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M AY 2 016 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 3851 Hwy 11, Travelers Rest SC 29690, Harry V. Roser, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Walnut Cove Realty, 158 Walnut Valley Parkway, Arden, NC 28704, Dotti Smith, Broker-in-Charge. Copyright Š2014Cliffs Land Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.

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MEMBERSHIP Three lakefront courses. Four in the mountains. Two by Nicklaus, two by Fazio and a dazzling new links course by Gary Player. There are seven in all and with The Cliffs National and Corporate Memberships, they’re all yours to enjoy with family, friends and clients. There is not a membership as vibrant, diverse and convenient in all of America. We invite you to join us for a visit and discover why we say, “There’s life, and then there’s living.”

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M O U N TA I N PA R K

WA L N U T C OV E

K E OW E E V I N E YA R D S

VA L L E Y

K E OW E E FA L L S

K E OW E E S P R I N G S

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Source: MLS Sales Volume 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012

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FIRST

Glance

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Stage Presence: Where: Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center. What: Dr. Gary Robinson conducts the Young Artist Orchestra and Philharmonic (see “Dr. Robinson’s Opus,” page 102). When: October 16, 2014. Photograph by Chad McMillan

Babies smile in their sleep because angels are whispering to their souls.Trust us – we have the inside scoop. stfrancishealth.org/women

M AY 2 0 1 6 / 7

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ENTERTAIN. FORM, FUNCTION & FABULOUS

This is your chance to add a ray of sunshine to any room in your home. This multi-functional piece can be used in the foyer, in the living room, dining room, behind a sofa or as a TV console. Available in solid quartersawn white oak or cherry, in a variety of hand-rubbed finishes. This piece will be crafted only in the year 2016. Own it before it’s history.

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Contents 21 27 41 47

54

THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

WEDDINGS TOWNBUZZ

Folk artist Charles Henderson; a modern twist on Southern hospitality at Savannah’s Brice Hotel; critterinspired children’s books; Philo Floral’s aesthetic arrangements, and more.

TOWN PROFILE

Violinist Rachel Yi’s moment in the spotlight with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra likely won’t be her last.

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STYLE CENTRAL

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MAN ABOUT TOWN

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COLLECTORS’ CALLING

When Susu & George Johnson began collecting art in the early 2000s, they could hardly anticipate their efforts would result in one of the world’s preeminent collections of Southern art. / by Steven Tingle // photography by Paul Mehaffey

DR. ROBINSON’S OPUS

It’s impossible to calculate the impact Dr. Gary Robinson has had after teaching and conducting one of the finest youth orchestras for 30 years. But on the eve of his retirement, we’ll try anyways. / by John Jeter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

Knack Studio’s new showroom in the Village of West Greenville; style inspired by art; how to create your own gallery wall; and artwork that draws upon time immemorial.

While revisiting the site of an embarrassing Vegas encounter, the Man realizes he might have played his cards right after all.

EAT & DRINK

Hand-picked strawberries turned into tasteful tarts; Super ’Nola Natural packs health food with a crunch; Bonnie + Bud’s thoughtful gift boxes for foodies.

DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

Kindred spirits—six artists explore bonds of human connection through abstract expression.

THIS PAGE: The young students of Maestro Gary Robinson practice for hours daily under the tutelage of their conductor, who is set to retire this month. For more, see “Dr. Robinson’s Opus,” page 102. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

COVER: We commissioned this cover of fresh flowers by Elizabeth Seward of Philo Floral, who arranges blooms into organic masterpieces. For more, see “Vase to Vase,” page 56. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

May 10 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter

Por t r ait by Chelsey A sh ford ; (cover-i n-prog ress) by Paul Meha f fey

))) For behind-the-scenes photos and digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

A shot of our May 2016 cover in progress. Floral artist Elizabeth Seward of Philo Floral used a mix of local plants to create a one-ofa-kind sculptural arrangement.

Garden Delight

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hirty years. Maybe it’s your exact age, or your anniversary, or the time it took to find your life’s work, finish your grand novel, or pay off your mortgage.  For Dr. Gary Robinson, thirty years is the length of his symphony, the notes and gestures and hours and flits of the baton to make the finest young musicians even finer. To push them beyond what they believe is their best. To craft a garden of symphonic flowers that leave the mind without words.  Robinson retires this month after thirty years of leading the Young Artist Orchestra of the superb Greenville County Youth Orchestras. The YAO is like a chip off the block of a professional orchestra—it is difficult to distinguish the talent of these young students from the sound of their Greenville Symphony Orchestra counterparts. And Robinson has been their constant gardener, tending to each so that their collective sound is like the height of spring (“Dr. Robinson’s Opus,” page 102). We typically think of art as a product or experience created with intention and artistry. But making art is more than a boxed-in landscape; it’s more than a visual reference. It is expression, embodied. In many ways, our definition of art falls short of its many forms. Consider a flower arrangement, like the delicate stems selected by Elizabeth Seward (who created this year’s cover art; see “Vase to Vase,” page 56). Seward isn’t only attracted to dazzling petals; she enjoys the impermanence of her art form: that these arrangements—in their originality, delicateness, and distinction—will eventually die. In this way, arrangements, like food, music, and most any creation, are ever-changing, evolving, and constantly recreating themselves. Flowers aren’t meant for enjoyment only at peak, while symphonies aren’t meant for ears only at crescendo, while paintings aren’t meant for viewing only in one light, as the Johnson Collection in Spartanburg attests (see “Collectors’ Calling,” page 92). The character of these works alters with time and with setting and with the perspective of the audience. Art is alive, showing something new in each moment. In this way, works are living things: having a beginning, morphing into new variations, then eventually expiring. Maybe if we thought of life like art, we’d make better music—or at least appreciate the beautiful stages of our own garden.

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

Photograph by Blai r K nobel

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @lbknobel

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NOT ALL STORIES ARE FOUND IN BOOKS.

Discover your story at the GCMA. Join the GCMA and get connected with members and art through workshops, travel, and parties! Visit gcma.org/support.

Horace Day (1909-1984) Posner’s Store watercolor on paper

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

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Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) Washington Square, 1952

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NOW ON VIEW in the exhibition The Poetry of Place Learn more about coming exhibitions and events at gcma.org.

GCMA.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

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Smart Home Security From the Ground Up Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

TELL US ABOUT A HIDDEN ARTISTIC TALENT.

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR

I am a perfectly imperfect seamstress, which means I specialize in turning onehour sewing projects into epic, weeks-long undertakings.

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka

You mean my penchant for cutting up old sexist advertising and turning them into feminist collages?

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MARY CATHRYN ARMSTRONG, Kathryn Davé, Courtney Tollison Hartness, John Jeter, Abby Moore Keith, Kathleen Nalley Moore, Stephanie Trotter & HEIDI CORYELL WILLIAMS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS CHELSEY ASHFORD, Caroline Brackett, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Kate Guptill, Alice Ratterree, Cameron Reynolds, Gabrielle Smith & Eli Warren

I love to play music. Taught myself how to play guitar freshman year of college and have been singing and writing music ever since.

EDITORIAL INTERNS Katherine Meis & Bethany Mlinar EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Andrew Huang Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Whitney Fincannon

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MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES NICOLE MULARSKI, Donna Johnston, Annie Langston, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes Making myself presentable to be seen by other humans.

KATE MADDEN DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com DANIELLE CAR DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

I’m an amateur painter. It’s a fun hobby that brings my blood pressure down to where it should be. 

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

We don’t sell systems, we create security solutions. A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

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DOUGLAS J. GREENLAW CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 5) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

16 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Marguer


Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

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18 S. Main St. #302 | Park Place On Main | $1,420,000 3 bedooms, 2 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1319110

110 Huckleberry Ridge | Greenville | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 6 full baths, 7,000 sq. ft., 10 Acres

221 Cureton Street | Augusta Road Area | $1,100,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1313889

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230 Riverside Drive | GCC Area | $899,500 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 13086073

1745 N Main Street | North Main Area | $598,500 3 bedooms, 2 full bath | MLS 1318462

213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $849,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

LE

B VAILA LOT A

58 Rock Creek Drive | GCC | $350,000 Lot | MLS 1317055

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Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

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Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

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BROADWAY 2016-2017

“IT’S SOME KIND OF

WONDERFUL!” Photo: Joan Marcus

–NY1

THE LIN COLN CENTER THEATER PRODUCTION

Kelli O’Hara & Hoon Lee. Photo: Paul Kolnik

BROADWAY ’S BIGGEST NEW HIT!

DI R EC T E D BY

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A vibrant mixed-use development is taking shape on more than 1,000 acres of untouched real estate within the city of Greenville. A smart, flexible plan comprises diverse housing at varying price points, thriving commercial districts and an array of recreational amenities.

Garden photo by Promotion Imaging, LLC

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Fostering a walkable environment, Verdae’s vision ranges from corporate headquarters and niche offices to a village square filled with specialty retailers, local restaurants and professional services, all interconnected by pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, a lush central park and abundant greenspace. It’s happening at Verdae.

Verdae Development Visit Our New Corporate & Sales Office 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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May

2016

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

BLUE MAN GROUP Much more successful than their predecessor groups Yellow Dude Trio and Purple Guy Friends, the Blue Man Group has been rocking the worldwide stage for some 25 years. A unique combination of hypnotic dance moves, colorful visuals, and pulse-pounding music, the all-male troupe delivers an assault—albeit a satisfying one—to each of the human senses. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. May 10–11. Tues–Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

MAY 2016 / 21

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List z

FIDELITY MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES

Paying homage to the drive-in days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks in scenic Falls Park. Snag your spot on the lawn with a warm blanket and take in a diverse selection of family-friendly films under the stars. Adult beverages will be available for purchase, and local food trucks will be curbside for your dining pleasure. And what’s a movie night without plenty of hot popcorn?

REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra gives a special shout-out to all that surrounds us with their final Masterworks performance of the season. Conductor Edvard Tchivzhel and his band of merry musicians unite with members of the Greenville Chorale and the Chicora Voices to present Symphony No. 3, written by Romantic-era composer Gustav Mahler. The evening will also feature vocalist Stacey Rishoi.

If you happen to see a few thousand of these floating rubber duckies making their way down the Reedy River, there’s no need to question your mental sanity. The Duck Derby has been steadily growing over the last few years, with the 2016 goal of 10,000 bathtub beauties to be adopted by community organizations. This year’s race benefits the Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network, Polio Plus, Mauldin Miracle League, EarlyAct FirstKnight, and World Hunger.

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. May 7–8. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $17-$66. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, May 7, 10am–4pm. $10 per duck; $30 for 5. reedyriverduckderby.com

Photo courtesy of the Reedy River Duck Derby

Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. May 4–25. Wed, 8pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / HYMN TO NATURE

Photo courtesy of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra

THE

Make your presence felt, just not literally.

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Whether you like golf or only pretend to like it so you can shamelessly stalk your favorite celebrities in a public place, the BMW Charity Pro-Am has become a centerpiece in the Greenville sporting community. Pairing up the game’s professionals with amateur and celebrity golfers for four days of competition on the Upstate’s most manicured greens, the Pro-Am has amassed more than 10 million dollars for charity and hundreds of thousands in revenue for the region.

Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. May 7–8. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $35. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Locations vary. May 19–22. Thurs–Sun, times vary. $10-$115. bmwusfactory.com/charity-golf/

Photo by Richard Finkelstein, courtesy of the International Ballet

Sure, cracking open a book can be fun. But a live-action retelling of all your favorite fairy tales is even better. The International Ballet will be joined by special guest artists Luca De Poli and Melissa Gelfin of the Cincinnati Ballet for this year’s spring production, bringing to life stories like Sleeping Beauty and Puss in Boots through dance. Additionally, the International Ballet showcase will debut fresh, original pieces alongside some of the craft’s most time-honored works.

LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES

Don’t be surprised if the theater gets a little steamy. The title isn’t the only thing sexy about this French tale of forbidden fruit. Originally written by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, the novel has since been adapted to stage productions and the cult-classic film Cruel Intentions. Having grown weary of the superficial pleasures of their wealthy lifestyle, two former lovers challenge each other to a duel of deception. It’s virtue versus lust in this sordid affair, and someone’s bound to lose. Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thru May 28. Thurs, 8pm; Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com Photo by Fred Rollison, courtesy of South Carolina Charities, Inc.

BMW CHARITY PRO-AM

FEATURES AND FAIRY TALES

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The QX80 Limited adds an even higher level of craftsmanship to the Infiniti QX80’s undeniable presence. Welcome lighting under stainless steel side steps, unique exterior badge, darkened chrome trim, and a dark-chrome finish on substantial 22-inch wheels all translate into refined ruggedness. Travel in the QX80 and savor comfort that could only come from dedication to each individual.

VISIT US TODAY FOR A TEST DRIVE.

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List z

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Quick HITS BLUE RIDGE FEST 2016

z Interested in joining the biggest classic car cruise-in that the Upstate has to offer? Then motor on over to this annual festival, where retro rides, shagging, and prize raffles create the perfect opportunity to give back to community charities like Dot’s Kitchen and the Wilderness Way Camp School. Now over a decade old, Blue Ridge Fest has become the gathering spot for good times and good fun for all; kicking off with the cruise-in, the evening will also feature live beach music with Jim Quick & Coastline, food vendors, and plenty of kid-friendly fun. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, 734 W Main St, Pickens. Fri, May 6, 6pm. Adults, $25; children (7–12), $15; children (6 & under), free. (800) 240-3400, blueridge.coop/blueridgefest

CELEBRATE 90 YEARS

Photos of artwork courtesy of Artisphere

z Back in 1926, Houdini was escaping from an underwater coffin, Puccini’s Turandot opera was making its debut, and a baby by the name of Norma Jeane Mortensen (aka Marilyn Monroe) was born in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the Upstate, another artistic giant was born: the Greenville Little Theatre. To honor 90 years under the spotlight, GLT will host a formal gala event, where guests will be treated to cocktails, delicious appetizers from local restaurants, and a musical revue of the theatre company’s most beloved performances. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. May 6–8. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

SECOND CHANCE

z If you could go back to the past, would you do things differently if you had the chance? That is the question for one widower, who is given the opportunity to re-live the last six weeks with his wife before her passing. At the end of their time together, he is given a choice: trust in the universe’s original decision or exchange his life for hers. It’s a bittersweet, emotional drama, directed by Shannon Rossi. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. May 10–18. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

DOWNTOWN CONDO RONDO

z This tour of downtown living—which coincides with Artisphere—showcases all the glamor, convenience, and possibilities of urban lifestyles. Each stop is a narrative of unique tastes and encapsulates all the things we love about living in the Greenville community. Hosted by the Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, this year’s tour will visit several distinct spaces in the heart of downtown, and proceeds will directly benefit the GSO’s continued efforts to bring music to our ears. Downtown Greenville. Sat, May 14, 10am–5pm. Advance, $20; day of, $25. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

Artisphere There’s something to be said for a community that embraces and supports the local arts yearround. With May comes Artisphere, one of the finest art fairs in the country, and a celebration of hand-crafted, visual, and live arts that the whole family can get on board with. In addition to more artistic ability than Picasso could shake a stick at, there’s Kidsphere for, well, kids’ crafts, and plenty of culinary cuisine to give visitors a true taste of the town. Downtown Greenville. May 13–15. Fri, Noon–8pm; Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–6pm. Free admission. artisphere.org

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GREENVILLE

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T O R O N TO

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Town

ON THE Hal Weiss Linda & Carl Sykes, with Melanie Pouch

Metropolitan Arts Council’s Annual Meeting March 29, 2016 Mark Johnston, Lynn Greer & Kim Sholly

The annual meeting of the Metropolitan Arts Council—held at the Gunter Theatre—presented awards to several trailblazers of the arts in Greenville. Board chairman Charles Ratterree announced a record of more than $2 million was raised in the past year. The proceeds, generated from various donors, provide generous support for the Greenville arts community.

Jack & Leora Riordan

Joyce Alexander, Isabel Forster & Anna Smith

By Chelsey Ashford Photography ))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Beth Lee & Sally Potosky Kim and Colette Kauffman

Sarah & Jonathan Schwartz Alice & Charles Ratterree Alan Ethridge, Cedric Adderley & John Warner

Michael & Elizabeth Fletcher

Louise & Roger Ables with Caroline McIntyre

Jim Burns & Max Metcalf M AY 2 0 1 6 / 2 7

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ON THE

Jules & John Soapes

Town

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Annual Gala

Bobby & Christi Couch with Susan & Karl Frisch

March 19, 2016

Emily Bishop, Suzanne Shirey & Janet Stewart

Guests experienced a night out in New Orleans at the 14th Annual JDRF Gala. More than 325 guests attended to honor the Riordan family and celebrate their work in raising awareness for juvenile diabetes in the Upstate. The night’s highlights included signature New Orleans cocktails and the naming of the Mardi Gras king and queen. The gala raised more than $390,000 for Type 1 diabetes research.

Emily & Duane Ensor

By Chelsey Ashford Photography Jessi & Jack Sizemore

Holly & Blake Julian

Mark & Kate Stewart with David & Sara Ramage

Robin & Reagan Stelling with Collette Kauffman

Burke Royster, Kent Owens & Jim Callaway

Christa Sorauf & Karen Clardy

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Andrew Riordan & Susan Riordan

Barbara & Michael Godfrey with Brad & Summer Jones

John McKillop, Jay Motley, Curt Hall & Greg Scott Colin & Hannah Spellmeyer

Meghan Riordan & Claire Riordan

Joe & Rhiannon Poore

Brad & Lori Schur

Pete & Gregorie Bylenga, Loraine & Marc Smith with Pat Dickinson

Tyler & Lindsey Moore

Ben & Becca Rook with Sharon and Dr. Jerry Youkey

Tracey Wingard & Amy Stansberry

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FEATURED AUGUSTA ROAD AREA LISTINGS

Wendy Walden & Magaly Penn

NEW LISTING!

Community Foundation Legacy Brunch March 13, 2016

Andy Goldsmith & Fred Carpenter

$689,900 • 172 Chapman Road Chanticleer Section VIII

The Community Foundation hosted its annual brunch celebrating 118 of its Legacy Society members and major donors. During brunch, the Community Foundation recognized Doug Kroske, the 2016 Ruth Nicholson Award winner, for his exceptional volunteer work and contribution to the Greenville community. The Poinsett Club catered the special event. By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Sue and Charles Chamberlain

NEW LISTING!

Lesley Pregenzer, Blair Knobel & Ann Bryan Suzi Kroske, Helen Smart & Harriet Goldsmith

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Live Local. Love Local. The Honorable Dick Riley & Betty Farr

Doug Dorman & Sue Priester

Nancy Stanton, Fred Cartwright, Donnice Styles & Dick Wilkerson

864.313.2986 www.VirginiaHayes.com 30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Small Plate Crawl

Jennifer Gould & Ken Mauney

March 24, 2016

Coming Fall 2016

Guests gathered at Roost to celebrate the third successful Greenville Small Plate Crawl. Yelp threw the party, and crawl organizers Laura Huff and Nichole Livengood, as well as Greenville’s new Yelp Community Ambassador Anna Creek, attended. Yelp and Le Creuset provided door prizes, and guests were invited to check in via the Yelp App. The party also featured a coupon draw for Small Plates and the Six and Twenty Spirits Challenge Cocktail.

Helping Manufacturing Thrive

By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Nichole Livengood & Laura Huff

Stephanie Cates & Sara Wooding Kim and Colette Kauffman

Hannah Morris with Maureen & Farmer Redmond

The average salary of manufacturing workers with an associate degree in Greenville County

Courtney Amos, Lena Dunham, Leslie Olson & Hilary Powell

Caroline Gomes & Chris Sweeney

As a workforce development leader in the Upstate for more than five decades, Greenville Technical College launches a new dynamic collaboration between education, industry and community partners at the Center for Manufacturing Innovation. Building upon an educational partnership with Clemson University, CMI was crafted with key input and guided by strong support from area manufacturers, including Bosch Rexroth, Michelin, GE, BMW, League Manufacturing, and Standard Motor Products.

Manufacturers help to drive South Carolina’s economy with $28.90 billion in manufactured goods exported in 2014.

Together, through this unique collaboration, we are working to connect a supremely qualified workforce with leading industry talent needs, so that local companies will be more globally competitive, and our community will continue to thrive. Find out more at CMIgreenville.com.

Stacy Silvers, Kenny Silvers & Kristi Evans

All information is sourced from The Manufacturing Institute, National Association of Manufacturers, Quarterly Workforce Indicators, and US Census Bureau, 2014.

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ON THE Claude & Ginny Huguley

Elaine Annese & Derek Dephouse

Town

Frances & Dave Ellison

Furman University’s Bell Tower Ball April 2, 2016 Furman University honored three distinguished alumni at its inaugural Bell Tower Ball. More than 500 people attended the event, which was held at the TD Convention Center. The ball featured a reception, a seated dinner provided by the TD Center, and dancing. It was an evening spent celebrating the accomplishments of the Furman family and honored alumni. By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Nick & Alison Hollstegge with Andy & Lindsey Waters

Tom & Becky Becherer with Todd Callaway Adelaide & Leo Fackler

Ben & Elaine Barnhill

Sharon & Leonard Lee Rena & Russell Gambrell

Rebecca Sandidge, Yendelela Neely Anderson & Zacobia Ritter Matt & Meredith Rouse

Wesley & Claire Wilson Bray with Caroline & Nick Reinhardt

Sarrin Warfield & Patrick Kerley

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Jennifer Fuller & Kimberley Gilmore David & Wendy Wilson Barbara Guth & Lori Reed Janet & Ken Ries

Eric & Linda Benjamin

Jerry Dempsey & Kay Foster Bob, Ann, Amy, and Philip Ray and Drew Thomas

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ON THE

Town

“Artists Touched by Carl R. Blair” Reception

Brooke & Jenny Figueroa

March 11, 2016 Carl R. Blair’s influence on the Greenville art community is evident in the lives of the students and artists he’s inspired. The Metropolitan Arts Council collaborated with 55 of these artists in an exhibit in his honor. The show’s opening reception was a celebration of Blair and his students, as 250 people gathered to view the diverse talent. The event was organized and catered by Carol Stilwell and Carl’s daughter Ruth Blair. Photography by Gabrielle Smith

Katie Koch, Kacee Lominack & Penn Williams

Ruthie Lair, Carl Blair & Jill Reynolds

Julia & Fabian Unterzaucher Emmie Watson & George Topka

Chet Whigham & Marcela Roman M AY 2 0 1 6 / 3 5

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Bill Rusher & Vince Sordello Rachel Cooter with Brice & Jill Bay

Rose Lane & Chuck Leavell Andrea Cooper with Rob & Stephanie Morgan

Kathleen and David Cull

Danny Crow & Marcus King

Gary & Sheryl Wood

Melissa & Roy Janse

Kirk Fisher & Rita Hunter 36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Backstage Pass with the Rolling Stones’ Chuck Leavell April 12, 2016 It was a night of rock ‘n’ roll at the Upcountry History Museum when legendary pianist and keyboardist Chuck Leavell performed. More than 200 guests spent the night listening to tunes and tales from Leavell’s experiences on tour with the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, and so many more. Chef 360 and Liquid Catering provided food and drinks, and Oskar Blues donated beer for the event. All proceeds support the museum’s mission to connect people, history, and culture.

Ray & Tori Costner

By Chelsey Ashford Photography Les & Jane Hudson

Mac Arnold

Keith & Alex Robinson

Claudia & Jay Malave

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Confidence.

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Kelly Ford & Elizabeth Lewis

Passport to Dance March 10, 2016

Beauty.

Beauty. Juliana Jordan with Chip & Juli Jordan

Grace.

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Guests experienced a journey around the world at the International Ballet’s first signature fundraising event held at the Old Cigar Warehouse. Dancers performed vignettes from ballets famous in Italy, France, Russia, Germany, and the United States. Cribb’s Catering presented dishes inspired from each country, and Liquid Catering prepared the night’s signature drink “Ballet Dancer.” By Chelsey Ashford Photography

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ON THE

Town

Tommy Wyche Memorial Concert

Tom & Debra Strange

April 2, 2016 The Greenville Symphony Orchestra arranged a beautiful night in memory of the late Tommy Wyche, one of Greenville’s beloved community leaders. More than 200 guests attended the Tommy Wyche Memorial Concert at the Peace Center, and then moved to the Westin Poinsett Hotel for a post-concert reception sponsored by the Wyche Law Firm. Attendees snacked on hors d’oeuvres and desserts while Tommy’s son Brad Wyche and Ted Gentry gave speeches.

Anne Woods & Beth Lattimore Hardin

Photography by Will Crooks

Alex Hutchins & Karla Birkel

Mary & Ted Gentry

Marshall & Jeannette Winn Reno & Susan Simmons

SHOES | HANDBAGS | ACCESSORIES Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel, Luba Tchivzhel, Bruce Braun & Sharon Kelley

864 271 9750 | museshoestudio.com 2222 Augusta Road, Greenville M AY 2 0 1 6 / 3 9

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Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

Pictured from left to right: Chuck Werner, Realtor; Fred Moore, EVP Chief Credit Officer; Schaefer Carpenter, EVP Retail Banking Director; John Bostic, VP Mortgage Lender

“It’s rewarding when local businesses are able to work together towards community growth. Independence National Bank considers The Marchant Company as one of its valued partners in handling real estate transactions. Chuck Werner and the rest of the experienced Marchant Team including Tom Marchant and Mikel-Ann Scott can be counted on to provide excellent all-around assistance in this area. We appreciate their hard work.” — Schaefer Carpenter, EVP Retail Banking Director of Independence National Bank

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

www.MarchantCo.com RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Bethany Mlinar

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Kate Furman & Rakan Draz March 19, 2016

Kate and Rakan shared a best friend for years before ever sharing a meal together. After losing count of all the times they had heard about the other, they both knew it was time to meet. Their initial connection was undeniable, and this pleasant surprise soon became history. Two years later, Rakan decided to surprise the love of his life a second time on a romantic getaway weekend surrounded by mountains at the lovely Hotel Domestique. As Kate excitedly handed the concierge her camera for their picture, Rakan dropped to one knee before the majesty of sunset-hued mountains to pop the big question. She, of course, said yes, and the two became one at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, Kate’s home away from home. Kate is the artist behind Kate Furman Jewelry, based at the arts center, and Rakan works at Avison Young. The couple plans to remain in Greenville. RACHAEL MCINTOSH // RACHAEL MCINTOSH PHOTOGRAPHY

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TOWN

Weddings Dana Duffett & Ben Green March 12, 2016 When they met on Furman’s campus four years ago, Dana was still in the middle of her collegiate career, while Ben was wrapping things up. Two years later, Ben remembered the token number of “last” moments that would come with Dana’s senior year. So, it was during this bittersweet rite of passage that he decided to make his move. It was already bound to be a wonderful night since Ben was driving up from Charleston for Dana’s sorority semi-formal, and when he decided to change their plans and start the night with drinks downtown, she agreed. They walked along the Reedy River, Dana happily oblivious, until they came upon a secluded spot where Ben got on one knee beneath a banner of carefully strung love notes and letters. After a tearful “Yes!” from his bride-to-be, the two eventually got their drinks at Pomegranate with Dana’s parents and all of her friends. In a year of lasts, Ben successfully created the best first of Dana’s life, and the start of so many more. The couple held their wedding at the Belfair Clubhouse in Bluffton, SC, and now live in Charleston. AMELIA & DAN HALE // AMELIA + DAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Madison Wynn & Henry Benthall Marshall IV October 10, 2015 There comes a time when every man in love feels the irresistible urge to change his girlfriend’s last name. Six years after they met, HB Marshall decided it was time to put some new letters at the end of college sweetheart Madison’s name. Enlisting the help of their two dogs Sadie and Stella, HB suggested the family go for a walk on the beach. It was not long after they began their sandy excursion when Madison noticed something very different on the dogs’ collars. Instead of their sweet names, the collars read something even sweeter: “Mrs. Marshall. Will you marry me?” Laughter, tears, and quite a lot of barking punctuated her “Yes!” The couple was married by HB’s childhood friend at the Greenfield Plantation in Georgetown, SC. Madison and HB live in Mount Pleasant, where Madison works as an HR assistant at Johnson & Johnson, and HB in sales operations at Carolina Green Energy. VIRGIL BUNAO // VIRGIL BUNAO PHOTOGRAPHY

Erica Lynn Berg & Isaac Edwin Cook December 4, 2015 What happens when two songbirds come together? They fall in love; or at least that was the case for Erica and Isaac when they met on the worship team at NewSpring Church. After a year of harmonizing and playing together, Isaac began to implement the four phases of a successful marriage proposal. Phase One: become extra observant, noting that one of your bride-to-be’s favorite places is the grand Biltmore Estate in Asheville, NC. Phase Two required scouting the landscape for the perfect proposal spot, which also needed plump bushes for concealing a photographer. Phases Three and Four were conducted within the moment, equal parts stealth and romance. Isaac led Erica around the Biltmore, happening upon a gazebo lit by the sunset. The photographer captured the proposal, as well as the unfortunate moment they were attacked by a hive of bees—proving that plans gone awry are sometimes the most memorable. The couple now resides in Spartanburg. CRYSTAL & KEITH CARSON // RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail blair@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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23 West North St., Greenville, SC 29601 864.232.2761 | www.rushwilson.com Open Mon.-Sat. 9:30am - 5:30pm; Closed on Sunday

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We love beautiful homes as much as you do. They make us smile. That’s why we take pride in marketing our clients’ homes more than any other local real estate company. We’re passionate about selling beautiful homes… selling your home. And finding the perfect home for your family, well, that makes us smile, too. When you’re ready to smile, turn to the Upstate’s #1 real estate company.

www.CDanJoyner.com | #BestMoveEver Residential • Commercial Relocation Property Management ©2016 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Seniors Services

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It’s about home. It’s about family. My dad taught me that real estate is more than just buying and selling homes. It’s about family! I live by his words and his way of life by carrying on his tradition of treating every client like family. Life is a journey, and when your journey takes you on the road to buy or sell a home, let me show your family the way home.

Beth Joyner Crigler

REALTOR® GRI, CRS, Luxury Home Specialist 864.420.4718 bethcrigler.net

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Artwork courtesy of Charles Henderson

TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Street Scenes Charles Henderson’s folk art shows Greenville’s changing landscape

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

City Record Charles Henderson captures Greenville’s past and present for future generations

T

hose who have lived in Greenville for any considerable time have noticed a change in the town’s landscape. Historic landmarks yield to new construction. Old buildings are gutted, retrofitted, and reformed into stunning structures for the way we live and do business today, while new, towering structures redefine the city from both street and sky. For some time, Greenville’s been in a constant state of evolution, and self-taught folk artist Charles Henderson has been its unofficial documentarian, chronicling this visual transformation through his detailed ink and watercolor urban landscapes. “I really started with the baseball stadium. From there, I just started going about Greenville and painting what I saw,” Henderson says. Many may recognize Henderson’s work from the Chicora Alley stairwell, where it used to hang. That’s where Betty Bercowski, owner of the Christopher Park Gallery, discovered him. “I’ve known Charles for probably 10 years now, and it has been a delight to see his work develop over time. Without realizing it, he has created a visual record of downtown Greenville through the artistic depiction of many of the city’s buildings,” Bercowski says. Most of Henderson’s urban landscapes are filled with colors elevated in vibrancy from their original source. “His method of applying multiple layers of watercolor creates

Urban Oasis: Henderson (above) depicts Greenville’s evolving cityscape, showing iconic buildings like the Westin Poinsett Hotel, City Hall, and the Army/Navy Store in exaggerated detail, with bold lines and vibrant watercolor. View and purchase Charles Henderson’s art through the Christopher Park Gallery at www. chickenmanart.com. Cards featuring his art are available at the gallery’s storefront at 610-C S Main St, Greenville.

saturated color normally not associated with the medium,” says Bercowski. One series features only a ballpoint pen’s black ink on white paper, Bercowski’s “personal favorites.” Henderson’s line art is equally definitive; he outlines and paints each brick in a façade, each seam in a metal roof. This astute attention to detail is what sets his paintings apart. Henderson paints what he sees, which often includes lighting, signs, trees, and other tiny details. For posterity, this also means that Henderson documents Greenville in a specific moment in time— a moment that may have already come and gone. In a painting of the West End Market, Saffron’s Sidewalk Café, long closed, is the focal point. In another, the iconic downtown Hot Dog King mural peeks between trees (the building is now painted gray and is occupied by Grill Marks). Collectively, Henderson’s paintings visually record decades of Greenville in flux and progress. “Right now, I’m mostly painting historic mill buildings in the West End before they’re all changed or remodeled,” Henderson says. “I want to show a new generation how it used to be.

Artwork courtesy of Charles Henderson

/ by Kathleen Nalley Moore / / portrait by Paul Mehaffey

48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Main Street in downtown Greenville (where nothing is as sweet as a summer night)

It seems there’s an app for just about everything these days, but good times are one thing you still can’t download. While there’s no app for happiness, there is a place for it. It’s a place where check-ins are a warm welcome at hotel front desks, and the best tweets come from the trees lining Main Street. A place where simple things inspire the real “LOL,”“favoriting” is all about your scoop selection, and when you like something it shows by the smile on your face rather than through the click of a button. Set your status to real life happy. (No emoji required.) To learn more, call 800.717.0023.

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Towner

UP

Collector’s Conscience Sandy Rupp, owner of Hampton III Gallery, makes art accessible / by Ruta Fox

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

R

epresenting artists with work in the permanent collection of MoMA, the MET, and the Whitney in New York City, not to mention the National Gallery in Washington, DC, and the Art Institute of Chicago, Hampton III Gallery owner Sandy Rupp has spent more than 25 years curating art. Her collaborations between artists, collectors, museums, and academic institutions form the basis for her South Carolina–focused exhibits. Featuring sculpture, collage, mixed media, prints, and paintings in subjects as varied as still life, figurative work, and landscapes, the Hampton III Gallery offers art aficionados work to fit any budget. Rupp offered some tips on how to start collecting. How long has the Hampton III gallery been in Greenville? >> Actually, we are the oldest art gallery in South Carolina, including Charleston. My father started it in 1970. He was a teacher who had summers off, so he decided to open an art gallery. He had three friends who were artists, so he called it Hampton III. In the late ’60s and early ’70s, there was a nucleus of professional artists in South Carolina who were exhibiting throughout the Southeast. He started with Carl Blair, Emery Bopp, and Darell Koons and soon invited their friends: Leo Twiggs, Jeanet Dreskin, and William Halsey.

Curatorial Tutorial: Sandy Rupp shows a varied stable of artists, many with Southern roots. Pursuing next? She hopes to include work by Jasper Johns.

))) TO READ MORE INTERVIEWS, GO TO TOWNCAROLINA.COM

How did you get into the gallery business? >> I grew up in it because I was surrounded by artwork. There were always artists around; they were like aunts, uncles, and grandparents, as well as mentors to me. The artists in the gallery are still mentoring me; I continue to learn a great deal from them. What hangs in your own home? >> It’s floor-to-ceiling work by all of my artists. If I fall in love with a piece of art here, it goes home with me. And it stays at home. How exactly do you decide on which artist to represent? >> I’m always looking for talent whether I go to exhibitions, research online, or peruse magazines. I’m interested in artists who’ve been influenced and have developed a legacy in South Carolina. They may or may not actually live here now, but either through their childhood, or their work career, they have deeply resonated with South Carolina. But most important is their aesthetic; each artist needs to have a unique voice. How do you describe the gallery? >> I can’t really describe it. It’s unpredictable as to what I might show. It has to have a depth of quality, but I don’t look for a particular style. I do feel that my artists are the foundation for the visual culture of South Carolina, and that it’s important that gallery owners, collectors, and museums pass along their visual history to the next generation. Is any type of art hotter than any other type right now? >> Oh, everyone asks me that! I am not in the market to follow trends or encourage artists to work in a certain style. I urge artists to express themselves and follow their path. Hopefully, I will find collectors that respond to that. The dialogue between the artist, the collector, and the gallery guests always delights and surprises me. Should people just buy what they like or have a strategy to pursue a balanced collection? >> People definitely need to buy what they love. When a collector looks at art, they bring their own aesthetic to the process. So, I find that often an unconscious connection will surface as a collection develops. Can you give us some tips for buying art on a budget? >> First, ask a gallery dealer if they will allow you to do payments. You could also start with etchings or lithographs, but be careful that the prints have come from the artist’s hand and are not commercially reproduced. There isn’t a rule that one medium is less expensive than another. However, sometimes works on paper tend to be less expensive than works on canvas. Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Suite #10, Taylors. (864) 268-2771, hamptoniiigallery.com

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Hom e i s... holding close and letting go.

Proud supporters of the American Dream

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TOP

Bunk

Abstract Charm The Brice Hotel in Savannah is a mix of Southern character and modern appeal

A

s a general rule, Southerners tend to adopt a wary attitude towards outsiders. So it helps that the California-based Kimpton Hotels & Restaurant Group has taken into account our distinctive Southern traits with the design and personality of the Brice Hotel in downtown Savannah. Located on Bay Street—within view of the Savannah waterfront—in a former Holiday Inn property, the Brice has been carefully curated as a charismatic reflection of its unique surroundings. Though contemporary in style, the inclusion of Southern design staples—stately grandfather clocks, tufted cushions, vintage fire-engine-red cruiser bicycles, and an overflowing library of books—exudes an ambience of relaxation and familiarity to guests from the moment they check in. “Everything that was done during the renovation was done with great thought and reason,” explains the Brice’s general manager Mitch Linder. “One of the things that we get the most from people walking in the hotel is the immediate warmth. They feel like they’re decompressing.” A closer inspection of the chevron carpet designs and white-wall accent pieces found in each of the hotel’s 146 rooms reveals a deeper layer of tribute to Georgia’s Hostess City. The latter pays homage to the uneven cobblestones of the River Street waterfront, the former to Savannah’s many brick-patterned walkways. The color palette—a blend of earthy greens and grays, crisp whites, and bright pops of yellow—has a youthful feel that is still luxurious. An old-fashioned mirror-topped desk stocked with an array of goodies from local purveyors the Byrd Cookie Company and Savannah Bee Company adds to the classic charm. There are even seersucker robes for the genteel comfort-seeker. Premier accommodations are outfitted with private balconies, many of which overlook a spacious pool area furnished with bright umbrellas and adjustable lounge pads. At the heart of the hotel sits the Secret Garden, a sprawling, open-air patio space thriving with lush greenery. Created as a sort of “oasis,” Linder

Southern Infusion: Though the Brice Hotel appears thoroughly modern in its approach to decor, the property still pays homage to its homestead with chevron carpeting that recalls brick walkways, a wellstocked library, seersucker robes, and goods from local purveyors like the Byrd Cookie Company and Savannah Bee Company.

says that the garden is often a guest favorite and serves as a serene escape from the typical “hustle and bustle” of a tourist season that is prominent nearly eleven months out of the year. On clear days, guests are encouraged to lounge outside with a novel, and in the evenings, tea lights strung between the breezeways set a soft tone for intimate conversation over cocktails and a delicious meal from the hotel’s in-house Italian restaurant Pacci. With so many hotel offerings throughout the area, it can be difficult to hone in on a sweet spot. The Brice seems to have found a niche in its twenty-first-century take on hospitality. A designated cocktail hour is a daily habit for the eclectic mix of guests (and their dogs) and the genial staff is on hand to provide everything from directions to a bottle of Champagne. “The personality of our staff is what sets the tones for our guests,” Linder says. “We empower our staff to read our guests and find out what surprises and delights them. I think that’s what sets us apart.”

The Brice Hotel 601 E Bay St, Savannah, Georgia (912) 238-1200, bricehotel.com Rates start at $219/night

Photographs courtesy of the Brice Hotel

/ by Mary Cathryn Arm strong

52 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photographs courtesy of the Brice Hotel

Caption Head: (clockwise, from left) t ext here text here

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TOWN

Profile

Violin Virtuoso Fifteen-year-old Rachel Yi takes on Mendelssohn this month / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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er left wrist quivers as her right hand pushes and pulls a horsehair bow over taut strings. A lock of shiny black hair flies across her brow, while her tiny body sways in time, a chin-thrust punctuating the end of the movement. The five-foot-one dynamo transports listeners to other worlds with her Vigato violin, but don’t call her a prodigy. “I feel happy when I hear that, but at the same time, I don’t know if that’s the right word for me,” shares the quiet 15-year-old. “I feel like a lot of people have expectations of that, and I don’t know if I can meet them. It’s not too heavy that I can’t bear it, but it weighs on me.” And how could it not?

Rachel Yi has been preparing for this month’s solo most of her life. On May 14, she’ll stand alone in the spotlight to perform Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64, with members of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, as part of the Young Artist Orchestra’s season-ending show. “If you talk about violin technique, it’s not a very hard piece,” she elaborates. “Tchaikovsky and Paganini, those are hard for the fingers and bow. The hardest part for me with Mendelssohn is understanding what he’s trying to tell you through his phrasing—what was going on, and what kind of character he was portraying.” While most teens toy with the heart of their crush, Rachel is probing the head of a nineteenth-century German composer. “Rachel is rare,” explains Greenville County Youth Orchestra’s executive director Holly Caprell. “She has a finesse. She can finesse her instrument when she needs to. It’s easy to be technical. It’s harder to convey the emotional message, and she does. That’s an extraordinary thing for her age.” Caprell bestows even more praise upon the violinist for how she leads the elite studentmusicians who compose GCYO’s Young Artist Orchestra. “What

Bow Forth: Violinist Rachel Yi and the GCYO’s Young Artist Orchestra will perform “shoulder to shoulder” with members of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra at the Peace Center for the Performing Arts’ Gunter Theatre, Sat, May 14, 7:30 p.m. Adults, $27; children, $10. For more information: gcyo.net.

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sets her apart from others that talented is that she’s very humble about it,” Caprell confides. “It’s refreshing when a young person with that amount of talent, at such a young age, doesn’t let it go to their head.” The child of immigrants, Rachel balances old and new ways as easily as she runs her scales. At home, she speaks Korean, watches Korean variety shows and listens to K-Pop music. Her father works at General Electric, while her mother Min-Jung oversees her homeschooling. This allows the Simpsonville sophomore to practice five hours a day and attend the Fine Arts Center each afternoon for music classes. Rachel fills her limited free time with typical student activities: snap-chatting and “hanging out at the mall with friends.” Min-Jung admits she didn’t anticipate her daughter’s rare musical gift when she encouraged her to take violin lessons at age five. But mom believes she’s identified the source of her offspring’s skill, saying, “My husband, he loves music. He’s not a musician, but he loves to play the piano. Her love of music came from him.” Musicians of Rachel’s ability tend to leave the Upstate for brighter lights and bigger stages. The violin virtuoso hopes to one day attend Juilliard in New York City, or the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Such institutions are taking note after her firstplace finishes at the Charleston Young Artist Competition and the South Carolina Music Teachers National Association Competition, in addition to appearances at Piccolo Spoleto and the Heifetz International Music Institute in Virginia. Rachel picks up her bow, turns the page on her practice piece and states, “I want to share with as many people as possible, the amazingness, the beauty of the music. As a performer, I want to be a connector to Classical music and the audience; I want to share a story that is really interesting, so they can see what Classical music is all about.” Encore! Encore!

“Rachel is rare. She can finesse her instrument when she needs to. It’s easy to be technical. It’s harder to convey the emotional message, and she does. That’s an extraordinary thing for her age.”—Holly Caprell

YI PLAYS ON A VIGATO VIOLIN, BY ITALIAN DESIGNER LAURA VIGATO (BORN 1958). THE INSTRUMENT OFFERS EASE OF PLAYABILITY WITH POWERFUL SOUND.

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Design Flower Child: (Left) Elizabeth Seward, owner of Philo Floral, finds inspiration in the contradictory, controversial, and masculine elements of florals.

Vase to Vase

Elizabeth Seward considers the facets of flowers at Philo Floral / by Jac Valitchka

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

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“When I was thinking of my company, I was in philosophy class and we were studying the Greeks at the time. I thought, I really want philosophy, psychology, and flowers to be drawn into one concept.” —Elizabeth Seward

Ephemeral Beauties: (This page) The fleeting nature of flowers attracts Seward. Each of her arrangements can be considered a specific moment in time— creation to extinction— within which beauty briefly exists.

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arvard University calls it the effects of home ecology. Closer to home in Greenville, Philo Floral owner Elizabeth Seward, when talking about the importance of flowers, says, “I want to convince people that flowers are necessary.” And what do flowers do, according to the Home Ecology of Flowers Study at Harvard University? Increase compassion and kindness for others; decrease anxiety, worry, and depression; and provide a boost of energy, happiness, and enthusiasm. Sure, your $8 bunch of Virginia Tulips from the Fresh Market might do the trick, but Seward does one better: she creates a floral moment—an experience, really. And it is precisely within that moment of time—the window from creation to extinction—that, to her, is where the true beauty lies. And, the darker the better. “If flowers came in black, I would love it,” Seward explains, laughing, saying that may make her sound too goth, too punk. But therein also lies the paradoxical nature of this floral designer—she’s working with elements in nature that are notoriously light, airy, delicate, and feminine, but she’s drawn to the more contradictory, controversial, and masculine facets. “I like dark, moody, saturated colors. Like winter rose, they go against the grain. They like the shade and cold and come out in a super dark, saturated feel.”

Seward, who has a degree in horticulture, got her fix of that kind of “flowerscape” with a recent Dutch Masters Study workshop she attended in March in New York City. Imagine the dark, burgundy-draped velvet in the still-life paintings of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: these were the cues in composition and color that Seward was craving to apply to her work. And it’s work that feels familiar as an art form—albeit one that eventually withers, which is part of its allure. “I never like the idea of working on a painting for a month. I liked the idea of working on a painting for an hour and then being done with it and moving on. So, I think that’s why florals have been my thing.” Unless it’s at her own home. “I only grow cactus because they’re really easy,” she says, laughing again at yet another contradiction. But it is the hellebore (or “Lenten rose,” as they poke through in late winter), especially the ones that bloom like a bounty of blood oranges, that Seward is attracted to, often either for her own designs or while working at the Station, a collaborative arts studio in the Village of West Greenville. She works with Statice Floral Couture, a full-time wedding florist, which has a different vision than what she has for Philo. “When I was thinking of my company, I was in philosophy class and we were studying the Greeks at the time. I thought I really want philosophy, psychology, and flowers to be drawn into one concept, and philo means ‘an affinity for a certain thing.’” Seward’s are the types of arrangements that don’t just take up space in the room, they bring atmosphere, feeling, and effect. The creation itself is a moment to experience before it’s gone. You don’t need an Ivy League study to appreciate that—it’s the thought that counts. Philo Floral (864) 608-9902 philofloral.com

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Wall to Wall Local talent goes public in three Metropolitan Arts Council galleries / by Abby Moore Keith

hen it comes to good art—you know, the kind that stirs your insides—it’s not always found en plein air. Enthusiasts shouldn’t have to book flights to Paris to experience the exquisite, thanks to the Metropolitan Arts Council. Providing a variety of support for the local arts community, MAC oversees three distinct galleries showcasing the best visual masterpieces around. MAC Gallery // One-Stop Open Studios Retrospective >> Take a leisurely stroll through the West End, and you might just find yourself at the MAC Gallery, a tribute to local talent and Greenville’s only public art gallery. This hub of creative ingenuity is home to the Open Studios exhibit in November, and the One-Stop Open Studios Retrospective in May. Dovetailing Artisphere (May 13–15), this exhibit features local artists

who’ve participated in Open Studios since its inception in 2002. Stop by to view the works of Lindsay McPhail, Marty Epp-Carter, Tom Flowers, and more. MAC Gallery, located at 16 Augusta St, Greenville, will be displaying One-Stop Open Studios Retrospective through May 27. Join artists on Saturday, May 16, from 6–9 p.m. for an opening reception. The gallery is open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Centre Stage Gallery // Yvonne Arrowood >> A synergic cooperative between the visual and dramatic arts, Centre Stage has opened viewing space for MAC member artists since 2005. This partnership allows for a unique celebration of talent and professionalism across the area’s arts community, and the exhibits often coincide with the playhouse’s production schedule. This May, the Centre Stage gallery presents the works of local oil painter Yvonne Arrowood. A portrait expert with a flair for Old Master reproductions, Arrowood’s creations project emotions that tell their own stories. Centre Stage Art Gallery, located at 501 River St, Greenville, will be displaying the works of Yvonne Arrowood through the month of May. The gallery is open Tuesday–Friday, 2–6 p.m. TD Gallery at Greenville Chamber of Commerce // Lorraine Martinie and Jo Ann Taylor >> They say don’t mix business and pleasure, but when pleasure is a watercolor landscape or a pastel portrait, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce doesn’t seem to mind. Showcasing visual works throughout the entire first floor, the newly renovated Chamber partnered with MAC in 2008 to create the TD Gallery. This month the gallery will be highlighting the works of two South Carolina favorites: Lorrain Martinie and Jo Ann Taylor. Preferring pastels and watercolor media, Martinie chooses subject matter that excites her, as seen in the piece, Fiery Sky. Jo Ann Taylor considers herself an evolving artist; she’s not afraid to embrace new techniques and materials. This bold nature appears often in her work, which is featured in private collections across the world. TD Gallery at the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, located at 24 Cleveland St, Greenville, will be displaying the works of Lorraine Martinie and Jo Ann Taylor through May 22. The gallery is open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Drawing a Crowd: The Metropolitan Arts Council supports artists and arts initiatives through its generous grants program, awarding nearly $400,000 toward Greenville County efforts in 2015. Additionally, it supports three city galleries to increase public awareness of local art.

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MAY 21 AUGUST 13 AUGUST 19

SATURDAY NIGHT LIGHTS, TRY LIVE AUCTION GALA, TRYON IN

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Creating Stronger Families An impact spotlight on our partners

The Family Effect is grateful to have a partner in Greenville Women Giving! Together, we’re working to help young children and their parents overcome the trauma of addiction in the family home. Many more families will find hope and healing thanks to the generous members of GWG. – Scott Dishman, The Family Effect

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The Family Effect, through programs like Serenity Place, works to reduce addiction as a leading cause of family collapse in the Upstate. Greenville Women Giving’s grants funded a new residential treatment protocol for Serenity Place and helped subsidize the construction of Serenity Place’s new therapeutic treatment building for children. Together, the partnership is building a brighter Greenville, especially for younger generations.

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Giving together for the good of our community. Come join us!

greenvillewomengiving.org | 864-361-1393 |

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// illustartion by Alice Ratterree

St(Art) Here The renowned Artisphere festival comes back to downtown Greenville, May 13–15

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Green Hill Landscaping creates garden spaces fit for Eden / by Kathleen Nalley

Animal Magnetism: Jean Hunt, author of a series of children’s books inspired by her real-life experiences with animals, has created a coloring book to benefit the new Cancer Survivors Park. Additionally, this month, the South Carolina Children’s Theatre is staging a play based on Hunt’s works: Mattie, Bogey & Blackbeard’s Lost Treasure, May 20–22, 153 Augusta St, Greenville. For more information, go to scchildrenstheatre.org.

Creature Comforts Jean Hunt’s life story inspired her to create a world of her own

/ by Stephanie Trotter // portrait by Eli Warren

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t’s a real-life fable that’ll make you perk up your ears. Our tale begins with a stray cat’s strut and ends with the feisty feline raising funds for the Children’s Garden inside the Cancer Survivors Park. But we’re pouncing ahead of ourselves. Let’s paws for a moment and start at the beginning. Once upon a time, Greenville native Jean Hunt moved to a quaint cottage on Boggy Branch Plantation in the Lowcountry. Jean’s husband Julian was fighting cancer and wanted to be near his doctors in Charleston. “It’s nothing fancy,” she says, as she describes her magical, coastal hideaway. “But when you go outside and relax, it helps you heal, and that’s what happened to us. It’s a spiritual, healing place.” One afternoon, as the Hunts returned from Julian’s treatments, emotionally and physically drained, a scrawny black-and-white cat wandered out of the woods to greet them in the cottage driveway. Later that night, while the couple sat reflecting upon the marsh, the cat came back with a raccoon and squirrel by its side. “We went and got Fancy Feast and nuts, and they ate side-by-side on my porch every single day after that,” Jean recalls. “Then, they’d sit and make noises to each other, and we’d laugh and try to guess what they were talking about.”

As Julian gained health, the cat gained a name: Bogey. The furball grew fat and earned house privileges as well, and that’s when Jean asked a friend to paint Bogey’s portrait. In turn, the artist encouraged the big-hearted grandmother to write a children’s book starring the plantation prowler and his four-legged friends. When the Hunts returned to Greenville, Jean wrote a book, and then another, and another, and another. Since 2009, she’s sold more than 6,000 copies, all featuring Bogey and his sidekicks, and their peppy leader, a young girl named Mattie. “I love how Bogey, and Randy the raccoon, and all the animals are different, but they are such good friends,” Jean shares in her soft Southern lilt. “I wanted to write beyond a cute book. I wanted to write books with morals.” The series and its success showcase Jean’s love of animals and kids. The Hunts have donated all profits, totaling $28,000, to the Greenville Humane Society. The author recently compiled The Mattie and Bogey Coloring Book, which will benefit the Children’s Garden inside Cancer Survivors Park, in downtown Greenville along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. The 80-page creation includes drawings from Jean’s illustrators, Caroline Lott and Zach Franzen, as well as dozens of pictures by local students. “It adds another degree to the survivor story,” explains Kay Roper, executive director of Survivors Park. “Bogey and nature helped save Julian, and now the animals and the Children’s Garden will provide healing and hope to young cancer patients, parents, and care providers.” Visitors won’t find this story’s whiskered hero in the Children’s Garden when it opens in 2017. Bogey passed away, after a long, happy life with the Hunts. But Jean now has a new feline friend rubbing against her ankles. She’s been spending time with Cleveland the Cat, who lives inside the park. In fact, a book about Cleveland may be in the works. Wouldn’t that be purrfect? Find out where to pick up a copy of The Mattie and Bogey Coloring Book at cancersurvivorspark.org, or at (864) 255-5010.

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SHELF

Life

Book Arts

These gorgeous hardcovers have style and substance

Sonnets, Flash Powder Projects, 2016 By Terri Bright

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ine art photographer Terri Bright’s first book delivers more than two decades of work by the Furman professor, who once worked solely as a painter. Bright now uses her camera to compose poetic images of everyday scenes, minimal frames that invite reflection. “In Sonnets, I create quiet, lyrical narratives from the everyday— inorganic forms disclose life-like characteristics, randomly placed objects seem purposeful, bent frames become graceful. These images are like small meditations, granting permission to pause, and creating space for contemplation. Forgotten items and ordinary spaces possess a kind of wilted beauty that alternately suggest playfulness, tranquility, melancholy and desire,” she says. The book includes 39 color plates and has a limited run of 500 copies. Additionally, the publisher’s website offers four book-plus-print options—all the more opportunity to take pleasure in looking.—Blair Knobel $40, available for purchase by the artist (terribrightphotography.com) or via flashpowderprojects.com

Spatial Value: Terri Bright’s Sonnets collapses more than 20 years of the photographer’s meditative work into her first limited-edition release, while Greenville-based designer Barb Blair returns with Furniture Makes the Room, her second how-to book on furniture restoration.

Furniture Makes the Room, Chronicle Books, 2016

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reak the rules. Resist what’s trending. Surround yourself with what you love. These are the mantras that designer Barb Blair inspires us to live by. In her second book Furniture Makes the Room, Blair focuses on the tetris-like mobility of shelves, the versatility of dining room tables, and the personality of unconventional design. Tranquility prevails throughout Blair’s airy spaces of 15 room makeovers with showstopping statement pieces declaring that rules are meant to be broken. She instructs that furniture has multiple lives, and spaces are given new life with the addition of a strip of color, pattern, or even a funky knob. The book includes how-tos on everything from stripping paint to distressing furniture to more technical applications like ombré lettering. Regardless of the extent of the makeover, Blair always lines each drawer with decorative paper, noting, “The little details are so important to me.”—Bethany Mlinar $28, available locally at Knack and Barnes and Noble, or via chroniclebooks.com

Photographs (Sonnets) by Paul Mehaffey; (Furniture) by Cameron Reynolds

By Barb Blair

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Green Hill Landscaping creates garden spaces fit for Eden / by Kathleen Nalley

Horse of a Different Color: Christine Mariotti is one of sixteen Tryonarea artists selected to create artwork for the Art of the Horse, a yearlong project from Our Carolina Foothills, a nonprofit working to promote the four-town area of Landrum, SC, and Tryon, Saluda, and Columbus, NC. The finished fiberglass horses will be auctioned off at an event later this year, with part of the proceeds going to Our Carolina Foothills.

Sixteen Hands

A unique public art project invites new connections in the Carolina foothills / by Heidi Coryell Williams

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// portrait by Eli Warren

he reflective coat, long bristling mane, and velvety nose of a horse invites connection. Fingers splay. Eyes lock, and the arm extends intentionally, carefully. Once, then twice. “The first thing people do is touch them, make contact,” offers Mindy Wiener, who is coordinating the Art of the Horse, a yearlong public art project and marketing campaign designed to promote tourism and foster connectivity between the foothills towns of Landrum, South Carolina, and Saluda, Columbus, and Tryon, North Carolina. For the past year, Wiener has headed up the Art of the Horse on behalf of Our Carolina Foothills, a nonprofit jointmarketing venture that promotes “Four Towns, Two States, One Great Experience” in Polk County’s foothills and the Upstate. They all share an equestrian heritage as a place for riding, raising, and trading horses. Modern-day Tryon International Equestrian Center has become an international hub for many of the world’s top equestrian athletes. It offers riding facilities, as well as places to spectate, dine, shop, and share a love of horses. The events hosted at the equestrian center are supported by hospitality and tourism offerings in all the neighboring foothills towns. So, when it came time to consider ways to visually connect the four communities, Wiener looked to the innate connectivity of the horse. The project encompasses sixteen plain white, fiberglass horses that local artists have transformed into unique works of art to be displayed in the

various communities. The final step in the Art of the Horse will be auctioning the art pieces off in a unique fundraiser, public art, and marketing campaign. The first of the horses were just unveiled in April, and more will be revealed this month. But the 16 fiberglass figures, each 16 hands tall—life-size by any measure—have been coming to life inside the studios of regional artists and artisans since last year. Career artist and art educator Christine Mariotti, who came to Tryon from Long Beach, California, has been studying Chinese brushstroke painting for ten years. She is now composing two horses for the Art of the Horse: one commissioned by a local business and the other inspired by her ever-evolving interest in Eastern art. While some horses are reflective of the area’s geography or have ties to causes such as “Save the Bees” (think a bumblebee-themed horse), others are simply art for the sake of art, including a linear piece by a Greenville-based Iranian artist entitled Night and Day, which uses the clean white fiberglass as a canvas for line and boundary shapes. Mariotti’s horse, inspired by Chinese pottery, is layered in texture, color, and history—from a hand-painted crackle to sculpted, three-dimensional medallions, and saddle adornments designed to mimic the glazes and formality of early Chinese sculpture. The work has taken hours of study, preparation, and execution, so the end result will be a striking, irresistibly touchable creation.

For more information about the Art of the Horse events, auctions, and updates, visit ourcarolinafoothills.com.

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CUSTOM BUILT HOME IN COBBLESTONE

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Home is beautifully appointed and works well for many lifestyles. Highly desired Eastside neighborhood.

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PAST

Lives

Target Practice Iconic painter Jasper Johns shows at the Greenville County Museum of Art

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his spring and summer, the Greenville County Museum of Art will exhibit approximately 25 paintings, drawings, and prints by our nation’s preeminent living artist (and Southern native), 85-year-old Jasper Johns. The works on exhibit represent one-third of Johns’s art held in the museum’s permanent collection, and span from the 1970s to 2010s. Johns, a native of Augusta, Georgia, grew up in Allendale, Columbia, and Sumter, and attended the University of South Carolina for three semesters before moving to New York in the early 1950s. After a brief stint in the military, Johns returned to New York and befriended several well-known figures in the city’s art world. After his first solo exhibition in 1958, Johns catapulted to the forefront of a new wave of American artists creating Pop Art and the new Minimal Art. In his early decades, he focused on what he described as “things the mind already knows”: images such as the American flag, targets, numbers, and mundane household items. In the immediate post–World War II and burgeoning Cold War era, his flag paintings became iconic images that brought him celebrity status. In the 1980s, his works became less inhibited and more personal and psychologically revealing. Over the decades, Johns has maintained his focus on flags and targets, albeit incorporating them into complex works that provide an “opportunity” for viewers to “participate” and “construct meaning” for themselves. Johns’s works will be on display at the GCMA until September 11, 2016. Courtney Tollison Hartness, Ph.D., teaches history at Furman University.

Jasper Johns, Target with Four Faces, 1968. Greenville County Museum of Art. Art© Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

/ by Courtney Tollison Hartness, Ph. D.

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HAIR | MAKE-UP | NAILS | ACCESSORIES

794 East Washington Street. Greenville, SC | 864-235-3336

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Central

STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Piece Keeper Barb Blair of Knack Studios uses furniture as her canvas

Photograph by Cameron Reynolds

Make Your Mark:

In Blair’s new book Furniture Makes the Room, she encourages playful updates to tired furniture, such as handdone patterns on a blank sofa.

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Shop

Modern Revival

Furniture designer Barb Blair opens her new showroom in the Village

/ by Andrew Huang

// photography by Cameron Reynolds

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arb Blair has mastered second acts. The author, furniture designer, and owner of Knack Studio built her business by finding and reinvigorating time-worn furniture. For 2016, she brought that expertise to bear on 580 Perry Avenue, turning an abandoned storefront in the Village of West Greenville into her new showroom and studio, its opening coinciding with the release of her second book Furniture Makes the Room. After moving from her former location on Lois Avenue, Blair took the opportunity to design the perfect space to showcase her work. “It’s always really important to me to have good natural light, so that’s why I designed the front the way I did,” she says. Sunlight pours through floor-to-ceiling windows, bathing the showroom’s natural hardwood floors and whitepainted brick walls in soft, clean light. A wall—itself adorned with a mural of a Pacific Northwest forest painted by artist Annie Koelle—separates the showroom from a back workshop, which overlooks Lois Avenue.

Blair’s own handiwork is neatly arranged along the side walls, modern bombshells that are barely recognizable as the staid classic pieces they once were. There are between eight and ten pieces on the showroom floor at a time—a byproduct of Blair’s intention to produce cohesive collections instead of a stream of furniture. Meanwhile, open shelving—stocked with creative home goods and gifts—fills the spaces between Blair’s signature work. “I love incorporating the shop’s modernity with the more eclectic, more bohemian nature of the furniture,” she says. “Not everything I do is super colorful, but a lot of times, I do have a lot of color going on, so it’s nice to have a really neutral surface for everything to pop on.”

Living Color: Author and furniture designer Barb Blair incorporates bohemian pieces into her new, modern showroom on Perry Avenue.

Knack Studio 580 Perry Avenue, Greenville (864) 412-8361, knackstudios.com

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THE

Look

Print Worthy Make a statement in bold color, form, and function / by Laura Linen

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

ON KAREN: Printed sleeveless shift dress by Jack’s

by BB Dakota, $68. From Savvy, savvygreenville. com; fascinator hat, $30. From Lou Lou Boutiques, loulouboutiques.com; Lauren Hope ABBA earrings in hibiscus ink, $78. From Monkee’s of the West End, monkeesofthewestend.com; black monogramming cuff bracelet, $45. From Lou Lou Boutiques; Wynne shoes in black kid suede by Sigerson Morrison, $275. From Muse Shoe Studio, museshoestudio.com; (opposite) Gigi Catie bubble bag in bright blue, $198. From Monkee’s of the West End

SPECIAL THANKS: Model Karen Lopez Jordan (Millie Lewis Greenville); hair and makeup by Isabelle Schreier (Belle Maquillage); and the Greenville County Museum of Art

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Museum Muse: The inspiration for our look on model Karen Lopez Jordan is Joseph Lambert Cain’s Memories of New Orleans, circa 1945 (oil on Masonite), in the background at the Greenville County Museum of Art.

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THE

Home

Hang Tight Mix and match your favorite things to maximize a gallery wall / by Caroline Brackett // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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allery walls aren’t fit for only fine art. You can display virtually anything that pleases you. The trick is to start with large objects first, then stagger remaining pieces around them with equal spacing, filling in gaps with smaller pieces or ephemera. Select neutral frames like black, white, wood, or metallic, and treat your wall like a canvas. In no time, you’ll have a collection fit for a museum—or, at least, an impressive addition to your own home.

1 Calligraphy brush, $98. 4 Black and white ink landscape, $298. 8 Cast turtle shell on rope, $162. 11 Pair of green velvet pillows with leopard tape, $240 each. All from Carolina Furniture & Interiors; 2 Woodblock print, $195. 3 Mounted horns, $220. 5 Arrow sign, $27. 9 Swamp Rabbit sign, $45. 10 Vintage abstract oil, $295. 12 Vintage caned bench, $1,895. All from the Rock House Antiques; 6 Original art by Dorothy Shain, Finding Flora: Southern California, available via dorothyshain.com; 7 Satellite mirror, $118. From 4Rooms

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THE

Object Marking Time: Justin Oberste’s canvases bear layers of materials, cracks, impressions, and worn-away areas that suggest an organic evolution, much like the experience of life itself.

3

Sense & His Ability Eric Brown Design exhibits Justin Oberste’s layered work

8 3 B p

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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s the sun moves across the sky, yin and yang gradually trade places with each other, revealing what was obscured and obscuring what was revealed. The mixed media art created by Justin Oberste is an exploration of past, present, and future. The encrusted surfaces of his pieces are rich with symbolism. Breaking through layers of plaster, rich jewels appear that represent one’s true self, obscured by a myriad of conflicting influences. The hieroglyphic-like incisions are deeply-etched markings that imply a surface that erodes with time. These components represent a life’s journey riddled with darkness and light, the beautiful and the grotesque, as well as repression and recovery. Oberste channels all of these things in his recent exhibit Neglect and Nurture. “Influences make us who we are. Neglect and nurture, when channeled, can awaken the artful soul,” says Eric Brown. Eric Brown has curated the collection of Justin Oberste’s work, which may be viewed by appointment at Eric Brown Design, 101A Augusta St, Greenville, beginning May 15. For more information, call (864) 233-4442.

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

What Happens in Vegas The Man goes for gold in the Silver State

T

he girl sitting next to me was one of the most beautiful women I’d seen in my entire life. I was at a bar in the middle of the Bellagio Hotel’s casino, sipping a gin and tonic and steadily losing at video poker. The woman had taken the empty seat next to me and ordered a glass of wine. I guessed her to be in her mid-twenties, and she was dressed elegantly in a grey cashmere sweater and black pencil skirt. Her hair was the color of maple syrup and fell in waves over her shoulders. She put a $20 in the video poker machine built into the bar, then turned her head and caught me staring. I smiled. She smiled back, and said, “Do you have a strategy?” Now, I’ve long believed there is not a more optimistic creature on earth than a middle-aged man who has been drinking. You see it all the time. Guys with pot-bellies and comb-overs chatting up cute bartenders and waitresses half their age. Confident that a beautiful and intelligent young woman is just dying for the opportunity to go home with an obnoxious and tipsy older man. While I didn’t have a comb-over back then, I was a bit chubby and had an unfortunate affinity for khaki pants and sweater vests. As the gorgeous woman in grey cashmere kept chatting with me, I was certain she was smitten by my witty banter and mysterious aura. I figured she was like me, traveling alone, in

town for a convention, ready to let loose in Vegas for a night. After we finished a second round of drinks, she placed her hand on top of mine and asked if I happened to be staying at the Bellagio. I gave her a sly grin and pulled my room key out of my pocket. When she said “I’d love to see your room,” a jolt of excitement shot through my body, and I thought to myself, “I am a god among men.” She then leaned in close and whispered, “It will be $1,500.” All of the blood must have drained from my face because she suddenly looked concerned and said, “Are you OK?” When I didn’t answer, she gave a sympathetic look and moved to the other end of the bar, where she struck up a conversation with another schmuck. Last month I found myself back in Vegas, sitting at the same bar next to an equally if not more gorgeous woman, the one who’s been my constant companion for the past six years. The beautiful blonde who inexplicably enjoys my company sipped a glass of Chardonnay while I told her the story of what happened over a decade ago at the same bar. When I finished, the beautiful blonde chuckled and said, “Wow, $1,500. That would have been the most expensive thirty seconds of your life.” “C’mon,” I said. “It would’ve been at least two minutes.” She shook her head, “Ever the optimist.”

88 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TA K E F L I G H T:

(this page) Marie Hull, Red Parrots, 1925, oil on canvas, 25 x 25 in.; (opposite) William Halsey, Inferno, 1983, mixed media, 48 x 48 in.

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Collectors

CALLING CALLING Collectors’ CALLING IN THE EARLY 2000S, SPARTANBURG RESIDENTS SUSAN AND GEORGE JOHNSON BEGAN COLLECTING SOUTHERN ART. BUT WHAT BEGAN AS A LOCAL FOCUS E XPANDED INTO A BROADER SCOPE OF ARTISTS FROM HALSEY TO ALBERS. TODAY, THE JOHNSON COLLECTION IS ONE OF THE PREEMINENT COLLECTIONS OF THE SOUTHEAST, PERHAPS THE WORLD. THANKFULLY, ITS RESTING GROUND IS RIGHT NE XT DOOR.

by S T E V E N portraits by artwork courtesy of

T INGL E PA UL ME H A F F E Y T HE JOHNS ON C OL L E C T ION

by STE PANIE TROTTE R

photography by PAUL M E H A FFEY

M AMR MACAYH Y 22001166 5 / / 99 733 5

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OW WN N // tt oo w w nn cc aa rr oo ll ii nn aa .. cc oo m m 96 42 TT O

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Photograph cour tesy of Joh n Nolan

It M

the British and the burning of his home by local patriots in the 1770s. After Vardry McBee bought the lion’s share of the village in 1815, it didn’t take him long to continue harnessing the river for commercial use. McBee was, perhaps, the greatest and most ambitious entrepreneur the city has ever known. One of the first of his scores of local businesses was a stone gristmill on the edge of the upper Reedy Falls in 1816. He built a larger mill right next to it in 1829 (the foundation wall can still be seen along the riverwalk and are the oldest ruins in downtown). Greenville, just like any town of the era, depended on grains as a staple of daily life. Gristmills, built on seemingly any available stream or river, were a vital part of early American society (by 1860, South Carolina averaged 40 per county). Agriculture was a specialty of McBee’s, and his crops thrived. Like most Southern farmers before the Civil War, he grew plenty of corn. His Reedy mill turned it into hominy, grits, and cornmeal to allow locals the convenience of processed grains to make cooking easier. Greenville’s first real manufacturing industry also utilized the waterpower of the river—although this time it wasn’t for grains. For nearly a century, what is now known as the Peace Center complex was the site of one of the busiest and most successful businesses in Greenville’s early history. In 1835, the Gower & Cox Wagon HAS HUMBLE BEGINNINGS. GREENVILLE’S REEDY RIVER STARTS and Carriage Factory was started by WITH A FEW SPRINGS SEEPING OUT OF THE GROUND JUST NORTH blacksmiths Ebenezer Gower and Thomas IN TRAVELERS REST OFF EBENEZER CHURCH ROAD. IT GATHERS M. Cox. When Ebenezer’s younger brother STRENGTH, BREADTH, AND FORCE AS IT FLOWS—TOUCHING Thomas Claghorn (T.C.) Gower joined the THOUSANDS OF LIVES BY THE TIME IT REACHES ITS MOST company they changed their name to the PROMINENT FEATURE IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. IT MEANDERS Gower, Cox and Gower Carriage Factory. FOR 16 MILES TO LAKE CONESTEE, ULTIMATELY CONTINUING FOR In 1853, H.C. Markley became a ANOTHER 57 MILES TO LAKE GREENWOOD. THE COMPLEXITY OF fourth partner in the business—then ITS USES AND ITS ENDURING PRESENCE IS WORTH REFLECTION. Main Street Spartanburg possesses a unique and named Gower, Cox and Markley Carriage WHETHER FOR REFRESHMENT, COMMERCIAL ENTERPRISES, surprisingly sophisticated charm. On a recent Thursday Factory—and they continued to prosper, ATTRACTIVE SCENIC VISTAS, OR JUST FOR RECREATION, THE afternoon as the temperature reached 75, locals and erecting the present three-and-a-half-story REEDY FLOWS THROUGH GREENVILLE’S HISTORY WITH VITAL tourists walked up and down the sidewalks past brick building in 1857, with a distinctive IMPORTANCE. IN MANY WAYS, THE FORTUNES AND FAILURES OF restaurants, ice cream parlors, and a pub where lowslanted roofline (now Larkin’s by the River BOTH THE RIVER AND THE CITY ARE INDELIBLY INTERTWINED. playing classic rock leaked through the door frames. Restaurant). The building originally was At the Coffee Bar, a handful of college-aged kids, used for carriage storage and display, with many Wofford or Converse students, sipped espressos thevisuality,” lower floor as a blacksmith and lattes while a few of their compatriots played optic perception and Erinserving says. “What you have here shop. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, there C O RN E R STO N E S : Frisbee in 1770s–1870s: an open lawn across the street. At Pink are all these different colors, but if you made them all was the same From the earliest times of Greenville’s Josef Albers’s a lumber shed on the bank of the river exactly where the TD on Main, several women, no doubt inspired by the shape, they would cover the exact same amount of surface Naples Yellow habitation, the Reedy River has A Century of Growth is also today and a with wheelhouse the banks next Center + 2 Green Amphitheatre season’s first hint of warm weather, fawned Lily role in attracting area. He’s playing depth of on perception byright simply playedover a central to the Main Street Bridge. A paint shop (now the Wyche Pavilion), + Black, oil on Pulitzer dresses and Kate Spade accessories. few overlaying color because there is no shading. There really is no peopleAaround its banks.board, For the 25 3/8 x carriage and wagon warehouses, a hardware store and office steps away at the Wild Ace Pizza & Pub, a family sat perspective here, yet you still feel like some of these objects 19 5/8 in. (above) Native Americans, its clear, cool waters were crucial. Even more building S. Maininto St.)space were and among the other in the is an example on the patio eagerly awaiting their orders. And right are(426 protruding receding into buildings space simply due important was its ability to draw wildlife in from of the Johnson next door, inside the Johnson Collection Gallery, the to color. This piece is exciting as an art historian because it is surrounding fields and hills, making the area an Collection’s gallery’s curator, a young woman named Erin Corralesboth a great artistic work, and it’s also an archival document diverse oeuvre. A CENTURY, important hunting ground for the local Cherokee FOR NEARLY WHAT IS NOW KNOWN AS THE PEACE Diaz, attempted to explain a piece of modern art to a because all of his notations are written on the bottom.” The and Catawba tribes. Our first colonial settler Richard CENTER COMPLEX WAS THE SITE OF ONE OF THE BUSIEST AND MOST confused-looking visitor. visitor leans in and notices a line of small handwritten print Pearis was also drawn to the area for its waters, SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSES IN GREENVILLE’S HISTORY, THE GOWER The painting is by Josef Albers, who along on the bottom of the painting: EARLY cardamom yellow, emerald choosing to build his plantation Great Plains near & COX WAGON AND CARRIAGE FACTORY. with his wife Anni, were among the leading green, ivory black. “As an art historian, being able to take that the Reedy Falls. Its natural water power was first pioneers of twentieth-century modernism. information and think about his process is exciting,” Erin says. harnessed by Pearispiece with isa titled gristmill built on the factory’s complex. in this the that Greenville facility outpaced This particular Naples Yellow “Because withProduction a piece like is so formalistic, people all of the upperand falls. Though was key to the otherstypically south ofsay Washington, D.C.,doputting Greenville the map as Center +edge 2 Green + Black consists of Pearis’ a seriespresence of ‘My kid could that.’ But while it on is laying down village’s the river’s utilization, a transportation long before textilessense became the city’s enduring green, black, andorigins yellowand quadrilaterals, with yellowhis time here was limited shapes andhub color, there’s a strong of philosophy and by to circumstances of the Revolutionary War, namely his siding with claim understanding to fame. The Reedy’s waters needed resource appearing be the dominant color. “He’s playing with about how the were mind aprocesses color.” for the


Portrait courtesy of the Johnson Collection

1870s–1970s: Flourishing Textiles and a Dying River

Photograph cour tesy of Joh n Nolan

CU LT U R AL AM BAS SAD O RS :

I had never heard of Josef Albers, and I’ll admit that when I saw Naples Yellow Center + 2 Green + Black, my first thought— which I kept to myself—was, “My kid could do that.” But as Erin described the complexities of the piece, my perception began to change. I started to see the work as much more than just random blocks of color. I gained an appreciation for the thought that went into the piece and what Albers was trying to convey. This speaks to the transformative power of art and the importance of art education. But I still had a long way to go. For as much philosophy, playfulness, and history that lies within that Josef Albers oil painting, it is just one piece of the Johnson Collection, a museum-worthy collection that encompasses more than 1,200 objects that chronicle the cultural evolution of the American South. George and Susan (“Susu”) Johnson are passionate about elevating the cultural landscape of George’s hometown of Spartanburg and the state of South Carolina in general. The couple shares a long history of philanthropy and public service.

“WITH A PIECE LIKE THIS THAT IS SO FORMALISTIC, PEOPLE T YPICALLY SAY ‘MY KID COULD DO THAT.’ BUT WHILE IT IS L AYING DOWN SHAPES AND COLOR, THERE’S A STRONG SENSE OF PHILOSOPHY AND UNDERSTANDING ABOUT HOW THE MIND PROCESSES COLOR.”

Susan ("Susu") and George Johnson (above) began collecting Carolina painters in 2002. Their collection grew to encompass more than 1,200 objects of Southern art.

— Erin Corrales-Diaz, Ph.D.

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F IE L D RE S EARCH:

Erin Corrales-Diaz, Ph.D., curator of the Johnson Collection Gallery, also serves as a visiting scholar at Wofford College and Converse College. Here, she stands before the painting The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet’s Assault, July 3, 1863, by James Walker, circa 1864–1870, oil on canvas, 90 x 240 in. It will be on view soon at the Spartanburg Public Library.

George is the founder and chairman of Johnson Development Associates, Inc., and was a founder and former executive of Extended Stay America, Blockbuster Entertainment, and Advance America. He served as a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives and is a past director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. He also served as chair of the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce and as a member of the Board of Trustees of Converse College. Susu is a life trustee of Converse College and a former member of the Spartanburg City Council. She has also served on the boards of Brookgreen Gardens and Spoleto Festival USA. The Johnsons quietly began collecting in the early 2000s with a focus on paintings by Carolina artists. But as time went on and the collection grew, so did the variety of artists, themes, and styles. The collection expanded beyond the Carolinas to encompass all types of Southern art. In 2006, the Johnsons purchased a collection of paintings and sculptures by William Melton Halsey, a Charleston, South Carolina, native who unlike his contemporaries was not content on painting narrative landscapes. (Think moonlight and magnolias.) Halsey took a different direction, and through his work in Abstract Expressionism became a pioneer of modern art in the South. Soon after purchasing the Halsey collection, the Johnsons added more works by modern Southern painters including Marie Hull, Will Henry Stevens, and John McCrady.

THE JOHNSONS QUIETLY BEGAN COLLECTING WITH A FOCUS ON PAINTINGS BY CAROLINA ARTISTS. AS TIME WENT ON AND THE COLLECTION GREW, SO DID THE VARIET Y OF ARTISTS, THEMES, AND ST YLES.

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REGI ON A L RI TES:

Works in the Johnson Gallery Collection include William Halsey’s Sundance, 1995, oil on board, 48 x 48 in. (right); and Will Henry Stevens’s Smoky Mountain Landscape, oil on canvas, 30 1/8 x 36 1/8 in. (far right).

As the private collection continued to grow, the Johnsons’ daughter Susanna, who at the time was an art history major at Washington & Lee University, suggested that the family find a way to share the collection with the community. The Johnsons embraced this concept, and soon many pieces of the collection were on display not only in Spartanburg but also on tour throughout the South and beyond. Over the years, three books have been published on the collection’s holdings. The latest book, published last year, is titled Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection, featuring “some forty paintings created between 1880 and 1940—including landscapes and genre scenes . . . Scenic Impressions traces an international aesthetic’s journey to and germination in the American South.” Each book is complemented with traveling exhibitions, which, staying true to the Johnson family’s philanthropic spirit, are loaned to participating museums without the typical fees. The Johnson Collection Gallery is open to the public free of charge each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon and also during downtown Spartanburg’s Artwalk series, held the third Thursday of each month between 5–8 p.m. Beyond the gallery, pieces of the collection can be seen at various locations throughout Spartanburg, including One Morgan Square, Wofford College, and Converse College. Soon, one of the collection’s most jaw-dropping pieces, a seven-and-a-half-foot-by-twenty-foot oil painting by James Walker titled The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet’s Assault, July 3, 1863, will adorn a wall in the Spartanburg Public Library. All of the works can be viewed on the collection’s website, which serves as a digital library searchable by artist or by year. Erin, the gallery’s curator who joined last fall, is helping the Johnsons fulfill their promise to use the collection to “enrich and educate the local community on the rich history and diverse cultures of the region.” Erin holds a Ph.D. in art history from the University of North Carolina and serves as a visiting scholar at both Wofford College and Converse College. “This position is unique in that it is both curatorial and teaching,” Erin says. “Those are my two loves, and I feel very lucky that I’m able to do both.” Erin teaches a class at Wofford College in the fall and a class at Converse College in the spring. “This position is so appealing,” Erin says, “because I get to do the research, learn about the paintings in this collection, highlight an aspect of American art and art history in the South that has not really been talked about, and then put it into a classroom with a bunch of Southerners and let them celebrate it.” This gives the students the opportunity to interact with real, museum-quality art. “They don’t have to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Art Institute of Chicago,” Erin says. “They can go to Spartanburg.”

“SOUTHERN ART IS NOT JUST REPRESENTATIONAL; IT CAN BE VERY MODERN, VERY CUT TING EDGE,” ERIN SAYS. “THIS IS ACTUALLY THE FIRST TIME MANY OF THESE OBJECTS HAVE EVER BEEN OUT IN A GALLERY. — Erin Corrales-Diaz, Ph.D.

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A R T D IRE CT IO N :

(below left) Anne Goldthwaite, Frances Greene Nix, circa 19351940, oil on canvas, 49.5 x 39.5 in.; (below middle) John McCrady, Boys Games. Oil on canvas, 30 x 41 in.; (below right) David Henderson, director of the Johnson Collection, stands before the work of Hale Woodruff, Return of Europa, circa 1958, oil on canvas, 52 x 60 in.

The Johnson Collection continues to grow. Some of the most recent acquisitions are now being exhibited at the gallery in A Process of Learning: Educating the Avant-Garde at Black Mountain College. “Southern art is not just representational; it can be very modern, very cutting edge,” Erin says. “This is actually the first time many of these objects have ever been out in a gallery.” The art, and artists, of Black Mountain College are trending right now. This past winter, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston produced a comprehensive museum exhibition on the school, as did the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum in Berlin last summer. The Johnson Gallery’s Black Mountain College exhibition will run through the end of May, and the objects from the exhibition will be on future display at the AC Spartanburg Hotel scheduled to open in 2017. So what began quietly and modestly in 2002 with a small oil painting of three red roses by Eugene Healan Thomason has now grown into a collection that recently received the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award, South Carolina’s highest arts distinction. The collection’s latest project is an “innovative study of the achievements and legacies of women artists working in and inspired by the American South.” The project will include a publication and a traveling exhibition, and is just another example of the Johnsons’ passion for Southern art and their commitment to sharing it with the world.

A P R O CE S S OF L E A R NING : E DUC AT ING T HE AVA N T- G A R DE AT B L A CK MOUN TA IN C OL L E GE Black Mountain College began in 1933 when a scholar named John A. Rice set out to create a new type of college experience that would embrace John Dewey’s progressive educational principles. Dewey believed that education and learning should be social and interactive, and that students should be allowed to interact with the curriculum. This was a radical idea at the time, and the fact it took shape in the mountains of Western North Carolina is a testament to the movement’s audacity. The college combined communal living with an informal class structure and was one of the few schools at the time dedicated to educational and artistic experimentation. The school also strove for self-sufficiency, with both students and faculty working on the school’s farm, in the kitchen, and on construction projects. By the ’40s, Black Mountain’s faculty included some of the greatest artists and thinkers of its time: Walter Gropius, Jacob Lawrence, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, John Cage, Alfred Kazin, Merce Cunningham, and Paul Goodman. Students were exposed to a wide range of ideas and innovations including Buckminster Fuller’s Geodesic Dome and Charles Olson’s Projective Verse. The college’s guest lectures included William Carlos Williams and Albert Einstein. It’s hard to believe that during the middle of the twentieth century, Black Mountain, North Carolina, was a hub of American cultural production. Like Einstein, Josef and Anni Albers were also refugees from Germany. Both had been students

at the Bauhaus, the experimental German art school that combined crafts and fine arts with modern processes. The school was closed in 1933 by the Nazi regime, and, soon after, Rice convinced the couple to establish the visual arts curriculum at Black Mountain College. Knowing very little English, the couple used the universal language of art to communicate with the students. While Josef focused on exploring printmaking techniques, abstract painting, and writing, Anni made extraordinary weavings and developed new textiles. The couple stayed at Black Mountain College until 1949, and the following year moved to Connecticut, where Josef became chairman of the Department of Design at the Yale University School of Art. By 1953, Black Mountain College was running out of steam. Many of the students and faculty had moved on to San Francisco or New York, and the school was suffering from a lack of administrative discipline. In a storm of mounting debt, internal disputes, and lackluster motivation, the school closed its doors in 1957. But the impact of Black Mountain College on the American art scene has been monumental. Abstract painter Kenneth Noland, who studied at the school, has said, “it really became kind of recognized [at BMC] that art could be anything, and could be made out of anything, and that it didn’t necessarily cross boundaries.” View the exhibition, on display through May 27, at the Johnson Collection Gallery, 154 W Main St, Spartanburg. For more, go to thejohnsoncollection.org.

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Artisphere Weekend

one place

. one stop . lots of art April 26 – May 27, 2016 A retrospective exhibit of Greenville Open Studios artists from 2002 – 2015

metropolitanartscouncil

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Everyone has an ArtCard, even the President.

Get yours today. When you contribute $50 or more, you will receive an ArtCard, good for buy-one, get-one-free tickets to a performance at each of the following for one year: Centre Stage Greenville Chorale Greenville Little Theatre Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Center (select shows only, call 467-3000 for details) South Carolina Children’s Theatre The Warehouse Theatre After only two uses, the ArtCard, has paid for itself, and using it is a great way to sample Greenville’s outstanding cultural community at a substantial savings. You can get an ArtCard through PayPal on our website, www.greenvillearts.com. We hope you will support our efforts as Greenville’s trusted champion of the arts.

Metropolitan Arts Council • 16 Augusta Street • Greenville, South Carolina 29601 (864) 467-3132 • mac@greenvilleARTS.com • www.greenvilleARTS.com

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DR. ROBINSON’S

F O R 3 0 Y E A R S , G A RY RO B I N S O N H A S L E D O N E O F T H E F I N E S T O R C H E S T R A S O F T H E S O U T H E A S T. T H A T M A N Y O F H I S M U S I C I A N S A R E N ’ T O L D E N O U G H T O VO T E I S O F LITTLE CONCERN TO THIS RETIRING MAESTRO OF THE YOUNG ARTIST ORCHESTRA, A L E G AC Y T H AT W I L L C O N T I N U E T H RO U G H E AC H M OV E M E N T OF HIS STUDENT PROTÉGÉS.

by JOHN JETE R

photography by PAUL M E H A FFEY

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It

Here’s to you, Dr. Robinson: the British and the burning his home by After 30ofyears of local patriots in the 1770s. teaching young musicians via lion’s After Vardry McBee bought the Greenville share of the village inthe 1815, it didn’t take Youth him long to continue County harnessing the Orchestras’ river for commercial use. McBeeYoung was, Artistmost program, perhaps, the greatest and ambitious Robinson will retire entrepreneur the city has ever known. One this month. He of the first of his scores of local businesses leaves a legacy that was a stone gristmill on the edge of the includes students upper Reedy Falls in 1816. built a larger who’veHe gone to the mill right next to it inlikes 1829of(the foundation Juilliard wall can still be seen and along riverwalk thethe Boston Conservatory. and are the oldest ruins in downtown). Earlier Greenville, just like any townthis of year, the era, Robinson the life. depended on grains as a staplewon of daily Carl R. Blair Award Gristmills, built on seemingly any available Commitment to stream or river, were aforvital part of early Arts Education from American society (by 1860, South Carolina the Metropolitan per county). was consumed the likes of Led Zeppelin and averaged The Who.40 Then Arts Agriculture Council. a specialty of McBee’s, and his crops he found classical music. thrived. Like most Southern farmers before At the University of Connecticut, he says, “I transitioned from art major to music, and thereby began thestudying Civil War, he grew plenty of corn. His classical music in earnest, and it became Reedy one of my milllife turned it into hominy, grits, and passions at that point, an overwhelming passion to the cornmeal to allow locals the convenience of point where there are whole decades’ worth of popular processed grains to make cooking easier. music I completely missed.” Greenville’s first real manufacturing It was in college that he found his earliest and also most utilized the waterpower of industry influential mentor. “The conducting professor there, the river—although this time it wasn’t for Jerome Laszloffy, took me aside and noticed something grains. For nearly a century, what is now in me, and he gave me special training and special known as the Peace Center complex was opportunities that probably were not available other the siteto of one of the busiest and most students.” Laszloffy speaks with the same affection for a successful businesses in Greenville’s early LISTENING TO GARY ROBINSON TALK IS MUCH former student who remains “very vivid in my life.” history. In 1835, the Gower & Cox Wagon HAS HUMBLE BEGINNINGS. GREENVILLE’S REEDY RIVER STARTS LIKE WATCHING A BRILLIANT COMPOSER “He has great enthusiasm, great passion for music, and Carriage Factory was started by WITH A FEW SPRINGS SEEPING OUT OF THE great GROUND JUST NORTH passion for learning,” says the conductor who LABOR OVER EVERY NOTE, ONE AFTER blacksmiths Ebenezer Gower and Thomas IN TRAVELERS REST OFF EBENEZER CHURCHbegan ROAD. IT GATHERS teaching at UConn in 1967. “He’s a very warm ANOTHER, EACH ONE COMPLEMENTING M. sincerity Cox. When STRENGTH, BREADTH, AND FORCETHE AS IT FLOWS—TOUCHING personality, very easy to deal with, and his is Ebenezer’s younger brother NEXTTHOUSANDS TO CREATE AOF COHESIVE Thomas Claghorn LIVES BYMASTERPIECE. THE TIME IT REACHES ITS MOST genuine. As a young man, he was very easy to work with. (T.C.) Gower joined the company they changed their name to the PROMINENT FEATURE IN THE HEART OF THE MEANDERS IN THE QUIET PRESENCE OF THIS ELEGANT, WeCITY. just got IT along well, and it went beyond a studentGower, Cox FOR 16 MILES TO LAKE CONESTEE, ULTIMATELY CONTINUING FOR teacher relationship because we became good friends and Gower Carriage Factory. SELF-EFFACING ARTIST-MUSICIAN, YOU FEEL H.C.I Markley became a ANOTHER 57 MILES TO LAKE GREENWOOD. THE COMPLEXITY OFeach other, andInI 1853, and communicated well with did what YOURSELF BECOME IMMERSED IN A MAN WHO, fourth partner in the business—then ITS USES AND ITS ENDURING PRESENCE IS WORTH REFLECTION. could for him.” LIKE THE CREATORS OF THE CLASSICAL WORKS Gower, WHETHER FOR REFRESHMENT, COMMERCIAL ENTERPRISES, Laszloffy, now 85 and retired in Mesa,named Arizona, servedCox and Markley Carriage HE INTERPRETS FROM HIS CONDUCTORS’ ATTRACTIVE SCENIC VISTAS, OR JUST FOR RECREATION, as musical director THE for 38 seasons at the Factory—and New Britain they continued to prosper, PODIUM, CRAFTS HISTHROUGH THOUGHTSGREENVILLE’S THAT THEN HISTORY Symphony Orchestra. He gave his youngerecting protégé athe present three-and-a-half-story REEDY FLOWS WITH VITAL chance to conduct not just OF the university’s symphony butin 1857, with a distinctive brick building IN MANY WAYS, THE FORTUNES AND FAILURES PLAY IMPORTANCE. ALOUD AS SEAMLESS MELODIES. the NBSO, as well. “I felt he was worthy slanted of that kind of (now Larkin’s by the River roofline BOTH THE RIVER AND THE CITY ARE INDELIBLY INTERTWINED. Take these few bars: “We get ourselves allied with or exposure, for that experience. I feel like Restaurant). he needed that. The building originally was involved with something that requires our deep resources and is I’ve always been very fond of him.” So isused everyone else for carriage storage and display, with demanding and exhausting, but deeply satisfying for us.” you talk with about the 61-year-old maestro. the lower floor serving as a blacksmith Long pauses float between his words; well-trained artists wen Caprell trombone shop. By thenow last plays decades of the innineteenth century, there was From He themuses earliest understand the power of well-placed silence. thistimes way of Greenville’s afreelance gigs around New York City.river exactly where the TD lumber shed on the bank of the for nearly an hour during a gorgeous spring morning, The Greenvillian was born a year after habitation, thereminiscing Reedy River has Amphitheatre is today and a wheelhouse on the banks right next about his last 30 years as conductor of the top-tier of Greenville Robinson left a job in Mississippi to played a central role in attracting to the Main Street Bridge. A paint start shop (now the Wyche Pavilion), County Youth Orchestras’ five ensembles. He steps downitsasbanks. For the at the Fine Arts Center. Today, Caprell people around carriage and wagon warehouses, a hardware store and office directorNative of the Americans, Young Artist its Orchestra in May. gives his former teacher and conductor for clear, cool waters were crucial. Even more building (426 S. Main St.) were among the other buildings in the “I’veimportant worked out a formula thattoseems work for four years plenty of credit for his current situation. “He’s was its ability drawtowildlife inthe from orchestra. That formula is not necessarily goingthe to carry definitely a large part of that, a large part of my success. surrounding fields and hills, making area itaninto the nextimportant 30 years, so having someone else come in with a fresh He NEARLY definitely helped with my professional development in AS THE PEACE hunting ground for the local Cherokee FOR A CENTURY, WHAT IS NOW KNOWN concept, and who has a lot of years ahead of him to develop it, is a lot of ways.” and Catawba tribes. Our first colonial settler Richard CENTER COMPLEX WAS THE SITE OF ONE OF THE BUSIEST AND MOST better for the program.” Caprell recently played in a production of The Addams Pearis was also drawn to the area for its waters, SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSES IN GREENVILLE’S EARLY HISTORY, THE GOWER The choosing program isn’t looking forward to his departure, but Family musical in New Jersey and plays in regular shows to build his plantation Great Plains near & COX WAGON AND CARRIAGE FACTORY. you’d never hear such a thing from the mellow maestro himself. with the Hot Shim Sham Orchestra, a swing band. “Dr. the Reedy Falls. Its natural water power was first He doesn’t beat his own drum, though he is a timpanist and Robinson was one of the driving factors to keep on harnessed by Pearis with a gristmill built on the factory’s Production the Greenville facility outpaced all percussionist. going,” he says. “He wascomplex. kind of the tough-loveinteacher. edge of the upper falls. Though Pearis’ presence was key to the others southdone, of Washington, D.C., putting Greenville on the map as Robinson started playing drums as a teenager in Storrs, a You have to get the work but he’s still supportive. village’s origins and the river’s utilization, his time here was limited transportation textiles became the city’s enduring village in rural eastern Connecticut. His first band Street Corner But hard. He’sagot his own way hub aboutlong him,before really pushing by circumstances of the Revolutionary War, namely his siding with and claim to fame. all The Reedy’s played mostly original songs. “Generally, those are bands not and driving encouraging at the samewaters time.” were a needed resource for the good enough to play covers,” he says. Growing up in the ’70s, he Caprell sympathizes with his mother Holly, who

O

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Photograph cour tesy of Joh n Nolan

1770s–1870s: A Century of Growth


“ D R . R O B I N S O N WA S O N E O F T H E D R I V I N G F A C T O R S T O K E E P O N G O I N G ,” S AY S O W E N C A P R E L L . “ H E WA S K I N D O F T H E T O U G H - L O V E T E A C H E R . Y O U H AV E T O G E T T H E W O R K D O N E , B U T H E ’ S STILL SUPPORTIVE. H E ’ S G O T H I S O W N WAY A B O U T H I M , R E A L LY P U S H I N G A N D D R I V I N G A N D E N C O U R A G I N G A L L A T T H E S A M E T I M E .”

Photograph cour tesy of Joh n Nolan

1870s–1970s: Flourishing Textiles and a Dying River

Classic(al) Rocker: Hailing from Connecticut, Robinson played drums in a high school rock band called Street Corner. At the University of Connecticut, he says, “I transitioned from art major to music, and thereby began studying classical music in earnest, and it became one of my life passions at that point, an overwhelming passion to the point where there are whole decades’ worth of popular music I completely missed.”

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“THOSE KIDS, THE ONES WHO GO TO CURTIS, CLEVELAND, JUILLIARD, THEY ARE THE EXCEPTION, B UT WE DON’T WORK EXCLUSIVELY FOR KIDS WHO ARE THE EXCEPTION. WE HAVE A STRONG SET OF STUDENTS THAT WE ARE WORKING WITH, AND THEY ARE APPROACHING IT FROM THEIR INDIVIDUAL LIFE’S PERSPECTIVE. WE DON’T WORK JUST FOR THE KIDS WHO ARE GOING TO BE THE STARS; WE COALESCE THEIR SKILLS SO THAT WHEN THEY HIT THE STAGE . . . THEY BECOME ONE.”—GARY ROBINSON

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Final Bow: Robinson coaxes the best out of his students because of his commitment to their success, which involves playing masterworks of world-class orchestras. His final program with the orchestra will be on Saturday, May 14, at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre, where the students will perform Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, op. 64, E minor, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 8, op. 93.

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happens to be GCYO’s executive director and had to choose Robinson’s replacement. “That’s going to be a challenge, I’d say,” he says. “Not knowing who’s down in that area anymore, I don’t have any idea who they have, but they might have to reach far and wide. It’s going to be hard, no matter who you pick. They’re going to have a little bit of growing to do, with some big shoes to fill.” Says Holly: “You know, we have tapped a replacement—you can’t say replacement, because he has no replacement— but we have someone to take over for him.” he GCYO hasn’t yet named the new director for the flagship orchestra, which is among the ensembles that annually enroll 300 students: the Philharmonic, the intermediate and advanced symphony for middle- through high schoolaged musicians; the Sinfonia and Junior Sinfonia, intermediate-level honors ensembles; and Chamber Strings, for the less-experienced set. Robinson’s impact on the countless students who’ve been under his direction is inestimable, Holly says. “Oh, my gosh, I don’t know that you can really quantify it. For 30 years, he’s had anywhere from 50 to 100 kids under his baton, exceptional kids.” Two of them were her own, including Owen. “They went off to music school, and both of them, in talking to them the first couple of years after they went off to college, they said, ‘Wow, the orchestra here (at school) isn’t as good as the youth orchestra.’ He has a lifelong impact on the kids, even those kids who don’t go on to be professional musicians.” His friendships apparently last forever, too. “I have known Gary, Dr. Robinson, for 27 years,” says his boss, Roy Fluhrer, the Ph.D. director of the Fine Arts Center, “and have watched him build the kind of youth orchestra that causes many to say, ‘Youth orchestra? They don’t sound like any youth orchestra I’ve heard.’” He sounds themes that many others voice about Robinson’s enduring and widespread impact. “How many musicians has he trained that are playing in other orchestras, who are teaching, who are making cultural contributions to their communities? Don’t know. I do know that he has changed lives, not just students, but mine, too,” he says. The work involved is enormous and runs year-round. That’s because his charges don’t mess around with amateur pieces—they play the same masterworks worldclass orchestras perform. Included in the program for his final bow at the podium on May 14 at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre are Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, op. 64, E minor, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 8, op. 93. Jon Grier, the Ph.D. composer-in-residence at the Fine Arts Center, and still another admirer with a multi-decadelong relationship with Robinson, wrote the program notes for the evening: “It has been my privilege these last 28 years to call Gary Robinson my colleague, collaborator, and treasured friend. His sophisticated musicianship and tireless devotion to his students have spurred me to strive and be never self-satisfied.” Grier, whose original compositions the YAO has performed, penned Canonic Fanfares to honor the maestro. The “series of boisterous canons” carefully deploys notes that spell out G-F#-A-C as a nod to the Fine Arts Center and G-A-D for Robinson’s initials; his middle name is Auguste. “The amazingly mature sound you are hearing from these flowering young musicians tonight—and on every GCYO concert in my memory,” Grier’s notes say, “comes about precisely because he has . . . relentlessly put the students first. The music sounds as it does because he regards the players as young musicians, full of enormous potential and capable of playing great music and playing it well. The results speak for themselves.”

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While many educators might name favorite students, Robinson doesn’t. “It’s important to note that they did that, they did that,” he says—you can practically hear his vocal chords strike the italics. “And you perhaps gave them an opportunity in which they could enlarge their skills. Those are the best students, the ones who go on, but without naming names, you can say that graduates from the Youth Orchestra have gone on to most of the major conservatories in the United States—Curtis Institute of Music, Cleveland Institute, Juilliard, Boston Conservatory.” “Again, without sounding self-congratulatory, we’re happy whenever the kids are able to move on to the next step in their lives and that we’ve been able to play a part in that. And I’m just as happy about kids who go to their local university system and find themselves there, as opposed to going to the big conservatories.” Another pause. “Those kids, the ones who go to Curtis, Cleveland, Juilliard, they are the exception, but we don’t work exclusively for kids who are the exception. We have a strong set of students that we are working with, and they are approaching it from their individual life’s perspective. We don’t work just for the kids who are going to be the stars; we coalesce their skills so that when they hit the stage . . . they become one.”

Raising the Baton: Robinson’s colleagues are quick to praise his efforts. “I have known Gary, Dr. Robinson, for 27 years,” says Roy Fluhrer, the Ph.D. director of the Fine Arts Center, “and have watched him build the kind of youth orchestra that causes many to say, ‘Youth orchestra? They don’t sound like any youth orchestra I’ve heard.’”

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Symphony Space: The Young Artist Orchestra is more than an after-school choir or club. The students must commit to hours of work a week to prepare for their concerts. While professionals will have four or five rehearsals, the YAO will have 10–12, practicing three hours a night.

“ I D O N ’ T K N OW I F M U S I C I A N S EVER RETIRE. I T ’ S N OT J U S T H OW W E M A K E A L I V I N G, I T ’ S O U R P A S S I O N , I T ’ S O U R S O U L ,” S AY S R O B I N S O N .

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orking with children is a far different kettledrum than directing adults. “The first observable difference is that we take longer to prepare our concerts than professional artists,” he says. “Professional artists will have four to five rehearsals, and we’ll have 10 to 12.” Rehearsals run three hours a night. “The kids are learning not only their instruments, but they’re also learning the traditions and the language of orchestral music. It’s our job to know that to the best of our abilities and therefore to impart that to them. “The reward at the end of the rehearsal process when we’re on the stage is twofold. One, the immediate contact with great art music and, two, the passion, energy, excitement that young people feel in their first experience with great art music.” Rewarding, yes, but that has got to be exhausting. (Italics are ours, not his.) “I think that the only significant advice I have ever given Gary was ‘go home, get some rest,’” Grier says in his notes to the program that should allow Robinson to do just that. Which isn’t likely, says Robinson’s wife of 35 years, Kathy, who teaches strings at Beck Academy and is assistant principal, second violin

at GSO. “Oh, my gosh, I don’t know the exact number of hours a week he works,” she says. Already, he’s accepting guest-conductor invitations, including one to lead the Spartanburg Philharmonic at its holiday symphony presentation. “I think Gary will always find a way to share his talents with the community,” she says. “I don’t think he’s going to be bored. He’s also an avid cyclist, he loves that, he loves to read. He’s a great student, he’s always engaging his mind in some topic.” And he’s forever a musician. Of his pending departure from a position that he has loved for so long and for which he is loved so widely, she says: “What I’m hoping is that this will help us free up some time for us personally. In the summer, he couldn’t allow himself to travel as freely because he was always studying the repertoire for the coming season. I think in that respect he’ll enjoy a little free time.” Besides, “I don’t know if musicians ever retire. It’s not just how we make a living, it’s our passion, it’s our soul.” Robinson’s thoughts about his swan song come out sounding like the very gestures conductors make with their left hands: “It will have all the joy”—he says before a magnificent pause that delivers a classic crescendo—“and nervous anticipation that comes with walking through a big door.”

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

A la Tarte: To see these berries transformed into a flawless fusion of fruit and pastry, turn to page 114.

Photograph by Jivan Davé

Jam Session Fresh from the field, springtime’s favorite berry is something to sink your (sweet) teeth into

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KITCHEN

Aid

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strawberry tart cannot pay your bills, run for president, or call your mother. It will not clean out your fridge or write your thesis. It doesn’t calm a colicky baby, mow the lawn, or do the laundry. These things need to be said because after one bite, you’ll probably feel that this strawberry tart can do anything—or, at least, that you can while enjoying it. If such praise seems a little excessive, consider this: strawberries arrive at the market in spring, a season known for its joy-inducing qualities. Call it spring fever. Sweet and juicy and vibrant, strawberries are nature’s giddy invitation to have fun. Set your salad aside—it’s time for dessert. Of course, strawberries are plenty satisfying on their own, but turning them into a simple tart will give you the double pleasure of making and enjoying something delicious. This strawberry tart seems made for a Saturday, and for getting the most from your market haul. In the early morning, cobble together a rustic dough before you head out for the farmers’ market, coffee in hand. The butter will form geological striations in a crust that’s chewy, crisp, and faintly nutty. Pick up a few pints of the reddest local strawberries while you’re there. Quarter some and slow-simmer them into a ruby jam while you catch up on Netflix. Assemble it all in a beautiful tart just before dinner—with plenty of time to invite a couple of friends over to share. Like spring, this strawberry tart is short-lived and best enjoyed immediately.

RUSTIC STRAWBERRY RYE TART Yield: 8 servings

INGREDIENTS For the pie crust:

1 1/3 c. all-purpose flour 1 1/3 c. rye flour 1 tsp. salt 1 c. + 2 Tbs. unsalted butter 1 Tbs. apple cider vinegar 8 Tbs. ice water

For the preserves

Just Picked

A simple, jewel-colored tart shines with fresh strawberries / by Kathryn Davé

// photograph by Jivan Davé

3 c. quartered strawberries ¾ c. sugar ½ tsp. fresh lemon juice A few dashes of grapefruit bitters (optional)

For the tart

1 egg, beaten 1 c. mascarpone cheese 2 c. hulled strawberries, sliced 3 Tbs. sugar 1 c. + 2 Tbs. unsalted butter 1 Tbs. apple cider vinegar 8 Tbs. ice water

INSTRUCTIONS 1.Whisk the flour and salt together in a large bowl. Cut the cold butter into cubes and then work it into the flour until well-mixed and flour has reached a crumbly consistency. 2. Add vinegar to the ice water; then add water to the flour mixture, a few tablespoons at a time until the dough just comes together. Add a few more tablespoons of icy water if the dough seems dry. Press it together into a ball, split into two disks, wrap each disk well with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least an hour or overnight. (You will only need one disk; the other will keep in the freezer for three months.) 3. To prepare the preserves, combine 3 cups of quartered strawberries, ¾ cup of sugar, lemon juice, and bitters (if using) in a saucepan. Bring to a simmer and cook until the juices thicken and become jammy, about 30–45 minutes. Allow it to cool completely. 4. Preheat the oven to 400ºF. On a floured sheet of parchment paper, roll out the dough into a long oval, about 15 inches long, 6 inches wide, and ¼-in thick. Prick all over with a fork to prevent bubbles during baking. Transfer parchment paper and crust to a baking sheet. Brush with egg wash and bake until the crust is a deep, golden brown about 25–30 minutes. Cool completely. 5. Meanwhile, combine 3 tablespoons of sugar and mascarpone cheese. Once crust is cool, spread the mascarpone mixture evenly over the tart, followed by the preserves. Arrange fresh sliced strawberries on top. Cut into slices and serve. ))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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SWEET

Spot

Mixed Bag Former music major Luanne Thayer discovered a new (crunchy) rhythm / by M. Linda Lee

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

L

uanne Thayer had no ambitions about starting her own company. It happened by chance as a matter of personal health. She was working as Clerkship Coordinator for Internal Medicine with the USC School of Medicine in Greenville, when she realized she needed to get healthy. “One day,” she recounts, “my boss [who was also her physician] handed me a 10-pound box of oats and a 3-pound box of flax seeds.” Luanne took them home and started designing granola recipes, playing with different grains and seeds to supplement the oats. “Granola was an opportunity to pack as much nutrition as possible into my first meal of the day,” says Thayer, who prefers to add Greek yogurt and fresh berries to her granola for an even bigger superfood punch. This experimentation resulted in her first recipe: pumpkin and fig granola. Soon, she was sharing her nutrition-rich breakfast food with friends and church members, and getting feedback about how good it was. Finally, her boss suggested that Thayer start her own business. So, in May 2015, she left her job to make granola full-time in a rented space inside a local DHEC-approved kitchen. “Super ’Nola Natural,” Thayer says, “is an accidental company but an intentional product.” Accident or not, the response to her granola has been “joyfully overwhelming.” Not only is Thayer’s granola delicious, it’s totally good for you. Super ’Nola Natural contains no refined sugar. Instead, Thayer uses local honey, raw and unfiltered, and packs each batch with protein and fiber from grains like quinoa, amaranth, and oats. In addition to the original Pumpkin Fig Pecan, Thayer now produces three other tasty combinations. Which is the best? “We’re a house divided on that issue,” she laughs. Luanne’s favorite is Banana Choco Almond, while her son Christian likes the Cranberry Apple Walnut—the best-seller by a nose—and her partner John Hanson prefers Pear Vanilla Hazelnut. Her next project will be granola bars. Thayer believes wholeheartedly that starting your day off with real food is key to good health. She feels a connection between her products and her customers, and relishes the social contact she gets when promoting her granola one-on-one. Her excitement bubbles over when she talks about Super ’Nola Natural, which she admits to making with close attention to detail and a lot of love.

Cereal Thriller: This summer, Luanne Thayer will sell Super ’Nola Natural, including the Banana Choco Almond, at the TD Saturday Market and the farmers’ markets in Greer and Travelers Rest. And look for her granola soon on the shelves at Whole Foods Market.

Super ’Nola Natural is available online (supernolanatural.com) and in stores around the Upstate, including Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery, Mill Village Market, Greenville Jerky & Vine, and the new Hub City Co-op in Spartanburg.

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Supporting Safer Schools

Where Atlanta Comes to Play!

Surrounded by the lush Smoky Mountains, speciality shopping, delicious dining venues, romantic vineyards, and many rustic lodging options! Come walk

under the swaying trees of Downtown, breathe in the fresh mountain air and learn about the culture of our unique mountain community.

We are so grateful to Greenville Women Giving. Their support helped fund our Bullying Prevention Program in elementary and middle schools in Greenville County, which is a vital part of our outreach. – Debbie Black, SCCT Executive Director

CLAYTON, GEORGIA IN RABUN COUNTY The Northeast Georgia Mountains

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I’m Not # MY CLIENTS ARE.

South Carolina Children’s Theatre uses drama and education to address serious social issues facing children. Its Bullying Prevention Program, for example, combines theatre arts and education to address, identify and reduce bullying behavior. Through a two-year grant, Greenville Women Giving helped SCCT’s Bullying Prevention Program reach more than 9,000 elementary and 5,500 middle school students. Giving together for the good of our community. Come join us!

I believe in individual attention and the ability to focus on each client. I believe in relationships built on trust, loyalty, and integrity. Buying or Selling? Let’s talk about partnering. My goal is for you to feel like #1.

Heidi Putnam

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Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

Small vintage garden hoops - black and white $50; Oval gypsy ring - denim - $85; Large vintage garden hoops - pink - $60; Teepee charm bracelets - iceberg blue and lime; Mini vintage garden rings - sage and denim - $45; Bohemian charm necklaces (on leather) $98; Gypsy charm bracelet - $165; Teardrop ring - pink - $85; Charmer necklace $325. Order online at www.lilypottery.com or by appointment at 220 Coffee St., Greenville. Email lily@lilypottery.com to set up an appointment.

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Friends by Choice. Realtors by Design. “Erin is one of those people who goes the extra mile for her clients, like it’s breathing. It’s just who she is.”

“Alicia always had my best interest at heart. She took everything I said I wanted in a home and made it possible.”

Stephanie Sanders

Mary Jane Satterfield

“Hilary was friendly, professional, available, patient and she learned our priorities quickly!” Mandy & Greg Cintron

ERIN HALPERIN Downtown & Around Town erinhalperin.com

HILARY HURST Eastside hhurst@cbcaine.com

ALICIA WAYNICK Travelers Rest awaynick@cbcaine.com

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THE

Pantry

Food for Thoughts Bonnie + Bud refines the art of the gift box / by M. Linda Lee

L

ooking for the perfect way to say “thank-you,” “happy birthday,” or “congratulations”? Whitney Holofchak can help. The Louisville native, Furman graduate, and now Charlotte resident, creates customized gift boxes for most any occasion. Holofchak has always enjoyed curating gifts for family and friends, thanks to her grandmother Bonnie, who taught her that the ultimate expression of Southern hospitality is giving to others. After graduating Furman in 2004, she moved to Charlotte shortly after. Holofchak suddenly lacked the time to peruse local markets after she got married and had two children a year apart. So, she launched Bonnie + Bud, an online gift-box business that honors her grandmother and her husband’s great uncle, whom she describes as “the most thoughtful, kind, and family-focused” people she knows. “With my boxes, I wanted to carry on the tradition of thoughtfulness, generosity, and compassion that Bonnie and Bud bestowed on me and my husband,” Holofchak explains. To do this, she haunts regional craft shows and local shops for eye-catching handmade items. Her website offers eight standard boxes

(starting at $100) for occasions from birthdays to housewarmings, plus more for holidays. This month she will offer a Mother’s Day box with a tea-garden theme. There’s also a box for foodies, brimming with gourmet items such as local honey, specialty oils and vinegars, and even edible flower petals. Boxes delivered in the Charlotte area come with a petite bouquet of fresh flowers. All come with a hand-written note dictated by the sender. Made by a local carpenter, the slide-top boxes are keepsakes in themselves. At its heart, Whitney’s business is all about making people feel special. “I love knowing that one of my boxes will put a smile on someone’s face,” she says. “It’s something made just for them.” Find Bonnie + Bud’s boxes online at bonnieandbud.com

Bonnie + Bud offers eight standard boxes for occasions from birthdays to housewarmings, plus more for holidays.

Crate Expectations:

Motherly Love This month Bonnie + Bud will offer a Mother’s Day box with a teagarden theme.

Photographs courtesy of Whitney Holofchak / Bonnie + Bud

Whitney Holofchak of Bonnie + Bud creates custom gift boxes for special occasions or just because. Her box for the foodie includes local products and fresh flowers for residents of Charlotte, NC.

120 TOWN / towngreenville.com

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DINING

Guide

BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

MARY BETH’S AT MCBEE STATION Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

AMERICAN AMERICAN GROCERY

Photograph by Cameron Reynolds

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Try the Charred Octopus with gigande beans, grilled spring vidalia onions, flatbread, romesco, salsa verde, and toasted almonds, before an entrée of salt-crusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus. Finish with pastry chef Ben Snyder’s Chocolate Whoopie Pie: toasted marshmallow buttercream, smoked honey walnuts, banana bread ice cream, espresso caramel, and dark chocolate ganache.

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

with julienne carrots and cucumbers in a creamy Sriracha aioli—along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers.

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

$$, L, D. 631 S. Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com

can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler.

You might have an inkling of what a meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From the board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to the glass-walled curing room on display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to the cocktail list, which heavily features whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup.

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com

$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

AUGUSTA GRILL

BRAZWELL’S PUB

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek stuffed chicken breast with roasted tomato vinaigrette. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next fun-filled food memory. Brazwell’s steps up your game day with plates like seared sesame tuna—an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesame-encrusted tuna seared to perfection and served

BREAKWATER RESTAURANT

Breakwater is a hotspot that serves droolinducing food (pan-seared scallops with butternut squash risotto and tabasco buerre blanc) and creative drinks. Candy-applered accents (the bar, dining room chairs, and wall decorations) meld with mirrors and glass to produce a uniquely New York City-meets-Lowcountry vibe. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 802 S Main St. (864) 271-0046, breakwatersc.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (all USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try something a little different—perhaps a Durham Ranch elk loin, served with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-

4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the Smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there are other things on the menu, but a rack of Henry’s succulent ribs with sides of beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s seeks to balance upscale dining with comfort. Start with shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Dine in the enclosed outdoor patio to enjoy the river view, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sunday Brunch = SBR M AY 2 0 1 6 / 1 2 5

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DINING

Guide

bistro. A wide range of beer, wine, and an ambitious menu that hits nearly every continent make it hard not to dive in. Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located right on Main Street midway between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, all in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 3737300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-and-three dishes up all of your homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, baby-back ribs and fried croaker on Fridays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides, either. The turnip greens and mac ‘n’ cheese taste the way mama made ’em and the way God intended. $, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in the hills of Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends the atmosphere of a contemporary European bistro with that of the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up freshbaked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the wine selection at their market. The menu changes daily, but expect dishes like line-caught rainbow trout and pork crepinettes (with spicy sweet potato puree, Brussels sprouts, sunchokes, cipollini, scallion, and smoked shoyu). $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant brings us closer to the sea. The day’s fresh catch tops the menu, grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the lobster bites, lightly breaded and fried, with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or postPeace Center performance. A destination for a group dinner or a quiet date night, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 5463535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with a separate street-side dining area and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens, and even spinach casserole. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like the crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. With an astonishing selection of 700 wines, you can’t miss the perfect complement to your meal. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the

chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing in on a fresh beach breeze down the eastern seaboard, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Pelham Road in Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, with fresh oysters served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

ASIAN BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are also a surefire hit, though the green curry is of particular note: it is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with plentiful choices that change daily. From the menu, try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, condiments, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. $$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi has locals coming back for seconds. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Among favorites is the grilled pork vermicelli, featuring marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and a chili-garliclime sauce. For some textural variation, try the broken rice platter, which puts julienned pork, a grilled pork chop, and a steamed pork omelet over broken rice. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com PURPLE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO & SUSHI

A stone’s throw from Fluor Field, this place serves an Asian mix. There are Japanese, Korean, Thai, and Asian-fusion entrées, but sushi is a strong suit. The udon with Prince Edward Island mussels, mahi-mahi with a spicy crawfish glaze, or roasted duck are worthy options. The latter, perfumed with

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star anise, is roasted to order—and well worth the wait. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 933 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-3255

BEER & PUBS DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

A traditional dive-bar atmosphere with an inventive menu, Dive ‘N’ Boar caters to the barbecue-loving Southerner. This spin on the neighborhood gastropub has 25 different local beers on tap in a laid-back atmosphere. The bar specializes in house-infused liquors and cocktails using local herbs and ingredients. Stop by on the weekend for live music and a meal, or meet up with friends for drinks on their screened-in patio. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from the classic burger and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends around the long bar to enjoy one of the nearly 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s looks to be family friendly for both the Harley-set as well as the post-Drive-baseball crowd with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beercan chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down (quickly, no doubt) with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben, for example—are the perfect soul-warming remedies. Everything about this pub has been designed to transport guests to Ireland—from the Dublin-crafted bar and booths, to the famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, to the spirit of hospitality inside.

legendary Horizon Records music store. This eclectic café with an international flair serves up daily specials for curry and pasta. For Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Drop by on Sundays for brunch. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs, to eggs Benedict, all the way to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Eggs Up also serves other classic diner fare like like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com THE GREEN ROOM

Like a European brasserie, the Green Room’s diverse menu features standout dishes that change with the time of day. Enjoy brunch on the weekend with eggs Benedict or stuffed French toast with raspberry cream cheese. For dinner, the melt-in-your-mouth, sweet chipotle meatloaf is the ticket. Wash it down with selections from the tap and a premium beer list that leans toward the Belgian and German end of the spectrum.

TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

$-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with the aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and guarantees of a happy stomach. Try the Lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or satisfy your sweet tooth with the Banana Nut crepe. If you can’t choose between savory and sweet, split one of each with a friend and enjoy in the spirit of Tandem’s motto: “Together is best.”

THE VELO FELLOW

$, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

BREAKFAST/BRUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat your taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the

Call for Reservations: 828-733-4311 www.Eseeola.com

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charming atmosphere perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the Ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and the hot chicken salad.

UNIVERSAL JOINT

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

Come to Linville and want for nothing.

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

$-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday. 615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com

Cozy in a funky way, the Velo Fellow is a hip pub under the Mellow Mushroom. Burgers and sandwiches form the core of the menu, which includes fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, and—in a twist—the falafel burger. In addition to the craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur.

Enjoy breezy summer days in the shadow of the Blue Ridge while our staff cares for you body and soul.

$$$, B, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222, thegreenroomupstate.com

$$-$$$, L , D. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to join cheer with (or heckle mercilessly) your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of the North Main area and features a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh.

Nature and Nurture

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in the form of a steaming hot biscuit at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in the famous sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try one of the mouthwatering sandwiches like the Southern Fried Chicken BLT with maplepeppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide

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selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie, with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfastanytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, pastries, and desserts. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops, the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, or the white-tiled loft, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. It’s no surprise, considering tastemakers such as the Vagabond Barista Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker are the forces behind Methodical. Even better: there’s plenty of substance to go with style. Single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, and homemade treats ensure there’s plenty to rave about.

Sunday Brunch both locations 11 am - 2:30 pm GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More!

$-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com MOE JOE COFFEE & MUSIC HOUSE

Book your private party with us! Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

Burning the midnight oil? Head over to Moe Joe in downtown Greenville. The coffee shop, open late every night, features a menu full of signature caffeinated concoctions as well as a fully stocked bar of craft beers and wines. Customers can enjoy the sounds of local talent or show off their own musicality during Wednesday open mic nights.

116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 608B South Main St. · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday 2MA15

$-$$, B, L, D. 20 S Main St. (864) 263-3550, moejoecoffeeandmusic.net

www.ChicoraAlley.com

TEALOHA

It always pays to have a cool, quiet escape away from Main Street’s bustle. Tealoha’s blend of raw and refined fills the bill. Recycled barn-wood panels and earthy brown and green tones impart the feel of a subdued oasis, while sleek, modern furniture is decidedly comfy and urban. A menu of exotic loose-leaf teas is fleshed out by smooTEAS (tea-infused smoothies) and specialTEAS (tea-based lattes).

WORN MARBLE?

$, B, L, D, Closed Sundays. 131 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 509-1899, tealoha.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

BEFORE

GRANITE, LIMESTONE, MARBLE, TERRAZZO, TRAVERTINE, TOO!

AFTER

DIRTY GROUT?

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is an essential destination for Greenville coffee lovers. With its emphasis on community, the coffeehouse uses only local ingredients—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee—to create one-of-akind beverages to be enjoyed with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

DELI & SANDWICHES

For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s stacks up custom bagel sandwiches served piping fresh. There are countless combinations, so plan on more than one visit to turn up the heat.

$, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food. Hot and cold lunch fare is available, ranging from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. If you’re not up to cooking, there’s a case of “crafted carryout” entrées and sides to go. Impress last-minute guests with the likes of roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the many options on the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 104 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefsdeli.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites makes Davani’s a Greenville favorite. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glace, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), BR (Sat– Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 5090142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

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Located just around the corner from Carl’s Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to Soby’s reputation for high-quality food. Pick from their regular menu or try one of their chalkboard specials that change with each day of the week. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast. $$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the ingredients for the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t often the first (or even last) thing to come to mind.

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish

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$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

melt-in-your-mouth havarti cheese, Thai basil aioli, and farm-fresh veggies. Or ,if you’re lucky to find JBT around brunch, then grab the Shindig breakfast taco—the perfect companion to a mimosa. Follow JBT’s Instagram account for weekly schedules. $. Schedule varies. Instagram: @j.b.tingles THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their Disco Tots are served topped with chipotle cream and scallions), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. With your tots, try a Meatloaf Sandwich: a thick slice of meatloaf topped with homemade pimiento cheese and served between two slices of grilled ciabatta bread. $. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew), and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 4517490, trappedoor.com

FOOD TRUCKS ASADA

The vibrant Latin culture of San Francisco’s Mission District comes to Greenville by way of Gina Petti and Roberto Cortez, who’ve been slinging tacos, nachos, quesadillas, and burritos for years out of LOLA, their food truck, and now from their location on Wade Hampton Boulevard. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote relleno de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in a creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw.

$-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday; food truck schedule varies. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. See your average mac n’ cheese transformed when owner Nick Thomas stuffs this country comfort inside a mild poblano pepper. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies. (404) 372-2266 CHUCK TRUCK

Like the paint splatters on the truck, the Chuck Truck’s burgers explode with intense flavors delivered by local ingredients. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins Burger—a freshly ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewoodsmoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com J.B. TINGLE’S

J.B. Tingle’s “Farm to Fender” mantra puts local farms first. This food truck bases their weekly menu on the freshest ingredients available from surrounding Upstate farms. Next time, try the Hurricane Veggie-Buttered Panini: grilled Great Harvest white bread,

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York-style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com MELLOW MUSHROOM

May 7-8 &

FEATURES

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A mixed repertory program featuring Classical and Contemporary works, and Cincinnati Ballet’s

Melissa Gelfin and Luca De-Poli Generously sponsored by:

Charles and Pam Walters (Guest Artist Sponsor)

John and Sandra Halsey

PEACE CENTER GUNTER THEATRE Tickets: 864-467-3000 or PEACECENTER.ORG

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the Kosmic Karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the House Special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese. InBallet 4thS Town May16.indd $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville

© Richard Finkelstein

hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main.

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SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brickoven pizzas made from local ingredients. Build your own or try a signature pie like the Tommy, with creamy roasted garlic sauce, mozzarella, pecorino romano, caramelized onions, mushrooms, spinach, and peppadew peppers. Don’t neglect dessert, either. The homemade ice cream (in a bowl, or in a float) is a throwback treat that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben and Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 6101406, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously. ))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM M AY 2 0 1 6 / 1 2 8

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Renderings and Plans presented are illustrative and shall be used for general information purposes only. Actual layout, room dimensions, window sizes and locations and steps to grade vary per plan and are subject to modification without notice.

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AMERICA’S RACE TO SPACE: WHERE DID IT TAKE US?

Thru Apr 28 LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES Don’t be surprised if the theater gets a little steamy. The title isn’t the only thing sexy about this French tale of forbidden fruit. Originally written by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, the novel has since been adapted to stage productions and the cult classic film Cruel Intentions. Having grown weary of the superficial pleasures of their wealthy lifestyle, two former lovers challenge each other to a duel of deception. It’s virtue versus lust in this sordid affair, and someone’s bound to lose. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

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Photograph (Impractical Jokers) courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

MAY

The life of rocket scientist and engineer Wernher von Braun is checkered with some of the greatest achievements and some of the worst follies in space exploration. Wade Hampton High School teacher Larry Bounds takes on the character with the same vigor Von Braun had for his craft as he discusses the inspiration behind the Apollo programs, his time at NASA, and other controversial aspects of this pioneer’s life. Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Pl, Greenville. Tues, 7–8:30pm. Free. (864) 244-1499, greenvillechautauqua.org

IMPRACTICAL JOKERS “WHERE’S LARRY?” TOUR

For nearly five years, the quartet of comics known as “The Tenderloins” have been making each other feel awkward on national television. The TruTV series follows Joe Gatto, Sal Vulcano, Brian “Q” Quinn, and James “Murr” Murray as each comedian is sent out into public with a single

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Photograph (Impractical Jokers) courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

mission in mind: pull off a hilarious prank. The live tour is set to pack just as many (if not more) laughs, with new footage and video segments that are impractically hysterical. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, 7pm. $55-$250. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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”THE LINES WITHIN” OPENING RECEPTION

Art comes in many forms, be it through photography, jewelry design, modelling, makeup, or hair styling. “The Lines Within” is a manifestation of this concept, bringing together Upstate creatives—Eli Warren from the Needed Image Portrait and Style Photography, Kate Furman Jewelry, Bo Stegall Salon, Liz McCreary Love Makeup, and models Tracy Smith and Jessica Fuller—for a unique, imaginative exhibition to coincide with the Warehouse Theatre’s production of Les Liaisons Dangereuses. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Downtown. Thurs, 5:30-7:30pm. Free. theneededimage.com, katefurman.com 

IMPRACTICAL JOKERS “WHERE’S LARRY?” TOUR May 4 Wed, 7pm Bon Secours Wellness Arena The night will be filled with laughs and hilarious videos inspired by the long-running “Jokers.” Expect the guys to be doing what they do best. By the way, have you seen Larry?

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PARTY TO MURDER 5–21 AIf there’s anything we’ve

learned from horror movies, it’s that you never, ever venture out to a summer camp, carnival, or abandoned insane asylum. Now, secluded island can be added to that list with this production directed by Kent R. Brown. When writer Charles Prince invites six individuals for a beach getaway, things quickly turn from leisurely to deadly. With non-stop murder, secrets, and ghosts (oh, my!) A Party to Murder will keep you on the edge of your seat until the curtain drops. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $10-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

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classic car cruise-in that the Upstate has to offer? Then motor on over to this annual festival, where retro rides, shagging, and prize raffles create the perfect opportunity to give back to community charities like Dot’s Kitchen and the Wilderness Way Camp School. Now more than a decade old, Blue Ridge Fest has become the gathering spot for good times and good fun for all; kicking off with the cruise-in, the evening will also feature live beach music with Jim Quick & Coastline, food vendors, and plenty of kid-friendly fun. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, 734 W Main St, Pickens. Fri. Adults, $25; children (7–12), $12; children (6 & under), free. (800) 240-3400, blueridge. coop/blueridgefest

year’s race benefits the Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network, Polio Plus, Mauldin Miracle League, EarlyAct FirstKnight, and World Hunger. Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 10am–4pm. $10 per duck; $30 for 5. reedyriverduckderby.com

STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL 7Nothing AND COUNTRY FAIR says spring like seeing the first ruby red strawberry sprout up from the ground. In honor of this annual awakening, the Bank of Travelers Rest sponsors the annual Strawberry Festival, where not only will you be able to delve into some of your favorite berry recipes, but you can also indulge in hearty helpings of musical acts, arts, crafts, and family activities—all against the backdrop of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. Blue Ridge Foothills, Hwy 276, Slater. Sat, 11am–4pm. Free. foothillsfamilyresources. org

90 YEARS 6–8 CELEBRATE Back in 1926, Houdini was 7–8 escaping from an underwater coffin, Puccini’s Turandot opera was making its debut, and a baby by the name of Norma Jeane Mortensen (aka Marilyn Monroe) was born in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the Upstate, another artistic giant was born: the Greenville Little Theatre. To honor 90 years under the spotlight, GLT will host a formal gala event, where guests will be treated to cocktails, delicious appetizers from local restaurants, and a musical revue of the theatre company’s most beloved performances. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

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REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY

If you happen to see a few thousand of these floating rubber duckies making their way down the Reedy River, there’s no need to question your mental sanity. The Duck Derby has been steadily growing over the last few years, with the 2016 goal of 10,000 bathtub beauties to be adopted by community organizations. This

FEATURES AND FAIRY TALES

Sure, cracking open a book can be fun. But a live-action retelling of all your favorite fairy tales is even better. The International Ballet will be joined by special guest artists Luca De Poli and Melissa Gelfin of the Cincinnati Ballet for this year’s spring production, bringing to life stories like Sleeping Beauty and Puss in Boots through dance. Additionally, the International Ballet showcase will debut fresh, original pieces alongside some of the craft’s most time-honored works. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $35. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

MAN GROUP 10–11 BLUE Much more successful

than their predecessor groups Yellow Dude Trio and Purple Guy Friends, the Blue Man Group has been rocking the worldwide stage for some 25 years. A unique combination of hypnotic dance moves, colorful visuals, and pulsepounding music, the all-male troupe delivers an assault—albeit a satisfying one—to each of the human senses.

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

12

10–18 eck, SECOND CHANCE

If you could go back to the past, would you do things differently if you had the chance? That is the question for one widower, who is given the opportunity to re-spend the last six weeks with his wife before her passing. At the end of their time together, he is given a choice: trust in the universe’s original decision or exchange his life for hers. It’s a bittersweet, emotional drama, directed by Shannon Rossi. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

12–22

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LEGENDS OF SOUTHERN HIP HOP

Best enjoyed with a hearty helping of collard greens, the Legends of Southern Hip Hop show brings together all of the best stars from below the Mason-Dixon line. You know that you rapped along with Trina when she and Missy Elliott were breaking down “One Minute Man” and moved it in “Slow Motion” with Juvenile. Maybe you even understood the “Danger” Mystikal was talking about. Now is your chance to do it all over again. In public. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $56-$107. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

13–14

HARMONY . . . WITH NATURE GARDEN TOUR True, no one appreciates the onslaught of pollen that comes hand-in-hand with springtime blooms. But what we can look forward to is the beautiful plethora of colors and scents that permeate the air when the buds finally burst open. This tour will take you outside of the city bustle and plant you in some of the area’s most vibrant landscapes, and will include stunning garden views from the Georgetown, Westcliffe, and Green Valley communities. Locations vary. Fri–Sat, 10am–5pm. Advance, $22; day of, $25. (864) 232-3020, kilgore-lewis.org

Artwork by Laurie Sullivan

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REASON AND PASSION Sat, May 14, 7:30 pm Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center In this season-ending show, young (and talented) members of the Young Artist Orchestra perform “shoulder to shoulder” with their Greenville Symphony Orchestra counterparts, conducted by Maestro Gary Robinson.

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AND PASSION 13–15 ARTISPHERE 14 REASON There’s something to be Mendelssohn and Beethoven

said for a community that embraces and supports the local arts year-round. With May comes Artisphere, one of the finest art fairs in the country, and a celebration of handcrafted, visual, and live arts that the whole family can get on board with. In addition to more artistic ability than Picasso could shake a stick at, there’s Kidsphere for, well, kids’ crafts, and plenty of culinary cuisine to give visitors a true taste of the town. Downtown Greenville. Fri, Noon–8pm; Sat, 10am–8pm; Sun, 11am–6pm. Free admission. artisphere.org

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DOWNTOWN CONDO RONDO

This tour of downtown living—which coincides with Artisphere—showcases all the glamor, convenience, and possibilities of urban lifestyles. Each stop is a narrative of unique tastes and encapsulates all the things that we love about living in the Greenville community. Hosted by the Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, this year’s tour will visit several distinct spaces in the heart of downtown, and proceeds will directly benefit the GSO’s continued efforts to bring music to our ears. Downtown Greenville. Sat, 10am–5pm. Advance, $20; day of, $25. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

may be on the bill, but the budding performers of the Young Artist Orchestra are the true stars of this springtime show. Performing “shoulder to shoulder” with their Greenville Symphony Orchestra counterparts, the young musicians will show off their flair for the Romantic with two hand-picked compositions, conducted by Maestro Gary Robinson. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. $10-$27. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

SMACKDOWN 17 WWE Two words: John. Cena. Most

fans of the action-packed, musclebulging, hotpants-wearing sporting event need little else to snap up tickets to Smackdown. The Champ himself will be joined by the likes of Chris Jericho, The Divas, and many of your other preferred masters of mayhem. There are so few times when smacking someone upside the head with a folding chair is considered “winning,” so why would you want to miss out? Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $24-$108. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

May 7, 2016 at 6:30 PM NEXT Innovation Center 411 University Ridge Rd., downtown Greenville, SC Join us for a magical evening of food, drink and dancing “Under the Boardwalk.” Enjoy the beach sounds of “The OLD” Swinging Medallions, culinary creations by Chef Matthew Niessner of Halls Chop House, creative design by Joel Kirby of Curly Willow and coordination and cuisine by Uptown Catering. Come dressed in your “shagging best,” and be sure to leave time for one-ofa-kind auction items and a candlelit boardwalk stroll. All proceeds from the event support the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

TICKETS Benefactor – $2,500 4 tickets, listing on event signage and 2 boardwalk plaques Friend – $1,000 2 tickets, listing on event signage and 1 boardwalk plaque Host Couple – $500 2 tickets and listing on event signage

14

DANCEARTS GREENVILLE ANNUAL RECITAL With two performances named “Tweedle Dee” and “Tweedle Dag,” you can probably guess what this year’s recital’s getting at. While “Dancing Through Wonderland,” the DanceArts Greenville artists will encounter a number of enchanting characters, including a testy Queen of Hearts and one very Mad Hatter. The recital will showcase all levels of dance, including beginner’s jazz and advanced hip hop. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, 3pm & 7pm. Adult, $17; children, $15. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

18

BIG BREAK: WARRIOR EDITION

In conjunction with this year’s BMW Charity Pro-Am, the Reserve at Lake Keowee will also play host to the second annual Big Break: Warrior Edition tournament. The event will put the golfing skills of 12 teams to the ultimate test with various rigors in chipping, putts, and driving—not to mention inviting a few of your favorite celebrities, professional athletes, and local heroes to the green. Big Break raised more than $43,000 at last year’s competition, with proceeds directly benefiting the non-profit works at Upstate Warrior Solution. The Reserve at Lake Keowee, 2999 Crowe Creek Rd, Sunset. Wed. Free. reserveatlakekeowee. com/area/bmw-charity-pro-am

Individual tickets – $125

PRESENTED BY:

SPONSORS:

TO PURCHASE TICKETS: CancerSurvivorsPark.org/boardwalk

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19–22 GREEK FESTIVAL

It’s time to get your Greek on once again at this iconic Upstate festival. Whether you hail from the Hellenic Republic or just down the street, you’ll be welcomed with open arms—and a plate heaped high with delicious food. Pick your poison from a variety of freshly made pastries, including baklava and kataifi, hefty servings of roast lamb, moussaka, and spanakopita,

CHARITY 19–22 BMW PRO-AM

and other authentic Greek goodies. Don’t be afraid to get down with a little traditional horos and be sure to pick up some goods from the marketplace. Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 406 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, 10:30am– 8pm; Fri–Sat, 10:30am–10pm; Sun, 11:30am–8pm. $1. stgeorgegreenville.org

Whether you like golf or only pretend to like it so you can shamelessly stalk your favorite celebrities in a public place, the BMW Charity ProAm has become a centerpiece in the Greenville sporting community. Pairing up the game’s professionals with amateur and celebrity golfers for four days of competition on the Upstate’s most manicured greens, the Pro-Am has amassed more than 10 million dollars for charity and hundreds of thousands in revenue for the region. Locations vary. Thurs–Sun, times vary. $10-$115. bmwusfactory.com/charity-golf/

22 TASTE OF THE UPSTATE

This year, Taste of the Upstate celebrates Loaves & Fishes’ 25th anniversary with the help of 10 of the Upstate’s most acclaimed chefs. In usual form, there will be a bevy of auction items up for bid, as well as accompanying tunes from the Greenville Jazz Collective and a gourmet cake walk. Proceeds will benefit Loaves & Fishes and provide food to various hunger organizations in the region. Hyatt Regency Downtown, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Sun, 6:30–9:30pm. $70. loavesandfishesgreenville.com

Pull pic from this year’s BTC. Wants Logo, social icons, possibly a Did you Know or testimonial quote. Can be dummy text and I can gather on quote.

27

BREW IN THE ZOO Sure, you may have acted like an animal once or twice after a few too many. But have you ever really knocked back a cold one with an orangutan by your side? Well, there’s a whole world of potential at the Greenville Zoo’s signature summer event. Guests get to sample the Upstate’s craftiest brews, tasty eats, and live music. It’s just like going out for a night on the town—just in a very different kind of jungle. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Fri, 6:30–9pm. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

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27–28 GALLABRAE GREENVILLE

SCOTTISH GAMES

Proving that Scots can do much more than drink heavily and look great in a variety of tartan patterns, this South-meets-Scot festival shouldn’t be missed. Kicking off with the Great Scot! Parade through downtown Greenville, the celebration carries on into the weekend with a bagpipe challenge, Border Collie Invitational, and a Miss Greenville Scottish Games for the lasses. War paint is optional, having fun is not. Games: Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville; other events, downtown Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. Adults, $15; children (6–12), $8. gallabrae.com

STATE 28 PALMETTO CHILI COOK-OFF

Chili may have the title of winter’s most cherished dinnertime dish, but that doesn’t mean spring can’t have a little bean action, too. Inviting competitors from across the nation, the cook-off will feature both local chefs and members of the International Chili Society, each of whom will whip up a hot pot judged on bite, consistency, aroma, taste, and color. When you’ve had your fill of the wholesome dish, browse through the craft vendors, grab a brew, or take in one of the live music acts.

Fountain Inn Chamber of Commerce, 102 Depot St, Fountain Inn. Sat, 10:30am. palmettostatechili.com

BY DARK: June 2 HOME A SONG CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE

Artist and songwriter James Casto plays host to a three-for-one smorgasbord of accomplished musicians, many of whom have opened for national acts. Michael Logen has had tunes featured on primetime television shows like Nashville and Parenthood, and has previously worked with powerhouse vocalist Kelly Clarkson. Tony Arata’s musical portfolio includes Garth Brooks and Emmylou Harris, while Emily Shackelton’s masterpieces have seen the American Idol stage. You won’t want to miss this show-stopping set of musical talents. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $35. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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SECOND

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Uncommon Bonds

K

indred spirits—an ineffable bond that connects two people, or the bond that connects us all under the shared state of being human? Six artists explore this topic with featured work of Abstract Expressionism, a movement that emerged on the heels of the devastation of World War II. From Galen Cheney’s work that “exists on a kind of tightrope, right on the edge of coming apart” to Katherine Aimone’s exploration into the ethereal beauty of the in-between—the breath in the quiet of frozen reality or the silence between steps meeting the pavement—these artists express the inexpressible: layers of time, effort, and beautiful messes transformed, and the reflection of overlaid lines, twists, and turns of the human soul that do indeed bind us as humans.—Bethany Mlinar Greenville Center for Creative Arts (25 Draper Street, Greenville) is showing Kindred Spirits: Exploring Abstract Expressionism Today until May 20. This exhibit is made possible through a grant by the Metropolitan Arts Council. For more information, please visit artcentergreenville.org, or greenvillearts.com.

(Top) Galen Cheney, Rupture/Rapture, 2014, plaster and oil on two panels, 48 x 64 in.; Katherine Aimone, The Floating World #2, 2015, 48 x 72 in. (each panel: 48 x 36 in.), acrylic on canvas

Six artists explore the meaning of connection through abstraction

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TOWN May 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN May 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com