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WINNER! 2018 TONY AWARD FOR BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL ®

©Disney

T H E H I T B R O A D W AY M U S I C A L

JIMMY BUFFETT’S

Photo by Joan Marcus

THE LINCOLN CENTER THEATER PRODUCTION

T H E

M U S I C A L

P H E N O M E N O N

©

THE

ARTS ISSUE

2019 2020

SEASON TICKETS ON SALE NOW! CELEBRATING OUR VIBRANT ARTS SCENE AND 15 YEARS OF ARTISPHERE IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

M AY 2 019 TOWNCAROLINA.COM


“ “ ” ” “ “

WHAT’S THE BUZZ?

“ “ “

So many good shows my whole family can enjoy!!! Thank You @peacecenter!!!

CAN’T WAIT FOR LES MIS AND ONCE ON THIS ISLAND! I AM SO GRATEFUL AND HAPPY THAT THESE ARE COMING TO @peacecenter!! #PCBroadway #yeahthatgreenville

Y’all might as well say this is close to my dream musical year!

Thank you Peace Center for working so hard to bring great productions to Greenville!!!

“ “

I am SO excited for this lineup!!

OMG OMG OMG. Cats AND My Fair Lady?! And Aladdin and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Les Mis?! I literally can’t even. Y’all. It’s gonna be a good year.

” “

”“ ” “ ” “

Looks like another fabulous season!

” ”

Wow. @peacecenter went all in this season!!

No words. Speechless. Thank you.

What an exciting line up!!

Okay friends...the 2019-2020 Broadway Series at the Peace Center looks like another great year of theater.

A chance to see so many classics next season! Way to go @peacecenter for making another excellent season.

Aladdin, Cats, Escape to Margaritaville, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory... we need a season pass!!!

@peacecenter YES YES YES!!! @aladdin YES! THANK YOU PEACE CENTER! THIS HAS BEEN ON MY LIST FOR YEARS! #PCBroadway #HappyBroadwayFanatic

TELL US WHAT’S HAPPENING! Share all season using #PCBroadway.

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THE

ARTS ISSUE

CELEBRATING OUR VIBRANT ARTS SCENE AND 15 YEARS OF ARTISPHERE IN DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

M AY 2 019 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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M AY B E YO U R H A P P Y P L AC E I S A R E A L P L AC E A F T E R A L L

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1

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FIRST

Glance

Taking to the Streets: The Artisphere festival (May 10–12), now in its 15th year, draws thousands of patrons from near and far to explore and enjoy visual and performing arts, food, and fun in downtown Greenville. Photograph by Will Crooks

6 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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It’s All About Others Edd Sheriff

Funeral Director Mackey Funerals & Cremations

I

t’s been some 50 years since Edd Sheriff decided to look for a job that was all about others. What he found was a long, satisfying career at Mackey Funerals & Cremations. “I’ve always had a desire to serve,” says Edd, a respected elder at Greenville’s oldest funeral home. “Being a funeral director allows me to make a difference during a family’s most difficult time.” And make a difference, he does. Edd is one of those rare people who can get families to smile, even in those difficult times. Greenvillians have long preferred Mackey, a fact Edd attributes to a tradition of compassionate expertise. “We offer impeccable service,” he says, noting they serve families of all faiths, all income levels. “People trust us.” Now semi-retired, Edd works with families who request him; in the meantime, he enjoys traveling, cooking and entertaining. During his half-century with Mackey, Edd has seen a growing preference for personalized memorials. “We don’t like cookie-cutter funerals,” he says, and often adds unique touches to tell an individual’s story – playing favorite music, perhaps, or holding the funeral in a special location. “We work closely with families to ensure a tailor-made service that celebrates their loved one’s life.”

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109 SOUTHKEE ROAD, TRAVELERS REST $750,000 | MLS# 1389125 Shannon Donahoo 864.329.7345

DOWNTOWN LIVING

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CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA

NEW S O U T H S T YL E QUEEN C IT Y HOME DECOR BOUT IQUES & VINTAGE FINDS

Charlotte, North Carolina offers award-winning interior designers and home decor boutiques to fit any taste. Spend an afternoon, day or weekend meeting Charlotte’s best-known home design merchants and makers and exploring celebrated regional furniture craftsmen.

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CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA

DESIGNING & SHINING TA K E Y O U R S E L F O N A N E W SOUTH SHOPPING ADVENTURE

In Charlotte, vision is at the heart of our growing city. Drawing on the creativity of its studio craft heritage, local home decor shops will help fill homes with interesting, local pieces that invite conversation. Surrounding Charlotte regionally lie renowned furniture manufacturers and purveyors. Deal-hunters and home designers flock to the easily accessible Hickory Furniture Mart, a mecca with home decor brands known the world over. In the boutique-heavy Plaza Midwood neighborhood, you’ll find people like Danielle McKim, who owns furniture restoration shop TUFT, crafting her vision. With an oldbecomes-new mentality, McKim’s customized designs breathe new life into vintage wares. Not far off, South End, Charlotte’s furniture district, offers myriad antique stores and cozy, catchall shops that spotlight retailers and makers who have a flair for design. Call it personality, identity, character or style, Charlotte visionaries have learned how to make spaces—and the Queen City—their own.

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Contents 14 21

EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

27 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

42 47

WEDDINGS TOWNBUZZ

Artisphere commemorates 15 years with an iconic sculpture by Blessing Hancock; gallery owner Dan Lyles makes art his business; Brandon Seabrook Nelson navigates deep themes in compelling portraits; indie bookstores are on the rise, thanks to M. Judson’s June Wilcox; glide along with Spartanburg’s award-winning instrument inventor, Keith Groover.

0 9

ARTE DE PASION

From Cuba to San Francisco to the mountains of Chattanooga, an artistic duo wandered across the United States before finding a creative home in Greenville.

59 OUT OF TOWN

86

TOWN ESSAY

SPORT 65 TOWN Forget glamping, find an outdoor oasis

97

EAT & DRINK

Settle into island living at Anguilla’s CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa; detour to Lake City, South Carolina, for its annual ArtFields fest.

with all the amenities—Blue Ridge paradise awaits at Virginia’s Primland resort.

CENTRAL 75 STYLE Bespoke hats abound at Carolina Millinery Company; find neutral fragrances for men and women at these local boutiques.

80 MS. BEA WRIGHT

When it comes to apologies, Ms. Bea argues that owning up eases troubled waters.

MAN ABOUT TOWN 82 The Man’s insomnia is a life-long occurrence

123 134 144

Writer, editor, and mom of four, Lindsey DeLoach Jones muses over the busyness of motherhood with the family fish. Up your G&T game at Stella’s Southern Brasserie with their house-made tonics; this Mother’s Day, create a meaningful brunch spread with these local favorites.

DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

West Pelzer launches the GRAND Gallery with select works by Glen Miller.

and conundrum.

COVER: The Vision, mixed media by artist Patricia DeLeon. For more, see “Arte de Pasion,” page 90. // photograph of artwork courtesy of Patricia DeLeon THIS PAGE: An urn shaped by potter Fred Johnston, one of many ceramacists based in Seagrove, NC. For more, see “Behind the Wheel,” page 98. // photography by Paul Mehaffey

/ by Steven Tingle // photography by Paul Mehaffey

8 9

BEHIND THE WHEEL Deep in the North Carolina piedmont, a community of potters in Seagrove has been utilizing the region’s rich clay to craft renowned works for hundreds of years. / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaffey

May 12 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The All-New 2020

GLE 350 4MATIC® SUV

The inventor of the class reinvents it. The luxury SUV that started the segment once again leads the way. Roomier, with a 3-inch-longer wheelbase, it’s also more agile and aerodynamic. Attention to aerodynamic detail helps make the new GLE more spacious and more sleek. Subtle spoilers ahead of each tire, around the rear window and built into the tailamps reduce noise and fuel consumption without spoiling the good looks.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter May Highlights Take Her Word

Sculptor Blessing Hancock fashions an iconic work for the Artisphere festival’s15th anniversary: page 47

That’s a Deal

Advocate of starving painters and auctioneer of Picassos, Greenville gallery owner Dan Lyles is passionate about art: page 50

Miss Independent

Watch out Amazon, local bookstore maven June Wilcox is on the move: page 54

Lucky Stars Photograph by Chelsey A shford

From sporting clays to spa days—there’s an activity for everyone at Virginia’s Primland resort: page 65

Derby Darling

Find a brim to fit your fancy from Charleston’s Carolina Millinery Company: page 75

Arte de Pasion

An artist couple with shared Cuban heritage makes their creative home in Greenville: page 90

Behind the Wheel

Nestled in Seagrove, North Carolina, a village of potters produces one-of-a-kind wares: page 98

Local Love

Make this Mother’s Day a little bit “extra” with a brunch of local goodies: page 114

Art Is Here

A

rtist Blessing Hancock doesn’t want accolades. She lets her sculptures do the talking (and take the attention). That is easily done, as her work—which now stands in the plaza of the Village of West Greenville—is an amalgam of words that evoke sense of place. They spill out and over the ground as night falls and the sculpture’s LED lights change color from yellow to neon green to blue to magenta. The metal art is in the tall shape of a spindle, a nod to the neighborhood’s textile history, but also to suggest that we, in our diversity and difference, are still connected like thread. Blessing’s work commemorates the fifteenth anniversary of the Artisphere festival, our yearly arts extravaganza that draws visitors by the thousands. Its popularity is a testament to the magnetism of visual and performing arts. Rather than relegate it into galleries or museums or performance halls that might intimidate, the festival literally brings art into the street, as if to remind—this is for you, all of you. We’ve presented our Arts Issue in May since 2012, in conjunction with the festival, to highlight its importance and value to our community. This year, more than 1,500 artists from the United States and internationally will shoot across the sky and descend on Main Street with their best work. Music, food, rides and games, interactive demonstrations, exhibits, and performance art round out the three-day event, May 10–12. (It’s the mother of arts festivals, so it’s fitting that it falls on Mother’s Day weekend.) Artisphere is a key reminder that art should not alienate; it should integrate. It should connect us, move us, challenge us, and inspire us—all of us. We each shape our lives each day, and we each have the drive to share our story. To be human is to create, and to connect with, our world. Thank you to the artists, and arts supporters, who illumine the path.

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

I’d love to hear from you.

Have a story idea, comment, or question? Write to me at blair@ towncarolina.com. @towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

14 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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WE’RE EVERYWHERE ™

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ALL THE BIG NAMES ARE HERE. Named one of South Carolina’s “10 Best Attractions,” by 2018 USA TODAY 10Best and as one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist Jasper Johns. When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. And admission is always free! Learn more at gcma.org.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Jasper Johns, born 1930 Target with Four Faces, 1968 Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

admission free

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Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER mark@towncarolina.com

HOW DO YOU TAP INTO YOUR ARTSY SIDE?

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR

FAMILIES

Abby Moore Keith MANAGING EDITOR Sara Ellis Pearce EDITORIAL ASSISTANT CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

I don’t really have an artsy side, because I think I’m an artist every hour of every day. When you write, everything and every moment is research.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, SCOTT GOULD, Libby McMillan Henson, Lindsey DeLoach Jones & ANGIE THOMPSON CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS, ILLUSTRATORS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sara Bonner, Will Crooks, The oldJivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Jason & Tara fashioned walkMassey, Carlisle Mercado & Eli Warren in-the-woods Andrew Huang EDITOR-AT-LARGE

technique has never failed me.

SYDNEY TAYLOR EDITORIAL INTERN

Join the Y!

I get inspired by others, so I’ll read something by Helen Rosner or Ruth Reichl to get my creativity flowing. A glass of wine always helps, too.

-412-0288 ymcagreenville.org 864

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Amanda Walker Emily Yepes DIRECTOR OF SALES

Donna Johnston MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES HEATHER PROPP & Liz Tew

FREE CHILDCARE while you work out with a household membership DISCOUNTS on Summer Camp, Swim Lessons & Afterschool Programming!

Holly Hardin VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

MEREDITH RICE RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Get out and explore. Nature always inspires.

Jane Rogers MAGAZINE ADVERTISING SPECIALIST Kristi Fortner ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

Listening and interpreting feelings and emotions of lyrics through dance.

Sue Priester CONSULTING MEMBER Susan Schwartzkopf EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 9, No. 5) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Downsize Without Compromise

Maintenance Free Yard • Homesites from the $130s • Walking Trail to Hollingsworth Park Custom Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Close to Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Visit the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

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List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

z

TOP OF THE

List

DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM The Dance Theatre of Harlem is celebrated as one of the first companies to spotlight African-American dancers in ballet. Having trained notable artists including Llanchie Stevenson and current resident choreographer Robert Garland, DTH has performed in venues across Europe and the United States (including The White House) and was inducted into the National Museum of Dance. The evening’s program will feature both classical dance and contemporary choreography.

Photograph by Rachel Neville

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, May 11, 8pm. $25-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

May 2019

MAY 2019 / 21

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List z

ALABAMA

AN EVENING OF ORIGINAL MUSIC

Fifty years ago, three cousins joined forces in Fort Payne, Alabama, and decided they were going to play a little Southern rock together. Fast-forward to 2019, and Alabama has racked up more than forty number-one singles and the rank of most-awardedband in the history of country music. The trio will be joined by yet another iconic name in country—The Charlie Daniels Band—for their 50th anniversary tour. From rocking Myrtle Beach’s Bowery to soldout shows across the country, Alabama proves all you need is a little staying power to keep rollin’.

As part of the Peace Center’s Songwriters Workshop Series, this special showcase will highlight the songwriting and instrumental talents of some of the industry’s most gifted musicians. The Upstate’s own Edwin McCain is set to take the stage along with country and pop music collaborator and singer Maia Sharp. Awardwinning folk artist and singer-songwriter David Wilcox will join the powerhouse duo. Genevieve’s Theater Lounge, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, May 3, 8pm. $75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, May 10, 7pm. $35-$130. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

If you happen to see a few thousand of these floating rubber beauties making their way down the Reedy River, there’s no need to question your mental sanity. The Duck Derby has a goal of 10,000 mallards to be adopted by community organizations for $1 a pop. This year’s race benefits a number of regional philanthropic organizations, and will feature musical performances by Darby Wilcox & the Peep Show as well as a hat contest. Falls Park, Downtown Greenville. Sat, May 4, 10am–4pm. Attendance, free; ducks, $10. duckrace.com

Experienced and Compassionate Care for Women at Every Stage of Life.

Dr. Denise Broderick

Photograph courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY

Dr. Kimberly Holloway

Dr. Tamela Keller

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22 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photograph by Julieta Cervantes

THE


BLUE RIDGE FEST

HELLO, DOLLY!

Interested in joining the biggest classic car cruise-in that the Upstate has to offer? Then motor on over to this annual festival, where retro rides, shag music, and prize raffles create the perfect opportunity to give back to community charities. Beginning in 1998, Blue Ridge Fest has become the gathering spot for good times and good fun for all. Kicking off with the cruise-in, the evening will also feature live beach music with Jim Quick and Coastline, MAGIC, The Tams, and the Oak Ridge Boys.

A master of meddling and matchmaking, widowed Dolly Levi is something of a name around New York City. But when she decides to aim Cupid’s arrow at her own heart, well, that’s when the fun really gets started! Starring Broadway darling Betty Buckley, this award-winning production packs extra oomph while still paying homage to the original with all the tunes you’ve grown to love, including “Before the Parade Passes By,” “It Takes a Woman,” and of course, “Hello, Dolly!”

Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, 734 W Main St, Pickens. Fri, May 3, 5:30–10pm. Adults, $25; ages 7–12, $15; 6 & under, free. (800) 240-3400, blueridgefest.com

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. May 28–June 2. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $35-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph by Julieta Cervantes

GALLABRAE GREENVILLE SCOTTISH GAMES Proving that Scots can do much more than drink heavily and look great in a variety of tartan patterns, this South meets Scots festival certainly can’t be missed. Kicking off with the Great Scot! Parade through downtown Greenville, the celebration carries on into the weekend with a bagpipe challenge, Border Collie Invitationals, and a Miss Greenville Scottish Games for the lasses. Warpaint is optional; having fun is not.

May 2019 S

Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Sat, May 25, 9am. 3 & under, free; 12 & under, $10; adults, $20. gallabrae.com

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GRACE HERLONG LOVELESS 864.660.3925 | grace@jha-sothebysrealty.com Instagram: @HomesWithGrace UNDER CONTRACT - MULTIPLE OFFERS

104 HIDDEN OAK TERRACE ∙ RIVER WALK ∙ $449,681

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19 WOODVALE AVENUE ∙ GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB ∙ SOLD FOR $607,605 EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

MAY 2019 / 23

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List z

THE

Quick HITS PAUL MCCARTNEY

z From his early days as one-fourth of one of the world’s most influential and recognizable musical acts, to frontman of Wings and a soloist, Paul McCartney is a household name in nearly every corner of the globe. McCartney is currently embarking on his “Freshen Up” tour in support of last September’s Egypt Station release—but you can certainly expect the magnetic stage show to be a beautiful anthology of McCartney’s many faces over his decades in the industry. Whether you’re belting out “Lady Madonna,” “Jet” or any of his other classic hits, McCartney has a little something for everyone. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, May 30, 8pm. $30-$255. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

NOISES OFF

z We as the audience might be used to seeing a flawless production without a hitch on stage. But behind the curtain? Well, that’s a whole different story. A unique play-within-aplay, Noises Off provides an in-depth (and laugh-out-loud funny) perspective on what goes on between acts during one theater group’s production of Nothing On. Costumes will fail. Lines will be flubbed. Cues will be missed. But hey—that’s showbiz, right? Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. May 9–25. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org z What with all the late-night wake-up calls and poopy diapers, being a new mom ain’t easy. Things are especially difficult for Jessie, a former legal bigwig Manhattanite who’s been transplanted to the quiet suburbs with her newborn. Seeking companionship to break up the solitude, Jessie befriends neighbor (and also new mom) Lina. But when the women’s quick friendship is shaken by the entrance of a third party, the real fun begins in this dark comedy crafted by Molly Smith Metzler. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thru May 12. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA

z Established in 1977 as a sister festival to Italy’s “Festival dei Due Mondi,” the Holy City’s iteration has transformed into one of America’s top performing arts celebrations. Housed in a variety of locations—theaters, recital halls, gardens, playhouses, parks, and churches—the popular festival invites renowned artists from around the globe to share their expression with the South. Slated on this year’s dynamic entertainment lineup are productions in dance, opera, music, theater, acrobatics, and more.

Artwork by Marina Terauds

CRY IT OUT

Artisphere Celebrating its 15th festival in downtown Greenville, Artisphere is an open marketplace of handcrafted, visual, and live arts. Our city’s signature springtime event has been touted as one of the best in the country, with streets overflowing with national and international artists, musical performances, demos, culinary arts, and exciting interactive exhibits. Downtown Greenville. May 10–12. Fri, 12–8pm; Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–6pm. Free. (864) 271-9398, artisphere.org

Various locations, Charleston. Times, prices vary. May 24–June 9. (843) 579-3100, spoletousa.org

NATIONAL WINE DAY

z Raise a glass to one of our favorite unofficially official holidays by enjoying a glass or bottle at The Community Tap, Northampton Wine+Dine, or Foxcroft Wine Co. If you’re feeling extra ambitious, head up to the Biltmore Estate and take a tour of their exclusive winery—and enjoy a Memorial Day weekend picnic. May 25. Locations vary.

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A WHOLE NEW SEASON OF BROADWAY!

2019 2020

WINNER! 2018 TONY AWARD FOR BEST REVIVAL OF A MUSICAL ®

©Disney

T H E H I T B R O A D W AY M U S I C A L

JIMMY BUFFETT’S

Photo by Joan Marcus

THE LINCOLN CENTER THEATER PRODUCTION

T H E

M U S I C A L

P H E N O M E N O N

©

SEASON TICKETS

ON SALE NOW!

Season ticket holders get the best prices, access to extended payment plans and

guaranteed seating starting at $400 for all eleven shows! PLUS, you’re guaranteed seats to Wicked and Hamilton when you renew for the 2020-2021 season.

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ON THE

2018 Annual Meeting of the Metropolitan Arts Council and the TD Bank Business and the Arts Partnership Awards March 18, 2019 Rosa Eisenstadt, Linda Grandy & Todd Weir

Leora Riordan & Catherine Smith

Eloise Weeks, Cary Weeks, Henry Weeks & Gage Weeks

Kris McGowan & Adam Schrimmer

Each year, the Metropolitan Arts Council and TD Bank honor local businesses and individuals who are devoted to Greenville’s arts scene. Guests gathered at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre to celebrate philanthropic support for the arts in Greenville, as well as time and resources given to artistic endeavors. The Metropolitan Arts Council also celebrated its highest philanthropic purse to date. By Dove Light Photography

Kristy Way Buchanan, Bob Howard & Linda Grandy Hank McCullough, William Brown & Karen Brown

Allen Armstrong & Bryant Brown

William McCune & Linda McCune

Jason Johnson & Kimberly Gibbs

Kay Betsch, Kenneth Betsch, Shelby Day, Creagh Cross, Gayla Day & Alan Ethridge

Judy Verhoeven, Beth Crews & Diane Hopkins-Hughs

Kelly Byers, Katie Leckenbusch & Maragaret Meadows

Stephan Glazebrook, Caroline Glazebrook, Mary Glenn Lively & Mary Kate Lively

Catherine Schumacher, Dr. Douglas Kennemore, Betsy Bloodworth & Kelly Groom

Lindsay Louise McPhail & April Huguenin

Penny Cooper, Judy Russell, Alan Ethridge, Bobbi Wheless & BJ Koonce M AY 2 0 1 9 / 2 7

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THE MARCHANT COMPANY WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE

TOM MARCHANT

FOR BEING THE #13 (OUT OF 2577) AGENT IN THE GREENVILLE MLS*.

VOLUME LISTING AGENT OF THE YEAR** UNIT SALES AGENT OF THE YEAR**

YMCA of Greenville’s Judson Community Center Chairman’s Roundtable

Sherri Guin, Chuck Miller & Valerie Miller

February 28, 2019 Celebrating victories from years past and present, YMCA Judson Community Center hosted its second annual Chairman’s Roundtable at Zen. The evening offered guests an exclusive look forward into the upcoming year’s schedule, serving as a wonderful way to honor the resources and programs that the Judson Community Center provides to families of the Hollis Academy neighborhood.

Lauren Santilli & Mark Godfrey

VOLUME SALES AGENT OF THE YEAR**

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Gail Depriest & Robin Wright

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TOM MARCHANT, REALTOR

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Terrence Wilson & Chrystal Wilson

864.449.1658 | Tom@TomMarchant.com *Based on volume sales information from the Multiple Listing Service of Greenville, South Carolina, Inc. for the period Jan 1 - Dec 31, 2018. ** Marchant Real Estate awards.

Matthew Santilli & Jayne McCall

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Emrys’s Fête Thursday March 7, 2019 Though local literary organization Emrys held their annual fundraising gala on a Thursday this year, it didn’t lose any of its Fête Tuesday flare. Guests came adorned in festive masks and beads to party Mardi Gras–style, along with the evening’s honored guests, Jeanet Dreskin and Alan Ethridge, serving as Regina and Rex. All enjoyed a New Orleans– inspired parade and band with food and drink by Larkin’s, which included crawfish étoufée and king cake, topped off with a classic Hurricane cocktail.

Michelle & Michael Shain

203 N. MAIN STREET

shopjbritt.com

Al Thomas, Marion Grier, & Jon Grier

By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Sally Armstrong & Kylie Felker

Joyce Pratt & Jeff Outten Powers & Adam Quattlebaum, Brooks Gallagher & Casey Reid

Regina Jeanet S. Dreskin & Ann Hicks

Maggie Marks, Nancy Taylor, Gail Crawford & Betty Nipper

MISA, PAIGE, KREWE, JADE & MANY MORE! Conyers Norwood, Jennie Wakefield, Dianne Jordan & Patrick Reid

Rex Alan Ethridge & Jennie Wakefield

@shopjbritt 864-240-7366 M AY 2 0 1 9 / 2 9

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ON THE Janet Matricciani & Ann Magnus

Town

Greenville Jewish Film Festival’s Opening Night February 28, 2019

Riley Russell, Aysia Walten & Andrew Kevic

Lydia Morris, Michael Morris, Laibel Kesselman & Musie Kesselman

Stacey Deyong & Jill Pancoast

Greenville’s first annual Jewish Film Festival, February 28 through March 3, was a tremendous success, with a large outpouring of support from the community. Thursday evening’s reception featured a guest speaker and a screening of Fanny’s Journey. The remaining films handpicked for the festival included Humor Me and Heading Home, each of which appealed to the diversity of guests. By Dove Light Photography

Kym Klapperich & Roger Thompson

Susan & John Stewart

Carole Weinstock & Arlene Hoffman

Dylan Fritz, Caroline Fritz & Jane Durrell

Gilad, Jonathon, Jotham, Osnat & Naama Rosen

Mike & Mindy Ungar

Beatrice Deligny & Karen Tannenbaum

Henry Gonzales, Jo Thompson & Sharon Gonzalez

Emily Arcuri & friend

Sarah & Alex DeRadke

Caren Senter & Kimi Husse

Rabbi Mathew Marko, Michelle Shain & Michael Shain

Patrick & Aileen Kirby

Jim Hoffman & David Schutzman

Rodney Tow, Dianne Daubler, Mindy Ungar & Mike Ungar

Teri & Michael Thurz

Emily Guer & Mariana Wiehen

Caroline Warthen, Osnat Rosen & Helaine Meyer

30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s Carnivale March 9, 2019 The Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra kickstarted their Carnivale fundraising festival at Zen, where guests sipped on Champagne served by an aerialist performer. A magician, fire dancers, stilt walkers, fortune tellers, and more, dazzled guests, not to mention the dinner, dancing, and silent auction.

NOT JUST ANOTHER AGENT. NOT JUST ANOTHER AGENCY.

By Bonfire Visuals

Daniel & Emily Kirkpatrick

Rick Timmons & Julie Fish Edvard Tchivzhel, Luba Tchivzhel, Mazza Filipi & Zoran Filipi Ellie & John Mioduski

Joan & Nick Burkhardt

Stephen & Rachel Reece

1743 N MAIN STREET | NORTH MAIN Restored and Renovated! This 5 bedroom, 5 bath Tudor Revival not only has the charm of the era but the modern conveniences of today. Meticulously restored by commissioned craftsmen to maintain and add the details of what makes this a true estate. Covered front porch has a great flow from either the formal entry or the formal living room. Kitchen has been re n ovated and includes top-of-the-line appliances. Master suite on the second level is a true oasis. Third floor could be the perfect guest suite with an oversized room that could be a den as well as a sitting room in the private suite. Superb private grounds with a restored pool, bluestone surround, and an excellent flow for entertaining!

Paul Stotts, Debbie Paden Mobley & Nancy Stanton

Linda Wilson & Greg Gann

NICK CARLSON 864.386.7704 | nick@wilsonassociates.net

WE’RE EVERYWHERE ™

Beth & David Jacobs

Shirley Moy, Diane Shaddock, & Norma Kriston

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Rose Ball Celebrity Guest Designer Luncheon March 21, 2019

Debra Howard, Sharon Wilson & Anne Carter MacNabb

The Rose Ball kicked off its 25th anniversary this year with a bang at the Poinsett Club. Designer Emily McCarthy unveiled her ballroom décor plans at this luncheon, which also featured a pop-up of her work for guests to browse and build anticipation for the upcoming ball.

NOT JUST ANOTHER AGENT. NOT JUST ANOTHER AGENCY.

By Fourth Dimension Photography

Maryann Blanks, Lorri Philpot, Beth Nuckolls, Sally Russell & Joyce Parks

Emily Grainger, Hayley Poillucci & Marquin Campbell

Sister Dorthy Brogan & Emily McCarthy

Wendy Wilson, Linda Grandy & Lesa Kastler

117 PACOLET TRAIL | RIVER RESERVE

Lee Stalvey, Lindsay Powers & Mallory Daniel

Caroline Schroder, Caroline Croft, Caitlin Hunt & Laura Pelham

This stunning, custom-built home meets every need: privacy, proximity and quality construction in a family friendly neighborhood. From the soaring 10’+ ceilings, to inviting keeping room off the kitchen, to high-end kitchen appliances, to gracious room sizes, the owners meticulously supervised the construction and design, leaving no detail behind. Upstairs bonus has en suite full bath and could be a true 5th bedroom. Terrace level is a great entertainment area or could be an in-law suite with another full bath and separate entrance and garage. Only 10-min to GHS and 15-min to downtown Greenville during any time of day, River Reserve has a pool, canoe barn and wonderful nature trail.

LAURA MCDONALD 864.640.1929 | laura@wilsonassociates.net

WE’RE EVERYWHERE ™

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ON THE

Town

Chop! Cancer March 8, 2019

Mollie & Mark Hawkins

Ben Rook, Becca Rook, William Bradshaw & Annette Bradshaw

Melissa Morrell, Neil Cochran & Madina Cauthen

John Symons, Kevin Dunn & Charles Brewer Gena & Frederick Turner

By Bonfire Visuals

Chelsie Sholes & Linda Phillips

Jackie Brooker, Jamarcus Gaston & Kristina Murphy

Bo & Donna Gossett

This year’s amateur cooking competition hosted by the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance featured 18 local celebs and community leaders crafting meals with cancer-fighting ingredients to raise awareness for the disease. Teams of chefs prepared a variety of dishes and courses, judged by Chef Francis Turck, Beth Bradley and Bill Ellis, and Bob Munnich. The fourth-annual event raised $130,000 to support the operations of the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

Rachel Soares, Bobbi Gregory & Krystal Weaver

Alison & Patrick Deviney

Tammy Hagin & Rob Miller

Steve & Susan Bichel

Sandy & Jim Dickert Phil Roper, Ashley Bates & Bladen Bates Marjorie Silbiger & Amanda McCall Nancy & Laird Minor

Stacey Williams & Crystal Humphries

Eddie & Cathy Wimpey

Tony Beam, Tony Robbins, Leah Robbins & Emily Robbins

Donna Phipps & Kerri Susko

Frank & Linda Foster

Sarah Beattie, Asia Grabska & Robert Tiffin

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Generations Group Luncheon March 13, 2019 More than 800 guests attended the annual Generations Group luncheon at the Greenville Convention Center, which was anchored by guest speaker Mallory Hagan, former Miss America, as well as solicitor Walk Wilkins, Attorney General Alan Wilson, and Lt. Governor Pamela Evette, who spoke on the importance of the efforts of Generations Group to aid those who have experienced sexual abuse.

Maureen Kunda, Barb Hocking & Joan Leaman

Gwen Whitner, Beverly Moore & Ann McCord

Terry & Margaret Thompson

By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Martha Ann Davis, Hunter Bell & Kay Post

Renee Lean, Brandon Cavaniss & Kimberly Haynes

Vivian & Harvey Choplin

Melanie Gearhart & Caroline Robertson

Paul Warner, Kim Carr, Daquan Ladson, Chris Leach, Summer Carr & Rebecca Warner

Joanne & Brian Clark

Mike Giordano, Jeremy Strickler & Brandon Cabaniss

Gloria & Mark Abate

36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Not My Boys BBQ for The Family Effect March 16, 2019 This charitable event is held each year so that guests can enjoy barbecue and raise funds for a great cause. This year’s proceeds benefited The Family Effect, a non-profit committed to reducing addiction among families. Not My Boys smoked fresh BBQ, and M&J’s Wings and Plenty provided delicious sides. There were more than 400 guests that raised more than $12,000 for The Family Effect. By Bonfire Visuals

Amanda Parrott, Mary Suddeth, Amy Vaughan & Silvia King

Nancy Theodore & Misty Hardaway

Brian & Susan Shelley

Reid Sherard, Gena Haskell & Anna Bates Dannelly

David Dannelly & McCreight King

Garrett Steck, Garrett Steck Jr. & Roxanne Mittelstaedt

Chris King & Rivers Pearce

Alex, Isabelle & Eliza Roy

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Parks & Rachel Workman

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ON THE

Town

17th Annual JDRF Gala March 16, 2019 Doug Bryant & Dr. Martha Durham

Julie & Curtis Rose

Megan Ritchie, Collette Kauffman & Kim Kauffman

Stanley & Lauren Worrell Susan & Karl Frisch

Nic Hartke & David McNeely

Chris & Sandy Wright with Nina & David Williams

Laura Glinka, Brandyn Bishop & Sarah Smith

More than $563,000 was raised to support the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at its annual gala. The organization advocates for policies and new therapies, and provides a support network for the millions of Americans affected by Type I Diabetes. The event honored Megan Heidlberg of WSPA Your Carolina, with a cocktail hour, silent auction, and music by Spencer Rush and Heirloom Entertainment. By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Jaime Terry, Dwain Waller & Keeli Waller Mark & Tanya Nagy

Andre and Robin LaCroix, Amanda Hartke & Elizabeth McNeely

Emma & Stephen Finley Cassidy Van Houten & Morgan McCall

John & Lauren Snipes with Blake Julian

Meredith Noon, Alisa McMahon, Brad Schur & Lori Schur

Leigh & Ben McCall

Griffin, Morgan, Mary Ellen & Greg Grom Joanna & Tavi Keskitalo

Elizabeth & Brian Barger

Emily & Duane Ensor

Diana Van Houten, Susan Riordan & Jill Bondura

Carson Donovan, Annette Bradshaw, William Bradshaw & Angie Donovan

Erica & Jeff Zaglin

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ON THE Aaron Parris, Mareena Register & Lisa Dwight

Town

Crew Upstate Awards March 21, 2019

Neil Wilson & Jake Anderson

Brooke Wing & Liz Tew

For its annual signature event, CREW Upstate celebrated individuals, projects, and companies in the commercial real estate industry that impacted the Upstate in 2018. Guests gathered at Avenue, where Table 301 provided catering, and award recipients enjoyed a celebration of progress in the Upstate. By Bonfire Visuals

Angela Self & Megha Lal

Michael & Sally Wise

Kathy Spicer & Michael Wolf

Liz & Josh Tew

Andrew Ruffin, William Trammell & Shelby Dodson

Andrew Ruffin, Maggie Kleger & James Bakker

Kate Pohlman, Lisa Lanni & Tanya Jones Lisa Dwight, Brantley Anderson & Angela Self

Clyde & Monica Gibson Elizabeth Bakker, Whitney Swafford & Kelly Moorhead

Ben Urueta & Lisa Dwight

Kimberly Bailey & April Staggs David Feild & Shontel Babb

Maria Mesa & Lucy Neal

Debbie McDonough & Mareena Register

Caitlin Moscato & Molly Stengel

Michael Pry, Jeannine Hill & Ben Urueta

David Feild & Brantley Anderson

Jeff White & Nick Funck

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Olivia McCall

Molly Kronemeyer & Jacob Kittleson September 2, 2018

M

olly Kronemeyer and Jacob Kittleson like to reflect on a relationship that almost never was. The two met on a flight, and though clear chemistry existed between them, they didn’t have the chance to exchange phone numbers before landing. A few months later, Molly received a message from Jacob on Instagram, and that was the starting point of their two-year, long-distance relationship. The couple had a day at the Biltmore Estate planned, but much to Molly’s surprise, Jacob had something else in store before they headed to Asheville to see the regal home’s famous Christmas trees. She was

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reluctant considering the snowy winter weather, but under the guise of a walk downtown for lunch, he led her to the iconic Wyche Pavilion where their picturesque proposal was captured by Chelsey Ashford. As the shock of the surprise subsided, the couple took more engagement photos to commemorate the important moment. The visit to the Biltmore was the perfect close, where the couple enjoyed a tour of the home and ended the day with a romantic dinner at the estate. A destination wedding was only fitting considering their

First Comes Love: A ceremony backdropped by Canadian mountain vistas was the perfect fit for Jacob Kittleson and Molly Kronemeyer, who met while traveling. Molly’s Hayley Paige gown was elegantly highlighted by florals from Willow Flower Co.

meet-cute, so Molly and Jacob’s ceremony was held at the Tunnel Mountain Meadow in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The couple said their vows with a stunning mountain view as backdrop, followed by a reception at the nearby Buffalo Mountain Lodge. The couple now lives with their dog, Zoey, in Greenville, where Molly works in business development at Scansource, and Jacob is lead engineer at General Electric. BY CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

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TOWN

Weddings Allison Chila & Reed Erskine October 20, 2018 Sometimes, that high school sweetheart story is just right. After meeting in the tenth grade, Allison Chila and Reed Erskine began dating before the start of senior year, and theirs was a relationship that was bound to last. Those tricky transitional years following high school were endurable for the couple, and Reed dropped a knee in a vineyard on a surprise Napa Valley trip celebrating Allison’s graduation from physician’s assistant school. The ceremony was held at Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, with the reception at The Rutherford—a charming venue perfect for their twilight dinner. The day contained plenty of personal touches, one of the most memorable being Allison’s veil that her mother made by hand, carefully matching the tulle and lace with the gown itself. Allison and Reed have settled in Greenville; Allison is a physican’s assistant at Anderson Emergency Associates, and Reed is an engineer at Michelin. BY EMILY BOLT PHOTOGRAPHY

Meghan Kremp & Thomas Pavelka December 22, 2018 A walk in Falls Park was a typical activity for Meghan Kremp and Thomas Pavelka, but one day, when on leave from the Army for only two weeks, Thomas had something different in mind. When they reached the stunning overlook of the falls, he only had to wait for a private moment to ask Meghan to spend forever with him. She, of course, said yes. An intimate winter wedding at Hotel Domestique in Travelers Rest, a venue that offers stunning views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, was the perfect choice for Meghan and Thomas. Only immediate family members joined them at the wedding, allowing the couple to give one another undivided attention on their memorable day together. Emily Payne planned their special touches, with flower décor by Foxglove Florals. Greenville is home for now, where Meghan teaches English at Greer High School, but the couple is planning to move to Fort Hood, Texas, following Thomas’s deployment. BY ANGELA ZION PHOTOGRAPHY

Ashlyn Evans & Henning Bundtzen August 31, 2018 An early morning after a night of camping at Table Rock—the site of Ashlyn Evans and Henning Bundtzen’s first date—consisted not only of a beautiful sunrise, but also a pivotal question. Perhaps they foresaw such a proposal two years earlier, when the couple was introduced by Ashlyn’s stepfather at a party of mutual friends, and they clicked. Their optimal first-date spot two years prior became the setting for a memorable proposal. Ashlyn and Henning’s ceremony was held at Duncan Estate in Spartanburg, a beautifully quaint venue that was the perfect spot to welcome Henning’s family, who flew in from Germany. As a nod to the family’s heritage, a local German baker made the desserts for the celebration alongside catering by Smoke on the Water. The couple is calling Greenville home, where Ashlyn is the location manager for Iron Tribe Fitness, and Henning is employed with Baier & Michels USA. BY MIRA PHOTOGRAPHS HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Take Her Word

Photograph by Eli Warren

Blessing Hancock’s celebratory sculpture in the Village of West Greenville commemorates the neighborhood’s textile heritage and Artisphere’s 15th anniversary

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Buzz

TOWN

Light Show Seattle-based sculpture artist Blessing Hancock creates environmental artwork around the globe, including in the Village of West Greenville // portrait by Paul Mehaffey

F

alls Park, Artisphere, Saturday Market. These are but a few of the nearly 300 words and phrases cut into the surface of The Spindle, the new stainless-steel sculpture installed in the Village of West Greenville’s plaza to commemorate Artisphere’s 15th anniversary. Designed by artist Blessing Hancock, who is currently based in the Seattle area, Spindle is the first commissioned Artisphere sculpture to be located outside of downtown Greenville. At 21-feet tall, including its base, the abstract cotton spindle speaks to the culture of West Greenville. “In looking at some of the history of West Greenville, I became interested in the Brandon Mill, which you have kind of a catty-corner view of from the plaza,” Hancock explains. “The sculpture reflects the textile heritage of the area and how that has informed what the neighborhood has

become.” The spindle itself is a historic reference to the textile heritage of West Greenville, while the contemporary voice appears on its surface in a jumble of positive words, with an emphasis on Artisphere and local place names. Like most of her pieces, The Spindle incorporates color-changing LED lights, which cast shadows of the words onto the plaza at night. Hancock, who grew up in Tucson, Arizona, has always been interested in three-dimensional art. “From an early age, it was all about solving puzzles and putting pieces together. I really enjoy math and science, but as I got to college, I realized I wanted something more abstract. Art is about defining a sense of place for me. I do these site-specific sculptures to try to tune into local

Artwork couresy of Blessing Hancock

/ by M. Linda Lee

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Design Dream:

Artwork couresy of Blessing Hancock

Blessing Hancock, a world-renowned sculptor of more than 40 steel and LED-infused designs, created Artisphere’s 15-year anniversary commemorative sculpture, dedicated to the City of Greenville. Hancock collected words from 2018 Artisphere attendees to help inform the design of The Spindle (page 47), which stands in the Village of West Greenville.

communities and create a voice for that particular place. So my pieces are all a response to their location.” After submitting her design, which she drew on the computer using a 3-D modeling program, and winning the commission, Blessing collected all of the text for the sculpture from locals who visited her booth at Artisphere last year. This type of community engagement is an integral part of her process. “If I get a commission for a specific place, I want it to be about that place and those people,” says the modest sculptor, who has worked all over the world. “As an artist, I’m not that comfortable with a lot of attention. But there’s also a side of me that really wants to engage with people, to make sure they’re heard. When it comes to accolades, it’s not about me, it’s about those people who were involved, and it’s about the work.” Most of her sculpture is in metal or polycarbonate, materials that withstand the rigors of weather and human interaction. “I like curves,” she says. “I like soft, big, round volumes of form. I like sculptures to feel really friendly; that’s what draws me to them.” When she started Skyrim Studio in 2008, she was fabricating and welding her own pieces, but the scale of her work quickly outgrew her capabilities. Now she hires a team of subcontractors to engineer, fabricate, and install the sculptures she designs. At any

given time, she might be juggling 7 to 10 different projects. Hancock hopes Greenvillians will truly experience her sculpture, and in so doing, connect with their community. “I’d like to see people visit The Spindle and remember some of the language they contributed,” says Hancock, who currently counts more than 40 installations throughout the United States and abroad. “I’d like people to take away a connection that they didn’t think was possible—a connection to art in general. Maybe they’re walking by in the early morning and they happen to catch a view of it, and they didn’t realize it was there. They might catch a word or a phrase on the surface of The Spindle, and that sticks with them during the day, and they bring their family back in the evening to see it change color. It’s something unusual and unexpected that changes your day-to-day experience.” See more of Blessing Hancock’s work at blessinghancock.com.

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TOWN

Buzz

That’s a Deal From auctioning Picassos to launching artists into the limelight, Dan Lyles paints by number / by Jac Valithcka

// photograph by Eli Warren

I

t’s hard to know how best to start a story on Dan Lyles. It could be, “Let me get the Picasso out to show you,” or “We’re going back to Arnold’s [Schwarzenegger] house in June.” These are just a few of the many varied things the art dealer, fundraising auctioneer, marketer, and gallerist said in the course of two hours, which flew by like twenty minutes—the gift of a talented auctioneer, no doubt, which Lyles is, having sold more than $15 million worth of art during his five years cruising around the world (not metaphorically, but on cruise ships auctioning off art for Park West Gallery, the largest independently-owned gallery in the world). Eager cruisers would hoist their glasses of free Champagne in the air along with their bid paddles for twentieth-century masters like Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, and Salvador Dali. “The largest single art work I’ve ever sold was a Picasso linocut,”

says Lyles, seated in his eponymous gallery on South Main Street in Greenville, which he opened last fall. “It took me about 15 minutes to sell it, and I sold it for $114,000, and that’s a rush.” So is smoking cigars on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s sofa at the former governor of California’s home in Los Angeles. Lyles landed there because of a chance he took on an unknown painter named Joe Everson, who was selling his art at a vendor tent during Oktoberfest in Greer several years prior. Lyles, 38, saw an opportunity for growth with the artist—for them both, it would turn out. With a bit of Pygmalion persuasion, Lyles commissioned Everson for a painting for his own collection, and then conceived an idea where Everson would be “the first singing painter,” meaning he would paint live-action patriotic paintings on upside down canvases, in front of a crowd, while singing the national anthem. Now lest you think this a gimmick, Lyles, was working at Jackson Marketing at the time, and knew from experience it doesn’t matter how good a painter is, if they’re not known, they’ll likely be the typical starving artist. Videos of Everson’s singing and painting performances soon went viral and landed him on Fox & Friends in 2016.

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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BUYING OR SELLING “A good art dealer’s role is to demystify the art world so that your average collector is not afraid to ask questions, educate themselves, and start collecting original art. It does not matter to me if you buy a $100,000 piece or a $300 piece, what matters to me is that you collect an original artwork.”—Dan Lyles

Claim to Frame: Art dealer and auctioneer Dan Lyles wears many hats, but perhaps his most sensational is launching the local artist Joe Everson, who went viral for his live-action patriotic paint performances, which led to an invitation to Fox and Friends, as well as to Arnold Schwarzenegger’s charity poker event.

“He goes live on Fox and Friends,” explains Lyles, and “by the time I get to work he has completed the painting, and I had over 300 emails from veterans, active military, and people with PTSD saying that it gave them more strength to get through one more day, and in that one hour, the guy that couldn’t pay his bills had sold $75,000 off his website, and I had bookings to last us through 2019.” Including The Terminator’s own charity poker event hosted at his home, which Lyles and Everson will attend again this summer, and where two of Everson’s paintings are included in Schwarzenegger’s private collection. Lyles, who is “obsessed with art” and “loves the art business,” has a succinct take on getting your own collection started. “The numberone reason people don’t buy is not price, it’s a lack of knowledge,” says Lyles. “What’s happened is that art has always been for the elitist, and a good art dealer’s role is to demystify the art world so that your average collector is not afraid to ask questions, educate themselves, and start collecting original art. It does not matter to me if you buy a $100,000 piece or a $300 piece, what matters to me is that you collect an original artwork.” You could start by visiting his gallery to view the large canvas of a famous actor painted by a local artist. Going once, going twice . . . sold. Dan Lyles Gallery, 123 S Main St, Unit B, Greenville; (864) 9155096, danlylesgallery.com

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Depth Perception Brandon Seabrook Nelson illumines what lies beneath through his street-inspired art / by Angie Thompson // portrait by Will Crooks

B

randon Seabrook Nelson doesn’t do small talk. Ask him how he’s doing, and you’re sure to get an introspective reply. Even his name is a tell for this trait. His middle name and sobriquet, Seabrook, was his grandma’s maiden name, itself a harbinger of how freely he moves toward great depths. Whether during a brief run-in at a coffee shop or through the acute edges of his paintings, he dives away from the mundane and straight to the meaningful. Seabrook is a deep well, and he won’t shy away from pulling you in with him. In Seabrook’s life, faith is a central focus. As we sat down to talk, Seabrook politely asked if he could pray over our food. He did, and it was more than just a blessing. It was an intentional slow-down, and just one manifestation of Seabrook’s unmediated and earnest nature. It felt like an invitation not only to the divine, but for us to plunge into the depths opened up by pausing. There are prayer-like moments in Seabrook’s paintings, too, though he is careful not to label himself

as a “Christian” artist. The point of his work, he says, is to “ask questions and leave room for interpretation . . . so my faith applies, but it’s not direct.” His sharp subject matter entwines with thoughtful technique to create, in each piece, an evocation. Seabrook refers to his paintings as “journal entries.” They are portraits mostly, with lilting, exaggerated curves and edges reflecting a street art influence. Eyes that shake with revelation and forms that disclose a practiced hand stand solid on his canvases, typically juxtaposed by a word or two—a question maybe, or a claim. Bold, animated lines open up to negative space like an estuary in a sea of shape and color. Seabrook’s use of words and space are deliberate

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A r t work cour tes y of Br andon Seabrook Nelson

Frame of Mind: Greenville-based artist Brandon Seabrook Nelson refers to his paintings as journal entries, bold portraits that reflect the deep waters of faith, race, and culture. View his works via Instagram at @brandonsnelson94.

choices. They give way to thought, to breath. Seabrook will even pen a poem to accompany a painting—“if it needs it.” He submits these poems as an artist’s statement—“instead of saying ‘I chose these colors or these brushstrokes,’ it comes out as a poem. It’s my thought process, putting my mindset in the subject’s.” Seabrook’s vulnerable, meditative approach to art-making began in college at North Greenville University. While in classes for youth ministry, he was pulled in to the underground art and music scene. He admits that while finding a real home “in the rock ’n’ roll, heavy metal scene,” he still “had identity issues.” He explains, “I never dated a black girl; I was raised on a military base. One time I wore a spiked collar and black lipstick,” he laughs, “and my mama got mad at that.” Seabrook often felt himself caught between invisible lines. He took to painting and poems as a way to navigate the grey areas of his identity, his work often eddying around faith, race, and culture. “I was just doing what I liked.” He was, and still is, working it all out on the page and the canvas. With the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement, Seabrook began to settle further into his identity. He felt a cultural shift, and its current took him under. Seabrook also credits Propaganda, a spoken word and hip-hop artist, with

a big share of his influence. With a stake in the movement and a personal hero echoing his values, Seabrook stepped into more clarity, realizing “Yeah, I am black, and I have something to say.” His work has responded in kind, engaging his essential point of view to tackle subjects like feminism, black history, and in his newest piece, gentrification. Seabrook’s road to selfdiscovery has been fraught with questions, but he’s holding the reins now. “I may listen to a certain type of music or wear these clothes,” he says, gesturing to his classic skater-boy getup, “but I’m not afraid to be black.” Each of Seabrook’s paintings is a mirror to himself and his journey. When you look at his paintings, you can’t help but gaze into the mirror yourself. He invites you to listen, to see yourself, and to answer. That’s his aim, stated in rhythmic conviction with his personal mantra: “I’m created to create; I create to allow people to see reality and resonate.” Seabrook’s paintings and poems bare the depths that he carries as a person. In his works, one thought can stream to a sea of questions, but Seabrook is comfortable with the grey areas now. “There might not be a conclusion,” he says. “It’s okay to wrestle with it.” M AY 2 0 1 9 / 5 3

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TOWN

Profile

Miss Independent An author makes a case for June Wilcox, the owner of beloved downtown bookstore M. Judson Booksellers / by Scot t Gould // photograph by Eli Warren

TO: J E F F B E Z O S , C E O A M A Z O N RE: T H E W I L C O X FA C T O R

Dear Mr. Bezos:

M

y apologies for disturbing you. I realize that strategizing to rid the known galaxy of pesky, independent retail establishments requires razor-sharp focus and 24/7 concentration. However, I feel it imperative to call your attention to that tiny, steadily approaching blip on your corporate radar. Sir, the blip has a name: June Wilcox. Ms. Wilcox does not know that I’m contacting you. She is far too professional and too polite (and, frankly, too busy) to engage in such idle activities. But I feel compelled. You see, I write stories, and one thing I know for sure: every story worth its salt must have its villain. Well, tag, you’re it. (And trust me, The June Wilcox Story is a good one.) Ms. Wilcox is the managing owner of the independent bookstore in my town, M. Judson Booksellers. (You are aware, I’m sure, that the number of independent bookstores is on the surprising rise, but really, what person with a fully functioning cerebral cortex wants to “own” a bookstore these days, right?) In fact, I asked June that very question: “What the hell were you thinking?” You know what she said? She started talking about things like “community” and “highly curated experiences for customers” and “bringing machine guns to a knife fight.” (More on automatic firearms later.) Anyway, she had that look in her eye, Mr. Bezos. Her store, M. Judson Booksellers, is named for Mary Camilla Judson, a pioneering woman in our community, a badass educator who broke more than her share of molds in the late 1800s and early 1900s. My suspicion? Ms. Wilcox is a great deal like Mary Camilla. June is feisty and focused. Pioneering herself, perhaps. (A contemporary badass, you might say.) She’s whip-smart, with that graduate degree in international business and her track record of entrepreneurial success with a company that has absolutely nothing to do with books. Why she took on the challenge (her word, Mr. B, not mine) of owning and guiding an independent bookstore would require more space than I have here, but as Ms. Wilcox told me, “It would have been easier not to do it. There were certain points when it would have been much easier to cut bait than to keep fishing.” However—and this is important—when June Wilcox wraps her brain and her heart around something, she doesn’t let go. She admitted as much. She said, “Once I’m in, I’m in. No matter what this takes, whatever we have to do, we are going to figure this out.”

It appears they are, indeed, figuring it out. M. Judson, unlike many upstart indie bookstores, had a wonderful year in 2018. But that is not enough for Ms. Wilcox. Complacency is not an entry in her business vernacular. Hence, she has plans. Like subscription services that will deliver a book-a-month (selections that fit your particular literary tastes) anywhere in the world. Enhanced online offerings. More events like the successful Lunch & Lit or Sunday Sit-Down Supper. A spin-off M. Judson location, just for kids. An expansion of their successful travel book-club program. Oh, and she is teaming up with the IT hotshots from her former consulting career to create an advanced technology platform to provide that highly curated experience. (You’ll be able to call M. Judson from your couch, receive a highly personal recommendation from a real live bookseller and have the book wrapped and delivered to your door. Nothing new to you, I realize, Mr. B, except of course for that “real live bookseller.” An important distinction, I feel.) This technology is the aforementioned machine gun, sir, coming soon to the independent bookstore knife fight. I had a basketball coach once, Mr. Bezos, who fashioned himself an amateur philosopher. One afternoon, he told us, philosophically speaking, “Boys, the world is round. Keep moving and you’ll run back into yourself one day.” When June Wilcox talks about community, I think about how she has truly come full circle. She was raised in our community. She remembers the old-school, creaky-floored bookstore on Main Street that national chains exiled to a slow, wheezing death. Now, she has created a new, sparkling community around M. Judson in the place where she grew up. And here’s an important point I shall whisper for fear of sounding too alarmist: She is taking the idea of the bookstore community on the road. That’s right. She is planning to move the M. Judson concept into college towns that don’t currently have an indie bookstore. Borderline brilliant, yes? You would not believe the number of college and university towns (with their built-in, book-hungry market) that don’t offer a bookstore. Sure, they have places selling textbooks and t-shirts and foam fingers, but not real bookstores. And she plans to name the new stores after “local female heroes,” in the M. Judson tradition. You see the dots I’m connecting here, Mr. B? Femaleowned bookstores, named after strong females, tapping into college-town markets? And you know better than

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On the Same Page: M. Judson Booksellers is a communityforward indie store with a big reach. Owner June Wilcox plans to expand the M. Judson model with curated recommendations and monthly delivery services that maintain the personal feel of a hometown bookstore.

Why she took on the challenge (her word, Mr. B, not mine) of owning and guiding an independent bookstore would require more space than I have here, but as Ms. Wilcox told me, “It would have been easier not to do it. There were certain points when it would have been much easier to cut bait than to keep fishing.”

anyone who buys the majority of books in the world. Women. This is a wave, Mr. Bezos. M. Judson and June Wilcox are the ones stirring up the proverbial waters. But as you have realized by now, June Wilcox is not coming for you, sir. Amazon is safe to continue tinkering with drones and algorithms. Ms. Wilcox is doing something different, creating something that you folks aren’t really interested in. I’m talking community again. Community means when you walk into one of Ms. Wilcox’s stores, the person behind the counter asks about your kids. By name. Or says, “Hey, we got something new and I know you’re gonna like it.” Community is about standing among the shelves and drawing a deep breath because you just love the way a bookstore smells. (I have no idea what Amazon smells like.) Community is having a place to meet for a beer and talk about what’s on the shelves or listen to a writer read from the novel she worked on for a decade. The world is a big place, Mr. B. There’s room enough for you and for June Wilcox to create her communities and her bookstores. Yessir, there’s room enough for us all in this big, round world. And isn’t that a good thought to end on? Yours in books, Scott Gould M AY 2 0 1 9 / 5 5

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Buzz

TOWN

Glide On Upstate guitar maestro and WireWood musician Keith Groover invents an instrument of his own / by Stephanie Trotter // illustration by Timothy Banks

lead music programs at area churches. Currently, he directs music at Grace Presbyterian in Spartanburg and teaches guitar at North Greenville University.

A

ll heads turn as Keith Groover enters the student-filled lobby of the Fine Arts Center at North Greenville University. “Hey, we were just watching you on YouTube,” a mop-haired coed announces in awe. The instructor turns and deadpans, “I swear this wasn’t staged.” The 42-year-old musician is frequently in the spotlight, after winning the recent Guthman Musical Instrument Competition at Georgia Tech. For those who don’t stray far beyond Spotify, the Guthman is known as the World Cup of instrument design— and a son of Greenville’s music scene just brought the award home. But we’re gliding ahead of ourselves. R U N N I N G S C A L E S As a young boy, Keith’s favorite class was music at Bob Jones Elementary. He started on piano at age five, and the trombone not long after that. But his soul found its rhythm when he picked up a guitar while at Eastside High. He and a next-door buddy would bang out Metallica after school. “Looking back, it was probably kind of weird,” he laughs. “We played a lot of heavier stuff, and all of this was on my acoustic guitar.” By his senior year, he’d found his way to Greenville County Schools’ Fine Arts Center, and spots in the Carolina Youth Symphony and All-State Orchestra. He enrolled at Indiana University as a double bass performance major, before transferring to the University of South Carolina to finish with a music composition and theory degree. The multi-instrument artist then returned to the Upstate, to

T H E M E L O D Y When not performing, directing, and instructing, the married father of four likes to invent things. Two years ago, he got an idea to create The Glide. “Instruments are not human-centric,” the music educator reveals. “They’re designed to make noise, and then modified just enough for a human to play it. I started thinking, what if there was an instrument designed the other way around? Start with what a human is good at, and turn that into a musical instrument.” The tinkerer taught himself programming, purchased off-the-shelf parts, and used Spartanburg County Library’s 3D printer to make the instrument, which resembles two game controllers connected by an ethernet cable. Sound comes from an app via Bluetooth. Some 56,000 viewers have watched Keith play Steve Wonder’s “Isn’t She Lovely,” with The Glide, on YouTube. With cautious expectations, the instrumentalist packed up his Glide in a wooden box from Hobby Lobby, and entered the Guthman competition, where he beat out creations from as far away as Australia. “I feel like this is one of the first times in my life where everything I’m good at was able to coalesce into one project,” the smiling winner admits. “I’ve always been a musician, interested in technology, and kind of an inventor, and they all worked together with my philosophy of music and teaching. It all came together.” He can now add businessman to his list of talents, as more than 100 enthusiasts have placed pre-orders for The Glide. Music Man: Keith recently debuted The Glide locally at TEDxGreenville. He is also part of the touring guitar/cellist duo WireWood, with Laura Koelle; they will play at Artisphere this month. For more on Keith and The Glide, visit theglide.cc and wirewoodmusic.com.

56 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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OUT OF

TOWN REGIONAL ESCAPES AND GLOBAL DESTINATIONS

Room with a View

Photograph cour tesy of the Cuisin A r t Golf Resor t & Spa

Blue horizons beckon from Anguilla’s sandy shores

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GET

Away

C

Electric Blue

uisinArt. The kitchen appliance brand has graced my cabinets and Christmas lists, so I was surprised to learn of its five-star resort in the Caribbean, a relatively easy hop from Charlotte. After a four-hour flight to St. Maarten, I connected with my resort companions on a private ferry to the British territory of Anguilla, one of the northernmost of the Leeward Islands. The captain greeted us with cold Caribbean beer, which became tricky to swig while bouncing across choppy waters. But after a lively twenty minutes, the boat slowed and cruised into port. Hurricanes Irma and Maria nearly obliterated the Leeward Islands in 2017. The CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa, which opened in 1999 in Anguilla’s Rendezvous Bay, underwent an extensive renovation in 2018, but in the devastation lost its beloved hydroponic garden and several greenhouses, staples that were integral to the resort’s culinary experience.

Anguilla’s CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa encourages you to unplug while plugging in / by Blair Knobel

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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White / Water: Nestled in the Caribbean paradise of Anguilla, the CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa combines elegant Mediterranean themes with copious water activities and distinctive dining options.

Photographs courtesy of CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa

Still, CuisinArt’s focus remains on the art of eating well, dining well, and living well. The resort itself is like an appliance that aids in total self-care and ultimate relaxation. Though it doesn’t come with a user’s manual, I devised my own step-by-step guide for maximum pleasure: STEP 1: Don’t be shy. It’s your experience and your beachfront junior king suite with a balcony patio facing the azure sea. It’s only you (and maybe your travel companion), so throw caution to the wind and sleep with the sliding doors open. STEP 2: When describing the resort to friends, just say, “Like a Greek island,” and they’ll get the picture (though you’ll take many). CuisinArt’s Mediterranean architecture in blue and white mirrors its stunning environment. Rooms are extensions of sand and sea, with tile, spacious walk-in closets, and bathrooms fit for royalty. Conair is the parent corporation of CuisinArt, so Babyliss hair dryers and Rusk products are standard. Frette linens, bathrobes, and towels round out the special touches—enjoy a morning Nespresso on your balcony, as I did, or request complimentary coffee via room service.

STEP 3: With a name like CuisinArt, it stands to reason that the resort takes its gustatory offerings seriously. There is no wrong turn here. My advice is to try them all: Mosaic for breakfast in a semi-open outdoor space, with soft breezes, ocean views, and scenic flora; Beach Bar & Grill for fish tacos and a bottle of rosé; Santorini for a romantic, luxurious dinner; and elegant Tokyo Bay for that sushi fix. Begin or end your evening with a potent cocktail at the funky KazBar, next to Mosaic. STEP 4: Though pool- or beachside-lounging might be your sun-up-tosundown preference, there are plenty of activities for those less ’suit inclined. From its 18-hole Greg Norman Signature Design Championship golf course, to its Spa by CuisinArt, Technogym fitness center, and Splashpad water playground (okay, bathing suit highly advised here), CuisinArt aims to keep you entertained, in shape, and pampered. If keeping to the beach is your thing, paddle boards, glass-bottom kayaks, and snorkeling add the perfect seasoning. Really, there is no formula for relaxation; it’s what you make of it. But it becomes a lot more accessible—and fun—when you find the right path. Let the experts at CuisinArt own the manual, and just push start. CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa, Rendezvous Bay, Anguilla. cuisinartresort.com

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FIELD

Guide

Small Town Charm: Lake City’s ArtFields celebration, April 26–May 4, has launched this small South Carolina town into national lights. The event showcases works from 400 artists (left), and includes workshops at Darla Moore’s family land, Moore Farms Botanical Garden (below). For more information, visit artfieldssc.org.

Lake City Life

T

hree hours from Greenville lies a small South Carolina town you’ve likely only passed through on your way to Litchfield or Myrtle Beach. But if you like art, or a great excuse for a road trip, put Lake City on your list, especially during its annual ArtFields celebration April 26–May 4. If you need a second opinion, Travel & Leisure just listed London, Stockholm, Monaco . . . and Lake City, South Carolina, as must-see places for May 2019. The exciting weeklong ArtFields celebration centers around a competition for artists from across the Southeast, each vying for part of more than $140,000 in cash prizes. Lake City businesses and organizations host juried ArtFields entrants in 49 venues across the area, from barbershops to warehouses. Festivalgoers choose annual recipients for the two People’s Choice awards, but a panel of art professionals awards the other prizes. The Grand Prize winner, selected from 2019’s 400 participants, will take a cool $50,000 check back to their studio. The name ArtFields has an agricultural ring to it, a deliberate tribute to the area’s agricultural past. Once the top strawberry market in the state, Lake City also grew more than its fair share of tobacco and beans. But when regional farming fizzled, the idea that art could grow a new annual crop—tourist dollars—took root, and ArtFields was born. The celebration has been such a hit since its 2013 inception that by 2017 it won a statewide award for realizing tourism potential. Today, Lake City visitors receive a vibrant Southern smalltown experience, and are often surprised by the diversity of attractions they discover. Plans for several other festivals are also well underway.

Another facet to the city’s growing success is powerhouse businesswoman Darla Moore, who moved back home to Lake City after a stellar investment career and founded the Moore Farms Botanical Garden. Since returning, she’s steered the transformation of her grandparents’ farm into a bonafide horticultural destination. During ArtFields it holds several workshops, and is a must-stop for the flowers alone. Other festival venues include the 5,000-square-foot TRAX Visual Art Center, as well as the Jones Carter Gallery, which hosts ongoing exhibitions of local, regional, and national artists. To fully enjoy the ArtFields festival you need to stay for “at least a day,” says interim director Jamison Mady. “But I’d recommend two, especially if you plan to attend any events,” including the Dandelion Gala and The Harlem Gospel Choir. While the city’s boutique shops help fill spare hours and lighten wallets, the dining scene is certainly not lacking in tasty bites—barbecue at Piggybacks, tenderloin shish kebabs at Crossroads on Main, and a double-scoop from Snax Gourmet Ice Cream Shop will keep any art enthusiast well-fueled. In a recent USA TODAY’s 10 Best Reader’s Choice contest, Lake City took first place for “Best Small Town Cultural Scene in America.” Quite a feat for an old farm town in the middle of the Pee Dee. Our recommendation? Exit the highway and make ArtFields a feature of your next beach-bound excursion.

Photographs courtesy of the ArtFields Festival and Moore Farms Botanical Garden

The annual ArtFields festival transforms Lake City, South Carolina, into a thriving creative destination / by Libby McMillan Hen son

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

SPORT

Photog r aph coures y of Pr i m land

THE BEST STORIES OF LAND & WATER

Lucky Stars Retreat to Blue Ridge Mountain majesty at Virginia’s Primland resort

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TOWN

Sport

Outward Bound Blue Ridge paradise Primland combines outdoor adventure with luxury stays / by Abby Moore Keith

M

aybe it’s the glimpse of gorgeous mountain vistas while teeing up on a quiet green. Or the gurgle of water after releasing your first catch back into the stream. Or the thrill of the covey rise, seconds before pulling the perfect shot. Whether you’re a sportsman with sights set on a European-style hunt or a bachelorette planning an adventurous hoopla, sporting paradise awaits in the hidden hills of Meadows of Dan, Virginia. Primland is a 12,000-acre outdoor escape tucked inside the Blue Ridge— one of a dozen or so globally renowned resorts run by the offspring of Swiss billionaire Didier Primat. A lover of the outdoors, Primat transformed the former

logging land into a high-caliber recreational retreat, complete with an Orvis-endorsed wingshooting lodge and a prestigious golf course. Though Mr. Primat passed away just before the launch of the 26-room luxury hotel (The Lodge), Primland now offers a smorgasbord of cottages, mountain homes, and more, with enough activities to fill the heart of any outdoor enthusiast. Planning a couple’s getaway? Rent a cozy treehouse with room service and a spectacular ridgeline view of the Dan River Gorge. Family vacation? Grab a Pinnacle Cottage suite with adjoining rooms and book a mountain-bike tour. River wanderer? Wade into some of the area’s best fly fishing. Shooting aficionado? There’s sporting clays and wingshooting, and did I mention the European hunts, complete with tweeds, handlers, and beaters? The list of outdoor opportunities seems endless, but it’s the customizable experience that makes an escape to Primland truly grand. My husband and I enjoyed a two-night stay in early March, and while the chilly weather made a few outdoor options less appealing, our stay was still chock-full of fun (one morning a snowfall transformed the entire property into a magical wonderland). After only a short four-hour drive

66 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Captionhead: text here

Photog r aph s coures y of Pr i m land

Head for the Hills: Just shy of the North Carolina border, Virginia’s Blue Ridge resort Primland is a luxury outdoor dreamland, offering patrons of all interests copious options for activity and accommodation.

from Greenville, we checked into a Blue Ridge Suite in The Lodge, the pinnacle of Primland with stunning views of the surrounding valleys. Our first adventure was on four legs—we saddled up on a few faithful steeds and explored the property by horseback. My boy Charlie was determined to lead the pack, and as we climbed up the mountain trail I couldn’t help imagining this same scenario occurring 100 years prior when lumber barons and bootleggers roamed these woods. We retired to The Lodge lobby for the rest of the afternoon—think cozy chairs and roaring fireplaces—then headed to our room to dress for Elements, the resort’s farm-to-table dining experience. Not only were we treated to a scrumptious menu—the wine, whiskey, and moonshine (an area favorite) made it difficult to choose. Knowing our Observatory tour was next, we kept it light. Housed in the top wing of The Lodge, a planetary-caliber telescope provides guests with celestial sights on a clear night. Our guide zoomed us in and out of galaxies and supernovas, providing an interactive astronomy lesson for all ages. After a cozy night on a comfy king and a hearty breakfast with excellent service, we donned helmets and hopped in an

ATV. Primland may seem to be in the middle of nowhere, but we charged up a trail that led to a wide view of the North Carolina piedmont. Our guide deftly pointed out a small silver cluster—the metropolis of Winston-Salem. We also caught a glimpse of area wildlife: both deer and turkey roam the estate, and when in season, guests can book a fair-chase hunt. For those preferring upland game, pheasants, quail, and chukar are released for a guided wingshoot. I, however, had my sights on the spa, and after lunching at the 19th Pub restaurant at The Lodge, I headed downstairs for Native American healing rituals and European spa techniques. An hour massage was the ideal way to relax after our activity-filled stay, and an evening hike along a nearby trail provided ample views of the Appalachian terrain. As we strolled back inside for dinner, a few snowflakes began to fall, and by the time we left the following morning, the entire property was blanketed in white. Winter, spring, summer, fall—Primland abounds with the best scenery (imagine the rolling hills bedecked in fall colors) and outdoor opportunities. My only regret is that we didn’t manage a moonshine tasting at one of the old stills preserved on the property. Rumor has it the guide might be a former bootlegger. And we didn’t make it to the the disc-golf course. Oh, and the tomahawk throwing. It will just have to wait until our next visit. Rates vary. Packages available. 2000 Busted Rock Road, Meadows of Dan, Virginia. (866) 960-7746, primland.com M AY 2 0 1 9 / 6 7

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4/12/19 4/8/19 12:29 11:16 PM AM


The 2nd Annual

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ARTBOMB STUDIOS $75 ADMISSION includes one full year of MAConnect membership + benefits

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For the purchase of artwork that evening from ArtBomb Studios. *must join MAConnect and be present by 7:30 p.m. to win!

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8:00 P.M. DARBY WILCOX

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JOIN MACONNECT ONLINE, BY PHONE OR AT THE DOOR View more exclusive MAConnect member perks on our website: www.greenvilleARTS.com/MAConnectModFete (864) 467-3132

MAConnect is a program of the Metropolitan Arts Council which gives members in their 20s - 40s a unique perspective on Greenville’s arts scene through lively member events. For $75 per person annually, MAConnect supporters are connected to fellow artists, arts enthusiasts, and anyone interested in discovering their passion for Greenville arts. Membership in MAConnect also comes with the MAC ArtCard which entitles you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets to seven local performances. A portion of proceeds support the Metropolitan Arts Council’s grants program for local artists, arts organizations and arts education programs in Greenville County.

ARTBOMB 1320 Pendleton Street Greenville, SC 29611

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& Congratulations to the award winners! TD Bank sponsored the 2018 Business & the Arts Partnership Awards which were presented in the Gunter Theatre of the Peace Center for the Performing Arts on Monday, March 18, 2019 at the MAC annual meeting. All of us at MAC greatly appreciate TD Bank’s continued support in honoring these businesses and individuals who are devoted to Greenville’s arts scene. TD Bank has a long-standing tradition of financially supporting the arts at very generous levels. Its executives and employees tirelessly give their time and resources to many important philanthropic endeavors throughout Greenville. We look forward to continuing our relationship with TD Bank in the future.

2018 TD Bank Business and the Arts Partnership Award recipients BUSINESS WITH LESS THAN 100 EMPLOYEES ESCOBAR PHOTOGRAPHY, nominated by Centre Stage and Greenville Theatre

BUSINESS WITH MORE THAN 100 EMPLOYEES CANAL INSURANCE COMPANY, nominated by South Carolina Children’s Theatre

PUT YOUR HEART IN THE ARTS VOLUNTEERS OF THE YEAR AWARDS WARREN HOPPER, nominated by the Peace Center DOUG KENNEMORE, nominated by Greenville Chorale TD Bank has been the title sponsor of these awards since their inception in 2002. MAC is very grateful for TD’s loyal and generous support.

2018 MAC Award Recipients MAC LIFELONG SUPPORT OF THE ARTS ROBERTA M. “BOBBI” WHELESS CARL R. BLAIR AWARD FOR COMMITMENT TO ARTS EDUCATION LINDA WILLIAMS MCCUNE ANN C. SHERARD YOUNG SUPPORTER OF THE ARTS CARY WEEKES CARRIE AND SKIP GORDON TEACHING ARTIST AWARD ADAM SCHRIMMER CARRIE AND SKIP GORDON EMERGING TEACHING ARTIST AWARD SUNNY MULLARKEY MCGOWAN MAC BOARD OF DIRECTORS AWARD ROGER ABLES

MAC’s grants budget was quite remarkable in 2018 - $417,741 for cultural initiatives throughout Greenville County.

2018 Highlights TOWN_.indd 6

MAC’s endowment had a balance of $1.45 million as of 12-31-2018.

4/12/19 11:21 AM


Through Greenville Open Studios 2018, MAC coordinated the sale of $318,975 in art for the 143 participating artists.

MAC allocated $137,900 to resident artists for their services in Downtown Alive and in SmartARTS, its arts integration partnership with Greenville County Schools.

Photo by Bonfire Visuals

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Gretta McCall

Sylvie Bucher

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Elaine Quave

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open studios Retrospective

ONE PLACE. ONE STOP. LOTS OF ART. | APRIL 26 – MAY 31, 2019 One-Stop Open Studios is an exhibit featuring the works of over 80 local artists who have participated in the fall Greenville Open Studios event between 2002 – 2018. Each artist is invited to submit a 12 x 12 (x12) inch piece for the exhibit which runs in conjunction with Artisphere, Greenville’s premier arts festival. The exhibit allows for greater exposure and awareness of Greenville-area visual artists.

COME SEE US DURING ARTISPHERE WEEKEND! Saturday: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., Sunday: Noon – 6:00 p.m.

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16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com @macARTScouncil #gvlARTS Hours: Monday – Friday | 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

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Greenville Health System and Palmetto Health are now Prisma Health We’re excited to be united under one name and one logo. Together, we’re looking at health in a completely new way. Our 30,000 team members are dedicated to supporting the health and well-being of you and your family. Our promise is to: Inspire health. Serve with compassion. Be the difference. We’ll continue to honor the sacred relationships our patients and families have with their physicians and advanced practice providers. To learn more about how we will serve you, visit PrismaHealth.org.

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ENCHANTING

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com 74 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; model Bethany Brown

To the Brim: Purple Sinamay Cartwheel hat with lilies, veiling, and feathers from Carolina Millinery; Gal Meets Glam Collection soft lavender crisscross bodice dress from Monkee’s of the West End. For more, turn to page 76.

Derby Darling

Set off to the races with a Carolina Millinery Company handcrafted hat

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TOWN

THE GOODS

HEADS ABOVE: (this page) Natural straw braid Trilby hat with brown band & removable turkey feather from Carolina Millinery Company; BB Dakota polka dot wrap top and Mignonne Gavigan shooting stars earrings from Monkee’s of the West End (opposite page) Pale pink Panama square hat with offwhite grosgrain ribbon from Carolina Millinery Company; BB Dakota Picking Roses short romper from Monkee’s of the West End

Hats Off Charleston’s Carolina Millinery Company brims with bespoke creations // photography by Paul Mehaffey

76 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Special thanks to model Bethany Brown; hair & makeup by Desiree Roberts of Palmetto Pout

FIRST BLUSH : There’s nothing quite like a distinctive hat to take one’s personal style straight to the top, especially when a creative hand is behind the craft. While studying fashion design, Natalie Simmons discovered a love of millinery, and taught herself the craft despite the lack of millinery offerings at her school. After traveling the world to learn from master milliners, Natalie launched Carolina Millinery Company, based in Charleston, and has been designing, restoring, and handmaking hats for more than 16 years. While she’s already in full swing producing her Race Collection, you can still grab a ready-to-wear Derby piece from her online selection. For more info, visit carolinamillinery.com.

M AY 2 0 1 9 / 7 7

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THE

ITEM

Cologne Zone: Going for neutral vibes? Uniscent perfumes abound at area retailers.

GOOD SCENTS: (clockwise from top) Pacifica Sandalwood micro batch from Garner’s Natural Life; Justin Press handmade Artist’s Studio roll-on perfume from We Took to the Woods; U.S. Apothecary’s Elderflower & Vétiver from Pickwick Pharmacy; Jao Inscental body incense No. 21 from We Took to the Woods; and Acqua di Parma Colonia from Bluemercury

Neutral Territory Fine fragrances for both guys and gals // photograph by Paul Mehaf fey

78 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Splash on Main

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MS. BEA

Wright

Mea Culpa When we apologize, we acknowledge our mistake and help ourselves in the process

I

will admit, many an apology has crossed my lips begrudgingly, full of snarkiness and lacking authenticity. This usually happened when the apology was directed toward a sibling as commanded by our mother. But the practice was part of growing up. We learned the importance of saying the words, “I am sorry,” as the first step toward reconciliation and the way to begin to set a relationship right. I am fascinated by Japanese culture, where apologizing is more than simply expressing you are sorry. Apologizing is about politeness and being courteous, hallmarks of this Eastern country and the means to achieve a harmonious society. Even ego-driven business leaders, politicians, and celebrities value the importance of apologizing as a way to rebuild trust and strengthen connections with customers, constituents, or fans. Japanese apologies go beyond language and generally include a formal bow as a sign of respect. The more robust an apology, the deeper and longer the bow. There are some people who simply refuse to apologize because they believe an apology is equivalent to an ego-injuring admission of guilt, one step short of groveling. These unapologetic types may also get a power rush by holding back on making a simple apology, establishing their control. Whatever the egocentric motivation for their apology aversion, they have missed the whole point. Apologies are not about admitting guilt or appearing weak. The primary purpose

for an apology is simply to convey that you care. I’m a diehard movie fan, and countless catchphrases from the silver screen find their way into my everyday conversations. There is one movie line, however, that has always bugged me: “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” Though I adore the 1970 film Love Story, this makes no sense whatsoever. “It is outrageous, egregious, preposterous,” to quote a favorite Seinfeld episode. You don’t have to love someone—or to even like them—for an apology to be appropriate if you have offended them, with or without intention. Being a good human being means caring about someone else’s feelings. And when you have hurt someone you love, it is imperative that you apologize, with sincerity and fitting contrition. An offer of a sincere apology can be a soul cleansing, relationship-restoring experience. Hollywood notwithstanding, “Love means always remembering to say you’re sorry.” I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.

80 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Every day, more than 32,000 people choose us for their healthcare. From the region’s most advanced heart program and cancer institute to a nationally ranked children’s hospital, we remain strong in our commitment – not just to delivering better care, but to delivering the best care. For all.

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Pub: Town Magazine

Client: Atrium Health Job No: ATRB-68703

4/12/19 11:26 AM


MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Sleep No More

W

From an early age, The Man’s anxiety has caused many a restless night

hen I was a kid, my parents and I lived in an old farmhouse in the mountains of western North Carolina. The house was built in 1888, and every night as the sun set and the temperature dropped, the old building would come to life. The floorboards creaked and the joists groaned as if the house was preparing to devour the small child who lie wide awake in one of the upstairs bedrooms. Occasionally a squirrel or other small animal would become trapped between the home’s walls and scratch at the plaster like a furious zombie trying to claw its way to my young, delicious brain. Sometimes one of these vicious animals would scamper down the chimney and run across my bedroom floor. This would send me into such a panic, I’d grab my blanket and sprint into my parents’ room as if I were being chased by a pack of rabid wolves. The fact I was 15 at the time is irrelevant. When I was in high school, we moved into a new house and out of the haunted mansion where I’d spent seventeen sleepless years. This house was set deep in the woods, and as darkness fell the wind blowing through the trees sounded like a sinister Gregorian chant. Many nights the hoot of an owl perched outside my window was answered by the distant but bone-chilling cry of a coyote, and I would become convinced the creatures of the night were mobilizing against me. “He’s

on the second floor under a Miami Vice duvet cover,” I imagined the owl saying. I wasn’t sure how they would get me, but I was certain each night was my last. Thirty odd years later, my sleep has not improved. While I’m no longer worried about being dragged through the woods to some wild animal’s liar, I now toss and turn while dipping into my bottomless well of cringeworthy memories. It’s as if a sadistic projectionist is just waiting for me to tuck myself in. Ready for bed? Great! Let’s cue up the time you vomited on the school bus. We’ll follow that with the time you asked the obese flight attendant when her baby was due. During my last check-up, my doctor said, “Either your anxiety is causing your lack of sleep or your lack of sleep is causing your anxiety.” Whichever way, it’s a vicious cycle that has been my norm for decades. But maybe lack of sleep is not really a problem. I recently read an article about a hunter/gatherer tribe in South America that operates well on just a couple of hours sleep each night. I don’t hunt, and my gathering is generally confined to offerings available from Amazon Prime, but I take solace in this tribe’s productivity. They are living proof that it’s possible to be a high-functioning insomniac. I’m sure I could get a lot done, too, if I could just stop yawning.

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The Top Hair Salon in Greenville, Salon Adelle, is a national award winning hair extension

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4/15/19 9:04 AM


TOWN

Essay Betta Club: During a

rare quiet moment, a tired mom of four contemplates the unending responsibilities of motherhood with her daughter’s worse-for-wear betta fish.

Under Water A weary mom bonds with the neglected family pet / by Lind sey DeLoach Jones // illustration by Timothy Banks

I

n the dark of my kitchen, having wiped down the island and replaced the all-purpose spray under the sink and arranged the barstools at even intervals and turned off the lights, I wander to the refrigerator for a glass of water. Everyone else in the house is asleep: my husband, my four young children. Often this silent hour of glowing appliances doing their nighttime work is my favorite time of day, and I am reluctant to go to bed. The night passes too quickly in sleep, and the morning begins for me with a freight train made of toddlers. For now I am soothed by the rhythmic slosh of the dishwasher, a noise signifying I will not wake to a heap of dishes slimed-over in the sink. By the refrigerator a square of blue light reflects off the white tiles. It is our tiny family fish tank housing our nameless betta fish. It has the aura of a nightclub rave—neon pebbles and artificial shrubs glowing under blacklight—and for a moment I imagine our fish flapping his fins to an underwater techno beat. In our long days of half-eaten and abandoned strawberries, overturned plastic cups of milk, Power Wheels in the driveway, and countless diaper changes on babies both alive and pretend, the fish goes largely ignored. It is an ugly fish, especially for a betta: dull orange with fins tattered and uneven. His water is murky, and a film has started on the ornamental plants intended to give him refuge. The algae keeps the plastic from reflecting under the blacklight, empty patches in the incandescent water. The fish was my daughter Scout’s fourth birthday present, the one we bought after the prettier fish her aunt gave her committed suicide by leaping through a two-inch breach in the top of the tank. By the time we arrived home from preschool that first day, the original gift fish was desiccated, its fins stuck to the countertop like iridescent melted cheese I had to scratch off with my fingernail. We had, back then, been filled with the promise of a first family pet. We anticipated our daughter’s joy at finally having an animal to care for. The fish, on the other hand, was eerily prophetic: our house was no place for a pet.

That afternoon at the pet store, in search of a replacement fish, I pointed out the blue ombré bettas trailing baroque fins like the petals of a parrot tulip. Scout wasn’t interested. She wanted the fish who looked to have survived a couple domestic disputes, the cheapest in the store. Looking back, maybe he was all the fish we deserved. Our intentions were good. Since she was one, Scout has cradled lizards in her chubby hands, stroking their backs; rescued ladybugs from our living room, where they hibernate every winter; and squealed from our foyer window every time a canine passes our front door. She began requesting a dog when she was two. Also when she was two, I gave birth to her twin brother and sister, so my husband and I couldn’t help but laugh maniacally in response. In our guilt, though, we bought her a golden retriever puppet for Christmas, the kind you stick your hand inside to make it wiggle like a real dog. This beloved stuffed animal, named Caramel, has slept with her every night since. It’s more than a little depressing to watch her petting the dog’s polyester fur with one hand while manipulating its head in satisfaction with the other hand stuffed inside. In Scout’s bedtime menagerie, Caramel has since been joined by KitKat the tabby kitten, Caramel Junior, a smaller version of the mother, and Pancake the ladybug. The animals have their own shoebox beds and Scout drapes them in blankets and leaves behind snacks when she goes to preschool. If love could animate, Caramel would bound to the door when Scout arrived home. But The Velveteen Rabbit is just a story, and our girl wanted, needed, deserved a pet. In lieu of the puppy she begged for and the hamster my sister originally suggested, I agreed to the fish. He isn’t technically nameless—it’s just that Scout insisted on naming him “The Fish,” so it’s easy for me to forget that we’re using a proper noun when I ask, “Have you fed The Fish?” It has been a year, and the children’s initial enthusiasm has vanished. I am the only one who feeds The Fish anymore, or replaces the water in the tank, or thumbs the slime off the hot

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Our girl wanted, needed, deserved a pet. In lieu of the puppy she begged for and the hamster my sister suggested, I agreed to the fish.

pink artificial flora. A fish, it turns out, isn’t the best pet for a child who just wants something to hold. I peer in the tank, guilty. Perhaps stunned by the attention, The Fish locks eyes with me. It is nearing midnight, but inside the tank it is the same unnatural bright as always. “My God,” I whisper. “Do you ever sleep?” I stare at the fish in a kind of meditative state until I feel a bond beginning to form, or until I can conjure the impression of one. I begin to believe we understand one another, both of us awake and flapping our fins in a lethargic imitation of day. I regret all the days I considered not feeding The Fish, sometimes because retrieving the little dried meat pellets from the drawer—while my four children were lined up at the bar with their own microwaved meat pellets— was more than I wanted to manage. I reach for my iPhone on the counter behind me and Google,

Do betta fish sleep? Yes, they sleep, I read, but they don’t have eyelids. I lean over and squint at the tank again, feeling duped. I tap my index finger against the plastic and a shudder passes through The Fish’s body. What kind of pet looks the same awake and asleep, alive and dead? We are at an impasse, the fish and me. I can hardly bear the thought of spending an hour of all my Saturdays dumping him into a plastic cup, paper toweling the grime from the walls of his tank and setting a timer while a tablet fizzes into his fresh water. But neither can I kill the family pet, not with a fist but not with neglect either. I consider the resources used to keep this bait alive, resources already scarce in our family, where adults are, in my personal opinion, underrepresented. Can fish be rehomed? I search again: How long do betta fish live? Google answers: 3–5 years in captivity. Captivity! It’s inhumane, I suddenly realize, what we’re doing here. Now there’s an angle I can work: releasing the fish into its native habitat. Google? Cambodia. I stop short of asking Google whether the Reedy River resembles the ecosystem of the Mekong Delta. I sigh at the fish tank. We’re in this together, I reckon, for the long haul. The Fish in his bright and bugless cube, and me in my indentured fish servitude. The last ones to bed, the first to wake, our eyelids never closing. And grateful, still, for a place to swim. M AY 2 0 1 9 / 8 7

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ARTEDE U N I T E D B Y W O R K A N D C U LT U R E , T W O TA L E N T E D A R T I S T S O F C U B A N H E R I TA G E T R AV E L E D T H E S TAT E S F R O M C O A S T T O C O A S T S E A R C H I N G F O R A C R E AT I V E H O M E . A F T E R S T I N T S I N S E AT T L E , C H AT TA N O O G A , A N D M I A M I , R E Y A L F O N S O A N D P AT R I C I A D E L E O N F O U N D S A N C T U A R Y IN GREENVILLE'S THRIVING ARTS COMMUNITY.

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E PASION BY S T E V E N T I N G L E I P O RT R A I T S BY PA U L M E H A F F E Y

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W

TO T O S AY R E Y A L F O N S O M O V E D F R O M C U B A T O T H E U N I T E D S TAT E S I S A M A S S I V E U N D E R S TAT E M E N T . Rey was born in Matanzas, Cuba, in 1974, and at age sixteen he was forced into Castro’s army, which was normal at the time. But it wasn’t normal for Rey. He knew he had to get out, and get far away from a country that was going through an extended period of economic crisis. So he took matters into his own hands. At age seventeen, he built a boat out of found materials and made the dangerous 200-mile journey to Miami. “I didn’t move from Cuba,” Rey says. “I escaped.” Greenville’s North Main community is a long way from Cuba, both in miles and atmosphere. But it’s where Rey and his wife, Patricia DeLeon, a painter working in mixed media, have settled after two decades of hopping around the country looking for the right place to call home. “We love it here,” Rey says. “We’re going to stay forever.” Whether that’s true or not remains to be seen. But Rey and Patricia have created an oasis in Greenville—a property with lush landscaping, a babbling brook, and two studios for their similar, yet distinctive work. For Rey and Patricia, the journey to Greenville has been a long one. A journey fueled by a passion to create beauty.

When Rey came ashore in Miami, he was not impressed. The city was hot and humid, much like Cuba, but there was tons of traffic and no sidewalks. It just wasn’t Rey’s vibe. So he caught a bus headed west, all the way to California. Rey settled in San Francisco and worked at making his name as a sculptor crafting enormous stainless-steel and corten-steel pieces, the kind of art that requires a crane to move. But San Francisco is pricey, and even after finding success as a sculptor, Rey couldn’t afford to own a piece of the city. “Cubans are all about real estate,” he says. “I wanted to own a house, but San Francisco is very expensive. I didn’t know anybody who knew anybody, who knew anybody, who owned a house there.” Frustrated with the overpriced property in the City by the Bay, Rey traveled to Seattle to visit a friend. This was in the late ’90s, back when Seattle was much more affordable. Sure, the weather was terrible, but the houses were cheap—so cheap, in fact, that Rey bought two. He went back to San Francisco, packed up his stuff, and made Seattle his new home. It was a smart move because a couple of years later, a chance meeting would change Rey’s life forever. Around this same time, Patricia DeLeon was working at an art gallery in Seattle. Patricia’s mother was born in Cuba but had escaped to Venezuela just after the revolution. Patricia had lived in Miami and had studied photography at an art school in Bellingham, Washington. At an art show being held at the Space Needle, she caught the eye of a short, Cuban sculptor. “I saw this woman with these sharp bangs and this cowboy hat, and I thought, oh my, that is a beautiful woman,” Rey says. The two started chatting, and that was that. Soon Patricia was Rey’s assistant, and then his wife. Rey’s home was not big enough for two dedicated artists, so the couple bought a five-acre property on Whidbey Island just north of Seattle. “I turned thirty, and I got thirty chickens for my birthday,” Patricia says. “We started living the country life.” On Whidbey Island, the couple built a gallery and a sculpture park. But the Pacific Northwest is a tough market for artists to crack, especially during the winter. “The area really shuts down for a few months,” Rey says. “So we bought this big truck and Sprinter van and started traveling to shows. But we were having to travel farther and farther, and after three months into it I told Patricia that we were going to have to move.” While at an art show in Texas, Rey and Patricia met an artist from Chattanooga, Tennessee. “He was this really cool Southern guy,” Patricia says. “And he told us about how this renaissance was going on in

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Chattanooga and how artist-centered it was.” The couple visited Chattanooga, parked their truck in town as a makeshift home, and traveled to shows in their van. “It was so cool,” Rey says. “Because you could travel to all of these shows in just eight or ten hours. We couldn’t do that from Whidbey. So we decided to look at moving to Chattanooga.” During this time, Rey and Patricia were experimenting with different artistic mediums. While Rey had been sculpting and Patricia had been working with various photographic methods, including the Van Dyke brown process, they were suddenly both captivated with painting. It was natural and invigorating. Plus, a few paintings were much easier to throw into the back of a van than several 500-pound sculptures. Property in downtown Chattanooga was a steal, and Rey and Patricia fell in love with an abandoned RC Cola bottling plant on the town’s Main Street. “It was a 20,000-square-foot brick building built in 1901,” Patricia says. “We bought it and then we drove back to Seattle and put our property up for sale.” In 2003, downtown Chattanooga was not the hopping destination it is now. Crime was bad, drugs were rampant, and the city had developed a program called Create Here that was offering grants to artists in hopes of luring them to the city. Soon Patricia and Rey were surrounded by other sculptors and painters. “It was kind of this magical time when artists were moving in and regrowing the city,” Patricia says. “There was so much excitement and harmony. It was just a great feeling.” But when artists breathe new life into an area, it doesn’t take long for everyone else to want to join in. Within a few years, coffee shops and restaurants were popping up in downtown Chattanooga. Property values increased, and the “artists community” feeling started to change. “After seven years in Chattanooga we knew it was time to leave,” Rey says.

REY OF SUNSHINE Rey Alfonso was born in Cuba in 1974 and fled its politically dangerous borders at 17, making a treacherous journey to Miami. He then moved west, settling first in San Francisco before finding a home in Seattle, where he met his wife, artist Patricia DeLeon. The two traveled the country, showing his sculptural work and her photographic imagery until both settled on paint as their medium of choice. “All of my work is stories about us, including all immigrants,” he says.

“All of my work is storytelling,” Rey says. “It’s about the illusion of separation.That’s why I do the little pieces. A lot of people think they are little boards, but it is all one piece of Baltic Birch.”

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The couple sold the building, packed up, and moved to Santa Barbara. “We missed the West,” Patricia says. “We had never lived together in California, and we wanted to have that experience.” But California isn’t the South, and Rey and Patricia soon realized that knowing your neighbors is more valuable than a view of the coast. “We moved from the South, where everyone wants to know you, to California where nobody wants to know you,” Rey says. “They don’t want to make friends with you because they know you won’t last.” After two years in Santa Barbara, Patricia suggested they move to Miami to be closer to family. The couple visited south Florida in the heat of the summer to look at property. “It was hot and terrible,” Rey says. “I hated it, and she loved it. So we moved to Miami.” But Miami turned out to be much cooler than Rey had anticipated. Just months after renting a warehouse in an artists’ neighborhood, Rey and Patricia were connected with hundreds

“We are both very into producing beautiful textures that talk about time and memory,” Patricia says.“And in this moment in time I think bringing beauty into the world is very important.”

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Photographs (pages 90 –91) counterclockwise from opposite top left) by Juan Vasquez; Paul Mehaffey; 204 Studios; Paul Mehaffey; Juan Vasquez; Juan Vasquez; 204 Studios; (pages 94 –95, clockwise from opposite top left) Paul Mehaffey; Paul Mehaffey; Juan Vasquez; 204 Studios; DeLeon Alfonso Studios

IN LIVING COLOR: While her husband Rey’s art is more sculptural and abstract, Patricia DeLeon (opposite left) creates works of mixed media that have a figurative, dreamlike quality. When she and Rey were searching for their next city, Patricia heard about an arts festival in Greenville. “Rey was the poster artist for Artisphere about four years ago,” Patricia says. “Everyone was so gracious, and there were so many lovely local people at the show. We noticed how happy and healthy people are here, and that was what put Greenville on our radar.”

Through the years, Patricia’s work has gone through several phases, from photography, to encaustic (layers of pigmented beeswax), to mixed media. “When I decided to put encaustic aside, I had to eek out that luminosity with new materials,” Patricia says. “So, part of my process is making a paste of marble dust and then laying down all of these textures and letting the figure develop.”

of Cuban artists. “We had so many parties and so much fun,” Rey says. “But after five years, we realized we couldn’t do it anymore.” The idea of where to move next appeared when Patricia heard about an arts festival in Greenville, South Carolina. “Rey was the poster artist for Artisphere about four years ago,” Patricia says. “Everyone was so gracious, and there were so many lovely local people at the show. We noticed how happy and healthy people are here, and that was what put Greenville on our radar.” In 2018, the couple said goodbye to Miami and made Greenville their home. Today, in their respective studios, Rey and Patricia create works that pay homage to their backgrounds and speak to their journey as artists. “All of my work is storytelling,” Rey says. “It’s about the illusion of separation. That’s why I do the little pieces. A lot of people think they are little boards, but it is all one piece of Baltic Birch.” Almost all of Rey’s paintings include artifacts he has collected over the years: a cigar box, a decades-old key from Miami, a weathered plaque. “All of my work is stories about us, including all immigrants,” he says.

While Rey and Patricia create art that can be described as modern, their processes are based on ancient methods, including making their own paints. The results are creative visions that are new yet familiar, serene yet vibrant, approachable yet mysterious. “We are both very into producing beautiful textures that talk about time and memory,” Patricia says. “And in this moment in time I think bringing beauty into the world is very important.” For Rey and Patricia, time and memory are the essence of beauty. Their artistic journey has been exhilarating and inspiring. And it’s a journey that is far from over. It’s just in a new phase, in a comfortable house with nice neighbors, in a town they love calling home. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N A B O U T R E Y A L F O N S O A N D PAT R I C I A D E L E O N , V I S I T T H E I R R E S P E C T I V E W E B S I T E S AT R E YA L F O N S O S T U D I O . C O M A N D PAT R I C I A - D E L E O N . C O M , O R S T O P B Y B O O T H # 6 9 AT A R T I S P H E R E , M AY 1 0 - 1 2 , T O V I E W R E Y ' S W O R K .

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DOWN TO EARTH Travis Owens (right) is part of an unbroken line of potters in the Jugtown pottery community within Seagrove, North Carolina, that stretches back seven generations.

BEHIND the

WHEEL

FOR MORE THAN 250 YEARS, POTTERY HAS BEEN ALIVE AND WELL IN THE CENTRAL NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY OF SEAGROVE, WITH HUNDREDS OF ITS RESIDENTS SHAPING BEAUTIFUL VESSELS. BUT JUGTOWN POTTERY PUT SEAGROVE ON THE MAP — HERE’S THE STORY OF ITS VARIED A R T I S A N S .

by M. LINDA LEE

photography by PAUL MEHAFFEY

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AMID THE PINE FORESTS AND ROLLING FA RML AND OF RURA L RANDOLPH COUNTY IN NORTH CA ROLINA—A THREE-HOUR DRIV E FROM GREEN VILLE— THE TINY BURG OF SEAGROV E IS SYNONYMOUS WITH POTTERY.

America’s largest community of working potters claims 300 permanent residents, roughly twothirds of whom are potters.That count includes Seagrove’s mayor, David Fernandez, who runs the Seagrove Stoneware Inn & Pottery with his wife, Alexa.

GLAZE PHASE Pam (below) and Vernon (opposite, right) Owens purchased Jugtown Pottery in 1983. Pam, who comes from a line of well-known potters in New Hampshire, makes many of Jugtown’s glazes. Grandson of J.H. Owen, the first potter hired at Jugtown, Vernon has worked here since 1960.

You’ll know you’ve arrived in pottery central when you spy the clay pieces mounted on the brick columns flanking the “Welcome to Seagrove” sign. Strewn along Highway 705 and the dusty roads that branch off of it, more than 100 potters work within a 20-mile radius of Seagrove. FORM FOLLOW S FUNCTION Although the pottery tradition in central North Carolina reaches back some 250 years to the first Native Americans, and later to the European farmers who were drawn by the area’s natural supply of heavy clay soil, it was the establishment of Jugtown Pottery in 1921 that put Seagrove on the map. Jugtown’s founders, Jacques and Juliana Busbee, were Raleigh artists who first visited the town in search of orange-glazed pottery similar to a “dirt dish” that had caught Juliana’s eye at a pie competition she was judging in Lexington, North Carolina, in 1915. The couple discovered stoneware aplenty here, but also found a waning pottery industry that had been hamstringed by Prohibition. nfluenced by the Arts & Crafts movement in New York, the Busbees set the wheels in motion in 1917 when they began buying wares from Seagrove potters and selling them in their crafts shop/tea room in Greenwich Village. In 1921, riding the wave of the demand for Seagrove pottery, Jacques built the first structure at what is now Jugtown Pottery. Juliana closed the shop in New York City five years later so they could dedicate themselves to preserving the craft of pottery in Seagrove. The first potter the Busbees hired was J. H. Owen. “He was already a potter, making utilitarian items like butter churns,” his great-grandson Travis Owens (later members of the family added an “s” to the end of their name) tells me, “but the Busbees wanted to update the shapes and some of the glazes to appeal to a broader market. Much of what goes on in

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"WE BUILD THE KILNS, TOO. W E F E E L I T ' S I M P O R TA N T T O H AV E O U R H A N D S I N E V E R Y PA R T O F T H E P R O C E S S . "

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TRAVIS OWENS

Seagrove today we really owe to them.” They introduced the first art shapes, inspired by Chinese and Korean pots. Though the Owens and other potters traditionally used a lead-based orange glaze and, later, nontoxic salt glazes, under the Busbees’ management, they developed Jugtown’s distinctive copper-based Chinese-blue glaze, along with other colors. “The Chinese blue is probably our most well-known glaze,” claims Travis, who is part of an unbroken line of potters that stretches back seven generations. “We still make a version of it today.”

ravis’s parents, Vernon and Pam Owens, purchased Jugtown Pottery in 1983. As they have always done, the Owens family formulates all of their own glazes and digs their own local clay. “Everything from the clay preparation to the end product is done by hand,” says the young potter who studied art and design at NC State. “We build the kilns, too. We feel it’s important to have our hands in every part of the process.” Inside the hand-hewn log building, Travis leads me through a small museum that displays the evolution of Jugtown pottery from the early Busbee days to the present. “We have pots from every generation of our family,” he notes. Scattered around the grounds are several kilns, including a wood-fired groundhog kiln, a long, low structure traditionally built into a hillside, constructed on-site in 1920. In the front rooms of the oldest continually operating pottery in North Carolina, I admire pieces crafted by all four members of the Owens family. Many of the influences in Vernon’s work come from the utilitarian Moore County, North Carolina, pottery tradition. Among other wares, Vernon makes all the candlesticks, a form he’s been perfecting for decades. His wife, Pam, takes her cues from early American, northern, and southern pottery. Her decorative pots are often embellished with crows and other animals. The work of his great-grandfather kindles Travis’ creativity. He produces most of the larger pieces at Jugtown—some ranging up to 75 pounds of clay—while his sister, Bayle, adorns her vessels with drawings of animals. “We work on the same shapes in different ways,” explains Pam, “but all our designs are based on Jugtown traditions.”

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CL AY AS A RT As the establishment of Jugtown Pottery sparked young artisans and fired up older potters to create “fancy ware,” pottery gradually made the transition from utilitarian to more decorative forms. With their googly eyes and often menacing expressions, face jugs became a popular form of folk pottery in the mid-1900s. The vessels trace their origin to the slaves who brought their stoneware traditions from West Central Africa a century earlier. In Seagrove, Terry King has been making these whimsical vessels since the early 1980s. Each hand-formed, wood-fired face jug has an expression and personality of its own, reflected in the name that King carves into each pot.

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POT LUCK Travis Owens (above), the son of Pam and Vernon, started dabbling in pottery when he was two years old. Today, he and his family call on a decades-long tradition of making pots using a variety of distinctive colored glazes. Carol Gentithes (opposite) of Johnston & Gentithes Studios draws her inspiration from the natural world, sculpting fanciful animals from clay.

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New Spin

With 70 galleries and studios that are open to the public, the question for any visitor to Seagrove is “Where to start?” The easy answer is at the NORTH CAROLINA POTTERY CENTER. Housing more than 800 pieces of pottery in its permanent collection, the center opened in 1998. Here, in an airy two-story building in the middle of Seagrove, you’ll find an exhibit on the history of North Carolina pottery, as well as changing displays of contemporary work.

If you favor Asian pottery, head to SEAGROVE ART POTTERY to check out the brightly colored Asian-inspired work of Korean potter Jinsong Kim and his artist wife, Carol. Visit BULLDOG POTTERY to purchase some of Samantha Henneke’s decorative porcelain squares, created using the cuerda seca technique that dates back to fifteenth-century Spain. In this technique, colored glazes are kept from bleeding into one another by painting on a line of black

pigment in an oil-resistant base. And don’t miss the horsehair glaze developed by Seagrove native David Garner at TURN & BURN POTTERY. Basing his work on a Lakota Sioux technique, Garner carefully wraps horsehair around hot bisque-fired pottery vessels before they are glazed a second time. The hair burns into the clay, forming a flowing design. North Carolina Pottery Center, 233 East Ave, Seagrove, NC; (336) 873-8430, ncpotterycenter.org

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" T H E I D E A I S T O L E T T H E C L AY H AV E A B I G G E R V O I C E . "

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nother of the old guard of Seagrove potters, Phil Morgan, who grew up six miles from his present-day shop, is internationally known for his stunning crystalline pottery. He was discovered by Good Morning America in 1995, when the staff was researching stories in every state for the show’s 25th anniversary. Morgan had his first 15 minutes of fame on the program in November 1995, and his celebrity rose from there. The World Master Potter discovered crystalline pottery in a gallery in Pinehurst, North Carolina, in 1976. “I couldn’t afford to buy the piece I liked,” he recalls, “so I went home and taught myself how to make it.” Today, Morgan mixes his own porcelain from clay he obtains from North Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee, and coaxes flowerlike crystals out of a zinc-oxide glaze in a complicated firing process he developed decades ago. “No one in the world does what I do,” declares Morgan, who manipulates the kiln’s heat to produce 3-D crystals. He melts the glaze at 1,700 degrees, then fires the kiln up to 2,450 to completely liquefy the glaze. The crystals

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FRED JOHNSTON

form when he cools it back down to 1,700 degrees. “It’s like snowflakes forming in the air,” as he describes it. And like snowflakes, each piece is one-of-a-kind. SHA PING THE FUTURE On Highway 705, not far from Seagrove’s center, Fred Johnston and Carol Gentithes ply their craft in a naturallight-filled structure they built five years ago. The couple is part of a new cadre of art potters who have come to the area in recent decades (Fred and Carol have been here since 1997), drawn by the town’s reputation for fine pottery and its supportive artistic community. Johnston, who now teaches ceramics at High Point University, and his wife, Carol, who left a career in tourism

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HIT THE CLAY Fred Johnston (left), who practices his art alongside his wife, Carol Gentithes, caught the pottery bug after a field trip to Jamestown, Virginia, in the second grade. He plays on classical forms, updating them with contemporary designs. Carol, on the other hand, uses decals to decorate her folk art works, like the clay salamander (right) that tells a story about the Homestead resort in Virginia.

to take up pottery, both produce their own distinct art wares. Many of Fred’s pieces, which range from updated moonshine jugs to rough clay plaques, reflect nature. Designs on his pots echo ancient cave drawings and early Native American rock paintings, while other symbols pay homage to members of his family. His ubiquitous bees nod to his beekeeper father and grandfather, and totemic animals honor the wisdom of his grandmother. His forms find inspiration in the couple’s travels to places like China and Greece, as well as from specific architectural elements that might catch his eye, such as the top of an old chicken-coop ventilator. red’s techniques mix old and new. He follows tradition by digging his own clay and using a wood-fired kiln, but also experiments with glazes he makes using ash from rice hulls. For some pieces, rather than refine the clay he digs, he leaves the rocks and leaves in the mix. “The idea is to let the clay have a bigger voice,” he says. Carol’s workspace is littered with sheets of decals, which she cuts out and affixes to her contemporary folk art pieces. “I have a degree from Duke University in English Lit,” she remarks, “so I approach everything with a story behind it.” She likes to play with color and texture, and animates plants with faces, creating a surrealistic effect in her fantastical hand-built animal figurines—perhaps a salamander or a frog—each of which tells a different tale.

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Whether native residents or new arrivals, traditional or avant garde, Seagrove’s potters each find their own distinct expressions in clay, the medium that binds them.Together these diverse artisans are sustaining Seagrove’s pottery tradition, guiding it, as the Busbees once did, steadily into the future.

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Marissa ’20 orchestra, IB student, varsity girls basketball

Rita ’20 IB student, dance team

Stefani ’21 varsity volleyball, AP student

Andrew ’19 IB and AP student, track, swimming

MUSIC

WRITING

VISUAL ARTS

DRAMATIC ARTS

IT’S A GREAT DAY TO

PURSUE YOUR PASSION IT’S A GREAT DAY TO BE A CAVALIER.

Strong arts programming is at the core of our curriculum in each grade level (K5-12th). Combined with rigorous academics, a wide range of athletic opportunities, and a service learning program rooted in our Episcopal traditions, CCES promotes creativity, social development, self-discipline, and confidence in each and every student. To learn more about the arts and all that CCES has to offer, visit www.cces.org.

CHARACTER. COMMUNITY. EXCELLENCE. SERVICE. Christ Church Episcopal School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

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PRESENTED BY THE CAPITAL CORPORATION

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One night. Five inspired chefs.

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DO YOU SEE WHAT WHAT WE SEE?

From stigma and shame to support and understanding. From fear and despair to empathy and hope. This is what we at NAMI Greenville see as we change minds about mental illness. In this season of rebirth and renewal, we ask you to rethink your attitude toward mental illness. There is help- and hope- at NAMI.

Change Your Mind About Mental Illness. To donate and learn about risk factors and warning signs, visit www.namigreenville.org

Join us in the fight to bring hope and help to millions of Americans. 2320 E North St., Suite L, Greenville, SC 29607 • 864-331-3300 NAMI fp May196TOWN.indd 1 TOWN_.indd

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Tonic Time

Sip a satisfying G&T at Stella’s Southern Brasserie’s gin bar

Photograph by Jivan Davé

That’s the Spirit: A curated collection of quality gins paired with Stella’s Southern Brasserie’s house-made tonics bring elevated flavors to the classic British cocktail.

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OPEN

Bar

Gin Up

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Explore a world of nuance in the gin and tonic bar at Stella’s Southern Brasserie / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

Meal Prep: “People forget that gin and tonic is an aperitif,” says Julia Scholz, co-owner of Stella’s Southern Brasserie. The spices and botanicals in tonic awaken the palate and the appetite, making it the ideal drink before dinner.

ary Poppins said a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, but the Brits thought a splash of gin would do just as well. It was English officers stationed in early nineteenth-century India who had the brilliant idea to add their gin ration to their daily dose of malaria-preventing quinine tonic—and a star was born. You can see for yourself just how easily a gin and tonic goes down at Stella’s Southern Brasserie’s gin bar. The tightly curated program is a celebration and exploration of the spirit: all that it has been and what it is becoming. “Gin is coming into its own, expanding the definition of what we think of as gin,” explains Julia Scholz, co-owner of Stella’s. Their gin bar menu— divided into traditional London Dry styles and newer “unique and unusual” types—charts this expansion with a changing roster of producers and flavor profiles. Their list includes gin sourced everywhere from Scotland to Japan to the banks of our own Lake Jocassee, with flavor notes as exotic as cardamom and yuzu or as traditional as juniper and lime. Despite the thrill of gin’s renaissance, it was tonic that first sparked Scholz’s interest in bringing a ginand-tonic program to the restaurant. “Once I tasted house-made tonic, I was in love,” Scholz says. A far cry from the stuff jetted out of a standard bar soda gun, the house-made tonic at Stella’s is the work of many rounds of tinkering before they settled on the perfect recipe. The resulting tonic makes a balanced base for the classic cocktail, allowing the unique flavor profiles of each gin to shine. Wade-in-slowly types might start with a G&T crafted with the very approachable Jocassee Gin, a locally crafted spirit with soft notes of magnolia, honeysuckle, and citrus, while the bold might ask for Opihr, a gin with spicy hints of cumin and black pepper. Or, order a range with a group of friends, swapping and tasting along the way. It’s hard to go wrong on this choose-your-own adventure because you’re bound to finish the drinks feeling good. The Brits had the right idea. Stella’s Southern Brasserie, 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Greenville. stellasbrasserie.com

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Life moments shouldn’t be interrupted

Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your

for service calls. From covering our shoes to explaining everything in detail, we are committed to ensuring your home’s problems are fixed without any headaches.

family deserves.

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“We have had several good experiences with Corley. Most recently, they replaced our 20 year old HVAC system with a new, modern and more efficient system. Everyone from the sales rep to the installers was very friendly, knowledgeable and professional. They always respond quickly and get the work completed in a very timely manner. They use top of the line products. The technicians from Corley have always explained what they were doing, how to operate whatever they have installed, and left our home looking as clean as it was before they came. We are definitely loyal Corley customers and recommend them for your plumbing, electrical, and heating & ac needs. — Tommy T., Greer

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CITY

Dish

Local Love

Celebrate Mother’s Day with an effortless brunch built from our faves / by Kathryn Davé // illustrations by Carlisle Mercado

Spread the Love: Map out a low-key Mother’s Day brunch with a little help from local artisans.

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hink of a mother you admire. Picture the love she pours out, the sacrifices she makes, the hard work that often goes unseen. Now, consider your plans for Mother’s Day. Maybe you can’t nail the Hallmark ideal of serving mom breakfast in bed, but you can craft a thoughtful brunch instead of booking the usual reservation. Here is our foolproof strategy for pulling together a sweet spread without stress or extra time in the kitchen.

// / CLASSIC QUICHE FROM STROSSNER’S Moms love quiche; this is a fundamental truth. The quiche Lorraine from iconic Greenville bakery Strossner’s checks the brunch requirements for both protein and pastry. And, best of all, it can be picked up in advance and gently warmed on the day of your celebration. The custard-like filling is remarkably flavorful, balanced by the buttery, flaky crust. A beautiful main dish that doesn’t require you to dirty a single dish? Consider it done. 21 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD, (864) 233-3996. $20 FOR 9” QUICHE; STROSSNERS.COM

/// COFFEE FROM JUNTO COFFEE /// CHOCOLATE BANANA BREAD FROM BANANA MANNA Where would all the ugly bananas be without mothers to transform them into banana bread? Turn the tables and treat mom to a perfect, chocolate-studded loaf to serve alongside the quiche. Banana Manna founder Chancey Lindsey-Peake swears that what you taste in her famous banana bread is love. But it could also be the quality ingredients she uses, including healthful whole-wheat flour. Banana Manna has gluten-free, sugar-free, vegan, and paleo offerings so everyone can enjoy. 27 RUSHMORE DR, (864) 244-5001. LOAVES ARE $5, PLUS TAX. PLACE MOTHER’S DAY ORDERS BY MAY 9; BANANAMANNA.COM

Even if she doesn’t know a thing about coffee’s third wave, she’ll appreciate the balanced complexity of Los Guaduales from Junto Coffee, the newest roaster to Greenville’s café scene. This single-origin coffee is approachable, with notes of vanilla, cherry, and clementine. If she likes it, follow up with the promise of a date to Junto’s new light-filled café in Taylors. 232 MILL ST, TAYLORS. $15 FOR 12 OZ. JUNTO.COFFEE

/// BOUQUET FROM ROSA’S It’s hard to go wrong with flowers on a holiday celebrating the beauty of motherhood. It’s even harder to go wrong with a local bouquet service that packages the prettiest blooms in simple arrangements and delivers them for you. Rosa’s was founded on the belief that beautiful flowers should be more accessible for everyone, and their seasonal, stress-free bouquets make it easy to brighten your special lady’s day. MOTHER’S DAY BOUQUETS ARE AVAILABLE IN 3 SIZES FOR $25, $50, OR $75 WITH FRIDAY OR SUNDAY DELIVERY INCLUDED. MOTHER’S DAY ORDERS SHOULD BE PLACED BY MAY 8; ROSASGVL.COM

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FIND YOUR HAPPY MEDIUM | MAY 10-12 | GREENVILLE, SC A Festival of Fine Art, Live Music and Southern Cuisine.

PRESENTED BY

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KITCHEN

Aid

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Berry Good: Settle into the rhythm of warm weather with a velvety smooth sorbet.

ure, if I lived in New York, I’d get along fine. I would bid farewell to my food processor and electric kettle and stacks of casserole dishes. I would learn to entertain without a cabinet full of water pitchers and wine carafes; I would whittle down my tools to the most essential, soaring on the initial euphoria of minimalism. But then summer would arrive—and I would long for my ice cream maker. Life comes with so many little negotiations, many of them bittersweet. Trade big city energy for suburban sprawl but find room to breathe. Or, give up your comfortable, convenient space and gain the globe. Here, there. Now or later or never. Every choice has its cost, one you don’t fully realize until you’re paying up with the hours of your “one wild and precious life,” as Mary Oliver reminds us. As for me, I pay in true pangs of longing every time I zip around a big city, imagining a life I could have. Even so, the emotional arithmetic lands me in the “here” column every time I tally things up. And I never feel more assured of my choice than in early summer, when friends overflow onto our sprawling back deck for dinners that linger long after dark. I like to serve simple strawberry lemon sorbet on occasions like these: the shocking punch of its flavor, a sweet tart for grown-ups, wipes the palate clean after smoky summer foods straight off the grill. There is room here for my ice cream maker, a big charcoal grill, a vast swath of stars overhead. Cheers to where we all choose to settle, to every spoonful of life, the bitter and the sweet.

Sweet Tart Lemon and sweet strawberry tango in this simple yet alluring sorbet / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

STRAWBERRY LEMON SORBET Yield: 1 ½ quarts

INGREDIENTS: 3 lemons 2 lbs. strawberries, hulled 2 cups sugar

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Seed and roughly chop one lemon. Place it into a food processor or blender (yes, peel and all!) and pulse until the lemon breaks down. Add sugar and blend until combined. Transfer mixture to a large bowl. 2. Add strawberries to blender and purée. Pour the purée into the bowl and stir in the juice from one lemon. Taste, and then add more juice from another lemon if needed. The lemon flavor should be clear and strong, but should not overwhelm the strawberries. 3. Chill sorbet mixture in refrigerator for about 20 minutes and then churn in an ice cream maker until frozen. Transfer sorbet to a clean container and freeze until set, about 4 hours or overnight. ))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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May your Spring be filled with

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YOU D

PARTIE

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WHO’S YOUR SHERO? Everyone has a woman who’s inspired them. A mother, sister, teacher, mentor, friend. This year, honor the SHEroes in your life with a special tribute. By making a minimum donation of $50 per SHEro to the Greenville Women Giving Endowment, your SHEroes will be recognized in a special ad running in the May 10th edition of the Greenville Journal. In addition, we’ll send a card letting them know of your contribution (a special Mother’s Day card is available). For details, visit www.greenvillewomengiving.org. Submission deadline is April 24.

Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

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Cater your next event with our mobile eatery! Book our antique truck for weddings, corporate events and more!

Coastal Crust Brick & Mortar Coming Soon! 1254 Pendleton St., Greenville, SC 29611 | coastalcrustgreenville.com | 843-654-9606 Follow along @coastalcrustgreenville

Serving Friendships When you deliver a meal to a homebound neighbor, you open the door to smiles, conversation and human connection. With every delivery or donation, you help us serve #MoreThanMeals.

Connect with your community. Make a difference at mealsonwheelsgreenville.org.

122 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

AMERICAN ADAMS BISTRO

The Adams family opened their bistro’s doors in February 2008 and have been serving up flair and flavor ever since. Expect classics like a burger with a chargrilled certified Angus beef patty, as well as out-of-the-box picks like the Jack Daniel’s Pork Chop, charbroiled in a sweet and tangy Jack Daniel BBQ glaze. Be sure to visit the outdoor patio during the warmer months—weather permitting of course. $-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 221 Pelham Rd, #100. (864) 370-8055, adams-bistro.com THE ANCHORAGE

With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include grilled Greenbrier Farms hanger steak, octopus carpaccio, and Chinese red shrimp and BBQ cabbage steamed buns. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, Bake Room bread, and pickled veg. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch, which is served on Sunday. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

AUGUSTA GRILL

Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution of upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D.

Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 2976000, baconbrospublichouse.com

FORK AND PLOUGH

This newcomer is the quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly. With its casual, family-friendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes like this barbecue local rabbit hash with bell pepper, onion, baby carrot, fingerling potatoes, mustard barbecue sauce, and poached eggs. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tuesday. 1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

BLOCKHOUSE

The Augusta Road crowd frequents the dark, cozy dining room here to knock back raw Gulf Coast oysters and happy-hour drink specials after work. An oldie but a goodie— 35 years strong and still kicking—Blockhouse offers a full menu of freshly prepared items including signatures like seafood gumbo and prime rib slow-roasted for eight hours. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1619 Augusta Rd. (864) 2324280, blockhouse.net BOBBY’S BBQ

At his new barbecue spot on Main Street in Fountain Inn, Tay Nelson smokes all the meat over oak wood in 1,000-gallon smokers. Named for his late father and brother (both named Bobby), the restaurant prides itself on its scratch-made sides and desserts. Go for the award-winning brisket and save room for the banana pudding. $, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed Sun–Wed. 1301 N Main St, Fountain Inn. (864) 409-2379, eatbobbys.com BRICK STREET CAFÉ

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try mom’s spaghetti, Miss Sara’s crab cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed Sun–Mon. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com

GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun—fill the menu. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of the restaurant’s best dishes. $$, L (Tues–Sat), D

(Thurs–Sat), SBR. Closed Mon. 1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri– Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

HARE & FIELD

Sister restaurant to Farmhouse Taco, Hare & Field serves comfort fare with upscale elegance. While the fried chicken skins in sorghum sriracha sauce are a sure starter, make your main meal the big mater sandwich slathered in basil aioli. Pair with the Hare & Field Trail Ale, crafted specially by Brewery 85 for the gastropub. $$. L, D, SBR.

327 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0249, hareandfieldkitchen.com

The Farehouse

Photograph by Andrew Huang

Set in the historic Taylors Mill, The Farehouse imparts a laid-back feel ideal for neighborhood hangs. Begin with a pour from the brewery next door, 13 Stripes, and dig in to the beer-boiled peanuts or burrata salad. House-made pasta comes in various forms, like linguine with shrimp, bacon lardons, smoked cherry tomatoes, spinach, garlic, zucchini, peas, and a Parmesan cream sauce. Finish with a creative cocktail, like the Orange Fashioned or Where There’s Smoke. $$, L, D (Tues– Sat). 250 Mill St, PW3151, Taylors. (864) 509-6760, thefarehouse.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR MAR M CA H Y 2019 7 / 12 03 5

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HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com HUSK GREENVILLE

Husk Greenville delivers legendary farm-totable concepts under Chef Jon Buck, who champions Southern fare by resurrecting dishes reminiscent of great-grandma’s kitchen. The ever-evolving menu offers starters—like the crispy pig ear lettuce wraps—then dives into heftier plates like the coal-roasted chicken, sorghum-flour dumplings, and shishito peppers. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskgreenville.com

KITCHEN SYNC

Fizz Boulder Ring

Beautiful? Naturally.

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the gritz fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The banh mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sun–Mon. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 568-8115, facebook.com/kitchensyncgreenville

HAMPTON STATION | 1320 HAMPTON AVE. EXT. #202A, GREENVILLE SC 29601

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

864.735.8379 | TANYASTIEGLERDESIGNS.COM

Y Y TR DA TO

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

LTO BURGER BAR

Chef Brian Coller has crafted a menu that steers the beefy American staple into unconventional (but totally delicious) territory. Take the Piedmont mullet ’85, with sloppy joe chili, bomb mustard, American cheese, and “phat” onion rings. For you Elvis enthusiasts, the King of Memphis is a hunk of burnin’ love concocted with banana jam, peanut butter, and bacon. $$,

Treatments start at

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MICRODERM INFUSION

This three-step treatment exfoliates, extracts and uses precision-timed hydration to deliver the most effective skin resurfacing results.

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DISCLAIMER: *The Massage Envy franchise network, collectively, provides more skin care services than any other service provider nationwide. Offer good for first-time guests only. Prices subject to change. All session times include up to a total of 10 minutes for consultation and/or dressing, which occurs both pre and post service. Microderm Infusion sessions will vary in length depending on skin care needs and are not intended to diagnose, prevent, or treat any medical or skin condition. You should consult your doctor if you are experiencing any medical or skin care concern. Individual results may vary. Rates and services may vary by franchised location and session. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. Not all Massage Envy locations offer all services. For a specific list of services available or additional information about joining as a member, check with the specific location or see MassageEnvy.com. Each location is independently owned and operated. ©2017 Massage Envy Franchising, LLC.

L, D. 2451 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 214-1483, ltoburgerbargvl.com

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE

Founded by three Alabama sons, this new ’cue joint hits the West Stone area with Bama-style barbecue and traditional Southern sides. Grab a seat indoors or out and enjoy a pulled pork platter or the fried catfish, all while cheering on your favorite football team on the flat screens. $-$$, L, D,

SBR. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite B (864) 5201740, moesoriginalbbq.com/greenville MONKEY WRENCH SMOKEHOUSE

Monkey Wrench Smokehouse comes by its name honestly, taking up space in a long-standing hardware store in Travelers Rest. This BBQ joint from the folks behind Sidewall Pizza and Rocket Surgery serves everything from ribs, wings, and veggies— all wood-fired. Steven Musolf wears the title of head chef and is the mind behind the menu. $$-$$$. D. Closed Monday. 21

N Main St, Travelers Rest. (585) 414-8620, monkeywrenchsmokehouse.com NORTHAMPTON WINE & DINE

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the hundreds for sale, open it for a

corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864)

271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and cocktails at its upstairs bar CRAFTED complement an ambitious menu of urban comfort food from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is a downtown hotspot. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country style prosciutto. $$$-

$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or chef-designed. Ideal for group dinners or date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 5463535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROOST

This fashionable restaurant lends a modern, tasty addition to N. Main Street. Whenever possible, Roost sources food within a limited distance from producer to consumer; ingredients are often procured from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snags a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L,

D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202.

(864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque

124 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE STRIP CLUB 104

Whether you’re a red-blooded meat eater or prefer a little pork, the Strip Club has it seared, grilled, basted, or blackened for your pleasure. Keep it simple with the “plain Jane” dish— house-aged Black Angus USDA prime strip—or spice it up with the carpetbagger, a filet mignon masterpiece paired with fried oysters, smoked bacon collards, and garlic mashed potatoes. $$$$$$, D (Tues–Sat). 104 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 877-9104, thestripclub104.com

B ARS & BREWERIES 13 STRIPES BREWERY

Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the Rise & Fight Again IPA and the Sgt. Molly American wheat— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect endof-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find a rotating roster, such as the Biggie Mango, Eldorado saison, or the 2 Hop session IPA. Thurs–Sun. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com BREWERY 85

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with its eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty howdy dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome.

6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at the Community Tap, Greenville’s neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from a wide selection—180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

EIGHTH STATE BREWING CO.

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery on Augusta, this brewpub is hoppy hour heaven. Expect to find a variety of their craft beers on tap, but branch out with the pub’s select draft cocktails or beer slushies. Live music, local art, and a rotating menu featuring shared plates and charcuterie round out the experience. 400 Augusta St.

(864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER

Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The small-batch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885, fireforge.beer

FOXCROFT WINE CO.

Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and panseared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D (Tues–Sun),

shop open 10am–11pm (Tues–Sat). Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville GROWLER HAUS

The franchise’s West Greenville addition is its newest, rounding out the total to four Upstate watering holes. Growler Haus’s drafts rotate seasonally to bring you the best in local and national brews, so whether you’re a fan of IPAs, pilsners, ciders, pale ales, or wheats, they’ve got a cold one waiting for you. Just remember to throw in a homemade pretzel with beer cheese or a pork belly bao bun in between pints. $-$$, L (Fri–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). Closed Sunday. 12 Lois Ave. (864) 373-9347, growlerhaus.com

IRON HILL BREWERY

Hailing from Delaware, this award-winning brewhouse has planted roots in Greenville. Chef Jason Thomson turns out an ambitious menu, while head brewer Eric Boice curates craft beer. Take on evenings with the summer seasonal Clock Out Lager, an American lager with notes of grapefruit and pine. $-$$$, L, D. 741 Haywood Rd. (864) 5687009, ironhillbrewery.com/greenville-sc LIABILITY BREWING CO.

United by a passion for Star Wars and craft brews—there may or may not be a storm trooper mural inside—fun-loving founders Dustin and Terry bring solid staples to the table at Liability Brewing Co. Located in an old electric company building in the new Weststone development, this new taproom pours creative flavors with even funkier names. Sip on a Carl von Cloudwitz, a New England IPA with a crisp finish. Thurs–Sun. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite D.

Hello Spring 850 east suber road, greer, sc 864-386-4368 | madiboutique.com

(864) 920-1599, liabilitybrewing.co

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill satisfies as both pre–Greenville Drive game watering hole or after-work hangout. Inventive and hearty apps, such as the “Old School” chicken nachos, start things off before the main event of fish ‘n’ chips, the Liberty Club, or even a Signature Steak. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 7707777, libertytaproom.com

MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabascofried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St. (864)

239-0286, macspeedshop.com

PINEY MOUNTAIN BIKE LOUNGE

Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, the Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a daily food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville. (864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com

QUEST BREWING CO.

Eco-minded Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the M AY 2 0 1 9 / 1 2 5

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dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 272- 6232, questbrewing.com SIP WHISKEY & WINE

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers fine wines and whisky, there’s no better end to an evening than an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail). SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a collection of small plates is a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite. $-$$, D. 103

N Main St #400, (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. The taproom features classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgian-style farm ale is a golden dream) as well as food truck visits—a sure favorite to cap off an lazy afternoon. 26 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2424, theswamprabbitbrewery.com TASTING ROOM TR

Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite from the weekly wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday–Friday. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com THE 05

A neighborhood gathering place, The 05, so named for the iconic Augusta Road zip code, offers seasonal cocktails and spirits as well as tasty tapas—like the roasted red pepper hummus or the chorizo-stuffed dates topped with whipped goat cheese. If you’re bringing the whole gang, opt for the cheeses and charcuterie, or nosh on the fabulous flatbread as a party of one. $-$$$, D. 3016 Augusta St. (864) 412-8150, the05.net THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville brew lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy. (864)

605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

UP ON THE ROOF

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With its classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most

scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250 RiverPlace. (864) 242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net VAULT & VATOR

Named for a former vault elevator in the underground expanse, this hip downtown joint puts a twenty-first-century spin on fashionable speakeasies of yore. Small plates of charcuterie, hummus, and cheese are simple yet refined, providing enough bite to not overpower the establishment’s true star— the cocktail list. The menu includes both signature and traditional libations; your only task is picking your poison. $$, D, Closed Sun–Mon. 655 S Main St, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 603-1881, vaultandvator.com

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR.

1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com YEE-HAW BREWING

Beers that celebrate good times with good company? Count us in. This Tennessee native serves up a mix of fine ales and lagers, including a World Beer Cup-Winning Dunkel dark lager. Diverse seasonals crop up with every change of the temperature giving guests a taste of something new. Gather with friends to find out which flavor fits your fancy. $-$$, L, D. 307 East McBee Avenue, Suite C. (864) 605-7770, yeehawbrewing.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head comes to Greenville with a wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves— you can’t go wrong with the GreenVillain topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823

S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café serves a wide-range of globally inspired dishes for lunch and dinner. For Sunday brunch, try the Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an almond brothers smoothie. $, B, L, D. 600 S Main St. happyandhale.com MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crêpes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the mega breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 2980005, fallscottage.com

RISE BISCUITS DONUTS

Fresh buttermilk biscuits. Hot-from-the-oven maple bacon doughnuts. Debuting its first SC outfit, Rise Biscuits Donuts pumps out biscuit sandwiches and hush puppies, to apple fritters and confection-bedecked doughnuts. While the spicy chickaboom sandwich is a crispy punch of fire, satisfy your sweet side with the crème brûlée doughnut, flametorched and filled with custard. $, B, L. 1507

Woodruff Rd, Suite D, Greenville. (864) 4028240, risebiscuitsdonuts.com TANDEM CRÊPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maplepeppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com

T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CHICORA ALLEY

CAFÉS

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy to Pattyo-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864)

520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s

BARISTA ALLEY

Looking for that midday pick-me-up? Pop over to Barista Alley, where exposed brick walls and wide wooden tables create the perfect ambience to converse with a warm mug in hand. Satisfy your caffeine cravings, but don’t miss out on Barista Alley’s colorful array of green, berry, peanut butter and chocolate smoothies. $, B (Mon–Sat), L, D

(Mon–Sun). 125 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 655-5180, baristaalley.com BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End joint. Find fresh fare in organic salads as well as fruit and veggie-rich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options

available, of course. $, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe BRIDGE CITY COFFEE

A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underprivileged teens and adults. The fresh space offers a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. A selection of Chocolate Moose treats is also available. $-$$. B-L. Closed Sunday. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville, SC 29607. bridgecity.coffee COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info CRÊPE DU JOUR

Much more than offering “really thin pancakes,” this downtown establishment brings a taste of Europe to the Upstate with delicate, delicious French fare. The diverse menu includes breakfast options like the bacon, egg, and potato, and for lunch and dinner, the tomato pesto. Crêpe du Jour also serves up specialty cocktails, coffee beverages, and wine. $$, B, L, D (Tues–Sun). 20 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 520-2882 DUE SOUTH COFFEE ROASTERS

Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with breakfast pastries, ice cream, and cold lunch items complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com GRATEFUL BREW

A brew joint where you can enjoy both varieties—coffee and a cold one—Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order espressos or pour-overs, all from Counter Culture coffee. Celebrating our area, and that it’s always five o’clock somewhere, half of the beer taps are locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com KUKA JUICE

If you’re hard-pressed for a fresh fix—Kuka Juice has just the ticket. Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out cold-pressed craft with healthminded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the taco ’bout it bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, smoothies, toasts, and more also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and housemade offerings like rose and almond olive oil muffins and snacks for the bar like lavender

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and sumac popcorn and citrus-marinated olives, it's worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N

Main St, Ste D & 207 Wade Hampton Blvd. methodicalcoffee.com MOUNTAIN GOAT GVL

based, customized meals. We suggest the almost heaven burger with a fresh patty from Providence Farm, or the seasonal cobb salad—featuring Kaland Farm eggs and a house-made apple pie moonshine vinaigrette. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Saturday.

A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule­—Mobile Meltdown and Automatic Taco are frequent visitors. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community. $-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120

860 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 518-1978, eatfarmfreshfast.com

O-CHA TEA BAR

$-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com

Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 2836702, ochateabaronline.com SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ & GROCERY Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is woodfired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D.

205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats from Bake Room. $, B, L. 1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

DELIS

RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s chopped salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

FARM FRESH FAST

While “fast food” and “healthy” aren’t often synonymous, Farm Fresh Fast might change your mind. The restaurant’s mantra is simple: build sustainable relationships with local farms and provide nutrition-

COMES WITH A

CHEERING

SECTION.

TABLE 301 CATERING & KITCHEN

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, this operation adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade stecca bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormonefree meat on just-baked white focaccia bread. Don’t miss The Grove on Friday nights—live music, a rotating tapas menu, and craft beer and wine. $, B, L, D. Closed

Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

CAVIAR & BANANAS

L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com

EVENT SPACE

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com

ETHNIC A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B,

OUR

ASADA

Vibrant Latin American cuisine comes to Greenville by way of ASADA, a brickand-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard serving traditional Missionstyle fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy inclined.

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$-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com ARYANA

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local

find out more at GreenvilleDrive.com/Hospitality M AY 2 0 1 9 / 1 2 7

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DINING

Lady J Specializing in Petite Clothing Maxwell Point 2131 Woodruff Rd. Greenville 864.234.7766 LIKE US ON

Guide

lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani, and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 236-7410, aryanagreenville.com

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

BASIL THAI CUISINE

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the concept with Basil Thai in the Aloft building downtown. Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/greenville EL THRIFTY

This Swamp Rabbit Trail–based cantina serves up trendy cocktails and Mexcian menu selects like chicken tortas, braised beef tamales, and pozole roja. Designed with a laid-back feel, the upscale social club is not shy of spirits; along with craft beer, wine, mezcal, and tequila, the bar whips up killer cocktails like the el Thrifty margarita with blanco tequila and orange liquer, or the Oaxaca Burro with mezcal, ginger, and lime. $-$$. SBR, D. Closed

Missy and Petites

Monday. 25 Delano Drive. elthrifty.com FONDA ROSALINDA

For almost 20 years, Rosalinda Lopez has been serving up fresh renditions of Mexican recipes across from Bob Jones University. Her repertoire lists a wealth of tasty beef, pork, chicken, seafood, and vegetarian dishes— including the ever-popular chile rellenos—but don’t pass up a starter of chips and Rosalinda’s homemade tomatillo salsa. $$, L, D. 1124 N. Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 292-7002, facebook. com/rosalindasrestaurantgreenville

GOLDEN LLAMA

Lomo saltado, ceviche, rotisserie chicken, and other Peruvian classics form the core of the menu at the Golden Llama, but you won’t regret the bistec a lo pobre—beef tenderloin, plantains, and potatoes, topped with a fried egg. The eatery’s two no-frills storefront locations (the second one in Five Forks) sport golden-hued walls and offer dine-in and carry-out service. $, L, D. 2435 E. North St. (864) 373-9958, goldenllama.net

IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modernAmerican elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should try the Punky Brewster roll: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D.

GARRISON OPTICIANS Fine European Eyewear

McDaniel Village • 1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109

864-271-1812 • GarrisonOpticians.com

the vegan moussaka. $$, L, D, Closed Sunday. 644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 3739445, jirozgreenvillesc.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

KAIROS GREEK KITCHEN

This Charleston-originated restaurant makes its Upstate mark by serving up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the homemade tzatziki sauce. Their chooseyour-own approach leads to options like this salad combo: mixed power greens, roasted chicken, cucumber salad, chickpea salad, tzatziki, and red pepper feta. You can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com KOREAN BBQ

This hole-in-the-wall won’t wow you with its simple interior, but its selection of ban chan (side dishes) will spark your palate with snapshots of flavor before you dive into bowls of bibimbap (rice mixed with vegetables, meat, and an egg) or yukejang (a spicy beef and vegetable stew). $$. L, D. 1170 Woodruff Rd. (864) 286-0505 MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crêpes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their homegrown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathed in a soy-based broth. $, L, D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 OTTO IZAKAYA

Modeled after the informal, after-work drinking holes of Japan, Otto Izakaya is the latest dining concept unveiled by Peter Lieu and Doug Yi—longtime owners of Lieu’s Bistro restaurant. The menu invites guests to embrace familiar favorites—spicy tuna and BBQ eel rolls with assorted nigiri and sashimi—while expanding palates to new tasting territories a la the mac ‘n’ cheese loaded with Panang curry, jack cheese, and radiatori pasta or banh mi sliders with chili pork and spicy mayo.

115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com

$$, D. 802 S Main St; 15 Market Point Dr, Greenville. (864) 568-5880; (864) 568-8009, otto-izakaya.com

JI-ROZ

PITA HOUSE

True, it would be fantastic if the Greek Festival happened year-round. But until that day, pop into this authentic Mediterranean eatery with modern flair. Take a light lunch on the outdoor patio with a Kalamata olive and fetatopped Greek salad or a classic gyro wrapped with your choice of lamb, chicken, or veggies. At dinner, try something more indulgent like

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some

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homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarinetiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com SACHA’S CAFÉ

Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com SAFFRON

It’s worth braving Woodruff Road to visit this Indian eatery. At lunch, the daily buffet lays out a wallet-friendly selection of curries, rice dishes, and chef’s signatures. The a la carte dinner menu boasts a staggering variety, but the yogurt-marinated chicken tikka cooked in a clay oven or the lamb saag stewed with spinach, ginger, and garlic are excellent options. $, L, D. 1178

inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday.1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com JIANNA

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms. $$-$$$, L (Sat–Sun), D. 207 S THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170

River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

SAIGON FAST FOOD

$$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

SWAD

Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D.

PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy the arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

$, D. 30 Orchard Park Dr., Ste. 22. (864) 627-7706, portofinossc.com

EUROPEAN

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes

Maintaining the marble and granite floor lobby at Anderson University

ROCKET SURGERY

From the culinary team behind Sidewall Pizza and Monkey Wrench Smokehouse, this recrafted concept ups the ante on contemporary Italian cuisine. Fresh housemade pasta highlights chef-driven seasonal dishes, like the bucatini with house-cured smoked bacon, sabayon egg sauce, grana padano, and black pepper. Select wine, beer, and cocktails available. $$, D (Wed–Sat).

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PORTOFINO’S

1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

Residential and Commercial

(Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

You’ll find Italian-American classics to feed every member of the family at this Greenville icon. For two decades, the familyowned restaurant near Greenville Mall has been pleasing palates with a generous menu of pasta, seafood, and saltimbocca. For the gluten-sensitive, sautéed vegetables can be substituted for pasta in many of the dishes

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soulsatisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $ -$$, L, D. Closed Monday.

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Woodruff Rd., Ste. 16. (864) 288-7400, saffrongreenville.com

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The latest addition to the Larkin’s line-up, this ristorante serves up Italian cuisine out of the former Playwright space on River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato.

Contrary to its name, Saigon Fast Food is a sit-down restaurant. Inside, the small room is spiffed up with green-clothcovered tables and a host of condiments in the middle of each. Folks come here for steaming bowls of pho—a fragrant broth made with rice noodles and your choice of other ingredients (meats and vegetables)—and an extensive menu of Vietnamese specialties to wash down with a glass of bubble tea $ -$$. L, D. 1011 N

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DINING

Guide

in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, Chef Jeff Kelly offers a local twist on French staples—blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky

Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com VILLA FROSI

A Greek and Italian restaurant with traditional flair, Villa Frosi hits Wade Hampton with Southern European staples. Sample specialties like the spanakopita, the seafood fettuccine, or go straight for the pizza. Finish with a slice of limoncello cake, and you’ll be booking you’re Mediterranean dream cruise, pronto. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 2520 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 520-0298, resto.tpsitetesting.info

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville hot chicken or Thai shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (404) 372-2266, facebook.com/automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com KEEPIN’ IT FRESH

As healthy as it is tasty, Keepin’ It Fresh food truck serves up a diverse menu of locally sourced cuisine guaranteed to please your appetite and your waistline. Catch them at Grateful Brew and the Swamp Rabbit Brewery and Taproom for a crispy fried Brussels sprouts salad, mouthwatering shrimp taco topped with peach slaw and guava crema, or a golden-brown fried fish plate. $$, schedule varies. (864) 386-5050,

@keepinitfreshtruck_gvl

KICKIN’ PIG BAR-B-QUE PIG TRUCK

If you’re in the mood for some authentic Southern eats, look no further than the Kickin’ Pig’s on-the-go ’cue truck. Go for the smoked bologna sandwich seasoned with BBQ rub and finished with cole slaw, or grab a fork and dig into the BBQ Sundae, a non-confectionary concoction of pulled pork, potato salad, slaw, and sauce of choice. $, schedule varies.

(864) 608-6187, kickinpigbbq.com

MOBILE MELTDOWN

Not to be cheesy, but the latest addition to Greenville’s food truck scene is melting hearts, one grilled sammie at a time. Lauren Kulesz of Mobile Meltdown has been delivering creamy grilled cheese, paired with tomato bisque or fried mashed potato balls, to comfort-food cravers from her truck window since fall 2018. Grab your typical American cheese and bread blend with the classic, or dig into the likes of the spicy pig. $, L, D. Times

& Locations vary, facebook.com/ mobilemeltdownfoodtruck ONE LOVE FUSION

Catch a summertime vibe year-round every time you drop by this Caribbean-inspired restaurant-on-wheels. Wrap your hands around One Love’s take on traditional favorites; the tropical gyro is rolled up with fresh mango slaw, pico, seared lamb and beef, and jerk-infused tzatziki sauce, while the Jinju hero comes topped on a grilled roll with kimchi, Italian sausage, provolone, and tangy Asian sauce. $, schedule varies. (864)

399-9392, facebook.com/OneLoveFF SMOKIN’ BLUES BBQ

Smokin’ Blues keeps things hot with a smorgasbord of savory sauces and smoked staples—pulled pork, beef brisket, pulled chicken, and ribs—that can be enjoyed solo or packed into sandwiches and tacos. For a treat that’s extra smokin’, go for the glutenfree loaded fries or homemade chips piled high with pork, white BBQ sauce, sour cream, pickled jalapenos, and three-cheese sauce. $, schedule varies (864) 444-4752,

mysmokinblues.com

THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

WE GOT THE BEETS

Proving that not all street food is created equal, We Got the Beets is Greenville’s very first plant-based food truck. This crueltyfree fare encourages diners to “celerybrate” vegan eats. Favorites include the Philly grilled cheese with marinated portobello mushrooms and cashew mozzarella cheese, and the sushi sandwich with sushi rice, Korean BBQ jackfruit, and more in a nori sheet pocket. $, schedule varies. @wegotthebeetsfoodtruck

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from 27 taps downstairs and 31 upstairs—are what bring patrons to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a long list of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitanstyle pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margherita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. $, L, D. Location varies. (843) 654-

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D'ALLESANDRO'S PIZZA

Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s Pizza brings its dough lover’s paradise to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, D’Allesandro’s pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy a variety of savory pizza, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com GRIMALDI'S PIZZERIA

Experience Big Apple flavor without the bustle at this NY-style brick-oven pizzeria. Serving up pies and calzones in a traditional yet chic environment, Grimaldi’s is dedicated to authenticity, down to the imported NYCwater used to craft their dough. Grab a slice of the buffalo chicken pizza, or build your own, just don’t miss the daily house-made cheesecake or wine pairings. Located in Magnolia Park Shopping Center, it’s an ideal spot to snag a bite before a cinematic viewing. $, L, D. 1025 Woodruff Rd, St. K101.

(864) 412-1032, grimaldispizzeria.com SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L,

D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com STONE PIZZA

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat

& Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com TOSS PIZZA

Located in the South Ridge Apartment Community, the TOSS menu is loaded with artfully crafted pies that are a far cry from your typical pepperoni. Head far east with the Phuket Thai pie, based with curry sauce and topped with peanuts, arugula, and shiitake mushrooms. The chile relleno is guaranteed to light a fire in the ol’ belly— thanks to a few poblano peppers. $$, L, D.

823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 2830316, tosspizzapub.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

WORLD PIECE

From the owners of downtown's beloved Coffee Undergroud, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Greenville’s dining scene from their laidback, 16-seat bar on Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers, as well as menu features — buffalo chicken wings, assorted salads, beef and veggie burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies—this pizza joint ensures there’s a little something to please everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave Suite A1. (864) 568-5221

TACOS CANTINA 76

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76, where the tacos shine. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St. (864) 631-2914, cantina76.com

FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with the campfire s’mores. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0586, farmhousetacos.com

NEO BURRITO

Hailing from Asheville, North Carolina, this locally owned spot takes—the burrito. Stop in for spicy tacos, cheesy quesadillas, zesty breakfast burritos, fresh salads, and more. Save room for the chipotle BBQ chicken burrito or the farm burrito, packed with rice, kale, hummus, beets, cilantro, cabbage, and more. $, B, L, D. 1268 Pendleton St. (864)

552-1054, neoburrito.com PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300 River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

TIPSY TACO

Dishes here bear the creative touch of Trish Balentine, former owner of Corporate Deli. Her made-from-scratch menu items include tamales, burrito bowls, and all the other Tex-Mex suspects. “Tipsy” nods to the bar, where you can swill tequila flights, frozen margaritas, and house-infused spirits. Take your pick of three locations—two in Greenville and one on Fairview Road in Simpsonville. $$, L, D, SBR. 15 Conestee Ave,

(864) 558-0775, and 215 Pelham Rd, (864) 603-1144, tipsytaco.net WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp bungalow golden ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with a house-crafted margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

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THE 2019

READER’S

LENS PHOTO C ON TEST

The Greenville Journal invites you to share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer. Each month one lucky winner will win a $250 gift card to be used at any Rick Erwin’s Dining Group restaurant. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal.

MAY THEME: SUMMER FUN

Centered around the fun and beauty of summer. Whether it be trips to the lake, summer camps or cookouts. We want to see how families across the Upstate are celebrating summer. For details on each month’s contest and to submit your photo, visit GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens

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SPRING ORCHESTRAS CONCERT May 2; Wed, 7pm. $25. The Peace Center. Greenville County Youth Orchestras combines the musical talents of 300 students in one unforgettable ensemble performance.

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1 FAC JAZZ AND BEYOND

Inspired by the partnership between the Fine Arts Center and the Peace Center’s Community Impact program, this new performance series provides FAC vocalists and jazz musicians the opportunity to strut their musical chops in an upscale arena before a live audience. The May showcase is slated to include a medley of jazz-fusion ditties, including works by Snarky Puppy, Herbie Hancock, and Pat Metheny. Genevieve’s Theater Lounge, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

SPRING ORCHESTRAS CONCERT

Greenville County Youth Orchestras brings another stellar year of musical enlightenment to a close with their final concert showcase. The spring ensemble performance will unite all 300 students of the organization, bringing together members of the chamber strings, philharmonic, young artists, sinfonia, and junior sinfonia for an unforgettable collaboration of melodies. It’s a fabulous opportunity to support arts in the Upstate and your local budding musician—need we say more? Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7pm. $10-$27. (864) 4673000, peacecenter.org

ROYALTY— 2–12 COUNTRY HANK & PATSY

Between the pair of these legendary country crooners, there’s nearly forty years of music and countless classic tunes like “Crazy,” “Walkin’ After Midnight,” and “Move It on Over.” As influential as they were gifted, Patsy Cline and Hank Williams have both enjoyed posthumous success thanks to the help of Billboard releases, “Best of” lists, and Hall of Fame inductions. Join Jason Petty and Katie Deal as they give tribute to two of music’s

Photograph of Greenville County Youth Orchestras by Jeff Levene

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS Weber, and others will attend to your listening pleasure, and will include a visually stunning masterpiece performed by dancer Sarah Lane. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

most transcendent recording artists. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 6:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$58. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

3

AN EVENING OF ORIGINAL MUSIC

As part of The Peace Center’s Songwriters Workshop Series, this special showcase will highlight the songwriting and instrumental talents of some of the industry’s most gifted musicians. The Upstate’s own Edwin McCain is set to take the stage along with country and pop music collaborator and singer Maia Sharp. The powerhouse pair will be guested by folk artist and singer-songwriter David Wilcox. Genevieve’s Theater Lounge, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

3

CASINO NIGHT BENEFIT

There’s no gamble here—you’ll definitely be getting lucky tonight. The Advanced Institute for Development and Learning has upped the ante with a Monte Carlo–themed event that will swap chips for fun raffles, a silent auction, and plenty of chance

3–5

HOT AIR AFFAIR: RISING ABOVE CANCER

to roll the dice. All proceeds will benefit the 501(c) (3) organization that works to provide support and care for children with special needs and their families. Crowne Plaza Greenville, 851 Congaree Rd, Greenville. Fri, 6:30–9:30pm. $75. eventbrite. com/e/casino-night-benefittickets-58304947668

3–5

SHALL WE DANCE?

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra closes out its Chamber Orchestra season with a zesty blend

of spicy compositions designed to get you moving. Rousing, dynamic works by Czechoslovakia’s Antonin Dvorak, American conductor Morton Gould, Romantic penman Carl Maria von

In its second annual year, the Hot Air Affair is promising even more fun, more activities, and, yep, more balloons. Presented by the Cancer Association of Anderson, the weekend-long event will feature festivities geared toward both of the weekend’s top spectacles—the Kentucky Derby and Cinco de Mayo—in addition to more than 28 hot air balloons waiting for you to come aboard and take flight. The soiree will culminate on Sunday with a special Celebration of Life & Remembrance Flight. Rocky River Plantation, 2000 E River St, Anderson. Fri–Sun. Free. (864) 222-3500, caanderson.org

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I am a leader. I am a Montessori student. I am Five Oaks Academy.

Karlotta, age 5, accompanies the toddler students as they sing during a school-wide International Festival.

Toddler through Middle School

1101 Jonesville Road Simpsonville, SC (864) 228-1881

www.fiveoaksacademy.com

Minds Opened Here!

Granted, indulging in a crawfish smorgasbord seems like a whole lotta work for not a lotta reward—especially when it’s more than 10,000 pounds brought in fresh from Louisiana. But toss in a few live acts by popular artists, a Crawdaddy Dash 5K, Artists Village, Crawdaddy Carnival, and plenty of other fun activities, and all that crackin’ will seem well worth the wait. Rosewood Dr, Columbia. Sat, 11am–8pm. Advance, $10; at gate, $15. (803) 960-3552, rosewoodcrawfishfest.com

RIVER DUCK DERBY 4 REEDY If you happen to see a few

Schedule a tour to see how Five Oaks Academy can unlock your child’s unique potential.

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CRAWFISH 4 ROSEWOOD FESTIVAL

4/15/16

Leisure, the Linville way.

thousand of these floating rubber beauties making their way down the Reedy River, there’s no need to question your mental sanity. The Duck Derby has a goal of 10,000 9:03 AM mallards to be adopted by community organizations for $1 a pop. This year’s

race benefits a number of regional philanthropic organizations, and will feature a musical performance by Darby Wilcox & the Peep Show as well as a hat contest. Falls Park, Greenville. Sat, 10am– 4pm. Attendance, free; ducks, $10. duckrace.com

FOOTHILLS FAMILY 4FESTIVAL RESOURCES STRAWBERRY Nothing says spring like seeing the first ruby red strawberry sprout up from the ground. In honor of this annual awakening, the Bank of Travelers Rest sponsors the annual Strawberry Festival, where you not only can delve into some of your favorite berry recipes, but also indulge in hearty helpings of musical acts, arts, crafts, and family activities—all backdropped by the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Slater Hall Community Center, 5 Whitney St, Slater. Sat. Free. foothillsfamilyresources.org/ strawberry-festival

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THE ILLUSIONISTS May 4–5; Sat, 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $45-$65. The Peace Center.

800-742-6717 Eseeola.com

Reserve some quality time with cool breezes, stunning mountain scenery, and every amenity you can imagine. Call today for reservations.

Photograph of Colin Cloud courtesy of the Peace Center

Catch Colin Cloud and other famed talents for a fantastical magic performance on the Greenville stage.

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4–5

THE ILLUSIONISTS

It’s not a magic trick . . . it’s an illusion! Drawing upon pioneering prestidigitations à la Harry Houdini, The Illusionists features a rotating hand of uber-talented magicians from across the globe. Conjuring up marvelous feats that are both physically and visually astonishing, this sleight-of-hand spectacular is here one moment, gone the next! The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

6

HILLSONG UNITED

Founded in 1998 as a youthful offshoot of Australia’s massively popular Hillsong United ministries, the band consists of a diverse collection of members that rotate in and out with the needs of the church. Their debut track “One,” was released in 1998, and has since been followed by five studio albums, all of which peaked at number one on the U.S. Christian charts. Hillsong United will be joined on “The People” tour by Amanda Lindsey Cook and Mack Brock. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Mon, 7:30pm. $31.50-$89.50. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

9–25

NOISES OFF

As the audience, we’re used to seeing a flawless production without a hitch on stage. But behind the curtain? Well, that’s a whole different story. A unique play-withina-play, Noises Off provides an indepth (and laugh-out-loud funny) perspective on what goes on between acts during one theater group’s production of Nothing On. Costumes will fail. Lines will be flubbed. Cues will be missed. But, hey—that’s showbiz, right? Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

DANCING IN THE STREETS 10 WITH DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM Martha and the Vandellas may have been the first to start dancing in the streets, but this troupe is putting a whole new spin on it. In conjunction with their Peace Center performance,

New York’s famed Dance Theatre of Harlem invites you to bring your best moves downtown for a special showcase led by the program’s most elite members—no ballet shoes required! Graham Plaza, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 6:30pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

10 ALABAMA Fifty years ago, three cousins

joined forces in Fort Payne, Alabama, and decided they were going to play a little Southern rock together. Fastforward to 2019, and Alabama has racked up more than 40 number-one singles and the title of most-awardedband in the history of country music. The trio will be joined by yet another iconic name in country—The Charlie Daniels Band—for their 50th anniversary tour. From rocking Myrtle Beach’s Bowery to sold-out shows across the country, Alabama proves all you need is a little staying power to keep rollin’. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm. $35-$130. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

10–12

ARTISPHERE

Celebrating its 15th festival in downtown Greenville, Artisphere is an open marketplace of handcrafted, visual, and live arts. Our city’s signature springtime event has been touted as one of the best in the country, with streets overflowing with national and international artists, musical performances, demos, culinary arts, and exciting interactive exhibits. Downtown Greenville. Fri, 12–8pm; Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–6pm. Free. (864) 271-9398, artisphere.org

11

Historical photo courtesy of Greenville County Historical Society & Photographs from the Coxe Collection.

The importance of having a plan could not be more clear.

SPRING FLING

Join the Greenville County Youth Orchestras’ elite Young Artist Orchestra and the advanced Philharmonic for their season closer, which will be spotlighted by timpanist Will Harris packing in the marimba mallet heat into a dynamic iteration of Ney Rosauro’s Concerto for Marimba and String Orchestra. Gunter Theatre at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. $10-$27. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

We offer our clients concierge quality advisory and planning services customized for their individual needs and goals. Our approach is to centralize our clients’ diverse financial strategies and life-plans to provide a coordinated, efficient and effective roadmap for financial security.

10 South Academy Street, Suite 250, Greenville, SC 29601

864.720.2000 | FosterVictorWA.com

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COMING UP NEXT AT THE CULTURAL CENTER

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PEABO BRYSON: STAND FOR LOVE May 16; Thurs, 7:30pm. $30-$60. The Peace Center. Renowned for his romantic ballads—think “If Ever You’re in My Arms Again” and Disney’s “A Whole New World”— Greenville native Peabo Bryson brings his melodic pipes home for an intimate evening of soulful tunes.

11

TAILS & TRAILS

Come out and support Greenville County Animal Care as they continue to strive for a no-kill community in the Upstate—while you get a workout in. Walk, run, or zoomie your way through the 5K course with your best pal in tow, then celebrate your accomplishment at the post-race wrap-up party, which will include petfriendly fun and a vendor marketplace. Conestee Park, 840 Mauldin Rd, Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. $35. (864) 467-3950, greenvillecounty.org/ACS/ TailsAndTrailsPrerace.aspx

and wildlife in the area. Cyclists can register for 30- or 60-mile races (breathtaking views included), and all are invited to dig into hand-pulled barbecue, craft brews, and Americana entertainment. Lake Jemiki, Walhalla. Sat, 8am. $25-$60. oconeeforever.org/ rallyvalley

The Dance Theatre of Harlem is celebrated as one of the first dance companies to spotlight AfricanAmerican dancers in ballet. Having trained a series of notable dancers including Llanchie Stevenson and current resident choreographer Robert Garland, DTH has performed in venues across Europe and the United States (including the White House) and was inducted into the National Museum of Dance. The evening’s program will feature both classical dance and contemporary choreography pieces. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $25-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

11 @mauldincultural

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road Mauldin, SC 29662

OCONEE FOREVER RALLY IN THE VALLEY

Oconee County’s natural beauty is a rare gem in the Upstate. Oconee Forever hopes to harness some of that earthy goodness with Rally in the Valley, a combination athletic event and conservation drive dedicated to preserving the habitats of farms

Thru May 12 CRY IT OUT What with all the late-night wakeup calls and poopy diapers, being a new mom ain’t easy. Things are especially difficult for Jessie, a former legal bigwig Manhattanite who’s been transplanted to the quiet suburbs with her newborn. Seeking companionship to break up the solitude, Jessie befriends neighbor (and also new mom) Lina. But when the women’s

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Photograph of Jeanne Roberson courtesy of the Peace Center

THEATRE OF 11 DANCE HARLEM


quick friendship is shaken by the entrance of a third party, the real fun begins in this dark comedy crafted by Molly Smith Metzler. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

14–22

TIGERS BE STILL

An original work by Kim Rosenstock and directed by Matt Reece, Tigers Be Still weaves the story of Sherry Wickman, a woman on the edge of coming undone after she loses her job and her home. The horizon starts to look a little brighter when she lands a job subbing for an art teacher, but as one part of her life takes a turn for the positive, everything else seems to be spinning in place. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $15. (864) 233-6733, centrestageorg

16

PEABO BRYSON: STAND FOR LOVE

Greenville native. Grammy winner. Voice of the Disney soundtrack generation. Singer and songwriter Peabo Bryson is known for his soulful ballads and powerful duets alongside some of the world’s most accomplished female vocalists like Natalie Cole and Celine Dion. His career has spanned four decades and multiple charts; now he’s hoping to spread a little romance in the Upstate with this intimate Peace Center performance. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $30-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

GREEK 16–19 GREENVILLE FESTIVAL

Photograph of Jeanne Roberson courtesy of the Peace Center

It’s time to get your Greek on once again at this iconic Upstate festival. Whether you hail from the Hellenic Republic or just down the street, you’ll be welcomed with open arms—and a plate full of delicious food. Pick your poison from a variety of freshly made pastries, including baklava and kataifi and hefty servings of roast lamb, moussaka, and spanakopita. Don’t be afraid to get down with a little traditional horos, and be sure to pick up some goods from the marketplace. St. George Greek Orthodox Church, 406 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs–Sun. (864) 233-8531, greekforaday.com

complete without a little pig racing? Just remember to try out the rides before you dig into that fourth corn dog. Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Mon–Fri, 4–11pm; Sat, 11am–midnight; Sun, 12:30–11pm. 6 & under, free; 17 & under, $1; adults, $7. fairatheritagepark.com

17

JEANNE ROBERTSON

While many comics credit their fame to hours spent on open mics in basement comedy clubs, Jeanne Robertson has a bit of a different story. The beauty-queen-turned-humorist began her career doing the Miss North Carolina wave on stage, a win that quickly propelled her to radio fame. In the years since, Robertson has built a successful career around her anecdotal-style humor, spinning yarns that are as relatable as they are hysterical. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

17–June 1

NEIL SIMON’S PROPOSALS

Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains are the setting for acclaimed American playwright Neil Simon’s 30th written production, which debuted on Broadway back in 1997. The mixed bag of humor and drama centers on the Hines family’s final trip to their vacation home, and the tangled web of heartache, secrets, and pain that quickly ensues—with a few bright spots thrown in for good measure. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$54. (828) 693, 0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

16–26

FAIR AT HERITAGE PARK Fairs are great for three reasons: funnel cakes, fried everything, and Ferris wheels—just preferably not in that order. Even better, the Fair at Heritage Park will feature these carnival staples and more—a live sea lion spectacular, magic with Lady Houdini, an exotic petting zoo, and much more. And what fair isn’t

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EVENING 18 AN WITH DAWES:

PASSWORDS TOUR Since their debut album was released to analog tape back in 2009, the men of Dawes have remained true to their uniquely vintage sound, drawing upon obvious inspiration from Laurel Canyon legends like Joni Mitchell and Neil Young. The band’s sixth studio album, Passwords, dropped last year, peaking at number 52 on the Billboard charts. Groovy and authentic, passionate and universal,

Dawes’ sound is a throwback to a simpler time in tunes. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $35-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

24–June 9

SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA Established in 1977 as a sister festival to Italy’s “Festival dei Due Mondi,” the Holy City’s iteration has transformed into one of America’s top performing arts celebrations. Housed in a variety of locations—theaters, recital

halls, gardens, playhouses, parks, and churches—the popular festival invites renowned artists from around the globe to share their expression with the South. Slated on this year’s dynamic entertainment lineup are productions in dance, opera, music, theater, acrobatics, and more. Various locations, Charleston. Times, prices vary. (843) 579-3100, spoletousa.org

25

GALLABRAE GREENVILLE SCOTTISH GAMES

Proving that Scots can do much more than drink heavily and look great in a variety of tartan patterns, this Southmeets-Scots festival certainly can’t be missed. Kicking off with the Great Scot! Parade through downtown Greenville, the celebration carries on into the weekend with a bagpipe challenge, Border Collie Invitationals, and a Miss Greenville Scottish Games for the lasses. Warpaint is optional; having fun is not. Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Sat, 9am. 3 & under, free; 12 & under, $10; adults, $20. gallabrae.com

25 NATIONAL WINE DAY Raise a glass to

one of our favorite unofficially official holidays by enjoying a glass or bottle at The Community Tap, Northampton Wine+Dine, or Foxcroft Wine Co. If you’re feeling extra ambitious, head up to the Biltmore Estate and take a tour of their exclusive winery—and enjoy a Memorial Day weekend picnic. Locations vary.

28–June 2

HELLO, DOLLY!

A master of meddling and matchmaking, widowed Dolly Levi is something of a name around New York City. But when she decides to aim Cupid’s arrow at her own heart, well, that’s when the fun really gets started! Starring Broadway darling Betty Buckley, this award-winning production packs extra oomph while still paying homage to the original with all the tunes you’ve grown to love, including “Before the Parade Passes By,” “It Takes a Woman,” and of course, “Hello, Dolly!” The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $35-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

MCCARTNEY 30 PAUL From his early days as one-fourth

of one of the world’s most influential and recognizable musical acts, to frontman of Wings and a soloist, Paul McCartney is a household name in nearly every corner of the globe. McCartney is currently embarking on

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Photograph courtesy of Spoleto USA

TOWN


his “Freshen Up” tour in support of last September’s Egypt Station release—but you can certainly expect the magnetic stage show to be a beautiful anthology of McCartney’s many faces over his decades in the industry. Whether you’re belting out “Lady Madonna,” “Jet” or any of his other classic hits, McCartney has a little something for everyone. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, 8pm. $30-$255. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

31–June 23

Photograph courtesy of Spoleto USA

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN First it was an autobiography crafted by the man who lived it. Then it was a high-grossing, critically respected film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and directed by Steven Spielberg. Now, Frank Abagnale, Jr.’s story has taken fresh life on the Broadway stage. Nominated for the 2011 Tony Award for Best Musical, the smashing spectacular bedazzles the true-life story (and various exploits) of one of history’s most famous con men—through flashy song and dance, of course. Catch it while you can! Greenville Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

z ot Do N

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SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA May 24–June 9; Various times. Prices vary. Charleston. Talented performers from across the globe unite in Charleston for two weeks of outstanding artistic exhibitions in opera, theatre, dance, music, and more.

MAY 9 - 25

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TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine.

Estates

To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Heather Propp at 864.679.1263 or hpropp@communityjournals.com

2

Homes as distinguished as our readers.

215 E. Wynward Pt. Drive, Salem 5BR, 6.5BA · MLS#1364891 · $3,600,000

820 S. Main St. Unit 304, Greenville

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3BR, 3BA, 2 Half BA · MLS#1388115 · $1,850,000

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Wilson Associates Laura McDonald (864) 640-1929

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12 Hidden Hills Drive, Greenville

Coldwell Banker Caine Carolyn Dowling (864) 360-5100 30mandarincircle.com

Wilson Associates Laura McDonald (864) 640-1929

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

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4BR, 3BA · MLS#1388676 · $730,000 wilsonassociates.net

Coldwell Banker Caine Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007

3BR, 2.5BA · MLS#1388709 · $685,000

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2407 Augusta Street, Greenville 5BR, 4BA · MLS#1388961 · $649,000 Keller Williams Greenville Central Kirsten Zinkann (864) 704-7591 kzinkann@kw.com

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109 Vaughn Ct., Six Mile Lake Keowee JC21 Basswood Ct., Cliffs Falls Keowee MLS#1367583 · $488,682

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MAY 2019 / 143

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SECOND

Glance

East to West

T

he town of West Pelzer holds a small, yet mighty, art community. Thank Andy Gambrell for its latest exposure. An artist and West Pelzer native whose travels include Hong Kong, Paris, New York City, and more, Gambrell is working with his community to showcase the hardworking artists of the Upstate. “We are trying to offer cultural development here,” Gambrell says. Smack in between Greenville and Anderson, West Pelzer will fill its town hall with area artwork for the opening of the GRAND Gallery. This exhibit offers insight to the range of community-committed artists, starting with Greenville-based artist Glen Miller. Miller’s art is inspired by his life in Southern Appalachia, encompassing realism with magical storytelling. Through the exhibit, Gambrell hopes to bridge the gap between rural and urban artists. “In order for Upstate South Carolina to grow,” he says, “regions of the Upstate are going to have to work together.”—Sydney Taylor Portraits by Glen Miller will be on display at the GRAND Gallery in the West Pelzer Municipal Center at 30 Main St, West Pelzer, through May 24th. The exhibit can be seen by appointment during regular business hours. For more information, visit westpelzer.com.

(left to right) Glen Miller. Appalachian Autumn #2, oil on canvas, 2017; Burning, oil on canvas, 2018.

West Pelzer’s new GRAND Gallery bridges an artistic divide

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TOWN May 2019  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN May 2019  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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