftparade

HANDBAGS FOR HOPE

z Shopping, dining, and a great cause? We’re there. The 10th annual Handbags for Hope event will benefit the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation, inviting guests for a fabulous evening of both silent and live auctions featuring more than 110 items to select from. Capping off the night will be plenty of flowing cocktails, delicious appetizers, and the opportunity to win big with gifts from local retailers. Huguenot Mill, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Fri, Sept 23, 6–9pm. $40. scovariancancer.org

THE GREAT ESCAPE

z Narrated by Greenville native Edwin McCain, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s 69th season will open with a special commemoration of Conductor Edvard Tchivzhel’s absconding from the socialist Soviet Union. The evening will feature the first piece the master maestro ever performed in our fine city—Tchaikovsky’s Third Symphony—followed by a rousing incarnation of Aaron Copland’s Lincoln Portrait and a peppy finale courtesy of George Gerswhin. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sept 24–25. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 467-3000, greenvillesymphony.org

Ben Folds Best known for his quirky musical style and ability to transcend the boundaries of any genre, Ben Folds has found success as both one-third of the indie rock band Ben Folds Five and as a solo artist. After charting at #42 in the Billboard 200 with 2001’s “Rockin’ the Suburbs,” Folds has since worked as a producer and collaborator with everyone from the Dresden Dolls to Sara Bareilles. A man and his piano—is there any greater love in life? The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Sept 15, 7:30pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

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GREENVILLE

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T O R O N TO

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NAPLES

101A AUGUSTA ST., GREENVILLE, SC ERICBROWNDESIGN.COM | 864.233.4442 |

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ON THE Penny Odum, Kim Schmidt & Kyle Cottengin

Euphoria’s Tapas & Tinis July 15, 2016

Bryan Kahler, Emerald Clark & Jillian Giometti Wellington Payne & Meredith Payne

Whitney Jones, Allen Jones, Amanda Ryan & Jim Ryan

Guests celebrated the countdown to Euphoria 2016 at Tapas and Tinis, a night of dancing, drinks, and delicious fare. At Clemson University’s space in the ONE Building, guests enjoyed gorgeous views, tunes from the Sound Committee, tasty bites by Chef Tony Schmidt of Performance Food Service, and beverages from Larceny Bourbon, Stella Artois, Goose Island, and Tito’s Vodka. Photography by Jake Knight

))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Chris Leavitt & Ben Campbell

Bill Zuppinger, Roselle Zuppinger, Mike Stahl & Christi Stahl

Lina LeGare and Lance Turner with Tom and Anita Harley

Steven & Catie Buckingham

Gina Boulware & Andrew Huang

Jim Hayes & Joe Thaler

Renee Merriam & Jane Merriam

Sharron Phillips, Marie Kernell, Wendie Lynam & Stacy Silvers

Jay Motley, Joanna Bragdon, Will Bragdon & Tom Bates

Danielle Burt, Melissa Fair & Lindsay Louise McPhail SEPTEMBER 2016 / 23

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ON THE Nan Finch & Kathy Harris

Town

Martha Pellet & Clay Rainey

Greenville County Museum of Art Collectors Group with artist Grainger McKoy July 17, 2016 Heyward Sullivan, Priscilla Hagins & Kay Sullivan Mickey Harder, Frances Fischer & John Mikell

The Greenville County Museum of Art hosted a reception for Grainger McKoy, a renowned South Carolina artist creating gravity-defying sculptures of Southern game birds. Guests were all members of the GCMA Collectors Group, a group of donors that meets throughout the year both at the museum and at homes to view and facilitate discussions about art. The event was catered by Chef Janet Poleski. Photography by Jake Knight

Flavia & Lynn Harton

Elizabeth McKoy Bemis, Grainger McKoy, Beth McKoy, Mark Griffith, Peggy McKoy & Andrew Bemis Ted Angermeier, Tom Angermeier & Paula Angermeier

Bob Hughes, Bunny Hughes, Floride McKoy & Grainger McKoy Marion & Bill Atkins

Christy Taucher & Roger Widener

Jennifer & Steve Yarborough

Emily Geyer & Brian Barbee 24 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR “We chose Laura as our Realtor to sell our home because of her professionalism, attention to detail, and her legal background. She listened to our concerns and worked with us to find solutions that worked for us. When it was time for negotiations, Laura was at her best. We have sold many homes over the years, but these negotiations were the most thorough, but the least challenging because of Laura.”

Successful Sellers

Monday Night Painters Opening Exhibition at Centre Stage Gallery July 15, 2016 Della Day, Kathy Wood & Joyce Coleman Mike & Beth Andrews

— Jim and Meg (Alta Vista)

Centre Stage Gallery hosted a reception for the Monday Night Painters, sponsored by South State Bank and the Metropolitan Arts Council. This group of nine artists, comprised of Tom Flowers, Bill Lewis, Carol Mann, Joe Merck, Robin Monroe, Joan Potter, Jo Ann Taylor, Kathy Wood, and Fred Wood, meets on Monday nights in various locations to pursue their artistic endeavors. Photography by Spencer Stanton

Fulfilled Buyers “With Laura’s extensive knowledge of the Greenville market, she was able to find us the perfect house close to Downtown Greenville and Augusta Road.” Melissa Boyd, Jamie Davis & Sandy Rupp

— Laura and Tom (Alta Vista)

Judy Mardre & Jeannie Bouton

Kathryne Atkins and Katy Stanberry Viktor Schuck & Marlowe Whitaker

It is time to move: imagine having a lawyer and a Realtor to advise you. With over 15 years of experience as a practicing attorney in South Carolina, Laura will give you an edge that other real estate professionals cannot offer. She can provide valuable advice, will assist you with contractual negotiations and understands she has an exclusive duty to you as the client.

LAURA McDONALD Realtor Associate (864) 640-1929 LMcDonald@WycheCo.com Joe Merck, Susan Peart, Bill Lewis, Jo Ann Taylor, Carol Mann, Penny Macauley, Kathy Wood, Tom Flowers, Robin Monroe & Fred Wood 26 TOWN / towncarolina.com LauraMcDonald_hlfV_TOWN Sep16.indd 1 TOWN OTT - Sept 2016 WF.indd 26

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ON THE

Town Peter & Doreen Richichi

Caviar & Bananas Preview Party August 7, 2016

A new taste of Greenville is certainly something to celebrate and guests did just that at the Caviar & Bananas Preview Party. Sneaking the first bite before the grand opening, guests were treated to new menu offerings, original hors d’oeuvres, and tasty wine pairings. With so much to celebrate and new eats to try, no one went home hungry. Photography by Jake Knight

Meisha & Cedric Adderley

Doug Harper & Bob Hughes

Berry & Amy Ponder

Bill Pelham & Mayor Knox White

Tish Glenn & Stephen Edgerton

Lacey Smith, Amanda Jones & Heather Orman SEPTEMBER 2016 / 27

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ON THE Molly Bedenbaugh & Argy Zochariou

Natalie Bikulege & Jocelyn Tisch

Town

Reception at the Metropolitan Arts Council for new MUSC students July 27, 2016

Taylor Lucas, Rebecca Johnson & Shyyon Lari Sara Perregaux, Alyssa Margiotta, Sona Chowdhary, Hannah Van Patten & Zack Waldman

Johnny & Sarah Josephson

The freshmen class of USC’s medical program received a crash course in Greenville culture at the Metropolitan Arts Council’s annual orientation. Students were introduced to the city’s vibrant arts scene and encouraged to participate in events like Greenville Open Studios and the Upstate Shakespeare Festival. Photography by Jake Knight Carrie Bailes & Julia Moss

Kiersten Rule, Anita Venkatesh & Vivek Venkatesh

Madeline Lang, Kendall Parrott, Drew Myers & Natalie Kimmey John Barrera & Jack Teasdall Whittleigh Kelly & Amber Frazier

Nicolas Osborne & Alyssa Margiotta

Krista Potthast, Sarah Stafford, Molly Bedenbaugh, Irina Geiculescu, Anna Tarasidis, Natalie Bikulege & Jocelyn Tisch

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Kevin & Emily Simmons

Laurens Electric Cooperative’s Poker Run July 23, 2016

Lisa Hicks & Jeff Butler

Laurens Electric Cooperative hosted its annual Poker Run, with proceeds benefitting Cooperative Care and the employee Pay It Forward program. Starting at both Laurens Electric Cooperative and the Harley-Davidson of Greenville, the best hand won $2,000 and the worst $250. Participants enjoyed tunes from South85, and Quaker Steak & Lube provided food. More than 600 people rode in the event and raised $14,000 to benefit the two charities. Photography by TJ Grandy

Rick Campbell

Mark Holsenbeck

Lori & Gus Byrd

Dometry Dawkins, Sherry Brantley, Jim Long, Doug Miller, David Hammond & Jim Donahoo 30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

SHE The Upstate Women’s Show August 5–7, 2016

The TD Convention center opened its doors to moms, daughters, and girlfriends alike for the ultimate girls’ weekend. The ninth annual SHE Upstate Women’s show celebrated the achievements of Upstate women with the best in Greenville’s food and fashion. From the culinary creations of award winning Chef Christina Halstead to the JC Penney men and women’s fashion shows, there was a little something for everyone. Photography by Jake Knight

Jamarcus Gaston & Rhonda Rawlings

Hannah Drake, Kristine Drake, Lynn Persons, Fran Coffey, Rachael Persons & Sydney Persons Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Barbara Corell & Susan Beam

McAlla & Haleigh Emerson

Trentsie Williams & Courtney Montgomery

Holly Jackson, Nadine Rhodes & Liz Olszower SEPTEMBER 2016 / 31

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ON THE

Town

Governor’s School Young Benefactors Bocce Social July 17, 2016

Maggie Morton, Meredith Cook, Scott McNeely & Kristin Eppinger

Jennifer Clark, Joel Douglass, Kevin Estep & Kelly Estep Brent Ayers, Amy Ayers, Ed Ayers & Sarah Lyle

Sunday afternoons were made for lawn games and live music. The Governor’s School for the Arts Foundation’s Young Benefactors hosted an enjoyable afternoon with music from Black Water Deep, bocce, corn hole, and delicious eats. Guests participated in a raffle for locally grown vegetable boxes from Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery. Proceeds from the event go toward the Guest Artist Fund at the Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanites. Photography by Jake Knight

Audrey Dangerfield, Ben Dangerfield & Carley Victor

Kat Crosland & Justin Vosburgh

George Patrick McLeer, Charles LaPrade & Jeremiah Adkins

Chris Russo & Caroline Crosland

Brennan Olmstead & Ian Quattlebaum

Bobby Vine, Emily Alfieris, John Alfieris & Grace Vine

Stephanie Klug & Drew Penley

Dustin Cox, Chandler Thompson, Ciji Runge & Matt Runge

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Greenco


Carbonated Footprint. Drink Local.

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FALL

into style!

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Olivia McCall & Hayden Arrington

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Katie Guptill & Justin Thompson June 18, 2016

Pulling off the perfect proposal takes time, preparation, and just the right amount of creativity. Luckily for Katie Guptill, husband-to-be Justin Thompson had all three. After nearly a year’s worth of planning, Justin, an art teacher at Mauldin High School, disguised the big question as a student showcase, with faculty raffling off their own pieces at the end of the night. When Katie’s number was called, Justin surprised her in front of family, friends, and students with a portrait of himself on one knee. Katie was astonished, especially when he pulled out a beautiful diamond ring. Determined to keep their wedding as original as the proposal, the couple filled their ceremony with personal touches, including 200 original mini canvases hand-painted as wedding favors by the artists themselves. The two were married at the Glassy Mountain Chapel at The Cliffs in Landrum by Justin’s brother, Jason. They reside in Greenville, where Justin continues to teach and Katie works in marketing and public relations for Table 301 Restaurant Group. ANGELA COX ZION // ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY SEPTEMBER 2016 / 35

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TOWN

Weddings Lauren Biediger & Paul McDonald, Jr. May 14, 2016 After a Valentine’s Day ski trip with friends, a belated romantic getaway to Old Edwards Inn was the perfect opportunity for time together as a couple. Lauren Biediger and Paul McDonald concluded their respite with a picnic at Sunset Rock, where Paul asked a photographer—conveniently nearby, of course—to take a photo of them with the beautiful, fiery sunset and picturesque mountains decorating the background. But instead of a quick pose for the camera, an unsuspecting Lauren was astonished when Paul dropped to one knee and asked her to be his wife. As if this excitement wasn’t enough, their return to Greenville the following day was met with a surprise engagement celebration and oyster roast with family and friends. The wedding ceremony took place at The Cliffs at Keowee Falls, where Chaplain Valerie Riddle, a memorable figure from their time at Christ Church Episcopal School, officiated. The two have settled in Greenville, where Lauren is a senior account manager at Erwin Penland and Paul is an underwriter at Armada Analytics, Inc. LAUREN MILLER // LAUREN MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Elizabeth (Libby) Mann & Raymond (Ray) Brown June 4, 2016 The introduction of Libby Mann and Ray Brown by mutual friends, who had in turn been introduced by friends, resulted in Ray’s beautiful marriage proposal to Libby at the North Carolina Arboretum in Asheville. He’d planned every detail, including the hidden photographer amid the foliage to capture the thrilling moment. During wedding planning, family history became integral. Not all brides have something old, new, borrowed, and blue on their wedding day, but Libby’s dress held almost all of these titles. Borrowing her mother’s gown, the skirt remained in the old style, but the bodice was redesigned for Libby, signifying an elegant meeting of generations. The ceremony was held at Christ Church Episcopal and the reception took place at the Poinsett Club, where Libby and Ryan commemorated the special day by re-creating a photo of the bride’s parents, who celebrated their nuptials at the same spot 33 years prior. The couple currently lives in Greenville, where Libby is a hospitality buyer for Centerplate and Ray is a manager for Ernst and Young. Now the question stands: what lucky couple will they now introduce? AMY & DAVID // RAYCROFT ART PHOTOGRAPHY

Caroline Campbell McLain & Thomas Hunter Howayeck July 16, 2016 False pretenses are not always constructed with mal intent, especially when a stunning engagement is in the works. Students at the University of South Carolina, Campbell McLain and Hunter Howayeck had been dating for four and a half years when Hunter, a Florida native, planned a trip to see the Jacksonville Jaguars play at Wembley Stadium in London. Expecting all the attention to be on the game, Campbell was delightfully surprised to find two days full of sightseeing planned. The last evening, on pretense of a concert viewing, the couple ventured to Hyde Park, where Hunter asked Campbell to be his wife. The happy celebration continued through the end of the night with Champagne from the hotel staff and a photoshoot in front of a starlit Big Ben. The ceremony was held at Daniel Chapel at Furman University, where family and friends joined the couple from across the country. Campbell is a first grade teacher, and Hunter is a procurement agent at The Boeing Company. The couple plans to live in Seattle, Washington. JEFF HALL // JEFF HALL PHOTO HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Three’s Company

Photograph by Eli Warren

Visionaries champion the Greenville Center for Creative Arts

SEPTEMBER 2016 / 41

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OUTSIDE THE

Box Blank Canvas:

(left) Art class students paint portraits in the Brandon Mill’s inspection room in the old cloth building —GCCA’s headquarters. The actual mill building, developed by Pace Burt, is the West Village Lofts.

Home Is Where the Art Is

Creative center reinvigorates Brandon Mill community with access to visual arts / by Abby Moore Keith // photography by Eli Warren

T

ucked away along the winding streets of West Greenville, a brick behemoth rises against a residential skyline. This is the Brandon Mill, a cotton cloth manufactory once the lifeblood of the neighborhood, its fabric intricately woven into the lives of mill community members. It’s been an empty shell since the doors closed in ’77—a “dark shadow” as Cherington Love Shucker describes it. But that’s all changing. Shucker, along with fellow visionaries Liz Rundorff Smith and Marlowe Whitaker, are the task force of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, an arts nonprofit bent on bringing the heartbeat back to the Brandon Mill. Stationed in the former cloth building, the GCCA provides year-round arts access through classes, exhibitions, and studio space. “We really see ourselves as the hub for the visual arts in Greenville,” Shucker explains. “We want a vibrant, living organization that’s changing and growing and meeting the needs of the Greenville community.” Operating since May 2015, the center has long been a dream of local artist Carrie Burn Browns and community member Randy Armstrong. The two ladies connected through one of Browns’ classes, and both recognized the need for a space where artists of all ages could grow, support, and share life together. A board was created and a partnership established with Brandon Mill developer Pace Burt, who also perceived the benefits of an artistic home in the area. Burt agreed to lease the cloth building while they raised funds to purchase, and Shucker was hired to turn the dream into reality. A developer by occupation, executive director Shucker is building an artistic army, and this summer brought in Artisphere’s Liz Rundorff Smith as art school director and Marlowe Whitaker as a development associate. Both are artists with experience in creative centers—Smith is an oil painter and Whitaker a potter. And while Shucker might not be an artist herself, she’s married to one—her husband is ceramic potter Darin Gehrke—and knows how to look at the world through a creative lens. As a team, these ladies exude a can-do spirit essential to the center’s success, and there’s no shortage of things to do. With gallery space rotating every six weeks and classes available across media, not to mention campaigns to buy their building and

renovate the cotton warehouse into glass, metalworking, and ceramics facilities—Shucker’s coworkers joke that she never sits down. The center is open six days a week allowing maximum access for people of all schedules to attend classes and experience shows—like the current Member Show and Brandon Fellows exhibition on display through September. After-school programs and weekend workshops are offered to children throughout the year, which is one of the key components in connecting to the Brandon Mill community. “If we can keep the immediate neighborhoods engaged and these children can access these services, that’s fundamental to us,” Shucker says. “To be able to engage people who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to take an art class is really important in cultivating a community,” Smith is quick to add. And when it comes down to the nuts and bolts—or paints and brushes—of the GCCA, it’s all about community involvement. From volunteers to studio artists, from members to students, the center’s heart and soul is the support and participation of people who believe in creating a diverse, collaborative, and caring community that’s unlike any other. “As big as this building is, as big as what we’re doing right now is, it’s gonna be so much bigger,” Whitaker explains. Shucker brings it home: “We’re not going anywhere, but we need your help to do it. We’re the best-kept secret in Greenville.” To take a GCCA class or learn more about membership, visit artcentergreenville.org. The center is open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., and Saturday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Towner

UP

One Gnarly Nana At almost 90 years old, Lake Keowee resident Jeanne Canfield prefers to hang ten / by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Paul Mehaffey coeds in an 8 a.m. class. Some of the figures include: 7 (the number of children she has), 5 (the number of grandchildren), 61 (the number of years she was married), and 1944 (the year she made the All America Team for platform diving); she then tried out again for the U.S. Olympic Team in 1952 (with a husband and two children). And then there’s 84 (the age at which she picked up the sport of wake surfing). With the shimmer of Lake Keowee in the background and her lovely and doting daughter Jean-Marie by her side, Canfield, a Chicago native who moved to Seneca 11 years ago, spills her secrets on staying young—at heart, in mind, and of body. So the first question, of course, I have to ask is, how have you done it? To be so active and youthful? >> First of all, I was involved with seven children! Well, what I do every morning is two tablespoons of lemon juice in warm water. The older you get you can’t cheat. I treat my health as a true priority, and you’ve got to have nutrition, exercise, and sleep. I never thought of my age. I never thought about it until I was in my 80s, and when I got into these late-80s, I became aware of it. That’s when the wrinkles started. But it’s really about how you feel. So what do you do? >> It’s best to have three cups of vegetables and two cups of fruit a day. I never really had a taste for alcohol, but if I have anything it’s ice cream. I lift weights three times a week, and I swim four to five mornings a week in the pool, and I play pickleball, which is like a smaller version of tennis on a court with paddles. Making Waves: To Jeanne Canfield, age is merely a number—a number she rarely considers when pursuing her many athletic endeavors.

And wake surfing is something you took up in your 80s. Why? >> It’s fun! What is it, actually? >> The wake surfboard is like a smaller surfboard—maybe 5.5 feet long and 2.5 feet wide—and it comes to a point on each end. There are no shoes on it, so you stand with bare feet and hold on to the rope and you ride the wake. (Jean-Marie interjects here that her mother doesn’t let go of the rope. Jeanne says, “That’s an amateur,” shaking her head at herself). Ha! Were you always involved in water? >> Yes, I started swimming as a child, and I started platform diving in high school and traveled all over the country competing. (Pointing to the framed front page of the Chicago Tribune from 1943 on the wall with her photo.) This was when I won the National Amateur Athletic Union women’s platform dive competition. I made the Women’s All America Swimming Team in 1944, and I made what they called the Mythical Olympic Team in 1944 because they couldn’t hold the Olympics due to the war.

W

ith her pastel-pink painted toenails, pearl necklace, and bright blue eyes, Jeanne Canfield seems more than ready for her upcoming girls’ trip to Michigan with friends from college. She’s been working out, of course, to stay fit in advance of the gathering, as she does almost daily: lifting weights, swimming, and wake surfing on Lake Keowee. Canfield is also nearly 90 years old. To say that she is incandescent is like saying Polaris is “kind of bright” in the ink of a night sky. She’s effusive, witty, and rattles off dates, names, facts, and figures quicker than most college

Oh my goodness . . . >> I tried out for the second time in 1952, and I had two children already, but didn’t make it the second time. I missed a dive. My coach said, ‘Jeanne, you don’t have to get 10s, 7s on everything will do it.’ I was in second place with my back dive, I had just gotten 9s on it and I missed my third one—the reverse—and I’m not a gutsy person who comes through at the end. I’m very glad I had the chance to try out. I cried for three days. But I was so lucky I had a chance to try out.

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ft)

TOP

Bunk

Creature Comforts: New B&B Magnolia Shadows, a bucolic property near Aiken, SC, offers spacious plantation rooms, an adorable two-story cottage that resides convenietly by the pool, and seven paddocks with run-in sheds for equine friends.

Rustic Retreat

T

rue to its tagline, Magnolia Shadows, a new B&B in Ridge Spring, South Carolina, exudes both Southern charm and European character. The former pecan plantation sits tucked off a country road 18 miles north of Aiken. An Italian ex-pat offers outdoor enthusiasts a casual At the end of the gravel drive, two venerable magnolia trees shade the yellow two-story escape at Magnolia Shadows plantation house (built in 1895) and provide the / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Katie Fiedler inspiration for the inn’s name. European hospitality materializes in the form of the property’s owner, Andrea (Ahn-DRAYah) Cerofolini, who made his way to the U.S. years ago from Como, Italy. He is currently a one-man show, though for a few months this summer is joined by family friend Cecilia Lezzani, a gracious young Italian woman who came to help him run the property he shares with four horses, several quails, a black barn cat, three English pointers, and a shy fox hound named Tractor.

46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Above Board: Italian marketing man turned Southern horseshow enthusiast, Andrea Cerofolini hosts both human and horse at his Aiken-based bed and breakfast.

Cecilia greets my husband and me with a warm smile in the front parlor and brings us tea in etched crystal glasses. Shortly after, Andrea joins us, and Cecilia brings out some red wine and snacks. The four of us sip wine while, in his lilting Italian accent, Andrea tells us how he found his way to Aiken. Cerofolini earned a degree in marketing and international business from Boston University, then moved back to Italy with his wife. Eventually, he landed in New York City, where he worked in the fashion houses of Ermenegildo Zegna and Giorgio Armani. After his marriage dissolved, he set out on a two-year journey across the U.S. in a horse trailer, with two steeds and four English pointers in tow. He traveled the country, competing in field trials with his dogs, until he decided to put down roots and open a B&B. The rolling 50-acre site outside Aiken was the 176th place he visited, and he loved it at first sight. “I traded in a designer suit for shorts, flip flops, and a tractor,” Cerofolini says laughing. The gorgeous property, with its renovated house, horse barn, and seven paddocks with run-in sheds makes boarding horses a natural business venture in this equine-

centric area (six Kentucky Derby winners have been trained in Aiken). At Magnolia Shadows, horse owners can board their steeds by the night, the week, or the month. There are six horse-trailer/RV sites on the grounds, plus a large outdoor area for exercising horses. Guests can cool off in the small pool and rent horses for riding. And what the comfortable rooms may currently lack in additional amenities (hair dryers, robes, irons and ironing boards, makeup mirrors), the rates make up for in affordability. The most expensive of the four accommodations, a two-story cottage that sleeps eight, rents for $230 a night. Things are informal here. There are no locks on the room doors, and Cerofolini doesn’t lock the front door at night. When I inquire what time breakfast is served, he responds “What time would you like it?” As the only guests that morning, we linger over breakfast (coffee, iced-tea, fresh quail eggs, toast, and bacon) with Andrea and Cecilia on the back porch. “This is more than a business,” declares the former marketing executive who now relishes serene sunsets from his land. “It’s a lifestyle, and it’s contagious.” Magnolia Shadows 595 Engineer Rd, Ridge Spring, SC (803) 522-1226, magnoliashadows.com Rooms range from $130 to $230/night, with breakfast included in the rate. SEPTEMBER 2016 / 47

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TOWN

Profile

Inspired Performance South Carolina Children’s Theatre’s Debbie Bell sets the stage for young artists / by Kathleen Nalley Moore // photograph by Eli Warren

“What truly inspires me is to see how one class, one audition, or one show can change a child’s life.” —Debbie Bell

I

Plot Twist: Sitting centerstage at the SCCT, Debbie Bell’s passion for theater nourishes children’s lives with her own form of therapy: performance.

t’s an age-old question: from where does passion come? At what moment does the heart, mind, and spirit converge around something that becomes an integral part of one’s identity? What sparks one to become, say, a writer, a painter, an actor? Exposure to the arts, typically at a tender age, ignites passion. Debbie Bell, executive director of the South Carolina Children’s Theatre (SCCT), knows this truth. She was introduced to the theatre through her parents’ involvement in the Greenville Little Theatre, and at eight years old, she played a role in The Music Man. She developed a stage and theatre of sorts in her basement and cast neighborhood children in her plays. “I guess I should have known where I’d end up,” Bell admits. But, as is the case with so many, Bell got busy with life and other priorities. A graduate of Greenville High School, she studied psychology at Converse College. She took additional business courses after college, served as a bookkeeper at various retail establishments, and worked at a family business, Caine Company. Then, in 1989,

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CUSTOM HOME ON WILLOW CREEK GOLF COURSE

perhaps when she wasn’t expecting it, that passion for theatre came flooding back. “My children auditioned for Dracula Spectacular at SCCT. I started volunteering and realized my heart was here,” she says. A volunteer position quickly progressed into a staff position, and eventually Bell was implementing her vision for SCCT. During Bell’s 28-year tenure, the theatre—which operates under a three-pronged mission of performance, accessible outreach, and year-round education—has grown into a thriving, well-respected community stronghold, a place where children find their passions and their self-esteem. Today, the theatre serves more than 47,000 young people and their families, and of these, 15,000 young people are served by the organization’s outreach, a mission dear to Bell’s heart. “What truly inspires me is to see how one class, one audition, or one show can change a child’s life. How we are able to help a child’s self-esteem, help them feel wanted and needed and welcomed. How we can help a sick child forget about his or her difficulties for a day and be somebody else. How a child that has not spoken can become vocal through our work. How we can help young people stand up to the bullies in their life. We are making a difference for so many every day,” Bell says. Bell’s work to make theatre accessible to all children hasn’t gone unnoticed. “Debbie believes in the mission of SCCT with all of her heart and tirelessly advocates for the theatre. She has built a wonderful organization that goes far beyond five productions a year at the Gunter Theatre,” says Michelle Seaver of United Community Bank. “She believes in the power of the performing arts and the impact it has on our children’s lives.” Community leader Minor Shaw concurs. “Debbie is one of the most passionate, dedicated, and caring people I have ever known. Her commitment to the SCCT for the past 28 years has made it what it is today—an unbelievable asset for not only the Greenville community but also the entire Upstate. Debbie is the heart and soul of the South Carolina Children’s Theatre.” Traysie Amick, 17-year principal SCCT teaching artist, credits Bell for impacting her life: “When Debbie hired me, she believed in my capabilities more than I did. It was through her patient training and encouragement that I am able to live a life I would have never dreamed possible. Her belief in SCCT and what it can do to change lives has become part of my own value system,” she says. Across Greenville, Bell’s name is synonymous with the great works being done at SCCT. The passion she found as a child now inspires her work in exposing so many children to their own possibilities. “Each workshop, production, and outreach program touches someone, while shaping the future of our citizens and our community. Theatre is life altering for a child. I had to be part of it.” ))) FIND MORE PROFILES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Buzz

Photograph by Michael Muser

TOWN

Saying Grace Three-star Michelin chef Curtis Duffy returns to Euphoria from Chicago / by M . Linda L ee

D

espite the fact that Greenville’s food scene is boiling over with new offerings, it’s not every day that a Michelin three-star chef comes to town. And it’s even more extraordinary to have one return. This month, during the Euphoria food, wine, and music festival, Curtis Duffy will be back to cook at Coast to Coast: Michelin Star Dinner at the Lazy Goat on September 24. The price tag for this star-studded meal is lofty ($350 per ticket), but consider the splurge. After all, it’s less expensive than traveling to Chicago to experience Duffy’s exquisite, “thoughtful progressive” tasting menu at his three-star restaurant Grace. Duffy—who cut his culinary teeth with no less than the late Charlie Trotter and Grant Achatz, who helms Chicago’s other three-star restaurant Alinea—began his culinary journey in Johnstown, Ohio, when he was reluctantly introduced to cooking in a sixth-grade home economics class. Surprisingly, he took quickly to the culinary arts. In high school, he worked his way through restaurant jobs, eventually landing in the kitchen at a prestigious local country club.

While Duffy’s cooking career blossomed, his personal life proved tumultuous. The boy’s parents’ had a rocky marriage, and inevitably they split up. When Curtis was 19, his despondent father shot his ex-wife, then turned the gun on himself. It was a dark time for the budding chef and his brother and sister. The story of how Duffy channeled his pain into cooking is poignantly detailed in the contemporary documentary For Grace, produced by Chicago filmmakers Kevin Pang and Mark Helenowski. Duffy opened his first restaurant Grace in December 2012, and it won two Michelin stars its first year. In 2015, Grace was awarded three stars—Michelin’s highest rating. The chef reports he is happy to be revisiting Greenville and participating again in the Kids’ Cookoff. “The best part of Euphoria 2015 was getting to meet all the aspiring young chefs and hearing how passionate and excited they were about the ingredients they were using,” Duffy recalls. As to the menu of the Michelin Star Dinner, Duffy can only hint: “A few of the dishes will be quite playful, as far as how you eat them,” he offers. No matter the menu, Michael Kramer, Table 301’s executive chef of culinary operations, looks forward to sharing the Lazy Goat’s kitchen with such exceptional culinary talent. “I have cooked with a number of Michelinstarred chefs, and it is always incredible to work alongside the masters of their craft,” declares Kramer. “It promises to be an amazing experience and an unforgettable meal.”

(B)raise the Stakes: Chef Curtis Duffy (front, right) achieved the rare feat of garnering three Michelin stars at his Chicago restaurant, Grace—one of only 13 restaurants in the United States to hold the high honor. Duffy will cook during Euphoria’s coveted Michelin Star Dinner.

For Grace

A feature-length documentary about “food, family, balance, and sacrifice,” For Grace chronicles the creation of Curtis Duffy’s restaurant Grace from the renovation of a former pickled-herring factory in Chicago’s Near West Side to its celebrated opening night. The film, which was released earlier this year, will be shown during Euphoria on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Kroc Center [venue is not yet confirmed]. In case you miss it, you can stream For Grace on Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, or Google Play. Coast to Coast: Michelin Star Dinner at the Lazy Goat. Sat, Sept. 24, 7 p.m. $350. For tickets, go to euphoriagreenville.com.

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TOWN

Buzz

Better Together: Shawn and Laura Currie celebrated the wedding of their dreams at the historic Wilkins House, an exquisite affair made possible by Upstate Warrior Solution’s generosity toward honorably discharged soldiers.

State of Union Upstate Warrior Solution throws a Marine and his bride an unforgettable affair / by Mary Cathryn Arm strong

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// photography by J. Jones Photography

f you were to ask Shawn and Laura Currie to envision their wedding right after the couple’s December engagement, the response would have entailed designs for an intimate, indoor affair at a downtown venue like Greenville’s Commerce Club. But instead, on July 3rd, Shawn and Laura were heading down the aisle, joined by family and friends al fresco on the grounds of the historic Wilkins House on Mills Avenue. What’s that they say about best-laid plans? Earlier this year, a friend of Shawn’s told him about an announcement he’d recently come across on Facebook. Upstate Warrior Solution, an organization dedicated to providing local servicemen with essential tools, support, and guidance for life back on the home front, was collaborating with Wilkins House owner Neil Wilson and an assortment of Upstate vendors to furnish the ultimate Warrior’s Wedding. All details great and small, including the valet, photographer, officiant, floral arrangements, cake, and catering would be taken care of—to the tune of $50,000. Shawn, an inactive Marine who had served in Iraq after 9/11 and received an honorable discharge, qualified for the application, and figuring it was worth a shot, submitted his personal essay. In March, the pair found out they had been chosen. Allie Barham, a senior wedding coordinator and owner of Upstate I Do, worked behind the scenes for several months on the Warrior’s Wedding before she met the soon-to-be-Curries. A veteran of sorts in her own industry, Barham had countless ceremonies under her belt and vendors at her fingertips, many of whom were extremely excited to donate their services. This cast of characters, Barham says, were handpicked with a certain criteria in mind. “I had already been looking for ways that I could give back through my own time and efforts,” she says. “So, I wanted to bring in people that I thought could

really benefit from it, who would really be interested in doing it, and who would do a great job and really give it their all.” With a venue still under construction and a much quicker turnaround time than most nuptials, the heat was on for Barham to marry (pardon the pun) the couple’s unique vision with the resources donated by participating businesses. Shawn says he and Laura entered into the experience with no expectations but remained involved throughout the planning process. They selected a signature cocktail through ICEBOX beverage company, chose their music with the Erica Berg Collective, and debated on color schemes with Urban Petals just like any other couple. Although many of the vendors only met the Curries briefly, Laura says the entire ceremony still felt very personal. “This was an amazing gift because everyone involved really gave us their best. We were overwhelmed and humbled,” she says. “It was a whirlwind, but Shawn and I kept reminding each other to have fun and enjoy it, because at the end of the day, we were getting married.” “It was unbelievable. I still can’t believe that this was all for us,” Shawn agrees. “It went by so quickly, but it’s not something that I will ever forget.” Other Upstate vendors who donated to the Warrior’s Wedding include The White Magnolia Bridal Collection, Southern Valet, South Carolina Ceremonies, Saffrons Catering, Kathy & Company, Uptown Entertainment, and Industry Events Rentals.Visit upstatewarriorsolution.org to learn more.

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Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

Realtors Lydia Johnson (left) and Mikel-Ann Scott (right) pose for a picture with client Nicole Ramsbey (center) at a fundraising event for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Light the Night Walk.

“I don’t think the selling or buying of a home is ever an easy process, especially when there are some obstacles out of your control to overcome. I can honestly say that we had Realtors who thought outside the box, listened to us, and were willing to work hard throughout the process to protect us. Mikel-Ann and Lydia have a level of real estate knowledge and past success that led us successfully through the sales AND purchase process. We remain friends to this day with Seabrook, Mikel-Ann, and Lydia who are now all involved in the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. We are grateful for our business relationship and friendship with The Marchant Company. If you are going to place one of your biggest life decisions in someone else’s hands, there is no better choice than The Marchant Company. ” — Nicole Ramsbey, Campaign Director for Man and Woman of the Year, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

Realtor Lydia Johnson 864.918.9663 | www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085 | Realtor Mikel-Ann Scott 864.630.2474 RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

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PAST

Lives

First Lady

Mary C. Judson remains a pioneer in women’s academics

Photograph courtesy of the James B. Duke Library / Furman University

/ by Hayden Arrington

P

rogress, whether on the national or local level, is often defined by individuals and the causes they seem destined to champion. Mary Camilla Judson—Greenville’s staunchest advocate for the advancement of female education—is certainly no exception. At the turn of the nineteenth century, the academic field was still very much a man’s arena. With little demand for greater female education and the constant reinforcement of household roles, schooling for women was expected to remain on the backburner of the American mindset. But Mary Judson had different plans. Educated in her hometown of Monroe, Connecticut, by a local Yale graduate, Judson fell in love with academia at a young age and was soon invited to Greenville to study under her brother, Furman University mathematics professor Charles H. Judson. In 1857, after returning to Connecticut to begin her career in teaching, Judson was invited back to Greenville to join Charles at Greenville Women’s College, where he had been appointed president. Despite the stigma of female academics, Judson fought the status quo as longtime principal of Greenville Women’s College and pioneer suffragette. Tackling and teaching every subject from physiology to French, the young principal believed in shaping the minds and bodies of young women. In addition to organizing and running the school, Judson founded the Judson Literary Society, an early women’s debate team, and donated her life savings to build a campus library later named in her honor. She even went as far as to introduce a calisthenics routine at college graduation, which featured her students in long flowing robes instead of the more traditional corset-based attire. With a strong belief in equal opportunity, Mary Judson changed the landscape of Greenville’s education system. Transcending the boundary of educator, Judson remains a memorable innovator in Upstate history. M. Judson Booksellers and Storytellers on Main Street is named in her honor.

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23 West North St., Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.232.2761 | www.rushwilson.com | Open Mon.-Sat. 9:30am - 5:30pm; Closed on Sunday

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The latest collection just in time for fall.

KEVIN HENSON

SYDNEY PARKER

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“Investors’ Best Friend”

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Previously a Realtor in South Florida

Previously a Realtor in Pennsylvania for 11 years and always an Artist

Finding your fit just got easier with the addition of five new agents! The Marchant Company is dedicated to providing you with the best fit whether you’re buying, selling or renting in the Greater Greenville area. Agents, if you are looking for a new company to call home, finding your fit can be just as easy with The Marchant Company. www.MarchantCo.com • 864.467.0085 • 100 West Stone Ave., Greenville, SC 29609

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HISTORIC

TRYON Small Town Charm

World Class Arts

WWW.ERIKOLSENPICTURES.COM

ArtTrek 2016

Foothills Open Studios

Preview Party: SEPTEMBER 23 Open Studios: SEPTEMBER 24–25 upstairsartspace.org

Retro-Inspired Show

opens AUGUST 20 runs to SEPTEMBER 23

Black & White Show

Gala Opening OCTOBER 20 runs to NOVEMBER 9 tryonartsandcrafts.org

Tryon Fine Arts Center: Hot Club of San Franscisco

OCTOBER 1, 8PM Cinema Vivant: Vintage silent films accompanied by live gypsy swing tryonarts.org

Tryon Beer Fest presented by New View Realty

NOVEMBER 5, Noon – 6 pm

Unlimited Beer Tastings, Live Entertainment, Oyster Roast tryonbeerfest.com

Shop, dine, play, and stay in Historic Tryon where you can be surrounded by world class arts and amazing entertainment options. Less than an hour from Greenville, Spartanburg, Asheville & Hendersonville, Tryon is easily accesible from Exit 67 on Interstate 26 and exit 161 on Highway 74.

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T:20” S:19.25”

The BMW X3

century-bmw.com 855-261-2676

1 2

X3 xDrive35i. X3 sDrive28i, X3 xDrive28i, X3 xDrive28d, X3 xDrive35i. ©2016 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

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FS:9.205”


T:20” S:19.25”

T:13” S:12.25”

“... WE GIVE THIS SPORTS ACTIVITY VEHICLE OUR HIGHEST RATING FOR A REASON: IT’S ONE OF THE BEST.” - Edmunds

Perform on any and all surfaces. Make room for both function and luxury. Drive with confidence and curiosity. With up to 300 horsepower1 and 63.3 cubic feet of cargo space,2 the BMW X3 turns challenges into possibilities.

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Opening Act: Some things only get better with age, and vintage fashion is certainly no exception. These pieces take the stage on local actress Sara Tolson in West Greenville’s Shindig Furnishings / Kate DiNatale Vintage. For more, see page 66.

Sheer Elegance Vintage style has timeless appeal

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; model: Sara Tolson

ON SARA: Sheer nylon blouse, $24. From Kate DiNatale Vintage; Kendra Kist Labradorite Mandy earrings with chain, $76; Pink Dogwoods vintage turquoise ring by local maker Nan Faulkner, $48. All from J. Britt.

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THE LOOK

Drama Queen

Dress the part in gold garb and glamorous gowns

/ by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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Standing Ovation: Our model, Sara Tolson, is a native Greenville actress, most recently cast as Patty Andrews in the Centre Stage production Sisters of Swing. With a bachelor’s in production studies in performing arts, Sara discovered her passion for acting while at Clemson University. She has now found a home in the Greenville theater community and is excited about the city’s future in arts involvement.

ON SARA: Tularosa wrap dress, $220; Kendra Kist Labradorite Mandy earrings with chain, $76. All from J. Britt; ECI long chain necklace, $25. From Lou Lou Boutique; marbled melamine cuff bracelet, $30. From Labels Designer Consignments; Vince Camuto Makato sandals in goddess gold, $98. From Muse Shoe Studio; 1970s Knoll chair, $695 (as pair). From Shindig Furnishings.

Special thanks: Model Sam Konduros (Millie Lewis Greenville); hair & makeup, Isabelle Schreier; Rodney Butterfield and Catherine Von Canon of Blue Ridge Sports Cars; Table 301

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THE LOOK

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ON SARA: (opposite) Adrianna Papell triangle cocktail dress, $50. From Labels Designer Consignments; Extra long pearl necklace with gold tassel, $22. TWD pearl embellished cuff, $35. All from Lou Lou Boutique; Midcentury Modern walnut armchair, $475. Shindig Furnishings; (this page) Charme silkiner amethyst pendant, $158. From Augusta 20.

Special thanks: Actress Sara Tolson; hair & makeup, Isabelle Schreier of Belle Maquillage; Shindig Furnishings and Kate DiNatale Vintage

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THE SHOP Retro Revolution: Shindig Furnishing’s refurbished pieces feature dapper design elements of Midcentury Modern style, while Kate DiNatale Vintage sources pristine items of the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s.

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Midcentury Mavens

Shindig Furnishings and Kate DiNatale Vintage put a shine on the past

/ by Ruta Fox // photography by Cameron Reynolds

F

ifty years after the first pieces came off the assembly line, the clean, sleek lines of Midcentury Modern furniture still resonate with collectors who value the craftsmanship, the contemporary aesthetic and, now, the coolness factor. Older fans are holding onto pieces purchased when they were young and starting out, but now there’s a whole new mass of millennial enthusiasts who covet furniture that showcases America’s seminal post-war design trend. Jackie Soladay Blackwell and her parents Jeff and Joan Soladay, along with Kate DiNatale, have created a retail store that is a Midcentury bonanza in the Village of West Greenville. Devoted to the ’50s and ’60s, they’ve assembled a stellar collection of furniture, barware, clothing, and accessories that span the decades. Shindig, with its original tin ceiling, whitewashed brick, and sun-flooded environment, displays pieces that are arranged in stylized vignettes to mimic actual living spaces. Squint your eyes, and Don Draper could be tending bar. “My parents grew up with Midcentury Modern furniture. My dad enjoyed haunting thrift shops and bringing pieces back to life, plus he was selling a lot of his finds on Craigslist. Two years ago we opened a store because we felt that Greenville could support it. We were on

Rutherford Road, and moved here just two months ago. Now people are considering us a true destination, driving in from Asheville, Atlanta, Birmingham, and Charleston,” says Blackwell. 7 The7perfect complement to the retro furniture is retro clothing. “Two and half years ago, Jackie and I met through Instagram,” DiNatale says.7 “I have been buying vintage clothing for over 16 years, and started selling in a booth at Olde Faithful’s Antique Mall in Taylors. Now I do really well on Etsy,” she adds. “We both thought it was the perfect time to combine our wares.” DiNatale’s finds are impeccable examples from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s. Lingerie, shoes, handbags, and eveningwear are all lovingly restored and in tiptop condition. Day dresses look like they’ve been pulled from TV’s classic ’60s sitcom Leave It To Beaver: they’re what Mom wore while waiting for Dad to come home. “I think these days many people want to have clothing as well as furniture that no one else has,” she says. And, really, there’s nothing new about that. Shindig Furnishings / Kate DiNatale Vintage, 11 Lois Ave, Greenville. (864) 915-9705 @shindigfurnishings; @katedinatalevintage

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Not Just For Special Occasions Chef’s Small Plates available for under $15. Make reservations at rickerwins.com.

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille | Rick Erwin’s Nantucket Seafood | Rick Erwin’s Clemson | Rick Erwin’s Eastside

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THE OBJECT

Street Seen From Euphoria events to outdoor concerts, hit the town in boho chic / by Laura Linen

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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ON THE TOWN : 1. Ruffled blouse by SEA, Augusta 20, $345; 2. Rag & Bone distressed plum crop flare, TWILL, $187; 3. Louise et Cie Vanita in tan, Muse Shoe Studio, $139; 4 & 6. Snakeskin HOBO Darcy bag (in Sand Snake or Ivy), lou lou boutique, $98; 5. Chokers: pearl and leather, circle pin and leather, Monkees of the West End, $30 each.

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Adding Warmth and Style to Upstate Homes for Over 50 Years ClaytonTileCo.com

EXCLUSIVE TOLANI RETAILER

STAY TUNED FOR NEW DOWNTOWN LOCATION JUST IN TIME FOR FALL!

Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for daily style posts!

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Shake, Rattle, & Roll An unwelcome guest interrupts the Man’s flow of business

F

rom where I was standing, safely on the porch peeking over the back of a wicker chair, the snake in my driveway looked to be about four feet long. It was thin and black and shimmered in the sunlight where it lay just a few feet from my car. I was late for a meeting and desperately needed to get to that car, but I was trapped. The snaked hadn’t moved in the past ten minutes so I grabbed the seat cushion from the wicker chair and hurled it toward my car. It landed with a dusty thud on the edge of the driveway, but the snake didn’t budge. This left me no choice. I didn’t want to do it but I dug my phone out of my pocket and placed the call. “What kind is it?” my mom asked, after she’d answered the phone and I’d frantically explained the situation. “What difference does it make?” I said. “It’s a snake, and it’s at least six feet long!” “Well, what color is it?” she asked. These are the sorts of insulting questions one does not want to hear when reporting an emergency. It’s like dialing 911 to say that you’re being chased by an knife-wielding maniac only to be asked, “Is the knife sharp?” “It’s probably just a black snake,” my mom said. “They’re harmless.” My mom grew up in the mountains of western North Carolina, and as a kid she would catch snakes in the creek beds and tall grass near her home. This was her idea of fun. As legend has it, her father, my grandfather, kept snakes as pets and at one time the family basement

was a veritable reptile farm complete with a ten-foot boa constrictor. Whenever my mom tells me these stories, I ask her why she just doesn’t come clean and admit I was adopted. Unlike my mother, I have always been deathly afraid of snakes, and the sight of one generally renders me simultaneously immobile and incontinent. I do not discriminate in my hatred of snakes, either. Size, color, species, none of that matters, I hate and fear all of them equally. When someone points out that a certain type of snake is not poisonous, I tell them that if said snake falls from a tree and onto my shoulders or slithers out from under my bed while I’m putting on my pajamas, I would have what cardiologists call a “massive coronary event.” So while not all snakes are poisonous, as far as I am concerned they are all deadly. The standoff in my driveway continued for the better part of an hour before the snake slowly slithered off into the bushes. I called my colleagues to apologize for missing the meeting, citing a problem with my car, which was more or less the truth. I know the snake will return, they always do. They can sense my fear. They know they have the upper hand, and I actually think they enjoy it. I imagine the snake going back to wherever snakes live and telling his friends, “You know that guy who screams and pees a little every time he sees us? Well, today I made him miss a meeting. What should I do to him tomorrow?”

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GREENVILLE We’re offering new clients 3 classes for $40 and unlimited classes for just $99 a month! Barre3 combines the best of ballet, yoga and Pilates to transform your body from the inside out. Best of all, anyone can do this low impact workout and see dramatic results. To learn more visit barre3.com or stop by our studio.

BARRE3 GREENVILLE

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O F 2016 PARTICIPANTS:

4Rooms Barre Evolution* Blend Salon* Christ Church Episcopal School* cocobella boutique Copper Penny Custard Boutique Downtown Divas* fab’rik* J.Britt Boutique Kate Furman Jewelry* Labels Designer Consignments lansing alayne* Laura Cox Designs* Leandra Hill Metal Works* Mainstream Boutique Monkee’s of the West End MUSE Shoe Studio Pink Bee *Will be located within the FOTT Prowse on Main* pop up shops at McMillan Pazdan Savvy Smith Architecture, above Upstate Craft Beer Co./in the former Claussen Splash on Main Bakery Factory (400 Augusta Street, #200) twill Vann & Liv Vintage Now Modern

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fashiononthetown

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October 20 & 21 • 5-9pm

ULTIMATE SHOPPING CRAWL

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MAK ERS MARK

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GREENVILLE’S GROUNDSWELL CRAFT MOVEMENT AND ITS FLAGSHIP EVENT INDIE CRAFT PARADE— FEATURING THE BEST ARTISANS ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST—BEGAN WITH A MIDNIGHT EMAIL.

BY Kathryn Davé & Heidi Coryell Williams PORTRAITS Eli Warren

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"AM I CRAZY?" It was late 2009. The word “craft” was relatively virgin, long relegated to church bazaars or kindergarten, smacking of Popsicle sticks and knitting needles. But here and there across the nation, something was happening which had always been happening, only it was happening collectively now. People were making things. Before work, late at night, abandoning 9-to-5s entirely—suddenly, there came a swell of makers and artists returning to time-honored methods of creation. Almost simultaneously, the country seemed to wake to a hunger for things made by hand, for a sense of personal connection faded by technology and mass production. Lib Ramos was one of the hungry, so when she tapped out an email titled “Am I crazy?” to Erin Godbey, she didn’t know what it would spark. She only knew she wanted to start an independent craft festival—and she guessed Erin had the event coordinating skills to help. She and Godbey launched the very first Indie Craft Parade in September 2010. The highly-curated fair showcased handmade art and goods from around the South, with a focus on quality over quantity. Seven years in, with Indie Craft Parade now widely recognized as one of the best craft shows in South—if not the nation—it’s hard to imagine there were ever any doubts about its success. But the months leading up to the festival were marked by hard work, late nights, fears, and even a few Field of Dreams moments. When it came time to print programs, Lib suggested two or three hundred. “I told Lib, ‘No way, we need to print two or three thousand!’” Erin recalls. “And then I told her something cheesy like ‘If we print it, they will come.’” hey came. Shortly after the doors opened, the line to get in stretched around the block. By the next day, they had to reuse programs. “We didn’t expect the response we got,” Lib says. “But Greenville was ready for it. It was the right place, the right time, and the city really came out in support.” The show’s overwhelming success delivered the affirmation they needed to keep going—and also the third member of their team: Jen Moreau. As co-owner of Dapper Ink, one of the first vendors at the festival, Jen recognized

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BRAINCHILDREN: (from left to right) Lib Ramos, Jen Moreau, and Erin Godbey, the talent behind Makers Collective, an organization that empowers creative entrepreneurs, have weaved their strengths to create one of the best expos of craft talent in the country.

there was something special about Indie Craft Parade. She volunteered to help with the next one, and, in her own words, “basically never left.” Today, their tight, three-person team is formidable, but only in the sheer strength of their achievements. Since the first festival in 2010, Lib, Erin, and Jen— and, they would absolutely add, a diverse group of supporters and volunteers— have grown an annual craft festival into a mighty, meaningful organization that empowers creative entrepreneurs. “I couldn’t have handpicked a better team to do this. Our strengths and weaknesses totally complement each other,” says Erin. The fluidity of their dynamic is evident: the easy give and take, the rounding out

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THE INDIE CRAFT PARADE, SEPTEMBER 16–18 AT THE HUGUENOT MILL, BEGINS WITH FRIDAY’S VIP GALA (TICKETS $35), CONTINUING SAT, SEPT 17, 9 A.M.–6 P.M. AND SUN, SEPT 18, 11 A.M.–5 P.M. JUST $2 GETS YOU IN THE DOOR, THOUGH YOU MIGHT WANT TO SNAG A SPOT EARLY: THE LINE HAS BEEN KNOWN TO SNAKE AROUND THE BUILDING! FOR TICKETS TO THE GALA AND FOR MORE INFO: INDIECRAFTPARADE.COM

of each other’s stories—it all mirrors the effortless way they work together. Lib is creative director, Erin, event director, and Jen, community director, roles that capitalize on their distinct backgrounds and skills. “We realized that this movement could and should be bigger than Indie Craft Parade,” Lib explains. “Our first inclination was to move in the direction of education.” Hosting an independent craft fair each year gave the founders a front row seat to the ups and down of small business, particularly the challenges for makers. When they saw vendors disappear or flounder, they launched Makers Summit, a creative small business conference, in 2013. It was the first conference of its kind specifically designed for makers, connecting them with professional expertise and workshops across a range of fields. This annual “business bootcamp” quickly became a key part of Indie Craft Parade’s “portfolio” of resources for creatives. SEPTEMBER 2016 / 81

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"IF WE PRINT IT, THEY WILL COME."

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hich brought the founders a challenge of their own. “Those Wild West years in the beginning were fun! Exhausting, but fun. Can we dream it? Can we bootstrap it? There was very little we actually said ‘no’ to,” Jen says. Indie Craft Parade arrived just as the national wave of the craft movement washed over Greenville. Consumer interest was shifting from mass-produced to handmade. Makers of all kinds were finding their voice. And, clearly, Indie Craft Parade’s growing roster of initiatives to support creative entrepreneurship was resonating. Their ideas were endless. Their resources weren’t. So in 2015, they evolved Indie Craft Parade into Makers Collective, a focused, non-profit arts organization that could serve as the umbrella for Indie Craft Parade festival, Makers Summit, and several other strategic initiatives. “Restructuring was a really good exercise for us to make sure that all the things we’re doing match our mission—and that they could be profitable and sustainable for us. It felt like our organization was growing up,” Lib says. Growing up—but also growing down. “We’ve been asked many times to replicate Indie Craft Parade or Makers Summit around the country, but for now, we have intentionally decided to deepen our roots in Greenville,” says Erin. This

decision comes as the result of the same thoughtfulness and commitment to excellence that have made Makers Collective and its events so distinct. Their philosophy is “makers first,” a mantra made meaningful in big gestures (investing heavily in event advertising) and small ones (putting out a festival PB&J bar just for makers). Jen, with firsthand experience as a vendor herself, can attest to the support that Makers Collective invests in makers: “It’s hard to get into the festival, but once you’re in, we take really good care of our artists. We want them to succeed,” she says. Six years ago, when the founders set up tables and welcomed artisans from across the South, that’s what they wanted, too. But who could have imagined the movement it would start, the businesses it would boost, the economic impact that would ripple across Greenville each year? Maybe no one, except a dreamer.

C A N' T-MISS M A K ERS THERE ARE 80 ARTISANS AT THE PARADE THIS YEAR. THESE ARE OUR TOP PICKS.

2 LE ANDR A HILL BEYOND BAUBLES.

PERHAPS YOU’VE ALREADY HAPPENED BY LEANDRA HILL’S METAL JEWELRY COLLECTION AT ARTISPHERE. SHE IS RELATIVELY NEW ON THE GREENVILLE ARTS SCENE, AND SHE’S DEFINITELY SOMEONE TO LOOK FOR—AT INDIE AND EVERYTHING AFTER. HER SIMPLE, CLEAN DESIGNS ARE CRAFTED WITH CLASSIC GOLDSMITHING TECHNIQUES. THEY ARE MEANT TO BE TREASURED PIECES, WORN AND THEN PASSED DOWN AS HEIRLOOMS LIKE MANY OF THE FAVORITE JEWELRY ITEMS LEANDRA HAS INHERITED THROUGHOUT HER LIFETIME. THE JEWELRY ARTIST AND METALSMITH HAS BEEN OUT ON MATERNITY LEAVE, AND HER ONLINE SHOP CLOSED FOR BUSINESS, SO FOR THOSE EAGERLY AWAITING HER RETURN TO THE MARKETPLACE, THE CRAFT PARADE WILL BE A PROPER DEBUT! leandrahillmetalworks.com

1 LONELY MOUNTAIN ME TALWORKS SHAPE SIMPLE.

THIS SCANDINAVIAN-INSPIRED, GREENVILLE-BASED LIGHTING AND DÉCOR COMPANY IS THE BRAINCHILD OF HUSBANDWIFE TEAM JOE AND EMILY CLARK. THEIR LIGHT FIXTURES AND HOME ACCENTS ARE A PERFECT BLEND OF (HER) LOVE OF MINIMALIST DESIGN AND (HIS) PROFESSIONAL WELDING EXPERTISE. THE SPECIFIC DESIGN INFLUENCE COMES FROM HIMMELI, A TRADITIONAL FINNISH HARVEST FESTIVAL THAT WAS HONORED, IN PART, THROUGH THE GEOMETRIC ASSEMBLY OF STRAW THREADED INTO A STRUCTURALLY SOUND MOBILE THAT WAS THEN HUNG FROM CEILING RAFTERS FOR CELEBRATORY DÉCOR. BY TRANSLATING THIS DESIGN INTO WELDED METAL, THEY CREATE AN EVEN MORE SOLID STRUCTURE THAT OFFERS A MODERN AESTHETIC TO MINIMALIST DÉCOR. ONE INITIAL, SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT LENT ITSELF TO THE DREAMING UP OF IDEAS FOR ART AND LIGHTING FOCUSING ON CLEAN LINES, SIMPLE BEAUTY, AND THE LONELY MOUNTAIN METALWORKS BRAND. lonelymountainmetal.etsy.com 82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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3 J. STARK PRIME QUALITY.

J. STARK GETS ITS NAME FROM JAMES DEAN’S CHARACTER IN REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE, SO IT’S LITTLE SURPRISE THAT THE HAND-HEWN LEATHER GOODS GROUP GETS ITS INSPIRATION FROM THE ARTISAN MAKERS OF YESTERYEAR. BUT OWNER ERIK HOLMBERG’S PORTFOLIO GOES WELL BEYOND THROWBACK. HE’S NEWGENERATION GENUINE, WHICH HE DEFINES AS “TANGIBLE GOODS OF A TIMELESS AESTHETIC.” THE NAMES OF HIS BAGS AND CARRYALLS OFTEN CARRY STREET NAMES FROM INNER-CITY CLEVELAND, WHERE HIS PARENTS GREW UP “AS GREASERS, OUTSIDERS” AND WHERE PERHAPS THE FIRST BRICKS WERE LAID IN THE FOUNDATION OF HIS NOSTALGICALLY INFUSED BUSINESS. WALLETS AND IPHONE SLEEVES MADE WITH HORWEEN LEATHER MEAN THEY’RE SOURCED FROM ONE OF THE OLDEST CONTINUOUSLY RUNNING TANNERIES IN THE UNITED STATES. LATIGO LEATHER, BUTTER SOFT AND UTTERLY TOUCHABLE, IS THE MATERIAL PREFERRED FOR HANDBAGS. YOU’LL BE HARD-PRESSED NOT TO FLINCH AT THE BEAUTY OF THESE BAGS. starkmade.com

BAG OF TRICKS: Straight out of Charleston, J. Stark offers loads of sleek-lined leather goods.

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FEW DESCRIPTIONS COULD DO JUSTICE TO WHAT KAREN O’LEARY CREATES WHEN SHE PLACES HER X-ACTO TO WATERCOLOR PAPER. NO PAINT NEEDED—A MAPCUT IS BEAUTY IN STARK WHITE. WHAT BEGAN AS PART OF HER FIFTH-YEAR ARCHITECTURE THESIS GREW INTO AN “UNINTENTIONAL BUSINESS.” HER ARTFORM EXTENDS FAR BEYOND SIMPLY CUTTING PICTURES OF MAPS; O’LEARY CREATES REPLICAS OF THE PLACES THAT HOLD OUR LIFE STORIES. THOSE STORIES HAVE NOW BEEN TOLD ALL OVER THE NATION— HER WORK DISPLAYED EVERYWHERE FROM ART GALLERIES IN CHARLOTTE, N.C., TO THE COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL IN LAS VEGAS. IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING, GREENVILLE IS IN GOOD COMPANY WITH O’LEARY’S ARRIVAL FOR THE CRAFT PARADE. studiokmo.etsy.com

MADE IN SMALL BATCHES, OFTEN TO ORDER, THE BAGS, BELTS, WALLETS, AND MORE FROM GO FORTH GOODS ARE PARTICULARLY IRRESISTIBLE WHEN PUT ON DISPLAY IN AN INDIE CRAFT BOOTH. THIS COLLECTIVE COMES TO THE PARADE FROM MARIETTA, GEORGIA, BUT YOU CAN PROBABLY SMELL THEIR LEATHER WARES ABOUT THE TIME THEY HIT THE BORDER AND CROSS INTO SOUTH CAROLINA. ATTENTION TO DETAIL, WITH SOLID BRASS AND COPPER RIVETS ON THEIR BAGS, AS WELL AS THE HAND-STITCHING WITH WAXED THREAD USED IN THEIR ASSEMBLY, MAKES THE INVESTMENT IN A GO FORTH BAG A WORTHWHILE ONE, KNOWING THAT IT WILL STAND THE TEST OF TIME AND EVEN LOOK BETTER WITH AGE. goforthgoods.com

THE BEAUTY OF A FIVE LOVES BAG OR BASKET IS ALL IN THE DETAILS—HAND-DYED ROPE, HANDWOVEN CREATIONS, ADORNED WITH CAREFULLY WOVEN THREADING AND AFFIXED WITH LEATHER HANDLES. THESE BASKETS AND BAGS ARE DRESSED IN COLORS AND PATTERNS THAT LOOK LIKE THEY STEPPED RIGHT OUT OF YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OR MAYBE A REALLY LOVELY DREAM. HARTSVILLE-BASED ARTISAN STACY ARREOLA, ONLY ABOUT A YEAR INTO HER BUSINESS VENTURE, HAS BEEN WORKING ON PLENTY OF PLANT BASKETS TO ROLL OUT AT THIS YEAR’S PARADE, BUT FIVE LOVES OFFERS A WIDE VARIETY OF TOTES, PLANT HANGERS, AND MORE TO CHOOSE FROM. facebook.com/ fiveloveshandmade

REPEAT VISITORS TO INDIE CRAFT WILL HAVE SURELY SPOTTED GREENVILLE-BASED MUSICIAN AND CRAFTSMAN RYAN BOASE’S REACOUSTIC CREATIONS. HIS “OLD SCHOOL” PHONOGRAPHS BLEND VINTAGE STYLE WITH MODERN (THINK BLUETOOTH AND SMART PHONE–COMPATIBLE) CAPABILITIES. BY REPURPOSING OLD GRAMOPHONE, PHONOGRAPH, AND VARIOUS BRASS HORNS INTO WIRELESS ACOUSTIC AMPLIFICATION, REACOUSTIC PROVIDES A HANDMADE ALTERNATIVE TO THE (DARE WE SAY IT) RESTORATION HARDWARE-ESK DESIGN AESTHETIC THAT’S ALL THE RAGE THESE DAYS, WITH HANDWORKED WOOD AND WELL-PATINAED METALS. reacoustic.com

PAPER. CUT.

AGAINST THE GRAIN.

A BOUNTY OF BASKETS.

MOST STYLISH SPEAKERS EVER.

Product descriptions by Heidi Coryell Williams; photography courtesy of the artists. 84 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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"WE TAKE REALLY GOOD CARE OF OUR ARTISTS. WE WANT THEM TO SUCCEED."

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8 ZEN SUCCULENT

9 BROOKE WATERS POTTERY

10 1767 DESIGNS

TRENDY DURHAM, N.C., DESCENDS ON GREENVILLE WITH THE ARRIVAL OF THIS MODERN TERRARIUM AND PLANT CRAFT SHOP, WHICH TAKES TERRARIUMS AND TURNS THEM INTO EVERYTHING FROM PARTY FAVORS TO AIR PLANTERS. THIS REPEAT VENDOR IS ROLLING OUT A COUPLE NEW CREATIONS FOR THIS YEAR’S PARADE, INCLUDING AIR-PLANT STANDS IN A VARIETY OF COLORS AND SIZES THAT TURN YOUR SUCCULENT (OR THEIRS, MORE LIKELY) INTO VENERABLE WORKS OF ART. UNDERNEATH GLASS, SUSPENDED BY STRING, OR SPRUNG FROM A TINY CLAY VESSEL, THE PLANTS AND PIECES CULTIVATED BY “CHIEF MAKER” MEGAN GEORGE OFFER LAYERS OF INTEREST AND INSPIRATION. thezensucculent.com

IF YOU’VE EVER FOUND YOURSELF FLEA MARKET SHOPPING AND SMITTEN BY VINTAGE FIESTAWARE, THEN BROOKE WATERS POTTERY IS SURE TO CALL YOUR NAME. BROOKE DERSCH (HER MARRIED NAME) IS A POTTER BASED IN GREENVILLE WHO APPRECIATES FUNCTIONAL PIECES, BUT IS ALSO INSPIRED BY THE DISHES OF YESTERYEAR. BROOKE DISCOVERED CLAY WHILE STUDYING THEATER AND PHOTOGRAPHY AT BOB JONES UNIVERSITY. NOW SHE HAS A HOME STUDIO WHERE SHE CHURNS OUT MODERN FORMS WITH DAINTY, FEMININE DETAILS, NOT OFTEN FOUND IN HAND-TURNED POTTERY. HER CORAL, MINT, AND MUSTARD YELLOW GLAZES ARE IRRESISTIBLE. AND, OF COURSE, THINGS JUST TASTE BETTER WHEN THEY’RE SERVED IN SOMETHING HANDMADE. brookewaterspottery.com

ANOTHER COLLECTIVE OF CRAFTERS BASED OUT OF NASHVILLE, 1767’S WOOD IS RECLAIMED (RESCUED, REALLY) FROM OLD HOMES—MANY OF THEM A CENTURY OLD OR OLDER. AND YET THE OLD CHARACTER WOODCUTS ARE CRAFTED TO FIT PERFECTLY IN MOST ANY MODERN HOME. 1767’S SPIN ON CLASSIC AMERICAN DESIGN TAKES THE SHAPE OF EVERYTHING FROM FISHBONE WALL ART AND PLANKSTYLE BENCHES TO COFFEE TABLES AND MORE. YOU CAN LEARN THE STORY OF EVERY PIECE BY TURNING IT OVER—THE AGE OF THE ORIGINAL BUILDING, ALONG WITH WHERE IT WAS LOCATED, IS WRITTEN ON EVERY PIECE THEY CREATE. BUT IT’S MORE FUN TO HEAR IT FROM THEM, SO STOP BY AND ASK THEM. IT WILL BE TIME WELL SPENT. 1767designs.com

BUDDING INTEREST.

CLAY DELICATE.

STYLE FROM SALVAGE.

WALLET WORTHY: Other fabulous fashioners to find at the fair include Jordan Grace, a Durham, North Carolina, artist who creates adorable paper doll cut-outs and minimalist illustrations, and Slab, local Greenville woodcrafters who can fill your entire kitchen with stylish spoons, superior bowls, and the smoothest cuttingboards around.

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BENEVOLENCE

BEYOND MEASURE

Support Beams:

A project funded by Betty Stall and other members of the Peace family, the Peace Center's construction transformed downtown Greenville's look and the city's cultural landscape.

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BETTY STALL, GENEVIEVE SAKAS MANLY, AND MARY STERLING, THREE COUSINS OF GREENVILLE’S PROMINENT PEACE FAMILY, HAVE MORE THAN A VISION FOR THEIR CITY—THEY HAVE HEART.

By Stephanie Trotter SEPTEMBER 2016 / 89

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As the Reedy ripples through town, hundreds sway upon her banks, serenaded by music from the TD Stage at the Peace Center. One hundred feet above, three silver-haired matriarchs look down from a penthouse porch at RiverPlace and smile. Like fairy godmothers sprinkling magic dust, these prosperous protectors shower their good fortune upon Greenville, infusing it with color and culture. “A community without arts and humanities is dead. Dull, anyway,” asserts the baby of the bunch, Betty Stall. “I think we all grew up with a sense of responsibility for where we were and gratitude for what Greenville has done for us. This is what made us, so this is what we’re obligated and responsible for giving back.” Her cousins, Mary Sterling and Genevieve Sakas Manly, warmly agree. Sterling elaborates, “We need to give back. The community has been mighty good to us.” “Us” refers to their family, the Peace family. Their grandfather, Bony Hampton Peace, bought a small, struggling newspaper in 1919. He and his sons built

— BETTY STALL

the Greenville News into a multi-media conglomerate and sold it to Gannett in 1995 for $1.7 billion. The Peace family displayed exceptional generosity before and after that transfer. And today, Stall, Sterling, and Manly continue to do so. These benevolent grande dames are the last of their generation, active and living here locally. Together, they form a familial female triumvirate, preserving and advancing accessibility to the arts, history, and education. B E T T Y S TALL The Advocate

“I grew up on Byrd Boulevard. We had such freedom then. I played in the woods all of the time,” confides Stall, reflecting upon her childhood. Like all Peace offspring, she worked at the paper before heading to college. She majored in history at Hollins University, and returned home to discover the family building the community in many ways. “My uncle Roger C. Peace was one of the founders of the Community Foundation,” she explains sweetly. “So, you know, this idea of giving has gone from generation to generation.” She immediately gave, too. Not just writing checks, but serving groups big and small, near and far, from Furman to First Baptist, St. Francis to Brookgreen Gardens. She quietly admits her endeavors with the biggest impact include assisting in integrating areas schools and building the Peace Center. In the early 1970s, the education enthusiast was facilitating a Junior League reading program when she was tapped to join the county’s citizens’ committee to integrate 105 schools. “It was a scary time,” she reveals. “It could have been violent. But Greenville stepped up, as [chairman] Ernie Harrill says, ‘with grace and style.’ Separate was not equal. We still have issues, but we’re far from where we were.”

Photograph (Betty Stall) by Paul Mehaffey

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Betty Stall

“A COMMUNITY WITHOUT ARTS AND HUMANITIES IS DEAD. DULL, ANYWAY.”

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Photograph (previous page) courtesy of the Peace Center; this page (Peace family) courtesy of the Greenville Historical Society Coxe Collection Photograph (Betty Stall) by Paul Mehaffey

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y the mid-1980s, urban decay was killing downtown. The Peace family, and others, envisioned a performing arts center at the corner of Main and Broad streets, where buildings were crumbling into the river. “We thought of it as a quality-of-life issue,” confesses Stall. “But it turned out to be an economic issue.” She dauntlessly served as president of the Center for the Performing Arts Foundation, which held a $10 million gift from her father and two uncles. In turn, all branches of the family donated—$42 million was raised in a public-private partnership, and the Peace Center opened in 1990. “Oh, it wasn’t just me,” cautions Stall. “All of my cousins and family got involved, too—the MacIlwinens, Ramsaurs, Echols, Grahams, Delapps, DuPonts. So many others.” The Peace Center’s president and CEO Megan Riegel acknowledges all benefactors, but displays a soft-spot for the three cousins. “Not only are they the most generous, kindest, smartest people you’ll meet, but they are so savvy and their hearts are in the right place,” she praises. “To be so community-minded and selfless. I have the utmost admiration for them.” After several years off the Board of Trustees, Stall was encouraged by Riegel to rejoin, maintaining, “She has insight that is incredibly valuable. I want to make sure we stay true to ourselves, our vision, and mission.” Meanwhile, the growing Peace family continues to bestow gifts. Genevieve Sakas Manly is one of the most consistent supporters, and during the recent $23 million renovation, a restaurant bearing her name was added alongside the Concert Hall.

GEN E VI E V E SAK AS MAN LY The Dancer

Peace Pipe:

The Peace Family (above), circa 1929; Betty Stall credits the giving nature of her forebears for instilling within her a drive to do the same.

“It’s so nice!” The vibrant 92-year-old applauds the patron lounge, adding, “When I visit, I’ll have a glass of wine.” Performance arts have centered Manly’s life for as long as she can remember. “I grew up going to dancing school three days a week,” she shares. “Momma insisted I go to college first. Afterward, I went to New York City and studied at the School of American Ballet.” While there, she met John Sakas, a soldier returning from World War II. They married, formed an act, and toured the globe, opening for Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, and Sammy Davis, Jr. In 1972, the couple moved to Greenville, and the dancer noticed her hometown was growing up. “I was delighted to see plans certain leaders had. I was glad to be a part of some of these plans,” she recalls. She joined forces with Dr. Virginia Uldrick, founder of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, who wanted to establish a residential campus where talented high school students could focus on the arts year-round. “There was nothing there, just empty land,” Manly recalls of the 8.5 acres behind County Square. “It seemed like a wonderful thing to do to help Greenville develop.” The state committed $12 million and a capital campaign began. Manly and her late husband contributed funds to build the 300-seat Sakas Black Box Theatre, inside the John and Genevieve Sakas Center for Drama—the very site where Tony Award–winning actress Patina Miller later trained. “The school has produced wonderful, talented

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“I DON’T THINK IT EVER OCCURRED TO A SINGLE ONE OF US WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE IN 50 YEARS.” graduates,” the benefactor declares. “It’s a wonderful outlet and venue for kids. It’s a wonderful, unique opportunity.” In later years, the long-time board member created the Sakas Endowment to fund costume purchase and repair, as well as student travel to auditions. She professes, “It’s been a privilege and pleasure. It’s just delightful to hear and see them. So many have gone on to have wonderful careers.” “Genevieve’s love is the Governor’s School,” divulges Mary Sterling, who lives next-door to her cousin. “She was the actress, the dancer, always moving and doing. I was probably the studious one.” MA RY S T ER L I N G The Student

Sterling and Manly attended Greenville High side-byside, where a love of history took root. “It proves things you don’t realize at the time,” Sterling proclaims. “If you don’t learn from history, you’re going to make the same mistakes. That’s trite, but the truth.” After graduating from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, she followed the path of her generation. “It was 1945, and when the war was over, we just wanted all of our guys to come home. We wanted to get married and start a family.” So, she did. But she couldn’t ignore the altruism coursing through her DNA. She spent decades physically and financially supporting the Association of Junior Leagues of America, Christ Church Episcopal School, United Way, the YMCA Endowment Corporation, and Furman Advisory Council. But her biggest contribution was yet to come.

News Worthy:

(top left) Mary Sterling and Betty Stall prepare to head out of town for a Junior League conference; the cousins' grandfather Bony Hampton Peace purchased the Greenville News in 1919; it was eventually sold in 1995 to Gannett for $1.7 billion.

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ell, that’s an interesting story,” the 92-year-old confides. “I had a friend who said, ‘You need to join the Historic Greenville Foundation.’ Well, I didn’t even know what it was, but once I got in, it was fascinating.” In the early 1980s, this grassroots group preserved historical artifacts and buildings. They eventually needed their own space, a museum. “I saw it in my mind as a place of activity,” she recollects. “I didn’t want a building full of dusty old relics. It’s got to have people in and out all the time, it’s got to have programs, and it’s got to appeal to young and old.” Sterling became one of three primary donors to fund a building, and in 2007, the Upcountry History Museum opened to the public at Heritage Green. “She was way ahead of her time,” states Executive Director Dana Thorpe. “The museum as it stands today is primarily guided by her vision. She saw from the beginning if you don’t inspire a love of history in children, as adults, they won’t become members, donors, nor visitors.” Sterling’s passion and push not only launched the museum, but it operates debt-free, which is rare for such entities. “We are living out her dream,” says Thorpe. “She’s one of those rare people who touch your life and make it so much better. She makes a huge impact on you, and I don’t say that lightly.” Today, Sterling serves as trustee emerita, and recently gifted funds to build an oral history recording studio and hire a specialized curator to run it.

(above, from left to right) photograph courtesy of Betty Stall; The News-Piedmont, courtesy of the Greenville Historical Society Coxe Collection; (opposite) photograph courtesy of Genevieve Sakas Manly; photograph courtesy of the Upcountry History Museum; portraits of Genevieve Sakas Manly and Mary Sterling by Paul Mehaffey

—MARY STERLING

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Class Acts:

(left) Manly performed across the globe with her late husband and dance partner John Sakas, opening for acts like Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, and Sammy Davis, Jr.; Mary Sterling contributed significant funds for the construction of the Upcountry History Museum at Heritage Green.

(above, from left to right) photograph courtesy of Betty Stall; The News-Piedmont, courtesy of the Greenville Historical Society Coxe Collection; (opposite) photograph courtesy of Genevieve Sakas Manly; photograph courtesy of the Upcountry History Museum; portraits of Genevieve Sakas Manly and Mary Sterling by Paul Mehaffey

FAMILIAL FEMALE TRIUMVIRATE

“I don’t think it ever occurred to a single one of us what it would be like in 50 years.” Sterling is back on her RiverPlace terrace, peering over downtown. “Legacy? We never thought along those lines. We cared. That’s the main thing, we cared about people and the community.” Stall nods saying, “You find meaning in what you give away with your time, your involvement with other people. Caring about the community. It’s what our family has done for five generations.” As tradition holds, future generations are sure to follow.

Genevieve Sakas Manly

Mary Sterling

“IT SEEMED LIKE A WONDERFUL THING TO DO TO HELP GREENVILLE DEVELOP.” — GENEVIEVE SAKAS MANLY

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THURSDAY

September 22 nd

SPORTS SERIES: CYCLING WITH GEORGE HINCAPIE Presented by Michelin

Bike with the best of ’em! Put on your helmets and take off on a 30 mile ride with one of the most recognized riders in the world, George Hincapie. price:

$150 venue: Hotel Domestique (Restaurant 17)

time:

10:00am

SONGWRITERS RECIPE Presented by BB&T Bank

An intimate “behind the scenes” event featuring legendary and Grammy-award winning songwriters. Hear the stories behind the songs you’ve been singing along to, straight from the mouths of the songwriters themselves! price:

$100 venue: Revel (old Handlebar)

time:

7-10:30pm

GREENVILLE KICK-OFF PARTY Presented by GSP Airport

What better way to kick off the festival weekend than with a taste of our hometown? From chefs and restaurants, to craft brews and spirits, even the music you’ll be dancing along to will be shining a spotlight on this amazing city we call home. price:

$75 venue: Old Cigar Warehouse

FRIDAY

time:

8:30pm- Midnight

September 23 rd

SPORTS SERIES: GOLF AT THE CLIFFS Presented by Michelin

Join us for a day of golf, lunch and libations at the beautiful Cliffs at Mountain Park, a private residential community located at the Southernmost tip of the Blue Ridge Mountains. price:

$175 venue: The Cliffs at Mountain Park

time:

8:00am-4:00pm

TASTE OF THE TRAIL: SWAMP RABBIT RIDE & LUNCH

Be a part of euphoria 2016’s first ever lunch experience, take a ride down the Swamp Rabbit Trail and end at the Traveler’s Rest Farmer’s Market Pavilion for a delicious lunch. price:

$65 venue: Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery

time:

10:30 am-3:00pm

TASTE OF THE SOUTH

Presented by The Local Palate

From Virginia to Florida, and everywhere in between, we’re bringing you a TRUE Taste of the South with over 10 Chefs showing off what Southern cooking means to them. It wouldn’t be euphoria without live music to keep you movin’…so throw on some seersucker and join us for a Southern celebration y’all won’t want to miss! price:

Those that eat together, stay together.

$125 venue: Peace Center Ampitheatre

SATURDAY

time:

6:00-10:00pm

September 24 th

euphoria CLASSROOMS price:

TOPIC #� SOUTHERN BREWING:

$35 venue: Fluor Field

time:

11:00am

TOPIC #� CRAFTING COCKTAILS:

price: price:

$35 venue: Pop-Up!

time:

1:30pm

TOPIC #� SMOKIN’ ON THE STREET:

$35 venue: The West End

time:

3:00pm

WINE SEMINARS

SOMETHING TO WINE ABOUT: WINE MEETS PUNCHLINE

TV personality, award-winning author and sommelier, Laurie Forster, delivers an edgy, off-beat hilarious seminar where wine meets punchline. venue:

Brazwell’s Event Space

times:

1pm & 3:30pm

FEAST BY THE FIELD

Presented by Greenville Water

Beer snobs, wine-o’s, and foodies unite for this amazing opportunity to learn, taste and imbibe with the experts themselves. price:

$75 venue: The West End

time:

12-4:00pm

TRAFFIC JAM

Presented by Lowes Foods

Come get gridlocked with us in an evening full of live music, craft beer & spirits, and an array of delicious food truck cuisine, all out on the outfield of our city’s own Greenville Drive. price:

$75 venue: Fluor Field

time:

6-10:00pm

GUEST CHEF DINNERS

Join guest chefs at some of Greenville’s most popular dining destinations. price:

$150-$350 venue: Various Restaurants

SUNDAY

time:

7pm

September 25 th

SUNDAY BRUNCH: FIRED UP! Presented by South State Bank

Join us this year as the South’s Best Pitmasters cook up an amazing spread. We will be serving up delicious brunch items, Bloody Marys and live music. price:

$55 venue: The West End

time:

10:00am -2:00pm

euphoria CLASSROOM

Presented by Southern Fork

HEIRLOOM FOODSTUFFS AND THE TRADITIONAL BBQ SIDE DISHES: BEER, CORNBREAD, AND BEANS

Taste the difference of heirloom ingredients as you sample cornbread, sip beer, and eat some delicious beans, and ask questions, chat with the host, and generally learn about heirloom foodstuffs the best way possible — by eating them! price:

$35 venue: Fluor Field

time:

1:30pm

SUNDAY SUPPER

This farm to table experience serves as the exclamation point to the weekend by allowing guests to break bread with our elite line-up of local and guest chefs. One of our most popular events of the weekend, join us for this family style meal with Guest Chef Chris Hastings, overlooking the Reedy River, as we cheers to a successful festival season! price:

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$150 venue: Wyche Pavilion

time:

5:00 -8:30pm

8/19/16 9:31 AM


Join Us

Join The Cliffs for a spectacular evening of tasting and toasting as we sample more than 150 incredible wines, enjoy delectable food pairings and chef stations, a beer garden supported by local North and South Carolina breweries, handcrafted spirits from around the world, enlightening culinary demonstrations throughout the evening, live music and lots of dancing.

OCTOBER 1 | 6:00 PM | THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK

To purchase tickets: go.cliffsliving.com/grandtasting Presented by

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

A New Leaf:

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Kitchen Sync’s crispy kale comes locally sourced and sprinkled with Parmesan.

Crunch Time Veggie eating is made easy with Kitchen Sync’s tasty takes

SEPTEMBER 2016 / 97

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SIDE

Dish

Family (a)Fare: Kitchen Sync is owned and operated by brother-sister team Kevin Feeny and Karin Farrell, along with Karin’s husband John, and it was recently awarded the highest Certified Green rating among independent restaurants in the country. Try the Gritz Fritz (left): grits from Hurricane Creek Farms, fried, with pepper jam atop sautéed collards, or the Shrimp Burger (right), decked with shrimp, Parmesan, and a special aioli sauce.

Arc of Taste Kitchen Sync blends sustainability and contemporary local fare for Greenville’s first Certified Green restaurant / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

N

ot everyone is eager to go into business with their family. That prospect, however, doesn’t intimidate Kevin Feeny. In fact, the Greenville native moved back from Raleigh, North Carolina, earlier this year to open a restaurant with his siblings. “We had been talking about doing something together for a long time,” explains Feeny, “but the opportunity never presented itself until now.” This summer they realized their dreams of a “cool, soulful, neighborhood joint” in the form of Kitchen Sync. Feeny, who owns the restaurant with sister Karin and her husband John Farrell (and who employs various other relatives), says family participation is part of the “sync” in the restaurant’s name. The low-slung building on Laurens Road, which once held the Coble dairy, now houses the first Certified Green restaurant in Greenville. Inside, the décor shows off wood reclaimed from a horse paddock in Kentucky, brick from a mill in South Carolina, booths from Goodwill, and a whimsical wall sculpture that Feeny’s mother created from bicycle rims donated by Lucky Bikes. Sustainable practices include composting and recycling the restaurant’s waste, capturing rainwater for irrigation, and generating electricity via roof solar panels. Mere weeks before the restaurant was scheduled to open, Feeny discovered the city no longer recycled glass. So he scrambled to find canned beer and boxed and keg wine to stock the bar. In the open kitchen, chefs Karin and John whip up “contemporary American comfort food” featuring ingredients from Greenbrier Farms, Crescent Farm, JBO Ranch, and Carolina Catfish. Sourcing local, sustainably-raised ingredients ties into the restaurant’s ethos and the owners’ desire to lighten their carbon footprint.

The seasonal menu cites an eclectic mix of family recipes and owners’ favorites, accumulated from their travels and collective experiences in the restaurant industry (there’s that sync again). For example, the recipe for Miss Betty’s Chablis Cake, soaked in butter and white wine, was handed down from a family friend in Asheville. Shrimp scampi, one of Karin’s favorites, gets a Southwestern spin in a broth of lime juice, butter, garlic, serrano chilies, and cilantro. Kitchen Sync’s version of tomato pie is lighter than the Southern standard, made on a half-sheet pan and layered with local tomatoes, mozzarella, Parmesan, and cheddar cheeses, mixed with a little mayonnaise. The idea for the tasty shrimp burger comes from the restaurant Karin and John had in San Diego. It’s finished with a drizzle of smoky aioli, dubbed TK Sauce, after their friend who created it. On a recent Thursday evening, people crowded the recycled-wood bar in the back of the 100-seat space, and the full dining room reverberated with animated conversations. Feeny assures me it’s been like this since they opened, often with a line out the door (they only take reservations for parties of six or more). As Karin describes it, “Every night is like a neighborhood party”—and one that’s definitely in sync with both the family’s vision and their diners’ pleasure. Kitchen Sync 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville (864) 568-8115, kitchensyncgreenville.com Tues–Thurs, and Sun, 4–9 p.m.; Fri–Sat, 4–10 p.m.

98 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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8/22/16 10:14 AM


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TOWN_blank page.indd 7

8/17/16 1:17 PM


SWEET

Spot

Rolling in the Dough: Along with an array of fresh-baked breads, Wade Taylor’s talent extends to tasty treats like chocolate croissants and sweet monkey bread.

Bread Winner

Artisan baker Wade Taylor proves his worth at the Village’s Bake Room / by Andrew Huang

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

W

ade Taylor looks tired. The baker and owner of the Bake Room stands inside a shotgun-style building on Pendleton Street. There’s a small prep table and a collection of well-used machinery arranged on the sides of the space: a commercial mixer outfitted with a bathtubsized bowl; a reversible dough sheeter for pastries; a rotating rack oven; and a three-tiered deck oven. It’s 5:30 p.m. on a Tuesday, but for Taylor, it’s already been a long week on top of a long season. The Bake Room owner began production out of his bakery in April 2016—just in time to get blown away by demand at the TD Saturday Market in downtown Greenville, as well as the Travelers Rest Farmers Market. At the moment, the Bake Room is just a one-man operation. That means Taylor may spend more than 20 hours on his feet as he works from Friday into Saturday to deliver oven-fresh goods and man the tents at these two markets. That’s on top of baking during the week for local clients like Methodical Coffee and the Village Grind. “Baking’s one of those things where anyone could do this, but do you want to get up at 3:30 a.m. to mix and pull large amounts

of dough?” Taylor asks. As for why he puts in the long and unconventional hours, Taylor offers this: “It fits me. The approach of baking bread, the quiet moments—those are what I enjoy. There’s a peacefulness of coming in when nobody else is on the road. It’s quiet at first, and then it builds over the course of the day. Eventually, it’s this bustling little place.” It’s almost surprising that Taylor is responsible for this entire operation. A thick but neatly trimmed beard disguises some of his youth, but the 2010 graduate of the University of South Carolina still wouldn’t look out of place on campus. Taylor has wide-ranging experiences to draw upon: Snake River Grill and Persephone Bakery (Jackson Hole, Wyoming); Billy Bread Bakery (Richmond, Virginia); a few days staging for Jim Williams at Seven Stars Bakery (Providence, Rhode Island); a workshop at the San Francisco Baking Institute. “When you’re baking a loaf of bread, you want it to be awesome for the person who is maybe buying a crusty loaf for the first time, but you also want it to be awesome for the person who knows more,” Taylor says of his approach to quality. “If Chad Robertson [of San Francisco’s Tartine Bakery] walked in, I’d want him to say, ‘That’s a pretty good loaf.’” “When it all goes right, it’s pretty awesome to pull out decks of bread that are exactly how you imagined,” Taylor says. With all the variables that go into making bread—ingredients, percentages, temperatures, humidity, shaping, proofing—perfection might be an unattainable goal, but it doesn’t stop him from trying. “You’re always striving to make that perfect loaf. That’s what keeps bakers going— knowing that each loaf and each day, there’s an opportunity.” The Bake Room, 1296 Pendleton St, Greenville (864) 735-8539, @sc_bakeroom (Instagram) ))) FIND MORE PHOTOS & VIDEO EXTRAS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

100 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Meet 80 southern makers, learn about their work, and enjoy this celebration of handmade goods. Visit indiecraftparade.com for a complete list of artists.

HUGUENOT MILL AT THE PEACE CENTER 101 West Broad St · Greenville, SC 29601

YOU’RE INVITED TO THE 2016 INDIE CRAFT PARADE

6-9PM FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

The VIP Gala offers an exclusive first look at the artists’ work. Enjoy the opening night of the festival with a relaxed atmosphere, live music, and a chance to win amazing giveaways. Complimentary desserts and drinks (craft beer, cider and coffee) are provided. Tickets $35. Available online at indiecraftparade.com.

Indie Craft Parade is funded in part by the Metropolitan Arts Council which receives support from the City of Greenville, BMW Manufacturing Company, Michelin North America, Inc., SEW Eurodrive and the South Carolina Arts Commission.

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8/17/16 4:10 PM 8/18/16 11:13 AM


OPEN

Bar

Mind of a Bartender Evan Leihy crafts a taste of history / by Blair Knobel // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

FOR HIS OLDFASHIONEDS, LEIHY PREFERS OLD FORESTER BOURBON— “IT’S ALMOST AS IF IT TASTES MORE LIKE BOURBON BECAUSE IT’S YOUNG ENOUGH TO STAND UP TO THE INGREDIENTS OF THE DRINK.” HE SAVES TOP-SHELF LIQUOR FOR NEAT POURS.

W

hen it comes to decisions, Evan Leihy has the Last Word. It’s his favorite cocktail—well, one of them. He’s also fond of the Negroni, that bitter classic made with gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari. As far as drinks go, Leihy is rather a purist. He likes the root of things; less is more. And when he crafts cocktails, he is doing more than making a drink—Leihy’s making history. “Older recipes were popular for a good reason,” he says. “They let everything shine on its own.” Formerly a pastry chef and competitionwinning barista, Leihy’s passion for making cocktails grew from a desire to “create things for people on a one-on-one basis.” This led him to start a cocktail-catering service with a few friends, which grew into his current pursuit, along with Bradley Hagen and Daniel Brown, of opening a pre-Prohibition– style bar in Greenville. They are at the beginning stages of bringing their concept, Swordfish Cocktail Club, into reality. “During the early 1800s until Prohibition, bartending was not a job in between jobs, but a career in and of itself,” he says. “I’m trying to pull from the wisdom of all those generations.” A sentiment that speaks for itself.

NEGRONI

INGREDIENTS 1 oz gin 1 oz Campari 1 oz sweet vermouth  2 orange peels

Bar Keep: Evan Leihy studies cocktail menus from the turn of the twentieth century to craft flavor profiles like the drinks of the past. He and friends hope to open a preProhibition–style bar that will bring historical tastes to the present.

INSTRUCTIONS Pour spirits into a mixing glass and fill with ice; press oil from orange peel over glass and drop in; stir until mixing glass begins to frost; strain over a large cube of ice into an Old Fashioned glass; press oil from second orange peel over glass and drop in to garnish. Evan’s Tip: “Sweet vermouth plays a critical role in a great Negroni. I would recommend Dolin Rouge paired with lighter gins, and Carpano Antica with more robust, juniper-forward gins.”

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5th Annual Benefit

Greenville Polo Classic

GHS Neurological Institute Offering New Help and Hope Sunday, October 23 • Noon Historic Hopkins Farm, Simpsonville Tickets $75 (includes champagne lunch and match) • Fundraising tents available For more information or to purchase tickets, visit greenvillepoloclassic.com.

ghs.org

16-0610TOWN

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8/17/16 1:18 PM


TAP INTO FOOTBALL AT LIBERTY! Watch all the games with us!

CREATIVE TWISTS ON TRADITIONAL AMERICAN FARE HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4PM - 7PM WEEKEND GAME DAY MENU featuring FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM - 3PM

DAILY SPECIALS MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

$12 BITE & FLIGHT NIGHT

1/2 PRICE SELECT WINE NIGHT

PINT NIGHT

$12 BURGER & BREW

$3 LOCAL BREWS

One Shareable Appetizer and a Flight of Beer

By the Glass or Bottle

TAP ROOM TEAM TRIVIA starting at 7:30pm

All Pints $3

Classic Certified Angus Beef® Burger, Seasoned Fries & a Select Pint

Carolina Brews

HOURS OF OPERATION SUNDAY - THURSDAY 11AM - 11PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY 11AM - 12AM

SATURDAY & SUNDAY $3 Bloody Marys & Mimosas All Day

941 SOUTH MAIN STREET DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 864.770.7777 LIBERTYTAPROOM.COM

HANDBAGS FOR HOPE Benefiting the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation

We are dedicated to

SHOP, SOCIALIZE, SAVE LIVES!

improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed

Join us for our 10th annual silent and live auctions of over 100 handbags and valuable gift items. Enjoy great food and Folonari wines!

with the disease and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 6-9 PM

PEACE CENTER Greenville, SC

Tickets are $40 and available at:

www.SCOvarianCancer.org or call 864.373.6306 email: scocfdirector@gmail.com

PHOTO BY DEBORAH TACIAK PHOTOGRAPHY

Huguenot Loft

110-B Edinburgh Court Greenville, SC 29607

104 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

American Grocery AMERICAN AUGUSTA GRILL

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler.

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the Crispy Greenbrier Farms Pork with sweet corn agnolotti, Parmesan cream, tomato jam, and smoked onion powder; next, have an entrée of salt-crusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus, and finish with pastry chef Ben Snyder’s Dark Chocolate Pôt de Créme. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection— along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers. $$, L, D. 631 S. Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR SEPTEMBER 2016 / 105

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DINING

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The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food.” Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 3737300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

Outstanding Service, Excellent Results!

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides; the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and the way God intended.

A Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, realtors® Top Producer!

GINGER SHERMAN, realtor

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com

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8/18/16

Brought from the coast to Greenville, this unusual event focuses on the study of silver and its influence on southern culture. More than 200 silver pieces crafted by eighteenth and nineteenth-century South Carolina artists from the collection of Dawn Corley will be on display. Participants are encouraged to bring one silver item for a verbal appraisal from The Charleston Silver Lady.

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing down the Eastern seaboard on a fresh beach breeze, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

BEER AND PUBS

$-$$, L, D, SBR. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 50 brews on tap.

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROOST

FEES ARE NON-REFUNDABLE

SOBY’S

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Advance registration is required to reserve your place. Space is limited to 25 participants. Parking, lunch, and all materials will be provided.

$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com

DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up freshbaked bread from the café (open daily) or the market’s wine selection. The 1:30peruse PM menu changes daily, but expect expertly prepared dishes like line-caught rainbow trout and pork crepinettes.

$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 5463535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com

FEE: $165 • MEMBER FEE: $150

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beerbutt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens.

RESTAURANT 17

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 • 10 AM-5 PM

1700 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29614 864-770-1331 • www.bjumg.org

$$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

NOSE DIVE

Ca

Ginger 4thS Town Sept16.indd 1

the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list.

SMOKE ON THE WATER

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com

A traditional dive-bar with an inventive menu, Dive ‘N’ Boar caters to barbecuelovers. This neighborhood gastropub has 25 different local beers on tap, specializing in house-infused liquors and locally-sourced cocktails. Stop by on the weekend for live music and a meal, or meet up with friends for drinks on their screened-in patio.

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the post-Drivebaseball crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben—are perfect soul-warming remedies. Designed to transport guests to Ireland, the pub features Dublin-crafted bar and booths, famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, and a warm spirit of hospitality. $$-$$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is walking distance of North Main, featuring

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a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh.

615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com

$-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub sits right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast.

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. Tastemaker Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, housemade shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about.

$-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com

$-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com

THE GREEN ROOM

THE VILLAGE GRIND

$$$, B, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222, highstreethospitality.com/ the-green-room/

$, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

The Green Room’s changing menu features standout dishes for any time of day. Enjoy brunch on the weekend with eggs Benedict or stuffed French toast with raspberry cream cheese. For dinner, the sweet chipotle meatloaf is the ticket. Wash it down with selections from the tap and a premium Belgian/German leaning beer list.

MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday.

FRIDAY Anything Butt Competition Music: The Blue Dogs SATURDAY BBQ Cook-off Music: The Piedmont Boys GHS Kids Zone

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton St, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar.

DELIS & SANDWICHES SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl’s Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, SEPTEMBER 2016 / 107

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DINING

Guide

Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 104 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefsdeli.com

$-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

ETHNIC

EUROPEAN

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room.

$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

Photography by Rebecca Lehde, Inspiro 8 Studios. Architecture by Jennifer Gosnell, Architects NAU.

HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. $$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more.

$$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork, grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com

WWW.AMYEMERY.COM

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

From the savory sweet curry of the chicken rendang to the fresh, updated take on shrimp lo mein, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp married together with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce, then topped with a fried egg.

TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

DISTINCTIVE INTERIORS FOR MODERN LIFESTYLES

$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 933 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-3255

PURPLE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO & SUSHI

A stone’s throw from Fluor Field, this sushi haven serves an Asian mix with Japanese, Korean, Thai, and Asian-fusion entrées. The udon with Prince Edward Island mussels, mahi-mahi with a spicy crawfish glaze, or roasted duck are worthy options. The latter, perfumed with star anise, is roasted to order—and well worth the wait.

DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville favorite. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glace, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), BR (Sat– Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 5090142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 2719895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

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Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching.

made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. With your tots, try a meatloaf sandwich: a thick slice of meatloaf topped with homemade pimiento cheese and served between two slices of grilled ciabatta bread.

$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

$. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

THE TRAPPE DOOR

PIZZA

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 4517490, trappedoor.com

HAS ARRIVED Independently owned, Mexican-inspired

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

FOOD TRUCKS ASADA

The vibrant Latin culture of San Francisco’s Mission District comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote relleno de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in a creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw.

$-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday; food truck schedule varies. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. See your average mac n’ cheese transformed when owner Nicks Thomas stuffs this country comfort inside a mild poblano pepper. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies. (404) 372-2266 CHUCK TRUCK

Like the paint splatters on the truck, the Chuck Truck’s burgers explode with intense flavors delivered by local ingredients. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a freshly ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewoodsmoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com

MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

$. Schedule varies. Twitter: @jb_tingles THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have

HALF-PRICE MARGARITAS

MONDAY-FRIDAY, 4-7PM & SATURDAY 11-7PM

@cantina76 ONE City Plaza, 103 N. Main St. #101, Greenville • 864-631-2914 • www.cantina76.com

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, and now at a new, second location near Cleveland Park, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pizzas made Cantina Town Sept16 4thS v2.indd from local ingredients. Try a signature pie like the Tommy, with creamy roasted garlic sauce, mozzarella, pecorino romano, caramelized onions, mushrooms, spinach, and peppadew peppers. Don’t neglect dessert, either. The homemade ice cream (in a bowl, or in a float) is a throwback treat that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben and Jerry.

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$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-1406; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 5580235, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

Sunday Brunch both locations 11 am - 2:30 pm GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More!

J.B. TINGLE’S

J.B. Tingle’s “Farm to Fender” mantra puts local farms first. This food truck bases their weekly menu on the freshest ingredients available from surrounding Upstate farms. Next time, try the hurricane veggie-buttered panini: grilled Great Harvest white bread, melt-in-your-mouth havarti cheese, Thai basil aioli, and farm-fresh veggies. Or, if you can find JBT around brunch, grab the shindig breakfast taco—the perfect companion to a mimosa. Follow JBT’s Twitter account for weekly schedules.

Image by Spencer Stanton

Come say “Hi!” to owners Jeb, Rob, Craig and Chad over imaginative tacos and hand-crafted margaritas!

Book your private party with us! Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously. ))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 608B South Main St. · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday

www.ChicoraAlley.com

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September 8–24 Thurs–Sat, 8 p.m.; Sun, 3 p.m. Centre Stage

7–28

FIDELITY MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES

Paying homage to the drive-in days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks outdoors in scenic Falls Park. More social than Netflix and less irritating than the sticky floors of the movie theater, it’s the best way to settle under the stars and welcome autumn. Grab some fare from the food trucks on site, just leave Fido at home. Falls Park on the Reedy, Greenville. Wed, 8pm. Free. (864) 467-4485, greenvillesc.gov/210/ Fidelity-Moonlight-Movies

A starving artist fakes his death to escape his debt , then returns in disguise as his fictional twin sister. Further complications and laughter will certainly follow.

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SEPTEMBER

IS HE DEAD?

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Photograph by Escobar Photography, LLC., courtesy of Centre Stage

HE DEAD? 8–24 ISThough it was written towards the latter end of the nineteenth century, it would take more than a hundred years for Mark Twain’s satirical play to hit the Broadway stage. When failed painter Jean-Francois Millet finds himself in debt to a greedy art dealer, the young artist is forced to take drastic measures—including faking his own death—to settle up. Is he dead? Is he wearing heels? Find the answer to these burning questions and more . . . Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

DIARY OF ANNE 8–25 THE FRANK She may have been only 15 when her life came to an end, but Anne Frank has continued to live on for decades through the powerful voice of her diary. Based on Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl published in 1947, the play adaptation brings Mrs. Van Daan, Otto, Peter, and the rest of the hidden characters to life through the eyes of a girl living in a time of turmoil. Strongwilled and full of moxie, Anne continues to be an idol for generations. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC.

Wed, 2pm & 7:30pm; Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $32$43. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

SAFARI 9:SIPPIN’ Having more than a few cocktails on a Friday night may leave you feeling like an animal, but how about actually partaking in a party with the animals? This annual event supports the Friends of the Greenville Zoo program, mixing cocktails with cockatoos to fund our beloved hometown creatures. There will be zoo tours for visitors, musical acts, and a silent auction loaded with plenty of must-have items. Baboon imitations are strongly discouraged. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Fri, 6:309:30pm. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

AN EVENING WITH CHRIS THILE September 13, 7:30 p.m. $24–$45. The Peace Center If you’re looking for a pure mélange of bluegrass and folk, Chris Thile will delight along with his arsenal of instruments in tow.

Unfortunately, Game of Thrones might have given us the wrong idea of just how much “fun” the Middle Ages were; however the real Renaissance is one of timeless tradition and nobility. You know, except for that whole plague thing. This annual event invites guests of all ages to don their best royal duds and take in a live performance, shop in the marketplace, fight in combat, and, of course, dig into some old timey grub. Fresh turkey legs included. The Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1135 State Park Rd, Greenville. Fri, 5–11pm; Sat, 10am–6pm. $8-$22. theenchantedchalice.com

9–11:ASHEVILLE GOOMBAY FESTIVAL The temperatures may finally be cooling down (Hallelujah!) but things are heating up for this annual Asheville soirée. Honoring the vibrant Caribbean and African communities in North Carolina, the Goombay Festival packs a cultural punch with three days of live performances, native cuisine, and local vendors. The best part? You don’t even need a passport. Roger McGuire Green at Pack Square Park, 1 Pack Square, Asheville, NC. Fri, 5–10pm; Sat, 10am–10pm; Sun, 1–6pm. Free. ashevillegoombayfestival.com

BEAUTY 9–25:DISNEY’S AND THE BEAST In most circumstances, talking to candlesticks named Lumiere might land you a one-way ticket to the looney bin. But this is Disney, so it’s fine. Drawing upon the classic animated film, the cast of the Spartanburg Little Theatre will present this tale as old as time for audiences of all ages. Just try not to engage your shower curtain in a political discussion when you get home. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

CARLILE 10:BRANDI Self-taught on both the piano and guitar, singer and songwriter Brandi Carlile has struck gold with fans for her folksy sound, gritty vocals, 114 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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and commanding lyrical storytelling. Carlile has already mastered the realms of country, rock, and alternative music, receiving critical praise across the board from NPR to the Grammy Awards. She will be joined at this special outdoor concert by acoustic and soft rock maven Greg Holden. The Meadow, 12 Old Charlotte Hwy, Asheville, NC. Sat, 7pm. Advance, $30; doors, $35. (828) 398-1837, theorangepeel.net

EVENING WITH 13:AN CHRIS THILE

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

For a guy from California, musician Chris Thile has certainly made himself comfortable in the world of bluegrass and folk. And he’s got plenty of street cred under his belt; Thile has been a longtime member of acoustic trio Nickel Creek as well as Punch Brothers, and is slated to take over A Prairie Home Companion after Garrison Keillor’s retirement this year. With an arsenal of talents that include the

mandolin, vocals, piano, and more, this songwriter is guaranteed to impress. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

VOLUNTEER 13–21 THE Centre Stage’s collection of plays “Fringe Series” is proud to debut the world premiere of The Volunteer, written by C. Kay “Andy” Landis. Inside the confines of a high-security women’s prison, a dedicated graduate student and a hardened inmate come face to face for a psychology research project. But there’s more on each of their minds than simply “getting to know you,” and when things go on lockdown for the night, the game of deception begins. Center Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

FOLDS 15:BEN Best known for his quirky musical style and ability to transcend the boundaries of any genre, Ben

Folds has found success as both onethird of the indie rock band Ben Folds Five and as a solo artist. After charting at #42 in the Billboard 200 with 2001’s “Rockin’ the Suburbs,” Folds has since worked as a producer and collaborator with everyone from the Dresden Dolls to Sara Bareilles. A man and his piano—is there any greater love in life? The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

16–17:

SPARTOBERFEST Sure, you’ve heard of Oktoberfest. But have you ever been to a SpartOberfest? It’s the inaugural year for this event, but they’ll still be serving up all your familiar favorites including strudel, hot pretzels, and grilled bratwurst, not to mention Beck’s and select brews from the city’s own RJ Rockers. Slated to perform at the festhalle are local legends True Blues, the Foothills Oompah Band, and rocker Alex Hunnicutt. Jesus, Our Risen Savior Catholic Church,

2575 Reidville Rd, Spartanburg. Fri, 5–9:30pm; Sat, 11am–9:30pm. spartoberfest.com

HOME 16–18:SOUTHERN & GARDEN SHOW Ladies, you may have to work around your husband as he plants himself on the couch for an 8-hour football binge during home improvement season, but there’s no better place to snap up a few fresh ideas than the Southern Home & Garden Show. Whether you’re looking to expand your closets, install a pool, put on a new roof, or simply give your home a little facelift, you’re guaranteed to leave with some design inspiration. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 12–5pm. Adults, $7; seniors, $5; under 12, free. (864) 254-0135, southernhomeandgardenshow. com

2222 Augusta Street, Suite 7 Greenville, SC 29605

16 Thru Oct 2:

FOOTLOOSE THE MUSICAL A town that bans loud music might be

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helpful when the next over-played pop single hits the airwaves, but give us dancing or give us death. When fasttalking bad boy Ren moves to the small town of Bomont, he teaches the town how to cut loose—much to the chagrin of the town’s uptight minister. Featuring original songs like “Somebody’s Eyes” along with ’80s hits “Holding Out for a Hero” and “Let’s Hear it for the Boy,” it won’t be long before you’re a little footloose yourself. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

16 Thru Oct 8: URINETOWN

THE 2016 TRIUMPH STREET TWIN

STARTING AT $8,700*

You may feel like paying $10 for a Chipotle burrito is torture enough— not to mention $2 for guacamole is basically highway robbery—but imagine having to shell out a few bucks just to use the toilet. Such is the case in this darkly comedic play written by Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann. A fictional city suffering a water shortage finds itself at the mercy of a money-hungry company that charges citizens under a pay-to-pee system. Bobby Strong becomes an unlikely hero in the tale, launching a risky revolution to relieve the bladder pressure of his hometown. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

Sept 16–Oct 8; $35. The Warehouse Theatre Imagine having to pay for one of humanity’s most basic needs: the restroom. With a ban on private toilets, no one is free from the new law—until a local hero takes a stand.

ANNUAL 17 5TH PRESERVATION RIDE Held on a course favored by local cycling celebrity George Hincapie, the Preservation Ride includes two other courses that are fit for athletes of any skill level. Stages roam through the breathtaking pastures of the Greenspace Fairview along the North Pacolet River. Following the serene yet stimulating ride, cyclists can dig into a fully catered lunch at Strawberry Hill USA and mingle with other athletes for new tips and tricks. Strawberry Hill USA, 3097 SC-11, Chesnee. Sat, 7am-3pm. $40. upstateforever.org/ preservation-ride

FRESH FAIR 17–18:FARM The word entrepreneur does not typically draw to mind a farmland teeming with animals and greenery. Nevertheless, the Farm Fresh Fair is dedicated to opening doors for the purveyors of handcrafted goods, homemade eats, and everything organic. Benefitting the Upstate’s Habitat for Humanity programs, the day will feature antique shopping, artisan crafts, farm fare, and even live music. Pick up some eats or just a home accent—it is all in the good faith of shopping local. The Farm at Rabon Creek, 125 Phillips Ln, Fountain Inn. Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 11am– 4pm. Adults, $5; juniors, $2. thefarmatraboncreek.com

Photograph courtesy of the Indie Craft Parade

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Photograph courtesy of the Warehouse Theatre

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than deep-fried hamburgers and getting trapped in the Gravitron for 2 to 10 hours. The South Greenville Fair will showcase prize-winning chickens, horses, beef, and rabbits from across the Upstate, and select a special Fair Queen to reign over it all. There will also be competitions in artwork, engine-tractors, and a BBQ rib cook-off. Fingerlickin’ food and free admission— what more could you ask for? Simpsonville City Park, 100 Park Dr, Simpsonville. Sat, 8:30am. Free. southgreenvillefair.com

Lindsay Louise McPhail pottery; photograph by Ben McKamey

GREENVILLE FAIR 17 SOUTH There’s so much more to fairs

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CRAFT 17–18 INDIE PARADE Much more exciting than sitting at home and painstakingly trying to stay inside the lines of your adult coloring book, the Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the Southeast, with medias ranging from paper goods to leather to unique wearables. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so join the Parade! Huguenot Mill, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Sat, 9am–6pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. $2. makerscollective. org/indiecraftparade

18–19

2016 LEGACY LIONS GOLF CLASSIC & GALA

Since opening its doors in 2010, the Legacy Charter School has been a gateway for underserved areas of the urban community, providing a unique and structured educational environment that strives for success in every student. The Golf Classic & Gala is an opportunity to support this innovative institution; whether you glam it up at the gala and auction event on Sunday or tee off Monday

singer Hailee Steinfeld. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $23-$156. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

22–25 EUPHORIA There are some things that go hand-in-hand in the Upstate: rich, robust wines taste their best when complemented by Greenville’s most appetizing and delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef experiences, cooking panels, and tastings, the festival has plenty to please your senses. Locations, times vary. Prices vary. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

PURE MASERATI DESIGN, DOWN TO THE FINEST DETAIL.

FOR HOPE 23 HANDBAGS Shopping, dining, and a great cause? We’re there. The 10th annual Handbags for Hope event will benefit the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation, inviting guests for a fabulous evening of both silent and

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INDIE CRAFT PARADE

Photograph courtesy of the Indie Craft Parade

September 17–18; Sat, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sun, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $2. Huguenot Mill Make sure to stop by or stay a while at this weekend-long showcase of the most talented artisans from across the South. From fine art to fiber arts and everything beyond, there are handmade treasures to be found everywhere you look.

morning, you’ll be doing something great in the name of learning. Gala: The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Sun, 6–9pm, $75; tournament: Green Valley Country Club or Furman University Golf Club. Mon, 8:30am. $300-$1,000. legacycharterschool.com/ legacy-golf-classic.php

20

MEGHAN TRAINOR

Are you all about that bass? Do you shun the thought of even a little treble? Well, you can thank Meghan Trainor. After the smashing triumph of her first single in 2014, Trainor his since followed up with a string of hits that reflect her love for the bubblegum sounds of the ’50s and ’60s. Now well into this year’s “Untouchable” tour, Trainor has extended her run through North America alongside opening acts Common Kings and “Love Myself”

ATHLETIC. ADVENTUROUS. ATTRACTIVE.

live auctions featuring more than 110 items to select from. Capping off the night will be plenty of flowing cocktails, delicious appetizers, and the opportunity to win big with gifts from local retailers. Huguenot Mill, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Fri, 6–9pm. $40. scovariancancer.org

Elegance, strength, boldness. The Levante embodies the soul of Maserati, and symbolizes the absolute best of Italian design. A unique, innovative SUV style, combining spaciousness with coupé lines, while maintaining a proud link to the Maserati tradition. Starting From $83,000*

ANNUAL 23–24 6TH MAULDIN

SOOIEBBQ COOKOFF

Ever since the dawn of time, legions of BBQ connoisseurs have hotly debated what makes the most succulent meat. Beef or pork? Mustard or vinegar? Whole hog or shoulder? Decide for yourself at this BBQ competition sponsored by the City of Mauldin. Enjoy plates heaped high with tantalizing cuts on Saturday, but be sure to stop by on Friday for the “Anything Butt” challenge, where rivals will plate to impress a variety of homemade side dishes.

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Scene Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 11am–3pm. Free admission. mauldinbbq.com

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Narrated by Greenville native Edwin McCain, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s 69th season will open with a special commemoration of Conductor Edvard Tchivzhel’s absconding from the socialist Soviet Union. The evening will feature the first piece the master maestro ever performed in our fine city— Tchaikovsky’s Third Symphony— followed by a rousing incarnation of Aaron Copland’s Lincoln Portrait and a peppy finale courtesy of George Gerswhin. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 467-3000, greenvillesymphony.org A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE & MURDER September 27–October 2; Tues–Thurs, 7:30 p.m.; Fri, 8 p.m.; Sat, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sun, 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. The Peace Center With his sight set on the family fortune, Monty Navarro decides to do whatever it takes to ensure he is the heir. Hilariously dark with a dash of romance, this performance will certainly be top drawer.

S O U T H

plotting the demise of eight relatives with weights, bees, and poison; it’s like Final Destination without those nettlesome premonitions. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm: Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

OUT HUNGER 29:ROCK Rock n’ roll and spirits go together like . . . well, rock n’ roll and spirits. Jam along with the soulful stylings of Atlanta’s own Drivin’ N Cryin’ while sampling the wares of the Upstate’s top ten distilleries. Proceeds from the evening will directly benefit the local Loaves and Fishes, a program that collects and distributes food items to local pantries in need. Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7–10pm. Basic ticket, $20; tasting ticket, $35. (864) 232-3595, loavesandfishesgreenville.com/roh/

27 Thru Oct 2: A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO

29:SCHUBERTIAD What better way to celebrate

The Peace Center kicks off its 2016–2017 Broadway season with this Tony Award–winning musical crafted by Steven Lutvak and Robert L. Freedman. This humorous jaunt through the conniving, villainous schemes of Monty Navarro will leave you in stitches—and a few of his family members in body bags. Blinded by dollar signs, Monty sets about

the Peace Center’s new Chamber Concert Series than with a special tribute to one of the world’s most revered composers: Franz Schubert. The American Chamber players will be joined by guest artists including soprano singer Kyoko Saito, double bassist Ian Bracchitta, pianist Reiko Uchida, and Brice Andrus on horn to present a collection of Schubert’s most intimate pieces.

LOVE & MURDER

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

TOWN

C A R O L I N A

OUR 2016-2017 SPONSORS

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Gunter Theatre, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

29 Thru Oct 2: OKTOBERFEST

Let’s be honest: Oktoberfest festivals are basically like Halloween for adults. Except with beer instead of candy. Well, technically both, since you’re an adult and can have candy any time you want. Be there on Thursday when the first ceremonial keg gets tapped, and continue the festivities into the weekend with plenty of hearty Bavarian cuisine, music acts, and stiff Wettbewerb. That’s German for contest—good luck pronouncing that after a few mugs of Paulaner. NOMA Square, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 5–9pm; Fri–Sun, 11am–10pm. nomasquare.com/oktoberfest/

ANNUAL OFA 30:3RD SPOTLIGHT GALA

There is an underground culture in the United States, one that often remains hidden until advocacy groups and other organizations prod it out into the daylight. One such group is Operation Freedom Awareness, a nonprofit that operates out of Greenville and is dedicated to eradicating the dark evil of human trafficking. This annual gala is designed to raise funds for OFA’s operations, offering cocktails, hors

d’oeuvres, dancing, and personal testimony to get you in the mood for giving. The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Fri, 7-11pm. $45. (864) 663-3480, ofamission.org/event/ 3rd-annual-spotlight-gala/

Oct 7–9

SYMPHONY TOUR OF HOMES

No one can truthfully say they don’t enjoy a peek into someone else’s house—can you say real-life HGTV? Whether it’s an elegant mansion or an energy-efficient home, this tour is sure to satisfy your interior decoration craving. From White Oaks, residence of Furman University’s president, to a modern sustainable home, guests will enjoy a wide range of styles on this tour. With proceeds benefitting the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, this neighborhood trek may just ignite a desire to redecorate. Green Valley area. Fri–Sat, 10am–4pm; Sun, 1–4pm. Advance, $20; day of, $25. (864) 370-0965, guildGSO.org/tour-of-homes/

SOUTH CAROLINA ARTISAN FOOD EVENT

featuring slow batch foods from around the state

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 • 4-8PM 300 Randall Street, Greer 29651

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Healing Hands for Arthritis®

SEPTEMBER 28

Love Your Carpet…

Again!

IKE’S

128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

PELHAM HILLS (864) 288-1150

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CARPET • RUG • UPHOLSTERY CLEANING ———— RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL ————

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Four days of great eats including Bratwurst, Currywurst, German Waffle Fries with Sauerbraten, and of course, Pretzels! Look for live music, contests, the Paulaner beer truck, and an authentic Bavarian biergarten on North Main. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for more details! @NOMASquare #NOMAOktoberfest

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Beauty

is our Best Amenity Of course we have wi-fi, down bedding, thick cotton robes, and turn down service, but it’s the amenities on the outside of the hotel that make us one of a kind.

Call for Reservations: 828-733-4311

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TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine.

Estates

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4BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1321042 · $549,000 Wilson Associates Angela Rodriguez (864) 609-7219 wilsonassociates.net

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SECOND

Glance

An Honest Take Seminal documentarian Walker Evans shows at the High Museum of Art

D

ocumentary, at its core, is an exploration of honesty—a reminder of what’s real in a world too often romanticized. Walking the lines between reality and idealism, honesty and flattery, Walker Evans pioneered the documentary tradition in American photography with breathtaking accuracy. At the turn of the twentieth century, Evans managed to capture the soul of America, including the despair of the Great Depression. His work inspired a slew of photographers from Helen Levitt to Robert Frank, and his particular style defined a movement. Balancing the spiritual and pragmatic, modern documentary work still echoes the words of the progenitor himself, “Good photography is unpretentious.” —Hayden Arrington Walker Evans’s Depth of Field will be on display through September 11 at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. For more information, visit high.org. Credits (clockwise from top left): Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975), Coal Loader, Havana, 1933, gelatin silver print. Collection of Marian and Benjamin A. Hill. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975), Truck and Sign, 1930, gelatin silver print. Yale University Art Gallery, Everett V. Meeks, B.A. 1901, Fund, 2009.163.1. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975), Alabama Cotton Tenant Farmer Wife, 1936, printed 1971, gelatin silver print. High Museum of Art, Atlanta, purchase with funds from a friend of the Museum, 74.82 L. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Walker Evans (American, 1903–1975), West Virginia Living Room, 1935, gelatin silver print. High Museum of Art, Atlanta, purchase with funds from the Atlanta Foundation, 75.45. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

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At Dillard-Jones, we believe that when your vision is combined with our design-build process and our interior design experience—we can create a custom home beyond your expectations.

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TOWN Sept. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN Sept. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com