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GIVING ISSUE

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Don’t just imagine better primary care, meet your true partner in personal health.

Imagine having a doctor with the time to truly listen. One you trust as your partner in lifelong health. Imagine also having unlimited access to a health coach to plan your unique path and help keep you on track. And imagine today’s most advanced physicals focused on giving you more information to take control of your health. At PartnerMD, our primary care physicians see significantly fewer patients and have the time and technology they need to provide our members with care so personal, it’s like having a doctor in the family. Schedule your complimentary tour and meet with a physician who can provide you with more personal care. Learn more at partnerMD.com

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Greenville’s leader in concierge primary care. 12 Maple Tree Ct. Ste 103, Greenville, SC 29615

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LAKE HARTWELL

LAKE JOCASSEE

Chinquapin Rd $3,700,690

114 Keowee Club Rd $2,950,689

187 Fisher Knob Road $1,945,676

134 Acres

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

3 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms

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102 Lakewood Drive $1,700,607

7 Riley Hill Court $1,289,650

117 Upper Ridge Drive $1,200,690

4 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

13 Acres

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53 Partridge Lane $1,125,601

650 Hammett Road $1,010,650

116 Collins Creek Road $1,010,607

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms

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204 Sorrento Drive $879,609

108 Lowood Lane $849,605

105 Putney Bridge Lane $789,681

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom 0.93 Acres

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FIRST

Glance

All Smiles: Attorney Merl Code (above center) celebrates during the 1970 Grey Cup victory parade for the Canadian Football League’s Montreal Alouettes, who he played for in the early ’70s; Merl is the recipient of the Visionary Leadership Award, presented by the Community Foundation of Greenville. For more, see “Moral Code,” page 106.

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DAMIAN HALL GROUP LUXURY REAL ESTATE

DITCH THE STATUS QUO.

estates | equestrian | lake | townEQUESTRIAN & country

180 Nightlark Lane | Campobello, SC | $1.4M Introducing Hummingbird Hill, a 12.71 acre farm nestled into the picturesque landscape below the Blue Ridge Foothills. Located within Golden Hills of Fairview Farms subdivision, an exclusive equestrian enclave with a private trail system.

180nightlark.com

We have redefined the way luxury homes are sold, and the results are stunning. We began with the simple, yet powerful belief that luxury homes deserve better marketing. We treat every home like a masterpiece. For each listing, we create custom branding, gorgeous websites, cinematic films, architectural photography, extraordinary events, captivating press and more. We invite you to learn more at www.sellmygvlhome.com

DAMIAN HALL GROUP

Damian Hall

LUXURY REAL ESTATE

864-561-7942 DITCH THE STATUS dh@damianhallgroup.com

QUO.

estates | equestrian | lake | town & country estates | equestrian | lake | town & country

NOVEMBER 2018 / 7

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LUXURY SERVICE AT EVERY PRICE POINT EQUESTRIAN AMENITIES

45 Falling Star Way, Cliffs at Glassy $2,999,999 | MLS# 1346484 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

16 High Bluff Ct, Cliffs Valley $2,695,000 | MLS# 1377161 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

NEW CONSTRUCTION

15 Windfaire Pass Ct, Ridges at Paris Mnt $1,598,500 | MLS# 1369349 Holly May (864) 640-1959

1209 Mountain Summit Rd, Cliffs Valley $1,950,000 | MLS# 1366596 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345 HUMMINGBIRD HILL, 12+ ACRES

119 Snap Dragon Way, Landrum $1,595,500 | MLS# 1346051 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

180 Night Lark Ln, Golden Hills $1,400,000 | MLS# 1370718 Damian Hall Group (828) 808-8305

WALKING DISTANCE TO DOWNTOWN

317 Hampton Ave, Hampton Pinckney $1,090,000 | MLS# 1377474 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

TO BE BUILT

200 Knightsridge Rd, Cliffs Valley $898,988 | MLS# 1361066 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

208 Lake Hills Lane, Cliffs Valley $799,900 | MLS# 1356360 Spencer Ashby (864) 344-0333 MOUNTAIN VIEWS

SOLD

29 Cliffs Parkway, Cliffs at Glassy $675,000 | MLS# 1347249 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

123 Greybridge Rd, Lake Trollingwood $644,900 | MLS# 1368180 Holly May (864) 640-1959 Zach Herrin (864) 990-1761

1489 Altamont Rd, Paris Mountain $550,000 | MLS# 1373450 Damian Hall (864) 561-7942

VIEW FULL LISTINGS ONLINE AT BlackStreamInternational.com/s=town

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LUXURY SERVICE AT EVERY PRICE POINT TO BE BUILT: 4 HOMES

915 Rutherford Rd, Greenville $535,000 | MLS# 1365558 Lonnie Adamson (864) 385-4659

UNDER CONTRACT

311 Meyers Dr, Augusta Road $514,000 | MLS# 1371559 Kris Cawley (864) 516-6580 AUGUSTA ROAD

2810 Augusta St, Augusta Road $449,900 | MLS# 1371217 Alex Kessler (864) 414-2174 TO BE BUILT

94 Park Vista Way, Hunters Ridge $449,000 | MLS# 1377991 Debra Owensby (864) 404-8295

29 Sylvan Dr, Pleasant Valley $444,900 | MLS# 1374988 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

64 Aqua Vista Dr, West Union $441,600 | MLS# 1360828 Cheyenne Kozaily (864) 999-1959

110 Oakview Dr, Augusta Road $439,900 | MLS# 1377877 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

203 Millstone Way, Stonehaven $379,500 | MLS# 1369899 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

5 Thorncliff Ct, Kilgore Farms $365,400 | MLS# 1378015 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

24 ACRES

1024 Pine Grove Church Rd, Sunset $349,000 | MLS# 1376303 Kris Cawley (864) 516-6580

UNDER CONTRACT

111 Middleby Way, Riverside Commons $239,900 | MLS# 1377384 Robyn Nelson (631) 839-7341

14 B Knoxbury Terrace, Greenville $200,000 | MLS# 1378292 Joye Lanahan (864) 404-5372

BUYING OR SELLING? CALL US TODAY AT (864) 920-0303

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Make Biltmore your year-round

Retreat

SPE C I A L FA L L SA L E on new Annual Passes now–November 30, 2018

EST. 1895

biltmore.com/fallsale ASHEVILLE, NC

Purchase your new Biltmore Annual Pass for $119 plus tax. Savings of $100 based on regular $219 new Biltmore Annual Pass. Some restrictions may apply.

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“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com 23 West North St., Downtown Greenville

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Contents 14 21

EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

29 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

44

WEDDINGS

49

TOWNBUZZ

Seasoned artist Andy Gambrell looks homeward for inspiration; Venice Lash Lounge has an eye for others; sing along with Phillip Lammonds and Co. at Songwriters in the Round; high school rivalries turn competitive spirits into kind contributions; and from Bosnia to Greenville, Kuća crafts tasteful home goods with care.

THIS PAGE: A slice of decadent pecan pie from The Bakery Off Augusta. For more see “Pie Chart,” page 116. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey COVER: A flower bouquet collage created by Greenville artist Glory Day Loflin. Artwork courtesy of Glory Day Loflin; photograph by Paul Mehaffey

63 OUT OF TOWN

88

71 TOWN SPORT

113

Tropical dreams meet relaxed themes at The Perry Hotel; fly above autumn forests during a Historic Banning Mills zip-line tour. Saluda River Archery carries all your bowand-arrow basics; Alaskan explorer Luke Meyers keeps bears in mind.

77 STYLE CENTRAL

Slide around in a pair of high-performance Kentwool socks; Slab Guild crafts wooden kitchen wares; treat yo’ body to some quality care.

BEA WRIGHT 84 MS. Avoid awkward (re)introductions with Ms. Bea’s guide to remembering.

86 MAN ABOUT TOWN

When setting weight goals, The Man discovers moderation is a key ally.

123 134 168

TOWN ESSAY

When facing writer’s block, author Michel Stone uncovers inspiration in an Edisto Island church.

EAT & DRINK

This holiday season, be thankful for noodles; do dessert right with our guide to pie; South Carolina sommelier Eric Cooperman talks Beaujolais revival; and indulge in creamy leek and Manchego mac & cheese.

DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

Open Studios Weekend premiers at MAC Gallery with A Square Affair exhibit.

2 9

PORTRAITS OF GIVING

Each November, The Community Foundation honors the philanthropic endeavors of Upstate individuals and organizations working to make a positive impact. Here, we tell their stories. / by Beth Brown Ables, John Jeter, M. Linda Lee, Kathleen Nalley & Steven Tingle // portraits by Eli Warren

06 1 MORAL CODE

From football star to star litigator, Greenville judge Merl Code forged through racial segregation to help form a more unified, diverse community. / by Stephanie Trotter // portrait by Will Crooks

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Wrapping countless technological advances in even more seductive style. The 2019 C 300 Sedan. The C-Class enters a new generation of innovation, with a more advanced suite of driver assists, user-friendly new technologies, and more thoughtful luxuries. You can even change up the cabin’s style with 64 colors of LED ambient lighting. The sensually sculpted cabin is both functional and feature-rich. Advanced innovations harmonize with five options in hand-finished wood trim. Starting at $41,400.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com

(864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter November Highlights Fields of Color

Artist Andy Gambrell creates modern paintings that reflect his West Pelzer home: page 50

Easy on the Eyes

Venice Lash Bar’s Amber Marquez and David Hawkins help cancer patients have a new look on life: page 52

High Life

Embrace your inner adventurer and take to the heights outside of Atlanta, Georgia: page 68

Glam Squad

Photograph by Chelsey A shford

’Tis the season to pamper yourself; here is our go-to guide: page 82

Sea Change

Spartanburg novelist Michel Stone finds writing inspiration on Edisto Island: page 88

Bowl Game

Warm up with these Asian bowls of comfort: page 114

Pie Chart

Ready for the big day? Make it easier with a homemade pie from one of these Greenville spots: page 116

The Lens of Giving

W

e often view our lives from a place of scarcity and desire—we’re always in need of more time and money (and vacation). But the trouble often lies with our mindset, with how we see the glass. If we constantly view our world as fraught with challenge and lack, then our ability to give becomes difficult. Thankfully, we have a choice in the matter, an opportunity to view our paths as unique to us. In this way, the bumps of our road—even the most painful—become beautiful and essential for personal growth. The holes, debris, and pitfalls aren’t pleasant, but they are part of our journey and catalysts of change; when we hit one, we’re often smacked awake to a better and deeper realization, a chance to frame our lives differently. Our viewpoint shapes the way in which live and therefore give, whether through volunteerism or money or even a small gesture like a smile or a nod—acknowledging another person as human and fallible, but also individual, singular, and important. Giving is not a selfless act, but a reflection of how we view ourselves. If we choose to live from a place of having more than enough, then giving—time, money, or a simple gesture—becomes easy, preferable, and pleasurable. The wonderful twist is, the more we give, the more we can give. Through the act of giving, we actually gain, and the glass overflows.

Greenville-based artist Glory Day Loflin’s original artwork is featured on the cover of our 2018 Giving Issue. Working in paint, ink, and mixed media, Loflin’s art features themes of home, animals, and quiet moments of the everyday. A graduate of the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City, Loflin is represented by Art & Light Gallery in the Village of West Greenville. For more information, go to glorydayloflin.com.

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

I’d love to hear from you.

Have a story idea, comment, or question? Write to me at blair@ towncarolina.com.

bit.ly // towniemail

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Please Join Us for the 8th Annual

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

IF YOU HAD A MILLION DOLLARS TO GIVE, WHO WOULD YOU SHARE IT WITH, OR WHAT TYPE OF CHARITY WOULD YOU START?

A grief seminar providing hope & healing

Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9 am to 3 pm

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR

I’d like to figure out how to get this money to children of homeless adults or organizations that help them. Such a need.

Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR Investing ourselves in another’s story is the only way we can affect longterm, positive change in our community.

For anyone who has experienced loss and grief in their own life, as well as professionals who help grieving individuals and their families. Keynote Speaker & Morning General Session: Mitchell D. Carmody, GSP, CCP

Proactive Grieving, Hope for the Holidays and Beyond Small Group Topics:

ABBY MOORE KEITH ASSISTANT EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle STEPHANIE TROTTER Jac Valitchka

I’d bring glass recycling back to Greenville County and make all recycling mandatory. Our planet is dying and we must do more to protect it.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS BETH BROWN ABLES, Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Vincent Harris, John Jeter, Kathleen Nalley & MICHEL STONE

Grief and Loss Due to Substance Abuse - Mildred Williams, MA, MA, ABD You Can Lean on Me: How Grief Can Either Push Relationships Apart or Make Them Stronger - Andrew Johnston, MDiv, MA, LPC Losing Your +1: Life After the Death of A Partner - Tamara L. Hanna, LPC

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

I’d share it with & DESIGNERS PMAC, Poe Mill Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Achievement Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Center. They’re Connolly, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney doing the vital Fincannon, Joel German, Jason & Tara work of connectMassey, Cameron Reynolds, ing kids to Kate Sutton & Eli Warren mentors, afterschool help, good Andrew Huang food, and the EDITOR-AT-L ARGE outdoors.

Whispers of Love, Signs & Synchronicity of Continuing Connections - Mitchell D. Carmody, CGSP, CCP Lessons Learned From Our Journeys of Healing: From Grief to Grace After the Death of a Child - Alice Ann Holman, BA, MEd, M+30, NBPT and Jan James, BA, MEd

I Want to Be a Grief Buddy: What Do I Do? - Christopher M. Strom, Grief Support Group Leader Music & Grief: Creative Resourcing in Bereavement - Cathleen Flynn, MA, MT-BC Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness & Grief & Loss - Mildred Williams, MA, MA, ABD

Holly Hardin VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

Grief 101: Who Are You as a Griever? - Mitchell D. Carmody, CGSP, CCP

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Amanda Walker

Hope After Suicide - Dan Taylor, Doctor of Ministry

Probate Court: How to Plan My Estate Administration - Judge Debora A. Faulkner

Closing Message of Hope: A seminar for loss, hope and healing

Our teams have been honored to come togetherNovember each year to Tuesday, 11, 2014 provide this special day of education, hope and healing to our 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. community. We consider it a privilege to provide this important day at no cost to you. Lunch is included as well as educational credits First Baptist Greenville, Fellowship Hall (CEU’s) for professionals.

Ed Ibarra & Donna Johnston MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp, MEREDITH RICE, Caroline Spivey & Liz Tew

847 Cleveland St.

Greenville, SC 29601 To register, please visit HolidayGriefSeminar.com RSVP by Friday, November 7 by Friday, November 9. This seminar for anyone who has experienced loss and grief, as well as professionals If unable to register online, or foris questions: 864-325-3526. who help grieving individuals, such as Nurses, Counselors and Therapists, Social Workers,

First Baptist Greenville, Fellowship Hall, Chaplains, Clergy Members, Guidance Counselors, Psychologists and Educators. 847 Cleveland St., Greenville, SC 29601 ( 4 .0 hrs. Continuing Education Credit available. More information upon request. )

Presented by

I would set up a fund to provide mental health counselors in all middle and high schools.

Jane Rogers MAGA ZINE ADVERTISING SPECIALIST KRISTI FORTNER EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Sue Priester CONSULTING MEMBER Susan Schwartzkopf EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

and

WOODLAWN

I’d start a foundation committed to tackling the major societal challenges of our times in the fields of education, healthcare, the arts, and empathybuilding.

Emily Yepes DIRECTOR OF SALES

Rev. Claire Ripley

GREENVILLE MEMORIAL GARDENS

MARK B. JOHNSTON PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

My dream is to offer a place for teens and young adults to become inspired and aware of their true potential, removed from everyday circumstances.

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

Memorial Park, Funerals and Cremations TOWN Magazine (Vol. 8, No. 11) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC,

581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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What Boxes Do You Check When WhatSelecting Boxes DoYour YouRealtor? Check When Selecting Your New Realtor? ✓Certified Real Estate Appraiser construction and land contracts expertise ✓ ✓Real Estate Broker Alta Vista resident ✓ ✓ ✓ Estate/ Appraiser New constructionSpeaks and land contracts expertise ✓Certified Five ForksReal Resident Downtown Specialist RENOVATION fluently ✓ ✓ Estate Broker VistaSpecialist resident ✓ ✓Real ✓ Expert Negotiator Relocation/ NewAlta Comer ✓ Forks Native Resident / Downtown Specialist Speaks RENOVATION fluently ✓ ✓Five ✓ Greenville Responsive, returns all calls promptly! ✓ ✓ Negotiator Relocation/ New Comer ✓Expert Top Producer TopSpecialist Producer ✓ ✓Greenville Native ✓ We check ALL the boxes. Responsive, returns all calls promptly! ✓ AUGUSTA CIRCLE - 103 WACCAMAW AVENUE 4BR/2.5BA - walkout basement - 2 car garage - newer build home - $669,605 ✓Top Producer Top Producer ✓

✓ We check ALL the boxes.

Matt Crider 864.444.1689 Matt Crider 864.444.1689

The

Team

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—— Premier Listing ——

Leah Grabo 864.901.4949 Leah Grabo 864.901.4949

—— Premier Listing ——

Augusta Circle - 103 Waccamaw Avenue - Greenville, SC 29605 - $669,605 Wonderful opportunity to own a custom newer built home perfect for entertaining. In sought after Augusta Circle school district. This 4 bedroom home is move-in ready. Rare full 2-Car, attached garage, with additional 3rd covered parking spot Augusta Circle - 103The Waccamaw Avenue - Greenville, 29605 (perfect for storing your golf cart or boat). yard space is ample. BasementSC level with a- $669,605 media room/man cave. Large Wonderful opportunity to own a custom newer built home perfect for entertaining. In sought after Augusta Circle school dining room, modern kitchen, & HUGE screen porch with stone stacked fireplace. Tons of storage and closet space. Big district. This 4 bedroom home is move-in ready. Rare full 2-Car, attached garage, with additional 3rd covered parking spot CARILION SUBDIVISION - TRAVELERS - 506 CARILION AUGUSTA ROAD - 243 MELVILLE AVENUE master bed/bath with a REST dream shower. LargeLANE 4th bedroom, playroom, & living room. A must see home. 5BR/4.5BA basement - 3 golf car garage yard -yard $474,605 2BR/2BA priceaimprovement - $344,605 (perfect- full for storing your cart or- fenced boat). The space is ample. Basement level -with media room/man cave. Large dining room, modern kitchen, & HUGE screen porch with stone stacked fireplace. Tons of storage and closet space. Big master bed/bath with a dream shower. Large 4th bedroom, playroom, & living room. A must see home.

www.jha-sothebysrealty.com Each office independently owned and operated.

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Each office independently owned and operated.

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BELLA GROVE

COTTAGE noun / cot•tage / \’kä-tij\

A small home with a big life. Maintenance Free Lawns • Cottage Homes from the High $400s • Walking Trail to Legacy Park Custom Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Close to Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Visit the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

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List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

November 2018

z

TOP OF THE

List

THE B-52S

Photograph by Joseph Cultice

A nonstop purveyor of feel-good, poppy party hits a la “Rock Lobster,” “Private Idaho,” and “Roam,” the B-52s have become quintessential idols of the dance-rock genre, paving the path for future artists to experiment and explore their musical bend in unexpected ways. Now, they’re inviting you for a night of fun in the “Love Shack”—updos optional. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Thurs, Nov 8, 7:30pm. $45-$75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

NOVEMBER 2018 / 21

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List z

Back in the olden days, cowboys and ramblers used to gather around the campfire and . . . eat beans out of a can or something? Greenbrier Farms’ annual charity event to benefit Project Host brings together the Upstate’s best and brightest culinary geniuses with other like-minded brewers and doers to swap a few tall tales over delicious local dishes. Feed your soul with bites from Husk, Blind Pig Supper Club, and more, with drinks courtesy of Liability Brewing Co., Sierra Nevada, and Fullsteam Brewing, and tunes provided by Amongst the Trees.

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES

They say that dogs are man’s best friend—just not this time. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s third novel to feature London’s favorite crime-cracking sleuth Sherlock Holmes, this eerie mystery set on the Baskerville moors is full of intrigue and suspense. Is a supernatural pup to blame for the death of Sir Charles Baskerville? Or is the supposed ancient family curse a front for something more sinister? Grab your magnifying glass and start searching for clues alongside the world’s most famous detective. And Watson, of course.

Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. Thurs, Nov 8, 6–9pm. $80. (864) 855-9782, greenbrierfarms.com

Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Nov 11–17. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $20-$52. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

236 RHETT STREET, #205 ✦ $1,470,000

Photo courtesy of Patrick Cox Photography

BEN RECTOR —MAGIC: THE TOUR

Photo courtesy of Stephen Vitosky

Photo courtesy of Patrick Cox Photography

As the youngest individual ever to win the pop category of the John Lennon Songwriting Contest, you could say Ben Rector has some musical chops. Having previously toured with other alt and folk rockers like Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors, NEEDTOBREATHE, and Colony House, Rector made a breakthrough with his “Brand New” single back in 2015, and this year’s Magic looks poised for success; it debuted at number one on Billboard’s Americana/Folk Albums chart. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Mon, Nov 5, 7:30pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of City of Greenville, SC. Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

5TH ANNUAL CAMPFIRE SOCIAL

Photograph by Kimberly Michelle Gibson Photography

THE

Luxury four-level Brownstone, custom built with the highest quality construction, materials, design and finishes, also offers one of the most beautiful views of downtown Greenville’s skyline. Spanning over 3,000 square feet, #205 features four bedrooms, four-and-one-half bathrooms, two-car garage, elevator to all levels, and two outdoor terraces - one with a gas fireplace and another with a built-in outdoor kitchen. In addition, this Brownstone was built by a Certified Building Biologist, and also includes many healthy features for improving overall health and quality of living.

Photo courtesy of Stephen Vitosky

864.313.2986 VirginiaHayes.com 22 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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HEROES & VILLAINS: MUSIC FROM HOLLYWOOD FILMS Just like no villain is complete without a lengthy, climactic monologue, any hero without a good theme song is severely lacking. The Spartanburg Philharmonic pays homage to these movie greats with “Heroes & Villains,” a carefully curated program of composed tunes that includes recognizable themes from classics like the James Bond films, Batman, The Incredibles, and more. Twichell Auditorium, 580 E Main St, Spartanburg. Sat, Nov 10, 7–9pm. $18-$55. (864) 948-9020, spartanburgphilharmonic.org

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / COUNTYBANK REEDY REELS FILM FESTIVAL A celebration of Upstate independent filmmakers and all the talent they bring to the table, Reedy Reels once again graces the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre for the fourth annual edition of this community-focused film fest. Screening works from selected artists, Reedy Reels serves a dual purpose in providing much-needed exposure for rising directors and education for locals on the hunt for the next big thing. Make sure to snag tickets to the Opening Night Party for local bites, brews, and a sneak peek of this year’s muchanticipated films. Opening Night Party: The Venue at Falls Park, 631 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Nov 2, 7pm. $75. Film Festival: Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat–Sun, Nov 3–4. $12-$50. reedyreels.com

TREESGREENVILLE TURKEY DAY 8K The idea of physical exertion on a day typically reserved for indulging in three different kinds of potatoes seems terrifying, but the good thing about this event is you can actually see what you’re saving. Since 2005, TreesGreenville has planted thousands of trees throughout the county and nurtured countless more. The organization is funded by events like this 8k, 2-mile walk, and tot trot, which loop their way through the scenic downtown area and prove the perfect opportunity to burn a few of those pre-meal calories. Downtown Greenville. Thurs, Nov 22, 7:30am. Registration prices vary. (864) 313-0765, treesgreenville.org

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List z

THE

Quick HITS

PARIS MOUNTAIN 16K

z Lace up those running shoes because it’s time to get a little dirty. The final race of Greenville Rec’s Dirt Series will determine who takes home the title of Champion of the Mountain and the reigning crown of Dirt King and Queen. It’s a nearly 10-mile race, but with scenic views of the Upstate surrounding you, it may just feel like a walk in the park. Paris Mountain State Park, 2401 State Park Rd, Greenville. Sat, Nov 3, 8am–noon. $16. (864) 676-2180, greenvillerec.com

GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS

z Fact: Our community’s buzzing art scene has steadily blossomed over the years, with new studios sprouting up from the West End to West Pelzer. Now you can visit them all. The annual event sheds light on Upstate visual artists, opening the doors to their creative workspaces and inviting visitors to take a behind-the-scenes look at the magic behind the craft. Locations vary. Nov 9–11. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, noon–6pm. Free. (864) 467-3132, greenvillearts.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

PAN HARMONIA: MUSIK AUS MITTELEUROPA

z Nineteen seasons strong, musical collaborative PAN HARMONIA continues its chamber concert performances with a tribute to the poignant pieces of Johannes Brahms. This month, four celebrated instrumentalists—Kate Steinbeck on flute, Fred Lemmons on clarinet, Nathan Leyland on cello, and Hwa-Jin Kim on piano—unite at the Carolina Music Museum to perform iconic trios by Brahms, as well as works by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů and Tarantelle, Op. 6 by Camille Saint-Säens. Carolina Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St, Greenville. Fri, Nov 9, 7:30pm. $20 in advance, $25 at the door, $5 students. panharmonia.org/shop

DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL

z When Charles Dickens penned his now-famous novella way back in 1843, we doubt he’d ever imagine Kermit the Frog starring as Bob Cratchit. Regardless, this Dickens’ tale of a soul reborn is a holiday classic with an amazing message. Albeit a little revamped, this musical version promises to unite all your favorite characters from Tiny Tim to Jacob Marley for an uplifting story of what’s truly important in life. Don’t be afraid to sing along—you never know when the ghosts might pay you a visit. The Logos Theatre, 80 School St, Taylors. Nov 24–Dec 22. Thurs, 11:30am; Fri–Sat, 7pm. $28. (864) 268-9342, thelogostheatre.com

Stephen Stills & Judy Collins He’s one-third of folk rock supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash. She’s the inspiration behind one of the band’s most popular and meaningful hits, “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes.” Now nearly 50 years later, Stephen Stills and Judy Collins are reuniting for the first time on stage. Each with a decades-spanning compendium of folk-tinged, eclectic tunes and colorful industry chronicles under their belt, the pair are ready to share some of their favorite musical works—along with a few rich anecdotes—with you. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri, Nov 9, 8pm. $35-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

HOLIDAY FAIR 2018

z It’s the season of giving. Or, more importantly, the season of giving your pesky neighbor a run for their money with an epic battle of the Christmas decorations. Stock up your arsenal at the Crafter’s Village, which features a wide array of wreaths, ornaments, nativities, and other décor sure to set your home apart for the holidays. Then, stop by the Gift Bazaar and handpick a perfect present for that impossible-to-buy-for guy or gal in your life. Bonus points if you nab a fruitcake for your neighbor. Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Nov 29–Dec 1. Thurs–Fri, 10am–8pm; Sat, 10am–6pm. Adults, $6; seniors, $5; under 12, free. (864) 233-2562, holidayfairgreenville.com

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ON SALE NOW! Groundbreaking holographic technology, backed by a live symphony orchestra.

THE MUSIC. THE LEGEND. BACK ON STAGE.

NOVEMBER 14

DORRANCE DANCE NOVEMBER 18

Photo by Matthew Murphy

NOVEMBER 15

THE B-52s NOVEMBER 8

EXPERIENCE THE EXCEPTIONAL An Evening of Original Music with Edwin McCain, Maia Sharp, and PHILLIP LAMMONDS NOVEMBER 2 BEN RECTOR NOVEMBER 5 BÉLA FLECK, ZAKIR HUSSAIN, AND EDGAR MEYER WITH RAKESH CHAURASIA NOVEMBER 6 STEPHEN STILLS & JUDY COLLINS NOVEMBER 9 VOCES8 Peace Chamber Concert Series NOVEMBER 13 HAMILTON DECEMBER 4-16

SIERRA HULL JANUARY 12

JERRY LEE LEWIS FEBRUARY 16

CURRENTS BY MAYUMANA FEBRUARY 26

MISS SAIGON JANUARY 15-20

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA with Kirill Karabits, conductor; George Li, piano FEBRUARY 18

An Evening of Original Music with Edwin McCain, Maia Sharp, and JILL SOBULE MARCH 1

I’M WITH HER: Sara Watkins – Sarah Jarosz – Aoife O’Donovan FEBRUARY 19

THE BOOK OF MORMON MARCH 5-10 (ON SALE NOVEMBER 9)

An Evening of Original Music with Edwin McCain, Maia Sharp, and GABE DIXON JANUARY 25 A BRONX TALE FEBRUARY 5-10 BERLIN PHILHARMONIC WIND QUINTET Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 13 The You & Me Tour: An Evening With DREW AND ELLIE HOLCOMB FEBRUARY 14

THEPIANOGUYS FEBRUARY 20 LARA ST. JOHN Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 21 SYBARITE5 Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 24

CELTIC WOMAN MARCH 15 TAP DOGS MARCH 22 PATTON OSWALT MARCH 30 AVITAL MEETS AVITAL Peace Chamber Concert Series APRIL 11 COME FROM AWAY APRIL 16-21

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THORNBLADE 110 Meilland Drive — Charming low country home with 4 bedrooms (Master

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package equal to your best vacation! Among its features is a resort style gunite pool complete with its own slide as well as a gorgeous covered porch with cedar accents and a pool bathroom lined in cedar walls. Outside the fenced area of the pool, there is a large fire pit with flagstone pavers and bench seating under the privacy and comfort of the mature trees.

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the equestrian community of Bruce Farm! 4 Bedroom, 4 1/2 bath home with 3 car garage affords immense gathering space starting with the kitchen which features maple cabinets, granite countertops, stainless appliances, slate flooring, and 10 ft. ceilings. There are two bedrooms each with their own private bathroom and closet. The master suite showcases a fully renovated bathroom complete with a tiled shower, soaking tub and a gorgeous vanity.

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the heart of Greenville. Location, Location! 3BR, 2BA plus 2 car garage and additional detached garage and workshop!! Beautifully renovated brick ranch with HUGE screed porch! Terra Pines is a hidden gem of a neighborhoodquiet and established with larger lots. Come fall in love with all the updates the current owners have done and move right on in. MLS#1368637 Susan Dodds • 201.8656

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ON THE

Sunday Supper September 23, 2018 Capping off Greenville’s much anticipated food fest, Euphoria’s Sunday Supper offered patrons a laidback Southern feast in the stunning downtown setting of the Wyche Pavilion. Crafted by North Carolina chefs Joe Kindred and Craig Deihl, of Hello, Sailor, along with The Lazy Goat’s Wilbert Sauceda, the familystyle meal included special cocktails, wine, and beer. Guests also enjoyed the cello and guitar melodies of Wirewood.

Bryant Byrne, Molly Freely, Molly Netzler, Peter Netzler & Jon-Mikel Byrne Diane & Bill Yarborough

By Cameron Reynolds Photography

Sima Patel with Liz & Matt Cotner

Caroline Jeffords, Chloe Jeffords, Dee Moss, Jillian Andrews, Zach Herron, Matt Moulton

Carl Sobocinski

Carrie Naas, Laura Lebel, Whitney Jones & Ritu Saha

Chris & Sandra Stone, Jennifer Stilwell & Nancey Breede

Michelle Byren, Caroline & Scott Dover, Matthew Brodsky & Jane LeGette

Carmen & Todd Fennell with Shay Williams Floyd

Joy & Cameron Dickerson

Courtney & Brian White with Sherry & Tim Todd

Teri Warren & Cheryl Cotner

Monika & Yoshi Kirsch NOVEMBER 2018 / 29

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STUNNING PROPERTIES LAST UNIT AVAILABLE

The Family Effect Donor Picnic September 9, 2018 A simple “thank you” can go a long way, and The Family Effect pulled out all the stops for its donor picnic at Serenity Village, which honored patrons for their generous contributions to help reduce addiction as a leading cause of family collapse. More than 100 guests, including current residents and graduates of The Family Effect program, noshed on Table 301 food truck fare, and enjoyed a quick word from board member Jason Richards of NAI Earle Furman.

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Cooper Hall, Jenna Milbourne & Larisha Martin Kristen Anthony, Evelyn Anthony, James Anthony & Jay Anthony Haley Elgin & Brittany Baker

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ON THE

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Reception for John Pendarvis at The Blood Connection September 13, 2018 While associated with its dedicated work to save lives, The Blood Connection cares about art, too. The center most recently celebrated its creative focus by presenting the works of area artist John Pendarvis. Guests of the reception enjoyed drinks and light refreshments while viewing Pendarvis’ painted depictions of shoes. The exhibit will be on display through November 17.

T. & Karla Welfare

By Jack Robert Photography Susan Peart & Jo Ann Taylor Miriam & Deigha Anderson-Davis

Create more Time, Space and Peace in your every day. NOW OPEN! Our Legacy Square at Verdae Showroom and Design Center

John & Brenda Pendarvis

Annette Burdette & John Casey

Laszlo & Lori Solymosi with Joe Merk

Carol Mann & Joan Potter

3 GENERATIONS OF CLOSETEERS

Michael Allen, Yolande Allen & grandchildren

Greenville Showoom & Design Center Legacy Square at Verdae, 340 Rocky Slope, Suite 104 www.carolinacloset.com | 864.288.0257 NOVEMBER 2018 / 31

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ON THE

Town

Fin de Verano September 10, 2018

Colleen Kocher, Anthony Kocher & Audrey Kocher

With a last hoorah to the sweetness of summertime, Time to Taste Catering hosted a paella-filled fest at The Rutherford. Coordinated by Cara Hafer Events, the evening featured the talents of Philofloral, Ice Box Bar, Uptown Entertainment, Argo Design, and Suede Radio, a new band by Steel Toe Stiletto. The affair showcased the talents of Greenville-based vendors in efforts to encourage future collaboration.

Tanner & Kelsey Crum

By Chelsey Ashford Photography Josh Morris, Anand Patel & Sam Sadeghi

Heath Clark, Cara Hafer & Rakan Draz

JDew & Ariel Turner

Kevin Holliday, Susannah Barba, Daniel López, Jon Pace, Aaron Rosenberg, Sean Mayer & Joseph Kass

Nick Navarro, Melissa Palmer, John McKiernan & Leslie Haas

Johnnie Choi & Josh Downey Time to Taste Catering

Allie Monday & Samm Kidd

Kristen Guenther & Krishna Patel

Brad & Julia Ross with Camille & Patrick Roberts

Amanda Phillips & David Hawkins Dan & Jenn Roberts

Melinda Lehman & Kym Petrie

Heather & Ryan Siders with Rob & Markie Walden

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ON THE

Town

Opening Reception for Aldo Muzzarelli & Yelitza Díaz September 14, 2018 Roger Gower, Martha Beaudrot & Alan Ethridge

Bo Pearson & Tara Kirkland

In partnership with the Metropolitan Arts Council, Palmetto Luna Arts hosted a welcoming reception for the MAC Gallery’s fall exhibit highlighting the works of Aldo Muzzarelli and Yelitza Díaz. Serenaded by the tunes of guitarist Jorge Garcia, guests sipped on refreshments while exploring the Latin American couple’s humanistic artwork. The event also featured a reading by award-winning poet, Vera Gomez. By Jack Robert Photography

Lois Ann & Gregory Parker

Avery Allen & Courtney Thomas

Aldo Muzzarelli & Yelitza Díaz

Camila Rueda Torres, Gabriela Rueda Alford & Diana Farfan Kim Carroll & Veronica Schoell

Mario Becerril, Marvin Muzzarelli, Carlos Muzzarelli & Renzo Muzzarelli

Ivan Segura, Aldo Muzzarelli, Yelitza Diaz & Diana Farfan

David & Kelsey Kabrin

Charlie, Alice & Helen Ratterree

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Christine Lyles, Malinda Coleman & Mary Johnston

GCMA Collectors Group Cocktails + Art with Matthew Rolston September 9, 2018

Christie & Bob Nachman

While encountering art can be moving, doing so with a cocktail in hand certainly enhances the experience. Members of the GCMA Collectors Group appreciated the photography of Matthew Rolston, and the catering expertise of Janet Poleski, during the museum’s latest Cocktails + Art event. The 100 attendees interacted with Matthew Rolston himself, who spoke on his extensive work, which includes more than 100 Rolling Stones covers, shots of Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson, and the colorful portraits of ventriloquist dolls in the GCMA exhibition Talking Heads: The Vent Haven Portraits. By Bonfire Visuals

Shara Crosby, Larry Kiss & Todd Edwards

Jennifer Yarborough & Julie Garrett

Diane Gluck & Larry Gluck

Lisa Stewart & Annie Roberts

Berry Garrett & Clay Rainey

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ON THE

Town

Anne Martin & Bob Simmons

Annie Roberts, Matthew Rolston & Lisa Stewart

Marietta Bolt & Charlene Comer

Ellen Westkaemper & Paula Angermeier

Karen Schaefer & Susan Stewart

Rachelle Mickel & Chesnee Klein

Charlie Mickel & Bill Masters

Anne Woods & Ashley McHugh

Marquin Campbell & Maggie Holmes NOVEMBER 2018 / 37

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ON THE

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International Ballet’s Season Kick-off Party September 14, 2018

Cameron Dennard, Amber Dennard, Eric Shafer & Debi Shafer

The International Ballet announced its 2018–2019 season in style with a kick-off party at Zen. More than 100 ballet supporters snacked on hors d’oeuvres from Cribb’s Catering while jiving to the beats of Collective Music Solutions. The dance company surprised guests by performing select excerpts from the new season, which includes a Russian folk dance, accompanied by accordion player T.C. Costello. Miss South Carolina 2018 Davia Bunch, an International Ballet alumna, was also in attendance.

Amy Bright & Lee Bright

Vlada Kysselova, Liz Acker, Doug Acker & Michelle Brown

Liz Acker, Michelle Brown & Steve Brown

By Fourth Dimension Photography

Kevin Privado & Evangeline Whaley

Joanna Henn, Greta Somerville & Eliza Burdette

Greta & Graham Somerville

Joseph Lannamann & Davia Bunch

Doug Acker, Michael Dodd & Kathryn Dodd

Will Snader & Meredith Rice

Evangeline Whaley, Steve Fowler, Susan Ashcraft, Sallie Holder & Jamie Prince

Stacy Quattlebaum, Stuart Reynolds & Amy Reynolds John Davidson & Liz Blackwood Michelle Mccallum & Micki Turner

Vlada Kysselova & Paul Creamer

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15th Anniversary Celebration for atHome Magazine

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September 5, 2018 Rebecca Lehde & Julie Tindall

Celebrating fifteen years of covering the best of Upstate home décor, design, and architecture, atHome commemorated its anniversary with a surprise party at Stella’s Southern Brasserie for Editor-in-Chief Lynn Greenlaw. Community Journals publisher Mark Johnston offered remarks, and guests savored a curated selection of hors d’oeuvres, wine, and beer.

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By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Dabney Peeples, Joe Henson & Libby McMillan Henson

Stephanie Burnette, Lynn Greenlaw & Blair Knobel

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ON THE

Town

The Honor Foundation’s Executive Sponsor Event September 20, 2018 The Honor Foundation held its 3rd annual Executive Sponsor event at the Greenville ONE building, where guests were introduced to the organization’s efforts to help Navy SEALs and special operators transition to civilian life. Fellows and alumni of the foundation shared personal stories from their own transition experience aided by the foundation’s process for professional development. The event also included networking and fellowship. By Dove Light Photography

Tyler Warren & Ken Cole

Jeanne McMillion, Greg McMillion & Katie Kern

John Sterling & David Maiorana

Shannon Hansen, Chris Lewis & Tami Miller

Chad Wooten, Mayor Knox White & Doug Smith

Celeste Purdie & Seabrook Merchant

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Yesenia Castro-Vazquez & Sandy Vann NOVEMBER 2018 / 41

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ON THE Danitra & Edgar Barnette

Town

Wines & Equines for Happy Hooves September 8, 2018

Louise Quarles & Alison Quarles Ted Slowik, Sara Slowik, Lil Fayssoux & Bill Fayssoux Jim& Janine Hatfield

Ellen & Bill Nesbitt

Local non-profit Happy Hooves held its 7th annual Wine & Equines evening amidst the picturesque background of Eden Farms. Guests enjoyed music from students of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities and heavy hors d’oeuvres, wine, and beer from The Liberty House Inn and Southern Libations. The event raised $25,000 for therapeutic riding scholarships for at-risk youth and children with special needs. By Dove Light Photography

Phil Monolo, Rachael Monolo & Lisa Gunn David & Cathy Mitchell

Nancy Sutterfeild, Kate Faulds & Zach Faulds

Caitlin O’Hare & Bridget O’Hare Mary Anne Inglis, Becky Sweeney, Walker Sowles & Christine Scarpelli

Rosemary Cook, Robbie Cole, Pam Cole & Ewan Sweeney

Lori Simpson, Kathryn Brooks, Sarah Henderson & Kym Klapperich

Paul & Carolyn Black

Jolene Hoover, Hayley Hoover & Andrew Williams

Emily Hawkins, Crystal Dempsey, Charlie Munson & Judy Munson

Dan & Monique Gillen

Bob & Melinda Hoover

Dale & Julie Dangler

Sara Fayssoux, Meghan O’Hare, Skye Sweeney, Caroline Mitchell & Abby Peterman

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TOWN

Weddings

Clair Dias & David Stone May 17, 2018

/ by Abby Moore Keith

C

ollege can be shaky ground for serious relationships, unless the parties involved have bachelor degrees in building design. Both architecture students at Clemson University, Clair Dias and David Stone structured their romance on a firm foundation. The two dated through undergrad and graduate school, until a family trip to Banff, Canada, presented David the ideal opportunity to nail down Clair’s

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“yes.” During a hiking excursion on Victoria Island, David popped the question, the moment forever captured on his strategically placed drone camera. The two were married at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Greenville with a reception following at the Greenville Country Club, both venues close to Clair’s family home. The bride wore a Christophe gown purchased from Nitsa’s Apparel in Winston-Salem,

Aisle Say: Clair and David met as architecture students at Clemson University, and after a few years of dating, the two were married in the stunningly designed Westminster Presbyterian Church in Greenville.

North Carolina. Urban Petals designed her bouquet and florals, and the reception featured the tunes of Men of Distinction. Clair and David now live in Portland, Oregon. David is a user experience designer for Nike Technology, and Clair is an architectural designer for BORA Architects. JEFF HALL PHOTOGRAPHY

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TOWN

Weddings

Mary Knight Stuckley & Tyler Felt June 23, 2018 It seems fitting that while celebrating at annual autumn event Fall for Greenville, two festival fans would fall for one another. In town for the weekend, Charlestonite Mary Knight Stuckley—girl tribe in tow—started the evening at Ink N Ivy, where Tyler Felt and his friends happened to be grabbing drinks. The two converged at the bar, and after hours of connecting—and reconnecting at the Clemson tailgate the following day— they recognized a bond stronger than a one-weekend wonder. Fifty-three weekends of dating later, Tyler casually suggested a Friday evening out. While walking downtown, he detoured across Liberty Bridge, only to drop to one knee in full view of the falls. After Mary Knight’s response in the affirmative, Tyler surprised her once more with a celebration at Up on the Roof with friends and family. The two said their vows in the bride’s hometown of Hartsville, South Carolina, where the matron of honor’s father, the Reverend Rags Coxe, performed the ceremony. Mary Knight’s mother created the flower arrangements, as well as the wedding cake. The couple lives in Greenville; Tyler is a regional sales manager for BW Flexible Systems, and Mary Knight is a physician assistant at Greenville ENT. LAUREN JONAS PHOTOGRAPHY

Laney Stephens & Shaun David Coppock August 25, 2018 Yes, we’ve heard the blind date horror stories. But Laney Stephens’ and Shaun David Coppock’s matchup is not your typical aunt’s best friend’s liveat-home godson set-up scenario. The two college kids took a chance when mutual friends suggested they meet, and three years of dating later, these Tennessee Vols turned Nashvillians were ready for the big-time commitment. Anticipating Laney’s desire for family presence on proposal day, Shaun David requested that they fly up from Greenville. After he received his bride’s forever yes at Nashville’s iconic Parthenon replica, the groom-to-be surprised her twice more with a family dinner and, after, an engagement party with all of their friends. The two were married at Grace Church Downtown, with sweet personal touches including Scripture readings and moments honoring loved ones. Strossner’s Bakery provided the cake alongside decadent bites by Seasons Café & Catering. The couple continues to live in Nashville, where Laney is a Staples business consultant, and Shaun David is an asset manger for Fresh Capital. CHRISTINE LEGRAND PHOTOGRAPHY

Miriam Zepeda & Fernando Solis July 29, 2018 When your epic sunrise beach proposal plan is wrecked by the weather, you resort to Plan B. At least, that’s what Fernando Solis opted for when surprising his long-distance girlfriend Miriam Zepeda. The two had started dating a year earlier, but as their jobs required constant travel across the country, Fernando and Miriam sustained a remote romance until one fateful weekend when the two retreated to Miami at an Airbnb boat anchored in the bay. While gray skies put a downer on Fernando’s initial pop-the-question plan, he quickly switched gears by suggesting a photo shoot on deck when the weather cleared, where he eventually obtained the affirmative answer he so desired. Miriam and Fernando tied the knot at The Red Horse Inn in Landrum. Miriam walked down the aisle in a Lillian West dress from Poinsett Bride, but not before their Labradoodle Bodhi announced her entrance with a “Here Comes the Bride” sign. The two have now moved to Tampa, Florida, where Miriam is the division director at Robert Half Office Team, and Fernando is a branch manager at Elwood Staffing. BONFIRE VISUALS HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Color Code: West Pelzer Pine by Loïs Andy Gambrell, 2017. Acrylic on canvas, 59 in x 63 in.

Artwork photographed by Eli Warren

Modern Eye

Back from his world travels, Andy Gambrell reimagines his Appalachian home in new angles

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Fields of Color Painter Andy Gambrell returns to West Pelzer to inspire an artistic movement / by M. Linda Lee // portrait by Eli Warrwn money on nonsense,” he concedes. “But when I saw Vir Heroicus Sublimis by Barnett Newman and Number 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist) by Jackson Pollack, I was thunderstruck by them. I was absolutely shaken to my core.” After graduating with a double major in studio art and art history, Andy turned down a scholarship to the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn to pursue his MFA in painting at the University of Miami. There he studied with Modernist masters—including Darby Bannard, a key figure in the Color Field movement.

Artwork courtesy of the artist

A

ndy Gambrell has lived in New York City, Paris, Miami, Atlanta, and most recently in Hong Kong, so it’s surprising to find an artist of his stature painting in a small studio he built behind his house in West Pelzer, South Carolina. Yet coming back to his rural hometown has always been part of this artist’s journey. “My lifelong plan,” Gambrell says, “has been to acquire the skills, experience, and credibility to return to the Upstate to paint full-time in a studio that I own in the place where I am most inspired, West Pelzer.” That creative journey began at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities and continued at Furman University. While at Furman, a trip to the Museum of Modern Art in NYC proved life-changing. “Coming from a blue-collar background, Modernist art struck me as a sort of game, a conspiracy where people were making

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Artwork courtesy of the artist

Hometown Hues: (Clockwise from opposite center left) In college, Andy Gambrell was inspired by the bold colors and geometric lines of the Modernist movement, qualities now reflected in his Foundation of the World painting in his West Pelzer studio, as well as Jocund and Boon; Needles; Tinhung; Cheung Chau; and No Bright Praise.

Gambrell, who taught art for 13 years, is now concentrating full-time on his own painting practice. His large canvases exert a gripping presence with their bold acrylic colors and geometric angularity—a stellar geometry that derives from his love of stargazing. The subject matter comes from the natural world around him. It’s an alchemy that he has spent more than 20 years cultivating. “I see my work as part of a dialogue with art history,” says the artist, “but in a more immediate way, the work is a response to my visual environment in South Carolina. I try to simplify nature to the point where it looks monumental. I boil out all the extraneous details and put in as few pieces as necessary to have as much impact as possible.” Currently, he’s building a body of work and talking with galleries regionally and abroad in order to assert his paintings into the market. As he prepares for the next chapter in his career, Andy feels a sense of cultural responsibility to the area he calls home. In addition to mentoring up-and-coming young artists and helping connect the dots for them to the international art world, he fosters the arts in his own community. “West Pelzer is a really exciting place to be right now,” Gambrell observes. “I’ve worked to turn around communities in Miami and Atlanta, and I really want to do that here. Quite literally, I want to paint West Pelzer into being.” Check out Andy Gambrell’s work at andygambrell.com, and look for his paintings via Blue Spiral 1 Gallery in Asheville, bluespiral1.com.

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TOWN

Profile

Easy on the Eyes Venice Lash Lounge lifts the spirits of clients and cancer patients through eyelash enhancements / by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Eli Warren

L

ean back and close your eyes,” says Amber Marquez from beneath a surgical mask as you recline onto a padded massage table. For a panicked nanosecond you think you forgot you were getting a root canal. “You’re going to be okay,” Marquez reassures, her gleaming, long dark hair as sleek as her black uniform. As you emerge an hour and a half later, you’re even better than okay—more winsome, more winning in life in general, you are sure, and also more wide-awake because your eyes, that hard-working window to the soul, make you look that way. How? It’s because

Marquez, intermittently humming along with the Pandora station playing overhead, has meticulously been applying synthetic eyelash extensions. Marquez is the master lash artist at Venice Lash Lounge on River Street in downtown Greenville, which she opened two and a half years ago. She is an impressive mix of focused energy and trajectory, and rightly titles herself a “manifester.” Once she decides to do something, it will be done. A single mom (to fouryear-old Venice, for whom the salon is named), Marquez, 33, has more than a decade of experience in esthetics and synthetic lash extensions; she was the first person certified in South Carolina in lash extensions after her training in Atlanta. She always knew one day she would open her own salon.

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See to Believe: Venice Lash Lounge’s Amber Marquez and David Hawkins recognize the salon’s unique ability to provide meaningful service. Each month, three cancer patients are given a full set of lash extensions.

“I’m a believer in Amber,” she says pointedly. “Amber is the master. Once you get them, don’t think that you’re going to be without them!” —Kathy Emerson “I was scared at first, obviously, with a one-anda-half-year-old baby, and I’m single,” says Marquez regarding her entrepreneurial leap. “My life coach said, ‘Listen, all you have to do is just fill out your LLC paperwork. You don’t have to make any decisions, and we’ll meet back in a week.’ Well, I walked down the street and saw a ‘for rent’ sign in the window the same day I filled out my LLC paperwork and I just knew that was it. I called [the realtor] that night and had the key the next day, and I had the store open in five weeks, taking my first client.” Kathy Emerson, a longtime client of Marquez, came to Venice as soon as the doors opened. Emerson has barely seen her own lashes in years after Marquez took, at first, a less is more approach, until she went full va-va-voom for a party. “I was wearing [a] paintbrush,” Emerson says laughing. There are 150 styles of lashes available—a full set of classic lashes is $175; a volume set $285 with fillins about every two weeks that start at $40—but Emerson is a believer in the service, right? Not so fast. “I’m a believer in Amber,” she says pointedly. “Amber is the master. Once you get them, don’t think that you’re going to be without them!” David Hawkins, who has known Marquez since middle school, sees the delight of her clients firsthand. After he made his way in the wild worlds of New York City and Los Angeles, he circled back to help at Venice. Marquez quickly asked him to handle her public relations, as well as the front-of-house goings-on. And a good thing, too. A recent gracious moment prompted Hawkins to suggest that Venice give back, too. After a long day of work, Hawkins headed to Publix for groceries but had forgotten his wallet. “There was a part of me that wanted to immediately be frustrated with myself for forgetting my wallet,” says Hawkins. “I told the people, ‘I’m so sorry I’ll go put this back,’ and the cashier, Doug, came from around the register and put his debit card in, and I’m like, ‘No, no, no, what are you doing?!’ He didn’t skip a beat. He said, ‘No, it’s fine. It’s just $8, not a big deal.’” To Hawkins, that small gesture was huge. Big enough, in fact, for him to inquire about a charity close to the cashier’s heart. The answer was “anything to do with cancer,” and soon after Hawkins presented the notion of Venice’s lash artists donating time and services to cancer patients, which Marquez immediately embraced. Now each month, three cancer survivors referred by the Cancer Society of Greenville County are given a full set of lash extensions, to counter the debilitating effects of chemotherapy. Proof that beauty and commerce can intersect in an unexpected, graceful way. And Doug, if you’re reading this—thank you showing that kindness is still the best look going.

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TOWN

Buzz Acoustic King: Famed songwriter Phillip Lammonds helps schools raise needed funds with his series Songwriters in the Round, inviting celebrated musicians to perform in an intimate environment for a charitable cause.

Perfect Harmony Songwriters in the Round brings the best of Nashville to raise funds for the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities / by Vincent Harris // portrait by Paul Mehaffey

P

hillip Lammonds has written songs for The Blue Dogs, Edwin McCain, Hootie & The Blowfish, The Steep Canyon Rangers, Craig Morgan, and Kellie Pickler, among many others. His songs have appeared on more than 30 albums, and he’s managed to carve out a 20-year career in Nashville, which is not a place known for fostering longevity in the music business. After all this time, one might think that the best moments in Lammonds’ life come when a platinum-selling artist chooses one of his songs to be on a new album. But in fact, the fun comes for him during the writing process itself. “I write songs every day,” Lammonds says. “I just like hanging out with the other songwriters and being in the room with them. Half of the session is us just joking around with each other. We talk about the songs, we talk about other things, we pick on each other, and there’s an intimacy built into the process.” Perhaps that’s why Lammonds has sought to keep that sense of intimacy in the series of Songwriters in the Round shows he’s been curating and participating in for the last 20 years. The idea came to him when he was looking for a unique way to raise money for his children’s school. “We were looking at alternative ideas for fundraisers,” Lammonds says, “and I’d been involved with a lot of guitar pulls (informal gatherings where songwriters trade off playing songs with just an acoustic guitar), and I just thought it would be a neat idea. And it ended up getting really popular, so we do several of them a year now.” One of Lammonds’ in-the-round fundraising shows will take place at the Old Cigar Warehouse in downtown Greenville on November 15. The show, presented by the South Carolina Governor’s School Foundation, will raise money for the Governor’s School’s resident high school students. Lammonds usually performs with three other singer/songwriters, trading off songs and stories. This year, he’ll be sharing the spotlight with

Brice Long, Tyler Reeve, and Hannah Dasher. “The crowd really enjoys it,” he says of the in-the-round setup. “You get to see the interaction. And since we don’t really have time to rehearse, we don’t know what songs we’re going to do. We’re in a jousting match. In that kind of setting, I might try something that I’ve never done, and I’ll just tell people to bear with me and I may mess up in the middle. It’s not a gimmick; it’s pure honesty.” 10th Annual Songwriters in the Round, Thursday, Nov 15, 7 p.m. $200. Old Cigar Warehouse, 912 S Main St, Greenville. For tickets or more information, visit scgsah.org/giving/events

W H O ’ S W H O at S O N GW R I T E RS I N T H E RO U N D TYLER REEVE

BRICE LONG

HANNAH DASHER

“Tyler is an up-and-comer here in town who’s had some hits with other people (Luke Combs, Love & Theft), and he has a solo career that is building,” Lammonds says. “I like to find one person who’s had some hits and another that I can introduce to people. That’s the core to the success of these shows . . . people are seeing someone they won’t see anywhere else.”

“Brice is sort of a nonconformist to musical authority,” Lammonds says. “He’s written a bunch of hits (for Gary Allan, Chris Stapleton, Garth Brooks, and George Strait, among others), but he doesn’t do things like everyone else. He’s a really accomplished singer and songwriter who could’ve been George Strait or Blake Shelton if he’d wanted to, but he decided he liked it where he was.”

“Hannah is Janis Joplin meets Patsy Cline,” Lammonds says. “She’s crazy good. There’s a lot of brilliance there. She just signed a record deal, and I think she’s the most likely to find some immediate success as a performer on big stages.”

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TOWN

History

Glory Days

I

Greenville’s Spirit Week festivities have grown into a professional-level philanthropic enterprise / by John Jeter

t’s the late 1970s, the heyday of high school hijinks. Rubber chickens dangle from campus flag poles. Toilets are dismembered in their stalls. Graffiti raiders tag rival schools. What’s supposed to be spirited, yet friendly, competition around football teams and mascots devolves into mayhem and misdemeanors, now memorialized in movies like Dazed and Confused and The Breakfast Club. Up until then, Greenville’s high schools were no different. But about 40 years ago, all that destruction and detention turned, improbably, into what has become a fundraising juggernaut. Here’s the story of Spirit Week, a tradition said to be unlike any other anywhere else. Spirit Week started in 1978, when the storied rivalry between Wade Hampton and Eastside high schools finally flew off the rails. One night, some Wade Hampton football players salted the Eagles’ field. Then a handful of Eastside kids retaliated with a “decorating mission” at the Generals’ stadium.

“There was a large general on a horse painted on the press box that faced the student parking lot,” according to a document whose provenance we can’t reveal. “When the students arrived the next day, the horse’s genitals had been greatly enhanced.” After that, competitive high school spirit came alive in Greenville. Brodie Bricker started as principal at Eastside in 1977, the year before the series of unfortunate events. He’s retired now but remembers when he and his colleagues decided that, rather than punishing the perps, they’d turn the rivalry into redemption.

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Teen Spirit: Each fall, Greenville’s biggest rival high schools turn from making mischief to raising funds for local charities during Spirit Week.

“I got together with the Wade Hampton principal and our student body president and said, ‘Hey, guys, let’s get together and do something.’” Spirit Week was born. During the first one, students sold construction-paper strips for a $1 apiece, ultimately stapling together a chain. It was decided the money raised would go to charity, announced during the height of high schools’ competitiveness: the Friday night football game. “That first year at halftime,” Bricker says, “the student body president of Eastside and the student body president of Wade Hampton walked side by side onto the field until the chain ran out.” Jane Robelot, now an anchor at WYFF, was there. “The class with the longest chain won,” WHHS’s then senior-class president says now. “Of course the seniors won.” She doesn’t remember where the money went, but over at Eastside, Bricker recalls the Eagles raised $3,500. Millions of dollars later, fourteen Greenville County high schools run their own Spirit Week, which typically leads up to fall’s biggest football game. Long before the week itself, students spend hours, often meeting through the summer, to prepare. Students select a charity, a different one every year, through a process every bit as rigorous as one you’d expect to see in a major philanthropic foundation. During their Spirit Week last year, the Generals chose Greenville’s Shriners Hospital for Children. The students hauled in an astonishing $251,376.12. “I don’t think ‘wow’ really covers it,” says Paul Finelli, the hospital’s director of development. “There are adult organizations that have not been able to raise that much money in one year for a charitable organization, let alone a group of high school students. It’s pretty exemplary.” Obviously, generating that much money requires more than construction paper. “To see how creative these high school students were, they turned anything they potentially could into a fundraising opportunity,” Finelli says, “and they had a blast doing it.” Eastside’s current student body president Daa’iyah Fogle, a 17-yearold senior, says she’s been involved with Spirit Week since her freshman year. She has seen the Eagles raise money with an ’80s-themed date night, a Sadie Hawkins Dance, a dog show, 5K run, golf tournament, talent showcase with 15 acts, and after-school events. This year, Eastside raised $118,130.62, says Sandy Mitchell, the school’s attendance clerk and alumni-relations staffer. The money went to the Cancer Society of Greenville—once again, a local organization that keeps Spirit Week funds in the community. “We decided that cancer affects so many people,” Fogle says. “Everyone knows a family member or friend or someone who has maybe fought cancer or survived or has passed away from cancer.” Of students’ charitable choices, Mitchell says, “It’s something that has struck a chord or has really touched their hearts, and it’s easy for those kids to focus on why we’re raising money. Whether we’re raising $200 or $120,000, it’s not how much money we raise, it’s what we’re raising money for.” Everyone involved—students, administrators, beneficiaries—says Spirit Week’s bundling of competition, creativity, compassion, and community means far more and lasts much longer than mischievousness with mascots. Finelli sees the tradition as “breeding a philanthropic spirit.” “They’re never going to forget their Spirit Week competitions. They’re never going to forget the amount of money they raised for charity, and they’re going to always think about the impact of their giving.”

Historical photo courtesy of Greenville County Historical Society & Photographs from the Coxe Collection.

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BY

Design

Pure Comfort Bosnian designer Marijana Mijacevic unites simple patterns and quality materials to create home-goods collection, Ku ć a / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaffey and Scottie Lenning

M

arijana Mijacevic loves simple things. So while the Bosnian apparel designer spends her days conceiving everything from hats to socks as the senior director of design for OOBE, in her free time, she fashions a line of unpretentious home goods. In this case, plain doesn’t mean homely. The linen pillows, aprons, and dishtowels she showcased at the Indie Craft Parade this fall developed a following among customers searching for simple and functional upscale items to adorn their homes. Since Marijana designs apparel for a living, home goods seemed an optimal fit for her hobby. “I always liked home goods, and they are different than apparel, which has to cater to an individual person—it has to fit,” she explains. “Home goods give me more freedom.” So she put together a small line under the

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brand name Kuća, which means “home” in her native Bosnian language. This was her second turn at the Indie Craft Parade, which hosts artisans across the country each September. “That first year at Indie was nerve-wracking figuring out how much to make,” recalls Marijana. “When I make stuff, I’m excited about it, and when I pack everything up [to take to the show], I think ‘who’s going to buy all this?’” This year, she made fewer items, concentrating on her best-selling pillows and taking orders for table linens and duvet covers. For the 2017 show, she had crafted a line of tote bags out of Tyvek. “The material is not natural, but it’s lightweight and you can shape it like paper,” she notes. This year, she took that concept a step further with waxed food-storage bags. The inspiration came when she wanted a bag to fit a baguette, and couldn’t find one big enough. Based on

Thread Lightly: Marijana Mijacevic’s thoughtfully crafted pillows, aprons, bags, and dishtowels are made in-house from linen, one of Mijacevic’s favorite materials to utilize for its natural tones and texture.

waxed sheets used to wrap produce, she designed a baguette bag out of cotton and waxed the material so it would preserve food. That led to a line of waxed spice bags that were so well-received that this year she added sandwich bags. The surprising thing about these bags is you can shape them, close them up, and seal them using only the heat of your hands. “And they still match that natural look to my aesthetic,” Marijana says. Lovely in their simplicity, Marijana’s products strike a balance between the natural and modern worlds. Crafted from beige linen, her aprons bear a trio of hand-painted indigo stripes, and her pillows display a variety of designs. She gets creative with painted patterns, dipping an ear of corn in indigo paint and rolling it down one side of a throw pillow, or using a vintage European stamp to repeat a more complex design. While some people avoid linen for the ironing nightmare it is, Marijana and her customers love it. “Natural materials always attracted me, and linen was my favorite material to work with.

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BY

Design

“I like to start with good quality fabric and good color and not overcomplicate it,” Marijana Mijacevic declares. “It’s important to me how things are made.”

Captionhead: text here

Hearth & Home: Originally from Bosnia, Marijana left her homeland due to national conflict. Her journey has led to positions at clothing companies Hanes and most recently OOBE, where she works as the senior director of design. Her home-goods line debuted at Indie Craft Parade in 2017.

What people don’t like—the wrinkling—I do,” says the designer. Though she gravitates to neutral colors, this year she added dusty rose, indigo, and charcoal hues, all hand-dyed in her kitchen. As a child, Marijana always enjoyed making, starting with doll’s clothes. “I like putting things together, regardless of what it is. I was always making things to give as gifts or for myself, and never thought about doing it on a bigger scale.” Even when she buys a gift, the designer doesn’t wrap it—she makes a bag for it. Her homeland of Bosnia was one single country when she went to university to study textile technology (including both garment manufacturing and design), but it was two when she graduated. As she was finishing her studies, war broke out, so she lived in Germany for a couple of years, and then immigrated to Canada. “There was nothing to go back to,” she laments. Her circuitous journey took her to Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she worked for Hanes, and finally to Greenville, in the steps of a former colleague who landed a job with OOBE. That was 12 years ago. Marijana sells her products online, but with a full-time job, she limits the number of orders she accepts. She’s considering placing some of her wares in local boutiques, and a collaboration with Greenville artist Keiko Kamata (who is currently experimenting with printed wallpaper) and Teresa Roche from Art & Light Gallery is in the works. “Teresa is using fabric and wallpaper in her paintings, so we have a similar aesthetic,” Marijana says. They are hoping to eventually combine their work in a pop-up shop in the Village of West Greenville, where Roche’s gallery is located. “Teresa has a good eye for connecting things. Keiko also has that refined taste, so our things fit naturally together.”

You might think $95 is a lot to pay for an apron, but consider the amount of time and the quality of the workmanship that goes into it, and you’ll appreciate the price tag. First there’s the linen itself, which is not inexpensive. When Marijana receives the fabric, she first washes, dries, and irons it before cutting out the patterns on a table set up in the living room of her Greenville town house. Articles are assembled in her sewing room upstairs. The deftness is in the details. “I like to start with good quality fabric and good color and not overcomplicate it,” she declares. “It’s important to me how things are made. I can’t just put it together.” That’s what stands out about Mijacevic’s workmanship. Her dishtowels have perfectly mitered corners and she sews vintage tape across the back of one corner for hanging; her aprons and pillows boast tidy French seams. Overall, there’s a lightness and a rich texture to Marijana’s creations that immediately draw your eye and invite you to touch them. Defined by simple lines, her work is remarkably beautiful— pure and simple. You can see Marijana’s products and place orders via her website: kucahome.com

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Remodel Reward Receive up to $1500* with purchase of select, customizable Café appliance suite combinations.

*Purchase 4 eligible Café Appliances, October 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018 at a participating authorized GE Appliances reseller. Depending on the number of BONUS models purchased, receive a Café Visa® Prepaid Card valued up to $1,500* via online or mail-in rebate. No more than two appliances of the same type will be eligible for rebate. For example, if you purchase three eligible microwaves, only two will be considered for rebate. See store for the eligible model list. This rebate cannot be combined with any other GE Appliances rebate. See store for full details.

Local family-owned and operated since 1951

17 Roper Mountain Road

|

Lowest Prices Guaranteed. Period.

G r e e nv i l l e , S C 2 9 6 0 7

|

864-268-3101

|

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SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-6, SATURDAY 9-5, SUNDAY-HOME WITH FAMILY!

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“We are thankful for the thousands of clients over the past 25 years who have trusted us to help them buy or sell the place they call home… where a lifetime of memories are made. Trust us to help you as well.” — Seabrook Marchant

www.MarchantCo.com • 864.467.0085 100 West Stone Ave., Greenville, SC 29609

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OUT OF

TOWN REGIONAL ESCAPES AND GLOBAL DESTINATIONS

Keys to Happiness: The Perry Hotel offers an ideal landing spot in the Florida Keys; for more, see page 64.

On a Breeze

Escape cold-weather doldrums in a Florida paradise NOVEMBER 2018 / 63

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Away

F High Keys Island dreams come true at Key West’s The Perry Hotel / by Mary Cathryn Arm strong

or those living in Florida’s coastal region, autumn can be stressful. It’s peak hurricane season, and with that comes the looming threat of what could happen should those warm, swirling Atlantic Ocean waters take on a more organized, ominous form. The stakes were particularly high for The Perry Hotel Key West in September of 2017. After all, the newly minted property had just opened its doors to guests a mere four months earlier and was finding favorable footing as an alternative refuge to the bustle (and cruise-hopping crowds) of the downtown district when Hurricane Irma came hurtling towards the Florida island chain. A little windblown and minus a few palm trees, The Perry came out of the Category 4 hurricane mostly unscathed, thus passing its first true test as a bonafide citizen of the lower Keys. More than a year later, not much has changed but the tide.

STOCK ISLAND SAVVY

Although only a few miles from typical Key West postcard scenes like the famous Mallory Square sunsets and Duval Street dives—a quick drive on the A1A across Cow Key Channel, and you, too, can stand in line to take your photo at the Southernmost Point—The Perry Hotel is firmly ensconced in the .9-square-mile snow globe of Stock Island. Rather than trying to mimic its tourist-centric neighbor to the west with bellsand-whistles attractions, the hotel has chosen to harness the mellow, saltwater-splashed persona of its surroundings into an experience that is distinctly vintage Key West.

Photography, excluding opposite far right, courtesy of The Perry Hotel

GET

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Captionhead: text here

Photography excluding opposite right courtesy of The Perry Hotel

PLAY /// Downtown Key West The Perry Hotel guests are provided complimentary shuttle service to downtown Key West. Check out the nightly turtle races (yes, you read that correctly) at Turtle Kraals; pay a visit to the feline residents of the Ernest Hemingway House; catch one of the famous Mallory Square sunset celebrations; or just wander along Duval Street to answer the eternal question of which bar makes the best rum runner. Locations vary. (855) 539-9378, keywestvisitorscenter.com

/// Stock Island Marina Village The Perry’s favorable waterfront location provides easy access to a wide range of seafaring excursions. On-site outfitters furnish fishing charters, sunset sails, deep-sea dives, jet-ski tours, snorkels, kayaking, and more. Plus, the Marina Village is home to a number of local artisans. 7005 Shrimp Rd, Key West, FL. (305) 294-2288, stockislandmarina.com

Sand Castle: Minutes away from Key West, The Perry Hotel (opposite left) offers a relaxing retreat from tourist hotspots. In-house eateries like Matt’s Stock Island Kitchen & Bar and the Salty Oyster Dockside Bar & Grill present authentic dock-totable dining (center) from the talented hands of Executive Chef Kalen Fortuna.

That’s not to say The Perry is without its upscale frills; the 100-room lodging features an outdoor pool overlooking Stock Island Marina, three luxurious suites, fire pits, and a glass of bubbly at check-in. However, it was a conscious design decision to adopt a motif that somewhat narrates a visual timeline of the close-knit community’s heritage, chronicling its abiding cultural ties to the maritime industry, uncluttered lifestyle, and, more recently, a love affair with local art. Echoes of history reverberate off antique boat propellers and retro snapshots that stud the walls, salvaged teak hardwoods and flooring inlaid with words of wisdom from Key West’s omnipresent ghost of cocktails past, Ernest Hemingway. Clean lines, handcrafted, regional artworks, and contemporary industrial pieces give the digs a modern punch that hedges the dicey “all look, no touch” trap many boutique properties fall into. Here is a haven for taking it easy—sure, you can arrange an adventurous outing from the hotel’s waterfront marina through the NOVEMBER 2018 / 65

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GET

Away

EAT /// Matt’s Stock Island Kitchen & Bar

concierge, but there will be no judgments passed if your Key West vacation takes place entirely in one of The Perry’s poolside hammocks, rum-soaked and rocked by the thick Florida breeze. Word to the wise: save the deep-sea fishing for after the hangover.

GET TING YOUR SEA(FOOD) LEGS The Perry Hotel’s most overt homage to its nautical roots is perhaps better sampled than seen. Let’s face it, no one comes to Key West to eat a cheeseburger (except maybe Jimmy Buffett), and you’ll be hard-pressed to find more authentic, dock-to-table dining than what’s plated at the property’s two in-house restaurants: Matt’s Stock Island Kitchen & Bar and Salty Oyster Dockside Bar & Grill. Well-versed in the quirks of cuisine served below the Mason-Dixon line, Executive Chef Kalen Fortuna, who grew up in the Charleston area, knows a little bit about working with what you’ve got in the kitchen. Brought on board in December 2017 to head up both eateries, Fortuna immediately set to crafting an evolving menu that embraced a lifelong passion for taking his main course straight from the hook into the fire, metaphorically speaking. It’s not unusual to see the young chef striding across the marina dock loaded down with a morning haul (either of his own efforts or from one of the area’s many local fishermen), off to excise the most tantalizing parts from whatever sea creature he’s landed and transform it

Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, The Perry’s flagship restaurant serves up innovative American-style dishes with a seaworthy touch that comes directly from nearby marinas and distributors. 7001 Shrimp Rd, Key West, FL. (305) 294-3939, perrykeywest. com/eat-and-drink/matts-stockisland /// Lost Kitchen Social pop-up dinners are themed by their various host venues around the community, and frequently feature guestchef collaborations, seasonally curated courses, and paired libations. Locations vary. (305) 896-2087, lostkitchenkeywest.com /// Salty Oyster Dockside Bar & Grill The Perry’s casual poolside spot is highlighted by quick bites—think Cuban sandwiches and citrus lime-dusted chicken wings—as well as a fully stocked bar. We recommend the Perry Punch. 7001 Shrimp Rd, Key West, FL. (305) 295-6363, perrykeywest. com/eat-and-drink/salty-oyster

into that night’s featured special. Fortuna has a natural knack for revamping traditional Southern fare with coastal flair, proffering indulgent dishes that check the boxes of a quintessential Key West spread—wild-caught pink shrimp, shellfish, full raw bar, fresh daily catches done six ways from Sunday—without feeling like worn versions of the same ol’ seafood platter. Perusing the menu, there are indeed recognizable favorites: roasted snapper tacos topped with orange jalapeño slaw; smoked fish dip served with Ritz crackers; baskets of beer-battered fish and chips; shrimp po’boys stuffed into crunchy French bread; raw oysters, tuna tartare, yellowtail ceviche, shrimp and lobster in iced tackle boxes; shrimp over stone-ground grits. But the true standouts are the dishes where Fortuna has had room to experiment. Take the beignets. An inherent icon of New Orleans cuisine, Fortuna’s fluffy, crab-filled version is complemented by a creamy aioli derived from yet another staple of the Southern spice rack—Old Bay Seasoning. The Carolina seafood chowder is a throwback to Fortuna’s Holy City roots, with an assortment of clams, mussels, shrimp, scallops, tasso ham, potatoes, crayfish, and sweet corn swimming in perfect creamy harmony. Classic braised short ribs are kicked up with an espresso-based glaze and rounded out with a golden cornbread mash. If you’ve saved room for dessert (or even if you haven’t), the skillet-baked peach cobbler and refreshing key lime tart crusted with coconut macaroons add the perfect crescendo to Fortuna’s epicurean opus. The best part? You’re only steps away from the comforts of your room, where you’ll inevitably hit the hay with visions of Key West Pinks dancing in your head. The Perry Hotel Key West, 7001 Shrimp Rd, Key West, Florida. (305) 296-1717, perrykeywest.com

Photography courtesy of The Perry Hotel

Sunnyside Up: Poolside lounges beneath gently swaying palm trees are a hallmark of The Perry Hotel’s laid-back luxury. The 100-room resort sports three posh suites and an outdoor pool with views of Stock Island Marina.

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GR A ND K I TC H E N S AV ING S

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Local family-owned and operated since 1951

Lowest Prices Guaranteed. Period.

17 Roper Mountain Road | Greenville, SC 29607 | 864-268-3101 | www.jefflynch.com SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-6, SATURDAY 9-5, SUNDAY-HOME WITH FAMILY!

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FIELD

Guide

High Life

A

Aerial adventures await at this adrenaline-pumping retreat just west of Atlanta / by Stephanie Trot ter // illustration by Timothy Banks

re you drowning in boredom? Is the nine-tofive pulling you down? Well, it’s time to soar. Shake off that humdrum ball and chain with a trip to Historic Banning Mills near Whitesburg, Georgia. Release your inner daredevil across 10 miles of zip lines and giant sky bridges. If the speed doesn’t make your heart pound, the height will. “We start with Level 1,” explains expert guide Caleb Henry. “People are getting nervous on the first bridge, they’re breathing heavy and

Zip It: Soar above a kaleidoscope of autumn color at west Georgia’s Historic Banning Mills. While the height may tempt you to shut your eyes, you will miss exceptional beauty and singular wildlife.

hyperventilating, but by the end of the tour, on Levels 3 and 4, on these big 1,000-foot zip lines, they are having the time of their lives.” Not that we know from personal experience . . . but Caleb is adept at calming nervous souls while defying gravity. “Helping people push past their barriers of fear is really rewarding,” the energetic 22-year-old reveals. “You can tell they’re scared and this is far out of their comfort zone. It takes a lot of courage to step off that

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platform.” Look at the Screaming Eagle line for instance. Lean forward, and you’re quickly zooming 70 miles an hour, 150 feet above ground. Flight of the Falcon is even more of a gut-check with zippers flying headfirst like Superman, 200 feet high, for three-quarters of a mile. Both runs are part of an adrenaline rush Guinness World Records has certified as the longest zip-wire canopy tour on the planet. This rustic hideaway, nestled in Snake Creek Gorge forty-five minutes west of Atlanta, is the brainchild of Donna and Mike Holder. The retired nurse and American Airlines pilot purchased an overgrown 88 acres to construct a team-building ropes course in the late nineties. “When we bought it, we didn’t have any idea about the history or anything,” Donna recalls. “We couldn’t see a thing, so we just started investigating.” They ended up unearthing the forgotten ghost town of Banning Mills, rich with folklore of a bygone era. Today, the site stretches across 300 acres, and includes a cozy lodge with 60 rooms, a gourmet restaurant, luxury spa, zip-line adventure park, conservation center, and hiking trails to ruins dating back to 1826. Always growing, the newest project will present a circular walk within the tree line for pedestrians to explore the grounds. Donna describes the vision, saying, “When you’re on the sky trails, you’ll be able to look around and see a lot of wildlife. We have cougar and bears. The ecosystem here is very unusual for west Georgia.” Equally unusual, are the Tree House suites. Guests traverse rope bridges to enter the octagon-shaped dwellings furnished with gas logs, cable TV, and Keurig Coffee machines. Tethered as tightly as an adventurer’s harness, the lodging and zip lines create the ultimate modern Swiss Family Robinson getaway. Historic Banning Mills, 205 Horseshoe Dam Rd, Banning, GA; (770) 834-9149, historicbanningmills.com

Stone & Tile Restoration Marble s Granite s Stone s Travertine Terrazzo s Concrete s Vinyl s Corian Polishing s Restoration s Maintenance

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Residential and Commercial SIDE TREKS /// A DV E N T U R E TOW E R : Another Guinness record-holder, Adventure Tower is listed as the tallest freestanding climbing wall known. Alongside skilled guides, even beginners can quickly learn to scale its 14 stories, as well as rappel down two shorter, 95-foot walls. The wall features nine climbing lanes, in addition to four overhangs that include a traversing overhang and chimney.

B I R D S O F P R E Y : Meet Liberty, a majestic bald eagle, and the newest resident and conservation ambassador at Banning Mills. She’s just one of many feathered creatures master falconer Dale Arrowood presents during on-site live shows, complete with flight demonstrations. Those interested can also accompany Dale on falcon hunts.

Restore Your Floors, Counters or Showers

Call for a FREE On Site Estimate

DAY S PA :

Just think of how wonderful a massage will feel, after all of Banning Mills’ high-wire hijinks. Swedish, hot stone, and deep-tissue massages are all available in the spa at the top of the lodge. The aromatherapy loofah salt glow is also a favorite, with mineral salts and aroma oils designed to improve circulation and soften skin.

Ask about our fabulous stone care products!

888-388-7730

marblelife-carolina.com NOVEMBER 2018 / 69

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Art. Culture. Style.

Get TOWN magazine in your mailbox every month. 12 issues $65. Subscribe today at

TOWNCarolina.com/subscribe

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TOWN

SPORT THE BEST STORIES OF LAND & WATER

Looking Sharp: Black Eagle Outlaw Arrows; arrowheads (left to right) Rage Trypan, standard field point, and SlickTrick broadhead. For more, see “Quick Draw,” page 72.

Point Blank

Modern arrows and tech-forward bows transform the art of archery NOVEMBER 2018 / 71

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TOWN

GEAR

Straight & Arrow: Located off Highway 153 in Piedmont, Saluda River Archery is a go-to for all your bow-and-arrow needs. The pro shop sports a wide range of gear, as well as rentals and equipment upkeep. For more information, visit saludariverarchery.com.

WILD GAME For deer hunters, compound bows like this Mathews Archery TRIAX are popular alternatives to rifles. Bows have a shorter range, requiring better accuracy, skill, and concealment techniques. In some of South Carolina’s wildlife management areas, archery season for deer opens as early as August 15 and extends through December.

Quick Draw

Stay on target with a TRIAX compound bow // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

Mathews Archery TRIAX bow from Saluda River Archery, 3318 Hwy 153, Piedmont. (864) 385-4117, saludariverarchery.com

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FOR THE CAROLINAS

Every day, more than 32,000 people choose us for their healthcare. From the region’s most advanced heart program and cancer institute to a nationally ranked children’s hospital, we remain strong in our commitment – not just to delivering better care, but to delivering the best care. For all.

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Pub: Town Magazine

10/17/18 12:50 PM

Client: Atrium Health


TOWN

Sport

Call of the Wild Bob Jones graduate Luke Meyers has a penchant for bear encounters, Alaskan adventures, and perpetual wanderlust / by Stephanie Trot ter // illustration by Timothy Banks

T

he tour was going just as planned. Sun glistened off the salmon-filled stream. An eagle soared high above. Suddenly, brush broke below as an 800-pound coastal brown bear ambled toward the group. Pitch-black claws ripped through the hillside, while the powerful hump on its back swayed with each stride. Guide Luke Meyers spied a tuft of white on the bruin’s chest— leftover polar bear DNA. “I’m locked, loaded, and the safety’s off. I’m ready to smoke him if I have to,” the outdoorsman recalls of the heart-stopping encounter. “He was 20 feet from me, and you could see there was something going on in his head. I just talked to him and said, ‘Why don’t you go back down there and get some fish?’ I talked in a real small, soothing voice, which I’d seen some of the natives use.” The panting beast turned around and walked away.

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Bear Necessities: Revered as a natural wildlife refuge, Alaska is home to brown, black, and polar bears. In Hoonah, former Greenville resident Luke Meyers guides curious groups to see the Sitka, a subspecies of brown bear that roams almost exclusively on the southeastern Alaskan islands where Meyers resides.

local ranger and indigenous friends. Once in a while, Meyers spies some “repeat offenders,” like Patches at Hoonah’s dump. But usually, each creature is different, providing a captivating glimpse of Ursus arctos sitkensis, a subspecies of brown bear that almost uniquely resides here. Sometimes, the best show plays out on his client’s faces. “I had a group from a big city, and we didn’t see anything for three hours. Then, we spotted a bear going in the bushes. It reemerged, looked right at us. One of the women was crying out of joy, and that made me tear up. That was magical giving her such an experience.”

B E A R T R A C K S Life in Hoonah, Alaska, couldn’t exist in starker contrast to Bob Jones University. But Meyers, a 1998 grad, wouldn’t have it any other way. “I wasn’t a conformist, ever,” Meyers says. “I was never going to do a nine-to-five.” The congenial rebel’s “office” is now 200 miles of logging roads in southeastern Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. His primary task: spotting bears for tourists. “Where I track bears varies by season,” he reveals. “Early on, they use the logging roads as game trails. Later in spring, they move to clearcut areas where wild blueberries, huckleberries, and salmonberries grow. Then later into summer, they go to streams—once the salmon start running.” Passengers bounce along in his large, Ford van, missing what’s obvious to trackers: “Destroyed skunk cabbage, paw prints going from one side to another, bear scat.” Years after guiding his first group, he still gleans “bear signs” from the

L E A V I N G T H E D E N Adjusting to life beneath the Northern Lights has been just about as perplexing as his initial move to Bob Jones University, after growing up in suburban Phoenix. “It was a haze!” the bearded adventurer says, reminiscing with a hearty laugh. “I came from arid Arizona. Everyone had clean haircuts; I’d had a ponytail and earrings. I was very disoriented.” He pressed every boundary at Bob Jones (his father’s alma mater and the only education his folks would fund), but skirted just shy of the demerit cap, to grab a degree in counseling. It was time to bust out of the bubble. First stop: Costa Rica to learn Spanish, and then the Dominican Republic where he worked with at-risk students. “There’s something about my brain, and I can’t do something that’s expected of me,” admits the middle child. “I get bored really easily. In the D.R., when I had to shower out of a bucket, eat foods I’d never eaten before, and speak a different language, these things were fun and new.” Once the newness wore off and money wore thin, he returned to Greenville, where he flipped houses and worked at Stella’s Southern Bistro. As much as he loved hiking Pisgah and Paris Mountain, his soul yearned to explore more. He built furniture in Oregon, but something was missing. At a low point in his mid-30s, a classmate from Bob Jones, a native Alaskan, invited him to the town of Hoonah to repair a roof. “I stayed two weeks, and kept calling the airline to delay my return. I finally came down, got my truck and drove back.” That’s when Meyers stopped wandering. His restless spirit finds peace on Chichagof Island, a panhandle known for the densest population of coastal brown bears in the world. (Think Northern Exposure on the ocean, with a quirky Alaskan mix of 734 eclectic personalities.) “We’re like a big happy, dysfunctional family,” Meyers explains. “I don’t lock the doors to my house. Everybody knows me. I’ll find plates of fish and crabs in my truck.” The bear whisperer has learned to can his own salmon, knows the exact island spot for cell service, and leads Sunday services in the small fishing village. “I host trivia nights on Wednesdays, and we have a Well-Fed, Well-Read group. We pick a piece of literature from somewhere in the world, like Japan, and we’ll talk about what we read and eat Japanese food.” Work is a mix of passions and hobbies: carpentry, construction, and guiding. He even plans to open his own tour company in 2019, where he’ll continue to carry his .45-70 lever-action Marlin for protection. He has never had to pull the trigger, despite several close encounters, including one with Darrell. “We used to call him Little Bastard because he gets right up in your business. If you’re fishing, he just starts walking toward you and you have to throw rocks at him to say, ‘Hey, this isn’t cool. We need boundaries dude!’” Meyers’ boundaries now encompass the world. During the winter, the journeyman leaves Alaska to travel. This year’s destinations include Ethiopia, Gabon, and Greenville. Yep. You can look for him at Stella’s, where he’ll be happy to share a beer and some bear tales. NOVEMBER 2018 / 75

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Leg Work: (left to right) Louise et Cie Kealy anthracite sandal with men’s Tour Profile midnight blue sock; Pelle Moda Bonnie blush velvet heel with men’s 19th Hole Performance Series solid gray sock; and Jeffrey Campbell total red crinkle patent leather bootie with men’s 19th Hole Performance Series red stripe sock. Socks from Kentwool; shoes from Muse Shoe Studio.

Sole Discretion Slip into a pair of sleek and soft Kentwool socks

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THE ITEM

Ankle Action Kentwool’s new designs will knock your old socks off // photography by Paul Mehaffey

HEEL YES : Crafting textiles in the Upstate for 175 years, Kentwool knows a thing or two about selling socks. But don’t let them pull the wool over your eyes—the manufacturer knows how to give them away, too. Since socks are a highly requested apparel donation item, the company has donated 30,0 0 0 socks, valued at $60 0,0 0 0, to local organizations, prioritizing charitable investment in the Upstate by supporting more than 10 0 non-profits in the past 15 years.

Wool Worth: (left to right) Band of Gypsies Andrea corduroy bootie with 19th Hole Performance Series Columbia blue striped sock; Louise et Cie Kealy anthracite sandal with 19th Hole Performance Series red striped sock. Shoes from Muse Shoe Studio; socks from Kentwool.

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We know a little bit about luxury. Internationally, Coldwell Banker sold $148.7 million in luxury real estate each day in 2017. Locally, Coldwell Banker Caine was involved in 25% of luxury transactions in Greenville in the first half of 2018. When it comes to luxury, there is no partner better suited to bring you success.

ColdwellBankerCaine.com/Luxury

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THE GOODS

Out of the Woods Local home goods crafter Slab Guild designs unique utensils perfect for holiday prep // photograph by Paul Mehaf fey Table Tools: Greenville-based Slab Guild designs high-quality home and kitchen wares that excel in both form and function. Products include cutting and serving boards, rolling pins, spoons, along with custom-crafted pieces like tables and bars.

READY TO ROLL : (left to right) long-handle spoon made from black walnut wood; French rolling pin made from ash wood; spoon made from maple wood; stirrer made from cherry wood; rolling pin made from cherry wood; and cutting board made from brass and black walnut wood. For more Slab Guild products, visit slabwoodworking.com.

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

Featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra conducted by Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel Starring James TormĂŠ With appearances by International Ballet and Santa & Mrs. Claus

The Peace Center

Nov. 30 at 7:30 pm | Dec. 1 at 7:30 pm | Dec. 2 at 3 pm Presented by

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For tickets visit greenvillesymphony.org

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TOWN

Beauty

Get It, Girl: Let the pros give your body some expert attention.

Glam Squad Look (and feel) fabulous with our lineup of beauty experts / by Ruta Fox // illustration by Kate Sutton

W

hether it’s pampering you desire or a bit of glamour you require, to prepare for this season of celebrations, you’ll want to surround yourself with professionals who will make you feel sensational. We’ve rounded up the best to help you shine.

M AS SAG E RIVER FALLS SPA Festive body indulgences worth seeking out at this downtown mainstay include the hydrating, anti-aging chocolate truffle body treatment, the espresso limón slimming body wrap, the nourishing and toning honey herbal body treatment, and the exfoliating body polish. On the massage menu are hot stone, deep tissue, sports, or relaxation modalities in this serene spa. Your body will thank you. 130 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 240-2136, riverfallsspa.com

NAILS

HANNA NAILS Spotless and friendly, Hanna Nails delivers an array of services. Go for classic manicures and pedicures, plus the healthier-than-acrylic NextGenNails or Signature Nail Systems (commonly called SNS or “powder dip”), which use no UV light and last flawlessly for well over two weeks. Dozens of color choices are available, from subtle hues to glittering sparkle. 409 Mills Ave, Ste 202, Greenville. (864) 520-1702

H A I R E X T E N S I O N S / S P R AY TA N N I N G

THE BEAUTIFUL CO. If you want to turn heads, head over to The Beautiful Co. This sophisticated salon specializes in 100 percent human hair extensions to add volume and length, which are the secret weapon for thick, magnificent manes, either wavy or straight. Pop into the customizable spray tan booth, and you’ll have a South Beach glow in five minutes. 100 Green Ave, Greenville. (864) 501 2678, beautifulsalon.co

FAC I A L S

TAUSEND-SCHOEN BEAUTY Flawless skin is the foundation for any holiday beauty look. It starts in this private salon where European owner Silvia Fischbach determines a custom facial from her menu, suited to your skin type and utilizing high-quality, imported creams and masks. Thanks to an annual European trip, she remains current on cutting-edge technology such as healing light therapy and exfoliation techniques. 905 E Washington St (upstairs in the Waterstone Dentistry Building), Greenville. (864) 201-9633

L AS H E S

VENICE LASH LOUNGE Venice Lash Lounge makes absolutely sure that the focus will be on your peepers. In an hour or two, the team will have you amazed at the difference that lash extensions, a lash lift, brow shaping, or a brow tint will make to your visage. 404 River St, Greenville. (864) 567-5654, venicelashlounge.com

MAKEUP

COTTON ROUGE Having your makeup professionally applied will up your confidence and make you feel like a VIP. From a natural look to a d ramatic difference, the pros at Cotton Rouge can show you how it’s done. Hire them for a makeup application or a lesson at their studio— or they’ll come right to your door. 250 Mill St, Taylors. (864) 416-1254, cottonrougeandcompany.com

ST Y L I N G ROBBIE RANDOLPH No time to shop and no idea of what to wear? Robbie Randolph is a personal shopper and wardrobe stylist with great taste who can pull selections from local boutiques, assess and work with what’s already in your closet, or accompany you on a shopping trip to buy new shoes, accessories, and clothing. (864) 567-6805

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GHS Cancer Institute. World-class therapies where you live. Video and more at ghs.org/cancerfacts.

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MS. BEA

Wright

Forget That

Though we’re each worth remembering, sometimes recalling names is a different story

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andshake, hug, or high five. Those are standard options when meeting a friend, colleague, or acquaintance. Ideally, the person’s name will be included in your greeting. Yet sometimes we simply cannot pull a name out of our brain’s catalog of the characters we are supposed to know. I have always considered myself to be pretty good at facial recognition and name recollection. One time I was riding an escalator in Atlanta and recognized an elementary school classmate whom I had not seen in decades going the opposite way on the same escalator. We had a lovely, albeit fast chat. But my skills were put to the test when I was rush chairman of my sorority. On opening night of rush, I was stationed at the door of the sorority house. As the 100-plus rushees crossed the threshold, I was tasked with introducing each one—most of whom I had never met, but may have seen in a photograph—to one of my 100-plus sorority sisters, with whom I was well-acquainted. The rapid pace was challenging as I strived to convey a sense of warmth and sisterhood to our guests. When memory failed, my sorority sister became a nameless “dearest friend” as the welcoming introduction was made. Not my finest hour, but we exceeded our rush goals, so it couldn’t have been that bad. Recently I read that an estimated 1 percent of the population has a particular knack for remembering the faces and names of everyone they have ever met. Can you imagine that? At the other end of the spectrum, recalling names presents a real challenge for an individual with a documented neurological disorder called prosopagnosia, also known as “face blindness,” which may affect up to 2.5 percent of Americans. If you are among the elite super-recognizers and run into an acquaintance who is a prosopagnosiac, there is no doubt that the encounter will be mutually frustrating. It will be necessary to reintroduce yourself to this person every time your paths cross.

Assuming the absence of such extremes, there will be multiple occasions when either you cannot recall someone’s name, or you receive a blank stare when you greet someone by name. If my husband ruled the world, he would mandate name tags for everyone, at all times, with a quick bio in small print to help him figure out how he knows the person. Since name tags are not always an option, I encourage this simple, tried-and-true habit: Take the initiative and introduce yourself as you reach out to shake the person’s hand. Be gracious, whether or not his face registers recognition, and offer a comment about when you last saw one another to jog a memory that will reestablish a connection. On the occasion that your greeting elicits a response that you have met previously, simply explain that you have developed a habit of always introducing yourself, because not everyone has a memory as good as hers. We are each worth remembering, and our efforts to remember someone’s name upon greeting will always be appreciated. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.

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W W W . M E Y E R D E N T I S T R Y . C O M NOVEMBER 2018 / 85

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Body Talk

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The Man recaps his struggle with living in moderation

ne morning in the spring of 2007 I stepped out of the shower and took a long look in the mirror. It was a depressing experience. My stomach, which just a few years earlier had been flat and taught, was now a flabby, rounded mass of hairy flesh that had inched my center of gravity out past my toes. My face was bloated and blotched from gin and salt-laden foods, and my eyes were surrounded by the dark circles that come from long restless nights. I looked like a raccoon with a thyroid problem. I’d reached the point where I’d begun to wear Guayabera shirts and pants with elastic waistbands. I’d even attempted to grow a beard just so I could contour its edges into some sort of trompe l’oeil jawline. I was thirty-eight years old and forty pounds overweight, and I was sick of it. I looked down at my beach ball of a stomach and put it on notice: “In three months you’ll be gone,” I said. “Mark my words, your days are numbered.” The next day I visited a local gym and took a tour. It was terrifying. The equipment was intimidating and seemed dangerous, and I imagined several different scenarios in which I might injure myself: slipping on a treadmill and then being sucked underneath its base, decapitating myself with a barbell during an overly confident bench press, snapping my crotch like a wishbone on the hip abduction machine—the possibilities for pain and embarrassment were endless. Plus the entire

place smelled. Everyone was covered in sweat, and several glistening men grunted and sneered at themselves in a mirror while curling dumbbells the size of tree stumps. I left the gym and stopped at a sporting goods store where I browsed the fitness department looking for ways to get ripped in the privacy of my own home. I settled on a jump rope, a Swiss ball, and a twentyfive-pound pair of dumbbells, which were the heaviest ones I could manipulate into my shopping cart. Back home I dragged the equipment to the basement and set up my “workout station,” convinced my six-pack abs were just days away from revealing themselves. Three months later I hadn’t lost an ounce. The dumbbells were covered in dust, the Swiss ball was still in the box, and the jump rope had been confiscated by my eleven-year-old son who was using it as a noose to torture his sister’s American Girl dolls. But a year later I finally lost the extra forty pounds, and I’ve kept them off. I’ve never had a six-pack, but I am able to tuck in my shirts and my jawline is defined by my actual jaw rather than by meticulously trimmed stubble. The change occurred not from grunting or sweating but from realizing that gin and charcuterie are not two of the major food groups. For me losing weight was about moderation. It’s a lesson I have to remind myself of every day.

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Essay Deeply Rooted:

Spartanburg-based Michel Stone goes to her native Lowcountry home for creative space. She is the author of critically acclaimed novels Iguana Tree and Border Child and has published numerous stories and essays. Stone is a 2011 recipient of the South Carolina Fiction Award, as well as the 2018 Patricia Winn Award for Southern Literature. For more about her work, visit michelstone.com.

Sea Change An Upstate novelist discovers writing inspiration and glimpses of humanity at an Edisto Island church / by Michel Stone

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ecently I spent a few days of solitude on Edisto Island, trying to make headway on a novel I’m writing and a keynote address I’d soon deliver at a writers’ conference in Tennessee. I’ve lived in the Upstate nearly three decades, but the Lowcountry is the land of my people and the place of my birth, so a trip “home” for a writing sabbatical always includes spending time with my father, one of life’s greatest joys. I’d begun to scratch a few notes for that speech, not finding a trajectory, when my favorite T-shirt came to mind, the one with a William Faulkner quote: “I write when inspiration hits me. Fortunately it hits me each day at 10 a.m.” Ol’ Will wasn’t just whistling Dixie. My one steadfast piece of advice to beginning writers has always been this: Write. I was reminded yet again that that pearl of wisdom is easier said than done as I stared at the fits and starts on my note pad. Why write anyway? What is the point? I was still mulling these questions as I drove to meet my dad for church on Sunday morning. A few years ago my father had begun attending the Presbyterian Church on Edisto Island, founded in 1685. There’s something special in the timbers of that historic, beautiful structure. Plus, Dad liked the people, the pastor, the quality and brevity of her services (always over in one hour!), and the parish’s renowned covered-dish luncheons. For years my father worked around heavy equipment and also spent much of his leisure time in duck blinds and dove fields in close proximity to shotgun blasts, so his running commentary that particular morning on every parishioner, while endearing, was slightly louder than I’d have preferred. “Well, that lady there sure has a good suntan!” He said, his voice a few decibels above a whisper. I nodded, looking at the bronze woman, likely a vacationer from nearby Edisto Beach. “See that fellow?” Dad jutted his chin toward an elderly man across the aisle. “Your Grandmama once told me that that man’s future father-in-law asked her out on a date in high school, but an old woman on the island advised your grandmother she’d find higher bush and better berry elsewhere.” What the . . . ? “What?” I had to ask. “It means she married your Granddaddy instead,” he said with a chuckle. I shushed him. “You’re loud,” I whispered, though I was still mulling that berry and bush thing. The opening hymn was followed by “Words of Welcome and Hospitality,” during which first-time visitors were asked to raise their hands to receive welcome gifts. A few hands went up and the usher delivered small, lavender-colored paper goody bags to each guest. Except he missed a lady in the front right pew. A dozen or so helpful parishioners’ arms shot up, pointing toward the neglected

guest who clearly desired one of those bags. My dad and I were seated in the back pew, which happened to be just in front of the small stash of gift bags. As the usher returned to grab one more bag for the woman, he leaned in between my dad and me and whispered, “Lord, have mercy. Everybody wants something for free.” The usher and my dad were friends, and, of course, he was joking to get a rise out of my dad, but Dad, (loud equipment, shot guns) didn’t hear the joke and wondered why I had begun giggling. “What?” he said. “Later,” I mouthed. With haste the usher graciously delivered the visitor the small sack of Presbyterian swag. As the pastor made her way to the pulpit I noticed a high-pitch whining which, at first, I thought must be the air-conditioning system struggling to keep up with the already steamy morning. The irritating sound increased to the point that heads began to turn in various directions, seeking its source. The wise pastor stopped the service, put her hands to her ears and said, “Everyone. Please. Check your ears. Someone’s hearing aid is BUZZING.” After about ten more seconds of necks craning, the usher tweaked his ears and the church was again silent, except for a few lingering giggles, mine among them. What I’m getting at here is that the mood was light in that cool, sun-filled ancient church, nestled among mammoth oaks, on that hot morning. My mind was far away from novels and speeches; I was just enjoying spending a pleasant hour with my dad. As soon as church let out, I would return to my desk for my date with inspiration. When the time came for the sermon, the pastor summoned all children to the sanctuary. She lifted a large sack from behind the pulpit and before she could explain its purpose, a child I suspect was the pastor’s son shouted, “I know what’s in there!” More chuckling from the congregation. The pastor explained the bag contained large toy bricks. She split the excited little congregants into two groups, telling them she planned to spill the bricks between them. She emptied the bag, and on her command the children were to construct a wall using all the bricks. She would time them. “Ready, set, go! One . . . two . . . ” In thirty-three seconds, the children constructed a perfect wall. Thirty-three seconds is fast for most things in this life, but in church, where the only voice is the pastor’s slow, methodical counting, Thirty. Three. Seconds. Takes. A. While. Once the job was done, she praised their well-constructed wall and asked them, “What would be necessary if all you children wanted to gather together to play a game? What if your friend is on the opposite side of the bricks? What would you do then?” “We’d punch it down!” a little one shouted, clearly excited at the

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prospect. “I’ll time you again,” the pastor said. “Let’s see how long it’ll take you to do that. Ready, set, go! One.” And the wall came down. The modest demonstration hit me like, well, a ton of bricks. Children take a concept to basic, essential terms. If we want to play together we’ll knock down any wall standing between us and we’ll squeal with delight as we do it. The pastor sent the kids out the side door for children’s chapel with the usher’s wife, and then she began her sermon based on Ephesians 2:11–22, Scripture with which I was unfamiliar. Scripture about walls— both physical and metaphysical, about divisions among God’s people, and ultimately about unity. The deceptively simple message snuck up on me, striking me solidly in the heart. As a novelist I often consider the ways human beings are more alike than we are different. And as the pastor said, “When we construct walls, divisions are counted and unity is lost.” Tears I’d not expected blurred my view of her. That’s what happens to me when I’m feeling lighthearted and suddenly something unexpectedly profound jolts me. I reached over and held my dad’s hand. He gave it a warm squeeze. If we ignore the walls and the divisions we institute among ourselves, we are dismissing Christ’s peace, the pastor said. She expounded on the morning’s Scripture, then finished her sermon saying, “Here’s the challenge. Consider this: How many walls that divide us are

we building? How many walls that divide us are we destroying?” Louisiana-born author Walker Percy said, “Bad books lie. They lie most of all about the human condition.” My dad’s pastor didn’t expound on hot-button politics that Sunday morning. Hers was a message involving kids’ building blocks, friendship, unity, and the human condition. If bad books lie about the human condition, then good books must do the opposite. They speak truth and shine a light on our connectedness. I think all good stories should do that. As the service ended and I headed out the door into the bright morning, watercolored memories of my childhood Sunday school lessons came to me. In those old memories, Jesus stands, surrounded by captivated children, engrossed in story. I imagine what good stories those must have been. Sometimes we just need to get out of our own way. I knew exactly what I needed to say in my keynote. I thought of the little boy who shouted with glee that he’d “punch that wall down” in order to get to his friends on the other side. I’d tell those writers not to shy from hard truths about the condition we share, to strive to evoke our common humanity, to illuminate the ways we as human beings are connected, despite the complexities of the human heart, despite our differences. I’d read them the Percy quote and tell them not to lie. And I’d tell them to get to their writing desks and make sure inspiration struck them, even if they had to throw the first punch. NOVEMBER 2018 / 89

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arrive CURIOUS. graduate READY. Forming Minds, Hearts, and Souls in the likeness of Christ

Sixth Grade Academy - 12th Grade

OPEN HOUSE

PROSPECTIVE PARENT NIGHT

Sunday, November 11th

Tuesday, December 4th

1 PM - 3 PM

6 PM - 7:30 PM

You are invited to discover St. Joseph’s! Hear testimonials, tour the campus, and meet many of our teachers, coaches and parents.

Still have questions following Open House? Come meet Headmaster Keith Kiser and hear what sets St. Joseph’s apart in a small, informal setting.

Admissions packets for 2019-2020 will be available.

100 St. Joseph’s Drive • Greenville, SC 29607 www.sjcatholicschool.org • (864) 234-9009 • admissions@sjcatholicschool.org

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Experienced and Compassionate Care for Women at Every Stage of Life.

Dr. Denise Broderick

Dr. Kimberly Holloway

Dr. Tamela Keller

Dr. Elizabeth Haswell

Call today for more info and appointment 864.720.1299 • vidagyn.com • 274-A Commonwealth Drive • Menopause and Hormone Management • Adolescent Care • Abnormal Bleeding Treatment • In-House Ultrasound And Procedures

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2018 CHARITABLE GIVING AWARDS

PORTRAITS OF GIVING

TH E AC T O F SERV I C E I S L I K E TH E CH ARACT ER OF A FACE OR T H E LI N ES OF ON E’ S H ANDS—THE E XPE RIE NC E OF GIVING I S U N I QU E TO EV ERY P ER S O N. JU S T AS OU R PERS ONAL EX PRES S I ON S ARE W H OLLY OUR OWN, SO ARE THE WAYS IN WH I C H W E G I V E O F O U R T I M E, TALEN T, AN D T REAS U RE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELI WARREN

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Doctor Detective DR. LARRY GLUCK UNITES EMPATHY AND INTELLECT TO HELP PATIENTS FIGHT CANCER BY B E T H B R O W N A B L E S

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career of nearly forty years healing and fighting cancer is enough to earn accolades. But talk with Dr. Larry Gluck, medical director for the Greenville Hospital System’s Cancer Center since 2002, and you’ll quickly gather that his work is more than a job—it is an extension of himself: inquisitive, analytical, a farmer’s son, a Boy Scout turned Sherlock Holmes cancer detective. From his research, Dr. Gluck knows change happens on a molecular level—that’s where the true healing lies. As this year’s recipient of the Healthcare Transformation Award, the doctor and researcher is proudly one of Greenville’s own. How do you start your day? I’m awake by 5:30, eat breakfast at the hospital, and check in at the lab. On any given day, I’m seeing patients and showing people around the Life Center. But I always begin early—it’s important to me to have the quiet time in order to focus before things get going. Your involvement with cancer treatment and research spans decades. When did you first feel called to the medical field, and to oncology in particular? I started in biochemistry. In medical school, I found all the disciplines to be interesting, and for a while I wondered if surgery was the way to go. But back in my days of medical school, left-handed people weren’t welcome in the operating room—it was considered a disruption. It was during residency where I moved to hematology and then oncology. During that time, a college student, who’d been sick all week, came into the office and said to me, “I think I have the flu,” but nothing came up on his exam. When I looked at his blood sample under a microscope, coupled with all the other data, I knew at once: he had leukemia. I call hematology the Sherlock Holmes of medicine. By being inquisitive and intuitive, you can figure out the mystery.

Cancer research and treatment is ever-changing. What innovations do you envision moving forward? Right now, there is a molecular revolution happening in medicine. This plays well with someone like myself who started in biochemistry. I enjoy the blend of clinic time and lab time. With these two united, I can see a patient on the floor, then go straight to the lab downstairs. It’s that whole Sherlock Holmes idea again. It used to be that when someone came in with a heart attack, we could locate the blockage, but nothing on a smaller scale. And what I call the molecular revolution will not solely be based on a physical exam. Now, it can go way below the level of a physical exam to what is an invisible universe. That’s taking medicine to a whole new vista.

MICRO MARVELS: Since 2002, Dr. Larry Gluck has led the charge at Greenville Hospital System’s Cancer Center, investigating the molecular makeup of one of our world’s most destructive diseases. He partners his time under the microscope with seeing patients and introducing others to the important work being done in both lab and clinic.

Where do you believe your drive to give your time and talent comes from? Actually, a couple things: One, I come from a long line of farmers. I truly think there is a work ethic and self-sufficiency that you grow up with, and then there is an inherited disposition. The other is simply that in the hometown where I grew up, there was and is a first-class prep school: Mercersburg Academy. I attended the boarding school as a “townie” on a scholarship. It was a first-class education that introduced me to teachers, scholars, and to a world of learning. Philanthropy is certainly vital to providing the best healthcare options for anyone, especially those diagnosed with cancer. How do you encourage the community to give of their time and resources? Someone has to invite a person into the process long before there is even a notion of philanthropy. I say that you have to come in and kick the tires. And so I carve out time on Tuesdays and Fridays where I make myself available to show individuals or groups what we are doing. I invite them into the science, the experience. If that rings true with them, then they want to invest because it is personal.”

THE HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD HONORS OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUALS OR AN ORGANIZATION THAT ACTIVELY AND COMPASSIONATELY WORKS TO TRANSFORM THE HEALTH OF OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS OF TIME, TALENT, AND TREASURE.

“FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY, GHS HAS BEEN COMMIT TED TO ADVANCING THE HE ALTH AND WELL-BEING OF THOSE WE SERVE. DR. GLUCK E X EMPLIFIES OUR VISION THROUGH HIS REMARK ABLE LE ADERSHIP, WISDOM, AND COMMITMENT TO OUR PATIENT S AND OUR COMMUNIT Y.” —Dr. Spence Taylor, president, Greenville Health System

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HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD / DR. LARRY GLUCK

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Gift of Art

GREENVILLE NATIVE AND EXPERT VOLUNTEER TRACY HARDAWAY MOLDS A CHARITABLE LIFE BY K A T H L E E N N A L L E Y

ommunity visionary Tracy Hardaway is the 2018 recipient of the Ruth Nicholson Award, the Community Foundation of Greenville’s highest honor to a volunteer who has made significant contributions to the Greenville community. Her introductions to countless community members to the foundation have made an impact. One referral in particular left a generous bequest, which has

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helped to support major initiatives, including OnTrack Greenville and the Greenville Free Medical Clinic. As a co-founder of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA), Hardaway has been instrumental in the arts and economic revitalization of the Village of West Greenville, helping to raise more than $1 million for this purpose. The Community Foundation was a part of this effort with a signature grant.

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RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD / TRACY HARDAWAY

“ TR ACY WAS RECRUITED TO SERVE ON OUR FINANCE AND INVESTMENT COMMIT TEE IN 1999. SHE WAS A TR AILBL A ZER AS A WOMAN STOCK BROKER, AND HER E X PERTISE HAS BEEN IMPORTANT TO US. IN ADDITION, TR ACY WAS AN E XCELLENT BOARD MEMBER.”—Bob Morris, president, The Community Foundation of Greenville KIND HE(ART)ED: Greenville native Tracy Hardaway learned her others-focused attitude from her parents, who inspired in her a deep love for community. The impact of Tracy’s dedicated volunteerism and board participation is tangibly seen throughout our town, most recently in the establishment of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts.

THE RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD IS THE HIGHEST HONOR PRESENTED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION EACH YEAR AND HONORS THE VOLUNTEER WHO HAS MADE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GREENVILLE COMMUNITY THROUGH VOLUNTEER WORK FOR THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OR TO ONE OF ITS PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, OR AREAS OF EMPHASIS.

Cherington Shucker, executive director of the GCCA, says, “Tracy’s dedication to the original concept of the GCCA is central to our success. For our staff, she’s been a cheerleader and strategic problem solver. Her passion as a founder has paved the way to see the vision coalesce into a vibrant arts anchor where multiple generations can interact and explore the visual arts in the community.” Tell us a bit about yourself. Are you from Greenville? I was born and raised in Greenville. One of eight children with a twin sister, I had a great childhood. My parents, Bill and Connie Timmons, were energetic and generous supporters of the community. My husband, Charles, is also a Greenville native, and we have known each other since we were 14 at Greenville High School. We have been married 47 years and have four sons and nine grandchildren. I have always been a dreamer. Art and being creative makes me happy. There is a great pleasure in self-expression. Being encouraged to be creative gave me confidence as a child. I believe that art is essential for living. Everyone should have access to art. Tell us about your volunteer experience. I have always been a volunteer and have been on numerous boards over the years. I have been on the finance committee of the Community Foundation for at least 20 years. I served two terms on the board. I am a founder and board member of the GCCA and former board member of the Upcountry History Museum, the Greenville Little Theatre, the USC Alumni Association, and many others. How has your professional experience parlayed into your volunteer work with the Community Foundation? Helping clients plan for their future as well as their charitable wishes was a big part of my work at UBS Financial Services. The Community Foundation is a natural resource for charitable gifts and has an extraordinary president in Bob Morris and talented staff as well as a board of community volunteer leaders. They ensure that gifts are used wisely and strategically to improve the lives of all in Greenville.

Tell me about the founding of the GCCA and your role in that. What vision originally inspired you to embark on this project? My good friend, Randy Armstrong, told me about a group of artists, former art teachers, and community leaders who were looking to form an arts center for visual arts. We met as a kitchen-table cabinet to begin our dream. I had taken art in high school and college and at the art museum, and looked forward to taking art classes when I retired, but the art school closed. A community the size of Greenville needed a visual arts center, and our efforts have proven that to be the case. I understand you are an artist yourself. I am an aspiring artist and have loved taking classes at the GCCA. Currently, I am co-chairman of the fundraising effort with my husband, and Cliff and Jane Roy. We are about to launch a campaign to raise money to renovate the cotton warehouse, an adjacent building to the cloth building that currently houses the center. It has over 30,000 square feet and will house class spaces for ceramics, jewelry, metals, and woodworking. This has taken some of my “art creative time,” but it is a worthy cause, and I look forward to adding other class choices. What inspires you, personally, to work so hard for this community? My parents and their love for Greenville and the “can do” attitude that the leadership of our great town has shown over the years have inspired me to volunteer and work to improve the lives of all in Greenville. What does the role of the volunteer play in the community and how does volunteerism benefit the individual who chooses to do so? I volunteer because I believe helping others is what we are meant to do. Volunteers help to engage those in the community who otherwise would not have the opportunities. This is a huge benefit to the volunteer as well as those served.

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Visual Gifts

UNITED COMMUNITY BANK GIVES A WEALTH OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO GREENVILLE’S ARTISTIC ASSETS AND COMMUNITY INITIATIVES BY J O H N J E T E R

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hometown masterpiece, the Greenville County Museum of Art banks on largesse. Now, one of its leading benefactors, United Community Bank, is honored with the coveted Philanthropic Spirit Award. UCB donates $50,000 toward the museum’s Antiques, Fine Art & Design Weekend, held each October to celebrate its annual Art for Greenville fundraising campaign, which has raised more than $10 million in 32 years, the museum’s executive director Tom Styron says. He offers effusive thanks to the bank and its CEO, Lynn Harton. “Most businessmen don’t understand the concept of giving money away; the point is to make money, but he sees this as an investment. “So many aspects to this collection have been built over the past three decades, and we couldn’t have done it without people like Lynn and companies like United Community Bank and their investment in the cultural well-being of this community.” Michelle Seaver, the bank’s Greenville County president, responds to the Community Foundation of Greenville’s honor. Why do you suppose United Community Bank won this award? I think the name of the award says it all. At United, we have a real philanthropic spirit and it starts at the top. I believe we received this award because of our genuine commitment to making our community a better place. What are your thoughts and feelings about receiving this award? It’s a huge honor! There are so many companies doing so much good in this community. It’s great to be recognized for something so important to us.

“UNITED COMMUNIT Y BANK IS LIVING UP TO THE WORD ‘COMMUNIT Y ’ BY PL AYING A KE Y ROLE IN MAKING OURS A BE T TER PL ACE. WITH LYNN HARTON, CEO AT THE HELM, AND MICHELLE SE AVER, PRESIDENT OF GREENVILLE COUNT Y UCB, THE BANK IS INVOLVED WITH THE PE ACE CENTER, GREENVILLE COUNT Y MUSEUM OF ART, ICE ON MAIN, MARCH OF DIMES, AND A NUMBER OF OTHER UPSTATE NON-PROFIT S. THIS AWARD IS A WELL-DESERVED HONOR FOR UNITED COMMUNIT Y BANK .” —Howard Einstein, division manager of Rosenfeld Einstein

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PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD / UNITED COMMUNITY BANK

How does UCB choose your beneficiaries? Ultimately, we want to give in ways that will make each of our communities better, but we also try to support organizations that our teammates are involved in or care about. We don’t just give financial support, but we also want to give of our time. What’s unique about Greenville’s philanthropic community? As a lifelong resident, I believe the amount of giving in this community is impressive. I would say that a philanthropic spirit has helped shape Greenville through the years. So many public-private partnerships truly make a lasting difference, and that’s not something you see everywhere else. Can you briefly explain what philanthropy and leadership have in common? Philanthropy gives us a chance to lead in a different way. It allows us to lead with our hearts to impact a change that needs to happen. We don’t want to just give funds, but we want to be a part of the model to help make thwe change to better our community. How do you encourage your employees to give back to the community outside of the corporate efforts? We recognize that everyone has something they feel passionate about, and we try to support them in their efforts. We have “Blue Jean Fridays,” where our teammates pay $5 to wear jeans on a Friday, and we give that money to a charity. During the spring, these funds support the March of Dimes, because our Greenville team feels very strongly about this organization, as well. If peer companies and/or startups are considering philanthropic endeavors, what advice would you give them? I would advise them to focus on organizations that their teammates are passionate about.

BANK ON IT : United Community Bank invests time and finances in community-forward organizations like the Peace Center, Greenville County Museum of Art, and the March of Dimes through the leadership of Greenville president Michelle Seaver (left) and CEO Lynn Harton.

THE PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD HONORS A BUSINESS THAT FOSTERS CHARITABLE GIVING THROUGH EMPLOYEEINCENTIVE PROGRAMS AND IS DEDICATED TO GIVING BACK TO THE UPSTATE IN A SIGNIFICANT MANNER.

Who are some of your biggest influences, from philanthropists to leaders to peers, friends, or relatives? I believe that everyone you meet along the way impacts you. I have worked with so many great leaders who have shaped my philanthropic spirit, including United’s recently retired CEO, Jimmy Tallent, and our current CEO, Lynn Harton. Both believe strongly in servant leadership.

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For Land’s Sake CONSERVATION CHAMPION UPSTATE FOREVER STRENGTHENS OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH GREEN-SPACE PROTECTION BY M . L I N D A L E E

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ounded by Greenville attorney and conservationist Brad Wyche in 1998, Upstate Forever is the first land-trust organization in South Carolina to receive national accreditation. Today, it protects more than 21,000 acres on 114 properties throughout the 10 counties in Upstate South Carolina. For all they do to foster the wonderful quality of life in our communities, Upstate Forever has been designated this year’s winner of the Community Spirit Award, which is bestowed on an outstanding local nonprofit that serves the community through its programs and partnerships. Why does Upstate Forever deserve this accolade? According to CEO of ScanSource and Upstate Forever board member Mike Baur: “I support Upstate Forever because I live, work, and play here, as do ScanSource employees. I believe strongly in Upstate Forever’s mission to lead the charge in protecting our region’s character and am proud to support this effort.” Executive Director Andrea Cooper, who came to Upstate Forever three years ago, talks more about this. How do you feel about winning the Community Spirit Award? We are honored, as developing partnerships and collaborating on efforts are very effective to achieve impact and maximize resources. How does Upstate Forever work behind the scenes to make our region a better place? That’s the crux of what we deal with. We have programs for land conservation, and we work with utilities to protect the quality of drinking water. We have a staff of 17 people, and we’re working every day, essentially on the community’s behalf, to improve the quality of life, not only for current residents but future residents, by increasing access to recreation and reducing sprawl. There’s subdivision after subdivision going up in southern Greenville County, and if we don’t work with our local farmers to have the land protected, we’ll lose the character of that area.

What are some of the ongoing programs you are working with this year? We have a lot of irons in the fire. Our Land Trust works with landowners in southern Greenville County who are interested in protecting their land. That builds on a project we completed last year called Upstate Critical Lands Mapping Project in partnership with Furman University and funded by Pacolet Milliken. We developed a map driven by water quality, but it layered all of our conservation values. We’ve mapped parcel by parcel, so we know the most critical lands to protect from a water-quality perspective. What do you consider Upstate Forever’s most significant recent accomplishment? We’ve had a couple of what we call ‘Goliaths,’ which is when an issue related to land, water, or community character just sort of arises. Recently, there was a proposed development [of 254 homes] at Glassy Mountain, a Heritage Preserve site in Pickens County. The development was not in keeping with the community character, which is more rural. That’s another example of where we worked with other conservation organizations to find a solution, and ultimately that property was permanently protected. How do you engage the public in your work? People understand an issue when it hits close to home. One of the best ways to engage the public is to make the connection. Sprawl starts to mean something when you have a 45minute commute, or when you start seeing the green space in your neighborhood being paved over without any trees. These are things people have an emotional investment in. Is there a sense of urgency in your work? Part of the reason we developed a new strategic plan is that it really hones in on what is needed now because time is of the essence. We don’t have unlimited time to protect green spaces and balance growth. There’s a lot at stake, and we can make positive change, but it does need to happen very quickly. Ten years from now, it will be too late.

SECOND NATURE: Dedicated to conserving our area’s scenic beauty, Upstate Forever protects 21,000 acres of natural landscape across 10 counties. Executive Director Andrea Cooper works urgently to raise awareness about urban sprawl, and she develops strategic partnerships to engage the community, such as a teaching farm in Spartanburg County that supplies produce to school cafeterias.

THE COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD IS GIVEN TO AN OUTSTANDING LOCAL NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION THAT SERVES THE COMMUNITY THROUGH ITS VITAL PROGRAMS AND THROUGH ITS EXCEPTIONAL EFFORTS TO COMMUNICATE AND PARTNER WITH OTHER NON-PROFITS.

“ THE UPSTATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IS E X PERIENCING UNPRECEDENTED GROW TH AS MORE AND MORE PEOPLE DISCOVER OUR CHARMING TOWNS, BUSTLING CITIES, AND SCENIC SE T TINGS BURSTING WITH CULTURE, WILDLIFE, AND NATURE. WE ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT COMMUNIT Y SPIRIT AWARD WINNER UPSTATE FORE VER FOR THEIR TIRELESS COMMITMENT TO PRESERVING THE NATUR AL BE AUT Y AND CHAR AC TER OF THE UPSTATE.” —David Sawyer, president, The Cliffs Clubs

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COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD / UPSTATE FOREVER

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Making the Grade DR. W. BURKE ROYSTER TACKLES THE ABCs OF EDUCATION AS HE OVERSEES SOUTH CAROLINA’S LARGEST SCHOOL DISTRICT BY S T E V E N T I N G L E

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ith more than 75,000 students and close to 100 schools, the Greenville County School District is the largest in the state. Dr. W. Burke Royster, who has been superintendent of the district since 2012, navigates the challenges and opportunities inherent to such a large district by finding a balance among students, administration, and the greater Greenville community. “Dr. Royster does an excellent job of creating educational

experiences for all students,” says Tobi Kinsell, director of OnTrack Greenville, an initiative designed to support students and keep them moving toward graduation. “That includes meeting the needs of the most underresourced students while also creating opportunities for the most-resourced. But I think the hallmark of his tenure as superintendent has been opening up the district to partnerships.” Here, Dr. Royster shares his views on the future.

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EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD / DR. W. BURKE ROYSTER

“FOR OVER A DECADE, GREENVILLE COUNT Y SCHOOL S AND THE COMMUNIT Y HAVE BEEN INFLUENCED BY SUPERINTENDENT DR. BURKE ROYSTER’S LE ADERSHIP. HIS VISION AND STR ATEGY FOR EDUCATION TO SERVE THE NE ARLY 7 7,000 STUDENT S ACROSS GREENVILLE COUNT Y IS E X HIBITED IN THE PROGR AMS THAT HAVE BEEN DE VELOPED AND MADE AVAIL ABLE TO THE COMMUNIT Y. HIS SKILL SE T IS AN AT TRIBUTE AND NEEDED IN A TIME OF GREENVILLE’S GROW TH, SHIF T S IN TECHNOLOGY, AND DEMANDS OF THE BUSINESS COMMUNIT Y.” —Dan Adams, president and CEO, The Capital Corporation CLASS ACT: Tackling the nuances of educational technology and reaching a diverse body of students, Dr. W. Burke Royster and team have seen significant growth through their initiatives, reaching the highest graduation rate in the history of Greeville County Schools.

What drew you to a career in education? There were many reasons I was drawn to education. My parents were educators. I was influenced by many outstanding educators and was raised to recognize the value of education to individuals and society as a whole. The primary factor that drew me to education was the opportunity to make a positive difference in the world, along with the belief that I could be one of those educators who leaves a lasting, positive influence on students, colleagues, and communities. What are the unique challenges that come with supervising the largest school district in the state? The most unique challenge in operating Greenville County Schools is not found in our size, but in our mission. We are one of the largest employers in the county, and the operations side of our business must follow sound principles and practice efficiencies like any other business. What makes us unique is that we have this whole other side of our organization that deals with producing quality graduates. Our “product” is influenced by countless factors such as home life, personality, family dynamics, cognitive ability, and early experiences, many of which are beyond our control.”

THE EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD RECOGNIZES INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE DEDICATED THEIR CAREER TO THE BETTERMENT OF YOUTH AND THE EDUCATION EXPERIENCE FOR THE UPSTATE.

The Greenville County school system serves a diverse mix of students. How does that diversity affect the school system and your strategy? Diversity is our greatest strength and greatest challenge. We operate at our peak and better serve our constituents when we consider diverse views, opinions, and backgrounds. On the flip side, providing instruction in a manner that meets the diverse needs, abilities, learning styles, personalities, and interests of each individual student is what makes our jobs difficult. What are some of the ways the Greenville County Schools are working to keep students engaged and on track to graduate? Retaining students and keeping them focused on learning has been a priority for the last six years, and that effort has paid off with the highest graduation rate (87.3 percent) in the history of our

district. Engagement is key because students have to be interested in order to retain understanding and build foundations for more difficult concepts. Our students interact with technology every day, so we are delivering more instruction through digital formats and assessing student learning via videos, electronic presentations, and other technology-based systems. We are also using push notifications, social media, and the Internet to both share and collect information, and are working hard to make sure students learn how to discern valid, vetted, quality information on the World Wide Web. Within classrooms, we are increasing student collaboration and peer accountability, and focusing on project-based learning that ties standards to real-world problems and solutions. How important are partnerships to the success of the school system? Essential. We are professional educators, but we do not have the resources or the expertise to meet all the needs of our students without help. In GCS, we have partners who provide work-based learning opportunities, mentors, tutors, real-world experiences, and donations. How do you engage the public in your work? From an academic perspective, parents need to read to their students and be seen reading. Help with homework, but don’t do it for your children. It is much more important that students have an authentic experience completing problems or creating presentations than that those tasks look or be perfect. Talk to students about your own experiences in school and talk positively about learning. Don’t always give them the answer; instead ask probing questions to help them find the solution. Build a positive relationship with your child’s teachers and administrators, and it is more likely your child will, too. What are you most proud of? I am most proud when a former student or colleague takes the time to tell me about something I said or did that made a positive difference in their life.

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WORLD CLASS. LOCAL TOUCH. CONGRATULATIONS TO UNITED COMMUNITY BANK ON RECEIVING THE PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD FROM THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF GREENVILLE. To learn how MMA can deliver smarter solutions, visit MMA-MidAtlantic.com.

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Letter of the Law

Community champion Merl F. Code Sr. has established a lasting legacy through his successful careers, companies, and leadership initiatives. The football player, judge, attorney, and community advocate has worked tirelessly to fight injustice and help unify Greenville’s diverse communities. He is the recipient of the Visionary Leadership Award. Nominated by the Community Foundation of Greenville and voted on by a committee of executives representing the Community Foundation and TOWN Magazine, the Visionary Leadership Award honors lifelong service to others through both individual endeavors and community involvement.

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MERL CODE’S LEGACY AS AN ATHLETE, ACTIVIST, AND HUMANITARIAN BEGAN AT THE FEET OF HIS FAMILY—AND CONTINUES TODAY AS HE GUIDES OTHERS WITH A DEDICATED VISION FOR INCLUSIVITY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL. BY STEPHANIE TROTTER PORTRAIT BY WILL CROOKS

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North Carolina A&T State University, and playing seven years of professional football, he enrolled in the University of South Carolina’s School of Law, where he became an Earl Warren Legal Scholar and the first African-American president of the Student Bar Association.

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SERVICE// SEIZE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY. Code’s parents placed service on par with education. “That is the obligation of being a good citizen,” the attorney summarizes. “You give, you serve.” The ways he’s served are endless, with positions across 30 groups that include the Palmetto Institute and Phillis Wheatley Association, to Greenville’s Urban League and Furman’s Board of Trustees. Longtime friend and co-philanthropist Bob Hughes has worked with Merl since 1980. “He’s a combination of so many interesting things,” shares the developer. “Every time Merl opens his mouth, you need to hear what he says. He always says something meaningful, and he always brings people together.” Behind the scenes, the duo lobbied to bring down the Confederate flag. In public, they’ve partnered for Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce projects. Merl served as the Chamber’s first African-American chairman, and created a program that’s grown into today’s Accelerate Program, fueling economic expansion. “I’m excited to know I have something to do with that,” Merl asserts. “We are an international city now, because we started laying the groundwork for that in the 1980s.” Bob elaborates, showering praise upon his friend. “Greenville is blessed that it works together, and people with all kinds of voices can be heard in a community vision. Merl has been there to lead when things have gone their best, and he’s helped fix things when they’re not working.”

THE UPSTATE IS A FACETED MIX OF OLD AND NEW, RICH AND POOR. AS NIMBLY AS LIBERTY BRIDGE CROSSES THE REEDY, PATHWAYS HAVE EMERGED, LINKING DISPARATE IDEAS TO BUILD A BELOVED COMMUNITY THAT’S CAPTURED THE WORLD’S ATTENTION. NO ONE HAS FORMED A LIVING BRIDGE BETTER THAN THIS YEAR’S VISIONARY LEADERSHIP AWARD WINNER MERL F. CODE SR. ALTHOUGH A GREENVILLE RESIDENT, THIS LITIGATOR AND LONG-TIME JUDGE STANDS OUT ACROSS THE ENTIRE REGION FOR HIS TIRELESS WORK FOR ALL. HERE’S THE SECRET KEY TO THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND CODE:

TEAMWORK// FIND STRENGTH IN UNITY. Whether it was sandlot pick-up games, or municipal court cases, the diehard athlete recruited team players. “You learn the strength of each other, and when you merge those strengths together, you have a chance to be champion.” His record speaks for itself. The captain’s Seneca Blue Ridge Tigers won the State AA title in ’65. The cornerback’s A&T Aggies were crowned National Black Champions in ’68. The rookie’s Montreal Alouettes won the Canadian Football League Championship in ’70. Off the

FAMILY / RESPECT YOUR ROOTS. Not a day goes by at Code’s law firm Ogletree Deakins without the attorney telling a tale about his parents. “My father? He was a great storyteller, a funny man. He understood human beings,” he says, as a smile breaks across his face. “My mom, she was extraordinary. She told me you’ve got to challenge yourself. What matters is trying to dig to find out what you’ve got, the greatness within you.” Sedalia Code always pushed her son growing up in Seneca. If Merl didn’t like the Sunday sermon, she’d prompt him to write a better one. She commanded her youngest to enter the annual oratory contest he’d already won nine times—not to secure a decade of dominance, but to simply test himself. Meanwhile, his father, Allen L. Code Sr., served as disciplinarian, commanding respect as the principal of the all-black Seneca Blue Ridge High School. It was a household built upon education, faith, sports, and service, and it molded the grandson of a sharecropper into one of the wisest civic leaders in the state.

“I lived segregation,” declares the 70-year-old. “But my father didn’t believe you have to be where you started. He believed that any man that had the right to read and think isn’t any better than any other man who has the right to read and think. He’d tell me, ‘Merl, you need to be prepared and equipped to do battle intellectually.’” The elder Code was the first in the family to go to school beyond third grade. He eventually earned a master’s degree and became superintendent of Seneca Negro Schools. “I know how blessed I was,” reflects Merl of the community’s emphasis on education. “There was always someone with a degree asking me, ‘How are you doing in school?’” His small kindergarten class produced an orthopedic surgeon, mathematicians, lawyers, and college professors. “That was a laboratory,” he adds with a chuckle. “We didn’t mess with blocks and paint, we were doing hard-core stuff that wasn’t normal in the early 1950s.” Later, that same group would look for errors to challenge the textbook. “We’d come home and do homework and the next day tell the teacher the book isn’t right.” After graduating cum laude from

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EDUCATION// NEVER STOP LEARNING.

Lead the Field

Captain of his high school football team, the Seneca Blue Ridge Tigers, Merl Code played cornerback for North Carolina A&T and for the Canadian Football League’s Montreal Alouettes. After playing professionally for seven years, he returned to school to study the law.

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field, Team Code is equally as competitive and successful—especially through the United Way of Greenville County. Merl not only served as the first black chairman of the board of directors, he also kick-started the organization’s African-American Leadership Council. “In the late ’90s, we raised $70,000. This year, we did over half-a-million dollars . . . from the minority community!” he exclaims. “Our volunteer hours are extraordinarily high. We are participating like full citizens ought to. That is our responsibility.” The gamer has firm ideas on how to be a good teammate. “On some teams, I wasn’t the captain of anything, or the star of anything,” he reveals. “I just did my job. But my job was important to us to win. Everybody has a job they’re supposed to do, and when everybody is doing it, if you have the right folks in the right positions, it can work.”

/ LEAD BY EXAMPLE. One position serves as the judge’s favorite—and that’s in front of young people. On Tuesday nights, his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi, mentors middle school athletes. “It’s quid pro quo,” he states succinctly of the four-year-old program. “They’re baseball and football teams. We sponsor them and provide uniforms, but in response, they come here.” Tutoring, life’s lessons, and role-playing form the curriculum presented by judges, ministers, business executives, and police officers. “We want to expose them to different stuff,” Merl explains. “If a police officer stops you on the corner, how do you act, and what should you not be saying?” He flips open a scrapbook to a vintage black-and-white photo showing a brighteyed, 11-year-old posing with Jackie Robinson. “This is our Cub Scout group,” he says, pointing to himself. “I was awestruck. He was such a nice guy, a gentle giant. He had the graciousness to give to little boys. The dream he was living gave us the inspiration that we could be what he was. You can imagine. We always looked up to this guy. To have him come and be in his essence was amazing for us.” Thousands now stand in Merl’s essence, soaking up his intelligence and passion.

MENTORSHIP

PERSEVERANCE// NEVER GIVE UP.

Omega Psi Phi wanted to hold its district meeting in Greenville. It was the racially charged ’60s, and multiple cities had

turned the boys down. Merl went to talk with Buck Mickel and was assured Greenville would welcome the group. The serviceoriented pacesetter never stopped seeking support to advance a good cause. “I’m grateful that men like Buck Mickel, Arnold Burrell, Roy Abercrombie, and later Champ Covington and Max Heller saw something in me and said, ‘Let us help you do what you’re trying to do.’” His nonstop efforts for business development and social change later linked him with Buck’s daughter, Minor Mickel Shaw, and a deep friendship formed. “I didn’t hear that story until just a few years ago,” she shares. “I thought it was very special. Merl may be a treasure for this community, but he’s enhanced my life. He’s mesmerizing.” The two met while guiding downtown growth through the Greenville Central Area Partnership. Her first impression has never changed. “I don’t know anyone who can bring people together better than Merl. I’ve always been impressed with his desire to make Greenville a better place for everyone. He wants to make sure we pay attention to housing, jobs, and transportation. That’s one of his major accomplishments.” Many have noticed his efforts to forge a diverse and vibrant community. The one-time “Young Lawyer of the Year” has received South Carolina’s highest civilian award, the Order of the Palmetto and been inducted into the state’s Black Hall of Fame. Now, as he slowly steps down from the bench, and other posts, one group continues to hold his attention—the Institute for Child Success. The nonpartisan organization drives research and policy to help children. “It started here in Greenville, and we now have fellows all around the country,” he explains, excitedly. “The thing we’re most proud of is we got legislation passed for children to improve their health and educational opportunities.” COMMUNITY / RESPECT EVERYONE’S CULTURE. He’s dined with U.S.

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presidents, owned successful businesses, and ruled the law. But one life experience stands out above all others. It was his rookie year playing in “MANY PEOPLE Montreal. “For the first time in my life, I HAVE THE ABILITY felt like a full human being,” he recalls. “I TO SPEAK WITH A had never felt this comfortable with people LOUD, BOOMING VOICE. whose complexions didn’t look like mine. We were able to communicate, we talked, BUT WHEN MERL we made friends, and it was a gift.” The CODE SPEAKS, THE discrimination he discovered north of the VOLUME IS FUELED border was between English- and FrenchBY HIS PASSION. HIS speaking Canadians, and that’s when the BELIEF IN DOING THE lesson dawned on him. “It’s not about how RIGHT THING IS AN you look, nor how you sound, it’s about AMPLIFIER, AND HIS respecting someone else’s culture.” POWERFUL MESSAGE He returned home with a mission. AS A VISIONARY “I wanted a society in which people COMMUNITY are offered the opportunity to grow, to assimilate. Where neighbor seems to look LEADER IS HEARD out for neighbor. They don’t happen to WITH CLARITY look like you, but we’re all Greenvillians. AND CERTAINTY.” We are all South Carolinians. We ought — Rick Davis, CEO, Elliott Davis to be able to galvanize around that. So, I started programs.” They’ve moved the city to where it stands economically and socially today. Bob Hughes sums it up best. “Merl is a Code of Ethics The son of Sedalia and Allen L. unifier, a communicator, and a wiseman. Code Sr., a high school principal Part of Greenville’s secret is how well and superintendent, Merl grew up surrounded by educators and aligned we all are, and he’s a big part of intellectuals. His parents helped that.” Imagine how far we can go, now that instill in him values of hard work and we’ve cracked the key to the Code. critical thinking, which have been crucial components to his success as a litigator and community leader. Code graduated cum laude from North Carolina A&T and became an Earl Warren Legal Scholar at the University of South Carolina.

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October ELEVATE YOUR STYLE TO NEXT-LEVEL STATUS WITH THIS SEASON’S RETRO LOOKS

Model Kaylee Glidewell wears a red MinkPink Nightrider biker jacket from Monkee’s of the West End with a Dex floral top and Leslie Francesca white geode ring from J. Britt in the Poinsett Club’s Napa Wine Room during our annual fall fashion shoot. For more, see “Age of Excess,” page 98.

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Use Your Noodle: Warm your bones with Saigon Fast Food’s Bánh Canh Tôm Thịt (#72, clear jumbo noodle with pork and shrimp).

Slurp Away! Asian noodle bowls offer the perfect antidote to what ails you NOVEMBER 2018 / 113

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CITY

Dish

Bowl Game Comfort comes in many forms, but we recommend a hearty helping of noodle soup / by Andrew Huang // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

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don’t care what the USDA or any other federal regulatory agency says. There’s only one food group that matters, and that food group is “noodles.” They’re slippery, chewy, slurpable, and just plain more fun than most other food. They’re an invitation to make weird faces and weird noises, and to take your food a little less seriously. There’s nothing that embodies “cheap and cheerful” more fully, so here’s some inspiration for some cold-weather noodling.

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Hot Stuff: Bún bò Huếế(#43, spicy beef and pork noodle soup) at Mekong Restaurant on Wade Hampton Boulevard is a spicy, hearty bowl of rice vermicelli, braised beef, sliced pork, and fresh aromatics.

// G LASSY- EYED

// B R ING TH E H EAT If you’ve ever squirted a ton of hot sauce into pho broth, stop. You’re upsetting the clean finish and balance of the broth with a chili-garlic suckerpunch. Instead, if heat is what you’re after, Bún bò Hu ếếis the way to go. The dish originated in the ancient Vietnamese imperial capital of Hu ế, and while it bears similarities to its cousin pho, there are a few notable differences. The noodles—a rice vermicelli—are thicker and rounder, and the soup—a murkier, red-tinted broth that shimmers with a spicy chili oil sheen—is rich with a complex balance of spicy, sour, salty, and umami. In Mekong’s rendition, lemongrass breathes brightness into a broth, which has solid backing from its beef-and-pork-bone base. Sliced pork, braised beef, and even the odd pork knuckle (tender, chewy, and gelatinous) make it hearty. Garnish with the provided cabbage, lime wedges, basil, and cilantro sprigs for some crunch and fresh aromatics. Bún bò Huếế(#43, spicy beef and pork noodle soup), $9. Mekong Restaurant, 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville.

// O LD R ELIA B LE Banish the thought of foil flavor packets and starchy noodle bricks. There’s nothing instant about tonkotsu ramen. The broth— which is what separates tonkotsu from other ramen varieties—is made by boiling pork bones for hours. That milky flavor bomb of concentrated smoky goodness gets ladled over satisfyingly chewy noodles. Ramen noodles are made using alkaline mineral water, which is what gives them their yellow hue and signature structure. They’re also made for slurping: kinked noodles help broth coat each strand, so when you start inhaling them—as you should—you get a little extra soup to go. Menkoi Noodle House’s version adds spinach and bean sprouts, a sheet of nori (dried seaweed) for a little ocean umami, a few slices of chasu (fatty braised pork), a slice of narutomaki (the emoji-looking fish cake with a pink swirl), and a soft-boiled egg with a perfectly fudgey yolk. A garnish of chopped scallions leavens the intense savoriness with just a bit of green freshness.

Some noodle soups are meant for heavy burdens like curing colds and mending broken hearts. Others are just for a regular Tuesday lunch. Bánh canh is one of the latter. Another non-pho Vietnamese dish, bánh canh refers to thick tapioca noodles cut from sheets of uncooked dough. Saigon Fast Food tweaks the formula by substituting thick cellophane glass noodles. The cellophane noodles—so called for their translucence—are slippery, but have a firm bite, almost like al dente pasta without the starchiness. The soup, made from a chicken broth base, is clear and flavored primarily by fried shallots and chopped cilantro: fresh, but with a savory kick. Shrimp and sliced pork (tôm and thịt, respectively) add substance without being overwhelming, while bean sprouts for garnish give a little crunch to each mouthful. In short, it’s satisfying and warm, but light enough that you won’t need to budget for naptime afterwards. Bánh Canh Tôm Thịt (#72, clear jumbo noodle with pork and shrimp), $10. Saigon Fast Food, 1011 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville.

// LO CA L C UE Want something that bucks convention? Well, you might look to the Village of West Greenville for Golden Brown & Delicious’s ramen. The exact composition changes regularly, but it’s always anchored by a bowl of GB&D’s house-made noodles. A recent incarnation featured a duck-and-pork– based broth, slices of roasted duck, local oyster mushrooms, slow-cooked egg, tatsoi (sometimes known as spinach mustard), quick-pickled cucumbers, and house-made kimchi, all topped with benne. So here’s the thing about GB&D’s ramen: it’s not really about the noodles or the broth. The noodles are thicker and have a solid chew, and the broth is light but packed with umami. Though you won’t be slurping it up at speed. The noodles are short, and there’s not enough broth to drown your sorrows. But they are solid dance partners for rare roasted duck that’s tender and rich; meaty oyster mushrooms; the slight bitterness of tatsoi; and the sweet crunch of quick pickles. And the slow-cooked egg adds just enough body to the broth. Whereas these elements would be secondary in other dishes, here, they are responsible for a playful back-and-forth volley of flavors and textures. Ramen, $16. Golden Brown & Delicious, 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville.

Tonkotsu ramen, $7.50. Menkoi Noodle House, 241 N Main St, Greenville.

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SWEET

Spot

Pie Chart Plot out your own slice of heaven with our guide to the Upstate’s greatest pies / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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lose your textbooks: Thanksgiving (and Thanksgiving break!) draws nigh. The only equation we’re interested in is how many slices of pie can one person responsibly consume during pie’s most important season? Around here, grandmothers seem to be a common denominator for perfectly flaky crust passed down to their grandchildren—the same children who have now grown up and built pie businesses on the backs of those floursmudged, time-stained recipe cards. Whether you’re a “sliver of everything” person or just treat pie as your plus-one to every meal, you’re gonna want to plot out your pie strategy using our guide to the Upstate’s tastiest picks.

T H E B A K E R Y O F F A U G U S TA

If you know, you know: the trained European bakers behind this cute Swiss bakery don’t take shortcuts— so when their order queue is full, you’re out of luck. Get your order in quickly and your reward will be the transcendent pastry that has earned Greenville’s loyalty. OUR PICK: Pecan HOLIDAY FLAVORS: Apple, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato, Egg Custard, Bourbon Pecan, Cherry, Blueberry, Pecan: $16–20 ORDERING INFO: one-week notice required CONTACT: (864) 2828580, facebook.com/ thebakeryoffaugusta

BUTTERMILK SKY PIE SHOP

BOSSY BAKER

OUR PICK: Buttermilk (a cross between a chess pie and a custard) HOLIDAY FLAVORS: I-40, Granny’s Apple, Buttermilk, Coconut Cream, Chocolate Cream, Peanut Butter Cream, Key Lime, Chewy Chocolate Chip, Pumpkin: $26 each ORDERING INFO: Holiday orders typically fill up after the first week of November; call soon. CONTACT: (864) 729-8555, buttermilkskypie.com

OUR PICK: Burnt Caramel Pear HOLIDAY FLAVORS: Apple Bourbon Pecan, Black Bottom Pumpkin, Burnt Caramel Pear, Salty Chocolate: $22.50 each ORDERING INFO: Thanksgiving orders must be in by Nov 12; Thanksgiving pickup, Nov 19 CONTACT: bossybakerco@gmail. com, bossybaker.co

Husband and wife team Scott and Meredith Layton turned the legendary pies of their maternal grandmothers into a beloved chain of pie shops that celebrates the sweetest part of the Southern table. Crusts are hand-pressed, and pies are made fresh in the shop every day.

Jeannie Hall knows her way around a commercial kitchen, but producing baked goods that relied heavily on artificial flavorings wasn’t her jam. She founded Bossy Baker to show off the flavor of local ingredients—one taste and you’ll see that her handcrafted pies don’t need any help.

S WA M P R A B B I T C A F É

UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

OUR PICK: Chocolate Chess HOLIDAY FLAVORS: Organic Maple Pumpkin, Local Apple Streusel, Local Bourbon Pecan, Chocolate Chess, Chocolate Peppermint Cream Pie (Christmas) , gluten-free crust available upon request: $26 each ORDERING INFO: Holiday orders start Nov 5; 48-hour notice required CONTACT: (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com

OUR PICK: Pumpkin with Whipped Cream HOLIDAY FLAVORS: Caramel Apple, French Apple, Bourbon Pecan, Blueberry Cobbler, Peanut Butter Cup, Pumpkin with Whipped Cream: $18-$24 ORDERING INFO: 72-hours notice required CONTACT: (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

Is there anything Greenville’s beloved grocery-café-pizzeriabutchery-bakery can’t do? Swamp Rabbit’s pies are just as delicious as everything else that exits their charming little shop, made with local ingredients delivered to the bakery by the farmers themselves.

Upcountry Provisions has been a Travelers Rest staple for years, but their artisan breads and craveworthy baked goods are worth a trip no matter where you call home. Pies are crafted with the same attention to detail that has made their bread famous.

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OPEN

Bar

Crushing It Eric Cooperman explains why he can’t get enough of vibrant, drinkable Beaujolais / by Kathryn Davé // photography by J ivan Davé

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ric Cooperman really wants you to drink Beaujolais. And since he’s the director of beverage at The Cliffs and the only advanced sommelier in the region (seriously—there are fewer than ten advanced somms in South Carolina), you should probably take his advice. The delicious, vibrant, light red wines from the oft-misunderstood Beaujolais region are undergoing a bit of a revival. Cooperman breaks it all down.

People hear “Beaujolais” and think poor-quality wine from Thanksgivings past—but what are we actually talking about? >> Beaujolais does get an incredibly bad rap, and it’s unfortunate . . . or fortunate, actually. Fortunate for drinkers who are open to exciting, rewarding wines that happen to be so cheap. These light, fruit-forward wines are made from the Gamay grape and come from the Beaujolais region, just south of Burgundy. The best part is their incredible value. A cru Beaujolais for 20 bucks? Sign me up!

Some people call Beaujolais a “sommeliers’ wine.” Why is that? >> Decades ago, Beaujolais really hung its hat on Nouveau [a young wine that goes from grape to bottle in just six to eight weeks]. As they pumped out tons of Nouveau to ship to America, the quality really plummeted. So, for years, the general public’s idea of Beaujolais was junk wine. But all along, sommeliers knew there was more to the region, knew about these amazing cru villages where they were handcrafting wine. Wine culture today is just clueing into the sommeliers’ secret. What do you like about Beaujolais? >> I’m tasting wines all day, and often, I just want something I can shut down on, something I don’t have to overthink. At the end of the day, you don’t have to—although you absolutely can—look that deep into Beaujolais. It’s approachable, easy to drink, delicious wine. These wines have that aura about them: just relax and drink. You have a culinary degree—what kind of food pairs with this wine? >> The magic about Beaujolais is that it goes with meat, but it also goes with shrimp, and fish, and crab cakes, and everything. You can order a pizza and slosh it down with a cru Beaujolais, or you can have

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A fine collection of sterling silver jewelry inspired by the treasures at Biltmore®. Cru Cut: The Cliffs’ Director of Beverage Eric Cooperman touts the delicious merits of Beaujolais, a perfect accompaniment to the Thanksgiving spread.

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lobster and enjoy it with cru Beaujolais. There aren’t too many wines out there like that. It’s really diverse. How you do get someone who’s never tried good Beaujolais to order a bottle? >> Let’s say someone wants a French Burgundy or a California Pinot Noir: if they’re open to something different, you put Gamay in their glass, and it’s just going to blow their mind. It bridges the gap between Old World French wine and New World Sonoma wine—all the food-friendly character of Pinot Noir, just a lighter, fresher spin on it. So, does Beaujolais have a place at the Thanksgiving table? >> Oh, I’m definitely bringing some Moulin-à-Vent, maybe some Saint-Amour. Then I would say a good Morgon that’s rich and dense. When you’re talking Thanksgiving spices and turkey and really anything you would typically serve with some rich Pinot Noir, think Beaujolais instead. These wines will open some eyes and make a Thanksgiving to remember. ))) FOR THE BEST BEAUJOLAIS BOTTLES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Clark’s Fine Jewelers 679-B Fairview Rd., Simpsonville, SC 864-228-2920 www.clarksfinejewelers.com

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KITCHEN

Aid

Say Cheese Luscious leek and Manchego mac & cheese is a good way to tell someone you love them / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

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Neither of us came to marriage with any connection to pasta, but somehow it became the food that says the most.

M

Romance Language: Creamy Manchego mac & cheese with leeks is a perfect marriage of savory flavors.

y husband likes to joke that pasta is his love language. Consider me fluent then. Neither of us came to marriage with any meaningful connection to pasta, but somehow it became the food that says the most to us. The big meals in my memory—the Michelin-starred restaurants, the celebrations, the award-winning chefs—are special, but fuzzed over in a happy, celebratory haze. Not the pasta. The simplest dinners are sharpest, etched in my mind because food is never only about the things we are tasting, but the people we are with. Pasta has been for us a clearing in the thick overgrowth of ordinary life, an open place to park shallow bowls and pour wine and linger, longer. The first time I made this leek-Manchego mac & cheese it was for our best friends and it was because we had a secret to celebrate. When we announced I was pregnant, their shock mirrored our own from a few weeks earlier. Manchego, with its sophisticated, earthy, nutty notes, felt right here: it steered a familiar dish into new territory. I couldn’t drink the wine, but I was comforted by the pasta’s luscious creaminess, the gratifying crunch of toasty golden breadcrumbs. The reason for that winter night’s celebration is three years old now, and he devours this very pasta (and all pasta) with gusto, as if we needed further proof he is ours. I remember the tiny glasses of Spanish wine and candlelight from the first night we ate it, and I remember the spilled sippy cups of milk and highchair percussion from the last time. I remember every bowl of pasta in between and the people we are and the people we have been and the people we are surely becoming, speaking to each other the way we do best, around the table.

LEEK AND MANCHEGO MAC & CHEESE Serves 6-8

INGREDIENTS: 7 Tbs. unsalted butter 1 bunch leek greens (from 1 ½ pounds of leeks), thinly sliced Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 3 Tbs. all-purpose flour 3 cups whole milk 10 ounces Manchego cheese, shredded (2 ½ cups) 1 pound elbow macaroni ¾ cup panko breadcrumbs 2-4 sprigs fresh thyme

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a large skillet. Add the leeks and cook over high heat, stirring until slightly wilted, 5 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Cook over low heat until very tender, about 20 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, melt 3 tablespoons of butter with the sprigs of fresh thyme. Stir in the panko breadcrumbs and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently until golden and toasted, about 3–4 minutes. Discard the thyme sprigs and set crumbs aside. 3. In a large saucepan, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter. Add the flour and cook over medium-high heat, whisking for 2 minutes. Add the milk and bring to a boil, whisking until thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Add 2 cups of the cheese, season generously with salt and pepper, and whisk until melted. 4. In a large pot of well-salted boiling water, cook the macaroni until nearly al dente. Drain well. Add the macaroni and the cheese sauce to the leek greens and stir until combined. 5. Transfer the macaroni to 8 ramekins (or a 9x13-inch baking dish) and sprinkle with the remaining ½ cup of cheese. Top with breadcrumbs. Place ramekins on a baking sheet and bake for about 25–40 minutes (depending on baking vessel), until bubbling. Turn the broiler on and broil the mac & cheese until golden-brown on top, about 2 minutes. ))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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EXPERIENCE OUR STORY.

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

AMERICAN ADAMS BISTRO

The Adams family opened their bistro’s doors in February 2008 and have been serving up flair and flavor ever since. Expect classics like a burger with a chargrilled certified Angus beef patty, as well as out-of-the-box picks like the Jack Daniel’s Pork Chop, charbroiled in a sweet and tangy Jack Daniel BBQ glaze. Be sure to visit the outdoor patio during the warmer months—weather permitting of course. $-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 221 Pelham Rd, #100. (864) 370-8055, adams-bistro.com THE ANCHORAGE

With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include grilled Greenbrier Farms hanger steak, octopus carpaccio, and Chinese red shrimp and BBQ cabbage steamed buns. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, Bake Room bread, and pickled veg. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch, which is served on Sunday. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com AUGUSTA GRILL

Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution of upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D.

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 2976000, baconbrospublichouse.com

FORK AND PLOUGH

This newcomer is the quintessential farm-tofork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly. With its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork & Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes like this barbecue local rabbit hash with bell pepper, onion, baby carrot, fingerling potatoes, mustard barbecue sauce, and poached eggs. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tuesday. 1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

BLOCKHOUSE

The Augusta Road crowd frequents the dark, cozy dining room here to knock back raw Gulf Coast oysters and happy-hour drink specials after work. An oldie but a goodie— 35 years strong and still kicking—Blockhouse offers a full menu of freshly prepared items including signatures like seafood gumbo and prime rib slow-roasted for eight hours. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1619 Augusta Rd. (864) 2324280, blockhouse.net BRICK STREET CAFÉ

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try mom’s spaghetti, Miss Sara’s crab cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed Sun–Mon. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com

GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun— fill the menu. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of the restaurant’s best dishes. $$, L (Tues–

Sat), D (Thurs–Sat), SBR. Closed Mon. 1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri– Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Photograph by Andrew Huang

ASADA Vibrant Latin American cuisine comes to Greenville by way of ASADA, a brick-andmortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard serving traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes (right), a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR N O VM EA MR BC EH R 2017 8 / 10 25 3

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PARK PLACE ON MAIN • 18 S. MAIN STREET, #202

DINING

Guide

HARE & FIELD

N Main St, Travelers Rest. (585) 414-8620, monkeywrenchsmokehouse.com

SBR. 327 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0249, hareandfieldkitchen.com

NORTHAMPTON WINE & DINE

HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

NEW PRICE! $1,225,000 • 3BR/2.5BA • MLS# 1373859

Enjoy an unbelievable urban lifestyle in downtown Greenville! This historic landmark is all on one floor. Open floorplan with high ceilings, exquisite moulding, heart pine flooring, top of the line appliances, 700+ bottle wine cellar and so much more! Please call for your private appointment.

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com HUSK GREENVILLE

Outstanding Service, Excellent Results! GINGER RODGERS SHERMAN realtor®

GingerSherman.net | 864.313.8638 A Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, realtors® Top Producer! President’s Club Member – Top 4% in the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Network of 45,000 agents

Husk Greenville delivers legendary farm-totable concepts under Chef Jon Buck, who champions Southern fare by resurrecting dishes reminiscent of great-grandma’s kitchen. The ever-evolving menu offers starters—like the crispy pig ear lettuce wraps—then dives into heftier plates like the coal-roasted chicken, sorghum-flour dumplings, and shishito peppers. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskgreenville.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the gritz fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The banh mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sun–Mon. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 568-8115, facebook.com/kitchensyncgreenville

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

LTO BURGER BAR

Chef Brian Coller has crafted a menu that steers the beefy American staple into unconventional (but totally delicious) territory. Take the Piedmont mullet ’85, with sloppy joe chili, bomb mustard, American cheese, and “phat” onion rings. For you Elvis enthusiasts, the King of Memphis is a hunk of burnin’ love concocted with banana jam, peanut butter, and bacon. $$,

The OpenHearted Collection

Love Beautifully HAMPTON STATION | 1320 HAMPTON AVE. EXT. #202A, GREENVILLE SC 29601 864.735.8379 | TANYASTIEGLERDESIGNS.COM

long-standing hardware store in Travelers Rest. This BBQ joint from the folks behind Sidewall Pizza and Rocket Surgery serves everything from ribs, wings, and veggies— all wood-fired. Steven Musolf wears the title of head chef and is the mind behind the menu. $$-$$$. D. Closed Monday. 21

Sister restaurant to Farmhouse Taco, Hare & Field serves comfort fare with upscale elegance. While the fried chicken skins in sorghum sriracha sauce are a sure starter, make your main meal the big mater sandwich slathered in basil aioli. Pair with the Hare & Field Trail Ale, crafted specially by Brewery 85 for the gastropub. $$. L, D,

L, D. 2451 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 214-1483, ltoburgerbargvl.com

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE

Founded by three Alabama sons, this new ’cue joint hits the West Stone area with Bama-style barbecue and traditional Southern sides. A fast-casual environment, grab a seat indoors or out—roll-up garage doors allow access to a pet-friendly patio— and enjoy a pulled pork platter or the fried catfish, all while cheering on your favorite football team on the flat screens. $-$$, L, D,

SBR. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite B (864) 5201740, moesoriginalbbq.com/greenville MONKEY WRENCH SMOKEHOUSE

Monkey Wrench Smokehouse comes by its name honestly, taking up space in a

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the thousands for sale, open it for a corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864)

271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and cocktails at its upstairs bar CRAFTED complement an ambitious menu of urban comfort food from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is a downtown hotspot. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Nick Graves like smoked scallop crudo with crème fraîche, grapefruit, hot sauce pearls, and Meyer lemon oil, and pork belly agnolotti with chestnuts, rapini, and saffron cream.

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or chef-designed. Ideal for group dinners or date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROCKET SURGERY

The Sidewall team trades slices for sliders with this craft concept, whose low-key bill of fare features snackable burgers like lamb topped with feta, spinach, and tangy harissa, and fried soft-shell crab with creamy paprika aioli. If you plan to drink your dinner, go for the Typhoon, with rum, dry curaçao, lime, lemongrass, curry, coconut

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cream, or The Prospector with bourbon and bitters. $$, D (Mon, Thurs–Sat), SBR. 164-D S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0901, rocketsurgery54321.com

ROOST

This fashionable restaurant lends a modern, tasty addition to N. Main Street. Whenever possible, Roost sources food within a limited distance from producer to consumer; ingredients are often procured from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L,

D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202.

(864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S

Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE STRIP CLUB 104

Whether you’re a red-blooded meat eater or prefer a little pork, the Strip Club has it seared, grilled, basted, or blackened for your pleasure. Keep it simple with the “plain Jane” dish— house-aged Black Angus USDA prime strip—or spice it up with the carpetbagger, a filet mignon masterpiece paired with fried oysters, smoked bacon collards, and garlic mashed potatoes. $$$$$$, D (Tues–Sat). 104 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 877-9104, thestripclub104.com

B ARS & BREWERIES 13 STRIPES BREWERY

Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the rise & fight again IPA and the Sgt. Molly American wheat— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

With a focus on farmhouse saisons and sour beers, Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect end-of-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find flavor-filled concoctions, such as the biggie mango, Eldorado saison, or the 2hop session IPA. Thurs–Sun. 1320 Hampton

neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from a wide selection—180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864)

631-2525, thecommunitytap.com EIGHTH STATE BREWING CO.

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery on Augusta, this brewpub is hoppy hour heaven. Expect to find a variety of their craft beers on tap, but branch out with the pub’s select draft cocktails or beer slushies. Live music, local art, and a rotating menu featuring shared plates and charcuterie round out the experience. 400 Augusta St.

Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The small-batch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington

75

GROWLER HAUS

The franchise’s West Greenville addition is its newest, rounding out the total to four Upstate watering holes. Growler Haus’s drafts rotate seasonally to bring you the best in local and national brews, so whether you’re a fan of IPAs, pilsners, ciders, pale ales, or wheats, they’ve got a cold one waiting for you. Just remember to throw in a homemade pretzel with beer cheese or a pork belly bao bun in between pints. $-$$,

L (Fri–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). Closed Sunday. 12 Lois Ave. (864) 373-9347, growlerhaus.com

more than

organizations touched since 2006

550 members

IRON HILL BREWERY

Hailing from Delaware, this award-winning brewhouse has planted roots in Greenville. Chef Jason Thomson turns out an ambitious menu, while head brewer Eric Boice curates craft beer. Take on evenings with the summer seasonal Clock Out Lager, an American lager with notes of grapefruit and pine. $-$$$, L, D. 741 Haywood Rd. (864) 5687009, ironhillbrewery.com/greenville-sc

LIABILITY BREWING CO.

United by a passion for Star Wars and craft brews—there may or may not be a storm trooper mural inside—fun-loving founders Dustin and Terry bring solid staples to the table at Liability Brewing Co. Located in an old electric company building in the new Weststone development, this new taproom pours creative flavors with even funkier names. Sip on a Carl von Cloudwitz, a New England IPA with a crisp finish. Thurs–Sun. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite D. (864) 920-1599, liabilitybrewing.co LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 7707777, libertytaproom.com

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at the Community Tap, Greenville’s

million in 12 years

St. (864) 735-0885, fireforge.beer

BREWERY 85

THE COMMUNITY TAP

$5.4

FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER

Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com

6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com

grants totaling

(864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com

Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill satisfies as both pre–Greenville Drive game watering hole or after-work hangout. Inventive and hearty apps, such as the “Old School” chicken nachos, start things off before the main event of fish ‘n’ chips, the Liberty Club, or even a Signature Steak. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap.

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with its eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty howdy dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome.

109

MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabascofried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S

We invite you to join Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville.

greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

2018-2019 Partners

Main St. (864) 239-0286, macspeedshop.com

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DINING

Guide

PINEY MOUNTAIN BIKE LOUNGE

Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, the Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a daily food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville.

(864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com QUEST BREWING CO.

Eco-minded Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272- 6232, questbrewing.com SIP WHISKEY & WINE

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers fine wines and whisky, there’s no better end to an evening than an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail). SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a collection of small plates is a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite. $-$$, D. 103

N Main St #400, (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgian-style farm ale is a golden dream) as well as frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become a favorite spot to cap off an afternoon. 26 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2424, theswamprabbitbrewery.com TASTING ROOM TR

Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale in-house, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite from the weekly wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday–Friday. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D

(Wed–Sat), Closed Mon–Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com THE 05

Priding itself on being Greenville’s neighborhood gathering place, The 05, so named for the iconic Augusta Road zip code, offers seasonal cocktails and spirits as well as a variety of tasty tapas—like the roasted red pepper hummus or the chorizostuffed dates braised in Rioja wine and topped with whipped goat cheese. If you’re bringing the whole gang, opt for the cheeses and charcuterie, or nosh on the fabulous flatbread as a party of one. $-$$$, D. 3016 Augusta St. (864) 412-8150, the05.net THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville brew lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy. (864)

605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com

UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

UP ON THE ROOF

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With its classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250 RiverPlace. (864)

242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net VAULT & VATOR

Named for a former vault elevator in the underground expanse, this hip downtown joint puts a twenty-first-century spin on fashionable speakeasies of yore. Small plates of charcuterie, hummus, and cheese are simple yet refined, providing enough bite to not overpower the establishment’s true star— the cocktail list. The menu includes both signature and traditional libations; your only task is picking your poison. $$, D, Closed Sun–Mon. 655 S Main St, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 603-1881, vaultandvator.com

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com YEE-HAW BREWING

Beers that celebrate good times with good company? Count us in. This Tennessee native serves up a mix of fine ales and lagers, including a World Beer Cup-Winning Dunkel dark lager. Diverse seasonals crop up with every change of the temperature giving guests a taste of something new. Gather with friends to find out which flavor fits your fancy. $-$$, L, D. 307 East McBee Avenue, Suite C. (864) 605-7770, yeehawbrewing.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head comes to Greenville with a wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves— you can’t go wrong with the GreenVillain topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823

S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café serves a wide-range of globally inspired dishes for lunch and dinner. For Sunday brunch, try the Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy to Pattyo-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864)

520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an almond brothers smoothie. $, B, L, D. 600 S Main St. happyandhale.com MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crêpes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the mega breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

Looking for that midday pick-me-up? Pop over to Barista Alley, where exposed brick walls and wide wooden tables create the perfect ambience to converse with a warm mug in hand. Satisfy your caffeine cravings, but don’t miss out on Barista Alley’s colorful array of green, berry, peanut butter and chocolate smoothies. $, B (Mon–Sat), L, D (Mon–Sun). 125 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 655-5180, baristaalley.com BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End joint. Find fresh fare in organic salads as well as fruit and veggie-rich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options available, of course. $, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info CRÊPE DU JOUR

Much more than offering “really thin pancakes,” this downtown establishment brings a taste of Europe to the Upstate with delicate, delicious French fare. The diverse menu includes breakfast options like the bacon, egg, and potato, and for lunch and dinner, the tomato pesto. Crêpe du Jour also serves up specialty cocktails, coffee beverages, and wine. $$, B, L, D (Tues–Sun). 20 S Main

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

St, Greenville. (864) 520-2882

Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 2980005, fallscottage.com

Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with breakfast pastries, ice cream, and cold lunch items complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR.

RISE BISCUITS DONUTS

Fresh buttermilk biscuits. Hot-from-the-oven maple bacon doughnuts. Debuting its first SC outfit, Rise Biscuits Donuts pumps out biscuit sandwiches and hush puppies, to apple fritters and confection-bedecked doughnuts. While the spicy chickaboom sandwich is a crispy punch of fire, satisfy your sweet side with the crème brûlée doughnut, flametorched and filled with custard. $, B, L. 1507

Woodruff Rd, Suite D, Greenville. (864) 4028240, risebiscuitsdonuts.com TANDEM CRÊPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maplepeppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com

T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CHICORA ALLEY

CAFÉS

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional

BARISTA ALLEY

DUE SOUTH COFFEE ROASTERS

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com GRATEFUL BREW

A brew joint where you can enjoy both varieties—coffee and a cold one—Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order espressos or pour-overs, all from Counter Culture coffee. Celebrating our area, and that it’s always five o’clock somewhere, half of the beer taps are locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com KUKA JUICE

If you’re hard-pressed for a fresh fix—Kuka Juice has just the ticket. Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out cold-pressed craft with healthminded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the taco ’bout it bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, smoothies, toasts, and more also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco

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Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, wine varieites, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L.

101 N Main St, Ste D. methodicalcoffee.com O-CHA TEA BAR

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more.

marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s chopped salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

$, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 2836702, ochateabaronline.com

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com

SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

TABLE 301 CATERING & KITCHEN

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ & GROCERY

Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is woodfired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D.

205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by Due South and serves flaky treats from Bake Room. $, B, L. 1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

DELIS CAVIAR & BANANAS

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com FARM FRESH FAST

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, this operation adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

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HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4PM - 7PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11AM - 3PM 941 SOUTH MAIN STREET DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

LOCATED IN FRONT OF FLUOR FIELD AT THE WEST END

864.770.7777 / LIBERTYTAPROOM.COM

Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade stecca bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormonefree meat on just-baked white focaccia bread. Don’t miss The Grove on Friday nights—live music, a rotating tapas menu, and craft beer and wine. $, B, L, D. Closed

Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC ARYANA

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani, and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 2367410, aryanagreenville.com

605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

860 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 518-1978, eatfarmfreshfast.com

BASIL THAI CUISINE

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted

NOW BOOKING

UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

While “fast food” and “healthy” aren’t often synonymous, Farm Fresh Fast might change your mind. The restaurant’s mantra is simple: build sustainable relationships with local farms and provide nutritionbased, customized meals. We suggest the almost heaven burger with a fresh patty from Providence Farm, or the seasonal cobb salad—featuring Kaland Farm eggs and a house-made apple pie moonshine vinaigrette. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Saturday.

RICK’S DELI & MARKET

&

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday.

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the concept with Basil Thai in the Aloft building downtown. Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut NOVEMBER 2018 / 127

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milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/ greenville FONDA ROSALINDA

For almost 20 years, Rosalinda Lopez has been serving up fresh renditions of Mexican recipes across from Bob Jones University. Her repertoire lists a wealth of tasty beef, pork, chicken, seafood, and vegetarian dishes— including the ever-popular chile rellenos—but don’t pass up a starter of chips and Rosalinda’s homemade tomatillo salsa. $$, L, D. 1124 N. Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 292-7002, facebook. com/rosalindasrestaurantgreenville

GOLDEN LLAMA

Lomo saltado, ceviche, rotisserie chicken, and other Peruvian classics form the core of the menu at the Golden Llama, but you won’t regret the bistec a lo pobre—beef tenderloin, plantains, and potatoes, topped with a fried egg. The eatery’s two no-frills storefront locations (the second one in Five Forks) sport golden-hued walls and offer dine-in and carry-out service. $, L, D. 2435 E. North St. (864) 373-9958, goldenllama.net

IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modernAmerican elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should try the Punky Brewster roll: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com

JI-ROZ

True, it would be fantastic if the Greek Festival happened year-round. But until that day, pop into this authentic Mediterranean eatery with modern flair. Take a light lunch on the outdoor patio with a Kalamata olive and fetatopped Greek salad or a classic gyro wrapped with your choice of lamb, chicken, or veggies. At dinner, try something more indulgent like the vegan moussaka. $$, L, D, Closed Sunday. 644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 3739445, jirozgreenvillesc.com KANNIKA’S THAI KITCHEN

The family-run restaurant serves up exotic recipes direct from owner Kannika Jaemjaroen-Walsh’s native Thai province, boasting traditional dishes like green and yellow curries, pad Thai, and the spicy/ sour Tom Yum soup. Don’t miss Kannika’s specialty items, like the pla pad khun chai, a lightly fried red snapper filet doused in white wine and soy bean sauce, and the savory honey duck with carrots, cilantro, snow peas, onions, and fried shallots. $$$, L,

D. 430 Haywood Rd, Ste B, Greenville. (864) 297-4557, kannikaskitchen.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

KOREAN BBQ

This hole-in-the-wall won’t wow you with its simple interior, but its selection of ban chan (side dishes) will spark your palate with snapshots of flavor before you dive into bowls of bibimbap (rice mixed with vegetables, meat, and an egg) or yukejang (a spicy beef and vegetable stew). $$. L, D. 1170 Woodruff Rd. (864) 286-0505

MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crêpes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their homegrown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathed in a soy-based broth. $, L, D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 OTTO IZAKAYA

Modeled after the informal, after-work drinking holes of Japan, Otto Izakaya is the latest dining concept unveiled by Peter Lieu and Doug Yi—longtime owners of Lieu’s Bistro restaurant. The menu invites guests to embrace familiar favorites—spicy tuna and BBQ eel rolls with assorted nigiri and sashimi—while expanding palates to new tasting territories a la the mac ‘n’ cheese loaded with Panang curry, jack cheese, and radiatori pasta or banh mi sliders with chili pork and spicy mayo. $$, D. 802 S Main St; 15 Market Point Dr, Greenville. (864) 568-5880; (864) 568-8009, otto-izakaya.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B.(864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St. (864) 2413012, pomegranateonmain.com SACHA’S CAFÉ

Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com SAFFRON

It’s worth braving Woodruff Road to visit this Indian eatery. At lunch, the daily buffet lays out a wallet-friendly selection of curries, rice dishes, and chef’s signatures. The a la carte dinner menu boasts a staggering variety, but the yogurt-marinated chicken tikka cooked in a clay oven or the lamb saag stewed with spinach, ginger, and garlic are excellent

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options. $, L, D. 1178 Woodruff Rd., Ste. 16. (864) 288-7400, saffrongreenville.com

into a pita wrap or bowl with your choice of fresh spreads like hummus, baba ganoush, or fat-free dill yogurt.$-$$, L, D. 1800 August

SAIGON FAST FOOD

St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Contrary to its name, Saigon Fast Food is a sit-down restaurant. Inside, the small room is spiffed up with green-clothcovered tables and a host of condiments in the middle of each. Folks come here for steaming bowls of pho—a fragrant broth made with rice noodles and your choice of other ingredients (meats and vegetables)—and an extensive menu of Vietnamese specialties to wash down with a glass of bubble tea $ -$$. L, D. 1011 N

Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 235-3472 SWAD

Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soulsatisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $ -$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise.$$$-$$$$, D.

Closed Sunday.1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com DA VINCI’S RISTORANTE

Located in the Forest Park shopping center, Da Vinci’s casual exterior belies the upscale atmosphere within. Executive Chef Carlos Echeverri serves fresh fare, updating menus to showcase new dishes like cold antipasti salad with fresh mozzarella and roasted red peppers. Highlights include the veal shank ​ osso bucco, butternut squash soup, and the black truffle​burrata. $$$, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 27 S Pleasantburg Dr, Ste 160, Greenville. (864) 241-8044, davincis-sc.com JIANNA

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms (right). $$-$$$, L (Sat–Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com KAIROS GREEK KITCHEN

This Charleston restaurant makes its Upstate mark by serving up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like made-in-Mount Pleasant falafels next to slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the homemade tzatziki sauce. Turn any meal

THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed

Celebrate

Simpsonville the holiday with

Sunday. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

LIMONCELLO

The latest addition to the Larkin’s line-up, this ristorante serves up Italian cuisine out of the former Playwright space on River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy the arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D

(Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

PORTOFINO’S

You’ll find Italian-American classics to feed every member of the family at this Greenville icon. For two decades, the familyowned restaurant near Greenville Mall has been pleasing palates with a generous menu of pasta, seafood, and saltimbocca. For the gluten-sensitive, sautéed vegetables can be substituted for pasta in many of the dishes $, D. 30 Orchard Park Dr., Ste. 22. (864) 627-7706, portofinossc.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, Chef Jeff Kelly offers a local twist on French staples—blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR.

340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com

VILLA FROSI

A Greek and Italian restaurant with traditional flair, Villa Frosi hits Wade Hampton with Southern European staples. Sample specialties like the spanakopita,

D EC E M B E R 1 , 8 , & 1 5 5-8PM Check off your holiday shopping list with unique gifts and treasures at Simpsonville's downtown Holiday Market.

CHRISTMAS

PARADE D EC E M B E R 2 AT 3 P M Start the holiday season off right with the annual Simpsonville Christmas Parade! More info can be found by visiting

SIMPSONVILLECHAMBER.COM NOVEMBER 2018 / 129

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Be Your Healthiest You!

DINING

Guide

the seafood fettuccine, or go straight for the pizza. Finish with a slice of limoncello cake, and you’ll be booking you’re Mediterranean dream cruise, pronto. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 2520 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 520-0298, resto.tpsitetesting.info

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville hot chicken or Thai shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (404) 372-2266, facebook.com/ automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 8843592, daveschucktruck.com

CLUCK SQUEAL AND FRIENDS

Fresh Cold-Pressed Juice, Salads, Smoothies, Paninis, Soup, & More Come visit us!

VILLAGE OF WEST GREENVILLE – 580 PERRY AVE.

Owner Jeff Selzer brings an inventive flare to his food truck fare. Expect staples like the fried chicken sandwich and the black & bleu burger, but don’t miss out on fan-favorite crab Rangoon or Jamaican jerk tacos with tropical pico de gallo. Check the Cluck Squeal and Friends Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (864) 395-9720, facebook.com/clucksquealfriend ELLADA KOUZINA

Greek cuisine hits the Greenville scene in this big blue traveling kitchen. Traditional treats are always available off the spit, the lamb and chicken gyros are Mediterranean heaven, and their special take on Greek fries are the ideal pre-meal snack. Check social media for weekly schedules. $, schedule varies. (864) 908-5698,

Love is in the Giving

facebook.com/elladakouzina2013 GRAVY TRAIN FOOD TRAILER

Dive into this over-the-border (no, not that border) delicacy, hailing straight from the land of maple syrup. The Gravy Train puts their own spin on Canada’s signature gravysoaked, cheese-curd-sprinkled French fry dish à la the chorizo fryerito layered with black beans, homemade chorizo, avocado ranch, and cheddar, and the Reuben-style corned beef poutine drizzled with Thousand Island dressing, smothered in Swiss, and doused in sauerkraut. $, schedule varies. (864) 326-5708, hoponthegravytrain.com KEEPIN’ IT FRESH

5% of all November proceeds will go to local charities. Since 1948

PACE JEWELERS 1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436

As healthy as it is tasty, Keepin’ It Fresh food truck serves up a diverse menu of locally sourced cuisine guaranteed to please your appetite and your waistline. Catch them at Grateful Brew and the Swamp Rabbit Brewery and Taproom for a crispy fried Brussels sprouts salad, mouthwatering shrimp taco topped with peach slaw and guava crema, or a golden-brown fried fish plate. $$, schedule

varies. (864) 386-5050, @keepinitfreshtruck_gvl KICKIN’ PIG BAR-B-QUE PIG TRUCK

If you’re in the mood for some authentic Southern eats, look no further than the Kickin’ Pig’s on-the-go ’cue truck. Go for the smoked bologna sandwich seasoned with BBQ rub and finished with cole slaw, or grab a fork and dig into the BBQ Sundae, a non-confectionary concoction of pulled pork, potato salad, slaw, and sauce of choice. $, schedule varies. (864) 608-6187, kickinpigbbq.com

MEAT’N IN THE MIDDLE

Treat yourself to a plethora of sandwiches from mobile marvel Meat’n in the Middle, each topped with your choice of a mouth-watering sauce. Try their Crystal Pistol Chicken with sautéed onion, jalapenos, pepper jack cheese, and mango-habanero sauce, or go for the bun length dog from Nathan’s. For those with dietary limitations, the vegetarian tacos are an excellent alternative. $, schedule varies. (864) 723-1185, mitmfoodtruck.com ROBINO’S

Chef Robin’s vision of freshly sourced fare with a home-cooked feel comes to fruition in Robino’s Food Truck. Though mainly featuring Italian food, this truck shucks out a wide variety of American classics, such as the chicken potpie with puff pastry or the garden burger. For those with dietary limitations, the vegan lasagna is a great go-to option. $, schedule varies. (864) 621-3064,

robinosfoodtruck.com ONE LOVE FUSION

Catch a summertime vibe year-round every time you drop by this Caribbean-inspired restaurant-on-wheels. Wrap your hands around One Love’s take on traditional favorites; the tropical gyro is rolled up with fresh mango slaw, pico, seared lamb and beef, and jerkinfused tzatziki sauce, while the Jinju hero comes topped on a grilled roll with kimchi, Italian sausage, provolone, and tangy Asian sauce. $, schedule varies. (864) 399-9392,

facebook.com/OneLoveFF SMOKIN’ BLUES BBQ

Smokin’ Blues keeps things hot with a smorgasbord of savory sauces and smoked staples—pulled pork, beef brisket, pulled chicken, and ribs—that can be enjoyed solo or packed into sandwiches and tacos. For a treat that’s extra smokin’, go for the glutenfree loaded fries or homemade chips piled high with pork, white BBQ sauce, sour cream, pickled jalapenos, and three-cheese sauce. $, schedule varies (864) 444-4752,

mysmokinblues.com THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

WE GOT THE BEETS

Proving that not all street food is created equal, We Got the Beets is Greenville’s very first plant-based food truck. This crueltyfree fare encourages diners to “celerybrate” vegan eats. Favorites include the Philly grilled cheese with marinated portobello mushrooms and cashew mozzarella cheese, and the sushi sandwich with sushi rice, Korean BBQ jackfruit, and more in a nori sheet pocket. $, schedule varies. @wegotthebeetsfoodtruck

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from 27 taps downstairs and 31 upstairs—are what bring patrons to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a long list of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington

St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the

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Don’t feel like cooking this Holiday Season? Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitanstyle pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margherita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. Location information available on their website. $, L, D. Location varies. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D'ALLESANDRO'S PIZZA

Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s Pizza brings its dough lover’s paradise to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, D’Allesandro’s pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy a variety of savory pizza, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville.

(864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com GRIMALDI'S PIZZERIA

Experience Big Apple flavor without the bustle at this NY-style brick-oven pizzeria. Serving up pies and calzones in a traditional yet chic environment, Grimaldi’s is dedicated to authenticity, down to the imported NYCwater used to craft their dough. Grab a slice of the buffalo chicken pizza, or build your own, just don’t miss the daily house-made cheesecake or wine pairings. Located in Magnolia Park Shopping Center, it’s an ideal spot to snag a bite before a cinematic viewing. $, L, D. 1025 Woodruff Rd, St. K101.

(864) 412-1032, grimaldispizzeria.com SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L,

D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com STONE PIZZA

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat

& Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com TOSS PIZZA

Located in the South Ridge Apartment Community, the TOSS menu is loaded with artfully crafted pies that are a far cry from your typical pepperoni. Head far east with the Phuket Thai pie, based with curry sauce and topped with peanuts, arugula, and shiitake mushrooms. The chile relleno is guaranteed to light a fire in the ol’ belly— thanks to a few poblano peppers. $$, L, D. 823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 2830316, tosspizzapub.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TACOS

Let us do it for you, it’s what we do!

CANTINA 76

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76, where the tacos shine. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St. (864) 631-2914, cantina76.com

FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with the campfire s’mores. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0586, farmhousetacos.com

Call us for all of your catering needs or to host your private event

NEO BURRITO

Hailing from Asheville, North Carolina, this locally owned spot takes—the burrito. Stop in for spicy tacos, cheesy quesadillas, zesty breakfast burritos, fresh salads, and more. Save room for the chipotle BBQ chicken burrito or the farm burrito, packed with rice, kale, hummus, beets, cilantro, cabbage, and more. $, B, L, D. 1268 Pendleton St. (864) 552-1054, neoburrito.com PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300

(864) 297 6000

3620 Pelham Road, Greenville, SC 29615 www.baconbrospublichouse.com

River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

TIPSY TACO

Dishes here bear the creative touch of Trish Balentine, former owner of Corporate Deli. Her made-from-scratch menu items include tamales, burrito bowls, and all the other Tex-Mex suspects. “Tipsy” nods to the bar, where you can swill tequila flights, frozen margaritas, and house-infused spirits. Take your pick of three locations—two in Greenville and one on Fairview Road in Simpsonville. $$, L, D, SBR. 15 Conestee Ave,

(864) 558-0775, and 215 Pelham Rd, (864) 603-1144, tipsytaco.net WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp bungalow golden ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with a house-crafted margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

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Preserving Our Upstate for Generations to Come The Cliffs is proud to present the Community Spirit Award to our partners at Upstate Forever. In a time of unprecedented growth around our charming towns and cities, Upstate Forever remains tirelessly committed to maintaining the character and natural beauty of the Upstate so future generations may enjoy this remarkable region we call home.

Contact Us Today to Discover How You Can Call the Carolina Mountains Home Mountain and Lake Homes and Homesites | Club Memberships 864.326.3126 | cliffsliving.com/town

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LATE BAROQUE—BACH AND BORDEAUX Nov 1st; Thurs, 5:15pm. Free. The Peace Center. Enjoy Baroque melodies with a rich Bordeaux during this month’s Interlude installment.

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LATE BAROQUE—BACH AND BORDEAUX

Hosted by the Peace Center’s artist-inresidence and master clarinetist Igor Begelman, this month’s installment of the new “Interlude” music-appreciation series will feature a combination of chamber tunes and full-bodied libations. Enjoy gripping works of music by German composer and Baroque pioneer Johann Sebastian Bach while indulging in a perfectlypaired glass of rich red Bordeaux from France in the intimacy of the Genevieve’s Lounge. Genevieve’s Theater Lounge at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Thurs, 5:15pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES

They say that dogs are man’s best friend—just not this time. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s third novel to feature London’s favorite crime-cracking sleuth Sherlock Holmes, this eerie mystery set on the Baskerville moors is full of intrigue and suspense. Is a supernatural pupper to blame for the death of Sir Charles Baskerville? Or is the supposed ancient family curse a front for something more sinister? Grab your magnifying glass and start searching for clues alongside the world’s most famous detective. And Watson, of course. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $20-$52. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

FLEW OVER THE 1–17 ONE CUCKOO’S NEST

While no one can ever top Jack Nicholson’s maniacal portrayal of McMurphy in the 1975 film, there’s certainly no harm in trying. Set in a sterile mental hospital ward ruled under the iron fist of one sadistic Nurse Ratched, Ken Kesey’s groundbreaking novel-turned-stage-production provides an intimate perspective of the fragility

Photograph of Igor Begelman courtesy of The Peace Center

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©JERRY FINLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

The season’s most beloved classic comes back to life. Featuring internationally-renowned dancers Adiarys Almeida & Taras Domitro FRIDAY, DEC. 21, 7:30 P.M. SATURDAY, DEC. 22, 7:30 P.M. SUNDAY, DEC. 23, 3:00 P.M. THE PEACE CENTER

FOR TICKETS VISIT INTERNATIONALBALLETSC.ORG Guest Artists sponsored by Greta & Graham Somerville ACCOMPANIED BY

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS of the human condition. Mixing elements of humor with shock value and compassion, “Chief” Bromden’s careful retelling of his stint amongst the other “acutes” and “chronics” truly stands the test of time. Centre Stage, 501 River St. Thurs– Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $19-$34. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Photograph of Igor Begelman courtesy of The Peace Center

EVENING OF ORIGINAL 2 AN MUSIC

As part of the Peace Center’s upcoming Songwriters Workshop Series, this special showcase will highlight the songwriting and instrumental talents of some of the industry’s most gifted musicians. The Upstate’s own Edwin McCain is set to take the stage along with country and pop music collaborator and singer Maia Sharp as well as Blue Dogs founding member Phillip Lammonds. Genevieve’s Theater Lounge at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri, 7:30pm. $75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

REEDY 2–4 COUNTYBANK REELS FILM FESTIVAL

A celebration of Upstate independent filmmakers and all the talent they bring to the table, Reedy Reels once again graces the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre for the fourth annual

edition of this community-focused film fest. Screening works from selected artists, Reedy Reels serves a dual purpose in providing muchneeded exposure for rising directors and education for locals on the hunt for the next big thing. Make sure to snag tickets to the Opening Night Party for local bites, brews, and a sneak peek of this year’s muchanticipated films. Opening Night Party: The Venue at Falls Park, 631 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm. $75. Film Festival: Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat–Sun. $30-$50. reedyreels.com

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GCA FALL FESTIVAL AND HOLIDAY MARKET Food, fun, and shopping? What more does a fall festival need? The Greenville Classical Academy–sponsored event will feature hayrides, flavorful concessions, games, face painting, farm animals, and much

more. It’s a one-stop-shop for visitors to snap up anything from locally crafted goods by Dapper Ink, Valli Designs, and Carolina Bourbon Belles, to retail items like Tupperware and doTERRA International.

Greenville Classical Academy, 2519 Woodruff Rd, Greenville. Sat, 10am–3pm. Free. (864) 329-9884, greenvillefallfestival.com

MOUNTAIN 16K 3 PARIS Lace up those running shoes

because it’s time to get a little dirty. The final race of Greenville Rec’s Dirt Series will determine who takes home the title of Champion of the Mountain and the reigning crown of Dirt King and Queen. It’s nearly a 10-mile race, but with scenic views of the Upstate surrounding you, it may just feel like a walk in the park. Paris Mountain State Park, 2401 State Park Rd, Greenville. Sat, 8am–noon. $16. (864) 676-2180, greenvillerec.com

RETURNS 3–4 BEILMAN At only 28, violinist

Benjamin Beilman has already accomplished quite a lot, playing in company with a number of internationally renowned symphonies stretching from Detroit to Sydney and North Carolina to Norway. In the midst of a busy season that includes debuts with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and premiere recitals across Europe, Beilman will join Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel and the

The sweetest part of the season just got sweeter. Get closer to your favorite holiday classic at our annual Nutcracker Tea where you and your children can enjoy refreshments, sweets, collectible ornaments, keepsake photos, autographs and so much more, including a special story time and performance by International Ballet’s Nutcracker dancers.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9TH 3:00 P.M. | TICKETS $30 To purchase tickets, visit: InternationalBalletSC.org PURCHASE BY DECEMBER 5TH

POINSETT CLUB • GREENVILLE

A SPECIAL THANKS TO ANN BIBLE © JERRY FINLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

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YOU DON’T HAVE TO GO FAR TO FIND AN INVITING SPACE FOR YOUR NEXT SPECIAL EVENT.

Greenville Symphony Orchestra for a Centre Stage, 501 River St. spellbinding performance of masterful Tues–Wed, 7pm. $15-$18.50. violin concertos from Antonin Dvorak, (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org Johann Brahms, and Richard Wagner. THE B-52S The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. beforeGATHERINGS Macklemore was Sat, PARTIES 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $19-$75. | WEDDINGS | FAMILY EVENTS | SOCIALLong & Corporate heralding the marvels of Goodwill (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org shopping, the quirky, oft-bouffanted BEN RECTOR—MAGIC: B-52s were epitomizing thrift-store THE TOUR glamour. A non-stop purveyor of As the youngest individual ever to win feel-good, poppy party hits a la “Rock the pop category of the John Lennon Lobster,” “Private Idaho,” and “Roam,” Songwriting Contest, you could say the B-52s have become quintessential Ben Rector has some musical chops. idols of the dance-rock genre, paving Having previously toured with other alt the path for future artists to experiment and folk rockers like Drew Holcomb and explore their musical bend in and the Neighbors, NEEDTOBREATHE, unexpected ways. Now, they’re inviting and Colony House, Rector made a you for a night of fun in the “Love breakthrough with his “Brand New” Shack”—updos optional. single back in 2015, and this year’s The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Magic looks poised for success; it Thurs, 7:30pm. $45-$75. debuted at number one on Billboard’s (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org Americana/Folk Albums chart. 5TH ANNUAL CAMPFIRE The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. SOCIAL Mon, 7:30pm. $25-$45. Back in the olden days, cowboys and (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org ramblers used to gather around the BELA FLECK, ZAKIR campfire and . . . eat beans out of a HUSSAIN & EDGAR MEYER can or something? Greenbrier Farms’ Three impactful instruments. Three annual charity event to benefit Project influential prodigies of their craft. One Host brings together the Upstate’s best exceptional evening. With musical and brightest culinary geniuses with abilities as unique as their chosen other like-minded brewers and doers tools, banjoist Bela Fleck, bassist to swap a few tall tales over delicious Edgar Meyer, and tabla talent Zakir cuts of meat and organic produce. Hussain each tell a story through their Feed your soul with bites from Husk, harmonies, weaving a cultural tapestry Blind Pig Supper Club, and more, that is both inspiring and breathtaking. libations courtesy of Liability Brewing You won’t want to miss out on this Co., Sierra Nevada, and Fullsteam one-of-a-kind intimate, international Brewing, and tunes provided by excursion. Amongst the Trees. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Greenbrier Farms, Tues, 7:30pm. $15-$50. 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org Thurs, 6–9pm. $80. (864) 855-9782, greenbrierfarms.com

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6,7,13,14 WORLD BUILDERS

Crafted by the same acclaimed playwright who wrote Gidion’s Knot— Johnna Adams—World Builders follows the saga of two patients seeking some semblance of sanity within the boundaries of their minds. Max and Whitney are participants in a clinical drug trial that hopes to cure them of their schizophrenic tendencies. But as the experiment progresses, the walls they’ve built to contain their illusions begin to crumble, with romance and love blooming in the wake. Straddling the line between fantasy and reality, the pair must learn to separate their feelings from the truth.

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9 MERCYME Since their formation in 1994,

Christian rock quintet MercyMe has racked up an impressive record of take-home hardware and industry accolades including two American Music Awards for Favorite Contemporary Inspirational Artist and eight Gospel Music Association Dove Awards. Inspired by the March release of a greatest hits anthology entitled “I Can Only Imagine: The Very Best of MercyMe,” the Imagine Nation tour will include a guest spot by fellow Christian artist Tenth Avenue North. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Fri, 7pm. $39-$69. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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Photograph of Jen Selwyn pottery, courtesy of Greenville Open Studios

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Photograph of MercyMe, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

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BELA FLECK, ZAKIR HUSSAIN & EDGAR MEYER Nov 6th; Tues, 7:30pm. $15-$50. The Peace Center. World-renowned banjoist Bela Fleck, along with bassist Edgar Meyer and tabla player Zakir Hussain, combine their talents in one exceptional music affair.

STILLS 9 STEPHEN & JUDY COLLINS

He’s one-third of folk rock supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash. She’s the inspiration behind one of the band’s most popular and meaningful hits, “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes.” Now nearly 50 years later, Stephen Stills and Judy Collins are reuniting for the first time on stage. Each with a decade-spanning compendium of folk-tinged, eclectic tunes and colorful industry chronicles under their belt, the pair are ready to share some of their favorite musical works—along with a few rich anecdotes—with you.

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri, 8pm. $35-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

& VILLAINS: 10 HEROES MUSIC FROM HOLLYWOOD FILMS

Just like no villain is complete without a lengthy, climactic monologue, any hero without a good theme song is severely lacking. The Spartanburg Philharmonic pays homage to these movie greats with Heroes & Villains, a carefully curated program of composed tunes that includes recognizable themes from classics like the James Bond films, Batman, and The Incredibles. Twichell Auditorium, 580 E Main St, Spartanburg. Sat, 7–9pm. $17.50-$55. (864) 948-9020, spartanburgphilharmonic.org

Photograph of Jen Selwyn pottery, courtesy of Greenville Open Studios

Photograph of MercyMe, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

9–11

GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS

Fact: Greenville’s got enough gorgeous skyline that the delightful Bob Ross could happily paint for decades. Our community’s buzzing art scene has steadily blossomed over the years, with new studios sprouting up from the West End to West Pelzer. Now you can visit them all. The annual event sheds light on Upstate visual artists, opening the doors to their creative workspaces and inviting visitors to take a behind-the-scenes look at the magic behind the craft. Locations vary. Select studios on Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, noon–6pm. Free. (864) 467-3132, greenvillearts.com

I CAN’T TELL IN 11 STORIES CHURCH

With his 21st-century, all-embracing views of the connection between the church and the LGBTQ community, First Baptist Church Senior Minister Jim Dant has attracted his fair share of supporters—as well as a few

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Nov 15th; Thurs, 7:30pm. $15-$55. The Peace Center. A tribute to the rich narrative of Mexican heritage, this talented troupe stuns audiences with their vibrant performance.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center.

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BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MÉXICO

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detractors. Dant’s novel, This I Know: A Simple Biblical Defense for LGBTQ Christians, made waves in the religious community, sparking a conversation about compassion and understanding within the confines of an institution. Using theology, inclusivity, and a bit of wit, Dant shares his refreshing perspective on the role of religion in modern times. Gunter Theatre at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Sun, 5pm & 7pm. $20. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

13 VOCES8 Hailing from across the pond in

the United Kingdom, VOCES8 is an a cappella octet that was founded in 2005 as a competition singing group. Mixing it up between classic and contemporary choral pieces and their own original works, the sensational artists have taken their vocal powers around the globe and collaborated with top instrumentalists and musical ensembles. Don’t miss your chance to see them live. Gunter Theatre at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Tues, 7pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

“Only the Lonely,” and “Running Scared” while getting a glimpse of new cuts and rare material showcased in a whole new way. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MÉXICO

Drawn from regional folk influences and traditional narratives threaded throughout Mexican heritage, the Mexico City-based troupe has wowed audiences internationally with their active spirit, vibrant costuming, and dynamic choreography. Pulsing with rich cultural energy and a blend of dances ranging from large ensemble acts to more close-knit movements, this show-topping performance will have you transfixed. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Thurs, 7:30pm. $15-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

A FAMILY 16–18 MOZART: AFFAIR

You may have heard of father-son rivalries, but you haven’t

DREAMS: ROY 14 INORBISON—THE HOLOGRAM TOUR

Photograph by Andy Staples.

Ever since Tupac was reincarnated on the Coachella stage in 2012, modern technology has been the go-to weapon for allowing future generations to catch “live” performances by artists like Michael Jackson and Ronnie James Dio. Rock and roll forefather and vocal powerhouse Roy Orbison is a recent addition to that lineup; the groundbreaking singer/songwriter passed in 1988, but will once again don his signature shades on stage during the In Dreams tour. Relive Orbison’s extensive songbook of hits like “Oh, Pretty Woman,” 138 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The Peace Center Chamber Orchestra is set to bring its special all-Mozart program back once again for a special family-style performance featuring three handpicked pieces written by prolific classical composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, as well as his father Leopold’s “Sinfonia de Caccia for 4 Horns and Strings.” Gunter Theatre at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

with traditional styles to create a comprehensive performance program that will completely change how you view tap. With a repertoire that includes critically acclaimed works like “Myelination,” “Three to One,” and “Jungle Blues,” Dorrance Dance is guaranteed to move you—no pun intended—with every shake, rattle, and roll. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Sun, 3pm. $15-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

16–Jan 21 UNITED 21–25 COMMUNITY BANK ICE ON MAIN On the search for that good ol’fashioned family Christmas? Look no further than this makeshift ice rink right in the heart of Downtown Greenville. In addition to a wide range of holiday events hosted on the ice each season, the open-air rink also has plenty of warm-you-up staples like hot cocoa for sale. Bring your own blades or rent a pair—just try to keep the Tonya Harding moves to a minimum. Downtown Greenville, 206 S Main St. Mon–Thurs, 3–8pm; Fri, 3–9pm; Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, 11am–7pm. Adults, $12; under 12, $8. iceonmain.com

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HOPE RELAY

While our school-day relays usually consisted of trying not to melt in the hot sun and hoping you didn’t get stuck with a grape popsicle, this race has a lot more impact. In support of Project HOPE’s programs to fund autism research and support in the community, runners will race in teams in either the 20k, Boot Camp 5k, or regular 5k. The classic-style relay will be broken up into different legs, with separate divisions for athletes of any skill. Hartness, 300 Smith Rd, Greenville. Sat, 7:30am. hoperelay.org

DANCE 18 DORRANCE Seeking to update the face of

tap rather than completely change it, this award-winning dance company marries innovative choreography

DISNEY ON ICE

It’s pretty impressive that anyone can keep their balance on an ice skating rink—let alone doing it in a 20-pound Olaf the Snowman suit while thousands of kiddos scream-sing along to “Let It Go” all around you. A mix of exciting stunts performed by all your favorite animated pals, kidfriendly humor, and the toonish tunes you secretly sing in the shower long after the little ones are in bed, Disney on Ice’s World of Enchantment is the stuff family fun is made of. Join Ariel, Lightning McQueen, Elsa, and more as they take you on a journey to infinity and beyond! Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Wed, 7:30pm; Fri–Sun, 1pm & 5pm. $15-$60. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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TREESGREENVILLE TURKEY DAY 8K

The idea of physical exertion on a day typically reserved for indulging in three different kinds of potatoes seems terrifying, but the good thing about this event is you can actually see what you’re saving. Since 2005, TreesGreenville has planted thousands of trees throughout the county and nurtured countless more. The organization is funded by events like this 8k, 2-mile walk, and tot trot, which loop their way through the scenic downtown area and prove the perfect opportunity to burn a few of those pre-meal calories. Downtown Greenville. Thurs,

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VOCES8 Nov 13th; Tues, 7pm. $45. The Peace Center. British a cappella octet VOCES8 graces the Greenville stage with their sensational vocal harmonies and original works.

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7:30am. Registration prices vary. (864) 313-0765, treesgreenville.org

NUTCRACKER: 23–25 THE ONCE UPON A TIME IN GREENVILLE

Carolina Ballet Theatre artistic director Hernan Justo adds a little hometown flair to this traditional holiday yarn, blending landmark Greenville spots with the majesty of the nineteenthcentury original. When Clara receives a wooden nutcracker from her beloved

uncle, she becomes so taken with the handsome creation that she soon finds herself caught in a whirlwind fairy tale of enchantment. The CBT performance will feature guest spots by American Ballet Theatre principal Herman Cornejo and soloist Skylar Brandt, along with surprise star athletes and dancers from the Meyer Center for Special Children. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri, 7pm; Sun, 2:30pm. $22.50-$75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

24–Dec 22

DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL

When Charles Dickens penned his now-famous novella way back in 1843, we doubt he’d ever imagine Kermit the Frog starring as Bob Cratchit. Regardless, this Dickens’ tale of a soul reborn is a holiday classic with an amazing message. Albeit a little revamped, this musical version promises to unite all your favorite characters from Tiny Tim to Jacob Marley for an uplifting story of what’s truly important in life. Don’t be afraid to sing along—you never know when the ghosts might pay you a visit. The Logos Theatre,

80 School St, Taylors. Thurs, 11:30am; Fri–Sat, 7pm. $27.50. (864) 268-9342, thelogostheatre. com

Thurs–Fri, 10am–8pm; Sat, 10am–6pm. Adults, $6; seniors, $5; under 12, free. (864) 233-2562, holidayfairgreenville.com

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29–Dec 22

PALMETTO POETS: AS WE BREATHE WE HOPE

Join Peace Center poet-in-residence Glenis Redmond in welcoming two new regional poets to the Poetic Conversations series: co-founder and director of the Watering Hole poet community Monifa Lemons and Charleston’s Matthew Foley. Both wordsmiths will share their original works inspired by the physical and emotional textures of the Palmetto State. Huguenot Loft, 101 W Broad St. Thurs, 6:30pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

29–Dec 1

HOLIDAY FAIR 2018

It’s the season of giving. Or, more importantly, the season of giving your pesky neighbor a run for their money with an epic battle of the Christmas decorations. Stock up your arsenal at the Crafter’s Village, which features a wide array of wreaths, ornaments, nativities, and other décor sure to set your home apart for the holidays. Then, stop by the Gift Bazaar and handpick a perfect present for that impossible-to-buy-for guy or gal in your life. Bonus points if you nab a fruitcake for your neighbor. Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville.

A FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE CHRISTMAS Turn the Christmas cheer up a notch at Flat Rock Playhouse’s one-of-a-kind holiday review that combines the best in yuletide anthems with dynamic set design and eye-catching dance moves. Audiences will have more than just Rudolph to light the way during their journey from the North Pole to the scenic mountainside and back again; keep your eyes peeled for a cameo from the Big Man in Red himself in this all-new production of last year’s smashing success. Flat Rock Playhouse 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$55. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

YOUNG 30 CHRIS While it’s mostly true that 50

percent of music competition winners fall off the radar after their victory— anyone even remember Ruben Studdard?—Nashville Star champ Chris Young has certainly made his mark on the country music world. After claiming his title in 2006, Young went on to drop seven studio albums and earn eight platinum RIAA certifications for singles like “I’m Comin’ Over,”

CREATIVE

by DESIGN

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“Who I Am with You,” and “Gettin’ You Home (The Black Dress Song).” The newly minted Grand Ole Opry inductee released Losing Sleep last year, debuting at number one on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart and kicking off a new tour alongside Dee Jay Silver, Dan + Shay, and Morgan Evans. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Fri, 7:30pm. $48.50-$89.50. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

z ot Do N

Miss

A FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE CHRISTMAS Nov 29–Dec 22; Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$55. Flat Rock Playhouse. Catch all your favorite carols and Christmas characters at Flat Rock Playhouse’s singular holiday review.

Photograph by Scott Treadway, Treadshots

AT 30–Dec 2 HOLIDAY PEACE

As the son of celebrated musician Mel Tormé (a.k.a. the Velvet Fog) and English actress Janette Scott, it’s no surprise that James Tormé has taken the entertainment world by storm. An uber-talented jazz singer with plenty of charisma to spare, Tormé has racked up numerous awards for his stirring vocal prowess and performance style that holds up as a perfect throwback to the crooners of yore. Tormé joins forces with the International Ballet and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra for a special holiday showcase, where St. Nick himself is sure to drop by with the missus for a quick naughtyor-nice checkup. The Peace Center, 300 S Main. Fri–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Estates Homes as distinguished as our readers.

308 Sorono Drive, Greenville

Lake Views, Reserve at Lake Keowee

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Patti Shull (864) 985-2980 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

4BR, 5.5BA · MLS#1367733 · $1,199,000

4BR, 4.5BA · MLS#20201068 · $1,175,000

Golf Estate, Reserve at Lake Keowee

309 W. Faris Road, Greenville

301 Broadleaf Ct., Lake Keowee

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Patti Shull (864) 985-2980 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Judy Dyer (864) 784-2511 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

4BR, 4 Full 2 Half BA · MLS#20201775 · $950,000

5BR, 5BA · MLS#1369694 · $949,000

100 McAlister Lake Drive, Easley

400 Father Hugo Drive, Greer

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

Wilson Associates Ashley Swann (864) 593-0188 wilsonassociates.net

4BR, 4.5BA · MLS#1375391 · $849,000

Hideaway Cove, Lake Keowee 3BR, 3BA · MLS#20207718 · $659,000 Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Libby Zorbas (864) 207-8711 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

4BR, 3.5 BA · MLS#1375785 · $699,900

3BR, 3BA · MLS#20202130 · $850,000

209 Garlington Oak Ct.

4BR, 3BA · MLS#1377462 · $669,900 Coldwell Banker Caine Cynthia Serra (864) 304-3372 Bit.ly/CynthiaSerra

615 Pelham Road, Greenville 4BR, 3BA · MLS#1377069 · $875,000 Coldwell Banker Caine Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 bit.ly/JaneMcCutcheon

YOUR LISTING HERE

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Caroline Spivey at 864.679.1229 or cspivey@communityjournals.com TOWNEstates_Nov18.indd TOWN_blank page.indd 6 2

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YOU WANTED A LAW FIRM WITH SOUTHERN ROOTS AND NATIONAL RESOURCES. WE HEARD YOU. On November 1, 2018

joined

900 attorneys | 27 U.S. offices California Colorado Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Illinois Minnesota

Nevada New Jersey New York North Carolina Pennsylvania South Carolina Texas Washington

Frank C. Williams III | Greenville Office Managing Partner 2 West Washington Street | Greenville, SC 29601 864.751.7600

The Community Foundation of Greenville bridges philanthropy and purpose by offering planned giving services, donor-advised funds and administering charitable endowment funds in support of a better community.

AGENT IN 2016 & 2017

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS®

VOTED BEST REALTOR®

OF THE UPSTATE

2015 2016 2017 2018

MaggieAiken.com NOVEMBER 2018 / 143

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Follow Us!

Breakfast & Lunch Grab n’ Go Provisions & Handcrafted Coffees Full Service Lunch, Dinner & Weekend Brunch Patio Dining, Adjacent to Greenville’s Legacy Park 340 Rocky Slope Road, Greenville 864-626-6900 www.stellasbrasserie.com

Tuesday - Saturday starting at 8:30am Lunch Tuesday- Friday • Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Brunch- Saturday & Sunday • Closed- Monday

Regularly Scheduled Events Wine Tastings & Wine Dinners Private Rooms Available for Parties For ten years, Stella’s has maintained a commitment to quality & community by serving locally sourced ingredients. We pride ourselves on attention to detail, and professional & friendly service. Enjoy regionally inspired cuisine in our relaxed dining rooms!

10 Year Anniversary Specials! $10 Nightly Burgers at the Bar (8:30 pm & after on weekends)

Every Monday - Anniversary Special: Lowcountry Seafood Features $10 Lunch / $20 Dinner • Half off Select Wines 684 Fairview Road Simpsonville 864-757-1212 www.stellasbistro.com

Open Lunch & Dinner Monday-Saturday Closed Sundays

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T O W N

M A G A Z I N E

P R E S E N T S

2018 GUIDE TO GIVING

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A Child’s Haven is a 501(c)(3) organization that treats children with developmental delays as a result of limited resources, abuse, or neglect, and provides support and education for their families.

JOIN US! 20th Annual Holiday Benefit Breakfast Embassy Suites Verdae Friday, December 7, 2018. 7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. YOUNG KIARA

Featuring Key Note Speaker: Richard 'Dick' Wilkerson

GRADUATE KIARA

ADULT KIARA*

*

Purchase your tickets or sponsor today!

THERAPEUTIC CHILD CARE

PARENT EDUCATION

HOME VISITATION

95% OF CAREGIVERS REPORTED THEY DEAL MORE EFFECTIVELY WITH DAILY CHALLENGES

90% OF FAMILIES REPORTED THAT THEY HAD INCREASED KNOWLEDGE AND GAINED THE SKILLS TO HELP THEIR CHILD

achildshaven.org/HBB2018

Each dollar invested in A Child's Haven results in $18.70 in savings for improved health through juvenile & adult programs, decreased dependence on public assistance and increased contributions from each person back to our community.

92% OF SUCCESSFULLY DISCHARGED CHILDREN DEMONSTRATED MEASURABLE BEHAVIORAL AND EMOTIONAL IMPROVEMENT

20 Martin Drive, Greenville, SC 29617 | 864.298.0025 | www.achildshaven.org Follow Us on Social Media

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In the Face of Uncertainty, We Give Them Hope, Love & Immediate Support.

Make a lifesaving difference for children across the Carolinas who are battling cancer. Make a gift to Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas. Help us ensure that all our brave Carolina children have access to lifesaving cancer treatment and the support they need.

Donate today! Visit ChildrensCancerPartners.org. 864-582-0673 | info@ChildrensCancerPartners.org | To Join the Fight, Text CCPCHILD to 51555 This message sponsored by a thoughtful CCP friend. TOWN_blank page.indd 7 Page_FINAL.indd 2 CCP-18.10.1_TOWN Ad Full

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I was given the opportunity to participate in internships and Model UN Conferences that have opened my mind to the world. The broad perspective I now have has inspired me to make real changes in the world. I was treated with respect by both my teachers and peers. I know who I am and what I want from life. I am a Five Oaks Academy Graduate.

“Here in this one tiny school in the middle of a small place called Simpsonville, there are students who are not treated differently for any reason but who are treated with respect and kindness by all their peers and teachers. I have loved Toddler through Middle School

my time here in this school and just now I am truly grasping

1101 Jonesville Road Simpsonville, SC 864-228-1881 www.fiveoaksacademy.com

how lucky I am to be here. I can only wish that more people

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were given the chance to attend schools like mine” — Enrique Dehaerne, Graduation Speech, 2013

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BUILDING GREENVILLE’S GATEWAY TO DIGNITY AND HOPE

SH FROM FROMSHADOWS SHADOWSTO TOLIGHT LIGHT FROM SHADOWS TOGREENVILLE’S LIGHT GATEWAY BUILDING BUILDINGGREENVILLE’S GATEWAY

BUILDING GREENVILLE’S GATEWAY TO TODIGNITY DIGNITYAND ANDHOPE HOPE TO DIGNITY AND HOPE

GATEWAY WILL DOUBLE ITS CAPACITY “From Shadows to Light: Building Greenville’s Gateway to Dignity and Hope” is Gateway’s Capital Campaign to fund construction of a new facility allowing us to serve twice as many people in our community. Our current facility serves approximately 225 members annually, but as Greenville has grown, so have the needs for adult mental health resources. This new facility will provide space for up to 450 members. Gateway is an accredited Clubhouse program serving individuals with serious and chronic mental illness in Greenville. We are close to reaching our fundraising goals. Please help us by giving today.

gateway-sc.org/donate | 864-520-1597

Gateway is the premier adult mental health resource for the Greenville community since 1984. gateway-sc.org/donate | 864-520-1597 Gateway is the premier adult mental health resource for the Greenville community since 1984.

gateway-sc.org/donate gateway-sc.org/donate | | 864-520-1597 864-520-1597 Gateway Gatewayisisthe thepremier premieradult adultmental mental health resource resourceforforthe theGreenville Greenvillecommunity communitysince since1984. 1984. gateway-sc.org/donate | health 864-520-1597

DONATE NOW!

Gateway is the premier adult mental health resource for the Greenville community since 1984.

Thank You to Our Foundational and Leadership Donors

GHS • Jolley Foundation

Community Foundation of Greenville • F.W. Symmes Foundation • Hollingsworth Funds • The Graham Foundation Greenville Women Giving • Stewart and Martha Spinks • John I. Smith Charities • Terry Don and Tricia Phillips The Daniel-Mickel Foundation • The Fullerton Foundation • The Earle Foundation • LaBarbara Sampson

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GENERATIONS GROUP WELCOMES YOUR SUPPORT

We welcome and need your help in ending sexual abuse. We invite you to volunteer time or money, donate needed items, or attend our annual event on March 13, 2019 at the Greenville Convention Center. For more info about how you can be involved, Contact Scott Stephens at 864-243-5557 ext. 266 or email Scott@GenerationsGroup.com

GENERATIONS IS ONE OF A KIND. For over 27 years, Generations has provided the only program of its kind in South Carolina to over 975 families from all over the state. Boys as young as ten years old come to Generations scared and alone. Most have experienced abuse and/or severe trauma and out of anger and frustration, sadly, many have become abusive. They come to us in need of hope and healing. When they leave us, they leave transformed.

They break the cycle of abuse.

To learn more visit us at generationsgroup.com

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The Greenville Center for Creative Arts Founders, Board and Staff congratulate Tracy T. Hardaway for being selected as the 2018 recipient of The Ruth Alexander Nicholson Award by the Community Foundation of Greenville.

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REBUILDÂ COMMUNITIES

REBUILD LIVES

OVER 50,000 GREENVILLE COUNTY RESIDENTS STILL IN POVERTY Make your donation today at homesofhope.org/giving

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PLEASE JOIN US ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH AT NOON 11:30 CHECK-IN • GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER PURCHASE TICKETS BY JANUARY 31 SASHA JOSEPH NEULINGER

GUEST SPEAKER

Sasha Joseph Neulinger travels nationally as a public speaker, advocating for reforms in child advocacy and child abuse prevention. Sasha’s 2015 TEDxBozeman presentation “Trauma is reversible. How it shapes us is our choice” has been viewed nearly 200,000 times to date. Neulinger’s transformative journey of learning to confront his past and learning to love and embrace every part of himself included telling his friends and loved ones what happened to him, and experiencing the love and acceptance that eluded him for so long. A renowned speaker, filmmaker and advocate, Sasha is the founder and President of Voice For The Kids, LLC and the co-founder and Head of Production at Step 1 Films, LLC. He has worked behind the scenes on National Geographic’s award winning series, “America, The Wild” as an assistant editor and has produced, directed, and edited films for corporate and non-profit clients nationally. He is currently directing his first feature length documentary, “Rewind To Fast-Forward,” an autobiographical film about his life surviving multigenerational child sexual abuse.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

TICKETS & SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE @ JULIEVALENTINECENTER.ORG TOWN_blank page.indd 6

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Shelter, food and miracles. Every day.

3

4

Children’s Shelters

Rescue Missions

Foster Care Services

2

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Addiction Recovery Centers

Thrift Stores

Since 1937, Miracle Hill Ministries has been growing and expanding to meet the changing and diverse needs of homeless, hungry and destitute people. With the help of our community, we have become the largest and most comprehensive provider of services to homeless and hurting children, women and men in Upstate South Carolina. Operating under a Christ-centered model, our rescue missions, children’s shelters, addiction recovery centers and foster families provide shelter, food, clothing, counseling, educational opportunities and much more. People walk through our doors broken, scared and empty. They leave with purpose, hope and a future full of possibility.

Give

Volunteer

Pray

MiracleHill.org | PO Box 2546, Greenville, SC 29602 | 864.268.4357 TOWN_blank page.indd 7

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DO YOU SEE WHAT WE SEE? From stigma and shame to support and understanding. From fear and despair to empathy and hope. This is what we at NAMI Greenville see as we change minds about mental illness. In this giving season, we ask you to please donate. You have the power to change a life- you just have to see it.

Change Your Mind About Mental Illness. To donate and learn about risk factors and warning signs, visit www.namigreenvillesc.org

Join us in the fight to bring hope and help to millions of Americans. 2320 E North St. L, Greenville, SC 29607 • 864-331-3300 NAMI fp Nov18 TOWN_blank page.indd TOWN.indd 6 1

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Autism now impacts 1 in 59 children.

Autism …a lifetime of needs Project HOPE Foundation …a lifespan of services Your support …a life-changing investment

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Celebrate and elevate those shaping Greenville’s future: Our Teachers.

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Thank you Greenville for helping us open the doors to the “House that Love Built” Visit us today at 706 Grove Road, Greenville, SC 29605 | www.RMHC-Carolinas.org

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When you give, expect change Give online at salvationarmygreenville.org or text Christmas18 to 41444

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Thank you to all of our Sponsors, Donors and Volunteers that supported us in 2018. We are dedicated to improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed with the disease and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

– TO DONATE AND FOR MORE INFORMATION –

www.SCOvarianCancer.org

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email: info@scovariancancer.org

10/17/18 2:22 PM


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Greenville County is the number one location for reports of human trafficking in South Carolina. In 2017, 49% of trafficking cases opened in state courts were from Greenville County. Since 2012, SWITCH has been shining a light on human trafficking and sexual exploitation in the Upstate. We have helped more than 100 individuals on the road to restoration and reached 20,000 community members through our awareness and prevention efforts.

Please consider making an end of the year donation to help us continue the fight against sex trafficking in the Upstate. SwitchSC.org | 864-350-0281

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Educational Touring Production of Twelfth Night, photo courtesy of Sumter Opera House, City of Sumter, Matthew Morse

10,000 education participants, ages 7 to 70, 296 workshops, 161 classrooms, 115 schools, 12 community partners, 1 reason: “Everyone is the hero of their own story.” —Neil, Thrive Upstate

What story will you help tell? Visit warehousetheatre.com to get started.

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Thrive Upstate is the largest and oldest provider

of services people with disabilities in Greenville We Believe inforthe Power of Love County. Today, the non-profit provides services to the Upstate of South Carolina at more than 40 locations. From birth through end of life, Thrive Upstate offers a wide variety of services and

at life

supports at low or no cost to families and individuals. Providing resources that empower

people to lead independent lives and reach their full potential.

Our mission is to provide all• people with KidVentures disabilities and special needs with meaningful • Family Supports services, opportunities, and support, so theyHousing may • Residential

R CHILD IS MAZING.

• play. HASCI Services thrive in life, work and • Day Services

KidVentures

we can help your child

ull potential. Our team

nced and caring Early

at work

Securing opportunities for individuals nists can show you how who want to work and utilize

PO Box 17467 Greenville, SC 29606 O 864-331-1427 F 864-234-1587 thriveupstate.org

their unique gifts in a productive e your child’s learning environment.

ment and will advocate Employment Services We are the•original early

Contract Services provider in•the Upstate

• The Generous Garden

ved children and families

ore than 20 years.

Thrive Upstate is the largest and oldest provider of services to people with disabilities in Greenville County, aged birth through end of life. Currently offering a wide variety of services and supports at low or no cost to families and individuals. Your donations make a difference! Please help individuals living with disabilities or special needs and their families to Thrive in the Upstate!

1700 Ridge Road, Greenville, SC 29607 |

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864.679.0220

|

info@thriveupstate.org

|

thriveupstate.org

10/17/18 2:39 PM


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SECOND

Glance

Creative Gifts

I

n its humblest form, artistic creation is a charitable act. When a work is fashioned, vulnerability is required, and the creator gives of herself in a personal, meaningful way. Each November during Greenville Open Studios, a host of visionaries open their doors to the physical spaces where this intimate action is shaped and curated. This year, the Metropolitan Arts Council presents a special preview to the weekend event with A Square Affair, an exhibition featuring the works of Open Studios participants. Pieces are presented in a 12 x 12 inch format, allowing guests a small taste of the artist’s ability and inviting them to take a peek behind the curtain into their natural creative environment.—Abby Moore Keith A Square Affair will be on display at the Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery through December 14. The gallery is located on 16 Augusta St, open Mon–Fri, 9am–5pm. Greenville Open Studios will take place Fri–Sun, November 9–11. For more information, visit greenvillearts.com.

Clockwise from top left: Sunny Mullarkey McGowan, Honeybees and Hellebore ; Andy Gambrell, Crystal of the Earth I; Laura Nance; and Melinda Hoffman. Artwork courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council.

Preview the works of participating Open Studios artists at MAC Gallery’s A Square Affair

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Mark Your Calendars

143 Artists - 89 Locations - 1 Weekend Greenville Open Studios allows you to experience the life of local artists at work in their studios for one full weekend, November 10 – 11. This free, self-guided tour is a unique experience to engage with our community’s incredible talent, learn about artistic processes, enhance or begin your art collection and become inspired.

2018 Weekend Resources The Catalogue – Get an official catalogue with maps in the November 2nd edition of The Greenville Journal. Catalogues will be available at the MAC office by October 22nd.

The 12 x 12 Exhibit – Visit MAC to see, A Square Affair, an exhibit of 12 x 12 inch works by the 143 participating artists. The exhibit is a great way to start your weekend and choose the studios you want to visit. The exhibit will be up from November 3 – December 14.

The Website – Visit greenvilleARTS.com for more information on the event, including maps and a directory of participating artists with additional images, directions and artist statements.

More info:

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Metropolitan Arts Council | 16 Augusta Street (864) 467-3132 | www.greenvilleARTS.com @macARTScouncil | #MACopenstudios

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TOWN November 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN November 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...