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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

T H E

A R T S

I S S U E

CELEBRATING THE ESSENCE OF CREATIVITY

For our feature presentation on Artisphere, see “Art Show,” page 82.

MAY 2021

TOWNCAROLINA.COM


M r T E F

B l f The Warehouse Theatre The Warehouse Theatre

S d p F F *select shows *select shows

*MainStage productions *MainStage productions

BUY-ONE-GET-ONE FREE TICKETS BUY-ONE-GET-ONE FREE TICKETS With a donation of $50 or more to the Metropolitan Arts Council, MAC you

G s M

With a donation of $50 or more to the Metropolitan Arts Council, MAC you will receive an ArtCard which entitles you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets will receive an ArtCard which entitles you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets for one time at each of the venues above, valid through July 31, 2022. for one time at each of the venues above, valid through July 31, 2022. The ArtCard is a great way to sample the fantastic The ArtCard is a great way to sample the fantastic performing arts in Greenville at a substantial savings. performing arts in Greenville at a substantial savings. In just two uses the ArtCard pays for itself. In just two uses the ArtCard pays for itself.

I B o w

Your donation will help to support artists, arts Your donation will help to support artists, arts organizations and arts education programs in organizations and arts education programs in Greenville County. Greenville County.

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MAC BOARD OF DIRECTORS AWARDS

If you would like to support the Metropolitan Arts AWARDS Council, MAC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Roger Ables,the Edith Hardaway, Chris Kavolus and Anne Woods If you please would like to support Metropolitan Arts nvilleAREdith TS.com /donate. Council, goRoger to greeAbles, Hardaway, Chris Kavolus and Anne Woods MAC very grgrateful eenvillfor eAthe RTgenerous S.com/dfinancial onate.support provided by board members Roger Ables, Edith please goisto MAC is very theAnne generous financial providedhave by board Roger Ables, Edith Hardaway, Chrisgrateful Kavolusforand Woods. These support four individuals been members outstanding assets to the Hardaway, and Chrishave Kavolus andasAnne Woods. These four individuals haveand beenservices outstanding assets the to the organization served strong advocates of MAC’s programs throughout organization and have served as strong advocates of MAC’s programs and services throughout the @macARTScouncil . | #gvlARTS Greenville community @macARTScouncil Greenville community. | #gvlARTS


METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL

2020 HIGHLIGHTS COVID-19 Relief

MAC awarded a record-high of $785,839. $488,950 in COVID-19 relief funds was awarded to 31 Greenville County arts organizations. The relief fund was begun with two withdrawals from the MAC Endowment for the Arts. The Graham Foundation, Hollingsworth Funds, the Community Foundation of Greenville and the Canal Charitable Foundation significantly contributed to this relief effort.

Jeffrey Leder

MAC Endowment for the Arts

Begun in 2009, the MAC Endowment for the Arts will ensure the longevity of Greenville’s cultural assets by providing much needed funding for operations and projects. As of December 31, 2020, the endowment had a record-high balance of $1,845,792.

SmartARTS

SmartARTS has had a presence in 76 schools of the 101 in the district. Before the schools were closed due to COVID-19, the program worked with 42 teachers. From September, 2020 through February, 2021, the program also partnered with Greenville County First Steps to provide arts integration experiences for children of essential workers in 10 locations in Greenville County.

Hallie Bertling

Greenville Open Studios

Greenville Open Studios had an outstanding year with $165,500 in sales for the participating artists. Over 18,440 visits were recorded. MAC designed and implemented a Greenville Open Studios YouTube channel featuring two-minute videos for each participant.

Centre Stage

TD Bank Business and the Arts Partnership Awards

In 2020, MAC again partnered with TD Bank to present the TD Bank Business and the Arts Partnership Awards to Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina and Greenville County First Steps. Dan Adams was the recipient of the Put Your Heart in the Arts Volunteer of the Year Award. (learn more on the next page) SmartARTS teaching artist and poet, Moody Black.

To learn more about our programs visit greenvilleARTS.com

@macARTScouncil | #gvlARTS

SmartARTS unit with felt artist, Cecilia Ho.


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First Glance

Betsy Best, Twister II—Twist Again, 2021. Five-color linocut printed with oil-based ink on Rives BFK cream paper, 16” x 10.25.” Artwork courtesy of the artist.

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boutique hotel and spa, along with dining and retail services of the Village Center. Woven into this tapestry of pleasures are walkways and green spaces with manor and estate homes living side by side with charming smaller cottages where you’ll meet neighbors of all ages and interests. It’s all just minutes from downtown and GSP.

THE WAIT IS OVER. YOUR TOUR BEGINS NOW. HARTNESSLIVING.COM / 864-920-0375 Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal notice. Prices and availability subject to change. All specifications supplied by builder/seller, and subject to change or modification. It is the responsibility of the buyer or buyer’s agent to verify. Equal housing opportunity – Dan Collins, Brokerin-Charge / Collins & Fine, LLC


Contents

MAY 2021

82

ART SHOW

Back this year with an adapted outdoors experience, the Artisphere festival showcases creative talent from near and far. by J. Morgan mccallum

“I see Artisphere as a widely esteemed and premier art fair— and incredibly important to my adopted, beautiful city of Greenville, South Carolina.” —Jeffrey Leder

ON THE COVER

Deana Goldsmith, Writer’s Block, pastel on sanded paper, 18” by 24.” (this page) Deana Goldsmith, Key to the Treasure, pastel on sanded paper, 16” by 20.” For more on Deana and other Artisphere participants, see “Art Show,” page 82.

Cover artwork and this page provided by Deana Goldsmith

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URBAN CRUSH From their vibrant accessories to sprawling street murals, Jae Page and Frankie Zombie speak to the masses with their chromatic creations. by kathryn davÉ

16 EDITOR’S LETTER 21 THE LIST 29 WEDDINGS 76 MS. BEA WRIGHT 78 MAN ABOUT TOWN 103 DINING GUIDE 112 TOWN SCENE 120 SECOND GLANCE

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Photograph by Studio Dispatch

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; Soho collar by Jae Page of Urban Collars

Contents

CAKE POP Culinary creative Jen Anderson takes cake art to new heights with her custom designs. by angie toole thompson

39 5355 63 6955 93 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

Floral painter Laurie Buck found art later in life; style maven Jeni Cain ups the ante at Monkee’s of the West End; The Warehouse Theatre pivots for the pandemic; best beach reads for your summer vacay, and more.

An overnight at The Joseph is a chic stay in Music City; from vintage varieties to modern instafilm, Spartan Photo Center sates your camera fix.

On his family’s Edgefield County farm, Dr. J. Drew Lanham developed an obsession with nature. Now the nationally known ornithologist shares his passion through the written word.

Dynamic duo Frankie Zombie and Jae Page combine culture and color in their collaborations; local framer and business owner Amanda Bennett launches a new creative collection.

Culinary whiz Jen Anderson turns to one-ofa-kind cakes for creative expression; welcome summer weather with these canned cocktails; this jerk roast pork and pineapple salsa recipe demands a full table spread.


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Saturday, Aug. 28 | Portman Shoals Marina, Lake Hartwell

Dragon Boat Upstate Festival

15 years. One goal: fighting cancer. Our dedicated Dragon Boat Hall of Fame members share a common goal: to help eradicate cancer. And they embody the spirit of the event – teamwork, perseverance and a shared passion to raise money to fight cancer right here at home. Cancer hasn’t stopped because of the pandemic, and neither have we. Our Hall of Famers invite you to join them by paddling in the race against cancer. Together, we can make a difference. Support these paddlers by donating at DragonBoatUpstateSC.org. The Prisma Health Cancer Institute Dragon Boat Hall of Fame: AccessHealth Big Daddy AKA Teensy’s Abbey Paddlers, in memory of Alan Howard Larry Brotherton cb events Mike Coe Stephanie Cofer - Interim HealthCare Countybank Richard Cox The Cunningham Family

Acey Deiwert Annette Dunphy Carmen Brotherton Clancy Crawford Eco Waste Solutions Jessica Edenfield Connor Evins Sarah Evins Fabri-Kal Cancer Containers John Frame Gina Franco The Freeman Family

David Freeman Tim Garrett* Family of Natalie Gibson Amy & Hunter Gibson, Jean Pendergrass Ragin’Cajuns/SCOCF Larry Gluck Grainger Jenny Green Matt Gregg Harper Corporation Ken Harper

Deb Ingalls - Interim Healthcare Stephanie Henkin South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation ITOR Biorepository Team Jani-King of Greenville Jim Kaltenbach Lisa Littleton Annie Maertens Julie Martin Amanda McGee

McNaughton-McKay Electric Company MDC Team Heather Meadors Anita Miller Matt Olinger Tim Olmstead Donna Phipps Krista Ramirez Carolyn Reeves Release The Kraken I Allyson Steffen

Release the Kracken II Shane Steffen, Rita Handler-Coli, Kellie Lindsey & Dori Valin Becky Rich Janet Rigdon* Chris & Andrea Roberts Roers SCOCF in memory of Sarah Harrison Brandon Scott - Team DPR Sally Smith Tru Blu and CRU Winn the Fight *deceased

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Editor’s Letter

Photograph by Blair Knobel

The Wings of the City exhibition by Mexican sculptor Jorge Marín presents nine bronze sculptures throughout Falls Park and the Peace Center campus. Greenville is the first East Coast city to host the exhibit, which will be on view through September 30.

TAKING FLIGHT

O

n a recent sunny Saturday, I enjoyed time in Falls Park (and Jorge Marín’s fantastic Wings of the City exhibition). Nature was in technicolor—leaves bursting in lime, azaleas in hot pink. I sat on the stone wall admiring it all, a beam of sunlight illuminating the air. Wind carried voices and laughter. It was a simple moment, yet layered with meaning—as so many simple moments are. As we move into May, there is a palpable shift happening—our world is regaining steam as we’re coming, ever cautiously, back to life. Events that were put on hold are returning, albeit in reimagined ways this year. We have devoted a significant part of our Arts Issue to highlighting the return of Artisphere in downtown Greenville, May 7–9. This year, the festival is ticketed with specific time slots to enjoy artists from here and beyond. In a gallery-like feature presentation, we spotlight twelve of our favorites who will take part (see “Art Show,” page 82). Throughout this edition, we’ve the gamut of creators, from selftaught painter Laurie Buck to Spartanburg couple Jae Page and Frankie Zombie, whose vibrant work is like visual jazz. Jeni Cain, owner of Monkee’s of the West End, guided her shop through a pandemic and a total renovation. Amanda Bennett, owner of Bennetts’ Frame & Gallery,

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turns her expert eye to creating beautiful home accessories via her side venture, Amanda Carol Home. Film takes renewed focus courtesy of cameras from Spartan Photo; a new luxury hotel in Nashville is bedecked in contemporary art; Clemson professor and author J. Drew Lanham has a penchant for birds. The Warehouse Theatre upended its programming to bring virtual shows to an international audience. Young culinary talent Jen Anderson of popular restaurant GB&D crafts uncommon custom cakes, and craft cocktails easily find a place at your next picnic, courtesy of these canned options. An innate aspect our humanness is the drive to create. It satisfies us in many ways but is linked to our need for connection. Creating is communicating, whether through visual art, writing, performance, or culinary wizardry. May you be inspired and uplifted by our community’s artistic vibes. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com

FOR MORE on the wings of the city exhibition: TOWNCAROLINA.COM


UNITED COMMUNITY. ALMA THOMAS. Know her name. Hear her voice. You may have already heard about the museum’s new Alma Thomas painting. We can’t wait for you to see it when we re-open this fall! Born in Columbus, Georgia, Alma Thomas (1891-1978) graduated from Howard University and taught art in a Washington, DC, junior high school for 35 years. It was not until her retirement from teaching in 1960 at age 68 that she began her career as a full-time artist. Inspired by the New York School and Abstract Expressionism, her artwork focused on color theory and experimentation, and she frequently exhibited with other Washington Color School artists, including Sam Gilliam, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland. In 1972 at age 81, Thomas became the first African-American woman to attain a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The new acquisition of Thomas’s work is among the rarest examples of her final full year of experimentation (1977); one of her “hieroglyph” paintings that shows a new direction in the work of the 86-year-old artist and a culmination of her experimentation with color effects--a truly original statement.

Alma Woodsey Thomas, 1891-1978 untitled (Composition in Rainbow Colors), circa 1977 acrylic and pencil on canvas

The GCMA is grateful for the continuing support of United Community Bank Foundation.

Help us to continue the work of building the African-American Art Collection that Greenville deserves. The GCMA annual fund-raising campaign, Art for Greenville 2021, will support the purchase of more than 30 works by African-American artists, including this painting by Alma Thomas along with work by Beauford Delaney, David Drake, William H. Johnson, Hughie Lee-Smith, Thomas Sills, Merton Simpson, Leo Twiggs, John Wilson, and Hale Woodruff.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Corporate Partner

Temporarily closed for construction


Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Abby Moore Keith

MANAGING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

BREAK THROUGH TO YOUR

BEST YOU

Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Laura Linen Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Lauren Maxwell, J. Morgan McCallum, Kathryn Norungolo & Angie Toole Thompson

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS & STYLISTS

Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Ian Curcio, Jivan Davé & Studio Dispatch Andrew Huang

EDITOR AT LARGE

Maddie De Pree

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

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TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 5) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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THE LIST THE MONTH’S MUST-DOS

ARTISPHERE, PRESENTED BY TD BANK It may be smaller and socially distanced, but the good news is that Artisphere is back! A full lineup of more than 100 artists will exhibit their wares along four gated blocks of South Main Street, from the intersection of River and Augusta streets to Markley Street, near Fluor Field. The event will operate at a limited capacity, with timed tickets available for two-and-a-half-hour sessions. Masks are required. S Main St, Greenville. May 7–9. Fri, noon–8:30pm; Sat, 9am–8:30pm; Sun, 10am–6:30pm. Reservations for timed sessions are $5, which will be reimbursed when you check in. (864) 271-9398, artisphere.org

Brian Keuhn, Apple Girl, soft pastel on black textured board, 23” x 30.”

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The List TD SATURDAY MARKET

April showers must have done their job, because the May flowers at Biltmore Estate have transformed the gardens and grounds into a bright kaleidoscope of color. A walled garden filled with tulips, banks blooming with pink azaleas, and arbors draped with wisteria are just a few of the delights that await you. Don’t let spring pass without spending some time wandering through this flowery wonderland. Biltmore Estate, One Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Thru May 27. Daily, hours vary. Prices start at $64/adult (children age 10–16 are half price; kids 9 and under, free). (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Starting on the first Saturday in May, come shop for a variety of spring greens and lettuces, plus seasonal delights such as fresh strawberries, carrots, turnips, and radishes. Being healthy never tasted so good! Masks required. Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. May 1–Oct 30. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

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Part of the Symphony’s Classical Series, Sensational Strings features guest conductor Ankush Kumar Bahl, music director of the Omaha Symphony. The evening’s performance will include three works: the Simple Symphony by Benjamin Britten; Rakastava, which Jean Sibelius based on text from a collection of Finnish folk poems called the Kanteletar; and the ever-popular Serenade for Strings, which composer Antonín Dvořák completed in just two weeks in 1875.

Photograph of Ankush Kumar Bahl, by Scott Suchman

First Presbyterian Church, 200 W Washington St, Greenville. May 1–2. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $35 each (sold in sets of 2). 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of Biltmore Estate

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GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: SENSATIONAL STRINGS

Photograph of felt flower bouquet courtesy of The Maker’s Collective

BILTMORE BLOOMS


Photograph of felt flower bouquet courtesy of The Maker’s Collective

GREEK FESTIVAL Opa! Greenville’s beloved Greek Festival returns this year with more than just drive-thru dining. That will be an option, of course, but this year you can eat on-site while you enjoy traditional Greek music and dancing on the outdoor stage. Standup tables provide pandemic-safe places to savor the best gyros, spanakopita, and keftedes in town. And what could be better for dessert than baklava ice cream sundaes? Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 406 N Academy St, Greenville. May 14–16. Fri & Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. (864) 233-8531, greekforaday.com

THE MAKER’S COLLECTIVE’S MINI-MARKET AND MOTHER’S DAY POP UP With handcrafted goods from more than 30 artists, the Mother’s Day Pop Up Shop and Mini Market has Mother’s Day gifts covered. The shop and market are only open for a single weekend, so be sure to scoop up these finds before they’re gone. The Maker’s Collective, 2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Free. May 7–9. Pop Up: Fri–Sun, 11am– 5pm. Outdoor Mini Market: Sat, May 8, 10am–4pm. makerscollective.org

ASIYA KOREPANOVA: RHAPSODY IN BLUE The Greenville Symphony Orchestra concludes their spring concert season with a double dose of piano prowess. This time, conductor Edvard Tchivzhel and pianist Asiya Korepanova are breathing fresh air into Franz Liszt’s First Piano Concerto and George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Book tickets online or at the Peace Center in downtown Greenville. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. May 22–23. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Greenville’s Salon

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MAY 2021 I

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The List

Quick HITS MASTERS OF AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY

z Ansel Adams, Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Stieglitz. Those names represent some of the best photographic chroniclers of American life in the twentieth century. Thanks to an exhibition organized by the Reading Public Museum, the works of these and other renowned photographers will be on display at the Upcountry History Museum. In addition to depicting America’s cultural and natural history, these important works illustrate the evolution of photographic techniques. Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. May 1–Aug 7. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4–18, $8; children 3 and under, free. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

KENTUCKY DERBY VIEWING PARTY

z Dust off your fanciest spring hat and head to Fluor Field to catch the Kentucky Derby big-as-life on the Jumbotron. After the race, sip mint juleps while you bid on more than 100 silent auction items. Proceeds benefit First Tee Upstate, an international youth development organization that builds character through the game of golf. A VIP ticket also includes a special Bourbon & Beemers event on Friday evening at the BMW Performance Center. Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, May 1, 5–7pm. General admission, $60; VIP, $125. (864) 268-3309, firstteeupstate.org

REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

z Forget about those horses in Kentucky. Greenville runs its own derby, this one with thousands of bright yellow rubber duckies racing down the Reedy River in Falls Park. The Duck Derby will be virtual again this year, and you can follow along on the Rotary Club of the Reedy River Greenville’s social media. So get your ducks in a row by adopting a single duck for $10, or five for $30; proceeds benefit United Ministries and Project Host. Virtual. Sat, May 1, 10am–4pm; winners will be announced at 2:30pm. Free. (864) 361-3112, reedyriverduckderby.com

ALBINO SPRING SKUNK MUSIC FESTIVAL

z After the pandemic forced the cancellation of the spring and fall SkunkFests for 2020, the festival staff is looking forward to bringing the bands—including Dylan Leblanc, Big Daddy Love, and Chatham Rabbits—back together this spring. The best way to enjoy the three-day lineup of bluegrass, folk, and country music concerts in the Blue Ridge foothills is to do as the die-hard fans do: pitch a tent and camp out for the duration. 4063 Jordan Rd, Greer. May 13–15. Thurs–Sat, concert times vary. Two-day pass (Fri–Sat), $100 in advance and $110 at gate; three-day pass, $148 in advance and $160 at gate. (864) 416-4515, albinoskunk.com

NO EXPECTATIONS COMEDY AT COFFEE UNDERGROUND

z No Expectations Comedy has cracked up Greenville

CJ Solar Kicking off the Peace Center’s White Claw concerts, CJ Solar conceived his distinctive sound from a mix of country and Southern rock, with some Delta Blues thrown in from his childhood in Cajun Country. This up-andcomer with the gravelly vocals has been hailed by Rolling Stone Country as “one of the new artists you need to know,” so you won’t want to miss this al fresco performance. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, May 30, 7:30pm. Lawn, $30; Genevieve’s, $50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Coffee Underground, 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. Mon, May 31, 7–8:30pm. Sign up starts at 6:30pm. Free. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info

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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT RIGHT HERE, RIGHT NOW

Peace Concert Hall James Gregory June 5

The Frontmen of Country

featuring Larry Stewart (Restless Heart), Tim Rushlow (Little Texas), and Richie McDonald (Lonestar)

TD Stage White Claw Concerts CJ Solar Band May 30

Shovels & Rope

July 31

June 11

Jeanne Robertson

An Evening with Jake Shimabukuro

August 14

June 15

Nate Bargatze: A Good Problem to Have

Mitch Rossell Band

September 9

June 25

America

Sierra Hull & Justin Moses

October 14

July 10

Chris Tucker: Live in Concert

St. Paul & The Broken Bones

October 29

Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit November 28

Old Crow Medicine Show Decmeber 27

July 23

Genevieve’s Maia Sharp May 6

Dan Navarro May 13

Griffin House May 20

S.G. Goodman May 27


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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

A study abroad in Spain led KATHERINE CARMICHAEL & MATTHEW HARBERG to a blissful wedding day. Photograph by Emily Barbee

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Weddings

KATHERINE THAYER CARMICHAEL & MATTHEW ROBERT HARBERG NOVEMBER 28, 2020

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atherine and Matt met in a tiny town in Spain during their study abroad with the College of Charleston. Had they not both elected to take a bird-watching course in Spain, the pair likely would never have crossed paths, as Kat was an art major and Matt was studying science. They started dating a month after returning home from Spain, and six years later, on their anniversary, Matt convinced Kat to take a half-day off from school to celebrate. After lunch, they walked to the Battery, where, under live oaks dripping with Spanish moss, Matt asked Kat to marry him. They had planned a huge

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wedding in Greenville, but with COVID-19 restrictions still implemented, the couple tied the knot at a private residence in Asheville overlooking the Blue Ridge Mountains, with just their families present. Afterwards, the group gathered at Cúrate, where they savored a handselected menu of Spanish tapas reminiscent of the cuisine Kat and Matt enjoyed in Spain. The couple resides in Charleston, where Matt is a medical student and Kat is an art teacher.—Kathryn Norungolo Photography by Emily Barbee


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Weddings

BRITTANY AILLS & TIM BURDEN JULY 18, 2020 In December of 2019, Tim was in the process of deactivating his online dating profile when Brittany first signed on. His account only had three days left, and as soon as Brittany saw him, she sent a message. The pair connected just in time and dated four months before getting engaged. On the anniversary of their first date, Brittany met Tim at his house in Columbia, where they exchanged cards. On the back of hers she wrote: “I want to marry you, Tim Burden!” to make sure he knew her heart. To her surprise, Tim’s card to her echoed that sentiment by asking her to be his bride—with his great-great aunt’s circa 1920 antique ring on hand to seal the deal. Just three months later, almost to the day they got engaged, the pair was married at Trinity Church of Greenville, with Brittany resplendent in a gown from Poinsett Bride and a handmade cathedral-length veil she hopes to pass down to her own daughter one day. Their reception was held at a close friend’s home in Greenville and catered by Asada. The pair now lives in Columbia.—KN Photography by Emily Barbee

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MADISON PADGETT & TYLER POOLE OCTOBER 3, 2020 Despite the fact that Tyler and Madison had mutual friends in college, they never managed to meet. After graduation, Tyler moved to Asheville and Madison went back to her hometown of Greenville. They connected on Instagram in 2017, and after talking for a couple of weeks, they met up at a Gamecocks football game and immediately hit it off. They dated long-distance for a year, until Tyler made the move to Greenville to be with Madison full-time. After a year of living together, Tyler knew it was time to take the next step. Since they went to dinner downtown every weekend, and Madison always picked the spot, Tyler had her choose the location early so he could plan his proposal. After dinner at The Lazy Goat, the couple went for a stroll along the Reedy River, where Tyler got down on one knee. In a gown from Lovely Bride in Charlotte, Madison married Tyler at the Venue at Grove Station in Piedmont. They now live in the Augusta Road neighborhood in Greenville.—KN Photography by The Ten Oh Eight Co.

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Weddings

EMILY SIZEMORE & ADAM IMPSON DECEMBER 5, 2020

Emily and Adam met by chance at a cigar shop in Charleston, where they were both living at the time. Not wanting to let Emily slip through his fingers, Adam asked her to dinner. To be on the safe side, Emily countered with a suggestion of coffee. Two years later, after many days spent relaxing and smoking cigars together, Adam asked Emily to be his bride on the beach at Kiawah Island. Their special day was held at Avenue, where Emily and Adam were married by a local pastor, who just happened to be a friend from the cigar shop. As she said “I do,” Emily, looking lovely in a David Tutera gown, was joined at the altar by her three brothers—her “bridesbros,” as she called them. Table 301 provided the catering, while Chris Scott (a local news reporter) spun the tunes. The couple just purchased a charming ranch home in Greenville.—KN By Red Apple Tree Photography

ALEX LEFITZ & JACOB STARK JUNE 14, 2020 A Chanukah party in Charlotte brought Alex and Jacob together in 2017. Alex had just moved to Charlotte, and Jacob had just moved back, and both were looking for ways to be more involved in the Jewish community. Lucky for them, that shared desire led them to one another. The pair dated for two years, cultivating a love of hiking and backpacking, despite Jacob being in Kentucky completing his master’s in biology for part of that time. One of their first hiking trips was to Shining Rock Wilderness in Western North Carolina, but bad weather forced them to cut the journey short. So when it came time to propose, Jacob brought Alex back to this spot and popped the question atop Black Balsam Knob, with the ring hidden inside a compass. True to their love of the outdoors, the couple was married at a friend’s mountain house near Table Rock State Park, overlooking Jones Gap. It was an intimate, familyorientated ceremony, in which Jacob and Alex said “I do” under a handmade chuppah that Alex’s twin sister had bedecked with flowers. They celebrated afterwards with dinner and cake prepared by her parents and grandparents. The couple remains in Charlotte, where Alex works as a geologist and Jacob as a biologist.—KN By Chelsey Ashford Photography

ELIZABETH PERRY & THACHER KARNER FEBRUARY 6, 2021 A carpenter and builder from Vermont, Thacher moved to Glenville, North Carolina, to help build a second location of Deerfoot Lodge, a Christian camp for boys. Elizabeth, who had just moved home to Greenville, had worked for a sister ministry while in New York. The two met after Elizabeth decided to volunteer at Deerfoot. It wasn’t until her second stint of volunteering, when Thacher saw Elizabeth wielding a chainsaw to build treehouses, that he knew she was the girl for him. After she returned home, the pair corresponded via handwritten letters (there is no cell service at the camp) and met up on weekends to go hiking. In May 2020, Thacher made the move to Greenville. Honoring their love of adventure, he proposed to Elizabeth at the summit of Big Rock Mountain—an apt location considering the size of the ring he placed on her finger. With COVID-19 still spreading, and given their desire for a short engagement, the couple was married at the Old Hickory House in Brevard, North Carolina, in a snowy ceremony surrounded by family.—KN Photography by TK Yang Photography hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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White Whale artist LAURIE BUCK paints floral portraits with Post-Impressionist flair.

Artwork by Laurie Buck; photograph by Will Crooks

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

As a young mom, Laurie Buck discovered a talent for painting while watching YouTube videos with her daughter. For more of her botanically inspired pieces, visit lauriebuckstudio.com.

FLORAL DESIGN LAURIE BUCK’S CANVASES ARE AS ORGANIC AS HER CREATIVE PROCESS by M. Linda Lee • photography by Will Crooks

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aurie Buck’s studio is in bloom. Not with real flowers, mind you, but canvases alive with them. Wearing a paint-splattered apron, the former English teacher holds sway at her natural-light-filled space on the second floor of the White Whale, a circa 1880 boarding house that is now home to a coven of creatives. Flowers are the chosen subject for this self-taught artist, nature’s endless variations providing ample fodder for her explorations of color. Her florals are not so much representational of the natural world as they reflect her memories and impressions, an intuitive study in color, shape, and line, forever preserved in acrylic paint. “Color is everything,” notes the artist of her experiments with monochromatic hues. “I feel like I’m studying color as I move from light to dark, learning as I go how one color turns into other colors and shades and tones.”

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Displaying an ethereal abstract quality, Laurie’s work mirrors her optimistic philosophy that beautiful things arise from life’s chaos. Her free brushstrokes bring to mind the paintings of PostImpressionists such as Van Gogh, Cézanne, and Matisse, whose works have influenced her style. “When I begin a large painting, I make all kinds of slashes and crazy abstract marks on my canvases and build on top of those. You can see the drips and splotches,” she says, pointing to a large canvas on the mantle in her studio. “The paintings grow organically as I go.” A literature major, Buck claims she was more comfortable crafting words. “I always said I was not artistic,” she confesses. It wasn’t until her oldest daughter was about six years old (Laurie stopped teaching when her first child was born) that she uncovered her penchant for visual art. Each week, as a bonding experience, the two would watch YouTube videos of how to draw faces, and that’s how Laurie learned to draw. The next thing she knew, she had turned the family dining room into a makeshift art studio. The mother of three steals time—most often when her children are at school—to cultivate her craft. Her studio, which she calls “my happy place,” performs multiple functions: art space, oasis, office, shipping area. It even contains a covered table that doubles as her “coffee bar.” Taking inspiration from gardens and interior design, Laurie is grateful for the opportunity to create and help support her family with her work. “Art has been the most beautiful and unexpected gift God has given me,” declares the soft-spoken artist. “It’s something I never dreamed I could do.” You can purchase Laurie Buck’s work at lauriebuckstudio.com.


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TB • UPTOWNER

You started here while a senior at Wofford. It was 2006. We only sold shoes then. Derek Dunlap opened the store and made me manager in 2008. He was wonderful and entrusted the store to me and let me learn how to run a business, and then when I bought it in 2015, he continued to help when I needed guidance.

You were an art major, with dreams to move to New York City. Why did you stay here after graduating? I struggled with an eating

WEST END REVIVAL RETAILER JENI CAIN RELAUNCHES MONKEE’S OF THE WEST END IN A NEWLY EXPANDED SPACE by Stephanie Trotter • photography by Will Crooks

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ertain shopping bags bring a smile to a woman’s face and cause her heart to flutter. They’re immediately identifiable: Tiffany’s iconic blue, Chanel’s interlocking Cs, the Monkee’s solid black with the bold white name. Greenville native Jeni Cain has been carefully filling those bags at Monkee’s of the West End since 2006. The 36-year-old’s story is too big for any satchel to contain. Jeni likes to say she and the store saved each other. In fact, Monkee’s is enjoying a post-COVID rebirth after significant renovation.

The renovation looks great. Thanks! If you’d told me last spring, when COVID hit, that we’d more than double the size of our space, I’d have said, ‘You’re crazy.’ The people who leased next to us decided to work from home, so we took over both spaces and took down a wall. We’re now 3,000 square feet that includes the backroom and upstairs.

What did you learn business-wise this past year? That we’re really resilient and that creativity goes a long way. We launched an e-commerce arm, but more than anything, we made sure to be vocal about things we were already doing for our customers. We would already pull stuff, and make drop-offs and pick-ups at people’s homes, and put together packages of clothing to try on. Some customers knew that, but not all. So, we communicated that message of personal experience.

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disorder. I’m now 15 years in recovery and very vocal about it. That’s why I started working at Monkee’s. I had to live at home, and other than classes and therapy, I worked here. I like to say we saved each other, as the store saved me, and then when the recession hit a few years later, I helped save it, by learning how important relationships are.

Sharing your story certainly must help others. I know what it’s like to not want to put jeans on or see what you really see in the mirror. I’ve learned to be proud and happy for what my body is capable of, not what it looks like. Women don’t have to be a certain size or look a certain way. When a customer says they have to lose five more pounds, or a woman doesn’t like her post-partum size, I tell them they are beautiful right now and to take pride in what their body can do. There’s nothing more powerful than feeling good in your own skin. Do Greenville women embrace current trends? We’re not like the ladies in New York City, or Dallas, who immediately trend with the runway, but we pick up those trends much more quickly than we used to. Usually now, in about a year’s time. What is the trend going into summer? It’s interesting. Designers work 8–12 months in advance, so what we’re seeing are trends they came up with at the height of the pandemic when working from home. A lot of the footwear is slide-on with comfort footbeds, not as many heels. Tops and dresses still don’t have a lot of structure; it’s more oversized collars, ruffles, and tiers. Vintage peasant and floral dresses with a ’60s and ’70s vibe are still popular as well.

What are your favorite brands? I have favorites for my personal style, as well as favorites for the store. Personally, I love Hunter Belle, Misa, and Marie Oliver. Those are my three go-tos. For Monkee’s, I love Marie Oliver, Tyler Boe, and Golden Goose. What’s your splurge? Italian shoes! I love AGL out of Italy. It’s a super-cool company that was started by a husband and wife at a very small factory. Their leather? You can open the box and smell the leather before you unpack the shoes. You can tell it’s been in someone’s hands, and they’re hand-sewn. Monkee’s of the West End, 103-A Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 2390788, monkeesofthewestend.com


Jeni Cain, owner of Monkee’s of the West End, began at the Greenville boutique in 2006. With dedication, business savvy, and an eye for style, she’s led the store through a recession, a pandemic, and now into an expanded, updated space. Below are some top items for spring that you can find at Monkee’s.

(top to bottom) Cristina V. Jewelry trade beads, $225; PBJamie raffia platform wedges, $433; Prada double tote, $2,150

“Women don’t have to be a certain size or look a certain way. There’s nothing more powerful than feeling good in your own skin.”—Jeni Cain

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TB • COLLECTIONS

The hollow interior and sound board of the hurdy-gurdy makes the vibrations of the strings audible: think guitars, violins, and other acoustic string instruments.

SINGULAR SENSATION

An afternoon with the collection will satisfy anyone with a craving for musical history.

HISTORIC INSTRUMENTS ABOUND AT THE SIGAL MUSIC MUSEUM by Maddie De Pree

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Recently voted number three in USA Today’s 10 Best New Museums 2020, the Sigal Music Museum houses hundreds of historical instruments spanning over 400 years.

The hurdy-gurdy’s sound comes from a handcranked wheel that rubs against the strings of the instrument, operating similarly to a violin bow.

(left to right) artwork by Traci Martin, Sunny Mullarkey, Darin Gehrke, and Mark Mulfinger

Sigal Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St, Greenville. (864) 520-8807, sigalmusicmuseum.org

When playing the hurdygurdy’s keyboard, small wedges of wood called tangents press down one or more strings to change pitch.

Photograph courtesy of the Sigal Music Museum

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ormerly known as the Carolina Music Museum, the Sigal Music Museum now serves as a hub for all things music. The collection, generously donated by private collector Marlowe A. Sigal, contains almost 700 instruments, including flutes and whistles, period keyboards, woodwinds, strings, and percussion. The collection showcases more than 400 years of musical history from all around the world. Their current must-see? The hurdygurdy, or vielle à roue, thought to have originated before the eleventh century AD. This particular hurdy-gurdy is from 1860, making the instrument more than 150 years old. Its body is shaped like a lute, but the similarities end there—unlike a lute, the hurdy-gurdy uses a hand-cranked wheel to make its signature noise, which sounds similar to that of a bagpipe. With its metal-wheel hand-crank, ivory handle, and carved man’s head scroll, this hurdygurdy is a unique example of a little-known musical treasure. Sensational Sigal—the museum’s debut exhibit—will run through December 2021. Curated by Alexandra Cade under the direction of Dr. Tom Strange, the museum is bursting with musical sights, sounds, and opportunities to thrill and inspire. An afternoon with the collection will satisfy anyone with a craving for musical history— music buffs and museum fans alike.


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TB • COMMUNITY

“Nothing will really match when I’m able to stand in front of a live audience again. That’s what we’re all hoping to get back to.” —Mike Sablone

OFF STAGE, ON SCREEN A N EPIC CHA LLENGE SET THE STAGE FOR NEW ENDEAVORS AT GREEN V ILLE’S WA REHOUSE THEATRE by J. Morgan M c Callum • illustration by Timothy Banks

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t was mid-March 2020. While backstage at a Sunday matinee of The Warehouse Theatre’s rock musical Hedwig and The Angry Inch, artistic director Mike Sablone came to a sudden and heart-wrenching conclusion: this was the last time he’d watch the performance. “Our entire livelihood and form of artistic expression relies upon getting people together in an enclosed space,” says Sablone, “and a pandemic meant that an art form which has existed this way for centuries simply couldn’t continue to exist in that same form.” While the decision to cancel the rest of the 2020 season was the hardest he’d ever made, it quickly galvanized his team and the innovative thinking that followed. “We were all going through a collective trauma, and I wanted to do what art does best: help people process, connect, heal,” Sablone reflects. “That led to a unique opportunity for us to produce some art, some

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theater, virtually. There’s already so much free entertainment out there [online], so how we responded needed to feel authentic to The Warehouse Theatre.” Sablone immediately started working on a show called Objectivity. “There was a silver lining to the show being virtual. It allowed us to collaborate with artists out of Los Angeles and Chicago, and people from 27 states and 7 countries tuned in to see it. We were able to share The Warehouse Theatre in a way we’d never otherwise have been able to do from 130 seats in the West End of Greenville.” Beyond being immensely successful, the most rewarding result was the community response. “It struck a chord,” says Sablone. “It spoke to the moment we were all in, and we saw the impact it made on the audience. People stayed afterward in the chat to talk about the show. . . . The conversations that started were organic, international.” Being able to pay artists when so many venues remain shuttered is really important to Sablone, as is continuing to support The Warehouse Theatre’s education initiatives. His passion for the show that followed, Fire in the Garden— also a success—and children’s programming like virtual Shakespeare, is evident in every word. “Teachers’ jobs in the last year have been incomprehensibly difficult. Knowing that we were there to work with them, to help bring the arts into virtual schools, makes me proud—and we couldn’t have done it without the incredible support of our donors and the Metropolitan Arts Council.” Sablone shares another year-long effort that recently came to fruition for the local theater. “I’m thrilled that we have this phenomenal new logo and branding that feels as fresh and contemporary as the work we’ve been doing.” Local agency FUEL helmed the refresh. “My favorite thing about the new logo is that it has a nod toward our physical space. You’ll recognize our iconic marquee, which helps root us in Greenville . . . while being modern and forward-looking at the same time.” For Sablone, that heritage and sense of place will always be foundational to The Warehouse Theatre, even as they evolve, adapt, and get ready for several upcoming endeavors. “I feel like the theater that’s being done here is just as important as what’s being done in New York. Our audience is just as important. I love the fact that we’re a professional regional theater pulling


text here

BACKSTAGE PASS

>>

What’s next for The Warehouse Theatre? Sablone let us in on a secret: a virtual short-play festival, featuring nationally known playwrights and local actors and directors, is in the works.

FOR the lineup, coming soon: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

After the pandemic forced him to cancel most of The Warehouse Theatre’s 2020 season, artistic director Mike Sablone improvised a repertoire of virtual performances.

artists from everywhere, but ultimately elevating the stories that are relevant to us here—and sending them out to the world.” Finding his way back to that emotional moment backstage in mid-March, Sablone smiles. “My hope was always that someday, we could reopen with Hedwig. The set is still there, almost untouched, covered in a thick layer of dust,” he says with feeling, noting that it became a symbol of hope. “I still believe in the importance of that story, and after a pandemic, it’s even more fitting. Hedwig is a show about rebirth, about going through a trauma to get to where you are . . . it certainly feels, somehow, incomprehensibly more relevant today than it did almost three years ago when I programmed it.” Though he couldn’t have predicted the future, it’s a credit to Sablone’s vision that the historic venue was able to adapt and thrive as quickly as it did. After all, thinking ahead—or in theater-speech, improvising—is just part and parcel of The Warehouse Theatre’s ongoing, impassioned mission.

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TB • SHELF LIFE

TURNING BY THE TIDES GRAB THESE MUST-HAVE BEACH READS FOR YOUR NEXT VACATION

of Lost and Found is the seventh in her popular Beach House series and follows the Rutledge family as they navigate coastal living during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you need more details before committing, join Monroe at M. Judson Booksellers on May 12 for the shop’s monthly Lunch & Lit, where Monroe will chat about the book and answer questions. Be forewarned, it might make you want to pack up and hit the sand. And if that’s the case, you’ll find my chair already there. For more books to add to your bag, M. Judson’s Ashley Warlick has a few suggestions. “Beach reads can take many forms—romancey, thrilling, adventurous,” she says. “But the pages need to virtually turn themselves.” To pick up a copy, visit M. Judson Booksellers at 130 S Main St, Greenville, or buy one at mjudsonbooks.com.

Under the Southern Sky

eight perfect murders

Surviving Savannah

“Though it’s set in Harvey’s idyllic oceanside town of Cape Carolina, this thoughtful story of reconnection between lost loves really makes you think about the nature of time, chance, and family.”—Ashley Warlick

“So, what happens when a bookseller compiles a list of the eight greatest literary murders of all time, from Agatha Christie to Donna Tartt? And somebody starts making those murders happen? This book is so much fun.”—AW

“This historical novel about the sinking of the great steamship Pulaski off the coast of Savannah in 1838, considered the Titanic of the South, will give your time along the coast a deeper context.”—AW

by Kristy Woodson Harvey

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by Peter Swanson

by Patti Callahan

(left to right) artwork by Traci Martin, Sunny Mullarkey, Darin Gehrke, and Mark Mulfinger

C

ome sun and sand season, you’ll find me living out a summer cliché— lounging in a beach chair with shades and a sunhat, devouring a novel so delicious that I’m oblivious to the waves lapping at my feet. This uninterrupted moment of reading bliss is so sacred that choosing which books to bring along on vacation can be a challenge. Recommendations are essential. To be sure, a good beach read varies with individual taste. But if, like me, you enjoy staying on theme, South Carolina sweetheart and environmental fiction writer Mary Alice Monroe drops her latest novel on May 11, just in time to slip in your beach bag. A New York Times bestselling author, Monroe weaves environmental concerns into authentic stories of the human experience, all backdropped by the beautiful Carolina coast. The Summer

Photograph of The Summer of Lost and Found, courtesy of Magic Time Literar y Publicity; remaining covers by Studio Dispatch

by Abby Moore Keith


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ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

Original artwork accentuates The Joseph’s elegant rooms.

Modern art permeates the luxe suites and spaces of THE JOSEPH in Nashville.

Photograph by Eric Laignel

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ESCAPE • TOP BUNK

MUSIC CITY MAGIC THE JOSEPH NASHV ILLE IMBUES A RTF UL ELEGA NCE IN A PR IME LOCATION by Lauren Maxwell

E

ver since I lived in Nashville, going back has felt like going home. What I didn’t expect when I visited The Joseph Nashville, a Luxury Collection Hotel that opened downtown last August, was that going home could feel so refined. The Joseph is owned by the Pizzutis, a family known worldwide for their contemporary art collection. They believe that art should be integrated with everyday life rather than hidden away in galleries, an ethos I can get behind. This philosophy was apparent at The Joseph from the second I pulled up. Even valet parking was an invitation to immerse myself in art. As my husband pulled bags from the car, I was captivated by living

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green walls, which display 7,000 plants around the building in the country’s largest plant-wall system, and a digital art installation by Patricia Dominquez in the porte-cochère. Wandering into the lobby, my eyes darted to a larger-than-life painting by Jackie Saccoccio that seemed to transform with each day’s light. After traveling through Italy in 2017 and 2019, smitten with the country, I joked that I must’ve been Italian in a past life. Maybe that’s why I was so delighted by the shakeratos and spritzes available at the bar, where I could lose myself in The Joseph’s aesthetic—think mid-century Italian design meets hand-cut marble meets contemporary art. But Nashville is known for a style all its own, so The Joseph blends its Italian touches with distinctly local flair. The front desk is wrapped in hand-tooled leather by bootmaker Lucchese; its design features the path of the monarch butterfly and calls attention to Nashville’s famous footwear. The rugs are a nod to nudie suits worn by Dolly Parton herself, and repurposed guitar picks are there if you know where to look. Our first evening was spent in the hands of James Beard Award– winner and Michelin-starred chef Tony Mantuano and his wife, Cathy, at Yolan, The Joseph’s signature restaurant. Widely adored for

Photography (pool, suite, and hotel exterior) by Eric Laignel); (Yolan pasta) courtesy of The Joseph Hotel

text here


Opened last August, The Joseph offers a refined stay in the heart of downtown Nashville, within walking distance of the Ryman Auditorium and the Nashville Symphony. From the rooftop’s skyline views to its elevated culinary offerings, The Joseph has a supreme focus on art, culture, and luxury.

Explore Nashville’s Art Scene 10am Begin your day at The Frist Art Museum, a cultural hub bringing major exhibitions to town. Located in a striking Art Deco building from 1934, The Frist should not be missed. Purchase timed tickets in advance. 919 Broadway. (615) 244-3340, fristartmuseum.org

Photography (pool, suite, and hotel exterior) by Eric Laignel); (Yolan pasta) courtesy of The Joseph Hotel

1pm Hop over to Wedgewood-

their work at Chicago’s Spiaggia, the Mantuanos are determined to bring high-end Italian cuisine to Nashville—and in my opinion, they are succeeding. At Yolan, I was taken with each course, but particularly enchanted by Chef Mantuano’s linguine fra diavolo and risotto with uni, crab, and chive. Our meal was punctuated by Italian wines from Cathy’s beverage program, and when I asked for a digestivo after the meal, my request was met with a stunning list of amari. When rain drenched the city on Saturday, I tucked myself away at Rose, a luxury spa on The Joseph’s 21st floor. It felt like a refuge in the sky and melted a year’s worth of pandemic tension away. After settling into a level of relaxation I’d nearly forgotten, my husband and I visited Denim, the hotel’s rooftop bar. From there we enjoyed quiet, sophisticated views of the Cumberland River paired with a wood-fired pizza and Carciofi Negroni, my new favorite drink. Nashville and Italy are two of the friendliest places I’ve been, so it makes sense that the warm and bolstering welcome I received at The Joseph brought both cultures to life. Every touch—and bite— reminded me that if we pay attention, art pulses through the fabric of our existence. Here, I didn’t have to seek it out.

Houston, a neighborhood five minutes away that’s known for its monthly art crawl. First things first: Refuel at Dozen Bakery. Have a sandwich—or pie—for lunch and take a box of cookies to go. 516 Hagan St. (615) 712-8150, dozen-nashville.com

2:30pm Venture further into Nashville’s art scene at Zeitgeist, a contemporary gallery right next door. Book your appointment ahead to enjoy excellent curation of emerging and established artists. 516 Hagan St. (615) 256-4805, zeitgeist-art.com

3:30pm Conclude your tour at David

Lusk Gallery, a leading regional venue whose collections never disappoint. 516 Hagan St. (615) 780-9990, davidluskgallery.com

5pm Enjoy a pre-dinner refreshment

at nearby Diskin Cider or Flamingo Cocktail Club, depending on your mood. 1235 Martin St. (615) 248-8000, diskincider.com; 509 Houston St. (786) 942-8279, flamingococktailclub.com

The Joseph, 401 Korean Veterans Blvd, Nashville. (615) 248-1990, thejosephnashville.com

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Ansel Adams, Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Stieglitz. Those names represent some of the best photographic chroniclers of American life in the twentieth century. Thanks to an exhibition organized by the Reading Public Museum, the works of these and other renowned photographers will be on display at the Upcountry History Museum. In addition to depicting America’s cultural and natural history, these important works illustrate the evolution of photographic techniques. Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. May 1–Aug 7. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4–18, $8; children 3 and under, free. (864) 4673100, upcountryhistory.org

“Instax is Fuji’s version of a Polaroid. You take a picture and out it comes in 3–5 minutes. My daughter takes it to friends’ weddings, and people say ‘Wow, I’ve never seen this before.’ It’s wonderful new technology that’s 70 years old.” —Mike Wojcik

Lomography Diana, $100

“That’s your modern vintage camera. The Diana was my brother’s first camera when he was 3. My grandmother bought it for him for 99 cents. It’s a fun little plastic camera because it’s got a lot of settings. You take it out and you get what you get.”—MW

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Lomography Spinner 360, $100 “The Spinner is a funky camera because it doesn’t give you many pictures, but each picture is 360 degrees. It has this little string you pull and when you let go, it makes the exposure 360 degrees. This was the original one-shot panoramic camera.”—MW

I

am probably the prototypical old-guy photographer,” confesses Mike Wojcik, who opened Spartan Photo Center at age 19 with his brother 36 years ago. He’s referring to the fact that he doesn’t have a degree in photography. Instead, he studied business in college and developed technical skills on his own. Family-run Spartan Photo focuses on a full range of cameras, lenses, and accessories in addition to offering film developing, equipment rentals, and classes. At any given time, the store stocks anywhere from 25–50 different brands of new cameras and 25 used models— including vintage cameras. In 2001, Wojcik “drank the Kool-Aid” and sold his film cameras in favor of digital. But a few years back, a customer reignited his interest by exposing him to her own passion for film. “There’s a nostalgia to film,” Mike says. “It’s similar to getting a real letter instead of an email—that’s the experience. I forgot how much fun [using film] is.” Spartan Photo Center, 108 Garner Rd, Spartanburg. (864) 583-6835, spartanphotocenter.com

Lomography Lomo’Instant Automat Glass Magellan, $180

“The Magellan is one of the more expensive instant film cameras. It’s a real instant camera—it’s got auto-focus and a glass lens. It’s more variable as far as the exposures it can make, so it’s a little more camera than the other three.”—MW

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MEET SOME OF GREENVILLE’S BIGGEST ARTS SUPPORTERS IN 2020... TD BANK BUSINESS & THE ARTS PARTNERSHIP AWARDS

TD Bank sponsored the 2020 Business & the Arts Partnership Awards which were announced on Monday, March 22, 2021 during the filming of the Metropolitan Arts Council (MAC) annual meeting. The recipients of these awards were:

BUSINESS WITH LESS THAN 100 EMPLOYEES Greenville County First Steps, nominated by the South Carolina Children’s Theatre

BUSINESS WITH 100 OR MORE EMPLOYEES BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina, nominated by the Peace Center

PUT YOUR HEART IN THE ARTS VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

C. Dan Adams, nominated by the Greenville Symphony All of us at MAC greatly appreciate TD Bank’s continued support in honoring these businesses and individuals who are devoted to Greenville’s arts community. TD Bank has a long-standing tradition of financially supporting the arts at very generous levels, and its executives and employees tirelessly give their time and resources to many important philanthropic endeavors throughout the area. We look forward to continuing our remarkable relationship with TD Bank.

MAC AWARDS

At the 2020 MAC annual meeting on March 22, 2021, the following individuals and organizations received recognition for steadfast and generous support of MAC’s programs and services. Their support has been especially crucial during the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020.

CAMPAIGN FOR THE ARTS Mr. and Mrs. William W. Brown Ann P. Bryan Larry Burgamy & Alex Ryan Campbell Young Leaders Canal Charitable Foundation M. Jill Cox Rosa M. Eisenstadt Entercom South Carolina Graham Foundation Phillip W. Gregory Edith & Bill Hardaway Mr. & Mrs. John B. Helmers, Jr. Joan & William Herlong Velda & Jackson Hughes Donna & Mark Johnston Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey G. Lawson Mr. & Mrs. E. Erwin Maddrey, II Helen B. Maish Dolly & Louis Pardi Megan Riegel Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Youkey

COVID-19 RELIEF FUNDING Canal Charitable Foundation Community Foundation of Greenville Graham Foundation Greenville County CARES Hollingsworth Funds, Inc. Jolley Foundation South Carolina Arts Commission South Carolina CARES

PROGRAMS & SERVICES

BMW Manufacturing Company, LLC Clinkscales Chevrolet Traute E. & Roland H. Engeler Family Piedmont Natural Gas Company SEW-Eurodrive Meredith B. Skinner South Carolina Arts Commission Don & Zelma Waggoner Foundation

SMARTARTS

Daniel-Mickel Foundation Duke Energy Foundation Carrie & Skip Gordon John I. Smith Charities, Inc. Jolley Foundation Greenville County First Steps George G. Caughman Margaret Ellis Pearce Laura & Bill Pelham Prisma Health TD Bank TD Charitable Foundation

GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS

DOWNTOWN ALIVE

Carolina Foothills Federal Credit Union Clemson University MBA Program

OUTSTANDING SUPPORT City of Greenville

MAC ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS Pat & Don Kilburg Elbert W. Rogers Foundation

SUPPORT OF INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS

Piedmont Arthritis Clinic, P.A. Fred Collins Foundation Peace Center Pelham Architects, LLC South State Bank Janette W. Wesley & Renato Vicario


Brittany Timmons

Rosa Eisenstadt

ANN C. SHERARD YOUNG SUPPORTER OF THE ARTS AWARD

MAC LIFELONG SUPPORT OF THE ARTS AWARD

As a board member of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Brittany serves on the Executive Committee and is the Endowment Campaign Co-Chair. She has been instrumental in navigating the Greenville Symphony through the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, working tirelessly in the areas of fund raising and management while ensuring the stability of the endowment.

Rosa truly has a passion for Greenville’s arts community. This is evident in her very generous level of support of the Greenville Jewish Film Festival, Carolina Youth Symphony and Greenville Symphony Orchestra. She is a former member of the Symphony Guild. She has also supported the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, the Upcountry History Museum, The Warehouse Theatre and the Metropolitan Arts Council.

Dove Dupree

Mary Leslie Anderson

CARRIE AND SKIP GORDON EMERGING TEACHING ARTIST AWARD

CARL R. BLAIR EDUCATOR AWARD

Dove is a SmartARTS Teaching Artist, lyricist, actor and educator as well as a Button Poetry feature, a Southern Fried Finalist and a National Poetry Slam semi-finalist. He spent the fall and winter bringing in-person curriculumbased arts integration learning to impact the academic achievement of the children of essential workers.

As principal of League Academy of Communication Arts, Mary Leslie Anderson invests in the education of those who will shape how the city grows and prospers in the future. In a variety of roles, from English teacher, to instructional coach to assistant principal, she has served Greenville County Schools for 20 years. Mrs. Anderson has created a vision for League Academy to include the infusion of arts education, literacy integration and multidisciplinary learning in each grade level and content area.

Jeff Holland

Cecilia Ho

THE DR. MARTHA R. WESTROPE TEACHING ARTIST FELLOWSHIP

THE SEW-EURODRIVE MINORITY TEACHING ARTIST FELLOW

Jeff Holland has been an integral part of the local music scene in Greenville for the past four decades as a drummer and music teacher. With this fellowship he will work with Greenville County teachers in high-poverty schools to integrate the arts into their South Carolina Standards based curriculum at no cost to schools.

Cecilia offers felting demonstrations and workshops at museums, galleries, art & fiber festivals and local businesses across the United States and Canada through her business, FELTasticFashion. As a SmartARTS Teaching Artist, Cecilia spent the fall and winter bringing in-person arts integration learning to impact the academic achievement of the children of essential workers.

Kelly Davis CARRIE AND SKIP GORDON TEACHING ARTIST AWARD A SmartARTS Teaching Artist and a teaching artist with The Warehouse Theatre, Kelly has performed in Upstate SC with Mill Town Players, Centre Stage and Greenville Chorale. Kelly spent time this fall and winter bringing in-person curriculum-based arts integration learning to impact the academic achievement of the children of essential workers.

MAC BOARD OF DIRECTORS AWARDS MAC is very grateful for the generous financial support provided by board members Roger Ables, Edith Hardaway, Chris Kavolus and Anne Woods.

View the full presentation of the 2020 TD Bank Business & the Arts Partnership Awards and the 2020 MAC Annual Meeting by visiting greenvilleARTS.com.


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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

Clemson professor Dr. J. Drew Lanham birdwatches in the Clemson Experimental Forest.

Renowned poet and naturalist DR. J. DREW LANHAM finds wonder in the wild.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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SPORT • PEOPLE

FLIGHT PATTERN CLEMSON PROFESSOR DR. J. DREW L A NHA M CONNECTS THE DOTS BET WEEN LOVE OF NATURE A ND LOVE OF M A NK IND by Stephanie Trotter • photograph by paul mehaffey

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J

ust like the clever raven he admires, Dr. J. Drew Lanham boldly squawks the message himself: “I’m a rare bird.” Such a simple statement yet riddled with complexity. Lanham’s a science nerd who writes award-winning prose. A country boy who travels the world. A Black birder who leads in a Caucasian-centric hobby. And as the resourceful raven uses all of its feathers to fly, Lanham uses his gathering of gifts to connect ornithology to the land, history, and race. Upon take-off with his winged objects of study, he prompts nature lovers to love all mankind. “I have this desire to move people,” explains the Clemson Alumni Distinguished Professor. “To have them think, but also to


“I saw 18 cardinals in my backyard the other day, but they’re not the same. I want people to understand that kind of complexity when viewing a bird, or person, in the full context of their being.”—Dr. J. Drew Lanham

When he’s not out birdwatching, professor Dr. J. Drew Lanham takes flight through his writing, in hopes of bringing to light the commonalities we all share.

have them feel about what they’re thinking. And then if they’re thinking and feeling, hopefully the next step is to act. I want to be understood not just as a scientist, but as a Black man who does this work, and as a Black rural Southerner who does this work. It all sort of falls through those prisms.” Lanham’s perspective is as unique as the peregrine falcon’s flying above Caesars Head. After decades of scientific writing for academia, the 56-year-old is now sharing his view on birds, conservation, and life in a variety of publications, including The New York Times, Vanity Fair, Newsweek, Audubon, and Orion magazines. The naturalist has penned a book of poetry, Sparrow Envy, as well as an autobiography, The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature. The latter, published in 2016, won many awards and continues to engage readers, with deep meditations not just on nature, but human nature. “I want people to understand why it’s important to see color,” the CU Master Teacher reveals. “I saw 18 cardinals in my backyard the other day, but they’re not the same. You have to look at the differences in their redness, crest shape, beak size. Their personality, or ‘birdnality.’ I want people to understand that kind of complexity when viewing a bird, or person, in the full context of their being. My pet peeve is when people say they don’t see color.” As a young boy growing up in Edgefield, Lanham saw the nuances of color everywhere, including the first sign entering town that stated, “W.E. Lynch.” “I always read that as ‘we lynch.’ You learned what lynching was pretty early on as a Black kid in the ’60s, but I didn’t have any incidences myself,” he shares. By second grade, he knew he loved nature, birds, and reading. “The die was cast. What eight-year-old kid do you know who has a subscription to Smithsonian Magazine?” he asks with a laugh. “Oh, how I wanted to be a bird. I wanted to fly.” The curious youth also came to know and respect history, including that of his forefather, a slave named Harry, who was sold in Maryland around 1790 and brought to Edgefield. “How do you find the strength to survive and thrive within a system that saw you as less than human? When I feel burdened, all I have to do is think about what that must have felt like and my burden becomes a lot lighter. Because of his strength, his endurance, and his persistence, my family is here. I’m fortunate to get to tell his story,” Lanham shares. A louder voice has come with age and current events. Recently, Lanham’s writings feature an additional layer of awareness and activism. He updated his 9 Rules for the Black Birdwatcher (#3: Don’t bird in a hoodie) to 9 Rules for the Woke Birdwatcher (#2: Leave your assumptions behind). The Seneca resident is also working on a sequel to Home Place, with Range Maps: Birds, Blackness, and Loving Nature Between the Two. “It’s about the intersection of birds’ lives, my life, and all of our lives,” the writer reveals. “I have a mantra: We all share the same air, the same water, same soil, same earth, and ultimately the same fate. Hopefully, it will be a chance for people to see what that sharing looks like through my eyes, and hopefully expands their ability, or desire, to think about this sharing, not just with wild birds, but how we’re going to live together as human beings in a better way.”

DREW’S FAVORITE LOCAL AREAS TO

BIRD Clemson Experimental Forest: “It’s 18,000 acres that surround campus in one of the nation’s largest school forests. There are a lot of migratory birds there like scarlet tanagers, prairie warblers, and wild turkeys.”

Caesars Head & Mountain Bridge Wilderness:

“I like to look for peregrine falcons and ravens. It’s one of the few places you can go in the state and see both of those birds because of the higher elevation.”

Nine Times Preserve (near Sunset): “It’s a kaleidoscope of warblers that come through in the springtime that really sort of complement the wildflowers, the trillium, and trout lilies. They come in waves from South and Central America.”

Jocassee Gorges:

“I worked here in the late ’80s and early ’90s with the DNR. You’ll see lots of Swainson’s warblers and ruffed grouse.”

Nemours Wildlife Foundation: “It’s in the Lowcountry on the Combahee, where Harriet Tubman liberated more than 700 enslaved. When I bird there, I think about bird-watching with Harriet Tubman. She knew the woods and wetlands well and used an owl call to identify herself to others.”

This year’s national Black Birders Week runs from May 30–June 5.

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Original artwork by Cat Tesla “Chrysalis 230”


STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY Frankie Zombie utilizes everyday objects such as shoes, skateboards, chairs, and instruments to create his abstract art. For more, turn to page 70.

Spartanburg duo JAE PAGE & FRANKIE ZOMBIE create colorful, wearable works of art.

Photograph courtesy of Frankie Zombie

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URBAN CRUSH M A R R IED A RTISTS FR A NK IE ZOMBIE A ND JA E PAGE FIND COMMON GROUND IN EXUBER A NT COLOR by Kathryn Davé • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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Frankie Zombie and Jae Page express themselves in bold hues, whether she’s fashioning textile art and crafting jewelry, or he’s decorating sneakers and painting abstract murals. Zombie’s clients include Pharrell Williams and Celine Dion.

Photograph of piano courtesy of Frankie Zombie

STYLE • THE EYE


Photograph of piano courtesy of Frankie Zombie

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reat art starts conversations. But Spartanburg artists and collaborators Frankie and Jae Page are not content to leave those conversations in the static space of galleries, walls, and museums. Their bold work brings dialogue to the living, breathing gallery of real life. “We have this way of thinking that visual art forms are only allowed to be painted on canvases that hang on the wall,” explains Frankie. “But our work is building a platform to start those serious conversations in a train or at a concert or at home or in the grocery store.” Although the two married artists share a last name, they have largely pursued individual careers. Jae, a textile artist/ jewelry maker, founded Urban Collars, while Frankie (who works under the name Frankie Zombie) is a painter whose contemporary abstract expressions range from murals to sneakers. As different as their mediums are, Frankie and Jae speak the same language when it comes to color. Vibrant, saturated, bold—their exuberant use of color is aligned not just in the bright hues they choose, but how they combine them. “I’m not a matchy-matchy kind of person,” Jae says, a fact that’s been true since childhood, when she was first drawn to bold prints and bright colors. Her love of vibrant color has turned out to be a beacon: it guided Jae through a dark season in life and became the genesis of Urban Collars. She began sewing her signature textile necklaces in 2016 as a creative therapeutic exercise. “Wearing bright colors helped me express myself when words couldn’t,” she explains. The jewelry attracted so much attention from friends and family that Jae decided to open Urban Collars in 2018. Her line now includes colorful earrings, a bit of apparel, and her distinct magnetic textile cuffs and necklaces. More than a functional necessity, the magnetic closure is a key piece of the design, allowing the wearer to easily interchange collars to mix and match bold prints—Jae’s homage to the rich textile tradition of African cultures. Frankie can thread his unique approach to color back to childhood, too, when the futuristic cartoon The Jetsons sparked a new way of thinking about the world. “Mentally, I’ve been painting since I was 9 or 10,” he says, “but I didn’t start physically making concepts until about ten years ago.” It’s been a productive ten years. Frankie has produced work for major celebrities and networks, including Pharrell Williams, Celine Dion, and the NBA, among others. His art— which ranges from his “diary-style” print to mixed-media to traditional paintings—has been recognized in Forbes. And last year, much of what he has been trying to say about equality, justice, culture, and change culminated in the Black Lives Matter street murals he led in Charlotte, North Carolina, and in Spartanburg. “Artists know that our art should be provoking something,” he says. It was only natural for the couple to join forces in their first collaborative work, a limited collection of Jae’s jewelry made with Frankie’s signature color-stacking and diary print. Big things are on the horizon for the pair with future collaborations in the works. “We are colorful people,” Jae laughs. “We inspire each other.”

To buy Jae Page’s jewelry and accessories, go to urbancollars.shop; for more of Frankie Zombie’s art, go to frankiezombie.com.

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STYLE • THE HOME

After helming Bennetts’ Frame & Art Gallery for 27 years, Amanda Bennett is profiting from her interior design background to add a side line of home accessories called Amanda Carol Home to her thriving business.

PICTURE PERFECT EXPERT FR A MER A M A NDA BENNETT EXPA NDS HER A RTISTIC V ISION INTO A NEW VENTURE by M. Linda Lee • photograph by Ian Curcio

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nything is frameable,” asserts Amanda Bennett. She should know. As the owner of Bennetts’ Frame & Art Gallery on Laurens Road, she has put molding around a mind-boggling array of items from paintings and mirrors to baseballs and christening gowns. Her most memorable framing job? “That has to be the woman who brought in dryer lint to frame because she liked the way the colors looked,” Amanda recalls. “Another time, we had a gentleman who had just enjoyed his last cigar, and we framed the cigar butt in a shadow box with a little brass plate bearing his name and the date he quit smoking.” It’s all in a day’s work for Bennett, who purchased her parents’ frame shop and art gallery in 1994. “I always thought I would go into the family business,” reflects the entrepreneur, who grew up helping her parents in the shop, “but I knew I didn’t want to do that right after college.” After graduating from Winthrop University with a degree in interior decorating, she headed to Boston, where she brushed up on her art knowledge while working in a gallery for two years.

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Although Bennett’s Greenville gallery sells work by artists from around the globe, as well as local ones, custom framing is her bread and butter—and a métier that requires an artistic frame of mind. “You have to have a good eye for design,” notes Amanda. “It’s important to enhance the art and not to take away from it. Often, that means being very minimal with framing.” But Bennett’s talents stretch beyond framing. Last June she was handing a customer a finished piece when a light bulb went off. “When I looked at the framed piece, I thought, ‘This size and this molding would make a really neat serving tray.’ So after she left, I ran to a fabric store and bought a yard of fabric and framed it. And I bought some pretty cabinet pulls and put them on the sides.” Bennett had barely set the tray on the front counter when it sold. And so her complementary business, Amanda Carol Home, “a creative collection,” was born. She currently makes three sizes of trays in 25–30 different fabrics and will soon be launching a line of framed fabric-covered headboards and room-divider screens. Her creativity flows from knowing the tastes of her customers, many of whom have become friends over the years. When she first bought the business, she had a beagle named Monet who came to work with her every day. “To this day, I still have customers who ask me about Monet and remember her,” Amanda says. “It’s things like that that make this more than just a job.” Bennetts’ Frame & Art Gallery, 2100 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 478-8497, bennettsartgallery.com; amandacarolhome.com


DO YOU SEE WHAT WE SEE? The Covid-19 Pandemic has forced us all inside – and started a conversation about mental health and the impact of mental illness. NAMI Greenville works to change minds about mental health – and this year has made us so hopeful. From stigma to support, from despair to solidarity – we thank you for helping to change the conversation about mental illness. As the world returns to normal, let’s keep these conversations going. It’s a new dawn and a new day and at NAMI Greenville, we are feeling so good about the future of mental health.

Change your mind about mental illness. Visit NAMI Greenville at www.namigreenvillesc.org to donate and learn more about prioritizing your mental health.

Join us in the fight to end stigma and bring hope and help for mental health. 130 Industrial Drive, Suite A, Greenville, SC 29607 • 864-331-3300


Your Health Care Should Always Revolve Around You At Bon Secours, we’re creating the personalized solutions you need, to meet you where you need us with the right care for you. Because whether safely in our clean facilities, or virtually from the comfort of your own home, we believe your health care should always revolve around you. Visit bonsecours.com/primarycare to connect with a primary care provider today.

PRIMARY CARE FOR THE UNIVERSE OF YOU


Ms. Bea Wright

MOTHER KNOWS BEST MS. BEA TA KES A POLL ON BREASTFEEDING IN PUBLIC

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ast week my husband and I popped into a restaurant for lunch. Seated at a table nearby was an adorable young family. I noticed that the mother was discreetly nursing a child, fully draped and covered by a poncho. The nursing did not register on my husband’s radar at all. In fact, it was only after we had been seated for several minutes and the baby was sated and cooing in his mother’s arms when he commented with surprise, “That couple has two children, not just one,” as if a miraculous birth happened while his head was turned. Our experience got me thinking about a hot topic of debate— breastfeeding in public. Women have an absolute right to nurse their children in public, but emotions and responses are mixed when the act is put into practice. Out of curiosity, I took a quick, unscientific, and anything but random poll of a few friends and colleagues, men and women, to get some views on the subject. My query garnered swift responses, ranging from “Kid’s gotta eat—nothing to hide” to “Ohhhhhhh. Not a fan.” Most, but not all, of the women surveyed responded with passion about the benefits of nursing, both for the health of the baby and the bond that is formed between mother and child. Describing breastfeeding as beautiful, natural, and empowering, they shared stories of nursing on a park bench, at the beach, and other public spaces. Several noted that pumping in public is a correlated task, especially for working moms. Imagine working as a busy television reporter, pumping in the back of the news van while racing to get the scoop, as became routine for one of my friends.

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The gentlemen were far less enthusiastic on the subject. When my question was posed in person, the reaction was consistent across the board—first, silence and hesitation, followed by a slight contortion of the face before a response could be formulated. As a rule (in my nonstandard survey) the guys were big on the breastfeeding mother “not making a scene” and “practicing modesty,” reminding the mothers (as if they needed a reminder) that they are not putting on a show. Men and women alike expressed a little less comfort with mothers nursing toddlers. As one grandmother expressed, “I prefer a nursing ‘baby’ not to be walking and speaking in complete sentences, asking for cookies with his milk.” Though he was not included in my small survey, I learned that one very famous man quite publicly expressed his thoughts in favor of women breastfeeding in public. In 2015, Pope Francis baptized 33 babies as part of the celebration of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord in the Sistine Chapel. During his homily, he specifically encouraged women to breastfeed their children publicly saying, “Even now, if they cry because they are hungry, breastfeed them, don’t worry.” Bottom line, and with the Pope’s blessing, nursing in public is a natural, accepted practice. Let’s stop the funny looks at mothers who are doing precisely the thing that everyone from your grandmother to the CDC says is providing the ideal nutrition to their children. But moms, modesty is appreciated. With so many nursing shawls, ponchos, and blankets available, a little discretion will help you avoid chastening looks (even if unwarranted). I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.


REAL LIFE,

Real Style

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864.565.8801 www.NandinaHome.com

creating real homes for those who live real lives.


Man About TOWN

WORLD TRAVELER THE M A N GA INS EXTR A BR AVA DO A F TER A FA MILY TR IP OVERSEAS by Steven Tingle

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n the summer of 1982, my parents called me into the kitchen and told me we needed to have a talk. When I sat down at the breakfast nook, my dad handed me a folder overflowing with brochures and pamphlets. Fear immediately coursed through my body. They’re going to send me to military school, I thought. Or worse, summer camp. Instead my parents told me we were going to Europe in November. A two-week trip that would begin in Germany and include stops in Italy, Switzerland, France, and Spain. I flipped through the brochures and glared at the families smiling like buffoons while strolling through museums, historical ruins, and botanical gardens. Summer camp seemed palatable by comparison. A few weeks before the trip, I was being insulted by the bullies in my eighth-grade social studies class when the teacher told me to go to the vice principal’s office. I knew the way. I’d been sent to Mr. Bennet’s office several times on a variety of trumped-up charges: chewing gum in the halls, reading the recipes section of Good Housekeeping during gym class, using the mouthpiece of my trumpet as a spitball launcher.

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“Your upcoming trip will be an excused absence,” Mr. Bennet said, “but you will be required to give an oral report of your travels.” I glanced at the poster thumbtacked to the wall behind Mr. Bennet’s desk. It featured a cat dangling perilously from a tree branch with the phrase “Hang in There” written underneath. I didn’t know it at the time, but that cat is my spirit animal. At the Frankfurt airport my dad rented a lime green Volkswagen minivan, and we set off on what I recall as an experiment in perpetual boredom. Ten tedious days later, we pulled into Marbella, a small town on Spain’s south coast. At dinner that night my mom announced that she had booked us on a one-day tour of Morocco. I finally perked up. Casablanca was my favorite movie and I imagined myself sitting in Rick’s Cafe, flicking cigarette ash off of my white dinner jacket while trying to convince a beautiful woman to join the Resistance. Instead I arrived in Morocco wearing denim shorts, tube socks, and a fanny pack full of sunscreen, Band-Aids, and allergy medication. Walking through the streets, we were surrounded by a throng of overzealous peddlers hawking everything from jewelry to throw rugs. I was terrified. I wanted to click my white Nike’s together and chant: There’s no place like home. There’s no place like home. A week later, I strutted back into school. I was never so happy to see those cinderblock walls. In social studies class, I stood by the chalkboard and gave a brief rundown of my European adventures. When I took my seat, the bullies called me names that today will immediately get you banned from Twitter. I should have cowered, but I was a new man—a world traveler who had navigated the seedy bazaars of Morocco. I ripped a corner of paper from my notebook and placed it on my tongue. The mouthpiece to my trumpet was tucked inside the pocket of my sweatshirt and I caressed it lovingly. My Resistance was about to begin.


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245 CHASTAIN HILL ROAD TAYLORS $1,995,000 | MLS# 1441810 Michael Mumma 864.238.2542

5 W NORTH STREET DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE $1,090,000 | MLS# 1437461 Damian Hall 864.561.7942

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3 SOUTHBOURNE COURT PARKINS MILL $774,500 | MLS# 1434252 Della Scott 864.363.5722

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18 CACHET COURT VERDMONT COMMUNITY $369,500 | MLS# 1441455 Kennie Norris 864.608.0865

UNDER CONTRACT

40 SEYLE STREET DUNEAN MILL $299,900 | MLS# 1440783 Kendall Keir 864.430.0301

100 PENDLETON ROAD GREENVILLE $299,750 | MLS# 1441406 Rex Galloway 864.630.1111 Kary Galloway 864.901.2204

119 WRENFIELD COURT PEIDMONT $270,000 | MLS# 1441415 Stacy Jacobs 864.395.1643

117 N LAWN DRIVE THE RESERVE AT LAKE KEOWEE $225,000 | MLS# 1440344 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

40 GRAND VISTA DRIVE THE RIDGE AT PARIS MOUNTAIN $209,000 | MLS# 1432210 Holly May 864.640.1959

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GREENVILLE’S BELOVED

ARTISPHERE

FESTIVAL RETURNS WITH A SMALLER, SAFER, AND INNOVATIVE OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE. WE SPOTLIGHT TWELVE OF OUR FAVORITE PARTICIPATING ARTISTS TO DELIVER A TASTE OF THE THREEDAY WEEKEND,

MAY 7–9.

ART SHOW BY J. MORGAN McCALLUM

1 Betsy Best /

From residencies in Italy and Japan, to studios in the Pacific Northwest and now her home state of Michigan, a passion for printmaking has grown into a storied career for Betsy Best. A background in graphic design has heavily influenced her work, as is reflected in her use of bold line and pattern, crisp design, and vibrant color.

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Betsy Best, Stretch, linocut. 9.75” x 14”; artwork courtesy of the artist.

Flushing, MI


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Betsy Best, Stretch, linocut. 9.75” x 14”; artwork courtesy of the artist.


SUN-DAPPLED SIDEWALKS. MUSIC IN THE AIR. A KALEIDOSCOPE OF COLORS, TEXTURES, AND TALENTS.

From established oil painters and printmakers, to emerging wood, fiber, and jewelry artisans, Artisphere, Greenville’s premier arts festival, offers a unique opportunity to be completely immersed in the arts and connect with the creators behind every inspired work—only this year, those points of entry are timed and ticketed to ensure safety for all. In lieu of live bands, tunes from local musicians will be piped in from off-site locations. Live painting, however—and the thrill of seeing art in action—will continue to surprise and delight. Kidsphere, juried exhibits, and additional elements of the festival have also evolved in order to return. Many believe that art is essential to life; others see it as a luxury. All can agree that after the extraordinary challenges of the past year, the chance to experience this sublime event again—altered though it may be—is something not taken for granted. Whether you’ve already reserved a ticket, or will be browsing the work virtually, we’ve spotlighted twelve of our favorite participating artists to bring a taste of Artisphere to you.

2 Jeffrey Leder / Greenville, SC

3 Gary Curtis /

Jeffrey Leder is intrigued by the relationship between form and color—how size, shape, and density dance around each other in a given space. His abstract paintings each have a multi-pronged intention: to achieve harmony within himself, to carve order from chaos, and to explore creative possibilities.

Woodstock, GA

A native of Southern California, Gary Curtis’s watercolors and paintings capture details so realistic that the viewer is tempted to draw close and touch the objects within. Some of his favorite subjects include mirror-like reflective silver vessels and transparent glass, and his watercolors have been exhibited in several galleries and juried fine art shows across the country.

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(opposite) Jeffery Leder, Well 28, flashe vinyl paint on strathmore 500 cotton paper. 24” x 18”; Gary Curtis, Set Sail, watercolor. 18” x 24”; (this page) Cheryl Mackey Smith, Subaerial, individually hand-formed ceramic pieces, bisque fired. 30” x 40”;

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(opposite) Jeffery Leder, Well 28, flashe vinyl paint on strathmore 500 cotton paper. 24” x 18”; Gary Curtis, Set Sail, watercolor. 18” x 24”; (this page) Cheryl Mackey Smith, Subaerial, individually hand-formed ceramic pieces, bisque fired. 30” x 40”; Greg Turco, Analogue, photographic print; all artwork courtesy of the artists.

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4 Cheryl Mackey Smith / Fairview, NC

A deep love of the world’s wild places informs Cheryl Mackey Smith’s hand-formed ceramics. Each and every small piece of clay depicts an aspect of nature, whether real or abstracted. As she applies the fired ceramics to archival backings, her flowing compositions and striking patterns develop into finished framed ceramic wall pieces.

5 Greg Turco / Jefferson, GA

A fascination with shape, form, and design is at the heart of Greg Turco’s photography. With subject matter ranging from vintage vehicles to twisted metal, his unique perspective and colorful compositions breathe new life and depth of character into abandoned structures, apocalyptic settings, and surreal cityscapes.

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6 Olivia Ruxton / 7 Steve Uren / Charleston, SC

Grand Rapids, MI

Each piece of jewelry crafted by Olivia Ruxton comes to life when it is placed on the body, pivoting and swinging as the wearer moves. Made from sterling silver and semi-precious stones, Ruxton’s work is inspired by paring down, focusing on traditional metalsmithing techniques, kinetic movement, and repetition of form.

For Steve Uren, a single, inspiring piece of wood is where every finished artwork begins. All of his objects and one-ofa-kind furniture pieces are created using hand and machine tools— nothing is automated. Uren strives to unearth something magical out of the functional, beautiful out of the mundane, and singular out of the common, always with expressive originality and unmatched quality.

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(opposite) Olivia Ruxton, XL swing necklace, Tibetan turquiose, gold rutilated quartz; Steve Uren, One Step Beyond, cherry, walnut, tiger maple, and flame

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(opposite) Olivia Ruxton, XL swing necklace, Tibetan turquiose, gold rutilated quartz; Steve Uren, One Step Beyond, cherry, walnut, tiger maple, and flame birch. 22.5” wide x 33” high x 13.75” deep; (this page) Ning Lee, Golden Afternoon, oil on canvas. 36” x 48”; all artwork courtesy of the artists.

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8 Ning Lee / Monroe, NJ

Painter Ning Lee pours passion into every canvas, evoking dynamic landscapes and seascapes that draw the viewer in before revealing rich abstract details. Rather than meticulously planned brush strokes, Lee leans into spontaneity, letting compositions unfold organically and with colors, patterns, and textures.

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9 Joe Graci /

Marquette, MI An unusual—even unkind—approach to treating and working with wood gives rise to beautiful results in Joe Graci’s work. Often worked green then allowed to warp and crack as they dry, Graci’s carved panels and objects are inspired by the simple and clean forms of modern design and the shores of Lake Superior, and are crafted from salvaged sawmill materials.

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pro tip:

Plan to eat before or after you go— there are no food vendors this year, and re-entering is discouraged.

10 Sunny Mullarkey / Greenville, SC

11 Deana Goldsmith /

Sunny Mullarkey constantly pushes the bounds of printmaking through nontraditional methods. Her colorful linocuts focus on texture and movement rather than a specific subject matter, and are printed and layered together on Unryu paper. Her work ranges from tiny prints to huge wall murals, which are intended to inspire joy and curiosity.

Perkinston, MS

Born and raised on the prairies of Oklahoma, it is only natural that the general theme of Deana Goldsmith’s art is wildlife. Her mixed-media pieces reflect a self-confessed obsession with birds, and portraying them as accurately as possible. Her still-life drawings pull the viewer into a playful, vintage world where nature is celebrated.

(opposite) Joe Graci, Black Wave, #9 pine stain; (this page) Sunny Mullarkey, from The Path Through Movement series, multi-layered mono-prints, individually printed on Unryu paper, finished on birch panel. 20” x 20”x 1.5”; Deana Goldsmith, Robins View, pastel. 20” × 20”; Judy Verhoeven, Kumquat May, mixed media. 8” x 8”; all artwork courtesy of the artists.

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10

YEAR’S * THIS FESTIVAL IN

DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE REQUIRES A ticket FOR ENTRY DURING A 2.5-hour TIME SLOT. TO BUY TICKETS ($5 EACH) AND BOOK YOUR SLOT, GO TO ARTISPHERE. ORG/TICKETS.

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Judy Verhoeven / Greenville, SC

Bold yet calming, abstract yet grounded, Judy Verhoeven’s collage work is captivating. Informed by a career in graphic design, Judy uses a comprehensive collection of found papers that she paints, stains, and textures for her mixed-media pieces. Themes of her work include acceptance, love, peacefulness, tolerance, and gratitude.

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CELEBRATE

Six Years OF ART WITH GCCA

Join Greenville Center for Creative Arts for a Summer of Celebration as we mark 6 years of providing arts programming to the Upstate!

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SUMMER ART CLASSES

Virtual & In-Person in a Variety of Skills & Mediums

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Weekly Art Camps Beginning June 7 through July 30

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BE PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER,

BE THE CHANGE,

#BEJLG WE ARE friends, professionals, mentors, game changers, mothers, volunteers, leaders, educators, artists, advocates, doctors, nurses, bosses, fundraisers, business owners, planners, and so much more! WE ARE the Junior League of Greenville.

FB.com/JLGreenville

@JLGreenville

JLGreenville.org/Join

Join@JLGreenville.org


eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Jen Anderson, a chef at popular Greenville restaurant GB&D, crafts stunning custom cakes as a side business. For more, turn to page 94.

Culinary artist Jen Anderson creates CUSTOM CAKES that surprise and delight.

Photograph by Studio Dispatch

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E D • SWEET SPOT

W CAKE POP JEN A NDERSON THINKS OUTSIDE THE (BA KERY ) BOX WHEN IT COMES TO CR A F TING HER DISTINCTI VE CUSTOM CA KES by Angie Toole Thompson • photography by studio dispatch

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hen ordering a cake from Jen Anderson, there’s no order form to fill out. No selection of sponges or list of buttercreams to choose from. Maybe you’ve ordered precisely a Red Velvet cake with cream cheese frosting from a bakery before and maybe you left with exactly that, but it wasn’t from Jen Anderson. Jen’s cakes, while made to order, can’t be ordered to exacting specs. Her process is far more niche. One of Jen’s cakes, on her Instagram, bears this description: “Bartlett pear, pomegranate, candied Meyer lemon peel, sage, marigold petals, and matcha powder.” It’s not likely that the average non-professional baker would walk up to a bakery with those specifications. But you’d eat it, wouldn’t you? In a heartbeat. “Grocery stores are my happy place,” the young baker says, “I go at least three or four times a week.” She’s always scoping out the weird fruit, buying it up to freeze or turn into jam, ultimately to fill or adorn some confection. Weird fruit is kind of a hallmark of a Jen cake. Her creations are jeweled, artful things. They’d just as easily suit a gallery


Culinary talent Jen Anderson returned to Greenville after the pandemic derailed a career move to Chicago. In the solitary months that followed, she shifted her creative baking to crafting exceptional cakes: (this page) strawberry buttercream with raspberry and dogwood flowers; (opposite left) blueberry buttercream with blueberries and blood orange pineapple jam.

ALL THINGS STYLISH /

text here

exhibit as they do a festive spread. It’s not all conceptual, though. “I’m always willing to work with somebody . . . I want to deliver the best product I can,” she says. If someone reaches out to her with a peanut allergy, or a severe distaste for strawberry, she’s going to steer the cake in the direction of their tastes. “My vision with these cakes is to give people a slice of something they haven’t tried before, something that feels personal and intentional.” It’s probable you’ve already eaten something made by Jen. She helmed the kitchen at the former Bar Mars and has crafted the get-’em-while-you-can doughnuts (among other things) at GB&D for years. In early 2020, the 26-year-old was ready to take her skills to Chicago in a career-boosting move. “I had been in the city for a week when things started to get serious with the virus . . . I had three separate chefs cancel interviews with me,” she reveals. Jen found her plans derailed, like so many others, by the global COVID-19 pandemic. She moved back to Greenville, hunkering down with a friend. “Three days after I got back, I broke my collarbone and got a concussion.” While she recovered, out of cooking commission and out of work, Jen was left to sit on the couch and scroll social media. There she found a slew of out-of-work chefs, just like her, shifting their focus to smaller projects. Jen felt a kinship. “Food is one of the most basic ways [we] can take care of each other.” During her own personal struggle, in a world where everyone was struggling, Jen says, “I just wanted to make people feel good.” If Jen was a cake, she would be an ice-cream cake. “One that’s cake and ice cream, layered. There would be citrus notes, something crunchy, something herbal.” It’s classic Jen—to embrace her own complexities and to see creative “Cake has this nostalgia. We, as a society, text here U N I Q U E / E X T R O D I N A R Ypossibilities. eat cake on these big, celebratory days when we are all together,” she says. And when we can’t be? Jen’s cakes offer something to be remembered, something singular and lovely to make any day better. To order one of Jen Anderson’s custom cakes: send a direct message to her on Instagram at @jn.rae; then tell her your likes and dislikes and let her take it from there.

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E D • OPEN BAR

CAN DO TA KE THE BA R OUTSIDE W ITH THESE NO-F USS COCKTA ILS by M. Linda Lee photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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icnic weather has officially arrived. Since it’s not likely that you can bring your favorite bartender along, the next best thing is canned cocktails. Convenience is a significant part of the reason why sales of canned spirits are currently growing at a rate of 62 percent a year. “Premium canned cocktails provide a bar-quality experience anywhere, any time,” says Andrew Rodbell, co-founder of Post Meridiem Spirit Co. in Atlanta. To add pizzazz to your next alfresco fête, just shake one up, pop the top, and pour over ice. Try these top brands at your next outdoor gathering.

Tip Top Proper Cocktails

From a rye-whiskey-forward Manhattan to a lime-infused margarita, Tip Top’s collection of six well-balanced (read: not cloyingly sweet) canned cocktails were formulated in Atlanta with the help of James Beard Award finalist Miles Macquarrie (co-owner and mixologist at Kimball House in Decatur, Georgia). Tip Top has garnered raves in the press, including winning first place in the Drinks category in Garden & Gun magazine’s 2020 Made in the South Awards.

Available at Bouharoun’s Fine Wines & Spirits, 301 Falls St; Green’s Discount Beverages, 445 Congaree Rd; and Total Wine & More, 1125 Woodruff Rd. tiptopcocktails.com Made with premium spirits, these portable canned cocktails are trending for all kinds of alfresco summer fun.

Post Meridiem

Distilled spirits, imported liqueurs, and 100-percent real citrus juices go into Post Meridiem’s five different 100-milliliter cocktails, reflecting the company’s commitment to using the highest-quality ingredients. Georgia’s first canned-cocktail company was founded by longtime friends Andrew Rodbell and Charles Sain, who hatched the idea at a concert where they found the mixed-drink options to be lacking. The name (usually abbreviated as “p.m.”) refers to after 12 o’clock noon, or as some would call it, cocktail hour. Available at Green’s Discount Beverages, 445 Congaree Rd; O’Darby’s Liquor Barn, 5115 Wade Hampton Blvd; and Liquor & Wine World 2, 1301 Wade Hampton Blvd. postmeridiemspirits.com

Waterbird Spirits

Family-owned and operated, Waterbird arrived on the beverage scene in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2019, thanks to real estate financier Wilson Craig. Five of the company’s seven canned cocktails, including a Moscow Mule and a refreshing Vodka Watermelon & Basil, are made with their own potato vodka, while the two newest, a Tequila Margarita and Ranch Water, center on premium agave-based spirit. You’ll get at least a couple of cocktails out of each of their portable 12-ounce cans. Coming this month to retailers in South Carolina. Check online for details: waterbirdspirits.com

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E D • KITCHEN AID

CROWD PLEASER

JA ZZ UP SUMMER GATHER INGS W ITH CA R IBBEA N ROAST JERK PORK A ND PINEA PPLE SA LSA by Kathryn Davé • photography by Jivan Davé

T

he first time I felt my generation had gone astray was when I received a party invitation requesting that I bring my own meat. The host was opening his home in celebration of some occasion, providing a hot grill and little else. I thought this style of hospitality was tacky then, but we were barely into our twenties, so I rolled my eyes and moved on. But a decade has passed, and my peers are still inviting guests to their gatherings with Google Doc sign-up sheets for all the ingredients that make up the actual party: food, alcohol, plates, and flatware. Plates! Asking someone to a party and then asking them to bring the party used to be bad form, a societal no-no. Now it’s the norm. But cooking for someone, cleaning the house, lighting candles, pouring wine—these are the tangible expressions of generosity that declare you are worth the work. Hospitality isn’t easy. But it doesn’t have to be hard, either. Inexpensive, forgiving, and plentiful enough to feed a crowd, pork shoulder is a good place to start. This Caribbean edition—spicy roast jerk pork with fresh pineapple salsa—even provides its own theme. Set out fluffy coconut rice and black beans alongside, and you’ve got everything a gathering requires. All that’s left are the plates.

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Hospitality is on the menu for summer when you channel the Caribbean in a platter of roast jerk pork.


Cooking for someone, cleaning the house, lighting candles, pouring wine—these are the tangible expressions of generosity that declare you are worth the work.

ROAST JERK PORK & PINEAPPLE SALSA Serves 8–10

INGREDIENTS: For the pork: 2 bunches scallions, chopped 6 garlic cloves 2 Scotch bonnet or habañero peppers, seeds and ribs removed 3 Tbs. lime juice 2 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves 2 Tbs. finely chopped fresh ginger 2 Tbs. soy sauce ½ cup dark brown sugar 1 Tbs. black peppercorns 1½ Tbs. kosher salt 2 tsp. whole allspice berries 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 2 whole cloves 1 (6–7 lb.) bone-in pork shoulder 1½ cups water For the salsa: 3 cups diced fresh pineapple (about 1 medium) ½ cup finely chopped red onion (about ½ small onion) ½ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish 1 jalapeño, seeds and ribs removed, finely chopped 3 tablespoons lime juice, plus more to taste Kosher salt to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. In a blender or food processor, pureé scallions, garlic cloves, habañero peppers, lime juice, thyme leaves, ginger, soy sauce, brown sugar, peppercorns, kosher salt, allspice berries, cinnamon, and cloves until relatively smooth. 2. Place the pork shoulder fat cap up in a large roasting pan and rub the marinade all over the pork shoulder (you may want to use gloves for this), turning to cover every bit of the surface. Cover with plastic wrap or foil. Marinate overnight or up to 24 hours. 3. When ready to cook, preheat the oven to 350°F. Pour 1½ cups of water into the roasting pan and cover it tightly with foil. Roast for two hours and then remove the foil, spooning the marinade back over the pork shoulder. Continue roasting uncovered to develop color for another 1¼ –1¾ hours until very tender—for 3¼ –3¾ hours in total. If the seasoning begins to get too dark, cover with foil again to finish cooking. 4. Meanwhile, combine all the salsa ingredients in a medium bowl, stir, and salt to taste. Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. 5. After the jerk pork is ready, let it rest for 30 minutes, and then carve into large chunks for serving. Transfer to a serving platter and spoon some of the pan juices over the meat. Serve with steamed coconut rice, black beans, and the fresh pineapple salsa scattered over the top, along with fresh cilantro for garnish. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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M AY 20 2 1 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m


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Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program is updated regularly, and now The Anchorage is offering a weekly online market featuring pantry items, take-home dinners, and more. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D,

SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tues. 1629 E North St. (864) 6094249, forkandplough.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com NEW

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque After spending a few months off the docket, this West End staple returns with a refreshed menu focused on all things meat. Continuing in their sustainable partnerships and quality craft, pitmaster David Jensen throws out ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and more, plus a host of scrumptious sides. Expect a heavy tribute to bourbon and whiskeys at the bar, and don’t worry, you can still order a side of those famous pork rinds. $-$$. L, D, SBR.

722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskbbq.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 4679777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant

bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings, an ode to nature’s bounty. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–

Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

N E W Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Newly opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flat-iron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D.

$-$$. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 283-0940, reids.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D, FSBR. Closed Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and panseared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different

weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

13 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all—whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

BARS & BREWERIES Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with elevated bar food. Co-owners Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$.

L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

L.E.B. GLASS STUDIO LLC

Custom Stained & Leaded Glass LEBglass.com | 864-268-6049 lebglass@bellsouth.net 2016 Palmetto Trust Historic Preservation Award

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

N E W EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson

St. exilegvl.com

$100,000

Phillis Wheatley Community Center, Urban League of the Upstate, Pleasant Valley Connection, Creative Advancement Centers & Greer Community Outreach Center

$275,000

$100,000 COVID-19 Community Relief Fund at United Way

$40,000

IN TOTAL GRANTS TO LOCAL NONPROFITS DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC Supporting emergency assistance, housing, minority-led nonprofits, direct service providers, and the arts.

$20,000

www.cfgreenville.org

Artisphere, Peace Center for Performing Arts & The Warehouse Theatre

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Greenville Housing Fund, Habitat for Humanity & Homes of Hope

$15,000

Greer Relief, Center for Community Services & Foothills Family Resources

an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

N E W Servus Biergarten Housed in a former feed and seed in downtown Simpsonville, Servus Biergarten adds an international accent to the new Warehouse at Vaughns, a smorgasbord of family-friendly eateries with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating. From doppelbock to dunkel, German beers flow freely here, so stake out a seat at the bar to discover your new favorite. Of course, you’ll want to pair it with menu items such as bretzels, wurst platters, and more authentic Saxon fare. $. L, D. Closed Mon.

109 W Trade St, Simpsonville. (864) 7571660, servusgreenville.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,

N E W Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, familyowned wineries that focus on sustainability.

N E W Juniper Hop on the outdoor elevator at Camperdown Plaza to reach Juniper, the rooftop lounge atop the new AC Hotel. Expansive views abound, whether you’re sipping cocktails on the “lawn” at the Secret Garden, sharing modern American dishes in the plant-bedecked Greenhouse, or noshing on stone-fired pizza at Fire Box. True to its name, Juniper rolls out a bar program highlighting gin-based libations— complete with a gin trolley for tableside pours. $$-$$$. D. Closed Sun. 315 S Main

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you.

fireforge.beer

St. junipergvl.com

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for

Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com

CAFÉS Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is


Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info N E W Dobrá Tea Tea is the new coffee at this cheery café in the Village of West Greenville, where you can choose among more than 100 different types of tea from around the globe. Pair your favorite cup with a gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian snack from the list of sweets and savories. $-$$. B, L, D. 1278 Pendleton

St. (864) 520-1832, dobrateasc.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the Taco ’Bout It bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207 Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

$-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

ENJOYING YOUR MORNING COFFEE IN THE...

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Old Europe Located in the West End, Old Europe satisfies your sweet tooth with dozens of decadent pastries and desserts. Éclairs and cookies pair well with an extensive coffee selection, while savory breakfast items are always on hand. Sink into a slice of opera cake, paired with a glass of Champagne. $, B, L, D. 716 S. Main St. Sun–Thurs, 8am– 9pm, Fri–Sat, 8am–11pm. (864) 775-0210, oldeuropedesserts.com N E W The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, it’s delectable to any type of eater.

$, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 2367467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds.

"We had an immediate connection and trust with Valerie Miller. The homes she found for us to review checked all of our must-have boxes, but she also has an intuition that comes from years of experience about when to show us something that was off the beaten path. We trusted her and now have our forever SC home. If you are a first time home buyer or a seasoned home buyer, choose Valerie Miller and Marchant Real Estate, and you won't be disappointed!" - MARJORIE + STEVE JENKINS

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Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities

for at-risk youth in the community.

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also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520

$, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The

864-467-0085 | MARCHANTCO.COM | INFO@MARCHANTCO.COM PHOTO CREDIT: KIM DELOACH PHOTOGRAPHY MAY 2021 I

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Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L. 1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

NG: FEATuRI

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr.

(864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089 N E W TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, healthhappy bites, and coffee. $$, L, D. 36A S Main

St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn

St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm.@ sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms. $$-$$$, L (Sat–Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

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Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

Luna Rosa The streets of Italy intersect the streets of Greenville at Luna Rosa’s fresh spot on South Main, bringing more than just tasty gelato to the table.The Luna Rosa family celebrates the concept that community starts in the kitchen, and they welcome you into theirs for a meal. From cool gelato options—think exotic mango or piña colada—or a warm Monte Cristo. There’s plenty of flavor to fulfill your cravings. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 123 S Main St. (864) 241-4040, lunarosagelato.com

Splash on Main

807 S Main St Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 534-1510 www.SplashonMain.com

Photograph of cannoli by Andrew Huang

GIO’S PASTRY SHOP If you grew up in the North and haven’t had good cannoli since you moved to Greenville, take heart. Maria Natale comes to the rescue with Gio’s Pastry Shop. Named for her pitbull, Giovanni, Gio’s occupies a tiny Fountain Inn storefront stocked with fresh-baked Italian treats: cannoli—the real thing, with homemade shells—rainbow cookies, bombolone (Italian filled donuts—try the one with Nutella), and clamshell-shaped sfogliatella, its crunchy leaflike layers of dough wrapped around creamy citrus-scented ricotta. A word to the wise: Gio’s is only open on weekends, so get there before they sell out of your favorites. $, B, L. Closed Mon–Fri. 218 S Main St, Unit A, Fountain Inn. (864) 724-2058, facebook.com/ giospastryshop

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Handmade. Functional.

Beautiful.

Pasta Addict This Italian haven satisfies at West End outdoor food hall Gather GVL. From gnocchi to tortellini, indulging in cheesy goodness is easy out of their iconic cone containers. Pair your favorite bottle of vino with a bowl of fresh spaghetti alla chitarra, featuring San Marzano D.O.P. tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, toasted breadcrumbs, and Addict oil. $, D, Sun lunch. Closed Mon. 126 Augusta St. (864) 404-0095, pastaddict.com

N E W Paloma This restaurant on the ground floor of the chic AC Hotel is downtown Greenville’s new hotspot. The wraparound bar takes center stage in the stunning space, where glass walls open onto a small covered patio. Charcuterie and cheese boards and Spanish-inspired small plates by Chef Fernando Coppola complement house cocktails such as the Wild Flower, a vibrant coral-colored quaff made with peach vodka, Aperol, and lemon, garnished with edible flowers. $$-$$$. D. 315 S Main St.

(864) 720-2950, palomagvl.com

DARIN R. GEHRKE CERAMICS 1266 Pendleton St.

www.drgceramics.com

Unparalleled Experience UnrivaledExperience Service Unparalleled Unrivaled Satisfaction Service Unmatched Unmatched Satisfaction

Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun

& Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com

PIZZA

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Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage.

Sam Van Gieson 864.630.4708 svangieson@cdanjoyner.com

in

$$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. The shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk

Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Kaleigh Trammell Whims the Upstate market to work for you! Sidewall Pizza Company 864.380.1117 pizza joint is a fast favorite with its Sam Van Gieson This handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from kwhims@cdanjoyner.com

864.630.4708 svangieson@cdanjoyner.com Kaleigh Trammell Whims 864.380.1117

local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

Stone Pizza Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, this spot is ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends. Stone and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with housemade mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked in a wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave.

(864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. $, L, D. 300 River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

Willy Taco Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta. Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the mother clucker—topped off with a margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon. 217

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.


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OLD ITEMS. NEW BEGINNINGS. Old items, new beginnings. When you visit a Salvation Army Family Store, you’re doing more than just donating to a thrift store or getting great deals on name-brand items: you’re helping The Salvation Army change lives. Our four Upstate Family Stores directly support our Men’s Rehabilitation Program, a free program for men struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. This Rehabilitation Program gives men the opportunity to free themselves

Shop. Donate. Help Change Lives.

from addiction and find peace from substance abuse. Our Family Stores also give families in need the ability to shop for clothing at no cost to them through our clothing voucher program. Salvation Army Family Stores are more than just thrift stores, and when you visit one of our locations, you’re doing than than just thrifting. Learn more about how your old items can be someone’s new beginning at SalvationArmyGreenville.org.

Family Stores


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Thru May 27

BILTMORE BLOOMS April showers must have done their job, because the May flowers at Biltmore Estate have transformed the gardens and grounds into a bright kaleidoscope of color. A walled garden filled with tulips, banks blooming with pink azaleas, and arbors draped with wisteria are just a few of the delights that await you. Don’t let spring pass without spending some time wandering through this flowery wonderland.

Masters of American Photography | May 1–Aug 7

Biltmore Estate, One Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Daily, hours vary. Prices start at $64/adult (children age 10–16 are half price; kids 9 and under, free). (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

MASTERS OF AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY Ansel Adams, Margaret Bourke-White, Alfred Stieglitz. Those names represent some of the best photographic chroniclers of American life in the twentieth century. Thanks to an exhibition organized by the Reading Public Museum, the works of these and other renowned photographers will be on display at the Upcountry History Museum. In addition to depicting America’s cultural and natural history, these important works illustrate the evolution of photographic techniques.

Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4-18, $8; children 3 and under, free. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

May 1–Oct 30

TD SATURDAY MARKET If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Starting on the first

Now Open at 2204 Augusta Street Our lobby is open for business! For over 20 years, we've been a part of the Upstate community. ww w.gra ndso ut h .com

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Come find out what makes the GrandSouth difference! Greenville • Fountain Inn • Anderson Greer • Columbia • Orangeburg • Charleston

Photograph courtesy of Reedy River Duck Derby

M AY

May 1–Aug 7

Photograph by Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936

Town Scene


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May 1–2

SENSATIONAL STRINGS, GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Part of the Symphony’s Classical Series, Sensational Strings features guest conductor Ankush Kumar Bahl, music director of the Omaha Symphony. The evening’s performance will include three works: the Simple Symphony by Benjamin Britten; Rakastava, which Jean Sibelius based on text from

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Virtual. Sat, 10am–4pm; winners will be announced at 2:30pm. Free. (864) 361-3112, reedyriverduckderby.com

Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 5–7pm. General admission, $60; VIP, $125. (864) 268-3309, firstteeupstate.org

cult

Photograph courtesy of Reedy River Duck Derby

May 1

REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY Forget about those horses in Kentucky. Greenville runs its own derby, this one with thousands of bright yellow rubber duckies racing down the Reedy River in Falls Park. The Duck Derby will be virtual again this year, and you can follow along on the Rotary Club of the Reedy River Greenville’s social media. So get your ducks in a row by adopting a single duck for $10, or five for $30; proceeds benefit United Ministries and Project Host.

Reedy River Duck Derby | May 1

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Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

May 1

KENTUCKY DERBY VIEWING PARTY Dust off your fanciest spring hat and head to Fluor Field to catch the Kentucky Derby big-as-life on the Jumbotron. After the race, sip mint juleps while you bid on more than 100 silent auction items. Proceeds benefit First Tee Upstate, an international youth development organization that builds character through the game of golf. A VIP ticket also includes a special Bourbon & Beemers event on Friday evening at the BMW Performance Center.

CA

Saturday in May, come shop for a variety of spring greens and lettuces, plus seasonal delights such as fresh strawberries, carrots, turnips, and radishes. Being healthy never tasted so good! Masks required.

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GREENVILLE 535 Woodruff Road 864.288.6290 GREENVILLE 7 Task Industrial Court 864.297.1496 ANDERSON 1718 Pearman Dairy Road 864.225.0884 SPARTANBURG 530 S. Blackstock Road 864.587.9732 PHOTO PROVIDED BY LUNADA BAY MAY 2021 I

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May 7–9

SOUTHERN HOME AND GARDEN SHOW Whether you’re building a new home or just looking to spruce up your backyard landscaping, South Carolina’s largest home and garden event can hook you up with the right experts, among the hundreds of vendors who will fill an entire hall of the Convention Center during the second weekend of May. Be sure to check out the daily schedule of demonstrations on a variety of topics. Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri & Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, noon–5. Adults, $8; seniors (55+), $6; children under 12, free. (864) 233-2562, southernhomeandgardenshow.com

The Maker’s Collective, 2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Free. Mother’s Day Pop Up: Fri–Sun, 11am–5pm. Outdoor Mini Market: Sat, 10am–4pm. makerscollective.org

May 7–9

ARTISPHERE It may be smaller and socially distanced, but the good news is that Artisphere is back! A full lineup of 105 artists will exhibit their wares along four gated blocks of South Main Street, from the intersection of River and Augusta Streets to Markley Street, near Fluor Field. The event will operate at a limited capacity, with timed tickets available for two-and-a-half-hour sessions. Masks are required. S Main St, Greenville. Fri, noon–8:30pm; Sat, 9am–8:30pm; Sun, 10am–6:30pm. Reservations for timed sessions are $5, which will be reimbursed when you check in. (864) 271-9398, artisphere.org

May 7–9

Artisphere, presented by TD Bank | May 7–9

“Dried Pitchers Plants and Sticks” 36” x 36” | $1565

Juried Fine Artist | Teacher | Curator | Art Investment Broker

By Appointment | Greenville First Friday | Open Studios Artist 864 376 5952 |

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cindyroddey_finearts | 10centralave.com/cindy-roddey

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THE MAKER’S COLLECTIVE’S MINIMARKET AND MOTHER’S DAY POP UP SHOP

Come see what’s blooming in the Village

Located in the Historic Village of West Greenville

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436

Photograph of Dylan Leblanc courtesy of Sacks & Co.

First Presbyterian Church, 200 W Washington St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $35 each (sold in sets of 2). 467-3000, peacecenter.org

With handcrafted goods from more than 30 artists, the Mother’s Day Pop Up Shop and Mini Market has Mother’s Day gifts covered. The shop and market are only open for a single weekend, so be sure to scoop up these finds before they’re gone.

Photograph of Teapot by artist Darin Gehrke, courtesy of Artisphere

a collection of Finnish folk poems called the Kanteletar; and the everpopular Serenade for Strings, which composer Antonín Dvorák completed in just two weeks in 1875.


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Photograph courtesy of Reedy River Duck Derby.

Photograph of Dylan Leblanc courtesy of Sacks & Co.

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Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Sat, staggered start times from 6:30–8:15am. $25. (503) 329-6453, runsignup.com/Race/SC/Greenville/ zoomthroughthezoo

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ZOOM THROUGH THE ZOO Take a run on the wild side by participating in the city’s only 5K with a loop through the Greenville Zoo. This Greenville Track Club Corporate Shield event is presented by the Greenville Zoo Foundation. So don’t monkey around: tie on those running shoes and help support your favorite wild things by signing up for this Zoo fundraiser.

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4063 Jordan Rd, Greer. Thurs–Sat, concert times vary. Two-day pass (Fri–Sat), $100 in advance and $110 at gate; three-day pass, $148 in advance and $160 at gate. (864) 416-4515, albinoskunk.com

CA

May 13–15

ALBINO SPRING SKUNK MUSIC FESTIVAL After the pandemic forced the cancellation of the spring and fall SkunkFests for 2020, the festival staff is looking forward to bringing the bands—including Dylan Leblanc, Big Daddy Love, and Chatham Rabbits— back together this spring. The best way to enjoy the three-day lineup of bluegrass, folk, and country music concerts in the Blue Ridge foothills is to do as the die-hard fans do: pitch a tent and camp out for the duration.

May 14–16

GREEK FESTIVAL Opa! Greenville’s beloved Greek Festival returns this year with more than just drive-thru dining. That will be an option, of course, but this year you can eat on-site while you enjoy traditional Greek music and dancing on the outdoor stage. Stand-up tables provide pandemic-safe places to

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Call today for more info and appointment 864.720.1299 • vidagyn.com • 274-A Commonwealth Drive • Menopause and Hormone Management • Adolescent Care • Abnormal Bleeding Treatment • In-House Ultrasound And Procedures

Dr. Elizabeth Haswell

Patients wishing to have a treatment must have a current Pap smear, no current infections, no vaginal mesh, & any person with a history of herpes must be on antiviral medication.

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May 14–16

MONSTER JAM Longing for some high-octane action? Head on over to The Well, where trucks with names like Kraken, Grave Digger, and Jester tear up the dirt as they compete in thrilling competitions of speed and skill. They’re called Monster Trucks for a reason: these behemoths weigh in at 12,000 pounds and have wheels that measure 66 inches in diameter. Not to mention engines that roar with 1,500 horsepower.

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 1pm & 7pm; Sun, noon & 5:30pm. Tickets sold in groups and start at $25 each for a group of 2. (864) 241-3800 bonsecoursarena.com

May 15–16

Vintage Market Days of Upstate, SC | May 21–23

SIPPIN ’

IN

SIMPSONVILLE

A craft beer tasting tour!

FRIDAY June 11 6-10PM

For Tickets & Info visit: Simpsonvillechamber.com

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PAGANINI VIRTUOSITY Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel conducts this outstanding evening of music presented by the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and starring

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $40 each (sold in sets of 2). 467-3000, peacecenter.org

May 21–23

VINTAGE MARKET DAYS OF UPSTATE SC If you’re in the market for upscale vintage goods and fresh reproductions, look no further than Vintage Market Days of the Upstate. At this bustling indoor-outdoor market, you’ll find everything from vintage clothes to retro home décor—and maybe even that perfect spring piece you’ve been daydreaming about.

Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri–Sun, 10am–4pm. Fri, $15; Sat, $10; Sun, $5. vintagemarketdays.com

Photograph of Asiya Korepanova by Emil Matveev.

Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 406 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri & Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. (864) 233-8531, greekforaday.com

Alexander Markov on violin. Hailed by Sir Yehudi Menuhin as “one of the most brilliant and musical of violinists,” the Moscow-born Markov will be the featured soloist in Niccolò Paganini’s masterful Violin Concerto No. 1, written between 1817 and 1818. The evening’s performance will also include Symphony in C, an early work (1855) by French composer Georges Bizet.

Photograph courtesy of Vintage Market Days.

savor the best gyros, spanakopita, and keftedes in town. And what could be better for dessert than baklava icecream sundaes?


Photograph of Asiya Korepanova by Emil Matveev.

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

ons

MAY

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ASIYA KOREPANOVA: RHAPSODY IN BLUE The Greenville Symphony Orchestra concludes their spring concert season with a double dose of piano prowess. This time, conductor Edvard Tchivzhel and pianist Asiya Korepanova breathe fresh air into Franz Liszt’s First Piano Concerto and George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. Book tickets online or at the Peace Center in Greenville.

eve n t s attra

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May 22–23

T MI N’

cult

Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe, 111 Augusta St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30–10:30pm. Free. (864) 282-8988, smileysacousticcafe.com

May 30

CJ SOLAR Kicking off the Peace Center’s White Claw concerts, CJ Solar conceived his distinctive sound from a mix of country and Southern rock, with some Delta Blues thrown in from his childhood in Cajun Country. This up-and-comer with the gravelly vocals has been hailed by Rolling Stone Country as “one of the new artists you need to know,” so you won’t want to miss this al fresco performance.

CA

May 22

RANDOMONIUM AT SMILEY ’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ With unexpected mashups and retromodern genre fusion, Randomonium is the perfect collision of old-meetsnew—their loyal fanbase is proof of that. Catch them at Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe and enjoy their wonderfully eclectic sets (and don’t forget to grab some loaded cheese fries, too).

TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 7:30pm. Lawn, $30; Genevieve’s, $50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

May 31

NO EXPECTATIONS COMEDY AT COFFEE UNDERGROUND No Expectations Comedy has cracked up Greenville for more than ten years, making it the the longest-running open-mic comedy event in the state. Grab a cup of joe and enjoy the free laughs, good vibes, and creative performances. Coffee Underground, 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. Every Mon 7–8:30pm. Sign up starts at 6:30pm. Free. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info

Asiya Korepanova: Rhapsody in Blue | May 22–23

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MAIN STREET STATUES

. Explore 864 is here

SCULPTED HISTORY Greenville’s impressive collection of public art includes statues memorializing some of the city’s most famous citizens — and one wild boar. Stroll down Main Street to view: MAX HELLER

by Tom Durham NOMA Flats Plaza, across from Hyatt Regency Greenville

Commemorating the former Greenville mayor, who served from 1971-79, for his many accomplishments, including the initiation of Main Street’s revitalization. SHOELESS JOE JACKSON

by Doug Young Main and Markley, at the entrance to Fluor Field

Commemorating the famed White Sox player with his bat, Black Betsy. VARDRY MCBEE

by T.J. Dixon Main and Court streets, across from the Westin Poinsett Hotel

Paying tribute to the “Father of Greenville,” whose legacy includes gifting the city with land for its first churches and schools. JOEL POINSETT

by Zan Wells Main and Court streets, in front of M. Judson Booksellers

Honoring the South Carolina statesman and amateur botanist who brought the first poinsettia flower to the U.S. from Mexico; located next to the Westin Poinsett Hotel, which shares his name. DICK RILEY

by Zan Wells Main and Broad streets, in the Peace Center Plaza

Memorializing the former South Carolina governor and U.S. secretary of education by depicting him reading to two children. STERLING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

*Present ad to take advantage of these by Mariah Kirby-Smith other offers. streets Loans between $5,000 West cornerwith of Main and Washington

special offers. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined and $9,999 will receive $50 cash back. Offers expire June 30, 2022.

Honoring students from the first Black public high school in Greenville; located in front of the former Woolworth Building, where Sterling high schoolers held sit-ins during the civil rights movement. CHARLES TOWNES

by Zan Wells Main Street and Falls Park Drive, across from the entrance to Falls Park

Celebrating the noted Furman University graduate, who invented the maser and the laser, and won a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1964. IL PORCELLINO

In front of TD Bank Building

A fanciful bronze replica of the original Il Porcellino (“piglet” in Italian) cast in Italy in 1634 by Baroque master Pietro Tacca.

DOWNTOWN 520 W. Washington St.

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Explore 864 2021.indd 1

HEALTHY EATS FARM FRESH FAST

860 S. Church St., Greenville EatFarmFreshFast.com

The South’s first farm-fresh, fast-food restaurant, with a menu centered on local produce and hormone-free proteins. Pro tip: they deliver readymade meals, too! JASMINE KITCHEN

503 Augusta St., Greenville JasmineKitchen.org

A social enterprise lunch café. The scratch-made menu sources local items (including cheddar cheese yeast rolls made by partner Project Host) and offers many vegetarian, gluten-free and Keto options. This good food supports the good work of local nonprofit Jasmine Road.

A CURATED GUIDE TO GREENVILLE & BEYOND

KUKA JUICE

580 Perry Ave., Greenville KukaJuice.com

The first cold-pressed juicery in the Upstate, with a mission to promote health and wellness to all. Also serving paninis, bowls, soups, toasts and smoothies. LEAN KITCHEN

5018 Old Spartanburg Road, Taylors 2017-B Augusta St., Greenville LeanKitchenCo.com

Local franchise providing fresh-cooked meals to help people get healthy. Everything is made from scratch without frozen ingredients or added preservatives.

It’s our guide to Greenville and beyond, filled with the best things to do, see, eat, and explore all around the Upstate. Whether you’re a newcomer or a native, we hope Explore 864 will inspire you to support local businesses and explore our area.

SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY 2 W. Washington St., Greenville SouthernPressedJuicery.com

A haven for the health-conscious, with organic, power-packed smoothies, energy bowls and juices. SUN BELLY CAFÉ

1409 W. Blue Ridge Drive @SunBellyCafe

A Westside café turning fresh, wholesome ingredients into creative dishes. The plant-based menu changes with the seasons.

KNOW SECRET What’s in a name? While it’s called Bacon Bros. Public House, this innovative farm-totable gastropub will happily accommodate the vegetarian at your table. Just ask! 3620 Pelham Road | BaconBrosPublicHouse.com SUN BELLY CAFÉ

DWELL

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calling Greenville

HOME

The City of Greenville offers a diverse array of housing options, from single-family homes in traditional neighborhoods to urban lofts, apartments and condos. Beyond downtown Greenville, real estate is colloquially divided into communities like West Greenville, the Eastside, Blue Ridge, San Souci, Five Forks and the Golden Strip. Greenville County’s small, vibrant cities and towns include Greer, Taylors, Travelers Rest, Tigerville, Mauldin, Simpsonville and Fountain Inn.

Augusta Road Area

POPULAR GREENVILLE NEIGHBORHOODS: • Alta Vista • Augusta Road • Cleveland Forest • Gower Estates

• Montebello • North Main • Parkins Mill • Stone Lake Simpsonville

GREENVILLE HISTORIC DISTRICTS: • Earle Street • East Park • Hampton-Pinckney • Heritage

• Overbrook • Pettigru • West End

NEW URBAN DEVELOPMENTS: • Hartness • Hollingsworth Park at Verdae

LUXURY CONDOS/APARTMENTS DOWNTOWN INCLUDE: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

98 E. McBee (indoor bike garage) 100 East (rooftop pool) 400 Rhett (saltwater pool and putting green) The Bookends (just steps from Main Street) The Davenport (historic property) District West (on the banks of the Reedy River) Ellison on Broad (rooftop lounge and a fenced-in dog park) The Field House (over Liberty Taproom) The Link Westend (open-air kitchen) Main & Stone (above Two Chefs) McBee Station (location, location, location) Ridgeland at the Park (hillside views of Cleveland Park) Rivers Edge (multiple shared Big Green Egg grills) South Ridge (above Biscuit Head)

Hartness

Downtown Greenville

GREENVILLE REAL ESTATE BY THE NUMBERS • 22 Neighborhoods in the City of Greenville • $254K Median Listing Home Price

ACCOLADES People love living in Greenville. The city has been recognized among the Top 10 Best Places to Live, per Livability.com and Men’s Journal; 10 Cities to Watch in 2020, per Worth.com; Best Places to Live, per Money Magazine; Best Places to Retire, per AARP; and Top 4 Best Places to Raise a Family, per MarketWatch.

• $123 Median Listing Home Price Per Square Foot • $247K Median Sold Home Price • 98.88% Sale-to-List Price Ratio • 70 median days on market Source: Realtor.com, February 2021

DOWNTOWN ANDERSON

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THE ELECTRIC CITY

T

Theatre Company are your ticket to live theater. Tour Bay 3 Artisan Gallery at the Anderson Arts Center or stroll through the Wren Pavilion Art Gallery to see the talent of local visual artists. GAMAC — the Greater Anderson Musical Arts Consortium — presents an annual Masterworks Series and performances by the GAMAC Chamber Orchestra, Chorale and Children’s Chorus as well as the Anderson Symphony Orchestra and Electric City Big Band. Suds are definitely up downtown. Carolina Bauernhaus is a farmhouse brewery and winery that serves handcrafted ales, ciders and meads made with locally sourced ingredients — be sure to order a charcuterie board, too. Electric City Brewing Co. specializes in small-batch beer as well as house-roasted coffee. Find unique crafts on tap at Brews On Main. Drink to Southern hospitality — plus hand-cut fries — at Anderson’s oldest downtown pub, The Local Uptown. Enjoy authentic Celtic favorites at

McGee’s Irish Pub, where farm-to-table specials are sourced from the owner’s own family farm. Doolittle’s is popular for dinner, drinks and blue-plate lunch specials. SummaJoe’s is all about fresh, seasonal ingredients. Indulge in fine dining in a historic setting at Sullivan’s Metropolitan Grill. Earle Street Kitchen and Bar puts a Southern twist on creative dishes — don’t miss the chicken-fried chicken. CocoBon Chocolatier specializes in handmade confections; other sweet spots include Figs Café & Farmacy and eCity Java. Shopping local is a delight in downtown Anderson. The Kitchen Emporium & Gifts offers a smorgasbord of kitchen supplies and gourmet items. Spoil your best friend with something from Bark International and find cute clothes at Simply Country Chic, Plum Suede Boutique, Collectique and Blake & Brady. And remember, all purchases at Remnants Antiques support Shalom House Ministries. 864

© JAMES SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY

he revitalization of downtown Anderson is generating plenty of buzz. The Electric City pays homage to its past while sparking progress with a dynamic mix of local restaurants, retailers and venues within the city center. Generator Park celebrates William C. Whitner, whose ingenuity led to Anderson’s distinction as the first city in the United States to enjoy a continuous supply of electricity. A bronze sculpture of Whitner’s likeness is among an abundance of public art throughout downtown. Check out Anderson Arts Center’s SculpTOUR collection and explore the city via an installation of bronze birds titled Carolina Wrens: A Bird’s Eye View of Downtown Anderson. Go out(side) for entertainment at Carolina Wren Park, which hosts everything from local music to Shakespeare in the Park; there’s a splash pad for kids here, too. Electric City Playhouse and The Market

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DRIVE

Order your copies of Explore 864 for $10.99 each by scanning the QR code or visiting CommunityJournals.com/Explore864.

[ TABLE ROCK STATE PARK ]

iconic

HIKE A day at Table Rock State Park starts at the Visitors Center on the south side of State 11. Here, on the banks of 67-acre Lake Oolenoy — which is stocked with bass, bream, and catfish — staff can answer any questions you have about the park. The main part of the park, including all the trailheads, lies directly across State 11. Some 12 miles of trails lace these state lands, ranging from an easy 1.9-mile loop around Pinnacle Lake to the challenging 3.6-mile (one way) trek to the top of the granite mass of Table Rock. When you reach the 3,124-foot summit of Table Rock — a hike that takes about two and a half hours — and look down across the breathtaking patchwork of land below, you’ll understand why the Cherokee called this place “Sah-ka-na-ga,” meaning “the Great Hills of God.” If you’ve got the family in tow, check out the seasonal swimming hole at Lake Pinnacle, where you can relax on the small strip of sand while the kids splash in the water. Or rent a pedal boat and take a turn around the lake. Pack a picnic to enjoy at the shelter here before you hit the trails. Just across the road is the head of the Foothills Trail, which stretches 77 miles down to Oconee State Park (be sure to register at the trailhead kiosk). Exploring Table Rock State Park is a day well-spent, but if you want to stay longer, lodgings include tent and RV campsites as well as 14 renovated cabins. Table Rock State Park is located 158 Ellison Lane in Pickens. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaParks. com/Table-Rock. 864 138 / EXPLORING864.COM

W H E R E TO E AT

N E A R BY

VICTORIA VALLEY VINEYARDS

PUMPKINTOWN GENERAL STORE & CAFÉ

LONG SHOALS WAYSIDE PARK

1360 S. Saluda Road Cleveland VictoriaValleyVineyards.com

3837 Pumpkintown Highway, Pickens @PumpkintownGeneralStore

Scenic Highway 11, Pickens Co.Pickens.sc.us

In season, enjoy a panini or a salad on the terrace overlooking the vines at this 47-acre winery off State 11.

Historic store-turned-café, serving a hearty breakfast complete with country ham, old-fashioned grits and giant pancakes. Lunch centers around what might be the best burger in the 864.

A frolicking little roadside park along Little Eastatoe Creek. Find it just off the highway between Table Rock and Keowee-Toxaway state parks, and enjoy the natural wading pool and rock waterslide – bring a tube to go faster!

COUNTY SQUARE S Suite 2100 240 T


COAST APPAREL FOCUS: Apparel & Accessories A D D R E S S : 324 S. Main St., Greenville E S T. : 2 0 0 9

Coast Apparel collections bring ease, style, charm, and dignity to men’s dressing. We do this by designing capsule collections that: • Care deeply for the details • Are grounded in classics and tethered to color stories • Are sensible for any situation • Are delivered with ease to fine men’s retail, through online experiences, and our own retail stylists. This spring we’ve crafted a line that embraces the seasons’ colors. The line will play perfectly through summer too. The products span from buttery soft slub tees and Pima cotton tees, to a range of fresh woven button downs, new 5 pocket stretch twill pants, jackets, vest, polos, quarter-zips and more.

SHOES HANDBAGS ACCESSORIES

Coast Apparel FA/WI19 collection is available at our own Main St. and Augusta St. locations as well as over 40 preferred shops. To find a location near you go to CoastApparel.com

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE P R I C E : Va r i e s b y p r o d u c t

W E B : CoastApparel.com

864.271.9750 INSTAGRAM @ MUSESHOESTUDIO MAY 2021 I

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Second Glance

STREET SMART DOW NTOW N GREEN V ILLE’S M A IN STREET HAS A LWAYS KEPT THE CIT Y’S PULSE

Though Greenville’s Main Street has changed significantly since the 1920s, many historic buildings, like the Liberty Building and Westin Poinsett Hotel, still stand today.

Photograph previously published in TOWN, January 2012.

O

nce known simply as “The Street,” Main Street is one of Greenville’s two original roads, making it the backbone of the area for more than 250 years. During the nineteenth century, Main Street began to develop in earnest. The first Greenville and Columbia Railroad train arrived on Augusta Road in December 1853, granting Greenville easy access to the rest of the state. Several industries sprung up along the Reedy River shortly after, including corn mills, ironworks, a paper factory, an armory, and the Gower, Cox, and Markley Coach Factory. Today, Main Street attracts locals and visitors alike. Its nineteen nationally registered historic buildings along the four-mile artery include the Liberty Building and the Westin Poinsett Hotel.—Maddie De Pree

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M AY 20 2 1 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m


75

th

ANNIVERSARY

Contemporary & Traditional

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM FOR SPECIAL SAVINGS AND EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. Complimentary ASID Design Service (In-store or In-home) • Furniture, Accessories, Rugs, Bed Linens, Lighting, & Fabric Serving Greenville for 75 years • Third Generation, Family-owned • Best Brands, Competitive Prices Experience, Knowledge, Reputation • Website w/Live Instagram Feed oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330


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TOWN Magazine - May 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Magazine - May 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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