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THE

FALL STYLE ISSUE

Material

Possession BREAK INTO THE FINEST LAYERS, TEXTURES, TWISTS & TURNS OF THE SEASON

OCTOB ER 2 016 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Haywood Mall - Greenville, SC 864.288.9752

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TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE HEUER 01 Four world championships and two league MVP awards. Forty-six game winning drives. The longest winning streak in NFL history. Tom Brady is a champion, and champions never crack under pressure.

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The Word on the Street… in 29607

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong Owner, Broker in Charge 864-325-2112

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Joan@AugustaRoad.com *Greenville’s Number One Realtor, for the past FOUR years. Source: MLS Sales Volume, 2015, 2014, 2013 & 2012

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FIRST

Glance

Fields of Gold: Where: The rolling expanse of a former Aiken, South Carolina, plantation is now the beautiful grounds of equestrian-welcoming bed and breakfast Magnolia Shadows. What: Italian expat Andrea Cerofolini exchanged his busy city life for a backcountry dream. For the story, see page 46. Photograph by Katie Fiedler

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Night Lights: Where: Chihuly in the Garden exhibition at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, on display through October 30, 2016. What: Fiori Boat and Niijima Floats, one of 19 installation sites highlighting the kaleidoscopic creations of glass sculptor Dale Chihuly. For the story, see page 50. Photograph courtesy of the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Be soft but strong. stfrancishealth.org/women

OCTOBER 2016 / 9

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THE TONY-WINNING BROADWAY PHENOMENON MAKES ITS GREENVILLE PREMIERE!

WINNER! FIVE 2015 TONY AWARDS®

BEST I

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PLAY

OCTOBER 25-30

Z A K I R H U S S A I N , TA B L A WITH

N I L A D R I K U M A R , S I TA R

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JULIE FOWLIS

MASTERPIECES

OCTOBER 21

Major, Minor, and Modern NOVEMBER 3

Music of the Scottish Isles

AN EVENING WITH

KEB’ MO’ BAND OCTOBER 13

NOVEMBER 23

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY TODAY! Learn more at peacecenter.org/specialevents

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

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Contents THE LIST 21 See, hear, read, react.

The month’s must-dos.

THE TOWN 27 ON Pics of the litter:

Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

41 WEDDINGS 47 TOWNBUZZ Married metalworkers Ben Gilliam

and Danielle Miller mold sculptures and make jewelry, respectively; Matt Crowder wraps wrists in strapping style with Jack Foster watch bands; and more.

50

TOP BUNK

Refined comfort coupled with Dale Chihuly’s color-filled creations make for an exquisite experience at Atlanta’s RitzCarlton.

58 Construction worker turned sewing TOWN EXTRA

wonder, Eric Brockman is following the thread of his mother’s tailoring talents.

CENTRAL 63 STYLE From Carolina to California, design

queen Kelly Wearstler introduces new natural interiors; Southern Tide conveys coastal vibes with its Main Street debut; and more.

MAN ABOUT TOWN 74 When the Man employs his writing skills to boost a friend’s dating profile, they’re both unprepared for the assortment of suitors that ensue.

78

GET AWAY

Downtown Manhattan’s Dream Hotel is a beat-dropping, cocktail-shopping, neverstopping, hard-party paradise.

107

EAT & DRINK

117

DINING GUIDE

124

TOWNSCENE

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SECOND GLANCE

00 1

MATERIAL OBSESSION

Fall fashion takes on fabricated feels and tangible textures, inspired by the Upstate’s rich history in textile production. / styling by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

THE PEACE OF WILD THINGS

Throughout the ages, birds have long been symbols of hope and peace, characteristics that sculptor Grainger McKoy encapsulates in not just his art, but his life as well. / by Abby Moore Keith // photography by Katie Fiedler

Lunch in a crunch at Caviar & Bananas; Lattice Pies turns local treats into decadent sweets; and the secret to the season’s savory sorghum syrup.

Got plans? You do now. Sydney Cross perceives reality through print in her exhibit Perpetual/Surrender.

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THIS PAGE: Spools of vibrant thread line the walls of Eric and Lila Brockman’s Tailor Shop. For more, see “Prodigal Son,” page 58. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

COVER: Model Ashtyn Lowery wears a Lari romper by Karina Grimaldi, available for purchase at J. Britt, $284. For more, see “Material Obsession,” page 82. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Enjoying the drive is always in season. 2017 C-Class Coupe

Not just a cut above. A coupe ahead. The 2017 C300 Coupe. Seductive lines slice the wind and the clutter of ordinary cars. Sculpted muscle and a confident stance put emotion into motion. Athletic yet elegant, clean yet impeccably detailed, it’s pure MercedesBenz. And like nothing you’ve ever seen. Starting at $42,650.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter Style editor Laura Linen gets crafty with models Brittainy Gardin and Ashtyn Lowery.

Photograph by Will Crooks

))) For digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

Depth of Style

E

very year around July, when I begin to consider the trajectory of our Fall Style Issue, I’m faced with a conundrum: how can we tell a different fashion story? This time, instead of fitting an idea into a box, we allowed the materials themselves to do the talking, the literal building blocks of style. Yet, fashion is more than material; it is substance. It delivers the essence of a person, as well as a defining presence. It is simultaneously abstract and practical, original and trendy. It allows us to feel part of a collective, a movement. Part of the prep crowd. Part of the in-crowd. Part of the hip crowd. Fashion is more than function—it is creative expression, art on human display. Some prefer an understated approach, while others take pleasure (and pride) in their outlandish costumes. While many of our stories this issue reflect what is tangible—clothing, accessories, objects—they equally define what isn’t. We assign meaning to items—the weight of a wedding band, the appeal of a brand name— because the message matters. Elegant, edgy, feminine, delicate, preppy, and sexy are characterizations of feeling as much as they are of design. Textiles inspire the looks in our annual fall fashion spread: denim, lace, prints, wool. This is our largest style presentation to date—16 pages—and our most varietal (see “Material Obsession,” page 82). Though we exalt materials this issue, not all references have sartorial concerns. We also celebrate the life and work of sculptor Grainger McKoy, who crafts impossibly detailed, emotive birds out of wood and metals in his Sumter-based studio. The Greenville County Museum of Art is currently showing McKoy’s diverse oeuvre in different stages of flight, which simultaneously represent grace, resilience, vulnerability, and power. For McKoy, who studied zoology at Clemson and who’s an avid outdoorsman, these birds aren’t just representations or decoys—they are metaphors for the richness, beauty, and ephemerality of life (see “The Peace of Wild Things,” page 100). Being materialistic is often cast in a poor light. But, if we redefine the term, reconsider its meaning, then perhaps we’ll understand that it is the first layer to finding depth in our (material) world.

Makeup designer Isabelle Schreier and style editor Laura Linen put the finishing touches on our cover model Ashtyn Lowery.

Photographs (left and top right) by Will Crooks

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @lbknobel

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William Charles Anthony Frerichs (1829 – 1905) Hunters on the Linville River, circa 1860

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A WORLD OF STORIES AWAITS AT THE GCMA. On view through December 11, 2016!

The Poetry of Place

From the colorful streets of New Orleans to the undulant Smoky Mountains, this exhibition invites you to re-discover America, where a picture is truly worth a thousand words.

To learn more about GCMA exhibitions and events, visit gcma.org.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

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admission free

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Imagination is the beginning of creation.

MARK B. JOHNSTON PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

-George Bernard Shaw

WHAT IS YOUR ESSENTIAL WARDROBE ITEM?

“Navy blue Peter Millar blazer.”

BLAIR KNOBEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR Abby Moore Keith EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

“Jeans. I prefer understatement with a standout piece, like a great top, shoes, scarf, or earrings.”

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka HEIDI CORYELL WILLIAMS

“A light-weight layering jacket. I own at least a dozen of these!”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, John Jeter, Kathleen Nalley & Stephanie Trotter CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Katie Fiedler, Whitney Fincannon, JAKE KNIGHT, Cameron Reynolds, & Eli Warren

“The Express 1MX, ‘extra slim fit’ button-up shirt. It’s available for every season in a variety of colors and matching ties. It can be worn with a three-piece suit, or you can roll up the sleeves and pair it with some shorts. I probably own 20 of them. Dryclean only.”

EDITORIAL INTERN Olivia McCall EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Andrew Haung Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen

“A neutral military style vest. It can be paired with jeans and booties or a patterned dress for a little more oomph.”

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Johnston, ANNIE LANGSTON, NICOLE MULARSKI, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes

“A great pair of jeans!”

Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com Danielle Car DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER

j. dabney peeples

design a ssociates, inc.

Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

www.thecollinsgroup.org

864.859.3425

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 10) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

120 E. Round Hill Road | Green Valley | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 23 acres | MLS 1317041

101 Woodland Way | Alta Visa Area | $1,550,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1322062

111 Rockingham Road | Parkins Mill | $2,250,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1312091

NEW

G

LISTIN

221 Cureton Street | Augusta Road Area | $967,500 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1313889

20 Ferncreek Lane | 3+ acres | $979,500 3 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath

312 Crescent Avenue | Alta Vista | $949,500 3 bedooms, 5 full baths | MLS 1329569

401 Crepe Myrtle Ct. | Willow Creek | $489,000 4 bedooms, 4 full baths | MLS 1319890

17 W. Prentiss Avenue | Augusta Road Area | $895,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1316669

607 McDaniel Avenue | Alta Vista | $998,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 13063041

CT

NTRA

R CO UNDE

12 Landsdown | Alta Vista | $463,500 3 bedooms, 3 full baths | MLS 1327925

213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $785,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 29601 www.wycheco.com 864.270.2440

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114 Woodland Way | Alta Vista | $954,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1327445

Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

864-270-2440 mwyche@wycheco.com

864-640-1929 lmcdonald@wycheco.com

Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

864-630-0826 bjohnson@wycheco.com

864-201-6001 swithington@wycheco.com

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A growing neighborhood town center that welcomes everyone. Whether you visit, work or live here, Legacy Square is blossoming into a shining centerpiece filled with a thoughtful collection of local shops and services for all. Located at the heart of Verdae’s high-growth area, this multi-phase town center surrounds the northeast end of Legacy Park and will ultimately include 13 acres of quality commercial development that provides accessibility and convenience to area residents and more.

Join the Expanding List of Businesses Holliday Dental YMCA at Verdae *Stella’s Southern Brasserie Majik Touch Lockers Park View at Verdae NHE Property Management

Wagner Wealth Management Caldwell Constructors KDS Commercial Properties Dwayne Wood Architects Kathy Lenser Interiors Verdae Development

*Opening early 2017

Legacy Square Phase 2 design by DP3 Architects

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Rocky Slope Road at Legacy Park New storefronts are taking shape & Phase 2 development is underway. For sales and leasing info, call (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

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October 2016 THE AVETT BROTHERS

Photograph by Crackerfarm

Known for their down-home, folksy sound and revelrous live performances, the North Carolina natives have rocked and rolled their way through nine studio albums, numerous international tours, and award nominations across the board. Now the footstomping Southerners are celebrating the release of True Sadness, their latest album that topped the Billboard 200 at #3. If you’ve loved them since Mignonette or are just now joining the Avett train, a good time is guaranteed. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, Oct 29, 8pm. $42-$58. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

OCTOBER 2016 / 21

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If you’re a warm-blooded beach bum vehemently protesting the coming of colder temperatures, we’ve got you covered. In collaboration with Barb Blair and Bracken Sansbury of Knack Studios, Jacksonville, Florida–based artist Madeleine Peck-Wagner will present a month-long exhibition titled These Days Are Perfect, an exploration of late summer’s last languid days. Peck-Wagner’s mixed-media drawings depict different animals at the switch of the seasons, all presented at an artist reception that will have you longing for those luxurious summer sensations.

Photograph courtesy of Knack Studios

Knack Studios, 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. Fri, Oct 7, 6–9pm. (864) 412-8361, knackstudios.com

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BRANFORD MARSALIS QUARTET WITH SPECIAL GUEST KURT ELLING Ever since the first vibrant notes floated over New Orleans in the early years of the twentieth century, jazz has been a staple of American culture. As one of its most famous practitioners, Branford Marsalis has carved out his niche playing the sax alongside the New York Philharmonic, Buckshot LeFonque, and the North Carolina Symphony. Marsalis’ quartet will be joined onstage by another standout star in the jazz world; Kurt Elling, who is known for his smooth, searing vocal presence. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, Oct 4, 7:30pm. $35-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

This might be Oktoberfest, but that doesn’t mean you need to get drunk and start chucking Schnitzel at the cellist. Instead, delight your ears with the melodic sounds of German composers like Handel, Beethoven, and Brahms while sampling a few festive beers from Thomas Creek Brewery during this unique fall celebration. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Oct 7–9. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $44. (864) 467-3000, greenvillesymphony.org

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Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

THESE DAYS ARE PERFECT

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S OKTOBERFEST

Photograph by Ernest Rawlins, courtesy of Greenville Symphony Orchestra

THE


THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

Based on the award-winning piece of fiction written by Mark Haddon, this Broadway sensation has taken the world by storm since its 2012 premiere. Stepping away from the first-person perspective showcased in the novel, the story is developed around the writings of Christopher John Francis Boone, an insanely brilliant but socially awkward protagonist. When he’s accused of killing his neighbor’s precious pooch, Boone vows to find the real murderer—even if the answer is closer than he thinks.

There’s no harm in pretending for a day that you drive a custom Ferrari instead of your mom’s ’98 Taurus. Each year, this gearhead meetup attracts thousands of entries and spectators from around the world to honor the best in European machinery, pick up auto-care tips, and even partake in spectacular wine tastings. The British roadster will be the superstar of the 2016 festival, honoring those tiny vehicles that still pack a punch. Those who feel the need for luxury speed can check out the supercar area; maybe, if you’re real, real good, you can get a test drive. The Preserve at Verdae, 650 Verdae Blvd, Greenville. Oct 21–22. Fri–Sat. Advance, $10; day of, $15. euroautofestival.com

FALL FOR GREENVILLE Our city on the Reedy is growing more each year, but you can’t call yourself a true Greenvillian until you’ve attended this annual autumn festival. Not only do the top dining spots get the opportunity to wow the masses with their signature culinary abilities, the spirit of competition is alive and well with contests for best dessert, cocktail mix-off, and best entrée. The Marcus King Band, Shooter Jennings, and Steel Toe Stiletto are slated to take to the fest’s various stages, not to mention cooking classes with the experts and a garden filled with the best kind of flower—one that comes in a frosted glass. Downtown Greenville. Oct 14–16. Fri, 5–11pm; Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, Noon–7pm. Free. fallforgreenville.net

Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Oct 25–30. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

EURO AUTO FESTIVAL

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You Dream. We Build.

Visit our model homes in the Upstate. Greenville & Upstate 864-655-7702

Mountains & Lake Keowee 864-836-3090

ARHUpstateSC.com Sales and Marketing by Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C.Dan Joyner REALTORS® American Eagle Builders, Inc., an Independent Franchise

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List z

THE

Quick HITS HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

z In celebration of the Hispanic and Latino legacies in South Carolina, a number of cultural events will be held around the Upstate. Check out an art exhibit at the Metropolitan Arts Council, gorge on regional fare and entertainment at the Noche de Gala, or learn about the educational obstacles facing immigrants in the U.S. at Café Con Leche. There’s plenty to do, so start planning your calendar now. Times, locations vary. Thru Oct 15. Prices vary. hispanicheritagemonthsc.com

ALBINO SKUNK MUSIC FESTIVAL

z Never fear the name—Albino Skunk is much more about showcasing funky fresh music than funky fresh forest creatures with a spraying complex. This family-friendly celebration of homegrown talents attracts fans of all ages for a weekend of live music including Bottle Rockets, Front Country, and Lilly Winwood. Overnight patrons can make use of the area’s campgrounds for the full Skunk experience, which also includes all your favorite food trucks and a craft beer garden on tap. Photograph by Chuck Arlund, courtesy of the Peace Center

4063 Jordan Rd, Greer. Oct 6–8. Thurs–Sat. Times and prices vary. albinoskunk.com

SYMPHONY TOUR OF HOMES

z Get a sneak peek inside some of the Upstate’s most regal homes—without breaking and entering. This year’s event is hosted by the Green Valley Estates community, and will feature several traditional-style mansions like the White Oaks property in addition to a newer “green” abode. As always, the tour will kick off with a celebratory patron party, held on October 4th from 7–9 p.m., with live music, noshes, and hearty helpings of vino. Green Valley Estates, Greenville. Oct 7–9. Fri–Sat, 10am–4pm; Sun, 1–4pm. Advance, $20; day of, $25. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

ANTIQUES, FINE ART & DESIGN WEEKEND

z It’s always the right time for wine and antiques. Join dealers and designers from across America for a classy weekend as you work your way through art and Old World goods. In addition to Thursday’s preview party gala, Friday’s show will kick off with Atlanta-based Westbrook Interior’s Barbara Westbrook, the Southern belle of high-end interior design (reservations required). Wine and boxed lunches will also be provided. Need we say more? Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St, Greenville. Oct 21–23. Fri–Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 1–5pm. $5. (864) 271-7570, gcma.org

3RD ANNUAL CAMPFIRE SOCIAL EVENT

z Greenbrier Farms’ annual charity event brings together the Upstate’s best and brightest culinary geniuses with other like-minded brewers and doers to swap a few tall tales over a delicious cut of meat. This year’s iteration will include American Grocery, Birds Fly South Brewing, Quest Brewing, The Anchorage, and music by the Soulfeathers. All proceeds will benefit Project Host. Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. Thurs, Oct 27, 6:30–9:30pm. $75. greenbrierfarms.com

An Evening with Keb’ Mo’ Band He may have come straight outta Compton, but musician Keb’ Mo’ has since made his home in the city of Nashville, rolling out a series of blues hits throughout nearly 40 years in the business. Having racked up three Grammys and a multitude of accolades from industry peers, Keb ‘Mo’ is bringing his latest album Keb ‘Mo’ Live—The Hot Pink Blues Album, to life on the Peace Center stage, accompanied by a dynamic trio of instrumentalists including bassist Stan Sargeant, guitarist and singer Michael B. Hicks, and Casey Wasner on drums. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Oct 13, 7:30pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

|

GREENVILLE

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T O R O N TO

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NAPLES

101A AUGUSTA ST., GREENVILLE, SC ERICBROWNDESIGN.COM | 864.233.4442 |

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Town

ON THE

Community Foundation’s 60th Anniversary Grant Announcement at the Poinsett Club

Bob Morris, Elizabeth Rasor & Ed Zeigler

September 8, 2016

Connie Lanzl, Betty Jenkins & Denise Sudderth Dan Blanch & Gary Daniels

Pee Wee Satterfield & Louise Oxner

To commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Community Foundation, $600,000 was granted to four local nonprofit organizations. This announcement was made during Greenville Women Giving’s second decade kickoff at the Poinsett Club. The 350 guests listened to remarks from Bob Morris and Minor Shaw and also viewed a video featuring women in philanthropy, as well as the four grant recipients. The Poinsett Club provided drinks and delicious fare for this significant presentation, as these generous grants will transform both the recipients and Greenville as a whole. Photography by Chelsey Ashford ))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Jennifer Howe & Beverly Ward Marlowe Whitaker & Patricia Kilburg

Michelle McCallum with Earle & Linda Furman

Gina Blohm & Magaly Penn

Dan Blanch, Debbie Bell & Bill Pelham Mary Sargent, Alice Sargent & Julie Weaver

Gary Gentry & Ben Clauss

Jill Fivecoat, Lee Bryan & Martha Louise Lewis OCTOBER 2016 / 27

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ON THE

Town

Guenter Westrich, Frauke Westrich, Valerie Wetzel, Paul Wetzel & Andrew Wetzel

Beautiful Music for Beautiful Minds August 5, 2016

Susannah & Daniel LĂłpez Claudia Seville & Claudia Figueroa

Shawn & Colleen Buckley

This signature fundraising event for Gateway, an organization that supports the social and educational development of those challenged with mental illness, took place at the charmingly rustic Cigar Warehouse. Guests enjoyed hors d’oeuvres, an open bar, silent and live auctions, and tunes from local band Steel Toe Stiletto. The funds raised will help aid the extensive work of Gateway and its critical Clubhouse model in our community. Photography by Jake Knight

Morgan Cook with Jeremy & Kelsey McMahan Butler Mullins, Sally Nicholson & Tom France Nancy Emory & Carolyn Wilkins Brooke Walter, Dave Kress & Mackenzie Lyons

Bobby Barreto & Leslie Cook Susie Eoute & Gary Barbare

Betsy Migdal & Vicki McLaughlin Pace & Sarah Beattie

Gerald Schultheis, Bryan Sanders, Steve Wallace, Susan Schultheis & Jill Wallace

Kathy Sheppard & Matthew Foster

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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From mild to gale force strength. In an instant

Libby McMillan Henson & Cindy Roe

The Ultimate Greenville Relocation Guide Release Party at M. Judson M. Judson Booksellers and Storytellers celebrated the release of The Ultimate Greenville Relocation Guide with a launch party featuring author Libby McMillan Henson. Guests received copies of the book, which is a 160page full-color guide to the best amenities Greenville has to offer. The guidebook can be purchased at M. Judson, Popcorn Parlor, Antiques on Augusta, Jerky & Vine, Joe’s Place, and Sully’s Steamers. Photography by Jake Knight

Knox & Marsha White

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ON THE

Town Peggy Henson & Joe Henson

Susie White, Alba Sunyer & Andy White Carol Bailey, Tisha Smith & Debbi Horton

Cathy Dugas & Kathy Atkinson

Susan & Mike Cruice

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ON THE

Town

Lee & Bill Barker

Our Carolina Foothills’ Art of the Horse Gala at Tryon International Equestrian Center August 13, 2016 Emily Clark, Stephen Brady & Nancy Brady

Hosted at the recently opened Tryon International Equestrian Center, the Art of the Horse Gala auctioned twelve lifesized horses painted by area artists. 225 guests enjoyed dinner provided by TIEC, and a live auction following. Of the funds raised, the artists received 25 percent, while the remaining 75 percent went to Our Carolina Foothills’ fund to promote the towns of Landrum, Tryon, Columbus, and Saluda. Photography by Will Crooks

Sharon Decker, Emily Decker & Bob Decker Gigi Dover & Eric Lovell Madalon Wallace Jamie Dunn, Nancy Mahler & Christie Heuman

Liam MacDougall & Aimee Wise

Daryl Nelms, Sofia Lilly & Dawn Jordan

Sarah Holmberg, Vic Russel & Joan McIntyre

Marie Christine Maitre De Tarragon 32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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FEATURED LISTINGS IN THE UPSTATE’S MOST DESIRED AREAS

Reception for Liz Rundorff Smith at the Metropolitan Arts Council

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The Metropolitan Arts Council hosted a reception for artist Liz Rundorff Smith and the opening of her exhibit titled Sea Change, which was sponsored by TD Bank. The 150 guests in attendance enjoyed the display of her work with refreshments provided by the artist. In addition to making art, Rundorff Smith is the art school director at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts. Photography by Jake Knight

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34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

“An Evening with Mark Twain” Cocktail Reception August 25, 2016 Jim Tindal & Brent Lybrand

The average cocktail reception doesn’t typically entail interaction with famous playwrights from the 1800s, but every good party needs a little drama. Portrayed by historian George Frein, Mr. Mark Twain entertained guests following the show hosted by Bev and Jim Whitten at Centre Stage Theatre. Don Rizer catering provided the 130 Twain enthusiasts with drinks.

Sue & Daryl Fisher

Photography by Jake Knight

Carroll Rushing & Billie Cleveland

George Frein (Mark Twain) & Donna Stroud Tom & Jenni Coker

Caroline McIntyre & John Fagan

After the applause, the stage goes dark… Blue Ridge Security keeps watch over the Peace Center.

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ON THE Bitsy Cazel, Pat Fuller, Bill Fuller, Jean Baiden & Art Baiden

Christa & Creighton Likes

Town

CHOP! Cancer Upstate August 26, 2016 This second annual energy-filled culinary competition showcased the kitchen prowess of local personalities with a common goal in mind: fighting cancer. Some familiar faces that participated were Jane Robelot, Chef Peter Collins of CHEF360, and Chef Teryi Youngblood, 2016 Chef Ambassador for SC and owner Passerelle Bistro. More than $190,000 was raised for the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

Nicole & Clause Robinson

Photography by Chelsey Ashford Buzz & Anne Garrett, Patricia & Matt Foster with Brittany Heusgen

Tom Bates & Steven Owings

Lance & Missy Owens with Julie & Jimmy Fowler

Jenny Brigh, Janie Marchbanks, Allison Powell & Donna Gossett Brenda & Nathan Luginbill

Elaine Sherard, Jim Kaltenbach, Andy Sherard & Jamie Kaltenbach Peggy Baxter & Connie Terrell Beth Garrett, Jane Bouton & Lisa Loftis

36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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“What I See— In Living Color” Reception September 2, 2016

Deirdre Dishman & Brett Turner Bev & Wally Seinsheimer

Guests enjoyed an evening of colorful photography at the exhibition opening of What I See—In Living Color at the Centre Stage Gallery. Photographs by Irv Welling, a Metropolitan Arts Council board member, provided onlookers with a chance to experience the artist’s extensive travel photography. The exhibit is in partnership with the Metropolitan Arts Council and sponsored by South State Bank and accompanied the Centre Stage production Is He Dead? Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Minor & Hal Shaw with Bev & Bob Howard

Mary Beth Culbertson & Suzi King Katie & Justin Thompson

Allison Fox, Beau Welling & Katharine Welling

Dean Rainey & Henry Parr

Eleanor Welling, Lil Parr & Sandy Rupp 38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

“Feeling Latino” Exhibition Opening September 8, 2016

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Metropolitan Arts Council of Greenville hosted a reception for its Feeling Latino exhibition, featuring the talents of local Hispanic artists. More than 150 people enjoyed viewing the works of Laura Lesllo, David Rodriguez-Gomez, Diana Farfán, Luis Jaramillo, Esther Rivas, Roberto Cortez, Aldo Muzzarelli, Yelitza Díaz, Byron Tenesaca, Steven Soto, Dalia Delanuez, and Jose Perez. The Metropolitan Arts Council, Palmetto Luna Arts, the Hispanic Alliance, and Hughes Main Library produced the exhibition. Photography by Jake Knight

Laura & John MacPherson

Ron & Frances Logan

Nancy Sharff & Linda Cameron

Roberto Cortez & Janis Boyd-Bowman

Crystal Welch & Jennifer Bolta

Nancy & Luis Jaramillo

Diana Farfán, Patti Brady & Kim Sholly

Kristin Dollar, Laura Estep, Sarah Delanuez OCTOBER 2016 / 39

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Olivia McCall

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Casey Marie Vaughan & Burton Harbin May 7, 2016

When it comes to weddings, the phrase “tying the knot” is typically figurative. Casey Vaughan and Burton Harbin, however, wanted this authentic symbol to come to life. The two met in middle school and began dating the summer before eighth grade, summing 11 wonderful years together before Burton decided to pop the question. One day while at the Cherokee Valley Golf Club, they headed to the 15th tee box under the premise of member photos. But instead, Casey found rose petals spelling “I love you.” After the proposal, family and friends surprised them with a dinner party complete with hundreds of balloons. When it came time for their service at The Hollow at Paris Mountain, Casey and Burton tied the knot—literally—as a physical representation of their two lives coming together to form everlasting unity. Casey is a dental hygienist with Constantine Dental, and Burton is a Mac Tools distributor. They now live in Travelers Rest. MICHELLE MOGAVERO // MIRA PHOTOGRAPHS

OCTOBER 2016 / 41

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TOWN

Weddings Liz Rollison & Josh Tew June 18, 2016 Sometimes mothers really do know best, especially when it comes to future sons-in-law. Liz Rollison’s mother worked with Josh Tew, and when she suggested he meet her daughter, it led to a first date. That bold start was the foundation for two and a half years of dating, eventually leading to a sublime seaside proposal at Tybee Island. Josh had much more in mind than a simple stroll when he and Liz took to the beach before dinner, made known by the wedding invitation he handed to Liz—with their names on it and Liz’s dream venue: a ceremony at the French Huguenot Church in Charleston followed by a reception at Boone Hall Plantation. Of course, Liz blithely said yes. The couple had a picturesque ceremony, after which guests enjoyed a true Lowcountry experience. The reception featured a greeting by traditional Gullah singers, beach music from the Voltage Brothers, and even the tide rising around the bar. The couple now lives in Greenville, where Liz is a development writer at Clemson University and Josh is a vice president at Flagship Properties. AARON AND JILLIAN OSTEEN // AARON AND JILLIAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Sarah Jo Willis & Christopher Harmon May 7, 2016 Coincidences can be all too meaningful, especially when it comes to new acquaintances. Sarah Jo Willis and Christopher Harmon met in a Spanish class at Clemson, but besides working as partners a few times, nothing more happened between the two shy students. But the next semester they were formally introduced by a mutual friend, and after going to the Carolina Cup together, they began dating. Four and a half years later, a trip to Asheville for the Brewgrass festival concluded with a breakfast at the Grove Park Inn and a walk along the grounds’ trails, as they both enjoy hiking in the mountains together. Sarah was suspicious of Christopher’s nerves—and rightly so—as moments later he asked her to marry him. Their ceremony took place at Trinity Lutheran in Greenville, followed by a Derby Day–themed reception complete with mint juleps. The couple now lives in Greenville, where Sarah has returned to Clemson, and Christopher is a commodity buyer for ZF Transmissions Gray Court. CHELSEY ASHFORD // CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

Kaylin Bagwell & Josh Chamberlain April 16, 2016 Not many high school sweethearts endure the hectic years that follow graduation, but Kaylin Bagwell and Josh Chamberlain are the king and queen of second chances. When the two took off to separate colleges, Josh and Kaylin believed they were parting ways forever. But when it came to college graduation, they soon found themselves reunited. The couple dated for a total of five years, before a Sunday afternoon drive to Lake Keowee presented an exciting surprise. During high school, the couple spent much of their time at that very lake, and the setting could not have been more appropriate for what Josh had in mind—asking Kaylin to be his wife. Their ceremony took place at The Cliffs at Glassy Chapel on their 10th dating anniversary, and was followed by a reception at The Cliffs at Mountain Park Barn. Kaylin works in business development at The Cliffs, and Josh is a landscape and irrigation specialist with Bagwell Landscaping, LLC. The couple now lives in Liberty, SC. ABBY FUNDERBURK // ABBY FUNDERBURK PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Heart of Steel:

Photograph courtesy of Ben Gilliam & Danielle Miller

Married artists Ben Gilliam and Danielle Miller collaborated on this Perforated Serving Knife, made of carved firebrick and nickel silver.

Carved in Stone Husband and wife artists work in tandem to create beautiful objects

OCTOBER 2016 / 47

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OUTSIDE THE

Box Forging Ahead:

Captionhead: text herew

Ben Gilliam and Danielle Miller have a marriage of steel. The two met in graduate school and now create beautiful work together, with Ben teaching at the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities and Danielle offering couples the opportunity to help craft their own wedding bands. To find out more, check out their websites at daniellemillerjewelry.com and benjamingilliam.com.

Ben Gilliam and Danielle Miller are creating a gem of a life together / by Kathleen Nalley // portrait by Eli Warren

G

reenville metal artists Danielle Miller and Ben Gilliam are married to their work . . . and to each other. The two share one household (with their two boys and beloved cats), but their artistic creations are largely individual pursuits. Danielle crafts fine jewelry—necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and rings—with precious metals and stones, while Ben turns forged silver, cast bronze, alabaster, and other materials into sculptures and works of art for the home. “Art runs in my family,” says Ben. His grandmother was a ceramicist and an art teacher, while his father was a sculptor. Ben remembers his first foray into art, pouring and casting little metal soldiers. “While probably not the safest activity for a child, I loved casting metal,” he says. In college, Ben studied bronze casting and wound up at the graduate program at Tyler School of Art at Temple University, where he and Danielle met. A Pennsylvania native, Danielle discovered her love of working with metal during high school. She transferred from Moore College to Tyler School of Art after becoming entranced with jewelry making. “I began to see jewelry more as small sculptural work,” she says. Ben and Danielle have worked together on a project or two: Ben often casts Danielle’s rings, while Danielle finds design inspiration in Ben’s work. A tendril shape employed in his sculptures informed the inclusion of a similar shape in several of her rings. Likewise, the spheres that dot one collection in Danielle’s jewelry line reappeared, slightly different, in Ben’s sculptural work. And when the Society of North American

Goldsmiths put out a call for collaborators to craft tableware, the pair designed and produced a knife that reflects both of their styles. For the past 17 years, Ben has taught at the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts, where he says, “The students are so passionate and have a mature idea of what they want to do within their disciplines.” Prior to the Recession, Danielle primarily wholesaled her work to museums and retail outlets. After the Recession, she diversified her business, changing her focus to online sales (via her website and Etsy), commissioned work, and jewelry-design workshops, including teaching a novel course wherein she works with engaged couples to craft their own wedding bands. “I’d seen an artist in New York doing this, but no one in this area was doing anything like it,” Danielle says. In her wedding band workshops, couples meet with Danielle one-on-one to craft the rings that symbolize their lifelong bond—from casting their metal of choice to finishing each detail. “The workshops create a special experience for the couple to always remember,” she says. Ben and Danielle use their annual anniversary as an opportunity for professional development. In recent years, they took a two-week silver-smithing workshop with Brian Clarke in Ireland and completed an advanced stone-setting class from the New Approach School for Jewelry Making. The pair plans to take a computer-aided drafting course next. “But, wait! That will be our 20th anniversary,” says Danielle. “On second thought, maybe we can put that class off for next year.”

Photography of artwork courtesy of Ben Gilliam & Danielle Miller

Love & Metal

48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOP

Bunk

Dreaming in Color: Dale Chihuly began glass-blowing in the 1960s, and his kaleidoscopic creations have been celebrated across the globe.

Great Expectations Atlanta’s exquisite Ritz-Carlton hotels partner with the Atlanta Botanical Garden for a premier package featuring the work of Dale Chihuly / by M. Linda Lee

E

xpectations can cloud an experience, especially when the experience falls short. Not so at the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead, where high expectations are not only met, they’re exceeded. Despite its 32-year existence—the oldest in the Ritz-Carlton brand—the grand dame of Buckhead does not rest on its laurels. The hotel’s sophisticated elegance dovetails seamlessly with Atlanta’s chicest neighborhood, known for its magnificent mansions and high-end designer boutiques. It’s the little things that stand out as I enter the wood-paneled lobby, paved with marble and set aglow by crystal chandeliers. It’s the smiling young woman who offers me a glass of Champagne at check-in, and the staff member who walks out from behind the desk to hand me my room key, asking if there is any additional way he can be of assistance.

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photographs (2) courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton; Chihuly photographs coutesy of the Atlanta Botanical Garden

Introduced by a small foyer with mahogany hardwood floors and a custom-designed refreshment center, my room reflects muted salmon tones bathed in natural light beaming from a bowed window wall. The room’s 17th-floor location allows me access to the Club Lounge above, where a dedicated concierge caters to guests: breakfast, midday snacks, early evening cocktails, hors-d’oeuvres, and a dessert buffet are set out daily. Thus begins my respite at the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead, and one made extra-special as it’s paired with a viewing of the Chihuly in the Garden exhibit at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, just a short drive away in Midtown. The spectacular showcase, which spotlights glass sculptures fashioned by world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly, runs through the end of October. Until then, both of Atlanta’s Ritz-Carlton hotels, in Buckhead and downtown, are offering customized packages including overnight accommodations, two VIP tickets to the Atlanta Botanical Garden, a Chihuly coffee table book, valet parking, and $100 in hotel credit. If the lustrous crystal chandeliers dangling from the hotel lobby ceiling are breathtaking, the kaleidoscope of colored glass formed into seemingly impossible sculptures by Dale Chihuly is nothing short of jaw-dropping. Along the shady pathways of the Atlanta Botanical Garden, Chihuly’s organic installations nestle

Royal Treatment: In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Garden, the city’s two Ritz-Carlton hotels are offering a perfect vacation viewing package, including overnight accomdations and VIP tickets to the Chihuly exhibit.

into the plantings as if they had spontaneously sprouted up there. Red-tipped Fern Dell Paintbrushes seems to grow out of a fountain, while delicate tubes of orange glass twist around the Saffron Tower rising at one end of a rectangular reflecting pool. Carmel and Red Fiori adds a bright face to the beds around the circular lawn that fronts the Fuqua Conservatory, illustrating nineteenth-century painter Paul Cézanne’s observation that “art is a harmony parallel with nature.” The plein-air ambience of Linton’s restaurant—by James Beard Award–winning chef Linton Hopkins—in the middle of the gardens makes a perfect stop for a delightful lunch of panéed mountain trout on a bed of creamed corn and leeks. All good things must come to an end, and my top-shelf experience concludes back at the Ritz, where I curl up in luxurious comfort for the night. When one of the world’s foremost hotel brands pairs with an exhibition by one of the most celebrated glass artists in the world, you’re safe to expect the best. Ritz-Carlton Buckhead; 3434 Peachtree Rd, Atlanta, GA (404) 237-2700, ritzcarlton.com. Package starts at $359/night Ritz-Carlton Atlanta; 181 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, GA (404) 659-0400, ritzcarlton.com. Package starts at $339/night

Chihuly in the Garden runs through October 30. OCTOBER 2016 / 51

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BY

Design

Strapped for Time: Matt Crowder is the hand behind Jack Foster, a company that produces leather watch bands in a variety of styles, including ones to fit Apple watch faces. To see his bands, turn to page 66, and visit jack-foster.com.

Band of One Matt Crowder crafts high-end, leather watch straps in a small Village nook / by John Jeter // photography by Eli Warren

I

f Dad gets a Jack Foster watch strap for Christmas, my droll, 84-year-old father would pull out one of his old soldier’s stories. “Alexander the Great invented those, you know. One day in battle, Alexander ripped some cloth from his tunic and tied it to his sundial: Alexander’s Rag Time Band!” C’mon, that’s funny—Alexander’s Ragtime Band was actually Irving Berlin’s first blockbuster hit in 1911, coincidentally not long after British soldiers in South Africa started affixing leather straps to their pocket watches, according to a Rolex anecdote. Ah, timeless practical fashion. Move the clock up to nearly three ago, when Matt Crowder started Jack Foster, a watch-strap company he named partly for his great aunt, Sally Foster, the Spartanburg gift-wrap maven; “Jack” just sounded like an allAmerican moniker. (Wouldn’t you know, Jack’s my Dad’s name!) Watches tell time only to the wearer, while watchbands make a statement: “‘I care about attention to detail. I’m going to stand out,’” the Greer native says. “People like the Made in America concept. People like something that’s handmade.” Jack Foster annually sells upwards of 600 bands, priced from $58 to $195. Crowder stitches his creations after using a hydraulic press he

built himself to die-cut any of 50-odd types of hides, including crocodile, stingray, ostrich, python, lizard, toad, and, of course, cow. All materials, except the buckles, come from American companies, namely Chicago’s storied Horween Leather Co. and stitching from the Maine Thread Co. His Standard, Premium, and Military styles feature Dublin leather, whose oil-and-wax blend lets the hide stretch, with color variations that look rustic, and Essex leather, strong, supple, polished, smooth, and creaseless. Seventy-five percent of his customers are men, though women accessorize their smartwatches. During a break in his mostly solo process, Crowder, 36, leans back in one of only a few chairs in his two-room workplace squeezed into the rear of a long-shuttered drive-through bank in Greenville. No sign outside, and the walls inside are blank. The cluttered space looks less like a growing office than a tiny factory, and sales soared 150 percent from last year. Before clocking in as an entrepreneur, Crowder was a computersecurity consultant, though a longtime leather hobbyist. Then he felt the allure of old-fashioned manufacturing. Why watchbands? He made holsters, belts, and wallets until watchbands proved more lucrative. “There’s more money in lo-tech than in high-tech,” he reveals. Crowder says he’s attracting high-end watchmakers, which is good, considering he doesn’t sell much locally; he started advertising only this year from his near-invisible location. “Not having a storefront,” he says in the two seconds it takes to survey his cramped mini-plant, “this obviously isn’t a place where people can walk in and shop around.” But he may have to change that—only time will tell.

54 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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CREATIVE

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“We knew that you were a person of integrity and professionalism that we could trust with such important decisions. We felt that you always had OUR best interest at heart. You went above and beyond to market our Downtown condo...On the other end, when we were looking for our current home and weren’t sure about new construction vs. renovated vs. renovating,.. you provided great and knowledgeable insight to guide us – again, with our best interest first. We never felt pressured or that any other motives were at play in your help with that decision. We love our new home, hope to have you come by soon to visit and see the ‘final product.’ We’re also very sure that if we made another move, you’d be the first person we’d call.” – Jeannie & Chris Kane, Byrd Blvd.

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TOWN

Extra

Prodigal Son Eric Brockman quit construction work to learn the first-class tailoring business that his mother built. Now, he’s reaping what she’s sewn. / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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Common Thread: Eric Brockman repairs a client’s garment at The Tailor Shop, a top-notch sewing business he inherited from his mother, Lila.

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amily sustains and friends entertain, but success today mandates a posse of professionals to build a better you. Doctor, hairdresser, accountant. Their numbers sit on speed dial, ready to engage an emergency. Nestled amongst this elite crew of critical care: tailor. A good maven of material can rescue the lost swimming in a suit, or revive a dress with a hemline that’s DOA. While some will never divulge the identity of their inner circle of support, word is out about the top tailor in town. Truth be told, there are two: Lila and Eric Brockman. A mother and son duo, working at the foot of Augusta Street, in a non-descript building thousands pass every day.

“A typical day here, you just never know. Dogbitten shoes, purses, split pants. It’s exciting to know something different is coming.” —Eric Brockman

STITCHES IN TIME

Coltrane fills the air as an iron gurgles and wheezes, erasing wrinkles from silk. “A person coming through that door at 9, 9:30, that makes my day ’cause it gets me started,” says Eric Brockman. He’s massaging the sleeve of a houndstooth jacket at The Tailor Shop, a funky, 108-square-foot space covered in clothing labels. “A typical day here, you just never know. Dog-bitten shoes, purses, split pants. It’s exciting to know something different is coming.”

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TOWN

Extra Fine Threads: Lila H. Brockman (right) has been sewing since high school, when she transformed her cousin’s band uniform into a dress suit. She opened The Tailor Shop in 1983, where her son Eric now does most of the work.

A TAILOR IS ONLY AS GOOD AS HIS TOOLS, AND A QUALITY SEWING MACHINE GOES A LONG WAY. WITH HIS TRUSTY CONSEW, ERIC HAS LEARNED TO LISTEN TO THE MACHINE’S SOUNDS TO KNOW HOW MUCH TENSION IS ON THE THREAD.

As much as the daily tasks and yearly styles change, the craftsmanship remains the same. Even as ownership shifts from mother to son, the work is impeccable, delivering a fine fit, through meticulous attention to detail. “I have a passion for making things right,” the tall, bespectacled 46-yearold explains. “If I put a hem in a pair of pants and it doesn’t look good, I’ll spend time to get them right. It’s just one of those things you have to put your all into.” The lefty deftly grabs a button, threads a needle, and creates stitches so small, they’re almost invisible to the eye. It’s hard to believe these nimble hands worked heavy demolition equipment 12 short years ago. “I didn’t even know he was interested in this,” shares his mother, Lila H. Brockman. “One day he says, ‘Momma, I think I want to do this.’ And I said, ‘Well, you have a lot to learn.’” Eric chuckles adding, “Yeah, as far as her teaching me how to do this trade, it was more or less you’ve got to learn on your own. She would answer my questions, but it was a hands-on process, and she was my training wheels. I looked over her shoulder a lot.” Just as Lila looked over her grandmother’s shoulder so many decades earlier.

VINTAGE PAT TERNS Lila grew up in a multi-generational home with her father’s family near Piedmont. “My grandmother’s hobby was quilting and making dresses,” she recalls. “I’d watch her and got intrigued.” She stitched a bit here, a bit there, but the pieces of the pattern fell in place while taking home economics at Bryson High School. Her assignment? Turn a cousin’s band uniform into a

dress suit. “He was very tall,” the talkative seamstress explains with a hearty laugh. “He ended up playing for the Harlem Globetrotters, so I had a lot of fabric to work with. That got me into men’s clothing, and then I went to tailoring school.” In her early 20s, Lila returned to Greenville armed with a combined degree from Voorhees College and Denmark Tech. She started collecting —Lila H. Brockman clients everywhere she worked. “My background is with retail,” she reveals. “I was with Ivey’s that got bought out by Dillard’s, and then Rich’s, which is now Macy’s.” From Main Street to the mall, Lila outfitted men and women across the county, assisting them to look their best with nips, tucks, and darts. She eventually opened her own shop, where she earned the hearts of hundreds of Donaldson Center Desert Storm reservists one well-placed patch at a time. “Oh, honey, tailors have been around since Jesus’s day,” she proclaims. “Ever since Adam and Eve and the apple, mankind’s been making some kind of

“Ever since Adam and Eve and the apple, mankind’s been making some kind of clothing. I’ve always enjoyed what I was doing.”

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clothing to wear. I’ve always enjoyed what I was doing. Seeing people happy and getting ready for this event and that, weddings, proms, trips, whatever it may be.” Clients were traveling from as far away as Asheville and Greenwood for her wizardly way with needle and thread. “I was just enjoying what I was doing and it kind of evolved,” she says of her growing business. She didn’t realize the boom yet to come, when her only child gave up Caterpillars for Singers, bulldozers for sewing machines. “I didn’t realize I was getting old, until after I got old!” she reveals. “It’s good to pass off the shop to Eric. I still go in every once in a while. I tell him the customer is always right, and if you try to please them, everything else will fall into place.”

EYE OF THE NEEDLE Brass bells tinkle, signaling another customer coming through the door, stepping into the shop’s small space. (Its lawful occupancy is three.) Dozens of clothing tags hanging from the ceiling sway with the rush of air. “Well, hello!” Eric greets a long-time patron who needs a poplin pink skirt hemmed for a special reunion. “Everything I’ve gone through in my life is instrumental to what I do here,” he explains. “Like in construction, one cat taught me to feel your body move when you’re on the rig, so you know where to cut the dirt. Here, you’ve got to know how the sewing machine sounds. If it doesn’t sound right, it’s got too

much tension on the thread. You’ve got to feel it. That’s a lot of material going over that machine right there.” He’s switched Sirius stations from jazz to Yacht Rock. If reggae’s playing, you know he’s slammed. The man who once tore things down is building a major client-list, while implementing skills he picked up studying business management at South Carolina State University. The biggest game-changer: the Internet. The Tailor Shop is rated #1 for the area on Yelp.com. Eric’s humbled. “I don’t read all those reviews. No need for that.” He focuses on the task at hand. A woman from Salem has brought in a long fur coat she’d like shortened to the waist. “You’ve got to be committed to what you do. You’ve got to please people,” he states. “It doesn’t matter if it’s in your D.N.A. Anyone who commits to tailoring, you really need to want to do it, because you can easily get overwhelmed. My biggest fun is seeing a person smile. When they walk out of that dressing room, that’s just it. It doesn’t matter, as long as the person is happy. That’s what I like.” But Lila’s the one smiling now, knowing the shop rests in good hands.

The Tailor Shop, 3209 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 277-9550 Mon–Fri, 9 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

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S

St. Mary’s Catholic School

Excellence

Virtue

Open House 7-11 November

Grades K3-8

Call to schedule your school tour: 864.679.4117

101 Hampton Avenue, Greenville, SC 29601

SACS Accredited National Blue Ribbon School

www.stmar ysgvl.org/theschool

Photograph courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

Tradition

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Room Diviner: Kelly Wearstler found inspiration for her latest line of furniture in the coastal beauty of her native Southern home.

Earth Angel

Photograph courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

South Carolina native, LA–based designer Kelly Wearstler finds natural inspiration for her new line

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THE FIND Piece Out: Kelly Wearstler’s designs outfit the chicest hotels, celebrity homes, and department stores. She has partnered with Morganton, N.C., furniture dealer E.J. Victor to launch her latest line of pieces inspired by nature (and her native S.C. coastal home).

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Carolina girl and international design maven Kelly Wearstler has introduced a North Carolina–based home 7 furnishings line, inspired by Earth and all its elements / by Jac Valitchka

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f you’re going to live life, you’ve got to “bite it in the ass,” a character in the 1996 indie drama Big Night tells Stanley Tucci’s character. Designer (as well as wife, mom, and former model) Kelly Wearstler does exactly that with her geometric, sleek, modern, nature-fueled, bold, and fresh design sensibility. The coastal-born Carolina girl from Myrtle Beach shook the sand from her fabulous Choos nearly two decades ago for Los Angeles. But the fingerprint of nature’s sensual generosity of her first home spills freely into her designs—from the hues that harken the sea mist in light-green linen against the stark-black steel lines of a bench that is part of her fall collection, to burnished brass, walnut, and any other element you can imagine. She already has imagined it and then reimagined it, and she incorporates it into her work without it being too trendy.

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Photographs courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

Room to Show

Her collection for 2017 with its gilded glamour, edge, and, yes, comfort, will make you want to redecorate, likely. And if it feels familiar, it’s because, no doubt, its bloodline comes from where we all do: the natural world. “Growing up near the beach helped inform my love of natural materials, textures, and colors,” Wearstler offers. “There is always an element of nature in my designs. Marble, luxe woods, and patina metals . . . natural materials have so much soul. Mother nature is the best designer.” What Wearstler’s hand on it does, however, is turn the henhouse egg into a Fabergè. It’s no small wonder her sleek take on interiors is what spurred her into the industry in the first place, as she was hired as interior designer for renowned boutiques and luxury hotels. The celebrities and major accounts like Bergdorf Goodman came calling quickly after. Her recent collaboration with more local—meaning a drive away to North Carolina and not a flight to California—furniture maker E.J. Victor means Wearstler’s aesthetic is within reach regionally. The collection for the family-owned, Morganton, North Carolina–based company, which partnered with Wearstler last year, consists of more than 75 designs (60 initial designs, plus 15 newer pieces launched at October market). “The materiality includes heirloom woods in sophisticated textures from combed, ribbed, and 7 ebonized walnut to lightly brushed oak, hand-applied, mixed-metal patinas in burnished bronze and gunmetal, white Calcutta marble, artisanal-quality hand-cast glass, antiqued mirror, and a curated collection of fabrics,” Wearstler says. It takes a certain something to be able to create, as Architectural Digest wrote, “sheets to jewelry,” and Wearstler has done it globally and continually. She’s written four coffee-table books, all the while being a wife and mother to two boys. So, in effect: the modern woman you would love to hate (supermodel looks, legs for days, and a style that not even your chicest friend can rival) if she weren’t so good at what she does. Wearstler knows clearly the point of good taste is not to imitate or even to improve upon, but to make your own—and let that, and not the label, do the talking.

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Classic. Timeless. Custom. From $675K

Photographs courtesy of Kelly Wearstler

24 Single-Family Home Sites Historic Augusta Road Walk to Downtown Greenville, Fluor Field & The Swamp Rabbit Trail

(864) 325-6266 • AugustaWalk.com

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THE ITEM

First Impressions Keep watch with Jack Foster’s sturdy straps // photograph by Eli Warren

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6 BATTLE OF THE BANDS: 1. Premium Watch Strap with hand-dyed saddle tan leather, $125; 2. Military Watch Strap with natural Dublin leather​, $58; 3. Standard Strap with burgundy ostrich leather, $95; 4. Standard Apple Watch Strap with English tan Dublin leather​, $74; 5. Standard Watch Strap with oxblood chromexcel leather, $58; 6. Premium Watch Strap with cognac Essex leather, $85 Read more about Jack Foster on page 54.

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Designed for Downtown There is no lack of excitement here this fall in our Designed for Downtown studio. Our team of designers – Lenzi Waits and Emily Michko – are busy this season with countless new designs on their boards and football games to attend on the weekends. Business is booming, with parent company AJH Renovations, LLC expanding its presence in the downtown area with even better design capabilities through our expanded studio. We specialize in designing dream custom homes, renovating existing homes, and restoring older historic homes back to their intended original state. We will craft a unique design package that caters to your taste and needs. Contact us now so we can begin the process of designing your perfect home today.

Something Uncommon

AJH Renovations, LLC ajhrenovations.com 864.901.3021

Splash on Main

807 S Main St Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 534-1510 www.splashonmain.com OCTOBER 2016 / 67

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greenville open studios nov 5 & 6, 2016

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. greenvilleARTS.com

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THE SHOP

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5 Game Day Prep: With an array of tailored shirts, pullovers, down gilets, and more, Southern Tide’s new downtown signature store offers plenty for the active Southern gentleman (and woman, with its new line of women’s clothing).

Rising Tide

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Southern Tide’s new Greenville location brings the brand close to home / by Andrew Huang // photography by Cameron Reynolds

rep style has always traced its roots to sporting and leisure activities. For New Englanders, that has meant inspiration from equestrians, polo, sailing, crew rowing, tennis, and rugby, among other activities. Naturally, in the South, prep has evolved to reflect the specificities of our locale and culture. That evolution of Southern prep is on full display at Southern Tide’s new signature store on the corner of East North and North Main streets in downtown Greenville. The new storefront joins the brand’s dedicated retail space on Kiawah Island. However, the Greenville location has the added benefit of being down the road from Southern Tide’s headquarters. “We’ve been waiting for the right time to open a store in Greenville,” says Southern Tide CEO Christopher Heyn. “Our goal for the Southern Tide Greenville signature store is to create an engaging retail environment that presents the Southern Tide lifestyle to our passionate customers while also introducing our brand to new customers. Since we’re based in Greenville, we see this store as a great opportunity to explore new products and customized local products for the Upstate region.

To that end, the downtown store maintains Southern Tide’s coastal aesthetic—white, built-in cubbies and natural hardwoods elicit the airy, 7 7 relaxed atmosphere of oceanfront homes or pleasure yachts. Against 7 this neutral background, Southern Tide’s vibrant palette pops in nautical stripes, bright plaids, and timeless ginghams in both the men’s and newly launched women’s lines. Of particular note is the emphasis on technical fabrics fashioned in classic silhouettes. Fishing shirts, down gilets, polos— even the classic navy blazer—get the performance treatment that enables living the coastal lifestyle from which Southern Tide finds inspiration. As Southern prep continues to evolve, Heyn sees the Greenville store playing a key role in the brand’s creative direction. “Our hometown is a great place for us to do research and development, try new design ideas, and really showcase the breadth and spirit of the brand.” Southern Tide 200 N Main St, Greenville (864) 412-5400, southerntide.com

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Tuscan Design in Montebello

329 Sorono Drive, Greenville • $1,100,000 You will be enamored by this extravagant, eye-catching, Tuscan architecture and design. This home is located in prestigious Montebello at the base of Paris Mountain and is set in the community’s premiere ‘Villaggio di Montebello’ area. The amazing panoramic and breathtaking views of Greenville and the Blue Ridge mountains are featured throughout the home located just minutes away from Downtown Greenville. Established with luxury, functionality, and exclusivity, the home features a dramatic two-story foyer with a striking grand staircase, an open floor plan, gourmet kitchen and much more. Two-story living made easy by taking the quaint elevator to the upstairs loft where you can relax by the gas fireplace or enjoy entertaining your guests with your own custom made bar area. The travertine tile balcony awaits you with spectacular sunsets, picturesque views of the downtown skyline, and sweeping mountain vistas that will leave you breathless. The large master suite is a private retreat with access to the awe inspiring private balcony, oversized “dream” walk-in closet, and luxurious master bath. This home is architecturally stunning from the curb appeal into its amazing interior. This home exclusively awaits you with its Italian inspired charm!

Call today to make an appointment to see this beautiful home and make it your own!

SIGNATURE TEAM OF THE YEAR 2015 864.430.6602 www.ValerieJSMiller.com OCTOBER 2016 / 71

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Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

Shop local. Shop year ’round. DowntownDivas TOWN_blank page.indd FOTT_Template_FP 6 TOWN.indd 1

Free People top, $48; AG Farrah high waisted skinny jean, $168; Friday’s Project Trench Coat, $239; Lucky Brand bracelet, $45; Frye Boot, $245. Visit our Pop-Up Show during Fashion On The TOWN. @downtowndivastr downtown divas travelers rest |

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IT IS TIME TO MOVE

IMAGINE HAVING A LAWYER AND A REALTOR TO ADVISE YOU. Whether buying a new home, selling your current home or both, Laura can offer you an edge that other real estate professionals cannot offer. She will provide valuable advice, will assist you with contractual negotiations and understands she has an exclusive duty to you as the client.

945 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29302

26 Rushmore Drive, Greenville, SC 29615

864-573-2353

864-268-8993

LAURA McDONALD Realtor Associate 864-640-1929 LMcDonald@WycheCo.com Laura’s Bio: WycheCo.com

MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR OCTOBER 2016 / 73

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Dating Game The Man turns into a real Cyrano for the benefit (or detriment) of a friend

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few months ago my friend Cathy asked me to help her write her online dating profile. “I want something that makes me sound smart, funny, and interesting, but not at all desperate,” she told me. I remember staring at her with a confused look and saying, “That’s the complete opposite of just about everything I’ve ever written.” Plus it didn’t matter. Cathy is beautiful and possesses a quality I secretly despise in people: being photogenic. Even her driver’s license photo looks like a model’s headshot. “The morning after Cathy posted her profile, she called to tell me she had 27 emails from prospective suitors. “So, how will you narrow them down?” I asked. “It won’t be difficult,” she said, forwarding me some of their photos. “The guy sitting on the hood of his car with his shirt off looks promising,” I joked. “I don’t know,” Cathy replied. “I’m kinda leaning towards the guy with the mutton chop sideburns.” I clicked through the photos. “I like the one where he’s holding the cat with caption, ‘Daddy and Mr. Whiskers,’” I said. “Ewww,” Cathy responded. “I wonder which one is which?” Cathy’s online dating life quickly became my favorite reality show. She would go on two or three dates a week and then meet me for coffee the following morning to share the grisly details. There was the story of the guy who smelled like Gorgonzola cheese and the one where the man brought his eight-year-old son along with him on the date, saying only, “It’s my day with him.” My personal favorite was the

guy who’d recently been in an auto accident and tried to conceal his neck brace under an oversized turtleneck sweater. “He looked like an egg in an egg cup,” Cathy said. I wrote down all of these details in a notebook, certain I could one day exploit Cathy’s pain. But none of Cathy’s dates prepared her for Allen, a handsome attorney who suggested they meet for cocktails one Friday evening. Cathy showed me his profile picture, a shot of him at a football game with a ball cap pulled down low on his brow. The morning after her date with Allen, Cathy slid in across from me at a table at Starbucks and whispered: “You are not going to believe this.” Apparently Allen showed up for their date wearing the same ball cap he was sporting in his profile picture, a cap he never removed all through drinks, dinner, and even later when they were, according to Cathy, “making out like high-schoolers” on her couch. In the heat of the moment, Cathy ran her hand across Allen’s cheek and up underneath his cap. She was rubbing her nails across his head when Allen yelped like a miniature schnauzer and jerked away. Cathy glanced at her hand and noticed it was covered in blood, the same blood that was beginning to stream down Allen’s face. I stared at her wide-eyed waiting for the climax of the story. “He had just gotten hair plugs that morning,” Cathy said, emphasizing every word. She glanced down at my notebook and said, “Don’t you ever write about this.” “Oh, please,” I said taking a sip of my latte. “I wouldn’t dream of it.”

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2222 Augusta Street, Suite 7, Greenville, SC 29605 Twill_hlfH_TOWN Oct16.indd 1

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Design for Beautiful Living Custom Home Design — New Homes · Renovations · Additions · Restorations www.NealPrinceStudio.com · 864.235.0405 · Greenville, South Carolina OCTOBER 2016 / 75

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MODERN

STONEWORK

FO N TS

CO LO RS

QUATTROCENTO REGULAR ABCDEFGHIKKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ a b cd efghijklmn o pqrstuvwxy z C 0 M 0 Y 0 K 70

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ALRIGHT SANS LIGHT A BC DE FGHIKKLMNOPQRS T U VWXYZ a bcdefg hi j kl mn opqrstuv w x y z

9/16/16 11:12 PM


Thomas Ray, Branch Manager

MA K E YO U R NEXT EV EN T G O D OWN IN H ISTORY

Alex Lilla

Caleb LeGrand

Jeremy Williams

Brad Rollison

David Zambelas

864.527.9980 120 SOUTH MAIN STREET GREENVILLE, SC 29601 | 864.421.9700 WESTINPOINSETTGREENVILLE.COM

400 Executive Center Drive, Suite 301 Greenville, SC 29615 OCTOBER 2016 / 77

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Away

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erhaps it’s the scantily clad bodies visible through the lobby ceiling, which doubles as the glass bottom of the second-floor pool. Or maybe it’s the enormous Pop Art American flag made entirely of Mexican beer cans. Or it could be the head-bobbing DJ in the corner, spinning a repetitive yet infectious blend of house and trance. Whatever it is, as soon as you walk into the Dream Downtown you quickly Indulge your wilder fantasies at realize you are in a very different type of Manhattan hotel. New York City’s Dream Downtown hotel Located in Chelsea, and just across the street from Google’s East Coast headquarters, the Dream Downtown is a boutique / by Steven Tingle hotel with a decidedly party-centric attitude. Founded by Vikram Chatwal, a former model turned actor turned financier turned hotelier, the Dream hotel family, which includes locations in Miami, Bangkok, Los Angeles, Phuket, and Midtown Manhattan, seems to have been designed to keep in step with Chatwal’s reputation as a hard-partying playboy. The hotel’s presidential suite, modestly called the GuestHouse, is a two-story, 2,500-square-foot party palace with a glass-bottom Jacuzzi and garden terrace. The $5,000-a-night suite comes with all the expected bells and whistles, but, keeping in step with the Dream’s polished attitude, a sneaker stylist, personal barista, and security guard are on call for an additional fee.

In the Matrix

Photography courtesy of the Dream Downtown hotel

GET

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Photography courtesy of the Dream Downtown hotel

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On the hotel’s second floor, the five-thousand-squarefoot pool complex features a fifty-foot heated pool, private cabanas, a DJ booth (naturally), and a beach with sand imported from Montauk. That it’s from the Home Depot in Montauk is immaterial and actually part of the tongue-in-cheek attitude the Dream does so well. Guests may book spa and massage treatments in the cabanas, and the full-service bar keeps the party going with cocktails and small bites from a seasonally evolving menu. The funky vibe continues deep into Bodega Negra, the Dream Downtown’s onsite restaurant. Vintage guitars, mariachi uniforms, a penny-covered disco ball, and a wall of tequila barrels set the stage for Michael Armstrong’s “upscale Mexican” cuisine—yellowtail ceviche, roasted chile rellenos, crispy pork belly, and soft-shell crab tacos. The cocktail menu is, naturally, tequila heavy with both the “El Diablo” Milagro Silver, ginger syrup, fresh lime juice, and Creme De Cassisa and the “Blood & Fire” Patron Silver, spiced hibiscus syrup, and fresh lime juice proving particularly refreshing and

Dream Scenario: Find your pleasure at New York City’s Dream Downtown hotel, where you can create your own escape. Fair warning, though: it may be hard to wake up. Dream Downtown 355 West 16th near 9th Ave. New York, NY (212) 229-2559, dreamhotels.com

dangerous. As expected, a DJ spins a blend of hip-hip and narco-corrido from a tiny, hidden booth in the back of the main dining area. At night, the Dream Downtown’s rooftop lounge, Ph-D, welcomes beautiful young patrons, who sip on exquisite, strong cocktails while (you guessed it) guest DJs perform from a raised DJ booth among Italian Portoro marble, Macassar ebony, nickel-finish walls, and amber Venini glass chandeliers. The landscaped terrace offers spectacular, uninterrupted views of the Hudson River, the Empire State Building, Midtown, and beyond. For a more rock ‘n’ roll vibe, exit the hotel and venture down a loading ramp just off of 16th Street to the hidden entrance of the Electric Room, the Dream’s “Britannia cool”– inspired nightclub, where the soundtrack ranges from The White Stripes to Radiohead and all the way back to the early 1960s. Craft cocktails and a comfort food menu including spicy meatballs, mini cheeseburgers, and BLTs fuel the party ’til the wee hours. OCTOBER 2016 / 79

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MaTER

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I M AT E R I A L O B S E S S I O N

takes on new meaning in a collision of textures, layer s, and patter ns—a f lashy fusion o f s t y l e a n d TA N G I B L E T E X T I L E S

p r o d u c e d & s t y l e d b y L a u r a L i n e n , p h o t o g r a p h y b y Pa u l M e h a f f e y hair styling by Desiree Rober ts; make-up design by Isabelle models Ashtyn Lower y and Br ittainy Gardin from Directions USA

Schreier;

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ON THE BRIGHT SIDE THIS PAGE on Brittainy:

Denim-tied sleeveless jacket dress, $425. By Sea, from Augusta 20; golden woven halter dress, $88. By BCBGeneration, from Cocobella Boutique; Tage tassel suede pumps, $149. By Louise et Cie, from Muse Shoe Studio; Mercer metallic adjustable shoulder bag, $395. By Tory Burch, from Monkee’s of the West End PREVIOUS PAGE on Ashtyn:

Wool felt fedora, $25. By Staring at Stars, from Labels Designer Consignments; Spencer quilted vest, $42. By Mudpie, from Splash on Main; Elisa Sweater, $295. By A.L.C., from Augusta 20

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g SHEER FORCE THIS PAGE on Brittainy:

Horn blue aqua necklace, $160. By T. Marie Designs; Shameless knit dress, $109. By MINKPINK, all from Monkee’s of the West End OPPOSITE on Ashtyn:

Manteau Ewa (coat), $398. By Suncoo, from Pink Bee; Teton plaid tunic, $182. By CP Shades, from Savvy

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C U R TA I N C A L L S THIS PAGE on Ashtyn:

Dauphine sunglasses, $275. By KREWE Optics, from J. Britt; Birds MLT necklace, $525. By Mignonne Gavigan, from Monkee’s of the West End; striped wool suit, $225. By Worth, from Labels Designer Consignments; Shelby black suede boots, $150. By Sam Edelman, from Muse Shoe Studio OPPOSITE on Brittainy:

Geo diamond deep V maxi, $273. By THE ODELLS, from Custard Boutique; Sheila double ring with coral pineapples, $48. From Monkee’s of the West End; Hematite Colette clutch, $148. By Hobo, from Muse Shoe Studio; Cheetah print belt, stylist’s own 88 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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g TUG OF WOOL ON BRITTAINY (left):

Black sun hat, $78. By Giovannio, from Belk; Kent black suede boots, $190. By Sam Edelman, from Muse Shoe Studio; turtleneck tunic vest, $68. By Rebecca Elliot; Crackle-print tunic dress, $179. By Tina+Jo, all from Savvy ON ASHTYN (right):

Jayme midnight blue pullover, $278. By Marie Oliver; CeCe tassel lace elephant wedges, $378. By Frye; blouse, $178. By Crosby, all from Monkee’s of the West End; Newton skinny jean, $228. By McGuire Denim, from J. Britt

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M AT E R I A L F O C U S WOOL:

One of fashion’s most crucial ingredients is fabricated right here in the Upstate. Piles of shorn wool from sheep in New Zealand are shipped to the Kentwool plant in Pickens (check out GVLToday’s video by Orion Yorke on Facebook), to be spun and cleaned, then spun and cleaned again, until finally reduced to tiny perfect threads. Famous for their smart socks, Kentwool not only covers the feet of every serious golfer and runner, but the company also manufactures threads that create the looks on St. John runway supermodels. Special thanks to Kentwool for providing TOWN with fresh wool skeins used for this photo shoot, and thanks to Labels Designer Consignments for providing a St. John skirt. Alpha to omega, right here in our own backyard.

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DENIM REFINED THIS PAGE on Ashtyn:

Denim tank with tie waist, $225. By Sea, from Augusta 20; cape jacket, $198. By BLAQUE LABEL, from Monkee’s of the West End; Tyler suede pull-on pant, $54. By Mudpie, from Splash on Main; Starburst bracelet, $40. By Ornamental Things; Link necklace, $82. By Mark Edge in Atlanta, all from Custard Boutique OPPOSITE on Brittainy:

Gilet garmia cardigan, $169. By Suncoo, from Pink Bee

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ARM’S LENGTH THIS PAGE on Brittainy:

Faux fur vest, $108. By Hatley, from Cocobella Boutique; stone and druzy bracelets, $18 each. By Pink Sky, from Pink Bee; La Veronika dress, $207. By Misa; mother of pearl teardrop earrings, $180. By Maya J, all from J. Britt OPPOSITE:

Floral chiffon hilo dress, $88. By Karlie, from Monkee’s of the West End; belt, stylist’s own; leather jacket, $499. By Liebeskind; Gotham slim jeans, $224. By McGuire Denim, all from J. Britt

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g TA L E S P I N THIS PAGE: On Brittainy (left):

T-body grommet detail dress, $225. By Laundry, from J. Britt; Horizon earrings, $49. By Betsy & Iya, from Custard Boutique On Ashtyn: Alice

crochet dress, $372. By Karina Grimaldi, from Monkee’s of the West End

OPPOSITE on Ashtyn:

Gisele gown, inquire for cost. By Jeff Garner, from Prophetik; Sterling silver dipped CZ hoops, $297. By Maya J, from J. Britt

96 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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M AT E R I A L F O C U S PROPHETIK:

Jeff Garner’s Prophetik line uses all-natural eco-materials inspired by his days growing up in Franklin, Tennessee, and he dyes fabric with plant dye he makes on his farm. His ecogowns are worn by celebrity clients such as Lady Gaga, Gisele Bündchen, and Taylor Swift. Garner makes use of everything around him, so his pieces surround the wearer in nature’s bounty and nostalgic memories. He is a trendsetter in sustainable fashion. prophetik.com

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The Peace of Wild Things With remarkable dedication to detail and defiant disregard for the laws of gravity, Grainger McKoy’s sculptures capture the essence and livelihood of birds, their movements, struggles, elegance, and fragility. But for this humble Lowcountry artist, his deeply realistic work is a conduit, a means to expose the authenticity of life—its relationships, trials, and lasting spiritual significance. BY Abby Moore Keith PHOTOGRAPHY BY Katie Fiedler

S

umter—or Sum-tah, if you

know how to say it right—is on the cusp of the Carolina lowlands, a good two-hour trip from the Upstate foothills. But today it’s well worth the drive, especially for a chance to glimpse the studio of worldrenowned bird sculptor Grainger McKoy. His exhibition legacy spans from the High in Atlanta to New York’s American Museum of Natural History, and most recently the Greenville County Museum of Art, where I encountered his Recovery Stroke. I say “encountered,” but in truth I was rendered speechless by the astoundingly accurate wooden replica of a pintail duck wing, towering an impressive 12 feet. Each feather had been individually carved with meticulous devotion, then ingeniously attached to the wing structure—forming a creation that extends gracefulness. It’s exquisite. After barreling down a gravel back road encased by Lowcountry forest, I pull into a drive shaded with oak and moss. A stately white house and wide front porch stand in friendly welcome, which I later discover were built in 1800. Grainger steps out of his workshop and greets me with a kind smile. Dressed in full khaki, he’s all warmth and Southern charm, and his strong brow mirrors the intensity with which he approaches his art. His hands, too, are powerful, and after fifty years under knife and wood, he’s earned the right to lay aside his work gloves. But one glance at his studio space and it’s obvious Mr. McKoy is nowhere near retirement. Blocks of basswood scatter left and right, dozens of chisels line the walls, and a band saw looms center stage, a wooden wing lying half-finished next to the blade. But it’s not the life-like duck depictions soaring across a white canvas or the mourning doves bronzed in elegant flight that strike me the most. It’s the boots. A hodgepodge of boat shoes and Bean boots are slung across a dusty beam in the left corner, twenty or so pairs hanging in forlorn glory, held up by lace and string. “They’re all the shoes I’ve worn since being a Christian,” McKoy explains when I ask. “I have to remind myself it’s not where you’ve been that matters. What matters is where you’re going.” As he tells me about his life, I quickly realize this artistic genius is chock-full of proverbial statements. Raised in Sumter, Grainger

fondly remembers his parents as the “original hippies.” He hands over a black-and-white photograph of a vibrant young woman dressed in her Sunday best with a log cabin behind her, the home his father built, and tells me of how when he was thirteen his mother helped him saw off part of that cabin—her pride and joy—so he could carve his first bird. It was a shorebird, and coupled with a love of nature and fascination with three-dimensionality, it sparked a hidden gift, a unique ability to shape wood. This led Grainger to Clemson University’s architectural department, but disliking the business of the trade, he switched to zoology. By this time, his extraordinarily precise carvings had caught the eye of bird sculptor Gilbert Maggioni, a Beaufort-based oysterman in his mid-40s who created intricate decoys on the side. After marrying high school sweetheart Floride and graduating from Clemson, Grainger headed to Beaufort to study under Maggioni. For Grainger this became a pivotal season in his life, and not just in the realm of artistic development. His apprenticeship with Maggioni required long workdays, often at the expense of time with his wife and children. But his art was transforming. It became less about replicating birds and more about communicating their essence, their behavior and movement. Regionally his pieces took flight— his Red-Shouldered Hawks and Copperhead Snake is a fantastical balancing act featuring two raptors grappling over a snake—and it wasn’t long before a few chance connections landed him and Maggioni an exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. “Floride and I have to pinch ourselves when we look back on how we made it,” Grainger says. “What that did was take us out of our South Carolina art culture, or took us away from decoys, and it parachuted us into an art world which gave the work credibility.” But as his art career was flourishing, his conscience was churning. In 1976, Grainger landed another prominent exhibit in New York, this time at Hammer Galleries. He sold every

Fowl Play: Bird carving has not always been considered an art form, and often stems from the hunting realm of creating decoys, in which wildfowl replicas are carved to entice birds to land nearby and within range of the hidden hunter. Gilbert Maggioni's work began in this arena, but he and Grainger's creations soon exceeded advanced decoy standards. Their fantastically detailed work replicated more than the bird’s anatomy. With new techniques, they managed to recreate environments and reflect bird behavior.

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sculpture—a significant feat for a young artist—but instead of enjoying his success, Grainger was left questioning his life. During this time, he visited a high school friend dying from a failed kidney transplant. Though frail, his friend was exuberant, professing to Grainger his belief in God and how it gave him hope beyond death and hope for Grainger’s life as well. Dumbfounded, Grainger couldn’t comprehend this spiritual paradox. His friend was dying and yet overflowing with hope, and here he was at the pinnacle of success and yet feeling empty. It wasn’t long after his friend passed away that Grainger came to faith. “It saved my marriage and changed my life,” Grainger explains with conviction. “You see the greatest art in the world is a changed heart. It’s when somebody’s walking this way and something happens internally.” Grainger stands up and walks to his desk, which is cluttered with a smorgasbord of tools, bird books, feathers, and wooden maquettes, all sprinkled with a fine layer of sawdust. He grabs a small block of wood and holds it out, running his hand over the grain. “All I do is change the surface of a material to make it look like it’s something it’s not,” he explains. “Only thing I do is surface treatment. True art is internal treatment, something that changes inside. You can pull one of my feathers out, and it will not grow back . . . you pull one of God’s feathers out, it has some embryonic tissue in there it triggers. It will grow another one right out.” This awe for creation’s complexity inspires Grainger’s incredible The Real McKoy: Not limited to game birds, Grainger has carved roosters (above), pelicans, plovers, kestrels, swallows, woodpeckers, and even a few wetland creatures he’s transformed into reflective pieces. His Least Bittern is a masterpiece capturing a two-dimensional water surface in a three-dimensional reflection. Several of the duck carvings Grainger is currently working on (above right) were left over from a previous project.

attention to accuracy and detail; he feels it’s his responsibility to represent them well. The precision is palpable in all his work, and in the years following his conversion, Grainger fashioned numerable multi-dimensional, multi-bird creations. Influenced by hunting excursions, his Covey Rise depicts an upsurge of 13 bobwhite quail caught in a moment of startled flight. And then there’s the Carolina Parakeets, a challenging representation considering the limited reference material. In order to maintain ornithological accuracy, Grainger keeps dead birds in a freezer to study. The ones he can’t shoot himself, he receives from The Center for Birds of Prey in Awendaw, South Carolina. The Carolina parakeet, however, has been extinct for a hundred years, and he relied heavily on the observations of the 1800s ornithologist Alexander Wilson to complete it.

A

fter mastering his skill in wooden sculpture, Grainger turned to metal as a medium. He discovered a foundry capable of casting his wood creations in bronze, an intricate technique involving waxes and long molding periods. An entirely new artistic process was uncovered for the artist, and he was able to explore older pieces with different material. He even developed a way to cast jewelry, which his wife Floride sold out of the back of her car until it transformed into an entire jewelry line run by their son and daughter-in-law. “I just followed the passion,” Grainger explains humbly. “I’d encourage anybody to follow a passion. Very few people find it.” Floride now joins us in the studio, and she shows me a pair of earrings she’s wearing from the Grainger McKoy Collection— beautifully detailed gold feathers molded into hoops. Floride is the perfect match to Grainger’s animated personality. She sat in front of Grainger in the third grade, and while he was at Clemson, she earned

“Art is contrast, art works as a result of contrast. It exposes the truth. I think the greatest art exposes the truth.” —Grainger McKoy 102 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Featherweight: To create one of his bird replicas, Grainger (below) cuts feather forms in basswood. Each one is carved individually, shaped on a sanding wheel, and then the feather’s barb is seared on with a hot burning pin (left). These feathers are then painted and attached to the overall structure.

a degree in modern languages from Converse College. Also an organist, Floride speaks several languages and is all thoughtfulness and consideration. When I ask her the secret behind Grainger’s gravity-defying masterpieces, she pauses for a second to think. “He used to say helium,” she says with a smile. “The secret is that at those contact points, it’s metal. There’s an armature of metal running through there. And he can detail the metal so it looks just like the wooden feathers.” If there is a metal rod in there, I certainly can’t find it. At Grainger’s Greenville County Museum of Art exhibit, I spent ten minutes scrutinizing his Three Green Herons, inspecting for any sign of support amidst the flapping wings, talons, and beaks. On relating my amazement to Floride, she responds with graciousness, her humility matched only by her husband’s. Together they have three children and four grandchildren, all within a day’s drive of the McKoys’ gorgeous homestead in Sumter. Both are active at church, and Grainger volunteers with a prison ministry, working and developing relationships with local inmates. After a tour of the grounds, including a visit with Grainger’s

As I pull out of the drive, I leave with something inexplicable stirring inside. I can’t help but think that like his freeze-frame representations of birds, Grainger captures people in moments, as well. Perhaps like his Covey Rise they’re in flight, or struggling like his Three Green Herons, or maybe in a season of rehabilitation like Recovery Stroke. Wherever they happen to be in their journey, Grainger meets them where they are and offers hope.

English setter and her newborn puppies, my host walks me back to my car. Floride comes out to say goodbye with a wrapped barbecue sandwich in hand, which she places on my passenger seat with the full kindness of a hospitable heart. I turn to Grainger for one last question—of one hundred-plus sculptures across fifty years of artistry, which piece of work is his favorite? “The next one,” he says without hesitation, and helps me into my car. He and Floride wave me off as I pull out of the drive, and I leave with something inexplicable stirring inside. I can’t help but think that like his freeze-frame representations of birds, Grainger captures people in moments, as well. Perhaps like his Covey Rise they’re in flight, or struggling like his Three Green Herons, or maybe in a season of rehabilitation like Recovery Stroke. Wherever they happen to be in their journey, Grainger meets them where they are and offers hope. It reminds me of something he said about a bird’s recovery stroke, how in that position a bird is at its weakest and most vulnerable, and yet a beauty and grace is uncovered there that’s found nowhere else. “Everyone is in recovery at some point in their lives,” I recall him explaining. “You have to be real, you have to be authentic. That’s what I want to be with my birds.” Grainger McKoy’s sculptures, including wood maquettes explaining his creation process, are on display at the Greenville County Museum of Art through August 27, 2017. An opportunity to meet the artist will take place at GCMA on Sunday, October 16, at 2 p.m.

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EAT&

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Photograph by Cameron Reynolds

Caviar & Bananas fills a gourmet market gap in downtown Greenville

Take the Cake:

Caviar & Bananas boasts an in-house, European-style pastry program. For more, turn to page 108.

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SIDE

Dish

Caviar Dreams Make all of your (Champagne) wishes come true at Greenville’s gourmet mecca / by Ruta Fox // photography by Cameron Reynolds

F

ormer Wall Streeter Kris Furniss and graphic designer Margaret Seeley were on demanding, divergent career paths when a love of food brought them together. After marrying and quitting their jobs in New York City, they relocated to Charleston in 2007, where Margaret had gone to school. Newly invigorated, they hatched an idea for a next-level gourmet market; Kris had managed the legendary food emporium Dean & DeLuca in NYC and Margaret had been a bartender and brand creator. Walking into a bank with a business plan, they waltzed out with a loan. Now, the culinary couple has brought a concept as unique as they are to Greenville—a wine bar/pastry cafe/epicurean deli/coffee shop/lunch spot/dinner destination and food wonderland. A bonafide hit in Charleston with three locations, and one set to open in Nashville, Kris comments, “With Greenville’s Main Street, and the welcoming people, we just felt Caviar & Bananas could work here, too.” The modern space, with black and white Italian tiles, sleek marble tables, and gleaming stainless steel, has all of Margaret’s deft aesthetic touches. It features an entirely made-from-scratch menu with an emphasis on healthy, sustainable, and responsibly sourced ingredients. From smoking and curing the salmon to roasting chickens onsite, they feature 20–25 of their prepared foods each day, rotated seasonally, plus imported and local specialties. They also create gift baskets and offer a full catering menu, as well as a wine bar and small plates menu. Margaret says, “We pride ourselves on serving unusual wines, like a Pinot Bianco or an unoaked Chardonnay. And, of course, caviar.”

Tray Chic: Kris Furniss and Margaret Seeley have brought their ultrasuccessful Charlestonbased gourmet market to Greenville’s One City Plaza, with another location in the works for Nashville.

Caviar & Bananas; 1 N Laurens St, Greenville. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com Open Mon–Thurs, 7 a.m.–8:30 p.m.; Fri, 7 a.m.–9 p.m.; Sat, 8 a.m.–9 p.m.; Sun, 8 a.m.–8 p.m.

A FEW OF KRIS & TORRES CAVIAR CHIPS THE JAM STAND JAMS HONEYSUCKLE GELATO HUDSON HENRY GRANOLA “Imported from Spain, if you “Jams direct from Brooklyn with “Bourbon Pecan and Snacks on a Plane “Hands down, the best we’ve ever tasted.” MARGARET’S don’t want to splurge on (pretzel/peanut/caramel/Biscoff cookie) some incredible adult flavors” FAVORITE PRODUCTS: are just a few delicious flavors out of this caviar” Atlanta purveyor.” 108 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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SWEET

Spot M E X I C A N C H O C O L AT E

SORGHUM PECAN

Pop-Up Tarts Part-time pie maker and full-time caretaker bakes an array of lattice-trimmed treats / by M. Linda Lee

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

110 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ROSEMARY APPLE

“Pie provides infinite options for creativity.” — Robyn Glenn

I

f you love to bake but have a three-year-old who commands most of your time, how do you turn a passion for pie-making into a part-time business? For Robyn Glenn and Lattice Pies, the answer is pop-ups. A former food blogger and freelance recipe developer, Glenn moved to Greenville from Los Angeles seven years ago with her husband, a Spartanburg native. As a child, Glenn preferred Julia Child cooking shows to cartoons, and is drawn to the nostalgia that pie evokes. “Pie brings back happy memories for so many people,” she observes. Glenn is a fan of local products and seasonal flavors, utilizing them to create her decadent treats. On a recent pop-up at Urban Digs (next door to The Community Tap), she featured three different pies: Mexican chocolate, warmed with a hint of cinnamon and a jolt of cayenne; sweet, custardy, salted lavender honey; as well as peach and blueberry, a lattice-crusted last bite of summer replete with local fruit and fresh basil from Glenn’s garden. She currently turns out 15 to 20 pies a week and crafts all the crusts by hand. Innovative combinations run from lemon pistachio to chai coconut cream and embrace savory options. At every pop-up, Glenn typically offers four varieties, and has even featured assortments of mini pies, or “pie flights.” Fall flavors include apple rosemary, coconut ginger carrot, caramelized pear, sweet potato sage, and plenty of twists on pumpkin.

Pie Chart: Robyn Glenn, owner of Lattice Pies, crafts impossibly delicious versions of the dessert favorite, including Earl Grey in an orange shortbread crust; a tangy grapefruit custard with sageinfused whipped cream; and the S’mores hand pie, complete with Nutella, roasted marshmallows, chocolate icing, and graham cracker crumbs.

Glenn culls inspiration from everywhere. It might be herbs in her garden, fresh produce at the farmers’ market, or simply two complementary colors. “Pie provides infinite options for creativity,” she notes. Her husband Zac is the official taste-tester for her pie experiments, and as Glenn figures it, “If we both like a pie, I know I’ve got something good.” For now, her hands are full filling custom orders and staging weekly pop-ups at Urban Digs and Knack (in the Village of West Greenville), but once her son is in school full-time, she’s open to branching out. “The future is a big place,” she muses. And that’s no pie in the sky. Find Glenn’s weekly pop-up schedule at latticepies.com. Pies can be purchased whole ($22 or $28 for a gluten-free pie) or by the slice ($4).

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IN

Season

F

or two months every year, starting in September, Terry Hughes puts his other farm chores aside and devotes himself to making sorghum syrup. He learned the craft from his father, Olin (now 93), who started turning sweet sorghum cane into syrup on his farm in Young Harris, Georgia, in 1954. “It’s down to just me now,” says Terry, who, despite the 12-hour days that syrup-making requires, still looks forward to the process. As his family has done for more than 60 years, Hughes hand-harvests his 30 acres of sweet sorghum— not to be confused with grain or silage sorghum. He leaves the canes, which resemble corn stalks and grow up to 12 feet tall, to sun-dry in the field for a week. Then, he strips the leaves from the stalks and puts them through a roller mill to press out the sweet juice. The juice flows from storage tanks into a shallow metal pan and is “cooked,” as syrup makers call it. “It’s really an evaporation process,” Hughes explains. He boils the green liquid at 212°F until the moisture evaporates and the juice thickens. The cooking time varies depending on the weather and the concentration of sugar in the cane, but his average cooking time for a batch of syrup is 45 minutes. Once finished, the pure syrup—Hughes adds no fillers or stabilizers—is filtered, strained, and jarred while still hot. He processes some 1,300 gallons of syrup a day. Introduced in the United States in 1853 as a substitute for sugar cane, sweet sorghum became a household staple in the mid-1800s, Liquid Gold: when sugar cane production in Georgia and Hailing from the Louisiana was disrupted by the Civil War. grass family, A fresh-baked biscuit warm from the sweet sorghum oven has long been the traditional vehicle for is a droughtresistant and sorghum syrup. These days, contemporary nutrient-rich plant, chefs—at restaurants such as Early Girl Eatery once prescribed in Asheville, Restaurant Eugene in Atlanta, by doctors as a and Gramercy Tavern in New York City— supplement for fancy the complex flavor of “long sweetening” patients low in (as it’s called in Appalachia) for everything calcium, iron, and potassium. from a glaze for pork belly to a sweetener in craft cocktails. Terry Hughes, on the other hand, prefers a simpler recipe: a peanut butter and sorghum syrup sandwich. Sorghum syrup is available for purchase at Hughes Mill in Young Harris, GA, and Hurricane Creek Farms in Pelzer, SC. Cooking days at Hughes Mill are generally Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday through October, depending on the weather. Call before you go. Hughes Sorghum Syrup Mill 2053 Olin Hughes Rd, Young Harris, Georgia (706) 400-8420, gafarmtrail.com/hughes-sorghumsyrup-mill

Southern Sweetness Sorghum is ripe for the harvest—and the biscuits are rising / by M. Linda Lee // illustration by Alice Ratterree

112 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

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Realtor Tom Marchant (center) with clients Joe and Roxy Fenten, Founders of South Carolina’s first licensed whiskey distillery since before Prohibition.

“We love our new home! We were referred to Tom Marchant who was critical in our search process. His patience and knowledge of the market allowed us to fine tune a specific location and strategically put together an offer in a high-demand, competitive market. Tom is honest, candid and results-driven. He has a keen sense of urgency and professional manner, but has a lot of fun in the process. Tom is not just our Realtor now — he’s a great friend.”

— Joe & Roxy Fenten, Founders of Dark Corner Distillery

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

Realtor Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 | www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085 RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

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5th Annual Benefit

Greenville Polo Classic

GHS Neurological Institute Offering New Help and Hope Sunday, October 23 • Noon Historic Hopkins Farm, Simpsonville Tickets $75 (includes champagne lunch and match) • Fundraising tents available For more information or to purchase tickets, visit greenvillepoloclassic.com.

ghs.org

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN

AMERICAN GROCERY

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the fried aged goat cheese: caña de cabra, piquillo-shallot jam, lemon agrumato, and pea tendrils; next, have an entrée of saltcrusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus, and finish with the banana pudding cake. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com

AUGUSTA GRILL

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection— along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers.

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville establishment. On tap are fresh takes on American favorites, fast-casual meals that are tasty and affordable. Lunchtime diners can nosh on well-crafted salads, sandwiches (like the sweat-inducing double cheeseburger on a homemade brioche bun), sides, and other seasonal specials, using local ingredients from Upstate suppliers. And don’t miss the addictive chicken & waffle sandwich with a fried egg and maple hot sauce. It’s totally worth the 1,000 napkin deaths.

Photograph by Andrew Huang

$, L. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR OCTOBER 2016 / 117

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DINING

Guide

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

203 N Main St.

864-240-7366

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The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept, Kitchen Sync relies heavily on natural, fresh ingredients from around the Upstate. The kale plate appetizer, baked crispy and sprinkled with Parmesan, is sourced from local farmers, and the Banh Mi salad comes loaded with bean sprouts, cashews, garden herbs, and rice noodles, and can be topped with pulled pork or tofu. Hungry for more? Try out the cracklin’ chicken thighs; spiced with a no-tell “magic” dust, this dish is served like Mama used to make with seasoned collards and hearty, roasted veggie mac ‘n’ cheese.

$$, D (Tues–Sun), Closed Mondays. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 5688115, kitchensyncgreenville.com LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Lovers & Friends , Tularosa, Keepsake, Finders Keepers, McGuire Denim, Current Elliott, Laundry, KREWE, Karina Grimaldi, Piper, My Sunday Morning, Cotton Citizen, Drew

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food.” Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OAKBLUE KITCHEN

Smoked, hand-pulled BBQ is a glowing centerpiece of most Southern cuisine— including the fare found at this downtown eatery. Although Oakblue Kitchen serves up plenty of homestyle dishes—like the Tabasco-breaded hot chicken sandwich and pimento cheese appetizer—don’t be afraid to sample some of the more “worldly” flavors. The Korean barbecue sandwich features a hefty short-rib done Korean-style with pickled Daikon radish and spicy Gochujang aioli, and the leafy ssam wraps (done with pulled pork, brisket, or short ribs) are a light but savory starter to any meal. $$, L (Tues–Sun), D (Tues–Sat), Closed Mondays. 109 N Main St, Ste A, Greenville. (864) 520-2579, oakbluekitchen.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides; the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and the way God intended.

RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up freshbaked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the market’s wine selection. The menu changes daily, but expect expertly prepared dishes like line-caught rainbow trout and pork crepinettes. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROOST

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beerbutt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing down the Eastern seaboard on a fresh beach breeze, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojsdiner.com

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B EER AND PUBS DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

A traditional dive-bar with an inventive menu, Dive ‘N’ Boar caters to barbecuelovers. This neighborhood gastropub has 25 different local beers on tap, specializing in house-infused liquors and locally-sourced cocktails. Stop by on the weekend for live music and a meal, or meet up with friends for drinks on their screened-in patio. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the post-Drivebaseball crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben—are perfect soul-warming remedies. Designed to transport guests to Ireland, the pub features Dublin-crafted bar and booths, famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, and a warm spirit of hospitality. $-$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub sits right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature

crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com THE GREEN ROOM

The Green Room’s changing menu features standout dishes for any time of day. Enjoy brunch on the weekend with eggs Benedict or stuffed French toast with raspberry cream cheese. For dinner, the sweet chipotle meatloaf is the ticket. Wash it down with selections from the tap and a premium Belgian/German leaning beer list. $$$, B, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222, highstreethospitality.com/ the-green-room/ MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday. 615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

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1054 E. Butler Road Greenville, SC 864-297-6516 | SeasonsCafeAndCatering.com Info@SeasonsCafeAndCatering.com OCTOBER 2016 / 119

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DINING

9th Annual

Run4Life 2016

Guide

from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more.

$-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

5K Run/Walk • 1 Mile Fun Walk • Children’s Fun Run

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. Tastemaker Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton St, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

DELI & SANDWICHES CAVIAR & BANANAS

Hope Starts at Home

A Charleston-based fresh food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. Its One City Plaza location offers downtowners delicious deli options, but don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T—bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, black pepper aioli, all on ovenfresh grilled sourdough bread.

Sat., Nov. 5, 2016 Caine Halter YMCA • Run4LifeSC.org 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

¼-mile Children’s Run (FREE) 1-mile Walk/Run (Adult: $15 • 12 & Under: $10) 5K Walk/Run (Adult: $25 • 2 & Under: $15)

$ -$$ B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl’s Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

After Oct. 5, fees increase by $5.

$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com

ghs.org

SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh.

Title Sponsor

$, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com Organizing Partners

TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials.

Platinum Sponsors

$-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Suite 107, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

ETHNIC ASADA

The vibrant Latin culture of San Francisco’s Mission District comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote relleno de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in a creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw. $-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday; food truck schedule varies. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room.

$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. $$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork, grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com PURPLE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO & SUSHI

A stone’s throw from Fluor Field, this sushi haven serves an Asian mix with Japanese, Korean, Thai, and Asian-fusion entrées. The udon with Prince Edward Island mussels, mahi-mahi with a spicy crawfish glaze, or roasted duck are worthy options. The latter, perfumed with star anise, is roasted to order—and well worth the wait. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 933 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-3255

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From the savory sweet curry of the chicken rendang to the fresh, updated take on shrimp lo mein, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp married together with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce, then topped with a fried egg. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville favorite. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glace, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), BR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern

Italian cuisine. Try the mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for people-watching.

$$-$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

PIZZA

Come watch your favorite teams at Chicora! Try our new wing specials for football season! GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More! Book your private party with us!

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs— are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes.

Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 608B South Main St. · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Sunday Brunch (both locations) 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday

$-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

2MA15

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

www.ChicoraAlley.com

MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and Chicora 4thS Town v2.indd pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese.

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$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, and now at a new, second location near Cleveland Park, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pizzas and sandwiches made from local ingredients. Don’t neglect dessert, either. The homemade ice cream (in a bowl, or in a float) is a throwback treat that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben and Jerry.

$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-1406; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 558-0235, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191,

The Konduros family is following in their father’s footsteps by using a Donor Advised Fund at the Community Foundation to support charities that align with their passions.

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously. ))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

Shop local. Shop year ’round. VintageNowModern TOWN_blank page.indd FOTT_Template_FP 6 TOWN.indd 1

Poncho in Cream ($58), Suede Hat in Brown ($48), Leather Multi Necklace ($52) all by Cobblestone; Hydrangea Stem ($15); Iron Military Canister $18. Model Sandra Miller is very active in our community and works for a non-profit, Clement’s Kindness Fund. Visit us at 651 S. Main. St. during Fashion On The TOWN. @vintagenowmodern Vintage Now Modern |

9/19/16 6:35 8:43 PM AM


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When: October 20, 2016 Where: BMW Performance Center Every 4 minutes someone is diagnosed with blood cancer. Every 10 minutes someone loses the fight. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Light the Night Walk funds treatments that are saving the lives of patients today. LLS is making cures happen and it’s all happening now. Join us to make someday, today in the fight against cancer.

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Proudly sponsored by ClaytonTileCo.com OCTOBER 2016 / 123

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HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

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RON WHITE October 6th Thurs, 7:30 p.m. The Peace Center If you need to increase your daily laughter quotient, join comedian, actor, and U.S. presidential candidate Ron White for a night of fun, Scotch and cigars not included.

You may feel like paying $10 for a Chipotle burrito is torture enough—not to mention $2 for guacamole is basically highway robbery—but imagine having to shell out a few bucks just to use the toilet. Such is the case in this darkly comedic play written by Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann. A fictional city suffering a water shortage finds itself at the mercy of a money-hungry company that charges citizens under a pay-topee system. Bobby Strong becomes an unlikely hero in the tale, launching a risky revolution to relieve the bladder pressure of his hometown. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

MARSALIS 4 BRANFORD QUARTET WITH SPECIAL GUEST KURT ELLING

Ever since the first vibrant notes floated over New Orleans in the early years of the twentieth century, jazz has been a staple of American culture. As one of its most famous practitioners, Branford Marsalis has carved out his niche playing the sax alongside the New York Philharmonic, Buckshot LeFonque, and the North Carolina Symphony. Marsalis’

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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One of the things that makes America so beautiful is the melting pot of customs, ethnicities, and heritages that our country is built upon. In celebration of the Hispanic and Latino legacies in South Carolina, a number of cultural events will be held around the Upstate. Check out an art exhibit at the Metropolitan Arts Council, gorge on regional fare and entertainment at the Noche de Gala, or learn about the educational obstacles facing immigrants in the United States at Café Con Leche. There’s plenty to do, so start planning your calendar now. Times, locations vary. Prices vary. hispanicheritagemonthsc.com

“The President’s Own” United States Marine Band

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS quartet will be joined onstage by another standout star in the jazz world, Kurt Elling, who known for his smooth, searing vocal presence. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $35-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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RON WHITE

Whether you know him as Ron or as “Tater Salad,” the bawdy funnyman is beloved by fans for his blatant honesty and humorous portrayals of nights on the town gone horribly awry. White first made a name for himself with other masters of downhome comedy on the Blue Collar Comedy tour, paving the way for an explosively successful solo career. Now the actor and bestselling author heads to the Upstate for an evening of mature, adult-only comedy— Scotch and cigar not included. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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or a complex equation, kids are only getting smarter, and YouthBASE is making sure it stays that way. An afterschool and summer program equipping students in behaviorial, academic, and social competencies, YouthBASE seeks to help children succeed. This fall they’ll be hosting the BrainBowl fundraiser, a quiz competition loosely based on Fox Broadcasting’s Are you Smarter than a 5th Grader?, which will pair children with community leaders.

Better brush up on your history facts; these kids know a lot more than their ABCs. A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School, 420 Westfield St, Greenville. Thurs, 5:30–7pm. (864) 520-1301, youth-base.org

7–8

THE TRUE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS!

The tough thing about fairy tales is that we never really know the truth. Did the Big Bad Wolf really huff and puff and blow the

house down? Or were those three little swine just “crying wolf”—see what we did there? Based on the children’s book of the same name, the Spartanburg Youth Theatre will present an untold side of the story via Alexander T. Wolf and allow you to be the judge of what really happened on that fateful day. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, 4:30pm & 7pm; Sat, 2pm. $9-$12. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

YOUTHBASE BRAINBOWL

Let’s be honest, we’ve all been out-witted by that one upstart smartypants at least once. Whether it was the year Christopher Columbus sailed

C AROL INA B AL L ET THEATRE PRES ENTS

THRIL LING BE ATS & GHOSTLY TRE ATS ERNAN JUSTO ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, H

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, HERNAN JUSTO IN SPIR ED

SAT. OCTOBER 29 AT 1PM | G U N T E R T H E A T R E This unique dance production is created speciically for children and inspired by Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”. Kids are encouraged to attend the production dressed in their Halloween costumes. Following the production, we will continue the fun with Trick or Treating and a Character Meet and Greet in the lobby. Ticket price: $25

BY

MICH AEL

JACKSON

CH OR EOG R APH Y

SAT. OCTOBER 29 | GUNTER THEATRE 7PM, THE WITCHING HOUR | 8PM, THE PERFORMANCE

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HAS YOUR MARBLE FLOORING LOST ITS SHINE AND SPARKLE?

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BEEHIVE, THE ’60S MUSICAL October 13th–30th Wed–Thurs, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; Fri, 8 p.m.; Sat, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sun, 2 p.m. $15-$40. (828) 6930403, flatrockplayhouse.org

Photograph courtesy of Flat Rock Playhouse

Hair takes on gigantic proportions in this throwback musical to the hits (and hairspray) of the ’60s. You’ll want to dance the night away.

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7–9

TRYON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

There’s no need to seek out the ritzy glamour of Cannes or the indiechic vibe of Sundance when some of the best international filmmakers are converging right in your own backyard. Hosted by the Polk County Film Initiative as well as the local depot, fine arts center, and theatre, TRIFF will screen a number of worldwide, critically acclaimed films throughout the festival weekend. Plus, you’ll have the chance to conversate with other cinephiles at scheduled workshops and discussion panels and 10:10 AM take in a special finale showing of Going Home: Saluda’s Music Tradition on Sunday. Tryon Fine Arts Center, 34 Melrose Ave, Tryon, NC. $20-$90. (828) 859-8322, tryoninternationalfilmfestival.com

7–9

SYMPHONY TOUR OF HOMES

Get a sneak peek inside some of the Upstate’s most regal homes—without breaking and entering. This year’s event is hosted by the Green Valley Estates community and will feature several traditional-style mansions like the White Oaks property in addition to a newer, “green” abode. As always, the tour will kick off with a celebratory patron party, held on October 4th from 7–9 p.m., with live music, noshes, and hearty helpings of vino. Green Valley Estates, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 10am–4pm; Sun, 1–4pm. Advance, $20; day of, $25. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

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ZAKIR HUSSAIN, TABLA, WITH NILADRI KUMAR, SITAR At the age of six, most of us are learning how to glue macaroni to a plate. When Niladri Kumar was six years old, he was performing for an audience at an ashram in his native India. The young prodigy learned under his father, who had learned from the famed Ravi Shankar, and has released more than 15 albums throughout his career. Tabla talent Zakir Hussain will add to the magic with his percussive range, making for one musically explosive evening. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon, 7:30pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

UPSTATE SHRIMP & 13 2016 GRITS COOK-OFF

If there’s anything more Southern than a steaming hot bowl of shrimp and grits, we’ll eat our hat. Local chefs will put their skills to the test at this unique competition, vying for the coveted title of “Upstate’s Best Shrimp & Grits Recipe.” Guests can sample an endless bounty of the delightful delicacy while jamming out to free tunes or taking in the Art Slam Live! Show that will make its debut this year. Civic Center of Anderson, 3027 Martin Luther King Blvd, Anderson. Thurs, 4–8pm. $5. andersonscchamber.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center; (photograph, bowl) courtesy of Hub City Empty Bowls

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13–30

BEEHIVE, THE ’60S MUSICAL

14–16

FALL FOR GREENVILLE

If the saying is true that “the higher the hair, the closer to God,” then these women must be knocking on the Pearly Gates. Paying tribute to the ladies that shaped the ’60s music scene, Beehive will feature select songs by the Angels, Leslie Gore, Connie Francis, and of course, the Queen of Soul herself, Aretha Franklin. Dust off those go-go boots and break out that can of Aqua Net; you’re in for one wild ride. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$40. (828) 693-0403, flatrockplayhouse.org

Our city on the Reedy is growing more each year, but you can’t call yourself a true Greenvillian until you’ve attended this annual autumn festival. Not only do the top dining spots get the opportunity to wow the masses with their signature culinary abilities, the spirit of competition is alive and well with contests for best dessert, cocktail mix-off, and best entrée. The Marcus King Band, Shooter Jennings, and Steel Toe Stiletto are slated to take to the fest’s various stages, not to mention cooking classes with the experts and a garden filled with the best kind of flower—one that comes in a frosted glass. Downtown Greenville. Fri, 5–11pm; Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, Noon–7pm. Free admission. fallforgreenville.net

DAY 2016 15 SOUP Last year, the Empty Bowls program raised nearly $30,000 to fund the non-profit charity TOTAL Ministries, which directly benefits local families that are in the wake of financial crises. The handmade bowls crafted by public participants in Spartanburg will be on display for diners to select from and enjoy an unlimited amount of soup provided by local restaurants, before taking the bowls home. The event will also feature live music from Upstate musicians. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sat, 11am–4pm. $15. hubcityemptybowls.com

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ZAKIR HUSSAIN, TABLA, WITH NILADRI KUMAR, SITAR October 10th 7:30 p.m. $45. (864) 467-3000, The Peace Center A melange of hypnotic notes will put you in a peaceful, musical trance—enough to take the Monday blues away.

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CAPUTO LIVE! 15 THERESA Brace yourselves Greenville: the original Long Island Medium is heading south! Much more fun (and less terrifying) than those Ouija board interactions you had in sixth grade, Theresa Caputo’s connection with the afterlife has spawned a successful reality show on TLC and several published books. Whether you’re a true believer or a true-blue cynic, this is one experience you won’t want to miss. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. $43-$94. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

If you’ve ever thought, “Hey, this would make a great musical!” then do we have good news for you. Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn have adapted the Robert Louis Stevenson novella into a deliciously poppy musical production, crafting a delightful romp that toys with good, evil, and everything in between. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $17-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

20–Nov 6

VINTAGE HITCHCOCK, A LIVE RADIO PLAY Forever dubbed the original “Master of Suspense,” Alfred Hitchcock brought us to the edge of our seats time and time again, playing on the idea of everyday situations gone sinister. Three of the director’s first cuts:

Sabotage, The 39 Steps, and The Lodger will be told through the sights and sounds of a vintage radio show that will include live effects and old-school commercial reels. It’s the perfect combination of thrills and chills, which is exactly how Mr. Hitchcock would have liked it. Flat Rock Playhouse Greenville, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$40. (828) 693-0403, flatrockplayhouse.org

20–Nov 12

JEKYLL & HYDE THE MUSICAL The harrowing tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is an all-too-familiar one: man is a successful scientist, man turns into murderous wretched creature at night, man ends life.

FOWLIS: MUSIC OF 21 JULIE THE SCOTTISH ISLES

The country of Scotland may be thousands of miles away, but when vocalist Julie Fowlis starts singing, those majestic highlands suddenly don’t seem so far. Sure, she’s only been a dot on the music map for just over a decade, but Fowlis is renowned for her melding of traditional Gaelic styles with modern folk. Take a journey across the world—without ever leaving your seat. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Oct 20th–Nov 12th Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $17-$35. (864) 233-6733, Centre Stage Witness the dual nature of man in Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of good and evil.

Photograph courtesy Centre Stage

JEKYLL & HYDE THE MUSICAL

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GRAN FONDO HINCAPIE

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Photograph courtesy of Hincapie Sportswear

October 21st–22nd Times vary. Locations vary. (864) 400-3040 Take a ride on the wild side (aka, the Blue Ridge Mountains) with the master himself. Mileage varies so that riders of all levels can enjoy this anticipated event.

FONDO 21–22 GRAN HINCAPIE

Eat your heart out, Tour de France. This annual cycling event combines athleticism and luxury and is hosted by none other than the Upstate’s own George Hincapie. Participants can select from within three different routes—the gran, the medio, and the piccolo—each of which comes with its own distinct set of challenges and landscapes to enjoy. Ride lengths range from 15 to 80 miles of trek up and down the mountains, making this fondo an ideal experience from cyclists of each level. Times, locations vary. Fri & Sat. Prices vary. (864) 400-3040, granfondohincapie.com

21–22

HAND-PULLED PRINTMAKING FAIR

Despite twenty-first-century technological interpretations, printing reaches far beyond the capabilities of your temperamental HP OfficeJet Pro. Printmaking as an art form utilizes different materials to create original impressions, and local printmakers are “etching” to tell the Upstate community about it. Hosted by the Contemporary Printmaking Collective, this hand-made affair will showcase the versatility of print, including realist and abstract works from woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and more. With willing artists on-site to educate onlookers on the extensive printmaking process, you’ll never look at that old office machine the same way again. Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 25 Draper St, Greenville. Fri, 5–9pm; Sat, 10am–5pm. (864) 423-8728, artcentergreenville.org

through the beauty of dance, lighting up the stage with our favorite cast of sea creatures. We all know it’s hotter under the water, so why be left out? Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$20. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

21–30

BOO IN THE ZOO

While nothing screams fun, fun, fun like dragging a fiveyear-old Spiderman around the neighborhood for hours praying that no one dares give him a box of raisins, it’s much easier to have all that excitement in one place. This annual event has become an Upstate favorite, as the zoo is transformed into a one-stop shop of Halloween games, costumed characters, and of course, plenty of candy. Get the best out of the season of creepy while still being safe—and maintaining parental sanity. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Fri, 5:30–8pm; Sat–Sun, 4–8pm. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

21–23

THE LITTLE MERMAID You may have been under the sea before, but you’ve never seen it like this. Ballet Spartanburg honors 50 years in the Upstate with the tale of a young mermaid and her struggle to become human

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3RD ANNUAL CAMPFIRE SOCIAL October 27th 6:30–9:30 p.m. $75. Greenbrier Farms Nothing beats a crisp fall night with great food, beer, music, and friends. Enjoy all four in Greenbrier’s bucolic setting, where you’re sure to see a sky full of stars.

25–Nov 9

LUNA GALE

do come in small packages, comedian Katt Williams has built a successful stand-up career simply by telling the truth. Now on his “Conspiracy Theory” tour, Williams is bringing the pain (laughing pains, that is) to the Upstate. With his trademark outlandish outfits, quick wit, and a flip of the hair, Williams is guaranteed to have you howling long after the stage lights go dim. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $50-$101. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

As part of Centre Stage’s popular “Fringe” series of plays, this drama written by Rebecca Gilman sheds light on the shifty politics of community welfare. When a young baby is dropped into social worker Carolina’s lap, she goes to great extremes in order to protect the infant - often to the detriment of her very own life. Unearthing age-old secrets and risking it all for Luna Gale, the audience will be left wondering if it was worth the cost. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues-Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

AUTO 21–22 EURO FESTIVAL

ANNUAL 27 3RD CAMPFIRE SOCIAL

There’s no harm in pretending for a day that you drive a custom Ferrari instead of your mom’s ’98 Taurus. Each year, this gearhead meetup attracts thousands of entries and spectators from around the world to honor the best in European machinery, pick up auto-care tips, and even partake in spectacular wine tastings. The British roadster will be the superstar of the 2016 festival, honoring those tiny vehicles that still pack a punch. Those who feel the need for luxury speed can check out the supercar area; maybe, if you’re real, real good, you can get a test drive. The Preserve at Verdae, 650 Verdae Blvd, Greenville. Fri– Sat. Advance, $10; day of, $15. euroautofestival.com

Back in the olden days, cowboys and ramblers used to gather around the campfire and . . . well, we’re not quite sure what they did but it was probably something like this. Greenbrier Farms’ annual charity event brings together the Upstate’s best and brightest culinary geniuses with other like-minded brewers to swap a few tall tales over a delicious cut of meat. This year’s iteration will include American Grocery, Birds Fly South Brewing, Quest Brewing, The Anchorage, and music by the Soulfeathers. All proceeds will benefit Project Host. Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. Thurs, 6:30–9:30pm. $75. greenbrierfarms.com

Photograph (Campfire Social) by Chelsey Ashford

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CONCERT 28 ESPRESSO #2: CAFEA VAMPYRE Watching Nosferatu pierce the necks of his victims is terrifying enough, but in the spirit of the Halloween season, the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra will present the timeless classic with only a minor twist. Each chilling scene of the old school horror film will be set to live scores from the orchestra, drawing you into the darkness with dramatic melodies sure to set your pulse pounding. Turtlenecks highly encouraged.

Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, 5:30–7:30pm. $25. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

28–Nov 13

I’LL BE BACK BEFORE MIDNIGHT

So, you don’t like mazes and break out in hives if you even get near a haunted hayride? Have no, er, fear— the Greenville Little Theatre is here to satisfy all of your spine-tingling needs. Set in a farmhouse out in the middle of nowhere (because what could possibly go wrong here), Midnight spins a yarn about

a young couple, who find themselves in the midst of murder and mayhem while on a relaxing country vacation. There are ghosts. There are dead bodies. There’s a creepy old farmer. Watch if you dare. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

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AFTER DARK: A THRILLER BALLET

There are few marathons out there where if you don’t like the sound of one event, you can pack up your toys and move on to the next one. This is the exception. Sponsored by Spinx, the weekend includes runs for athletes of all degrees, including half-marathons, Greenville 10k, Big Punkin 5k, a kids’ run, and a marathon through the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Saturday’s day of pavement pounding is predated by a runner’s expo on Friday, guaranteed to be well-stocked with all the products, information, and techniques to keep you on the track for years to come. Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:15am. $40-$85. spinxrunfest.com

be the same. Taking cues from the King of Pop, artistic director Hernan Justo and the Carolina Ballet Theatre will present their own version of a Southern gothic in motion, filled with murder, lust, and dark tales of revenge. Drop by early and enjoy a special cocktail “witching hour”—you may need a drink to keep the haints away ’til dawn. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7pm. $25. (864) 421-0940, carolinaballet.org

The first time we saw Michael Jackson and his gang of ghoulish backup dancers pop, lock, and drop it into our worst nightmares, we knew Halloween would never

M A I N S T A G E P L AY P R E S E N T E D B Y S O U T H

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TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com 9/20/16 5:26 5:02 PM


Viscount Gaston Van Helsing requests your company at his A craft beer tasting presented by H2E Construction

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SECOND

Glance

Reality Check

A

s art imitates life—or perhaps we imitate art—the many sides of reality become manifest. These multiple spheres, the overlapping of realities, are seen dimensionally in the prints of Sydney Cross. But Cross is not writing the script. Instead, she provides the set while the viewer creates the story. In her exhibition Perpetual/Surrender, Cross creates a space for such dialogue. With technology’s ceaseless progression, we must pause to consider the value of the essential. The artist confronts this narrative with a merging of photographs, media, and hand-drawn images, reflecting the tensions we face in personal relationships and in humanity’s ties with our vital surroundings.—Olivia McCall

Sydney Cross’s show Perpetual/Surrender is on display through October 17 at Greenville Technical College’s Benson Campus Galleries (Mon– Fri, 9am–5pm) and through October 7 at RIVERWORKS Gallery in downtown Greenville (Thurs–Sun, 1–7pm). For more on printmaking, the Contemporary Print Collective, where Cross is a member, is hosting its first annual Print Fair on Fri, Oct. 21, 5–9pm, and Sat, Oct. 22, 10am– 4pm, at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts.

Sydney Cross, Toile ; courtesy of the artist.

Sydney Cross explores multi-layered messages through print

136 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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™ and A Diamond is Forever™ are Trade Marks used under license from The De Beers Group of Companies. ™, © Forevermark Limited 2014–2015. Forevermark™,

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TOWN Oct. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN Oct. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com