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Think AT THE INTERSECTION OF MARKETING, DESIGN, AND TECHNOLOGY IS A COMMON THEME: CO-WORK.

M A R C H 2 017 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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within nature a steward of nature.

To live is to become

With a history steeped in preservation and built on a commitment to the land, Balsam Mountain Preserve is just that—a preserve. Not just for nature and all her glorious wonders, but family, friends and everything else we hold close to our hearts. Located less than 45 minutes west of Asheville, Balsam Mountain Preserve isn’t your typical private mountain community. It’s something different. And with fewer than 400 homes spread across 4,400-forested acres, owners truly live within nature. Come experience life at Balsam Mountain Preserve, and learn about the community’s newest commitment to life here, Double Top Village.

51 Gin Pole Way | $1,229,000

49 Corkscrew Way | $2,149,000

3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 3207664

4 bedrooms, 5 full bath, 1 half bath | MLS 3212966

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ARNOLD PALMER SIGNATURE GOLF

NEW DOUBLE TOP VILLAGE

MORE THAN 30 MILES OF TRAILS

To arrange a visit, call 828.202.9182 or visit BalsamMountainPreserve.com

This is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation to buy to residents in jurisdictions in which registration requirements have not been fulfilled, and eligibility for purchase will depend upon the state of residency of the purchaser. There is no guarantee that facilities, features, or amenities depicted or otherwise described will be built or, if built, will be of the same type, size, or nature as depicted or described.

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AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC IS, T NN COUR E T L, LL POOKETBA BAS

…where listings actually SELL, too.

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4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

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Joan Herlong, Owner, BIC CLEVELAND PARK CHANTICLEER 864-325-2112 172 Ridgeland Dr Unit 100 $729,601 17 Chanticleer Drive $739,605 AugustaRoad.com 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Bathrooms TOWN_blank page.indd 6

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Is your REALTOR missing something...?

Joan is…she worked it off for her clients. That’s how she’s sold more real estate than ANY single Realtor in Greenville four years in a row.* That’s not just a slogan, it’s results. It’s not that she’s smarter, or funnier, or more connected…or maybe it is. Put her to work on your next home purchase or sale.

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AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong Owner, Broker in Charge 864-325-2112 Joan@AugustaRoad.com

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*Greenville’s Number One Realtor, FOUR years in a row. Source: MLS Sales Volume, 2015, 2014, 2013 & 2012

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586 PERRY AVENUE | WWW.THEANCHORAGERESTAURANT.COM | 864.219.3082

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FIRST

Glance

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On the Clock: Where: The Wheelhouse Group, 25 Delano Dr. Greenville. thewheelhousegreenville.com What: Housed in the same space as Swamp Rabbit Crossfit and Soul Yoga, The Wheelhouse is a community co-work spot for marketers. Photograph by Will Crooks

Beating cancer with faith, hope & expertise. stfranciscancercenter.org

MARCH 2017 / 7

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BRING

Comfort

HOME

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PHOTO © JEREMY DANIEL

“BROADWAY’S FU NNIEST MUSICAL COMEDY IN AT LEAST 400 YEARS!” –TIME OUT NEW YORK

APRIL 11-16

RICKIE LEE JONES & MADELEINE PEYROUX

AMOS LEE March 10

March 9

CELTIC WOMAN: VOICES OF ANGELS March 17

ANN WILSON OF HEART March 23

TAJ EXPRESS: A BOLLYWOOD MUSICAL REVUE

PAUL TAYLOR DANCE COMPANY April 4

March 12

BLACK GRACE April 18

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

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Contents 12 EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST 19 See, hear, read, react.

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MAP QUEST

Atlas Local is a community of creatives leading global projects. / by John Jeter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

The month’s must-dos.

27 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

38 WEDDINGS 45 TOWNBUZZ

Mary Hamby fashions wearable fiber art; Endeavor exec Joe Erwin calls for collaboration; Nasha Lending embraces the entrepreneurial spirit; and meet the design queen behind the nationallyacclaimed blog White Buffalo Styling Co.

52 BACK STORY

Slip behind the scenes of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons with The Warehouse Theatre’s Mimi Wyche and Chip Egan.

60 TOP BUNK

Get schooled in style at The Graduate Hotel in Charlottesville, VA.

CENTRAL 65 STYLE Look smart in urban work duds;

tackle your daily commute on a sleek Specialized Vita bike.

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MAN ABOUT TOWN

No man is an island, but our Man might have one—tattooed on his left hip.

87 EAT & DRINK

Coastal Crust trucks to the Upstate with scrumptious pizza pies; McCrady’s Tavern is a fine throwback to colonial Charleston; tap into local liquids; and more.

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DINING GUIDE

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TOWNSCENE

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SECOND GLANCE

Got plans? You do now.

THIS PAGE: Model Michael Fekete wears a Charleston sport coat, $200, and a Coral Springs button up, $100, both from Southern Tide. For more of our men’s work wear picks, see “Office Hours,” page 66. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Salvador Dalí’s Fantastical Fairy Tales in Columbia is a whimsical union of the visual and literary arts.

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Sensual, sculptural design 2017 E 300 Sedan The three-dimensional flow of the E-Class cockpit is more than a visual achievement. Every aspect of the cabin experience is equally fluid, from the natural feel of the controls to the clarity with which information and entertainment reach the driver and passengers. A single floating panel houses the instruments and COMANDŽ widescreen, while aluminum-ringed air vents and control elements punctuate the wave-formed dash trim. It’s a haven of luxury and fine craftsmanship.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com

(864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 296

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EDITOR’S

Letter March Highlights Great Heights

Adman Joe Erwin channels his creative capital into a new Endeavor: page 48

Ready to Role

Mimi Wyche and Chip Egan star together again at the Warehouse Theatre: page 52

MY PHOTO HERE

Schooling the Rest

The Graduate Charlottesville is a lesson in detail: page 60

Photograph by Will Crooks

Map Quest

Atlas Local, once CoWork Greenville, houses creative thinkers who work globally: page 78

Blue Heaven

Coastal Crust delivers Neapolitanstyle pizza in a turquoise ’55 Chevy: page 87

Mixed Company

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

I

n life, we typically think in terms of what is. But there is also plenty of value in what isn’t. For instance, this isn’t strictly a tech issue or a design issue, a business issue or an urban issue. It’s about where these ideas intersect. Thanks to the Internet and affordable, smart products that harness it, we’re in touch 5 miles and 5,000 miles away. Like nomadic shepherds, we carry our tools on our backs, by our sides, in our pockets. No longer must we have walls or even work where we work. I’m writing this note from a coffee shop near my office, which is more like a hub. The TOWN staff operates in an open environment, along with other colleagues at the Community Journals. There are setbacks, sure—more noise, interruptions, lack of privacy. Still, I’ve found that this kind of workspace allows for smoother communication. Instead of waiting to discuss a problem, allowing it to fester and build, challenges are met in the moment and potential disagreements are dispelled before they become arguments. Collaborative workplaces allow for better ideas, faster solutions, and creative community. Co-working in Greenville is nothing new, but the last couple of years has seen an uptick of such spaces: Open Works, Endeavor, Textile Hall, and The Wheelhouse, to name a few. The mother of them all, however, is CoWork Greenville, which loosely began in 2007 as a solution for Matthew Smith and others to save on rent and get out of the house. Ten years later, CoWork has been rebranded as Atlas Local, making its home in the Brandon Mill in the Village of West Greenville (see “Map Quest,” page 78). It’s an airy space with spiffy design, comfy conversation areas, and funky details. Courtesy of high mill windows, sunlight pours in as tech CEOs, designers, developers, and entrepreneurs work at standing desks, communal tables, and in Eno hammocks. There is a game room, Methodical coffee, and even a sauna. It’s a beautiful marriage of work and play. But isn’t that the point? In creative industries—especially marketing, design, and tech—the 8-to-5, corner office is done. We integrate work with life, because in the end it’s all about life. And the best ideas are born where all roads converge.

Details matter. Atlas Local’s space is full of charming character (and characters, as the case may be). For more, turn to page 78.

Blair Knobel, Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @LBKNOBEL

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

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Carew Rice now on view

Carew Rice 1899-1971 Gate of the Swords, Charleston, SC, 1933 hand-cut paper

A native of the South Carolina lowcountry, Carew Rice was working in Chattanooga, Tennessee in the late 1920s when he discovered the art of cutting silhouettes. He worked from the Depression era up until 1970, when he cut silhouettes for South Carolina’s Tricentennial celebration. He traveled the world creating portraits of politicians, royalty, and ordinary folks, and he became well known throughout the South for portraiture, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life meticulously rendered in this unusual and exacting medium.

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Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

admission free

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A WORLD OF STORIES

now on view

Special Thanks to Exhibition Sponsor

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S AWAITS AT THE GCMA.

Jamie Wyeth born 1946 A Recurring Dream, 2011 acrylic, oil, and watercolor on archival cardboard

In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N.C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 70 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. Representing the third generation of this legendary family, James Browning Wyeth (born 1946) began his career as an artist at the age of eleven. Ambitious and talented, Jamie Wyeth enjoyed early success painting the residents and landscapes of his hometown, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. He later worked in New York City, where he befriended and painted arts celebrities Andy Warhol, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rudolf Nureyev, and Lincoln Kirstein. Highlighted by local residents, both human and animal, and set in the familiar surroundings of the Brandywine River Valley and coastal Maine, Jamie Wyeth’s expressive new works invite viewers to create their own narratives based on the artist’s provocative titles and ambiguous imagery.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

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admission free

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AFC URGENT CAREBON SECOURS Greer 864-849-8999 AFC URGENT CAREBON SECOURS Cherrydale 864-467-2005

AFC URGENT CAREBON SECOURS Woodruff Rd. 864-458-8126

WHERE IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO GET WORK DONE?

AFC URGENT CAREBON SECOURS Augusta Rd. 864-243-7062

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

“I’m a daylight junkie, so my work quality is in direct correlation with UV frequencies. I can’t vacation in a subtropical paradise because I’m freakishly productive. It’s horrible.”

Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR

AFC URGENT CAREBON SECOURS Simpsonville 864-757-5059

Unbelievable care in unexpected moments. Sometimes you need medical care when your doctor’s office is closed. For those times, we make getting the care you need as easy and convenient as possible.

Now open at Augusta Road Open 7 Days a week Monday – Friday | 8:00am – 8:00pm Saturday – Sunday | 8:00am – 5:00pm 1800 Augusta Street, Suite B Greenville, SC 29605 (864) 293-7062

ABBY MOORE KEITH EDITORIAL ASSISTANT “While I have a home office, I tend to be most productive at my dining room table.”

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS RUTA FOX M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka Heidi Coryell Williams

“My apartment, where I have a beautiful lake view, right in the city.”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Kathryn Davé, KATHLEEN NALLEY, John Jeter & Stephanie Trotter CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Jake Knight, Rebecca Lehde & Eli Warren “In my home office with a fur baby on each foot.”

ANDREW HUANG EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Kathryn Baker EDITORIAL INTERN HOLLY HARDIN OPERATIONS MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KRISTY ADAIR Michael Allen

“I LOVE being able to work poolside or on my deck— nothing beats fresh air and sunshine, courtesy of the Cloud and a portable Wi-Fi hotspot, of course.”

“In my shower. I have a tremendous shower. It’s where I think all my brilliant thoughts. Everyone knows my shower thoughts are the best. Ask anyone.”

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Johnston, Annie Langston, Nicole Mularski, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes Tori Lant DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 7, No. 3) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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UNDER CONTRACT

UNDER CONTRACT

UNDER CONTRACT

112 Walton Dr., Greer $420,000 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms MLS#1331754 Steven Delisle 864-757-4970

303 St Helena Ct., Greenville $549,000 4 Bedrooms, 3 Full & 2 Half Bathrooms MLS#1332743 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

5 Graywood Ct., Simpsonville $489,000 5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms MLS#1333714 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

104 Pheasant Trail, Greenville $230,000 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms MLS#1336299 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

120 E Round Hill Rd., Greenville $2,495,000 5 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms 23 acres MLS#1335830 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

6 Monet Dr., Montebello $925,000 3 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms MLS#1336098 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

132 Horsepen Way, Simpsonville $270,000 5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms MLS#1337305 Steven Delisle 864-757-4970

420 Packs Mtn. Ridge Rd., Taylors $450,000 5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms MLS#1336503 Steven Delisle 864-757-4970

We bring the world to your doorstep. blackstreaminternational.com Christies_fp_TOWN TOWN_blank page.indd MAR17 7 v3.indd 1

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Opening March 2017 at Legacy Square Jason and Julia Scholz, owners of Simpsonville-based Stella’s Southern Bistro, will expand by opening their second restaurant location in just a few days at Legacy Square within Verdae. The new restaurant concept highlights a relaxed atmosphere, expanded bar, community seating, and menu that includes small plate options. The first restaurant to open in the Legacy Square town center, Stella’s Southern Brasserie is sure to become a natural gathering spot and excellent destination for a quality meal. For restaurant opening and reservation details, visit: stellasbistro.com or facebook.com/stellasbistro

Legacy Square is located on Rocky Slope Road at Legacy Park. New businesses are taking shape and land sales are underway. For Legacy Square sales and leasing info, call (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

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THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

AMOS LEE From bartender and second-grade teacher to opening for acts like Bob Dylan, Adele, and Paul Simon, Amos Lee seems to have found his calling. The songwriter’s ability to meld together elements of folk, rock, and soul has spawned six studio albums and a fanbase dedicated to the art of gritty, passionate tunes. The songwriter’s 2016 album Spirit debuted at no. 3 on the Billboard Top Rock charts, proving that whether he’s behind a desk or a microphone, Amos Lee is here to teach you a thing or two about music.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Mar 10, 8pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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zWhat-Not-to-Miss / SISTER ACT

RICKIE LEE JONES AND MADELEINE PEYROUX

Based on the 1992 hit movie starring Whoopi Goldberg, Sister Act made its musical debut in 2011. The sensational stage show follows Deloris Van Cartier, an aspiring nightclub singer who dreams of seeing her name in lights. Those aspirations are put on hold when Deloris witnesses her boyfriend commit murder, and she is forced into protective custody at a convent. The habit will never be the same!

Sultry and saucy are the words of the day for this duo of powerhouse female vocalists, whose combined stints in the spotlight total more than half a century. It’s a little old school mixed with a bit of the new; Jones’s raw, sensual persona has made her a music legend, (not to mention one of VH1’s “100 Greatest Women in Rock & Roll”) while Peyroux’s soulful stylings have garnered comparisons to that other queen of jazz blues— Billie Holiday.

Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Mar 16–Apr 8. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Mar 9, 7:30pm. $25-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

z Long before it’s whittled down to the Final Four in Phoenix, the Well will serve as one of eight venues hosting the country’s elite athletic teams. The family-friendly event will include first and second rounds of tournament play, setting the scene for an electrifying weekend of nothing but net. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Mar 17–19. Fri–Sun. $228-$300. (864) 2413800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph courtesy of Centre Stage

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

NCAA DIVISION I MEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

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CHICAGO It took 108 years for the Cubs to bring home a World Series title, but it’s taken these hometown heroes only 50 to rack up American Music Awards, three numberone, chart-topping singles, and a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. While the band reached early success with hits like “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” and “25 or 6 to 4” from their first two albums, more contemporary tunes—“I Don’t Wanna Live Without Your Love” and “Look Away”—have proven Chicago’s staying power. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, Mar 19, 7:30pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

NOEL COWARD’S BLITHE SPIRIT Remember the saying, “Let sleeping dogs lie?” The same goes for dead ex-wives. Seeking to do a little research for his upcoming novel on the occult, author Charles Condomine requests the help of kooky medium Madame Arcati. But Charles soon gets more than he bargains for when the ghost of his deceased ex Elvira comes a hauntin’. The madcap comedy has been around for more than 75 years, so you know it’s got the chops to split your sides.

BLACK & WHITE BALL

The glitz and glamour of a romantic evening in Paris is the motif of this year’s Black & White Ball, held by the Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. The black-tie “Cirque de Lumiere” will include specialty cocktails, seated dinner, live band, and both silent and live auctions to whet your shopping appetite. As always, proceeds from the evening will fund continuing seasons of musical magic with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. Westin Poinsett Hotel, 120 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, Mar 11, 6pm. $160. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Mar 10–19. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$25. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

March 2017 S

Life moments shouldn’t be interrupted for service calls. From covering our shoes to explaining everything in detail, we are committed to ensuring your home’s problems are fixed without any headaches.

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Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

(864) 908.3362 W W W. C O R L E Y P R O . C O M

“As always EXCELLENT! Thank

you for taking such great care of our home.”

Becky B. Greenville, SC 2/11/2017 Corley hlfH TOWN_Laundry.indd 1

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List z

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Quick HITS RACE THE HELIX—UPSTATE

z Race the Helix returns for a third year, inviting runners to participate in a 5K trail run and one-mile walk/run at Lake Conestee Nature Park. Inspired by the Shenal family’s struggle to fight their daughter’s rare chromosomal disorder, Race the Helix seeks to raise awareness for genetic diseases. Funds raised from the event will benefit the Greenwood Genetic Center Foundation and research. Lake Conestee Nature Park, 840 Mauldin Rd, Greenville. Sat, Mar 11, 9am. $15-$25. go-greenevents.com/HelixUpstate2017

2017 SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

Photograph by Naomi Gaffey, courtesy of the Peace Center.

It’s been twelve years too long since Greenville last hosted the SEC Women’s Basketball Tournament. Top competitors from universities around the South will hit the hardwood for an all-out basketball brawl to be crowned the queens of the court. The tournament will feature 14 teams in single-elimination play for the title, currently defended by the University of South Carolina Lady Gamecocks. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Mar 1–5. Times and prices vary. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

THE MAKERS SUMMIT

z It’s no secret that the Upstate is rapidly becoming a destination for entrepreneurs to plant roots. Whether you’re just getting started or have several years’ experience under your belt, the Makers Summit is committed to bringing together creatives of all levels for two days of rigorous discussion panels, workshops, and valuable networking opportunities. Clemson University ONE Building, 1 N Main St, Greenville. Fri, 11am–10pm; Sat, 9am–5:30pm. $295. makerscollective.org/ themakerssummit

CHAMBER EXTRAVAGANZA

z Greenville’s chamber orchestra ends the season with a bang—and a big surprise. Featuring solo performances by trombonist Stephen Wilson and bassoonist Amy Yang Hazlett, conductor Edvard Tchivzhel will guide his band of merry musicians through a series of three thrilling works by top film and theater composers. The last song of the evening? You’ll just have to wait and see. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mar 24–26. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $44. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

ALL MY SONS

z American playwright Arthur Miller captures the fragility of friendship and betrayal in this 1947 play. During World War II, Steve Deever and Joe Keller’s joint business was responsible for the deaths of 21 Air Force pilots when their cylinder heads were found to be cracked. Steve took the fall, while Joe walked away scot-free. Fast-forward, and the men’s families soon begin dusting off the past, uncovering hidden truths and learning that some wounds truly never heal. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Mar 24–Apr 15. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

Celtic Woman: Voices of Angels Take a break from dying your beer green to appreciate some real Irish culture. Breathtaking vocals and storied heritage have become calling cards for Celtic Woman’s multifaceted live shows, often accentuated with traditional dance and talented musicians. New to the quartet is singer Tara McNeill, who began performing with members Susan McFadden, Mairéad Carlin, and Éabha McMahon during last year’s Home for Christmas symphony tour. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, Mar 17, 8pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org March 2017 S

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Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

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GREENVILLE

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NAPLES

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Town

ON THE

Junior League of Greenville’s Big Night Out February 11, 2017 Kristen Whitehead & Katrinka Mendenhall

Amanda McDougald Scott & Brandon Scott

Cory & Cati Heglar

Kyle & Claire Stam

Colin & Hannah Spellmeyer

Guests gathered at the historic Westin Poinsett for Big Night Out in support of the Junior League of Greenville. This black-tie gala is the League’s largest fundraising event of the year and was an evening filled with delicious food and great tunes by The Mighty Kicks. To raise funds for several of the League’s community programs, guests walked away with some stellar items from the event’s auction. Photography by Jake Knight

Amy Ryberg Doyle, Jocelyn Mickel & Leslie Haas

Lauren & Chase McCallister with John & Adelaide Crangle Weston & Rhoades White

Kathryn Freedman, Scott Repass & Amanda McDougald Scott Sally Kate & Jordan Felts

Jason & Anna Winecoff

Cameron King, Emily Buchanan & Lindsey Twining Amrita Jayaram & Virginia Miller

James & Nicole McAden

Will Davis & Lauren Craine

Josh & Liz Tew Jordan Shane & Laura Wexler

Sarah Henley, Cassandra Stevens & Emily Foster MARCH 2017 / 27

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ON THE

Town

Benefit at Centre Stage for Camperdown Academy January 17, 2017

David Adams & Adrith Thayer Jared & Anna Pretulak

As a special thank you for their support of Camperdown Academy, 350 patrons were invited to Centre Stage for an evening of fun, food, and music. Guests enjoyed appetizers and beverages provided by Cepin Company and dessert by GB&D, as well as a preview of Centre Stage’s annual classic rock show Jukebox Heroes. Special thanks to Me & Me Designs Unlimited for generously providing a table arrangement for the event.

Caroline & Clif Schmitt with Kathy & Phil Falls

Tommy & Keri Knisley

Brenda & Nathan Luginbill

Photography by Jake Knight Sara Lindley & Jill Alper

John & Patty Walker

Steven Wood & Robert Gagnon

John Alexander, Meg Campbell & Pam Foster

Alisson Krause & Suzanna Greer Ben & Danielle Gilliam

Sherrill Livernois & Becky Strange

Kathy Barrett, Noah Barrett & Nate Barrett

Becky Ruff, Dan Blanch & Harriet Johnson

Ron Bruccoliere & Lisa Mlady

Jim & Deana Gasque

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Opening Reception for Christina Laurel at the Metropolitan Arts Council January 27, 2017

Christina Laurel & Marcy Yerkes

The Metropolitan Arts Council celebrated the work of artist Christina Laurel, who uses Japanese imagery such as the delicate butterfly, to communicate themes of ephemerality, transition, and renewal. Patrons enjoyed wine and hors d’oeuvres as they pondered Laurel’s two- and three-dimensional works. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Arlene Neville & Ruth Neville

Carole Browder & Anna Sparks

Kelley Woodsey & Tanya Stiegler

Sonny & Marianne Ballard with Ken & Kay Betsch Barbara & John LaBosco

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ON THE

Town

Christi & Rob Hitzelberger

Kristin & Matt Wenc

Shelley Keim & Summer Sondov Robert Neville & Stephanie Sullivan

Kathleen Piteva, Tracy Gillen & Rose Mihaly

Greg & Lois Parker

Charles Smith & Garland Mattox

Becky Johnson & Rachel Clarke

Kim Sholly, Charles Ratterree, Alan Ethridge, George Patrick McLeer & Blair Knobel MARCH 2017 / 31

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ON THE

Town

Rita & Kirby Stone

The Cotillion Club’s 129th Anniversary Ball January 20, 2017 Tamela & Kevin Keller

Jane Harrison Fisher & Penn Williams

Continuing the legacy as one of South Carolina’s premier social events, the Cotillion Club hosted its 129th Anniversary Ball at the elegant Poinsett Club. Attendees gathered for an evening of ballroom dancing and dinner. The night—a whirl of ball gowns, coat-tails, and white gloves—included traditional and contemporary dancing.

Libba & TF Huguenin Jr.

Photography by Gabrielle Grace Miller

Ashley & Gabe Waters Corbett & Gena Haskell

(bottom row) Buzz Cleveland, Chuck Stone & Charlie Mickel; (middle row) Andrew McDonald, Jimmy Allison & Gunn Murphy; (top row) George Zimmerman, Dan Sterling & Mike Smith

Kevin & Allison Mertens Van & Julie Perry

Chelsea & Kyle Galbraith

Langston Dunkle Page, Connecker Rogers, Buzz Cleveland & Hazel Chaplan

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Betsy & George Zimmerman

Caroline & Mauldin Avinger

Andrew and Laura McDonald, Dan Sterling, and Jennifer & Patrick Fant

John Mcbee Zimmerman & Rhett Brown

Buck Stone & Sydney Robinson

Devan & Michael Pace

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ON THE

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GREENVILLE

Possibilities: GCCA Ceramics Invitational Opening February 3, 2017

Cassidy Mulligan & Bethany Williams

Art lovers gathered at the gallery at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts for the Possibilities: GCCA Ceramics Invitational opening. Nine contemporary ceramic artists invited nine additional artists to showcase their clay art at GCCA. On display through March 29, the exhibit demonstrates the endless possibilities of clay as an artistic medium. Photography by Jake Knight

Judy Cromwell & Valerie Zimany

Nilly & Terry Barr

Shannon Caldwell & Scott Gould with Martha & David Dolge

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ON THE

Town

Jim Campbell & Waylon Bigsby

Kimberly Huddleston with Mike & Roxanne Vatalaro

Gayle Burke & Bryant Brown

Sarah Blackman & Glenda Guion

Mollye Spitler, Kelly Jenko & Megan Cosgrove

Adrian & Sharon Steinmann Ashton Williams & Frank Vickery

Kate Furman & Randy Armstrong

Christy Ashkettle & Daniel Smith MARCH 2017 / 37

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Kathryn Baker

Lauren McKenzie Breland & Cameron Kirk Durham October 8, 2016

W

hat happens when a man with a cattle drive finds the love of his life? A truly (moo)ving proposal. Cameron Durham would not have met McKenzie Breland if their friends hadn’t herded them together. McKenzie, a student at Clemson University, and Cameron, who attended Piedmont Technical College, were introduced through mutual friends, and it didn’t take long for them to start dating. A year and a half later, Cameron decided to steer their relationship in a more serious direction. One sunny October afternoon, the groom-to-be insisted he and McKenzie stop to feed his father’s cattle before going out to lunch. McKenzie, while a tad suspicious, went along

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Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

with the plan. As Cameron called the cattle out of the barn, one cow trotted out with “Marry me?” painted on its flank. A shocked McKenzie excitedly said yes to becoming Cameron’s wife, and the two celebrated at the beloved Belton staple Grits and Groceries. Not wanting anything extravagant, the pair decided on a simple ceremony at the Old Stone Church in Clemson with 40 of their closest friends and family. While the couple stressed simplicity, the beauty was heightened in the details. Electric City Blooms created a stunning bridal

Wedded Bliss: Cameron and McKenzie’s quiet ceremony at the Old Stone Church in Clemson was a sweet affair showcasing the couple’s simple, yet elegant style.

bouquet using an array of flowers in autumn colors, including oranges, deep reds, and light pinks. Guests enjoyed dinner at downtown Anderson’s fine-dining restaurant Sullivan’s Metropolitan Grill. To conclude the evening on a sweet note, Tip Top Cake Shop provided a subtly elegant white wedding cake. The couple now lives in Belton, SC, where McKenzie is the Phonathon director for Clemson University and Cameron works for Silt Fence Installations. CHELSEY ASHFORD // CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

MARCH 2017 / 39

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TOWN

Weddings Lauren Davis & Ronald Krankowski III August 27, 2016 Novelist Tom McNeal once said, “Distance means so little when someone means so much,” words that ring true for long-time couple Lauren Davis and Ronald Krankowski III. After dating throughout college at Clemson University, the two split upon graduation, as they were moving to different states. But after time spent apart, the two finally understood the Lauren-and-Ronnie team was meant to be, and that no distance could ever change that. One weekend, Lauren headed to New Jersey to visit Ronnie, not knowing her life was about to change forever. A dance enthusiast, Ronnie set up a studio on his porch complete with romantic music. As they danced, Ronnie whispered to Lauren the most important question he’d ever asked, and then got down on one knee. The ceremony was held at the beautiful Charles Ezra Daniel Memorial Chapel at Furman University, and the reception was at the iconic Poinsett Club. The couple lives in New Jersey where Lauren is an E.R. nurse and Ronnie is a sales representative for Gallo Wine Company. PATRICK COX // COX PHOTOGRAPHY

Megan Sherard & Creed Campbell August 13, 2016 No one expects you to marry your middle school crush—you know, raging teen hormones and all that jazz. But Megan Sherard and Creed Campbell are the uncommon exception. Knowing each other the majority of their lives, Megan and Creed attended high school and even college at Clemson University together. But after 8 years of dating, well, it was about that time. The proposal was a tropical affair, taking place on the white sands of Aruba. With the Caribbean Sea as a spellbinding backdrop, Creed’s knee hit the sand under the shade of one of Aruba’s iconic divi-divi trees. His proposal was greeted with an ecstatic “yes!” from Megan. The ceremony was held at Belton Presbyterian Church and the reception took place at Green Valley Country Club. The couple resides in Greenville, where Megan is a marketing and communications coordinator for the Greenville Chamber, and Creed is a project manager at Harper Corporation. CHRISTA RENE // CHRISTA RENE PHOTOGRAPHY

Mary Grace Garabedian & Aaron George October 15, 2016 Nothing says true love like an evening chock-full of music trivia. Mary Garabedian and Aaron George met one night at Aaron’s speakeasy in Charlotte, but it took several years just as friends—and one fateful night at trivia—to realize they belonged together. Four years of dating later, Aaron was ready to take the relationship to the next level. After he bailed on dinner one evening, Mary was pretty upset with him, not knowing his alternative plans. So when she returned home to find a candle-lined driveway and a poetic scavenger hunt leading her through the house, Mary was more than surprised. Aaron was waiting in anticipation under a lighted tree in their backyard with Champagne and a very important (non-trivia related) question. The couple was the first to say “I do” at Brewery 85, where they were surrounded by their closest friends and family. Mary and Aaron reside in Simpsonville, where she works for Net3 Technology and he is a director with KW Beverage. The couple has also started their own handcrafted wood-sign design business, Georges Gorgeous Goods, found on Instagram @georgesgorgeousgoods. APRIL + JAMES // SIMPLY VIOLET PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Beautify with Tile and Stone…Inside and Out Welcome to Clayton Tile – The Upstate’s leading tile distributor for over fifty years. Renowned for our vast selection of ceramic and porcelain tile, natural stone, glass tile, mosaics, and our quality customer service. We specialize in all of your home and business design needs and welcome you to visit one of our four showroom locations in Greenville, Anderson, and Spartanburg, South Carolina.

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Touch Point

Photograph by Eli Warren

The textile art of Charlotte’s Twenty Two West is to have and to hold

MARCH 2017 / 45

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Wool Works:

Material Girl

Greenville native now Charlotte resident, Mary Hamby is a self-taught weaver. She made her first loom herself and translates that experience into signature sculptures, each unique in their colors and patterns. Hamby named her business Twenty Two West after the Greenville address of the home in which she grew up.

Mary Hamby crafts one-of-a-kind textile sculptures and jewelry

E

ver since she was little, fiber artist Mary Hamby’s hands have always twitched to have something to do. As a child, she took art classes, sewing classes, knitting, and crocheting classes. “I soaked it all in,” says the Greenville native who attributes the mixed-media style of her art to this mélange of early experiences. In college she studied interior design, but found she missed making things with her hands. So, in 2015, Hamby committed to her art. Twenty Two West, the name of her business, commemorates the address of the house in which she grew up in Greenville. After dabbling in different media, she found her true voice in textiles. “I connected with weaving in a way that I never had with any other media,” reflects the self-taught weaver. “In weaving there is a beautiful balance between rules and freedom.” Hamby and her filmmaker husband recently moved to Charlotte, where she works full-time on her line of wearable art and sculptural mixed-media pieces for the home. Out of financial necessity, Hamby made her first loom herself—a practice she continues to this day out of preference. Her delicate fanlike fiber necklaces, weighted with thin pottery bars that she stitches on by hand, were born from a mistake in purchasing. While in college, Hamby was making a white and cream tone-on-tone quilt, and the website for the quilting thread advised her to buy more than she thought

she’d need. She ordered 15 spindles, only to find she actually used less than one to stitch her quilt. “I realized I needed to do something with all that leftover thread,” she recalls, “so I wove my first necklace.” She still uses that same type of fine cotton quilting thread to craft her jewelry. The idea for Hamby’s sculptural loom boxes arose from the necklaces she wove on the loom. With the boxes, she makes a wood frame, builds the loom on it, and creates a weaving from thread, roving (raw wool), and pieces of pottery—often gilded—which she leaves on the loom. Each distinct signed and numbered loom box displays novel patterns, colors, and textures. You can hear the excitement in Hamby’s voice when she talks about launching her new spring/summer line in early April. For this line, she is collaborating with a farmer friend in Tennessee who will hand-dye thread for the artist using natural materials. In her art, Hamby aims for equal parts beauty and function. “I love good craftsmanship that will last so that it can be treasured,” she notes. “And I treasure that moment when someone connects with my work.” You can order Hamby’s work on her website: shoptwentytwowest.com. In Greenville, her jewelry and loom boxes are exclusively available at Art & Light (16 Aiken St.; artandlightgallery.com) in the Village of West Greenville.

Photograph (fiber sculptures) courtesy of Mary Hamby / Twenty Two West

/ by M. Linda Lee // photography by Eli Warren

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TOWN

Profile

Great Heights

Joe Erwin pushes toward new creative dimensions at Endeavor

/ by Stephanie Trotter // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Rocket Man: Joe Erwin, who started in the mailroom at Leslie Advertising in Greenville, shot up to found the mega marketing agency Erwin Penland. After 40 years in advertising, he now leads Endeavor, a community of creative professionals.

“Back in the day, I wouldn’t have been involved in something where we saw other agencies. But people have realized that sometimes collaboration trumps competition. And if we collaborate, maybe we both win, and that’s what we’re seeing here.” —Joe Erwin

Learn more about Endeavor or apply to join at endeavorgreenville.com.

A

s the elevator opens at Endeavor and you approach what’s called the Flight Deck, strap in for an exhilarating ride. In a mash-up of Friends meets Mad Men, creative-service professionals are brainstorming in vibrant communal areas filled with high-top tables, comfortable couches, and monitors streaming news of the minute. “Greenville has really become an enclave for creatives regionally and is getting national love,” explains long-time pitchman Joe Erwin. “People in advertising and marketing disciplines are recognizing Greenville really is a leader.” Piloting Endeavor, Erwin guides more than 125 people in this collaborative-space mission, using strategies he deployed across 29 years at his namesake advertising company, Erwin Penland. “I loved my job at E.P.,” shares the 60-year-old innovator. “But I was ready for a new challenge. I thought if I don’t do something else now when I’m young enough, and vigorous enough, and have a passion to do something new, I never will”—an idea to unite Erwin Penland alums with videographers, bloggers, and branders working out of Starbucks and other out-of-the-way places. Once he toured the deserted Certus Bank executive suites at ONE North Main, his lasers locked on target. He kept some of the opulent touches—a penny-covered ceiling, gourmet kitchen, and fully-loaded gym—and created open workstations perfect for imaginations to ignite. In a nod to his childhood love of space exploration, he named this quest for creative camaraderie Endeavor. “We want to help drive the creative process and be champions for it,” Erwin says. “Just like NEXT is an economic accelerator, and Iron Yard for coding, we’re kind of similar. We’re here to help each of our Endeavor members grow to another level.” No matter the journey, uber-networking has always served as Joe Erwin’s tarmac, his homebase touchpoint. First as student-body president at Eastside High and later as the head cheerleader at Clemson University. Personally, and professionally, he’s learned to identify, harness, and sell the spirit of people and their passions, sometimes even coupling competitors together for success. Endeavor’s manifest includes companies that could easily battle while bidding. “I think the world’s changed,” Erwin says, pondering this new landscape. “Back in the day, I wouldn’t have been involved in something where we saw other agencies. But people have realized that sometimes collaboration trumps competition. And if we collaborate, maybe we both win, and that’s what we’re seeing here.” One of the most exhausting, yet rewarding, efforts to make connections in his life was serving as South Carolina’s Democratic Party chairman across much of the 2000s. During his tenure, the Palmetto State captured worldwide attention with televised primary debates and set then-Senator Barack Obama, who lost New Hampshire, on course to win the White House. Today, public education sits on his volunteer radar. To strengthen his alma mater, almost half of his free time is spent at the Erwin Center for Brand Communications at Clemson University. The four-year-old center is adding one new course a semester, and producing graduates who are now finding marketing and advertising jobs in New York and Los Angeles. “I do feel a sense of responsibility,” he reflects. “I remember the people who were good to me, like Bill Leslie and Jim Henderson, and I consider it a responsibility to do some of what those guys did, because they were trailblazers. They helped a lot of young people with careers in advertising.” After building a powerhouse agency, and now a creative collaborative community for hundreds, the adman’s legacy is soaring. He admits, “I feel so blessed and lucky for all the years at Erwin Penland. So now, for me, to help all these folks feels so good. It feels like home.” MARCH 2017 / 49

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Towner

UP

Loan Believer Non-profit director Taylor Beard empowers local entrepreneurs through consistent community support / by Steven Tingle // photograph by Will Crooks

T

here is no such thing as a typical day for Taylor Beard. As director of Nasha Lending, a non-profit providing small loans to under-resourced entrepreneurs, Taylor is responsible for everything from strategy and marketing to making sure the coffee maker works. Nasha Lending is part of Mill Community Ministries, a collection of local outreach programs including Mill Village Farms, Mill Village Market, Village Wrench, and Textile Hall, a co-working community in West Greenville. Taylor is a firm believer in the power of communities and how social change can be brought about by partnerships, education, and opportunity. She’s also a firm believer in the power of homemade tacos, especially those topped with a squeeze of lime. How did the concept for Nasha Lending come about ? >> Nasha Lending was the brainchild of two guys on staff at Grace Church. It was 2009, and they saw a need in our community for start-up capital for under-resourced entrepreneurs. Through the process of making loans and working with entrepreneurs, we realized they needed not only financial capital, but also relational capital and knowledge expertise. How does it fit into the mission of Mill Community Ministries and Textile Hall? >> We, Mill Community Ministries, are a collection of social entrepreneurs whose mission is to unite with God’s vision for individual life change and holistic transformation of under-resourced communities. One of the ways Nasha Lending supports local entrepreneurs is by providing office space and a community for business owners and entrepreneurs through a coworking space called Textile Hall.

additional revenue outside of the traditional donation and grant funds. That being said, non-profits exist because there is a gap in the economy the market cannot fill. As a non-profit, we rely on the generosity of others to help us fill that gap. If you could snap your fingers tomorrow and have one thing what would it be? >> An unlimited supply of homemade tacos—fresh tortillas, chicken, cilantro, onion, avocado, with a squeeze of lime. Or if we’re talking business, then I would say a fully-funded budget to keep up with my brainstorm sessions!

Leading Lady: When she’s not meeting with entrepreneurs or connecting with community members, Taylor Beard can be found hard at work in Textile Hall. For more information visit nashalending.org and textilehall.com.

What does success look like for Mill Community Ministries and Nasha Lending? >> Success for Mill Community Ministries means working ourselves out of a job. In 10 years, if our communities are thriving . . . then our work is done. That will be true success. Specifically for Nasha Lending, I would love to see Greenville and the Upstate become a hub for creators, risk-takers, and go-getters. Our greatest asset as a community is our people. How do you stay sustainable? Is this a strictly a nonprofit idea ? >> Sustainability has always been core to who we are. When we began Nasha Lending, we reinvested the repaid loans into additional businesses in order to build a cycle of sustainability. Ventures like Textile Hall and the Mill Village Market are two ways we bring in

))) TO READ MORE INTERVIEWS, GO TO TOWNCAROLINA.COM

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Congratulations to our Agents for an Outstanding 2016!

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Story

BACK

On a Role Mimi Wyche and Chip Egan entertain Warehouse Theatre audiences in an Arthur Miller classic / by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Eli Warren

W

hen actors Mimi Wyche and Chip Egan take the stage on March 24 at the Warehouse Theatre as the lead roles in Arthur Miller’s dramatic 1947 play All My Sons, it will only be the second time the two have performed together since Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? roared through the space on Augusta Street six years ago. Miller—who we hope is known more for his work and less for being married to Marilyn Monroe— created “a masterpiece of American drama,” says Egan of the play. No pressure there, right?   Egan, a freelance director, actor, designer, and retired dean emeritus of the College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities at Clemson University, and Wyche, the Greenville native erstwhile New Yorker, sat down to banter a few weeks out from beginning rehearsals:

So, Mimi, you were in a Broadway play when you lived in New York City, correct? >> MIMI WYCHE: Yes, it was Cats (pausing for a beat, then smiling)—back when it mattered (laughter). What does acting fuel for you, Chip? >> CHIP EGAN: It’s sort of who I am. I am a theater artist and that takes lots of forms— actor, director, sometimes designer—and that’s the way I’ve been since I was a teenager, and it’s a kind of lifeblood. I’m not very good at not doing it after awhile.

Take(s) Two: Mimi Wyche and Chip Egan are veteran actors who first appeared together at the Warehouse Theatre’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? six years ago. They meet once again as Kate and Joe Keller in Arthur Miller’s challenging work All My Sons.

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MW: I feel like it’s food for my soul. In New York there’s a thing that if you can’t get hired, make your own jobs, so that’s why I started writing these one-woman shows because it would give me something to work on while I was trying to get a “job-job.” What were your shows about? >> MW: Most of the shows were written to music like cabaret shows. One was on the music of Cole Porter, one was on romance, one was country/western. Then I started to write the piece about eating disorders, which I suffered from and I’d always said, ‘I’ve got to do some kind of theater piece about eating disorders,’ and my friends finally said, ‘Either write this show, or shut up about it.’ I played five different women who had some version of weight obsession, or exercise, or bulimia, anorexia, or obesity. That is intense, to say the least. What was the show called? >> MW: Eaten Alive. I toured colleges and did the show myself for five years, and then a friend of mine took it over, so it toured colleges for 11 years. I was just amazed. It’s not a brilliant piece of theater by any means, but to have someone going through . . . sharing the emotional terror of an eating disorder, and they’re up there and you’re able to witness it—it’s so much more powerful than having a speaker. That, to me, is the power of theater. If you can sit in the audience and share that emotional journey, it hits you in a way that watching a video or going to a movie doesn’t quite nail that energy that is shared. So here you both are a few years after Virginia Woolf, with All My Sons now bringing you back together. What was it about these roles that attracted you?? >> MW: I actually saw it on Broadway. My husband and I were in New York and Dianne Wiest played Kate, and she was literally in front of me. At the end of the play, my husband and I just sat there and we looked up when the guy said, ‘We are sweeping up the theater—you gotta go.’ It was just so powerful and I remember thinking, ‘Man, I would love to just have a swat at that play at some point in my life because that part . . . she’s a goddess.’

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Like Joe and Kate Keller from this production, George and Martha from Virginia Woolf were intense characters to play against each other. >> CE: It was every bit as rewarding to work together in that piece as we thought it would be. MW: Absolutely for me. It’s up there in the top-three, all-time great experiences in theatre. I don’t know what the other two are . . . (laughing). CE: We’ll talk (more laughing). Are you nervous for this performance? >> CE: This is an American classic that’s not seen all that often or produced very often. I’ve never seen it on stage. I’m going to be doing it, but I’ve never seen it. So I have a sense of debt to the work and to the importance of it, and that’s a little intimidating, but you don’t think about that while you’re rehearsing it. What about you, Mimi? >> MW: I get incredibly nervous about any kind of performance. I recently did a solo in church here locally, which I’ve done for 35 years, and I almost threw up. It’s just sort of a given. All My Sons by Arthur Miller March 24–April 15 Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

We bring the world to your doorstep. blackstreaminternational.com MARCH 2017 / 53

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Designing a Life From home renovations to national design features, lifestyle blogger Lindsay Lark Jackman patterns her world with purpose / by Kathleen Nalley

// photography by Rebecca Lehde

E

ver wander onto Pinterest or Instagram and see fabulous photos of cozy living rooms with colorful, layered blankets draped atop plush chairs and couches, or sleek, gleaming kitchens with subway tile backsplashes and live-edge wooden countertops and open shelving? Do you keep dream boards—or oldschool magazine rip-outs—of ideas you’d love to do to your home? Chances are, at some point, you’ve glimpsed an image from Pickens native Lindsay Lark Jackman’s residences without realizing she’s right here in Greenville. Lindsay is the founder and brainchild behind The White Buffalo Styling Co., a design and lifestyle blog that’s received notoriety in the home-design world. Her exterior and interior renovations of three houses in Greenville, along with designs and various other inspirations, have even been featured in Better Homes & Gardens magazine. Of course, this hasn’t been by chance. A wise person once said, “Opportunity looks a lot like hard work,” and never has this idiom been truer.

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Top Shelf: Lindsay Lark Jackman’s curated aesthetic, rustic farmhouse meets modern bohemian, has been showcased on design blogs across the country, as well as in Better Homes & Gardens magazine.

“The national attention The White Buffalo has received—to be valued for what you do and what you love—is really affirming,” says Lindsay. The White Buffalo Styling Co. blog not only features Lindsay’s design style as well as specific products she uses throughout her home, but additionally includes recipes, articles on health and wellness, and one of Lindsay’s favorite activities: entertaining. What sets her blog apart, however, is her personal storytelling. A writer by trade (she holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Converse College), Lindsay approaches her blog and her reader relationships with the same care as that of a novelist. Readers soon realize that for the blog’s author, living with style is not just about good design; it is all about family and the life she and her husband, Chris (a project manager for an area electrical contractor), and daughter, Rosie Mills, have built together.

L I F E H A P P E N S W H I L E YO U ’ R E M A K I N G P L A N S Lindsay and Chris met while undergraduates at Furman. Faithful yet pragmatic, the couple began their marriage with a plan. They wanted to

build a family business so Lindsay could work from home once they had children. They wanted to release themselves from the burden of debt and live a simpler life. They wanted to do something for which they felt passionate. And they wanted to be a testimony to their faith. “Together, we started out our lives realizing we were drowning in college debt that was going to prevent us from doing all of the things we wanted for our family. We decided a radical approach was needed, so we put a plan in place to renovate houses to pay off that debt and live more simply,” Lindsay explains. The journey began when Lindsay and Chris bought their first home in Greenville. A foreclosure, the structure needed work and lots of it. The couple rolled up their sleeves, learned everything simply by doing it, all the while determined to refurbish the house in the most costefficient way possible. Lindsay started her first blog as a way to let family and friends see what they were doing to the house. “What’s funny is that at the time, I barely knew what a blog was until a friend suggested it as a way to MARCH 2017 / 55

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keep everyone informed,” laughs Lindsay. Her initial learning curve was short, and she realized other bloggers were making income from their blogs. So, ever the planner, she set out to learn everything she could: observing and analyzing other design blogs, attending conferences, and networking with other bloggers. Her research turned into meaningful friendships with like-minded people all over the country, which later spurred a series of collaborative online home tours. She studied for two years, and during a six-month stint, she immersed herself in the world of branding, web design, and commerce. Most important, she found her own voice.

“I remember walking along a dirt road talking with my dad in my late teens. He said that the key to true happiness and fulfillment is to find what you love enough to do for free, then find someone willing to pay you for it,” says Lindsay. As for the home renovations? “Our initial plan was to stay in this first home for 20 years or more,” admits Lindsay. But after Chris told Lindsay he felt they were supposed to sell the home, the couple decided to move up their plans. So, the next home—an older rental in a transitional neighborhood— was quickly purchased, and another round of renovations ensued. By this time, The White Buffalo had picked up speed, gaining a mass following.

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IT’S IN THE DESIGN Lindsay’s design aesthetic is a mixture of rustic and farmhouse style—likely inspired by growing up on rural farmland in Pickens County—and modern, with lots of white and clean lines. She admits she’s a bit of a hippie, so bohemian textiles and patterns are thrown into the mix, as are midcentury modern styles. She also finds inspiration in Southern history and architecture with stories to tell (think Charleston and Savannah). Somehow, magically, Lindsay fuses all of these elements together to create a balanced yet eclectic style all her own. While her own aesthetic serves as inspiration to readers, Lindsay believes each person has a distinct style, and nothing makes a home more meaningful than embracing that and surrounding yourself with what you love. One of the most fielded questions on her blog is the color of her current home’s exterior, kitchen cabinets, and fireplace. (It’s Benjamin Moore Hidden Falls, by the way.) Another popular question involves how she finds work/life balance. Lindsay says this balance is easier than working 8 to 10 hours a day away from home. But, she adds, working from home means you can’t hold regular office hours. “For example, this morning Rosie woke up with a slight fever, and she just wanted to be held all day,” Lindsay says. “I’ve learned to give myself grace; if things don’t get done, I have to be okay with that,” she says.

O N E F O R T H E B O O KS

Pattern Play: Read more about Lindsay’s family life—and see some incredible renovations and design inspirations—on her blog, thewhitebuffalostylingco.com.

Six years, three renovations, several national magazine features, numerous hosted home tours in conjunction with other design and lifestyle bloggers, a frenzy of attention through social media, and new, diversified product lines including essential oils, and Lindsay has built a solid business that brings her dad’s advice to fruition. “This year feels like the culmination of the last six years,” she explains. “I feel like our family is on the cusp of some really exciting developments.” One of those developments: The couple’s three renovations have helped to pay off the college debt, and they will soon be free to live as God calls and move into other areas . . . right around the same time they will welcome baby number two (due in April!) into their home. Other big plans are on the immediate and long-term horizon, but you will have to tune into her blog over the next several months to see these revealed. “God has really written our story,” Lindsay says. “Along the way, he’s put people and experiences in our path that have helped drive our company’s and our family’s personal growth.” And also along the way, she’s learned a thing or two about branding, business, partnerships, contracts, commerce, and the like. But, more importantly, since becoming a mother, she’s realized that these are not the most important facets of her design and lifestyle blog. “Sharing our family’s story, sharing our lives and how we shape them, sharing what’s special to me personally, finding purpose and meaning in everything we do . . . that’s what is important to communicate. My focus has shifted much more toward telling our story of family, love, and faith than simply showing pictures of design ideas or renovations.”

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Coldwe ll Ban ke r Cai n e

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Picture This: The Graduate Hotels incorporate layers of detail into each college-town location. In Charlottesville, guests are greeted at the card catalog–turned–reception desk, and guest rooms include a Wahoo over each bed, a nod to UVA students who refer to themselves as “Wahoos.”

Schooling the Rest

T

homas Jefferson designed this hotel. It’s true. Our third president of the United States crafted many things during his long life, including the Declaration of Independence, his beloved home Monticello, and the University of Virginia. It makes sense that this arbiter of taste would lend his eye to the lobby and halls, rooms, and even baths of The Graduate, a three-star boutique lodging that rests on the edge of the UVA campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. That is certainly the idea, according to general manager Yolunda Harrell. “If Thomas Jefferson were alive today, how would he decorate his home? That is the premise behind the designers’ idea for the hotel,” she says. And, indeed, no stone appears unturned in

The Graduate Hotel in Charlottesville, Virginia, aces the test / by Blair Knobel

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Photographs courtesy of the Graduate Hotel Charlottesville

their quest to integrate the smartest details into the space, courtesy of found and handmade objects. Take the lobby, for example: the front desk is a brainy combination of card catalog and toy railroad, which reflects Virginia towns by bespoke train-set creator Rail Tales. Instead of cards, however, the small drawers contain candy and dog treats (you can bring your furry bestie). Every nook, I find, is full of surprises. From the broad strokes of décor—plush plaid carpeting and hardwood floors like in Jefferson’s day, antique photographs, and inspired light fixtures—along with a game room/lounge (with conference/ping pong tables, aka ping pong tables with chairs), The Graduate goes for extra credit. Even UVA students hang out here, but I wonder if they are strategically placed like everything else. The Graduate Hotels are a collection of boutique lodging in college towns throughout the country—in addition to Charlottesville, Athens, GA, Oxford, MS, Ann Arbor, MI, and more—designed with the geographic and cultural characteristics of each location. The giant fish above my luxurious king bed isn’t like something carelessly tacked to a dorm room wall. It’s a Wahoo, which is a nickname for the students at UVA, officially called Cavaliers. Legend has it that they adopted the name after a baseball game in 1890, when fans of rival Washington & Lee dubbed the students “Wahoos,” an insult they embraced.

Game Day: Enjoy coffee in the game room lounge, where you might bump into UVA students working on latest projects; by night, grab a drink and try your hand at ping pong. The newly renovated and expanded Sheepdog Café (not pictured) offers breakfast, lunch, dinner, and cocktails.

Pop quiz! Try to locate the chandeliers covered in custom-made crochet or maybe the intricate threaded wallpaper. (Hint: They’re upstairs near Heirloom, the hotel’s rooftop restaurant and bar that crafts food with the seasons, utilizes local produce, and shakes up a damn good drink. I recommend the Society of Precious Blood, with Strange Monkey Gin, St. Germain, lemon, blackberry simple syrup, and sparkling wine.) Among the hotel’s calculated design, I am especially taken with my in-room bath. The mirror, fixtures, elevated sink, and metal baskets for towels, hair dryer, and tissue have Jefferson’s contemporary imprint, and—poof! just like that—past and present mesh in perfect time. With myriad throwback details, including placement near UVA’s beautiful campus, The Graduate offers the best of college without fail—but, like its name implies, with a refined, accomplished spin. It reminds that, at heart, we are students for life. The Graduate Charlottesville, 1309 W Main St, Charlottesville, VA. (434) 295-4333, graduatecharlottesville.com. Rates start at $125/night.

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; model: Michael Fekete; hair & make-up by Isabelle Schreier / Belle Maquillage

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

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THE LOOK

Office Hours Work overtime in these fresh threads

ON MICHAEL : French Terry grey pullover, $40. By COAST; black jeans, price on request. By BILLIAM; classic loafer, $188. By Austen Heller, from Southern Tide; fountain pen, $12. By Cross, from Staples.

Hair & make-up by Isabelle Schreier / Belle Maquillage

/ styled by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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THIS PAGE: Navy and gray striped q-zip sweater, $135. By Westwood, from Southern Tide; Sid straight jeans, $178. By Citizens of Humanity; Sadler loafer, $195. By Trask; Dapper watch, $249. By Daniel Wellington; all from Smith & James; metallic chair, courtesy of The Village Grind.

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THE GOODS

Work Detail Smart accessories for your everyday wardrobe // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

MAN MADE (clockwise from top left): leather belt, $78. By Trafalagar; Sadler loafer, $195. By Trask, all from Smith & James; tablet briefcase, $274. By FILSON, from Southern Tide; Dapper watch, $249. By Daniel Wellington, from Smith & James.

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THE ITEM

Daily Commute Turn your drive into a smooth ride with a Vita road bike // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

// F R A M E The Vita’s lightweight carbon frame boasts excellent shock absorption and features an

// B I K E S T A N D

efficient gear system.

Rack your ride anywhere with a Superstand, available at Carolina Triathlon, $45.

// W H E E L S Carolina Triathlon fits their Vitas with 700C diameter tires, allowing for quality performance on versatile terrain.

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C

arolina Triathlon owner Randy McDougald describes the women’s Specialized Vita hybrid as the “perfect commuting bike.” The bicycle offers all the essentials for the early morning rider, including handlebars that sit up higher allowing for more stable posture. The Vita’s pedals ensure an efficient ride, and it sports larger tires for navigating turbulent roads and those inconvenient potholes.

Satin Indigo Vita Women’s Hybrid Bicycle, $500. By Specialized, from Carolina Triathlon. 928 S. Main St, Greenville. (864) 331-8483, carolinatriathlon.com

// F O R K The rigid carbon fiber fork makes the Vita model durable, while the Zertz inserts create a smoother ride.

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Needle Work The Man’s old ink reminds him of a once rebellious spirit

I

was eighteen years old when I walked into the sketchy tattoo parlor squeezed between a dive bar and marine supply store on Federal Highway in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It was 1987, and I was a freshman in college with forty dollars burning a hole in my pocket. I’m not quite sure why I was so determined to get a tattoo back then. Today, everyone from soccer moms to chefs to CEOs is covered with ink. But back in the late ’80s, tattoos were a rarity, something you only saw on the hairy arms of aging Harley riders, Vietnam vets, and heavy metal singers. The owner of the parlor was named Tatts Taylor, and he looked like someone my aunt Janie would describe as having been “rode hard and put up wet.” He was covered in tattoos, most of them dull and faded from years of baking in the south Florida sun. The walls of the parlor were papered in tattoo designs that ranged from small, winking devils and flaming skulls to winged dragons and fantasy landscapes large enough to cover the hood of a small car. I limited myself to what I considered the “introductory” section, an area of tiny designs consisting mostly of kanji symbols and cartoon characters. These seemed to fit both my budget and pain tolerance. I finally settled on an image of a small island with a single palm tree silhouetted by a setting sun. It was $35 and about the size of a fifty-cent piece. I showed Tatts the design, and he asked me where I wanted it

placed. When I pointed to my left hip, one of his furry eyebrows rose, but after a moment he shrugged his shoulders and started prepping his equipment. The tattoo chair was located behind a waist high counter in the back of the parlor and visible to anyone inside the shop. As Tatts began outlining the island on my hip, several large, bearded bikers in leather vests stared at me from the other side of the counter. Look at that tough kid getting that awesome tattoo, I imagined them thinking. He must be a real badass. In retrospect, I think their stares may have been ones of bewilderment rather than awe. They were, after all, watching an eighteen-year-old kid in white shorts and a pink tank top getting a tiny island tattooed where his mom wouldn’t be able to see it. When I was eighteen, it didn’t occur to me that one day I would be forty-eight. And it’s only just now dawning on me that I will eventually be sixty-eight and one day maybe even eighty-eight. I wonder what the tiny island on my hip will look like then? I wonder what it will mean to me? Will I see it and remember my carefree college days in south Florida? Or will I think of how dramatically things change over the years? Hopefully it will make me recall a dingy tattoo parlor full of grizzled bikers, and how one day, long before tattoos were cool, I strolled inside looking like an extra from Miami Vice without caring what anyone thought of me. Maybe it will remind me that I was once a badass, after all.

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Bee A BETTER P R E S E N T S

GREENVILLE A D U L T

A spelling competition among corporate teams of 4 featuring emcee JDew. Bring your enthusiasm! Create team costumes/themes to help your spellers stand out! Prizes to the first place team.

S P E L L I N G

Thursday, March 30 from 6-9 pm at Larkin’s Sawmill

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THREE WAYS TO ATTEND: • BEE a corporate sponsor • BEE an individual fundraiser ($1500 min./team of 4) • BEE an audience member ($25/person) To BEE involved, contact Eleanor Vaughn at (864) 467-3458 or vaughn@greenvilleliteracy.org.

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Decade Two of Racing Against Cancer!

Sat., May 6 • Portman Marina, Lake Hartwell

Dragon Boat Upstate Festival

They All Had a First Year: Is 2017 Yours? The 2017 Dragon Boat Upstate Festival is anchored by our dedicated Hall of Fame members, who embody the spirit of the event: teamwork, perseverance and a shared passion to raise money to fight cancer right here at home. They invite you to share the satisfaction of taking on a common enemy and of knowing that if we keep paddling together, victory is within reach. Please join or start a new team today! THE HALL OF FAME IS PRESENTED BY ACCESSHEALTH: Big Daddy AKA Teensy’s Abbey Paddlers Larry Brotherton cb events Mike Coe Countybank Richard Cox The Cunningham Family Acey Deiwert Annette Dunphy

Fabri-Kal Cancer Containers Gina Franco The Freeman Family David Freeman Tim Garrett (1956-2016) Larry Gluck Grainger Jenny Green Harper Corporation

Linda Hillman ITOR Biorepository Team Jani-King of Greenville Jim Kaltenbach Julie Martin MDC Team Donna Phipps Carolyn Reeves Release The Kraken

Janet Rigdon (1955-2011) Chris and Andrea Roberts Roers SCOCF in memory of Sarah Harrison Sally Smith Tru Blu and CRU Winn the Fight

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MAP Q

W O R K M AY B E A N E C E S S I T Y, B U T W H E R E Y O U W O R K , W E L L , T H A T ’ S A M A T T E R O F P R E F E R E N C E—AT L E A S T F O R C O - W O R K C O MMU NI T Y AT L A S L O C A L . H O U S E D IN T HE H O ME T O W N H A L L S O F T HE B R A ND O N MIL L , T HI S C O N G L O ME R AT IO N O F B U S INE S S C R E AT I V E S C HUR N S O U T A S M Ö R G Å S B O R D O F S E R V IC E S T H AT S PA N S T HE G L O B E .

E S U

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BY JOHN JETER

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y PA U L M E H A F F E Y

34.84417°N 82.43139°W ATLAS / LOCAL

29611

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THREE’S COMPANY >> (left to right) Matt Cook, Matthew Smith, and Chris Merritt, the enterprising owners behind Atlas Local.

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He

was 12 years old when he began working in the mill. The kid swept floors, cleaning up among the 150 people who worked in the sprawling red-brick colossus just off of Pendleton Street. When he was 20, on a dusty baseball field behind the factory, he pitched a four-hitter against Wake Forest. Beat ’em, too, 4–0. It was so, Joe—back when Joseph Jefferson Jackson spent his teen years at Brandon Mill. Today, “Shoeless” Joe wouldn’t recognize the place, now alive with a hyper-creative geekhive that buzzes with brainiacs who also swing for the fences. They work in the heart of the mill, in a place called Atlas Local. Atlas Local, nicknamed AtLo, kind of takes its name from an Ancient Greek word for “enduring,” or “upholding.” Founded in 2007 as CoWork Greenville, Atlas Local rebranded when the three owners decided that “co-work space” had become shopworn. “I love the hell out of this place,” says managing partner Chris Merritt, 30. “It saved me, in essence. I’d probably be sitting at a desk, in a suit and tie, or in a mental ward.”

ON. BRAIN TRAIN Area companies at AtLo, like Rice Bowls and Fathom & Draft, care for clients across the world.

OPEN MIND On the first Friday each month, AtLo hosts Zero Day, which allows its members to speak on any topic of their choice for 10 minutes.

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In a sense, AtLo is a mental ward, the cranial commune welcoming and infectious. “You should hear this word community a lot because we’re not desk-leasing people—we’re community builders,” says Matt Cook, 30. He’s a partner among the three Millennial-bearded entreprenerds who moved into the 5,000 squarefoot-space in the center of the half-million-square-foot mill. On a balmy winter morning, Merritt, Cook, and founding partner Matthew Smith relax on comfy couches and chairs in the middle of the room while their clients/tenants hover over keyboards. Most of the twenty-somethings wear headphones as they stand or sit at long, simple wooden desks. Projects they create go to Walmart, Playstation, all over the Internet, and to nonprofits all over the world. Working for one group, about to leave for the Philippines, an employee puts together an animated-film storyboard. Over there, somebody’s developing a grocery app. In another corner, a couple of guys are tinkering with a solar-power startup. “Almost no one here has just

one thing,” says Smith, who also runs Fathom & Draft, a design firm, and Really Good Emails, which does just that. Same’s true for Dodd Caldwell. The 38-year-old novice beekeeper, chewing-gum aficionado, and startup junkie runs three companies. He’s president of Rice Bowls, which began in Spartanburg in 1980. The nonprofit helps feed children in more than 50 orphanages in eight countries. He also runs MoonClerk, an online platform for small businesses to accept recurring payments. And he owns Loft Resumes, which turns curricula vitae into works of art. Rice Bowls and MoonClerk employ 11 people, including Caldwell. That’s enough to justify their own office, but Caldwell’s been leasing from Atlas Local since its CoWork days. “We started off small,” he says, “and what I really saw was that, at a place like this, you get a lot of the advantages of working in a larger office without some of the disadvantages: some of the politics and all of that—but you still get that diversity, maybe even more of a diversity of ideas and opinions and feedback. It’s a little less myopic working here.”

“AT A PL ACE LIKE THIS, YOU GE T A LOT OF THE ADVANTAGES OF WORKING IN A L ARGER OFFICE WITHOUT SOME OF THE DISADVANTAGES.” — DODD CALDWELL

Caldwell says he’s seen AtLo’s population morph from mostly gigeconomy types to more multi-employee firms that don’t want to lease or buy their own standalone offices. The average age here was around 29, with typical leasing times lasting just over two years, Cook says. “Now we might be a year or two older on average, and the tenure might be lower because we’re adding new people.” At 38 and bending the age curve, Matthew Smith, a Colorado native, is the poster adult. In 2013, he co-founded The Iron Yard, the now-venerable tech incubator/accelerator. While Iron Yard grew to 16 campuses, CoWork simply moved to larger rooms, tapping an expansive market of people willing to lease communal workspace. Depending on how much of it members use and how often they use it, rates range from $100 to $500 a month. About that: Listen in on the banter between the three—Smith and Cook, who sips a mug of excellent coffee that tenants get gratis, and Merritt, who flits in and out of the conversation. Smith: “Working from home is a pain in the ass. For a lot of people, it’s really rough to work around all these other responsibilities, like laundry or a honey-do list or whatever. “ Cook: “The stress of, I can’t deal with my work being in my home. I personally can’t handle the fact that that desk is where I do my work.” Merritt: “Don’t shit where you eat.” Smith: “It’s not a work-life balance, it’s just life, it’s creating the right kinds of constraints in life so when you come here you can also leave your labor-brain here. And you can go home and feel like you can relax. When your work can travel with you really easily, then it becomes important to find a place.” shared place for sharing: not the kvetching kind of therapy, but the interactivity that drives innovating businesses and the collaborationists who work for them and run them. Take Zero Day, for instance. AtLo plays host to the group-share experience the first Friday of every month. “If you’ve ever gone on any long hikes, Zero Day is a concept where you stop the crazy trekking and just enjoy the day and maybe you go take a shower, you just pause,” Smith says. “If you’re hiking the Pacific Crest trail, pause, just see what’s around you. We thought, oh, man, we need that in business because you’re constantly trekking, you’re constantly moving forward. You’re constantly pushing the bottom line, where are we going next?” That’s where a bit of, let’s call it, cultural regulation comes in. During Zero Day, participants get 10 minutes to speak their minds. “And we’re strict about it,” Cook says. “The sharing is something closer to, ‘This is what I’m working on,’ ‘Here’s something I’ve learned recently,’ ‘Check out this cool video game,’ ‘Hey, do you want to learn how I do beehive maintenance,’ or ‘I don’t know how to get rid of this terrible client.’”

A

CREATIVE FREEDOM >> Chris Merritt (lounging) , Matthew S mith ( jumping) , and Matt Cook (plotting) are the partners of Atla s Local, a co -working firm in the B randon Mill of the Village of West Greenville. The group, which wa s formerly CoWork Greenville, began in 20 07.

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COLLECTIVE CONSCIOUS >> Atlas Local’s space is broken into long wooden desks, attractive conversation areas, and hip office and conference rooms. Its 40 members and counting run the gamut from web developers and illustrators to nonprofit creators, marketing gurus, and more. Its culture is one of openness, camaraderie, and fun, fostering a rich experience of community.

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Captiohead:

W H AT ’ S T H E BIG IDEA Value-added amenities at AtLo include access to a game room, gym, bike parking, free beverages, and, yes, a sauna.

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T H I N K TA N K Currently leasing to 40 “locals,” AtLo expects its co-work community to increase in the coming months.

“THERE’S SOME THING ABOUT TAKING AN OLD SPACE AND RE-IMAGINING IT FOR A NE W PURPOSE THAT MAKES YOU FEEL THE ENERGY OF CRE ATIVIT Y, PRESERVING THE PAST AND CRE ATING THE FUTURE. E VEN A SPACE CAN CONVE Y THAT.”

I

—TIFFANY DELUCCIA , THE UNSTUCK GROUP

n other words, just as any company develops an ethos, Atlas Local does, too. “This is more similar to a business where you hire employees who are a good culture fit than it is a space that you just let people come and use,” Smith says. Adds Cook: “It is not okay to come in here and just, ad nauseum, tap people on the shoulder and be like, ‘Hey, what’cha doin’? What’cha workin’ on? Got anything I can work on?’ That’s the wrong type of person for our space. There’s a culture of good people and sharing with each other. If you are coming in here, and you are just overflowing with things to share because you’re passionate about what you’re doing, and you nerd out about this kind of thing and that kind of thing, and you’re running three businesses—that’s the kind of person you want.” Those sentiments actually seem to resurrect the same sense of community that began in 1900, when 66 cottages were built around Brandon Mill to house its first wave of workers, with lanky Joe Jackson earning less than $3 a week. Until it closed in the mid1970s, the factory churned out duck cloth and, during World War II, medical gauze and twill uniforms. In 2013, Pace Burt, bought the property for $1.9 million, and his Albany, Georgia–based Burt Development Co. spent $45 million to renovate it. In addition to the main mill, the nine acres also include an engine house, boiler

house, machine shop, cloth building, cotton house, fan house, and pump house. Now, of the 182 apartments at the West Village Lofts at Brandon Mill, 120 are leased. Atlas Local sits on the ground floor of the four-story building, one of three or four other businesses in the development; AtLo’s acrossthe-breezeway neighbor is the Greenville Center for Creative Arts. “What I like about those guys,” Burt says of AtLo’s trio, “is they were able to hit the ground running. We spent four months trying to put a co-work group together like that, but we just weren’t getting any traction, and then these guys popped up. It was perfect timing. We brought them over, and they loved the idea of being interactive with the building.” By that he means that AtLo’s lessees, whose number likely will rise fast from its current 40 to 70 or so, enjoy access to the main floor’s incredibly hip common space. “Our value-added amenities, no one can touch them,” Merritt says, smiling over what could sound like braggadocio. “You show me a co-working space that has this game room and a gym and a sauna and bike parking and free beer and these people. That’s right, print that, we got a sauna! Ain’t nobody got a sauna!” Tiffany Deluccia feels the warmth the minute she pulls off Draper Street into the mill’s freshly asphalted and landscaped parking lot. “I love the connection this place has to the history of the city, that we’ve taken something old and are infusing it with new life,” she says. “We see it play out a history of its own. I enjoy coming down here, every

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HEAD GAMES >> (from left) Matt Cook, partner of Atlas Local and digital producer with Fathom & Draft and Arbitrary; Matthew Smith, founder of AtLo, Fathom & Draft, and ReallyGoodEmails.com; and Chris Merritt, managing partner of AtLo and project director at A Vital Few

AT L AS LOCAL

atlaslocal.com

25 Draper Street, Greenville

day that I come, and feeling like you’re connected with the history of the city but also current with what’s happening right now.” Deluccia, 29, director of marketing and communications for The Unstuck Group, which consults with some 200 churches nationwide, works just as the entirety of the company’s staff does: remotely. Like most of the others here, she’s bright, ambitious, service-oriented, and young. She was another member who moved from CoWork Greenville’s West Washington Street site to AtLo’s fourth incarnation in the artsy-nascent Village of West Greenville. “I worked for about a year from home, exclusively, and then just eventually I was going to coffee shops so often to get out of the house. You can only go to so many coffee shops. I started looking for other options,” she says. She didn’t have to look far—she and Merritt attended Wren High School together in Piedmont. Again, a connection to people. And to the future and to Greenville’s past. here’s something about taking an old space and reimagining it for a new purpose that makes you feel the energy of creativity, preserving the past and creating the future, and even a space can convey that,” she says. Says Smith, who may consider expanding his business model to other funky, sun-bright, wide-open spaces around town rather than moving yet again: “It’s the intangibles that make this place invaluable. It’s the ability to be around all these other people, asking interesting questions, bringing up interesting issues, creating an environment for just fun and awesome work.”

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Life of Pie:

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Coastal Crust serves up wood-fired pizza, like this purple potato, leek, and bacon, with local ingredients.

Home Slice Coastal Crust takes the pizza party on the road

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CITY

Dish

Caption Head: (clockwise, from left) text here text here

Beyond the Peel:

Chef Matt Cole crafts woodfired Neapolitan pies in a ’55 Chevy-turned-oven/ bar as part of Coastal Crust, a Charleston-based pizza catering company now with wheels in Greenville (and plans to open a brick-andmortar shop this year).

Blue Heaven

I

f you glimpse a turquoise tow truck rolling down the Greenville drag, it’s not heading to the nearest garage. The only thing this refurbished rig’s hauling is some serious dough. Last fall, Charleston-based pizza caterer Coastal Crust hit the Upstate food scene Charleston’s popular pizza joint hits the in a ’55 Chevy, and this truck’s been shuckin’ out Greenville scene in a refurbished ’55 Chevy Neapolitan-style pizza pies ever since. The scent of rising dough is intoxicating. An / by Abby Moore Keith // photography by Paul Mehaf fey array of toppings await in cool metallic containers— prosciutto, mozzarella, and fresh greens just in from Reedy River Farms. The pie I order will be garnished with red Russian kale, gorgonzola, and almonds, but not quite yet. I watch as Chef Matt Cole turns the dough (crafted with Caputo flour), drizzles garlic olive oil over the surface, and slides it into the half moon opening of the truck’s built-in, wood-fire oven.

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Fired Up:

Chef Cole cooks the pies in a Valoriani wood-fired oven built into the truck (along with taps for beer and wine). It takes only 90 seconds to deliver cheesy nirvana.

“I like the dough to kiss the fire right when it goes in there,” says Chef Cole, as he sticks a bare arm into the oven, scooting the pies closer to the flames. “It gives that nice color. Some people say char . . . we call it leopard spots.” He grabs a wooden peel and pulls out my pie. It’s been 90 seconds. The bottom is speckled with dark brown spots; the dough and cheese bubble in pure pizza bliss. After he adorns and cuts, I take a bite. It is a slice of heaven. But it’s not just the pizzas that inspire awe; it’s the truck, as well. Refurbished with reclaimed wood and painted a kicky bright teal, the truck boasts shelving, storage, a built-in bar, and, of course, the time-tested Valoriani wood-fired oven. Coastal Crust is technically a catering outfit, which means there’s a little more freedom in their serving style than food trucks. The side opens up, creating a bar where patrons can watch their pizzas turn into perfection. This inviting atmosphere is exactly what owners Bryan Lewis, Brian Peisner, and Mickey DeMatteis were going for with Coastal Crust, and something Chef Cole appreciates. With a culinary background in restaurants and as a private

chef, Cole is thrilled to be a part of bringing Coastal Crust to Greenville. From branch manager to event coordinator, he typically clocks in 14 hour days. “It’s where I marry both of my passions. I really enjoy private, small functions. Here I do small events with the restaurant side of it. I get the best of both worlds really,” says Chef Cole. And with a brick-and-mortar space set to open on Pendleton Street this year, Greenville’s getting the best of both worlds, too. “We want to be known as a nice little spot where you can get some really good pizza, some beer, and hang out,” says Matt. Coastal Crust is available for private events, and is also at select locations depending on its schedule (Facebook: Coastal Crust Greenville). 1180 Pendleton St, Greenville. (843) 224-3959, coastalcrustgreenville.com

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PIT

Stop

Double Take

Chef Sean Brock reinvents his flagship restaurant McCrady’s and adds a second edition: McCrady’s Tavern / by M. Linda Lee 1

Refined Line: The black walnut counter at McCrady’s (above) sets the stage for Chef Brock’s tasting-menu-only courses prepared in his exhibition induction kitchen (dishes 1, 4, and 7 are examples). Instead of reservations, dinner tickets are sold online in advance, a different approach than next-door-neighbor McCrady’s Tavern.

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Colonial Reprise: McCrady’s Tavern, a more casual, à la carte retune of the former larger McCrady’s restaurant, pays homage to the Lowcountry’s historical roots. A few recipes harken back to the nineteenth century’s Gilded Age, such as Broiled Flounder, Confit of Tomato and Eggplant, Sauce Vin Blanc, and Calf’s Head Soup, c. 1885 (second and third from opposite, top).

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7

MCCRADY’S TAVERN BEST BITES:

Photography courtesy of Neighborhood Dining Group

You’d swear Beet au Poivre was a steak when it comes to the table: a thick rectangular slab spiced with a variety of peppercorns alongside a fluff of watercress. It tastes meaty, too, thanks to being partially dehydrated and then rehydrated in beef fat. Pan-fried Crispy Veal Blanquette resembles Weiner Schnitzel rather than the French stew (blanquette de veau) that its name calls to mind. “Blanquette” refers to the velvety sauce made from veal stock and cream that blankets the meltingly tender veal. A Pie Called Macaroni is Brock’s take on a recipe he uncovered from Thomas Jefferson, c.1802. House-made sprouted-wheat radiatore pasta gives this mac and cheese a contemporary edge.

I

f necessity is the mother of invention, then perhaps dreams are the mothers of reinvention. In Sean Brock’s case, his dream of a restaurant is what spurred the acclaimed chef and the Neighborhood Dining Group to reinvent McCrady’s restaurant in Charleston last summer. For the restaurant’s tenth anniversary in 2016, the team cooked up a plan to carve two restaurants out of the existing space. McCrady’s has waffled over the years between à la carte and tasting menus. Brock is drawn to the latter, which is why he envisioned a tasting-menuonly restaurant in the narrow adjoining space formerly occupied by his Mexican concept Minero (now relocated two doors down). “We wanted to develop a concept with a more relaxed atmosphere and a menu with more options and diverse pricing in the larger space (McCrady’s Tavern),” explains David Howard, president of the Neighborhood Dining Group. “We took McCrady’s back to its original use as a tavern and added an intimate space (McCrady’s) to create a platform for Sean’s finest work.” As a result, the original McCrady’s has tossed off its white tablecloths and special-occasion mantle to honor its colonial roots. Bare-wood tables now merge with beige banquettes that line the low stained-glass-andwood partition bisecting the room, but the historical bones—graceful brick arches, exposed brick walls, thick wood beams—remain. Set off the tourist track of East Bay Street on brick-paved Unity Alley, the structure dates back to 1778, the year Edward McCrady built a Georgian house on this spot and opened his eponymous tavern. (And, yes, George Washington did eat here.) At McCrady’s Tavern, Brock’s vision of Frenchinspired Gilded Age dishes takes the form of escargotstuffed marrow bone and fois gras and chicken liver parfait, while modernized versions of roasted chicken and a tavern burger do justice to American classics. Next door, the 22-seat McCrady’s centers on a custom-made, U-shaped, black walnut counter. It’s here that Brock’s laser-sharp focus zeros in on 15 or so intricate courses, served from the exhibition induction kitchen (no open flames) at one end of the room. Instead of reservations, tickets for dinner here are sold online in advance. With the advent of the reimagined McCrady’s Tavern and McCrady’s, diners have the choice of sophisticated tavern fare one day and a meticulously executed dégustation menu the next. These dual stages also allow Sean Brock the freedom to indulge his constant pursuit of excellence and passion for fine ingredients. A dream come true. McCrady’s. 155 E Bay St, Charleston, SC; McCrady’s Tavern. 2 Unity Alley, Charleston, SC. mccradysrestaurant.com MARCH 2017 / 91

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Thank you for an incredible 2016!

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KITCHEN

Aid

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egend has it that puff pastry was invented in response to a strict diet. Nowadays, it’s humorous to think of the light, flaky pastry made delicious by a lavish abundance of butter as “diet food.” In 1645, however, French pastry apprentice Claudius Gele was quite serious in his quest to produce a tasty loaf of bread for his sick father, who was limited to a diet of flour, butter, and water. The result of his hard work was no ordinary loaf, but something golden and crisp and puffed with air. His pastry grew famous and so began a journey that would span centuries before landing in the grocer’s freezer. Thanks to the miracles of modern science, frozen puff pastry makes it possible to enjoy Gele’s magnificent discovery on a weeknight. The pastry is an elegant but unfussy base for a goat cheese and allium tart. Buttery and flaky, it balances the sweet onions and the tangy chevré. The colors of the alliums—deep magenta that will caramelize into an earthy purple-brown and bright grass green—feel fitting for the month when winter and spring play tug-of-war. The whole tart comes together easily, with time for you to open a bottle of wine, light a candle, toss a salad. Tarts and quiches have fallen out of fashion as new diet trends elbow each other for the spotlight, but the restorative power of a simple vegetable tart served with a peppery arugula salad should not be overlooked. After all, it’s diet food.

CARAMELIZED ONION AND LEEK TART SERVES 4–8 INGREDIENTS

2 large red onions, thinly sliced 2 leeks, thinly sliced 2 Tbs. white balsamic vinegar 5 Tbs. olive oil, divided 1 sheet puff pastry (thawed, if frozen) ¼ c. heavy whipping cream 4 oz. herb & garlic goat cheese 1/4 c. grated Parmesan 2–3 green onions, very thinly sliced Salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Unfold puff pastry sheet on a lightlyfloured surface and roll into a 12” x 4” rectangle. Place the pastry on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Refrigerate until ready to use. 2. Heat 3 Tbs. of olive oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add thinly-sliced onions and cook slowly for 25 minutes, stirring frequently. Deglaze the pan with white balsamic vinegar and season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue cooking for another 10–15 minutes until onions are limp and deep brown. Transfer to a bowl. 3. Meanwhile, in another skillet, heat 2 Tbs. olive oil and add sliced leeks. Sauté for 10–15 minutes until the leeks have softened. Season to taste with salt and pepper; then stir in crumbled goat cheese and heavy cream until combined. 4. Spoon leek and cheese mixture over the prepared puff pastry, spreading evenly. Top with the caramelized onions and scatter with Parmesan cheese. Fold edges of the pastry up, pinching corners closed, to create a crust. 5. Bake the tart for 30 minutes, or until puff pastry is a deep golden brown. Garnish with sliced green onions and serve with arugula salad. ))) FOR MORE RECIPES, TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Square Meal A flaky, caramelized onion tart makes an easy, elegant dinner a sure thing / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

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MARCH 2017 / 95

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OPEN

Bar

Tap Dance Amp up or power down at these Greenville drink spots / by Kathryn Baker // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

W

hether it’s a cold brew or a craft pint, you can’t deny that beverages— tapped, especially—draw a crowd. Whether you get going with a local roast or take a load off with a brew(ski), un-tap your pleasure at one of these spots.

METHODICAL COFFEE At Methodical, coffee is not a merely a black beverage—it’s an art form. Their baristas understand the inner workings of the world’s favorite bean and utilize special techniques to draw out the best flavor. Not limited to crafting killer capps, they also have craft sodas on tap, like ginger beer and citrumelo hops. 101 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 735-8407, methodicalcoffee.com DUE SOUTH COFFEE ROASTERS With its large tables and comfy leather sofas, Due South boasts a setting that fosters community in the Taylor’s Mill. If you’re looking to lounge with an unpretentious cup of joe that’s good for the soul, this joint’s for you. In addition to roasting coffee beans themselves, they also have a selection of beers— and cold brew—on tap. 250 Mill St #4c, Taylors. (864) 2836680, duesouthcoffee.com GRATEFUL BREW Grateful Brew’s unique architecture will certainly catch your eye on Pleasantburg, but what lies inside is the real surprise. The shop features both types of brew, perfect for grabbing a latte during the day and a pint at night. Grab some grub to go with your growler at one of the local food trucks in the parking lot. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

POUR TAPROOM Embrace your inner bartender at Pour Taproom, where more than 50 taps line the length of the room. Grab your handydandy wristband—which records your purchase per ounce—and enjoy an array of wines and local brews. Hungry? Nosh on nachos straight from next-door-neighbor Gringo’s Mexican restaurant. 7 Falls Park Dr, Greenville. (864) 412-7400, pourtaproom. com/greenville THE COMMUNITY TAP True to its name, The Community Tap is a staple community hangout. With a rotating selection of 20 craft beers on tap and several curated wines, it’s easy to find a drink to enjoy inside or on their large outdoor deck. With a food truck or two in the lot most nights, it’s the perfect spot for families, friends, and even Fido. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

Bubble Burst: Charleston-based CannonBevCo’s fresh fruit sodas rotate on tap at Methodical.

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V

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AMAZING. BREATHTAKING. AWE-INSPIRING.

CIRQUE de la SYMPHONIE May 6 at 8:00 pm • May 7 at 3:00 pm THE PEACE CENTER This spectacular and mesmerizing program marries symphonic hits with live, heart-pounding acrobatic feats by some of the world’s greatest cirque artists. Each performance is perfectly choreographed to popular orchestral masterpieces and will astonish and captivate in this incredible, once-in-a-lifetime event. Reserve your seats now before it sells out. For tickets call (864) 467-3000 or purchase online at greenvillesymphony.org.

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We have a lot on our plates @ Broad and River.

New Management New Chef & Menu Same Great Atmosphere Same Convenient Location We Are Now…

B.A.R. BROAD AND RIVER PUB

Pet-Friendly Patio • Easy Parking in River Street Garage Across Street • Swamp Rabbit Cyclists and Runners Are Welcome 401 River Street, Greenville, SC 29601 | 864-241-3384 | BARpub.net | broadandriverpub | broadandriverpub Playwright_hlfH_TOWN Feb17.indd 2

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DAILY SPECIALS MONDAY

MEATLOAF MONDAY MEATLOAF DINNER $11.95 TUESDAY

LOCAL BREWS $4

DOUBLE LOYALTY POINTS WEDNESDAY

WINE DOWN WEDNESDAY HALF PRICED WINE BY THE BOTTLE OR GLASS THURSDAY

BBQ RIB & PINT NIGHT

HALF RACK, FRENCH FRIES & SLAW $9.95 SELECT PINTS $4 FRIDAY

FISH FRY FRIDAY

72 BEERS ON TAP CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF® BRAND STEAKS & BURGERS HAPPY HOUR MONDAY - FRIDAY 4PM - 6PM 9 41 SO UT H M AI N ST RE E T / DOW NT OW N G R E E N V I LLE LOC ATED I N F RONT OF F L UOR F I E L D AT T H E W E S T E N D 864. 770. 7777 / L I BE RT YT APRO O M . C O M MONDAY - THURSDAY 11AM - 11PM / FRIDAY & SATURDAY 11AM - 12AM / SUNDAY 11AM - 11PM

FRIED SHRIMP OR FLOUNDER DINNER, FRENCH FRIES & SLAW $12.95 SATURDAY

MARTINI NIGHT SELECT MARTINIS $5 SUNDAY

BRUNCH 11AM-3PM

$5 SELECT PIZZAS 5PM –10PM

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN AMERICAN GROCERY

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com

$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the crispy farm egg with pencil cobb grits, mushroom ragoût, pea tendrils, and pickled shallots; next, have an entrée of salt-crusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus, then finish with the banana pudding cake.

THE ANCHORAGE

Photograph by Will Crooks

Chef McPhee’s blue-bedecked restaurant and his fresh fare–focused menu is causing quite the splash. Start your Anchorage experience with the brown butter cauliflower grits or the spicy sweet potatoes. Then move on to the pappardelle with Border Springs Lamb sausage, complete with botarga, white sofrito, Reedy spinach, and egg yolk. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs.

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup.

BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection—along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers.

$-$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 586 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

$$, L, D. 631 S Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com

AUGUSTA GRILL

Don’t be fooled by its title—this establishment is much more than a traditional dive-bar. With a smashing cocktail program and Chef Adrian Carpenter’s fine fair, Dive ‘n’ Boar makes quite the splash. Try the oxtail and potato gnocchi or the crispy frog legs with charred okra and Tabasco brown butter.

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

Jī-rōz The delicacy of Mediterranean cuisine greets Greenville at Main + Stone’s latest food joint, Ji-roz [YEE-ros]. With its abundance of natural light, ocean blue décor, and authentic Grecian pottery, this farm-to-table concept transports patrons straight to the Santorini seaside. Do dinner tapas-style with a variety of small plates (try the chargrilled octopus above), or go straight for the gyro, complete with a fluffy pita wrap, tzatziki, tomatoes, onions, fries, and your meat of preference. For dessert, the baklava topped with candied orange is a staple Greek delight, and the ekmek kataifi—shredded phyllo and custard topped with chopped pistachio—is sure to extract an opa! from your satisfied sweet tooth. $$, L, D, SBR. 644 N Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 373-9445, jirozgreenvillesc.com

$-$$, D. Closed Sunday. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR MM AA RR CC H H2 2 00 11 7 7/ /1 9 09 5

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DINING

FREE PIZZA? Yes!

Purchase any 14” pizza and receive a FREE pizza of equal or lesser value. Coupon must be present at time of order. Dine-in Only Expires 08/302016 Expires 03/31/2017

TM816

Guide

GB&D

Delicious Thin Crust Pizza * Fresh Salads * Homemade Ice Cream * Craft Beer & Soda 99 Cleveland Street Greenville,SC 29601

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally-sourced takes on American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun, as well as seasonal specials fill the menu. Don’t miss the chicken & waffle sandwich with a fried egg and maple hot sauce. It’s totally worth the 1,000 napkin deaths. $$, B, L. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 2309455, eatgbnd.com

864-558-0235

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

35 S. Main St. Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-610-0527

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com INK N IVY

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Located in the space formerly occupied by Corner Pocket, Ink N Ivy boasts a menu of American fare with an emphasis on fresh seafood. Lunch features staples like the charred salmon salad, wok-blackened and served over crisp greens, sweet peppers, and leeks. The evening menu tacks on 10:11 AM entrées like the grilled scallops, topped with lime cilantro butter, and served on wilted chives, baby spinach, and roasted peppers. $$, L, D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat– Sun). 21 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 438-4698, greenville.inkanivy.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept, Kitchen Sync relies heavily on natural, fresh ingredients. The crispy kale plate appetizer is sourced from local farmers, and the Banh Mi salad comes loaded with bean sprouts, cashews, garden herbs, and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu. Try the cracklin’ chicken thighs: spiced with a no-tell “magic” dust, served with seasoned collards and roasted veggie mac ‘n cheese. $$, D (Tues–Sun). Closed Mondays. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 5688115, kitchensyncgreenville.com

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

NOSE DIVE

Portrait + Wedding Photographer www.cmaphoto.co | 864-483-1765

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food” from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood

hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OAKBLUE KITCHEN

Smoked, hand-pulled BBQ is a glowing centerpiece of this local eatery. Serving plenty of homestyle dishes, like the Tabasco-breaded hot chicken sandwich and pimento cheese appetizer, Oakblue also offers the Korean BBQ sandwich with hefty short rib, pickled Daikon radish, and spicy Gochujang aioli. $$, L (Tues–Sun), D (Tues–Sat). Closed Mondays. 109 N Main St, Ste A, Greenville. (864) 520-2579, oakbluekitchen.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended. $, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojsdiner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. Pick up fresh-baked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the market’s wine selection. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes like sweet corn beignets and a dry-aged pork chop with pumpkin-seed pesto. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere.

$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROOST

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

This N’awlins-based franchise pairs the finest steak fare with its ideal wine complement. To start, snack on the succulent blue crab cakes with lemon butter, then cut into a tender filet perfectly paired with a glass of dark red Syrah. For a sweet finale the bread pudding—drizzled in white chocolate—is a dessert lover’s dream. $$$-$$$$, D. 250 Riverplace, Greenville. (864) 242-2000; 851 Congaree Rd, ruthschris.com

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SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com

SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

BEER AND PUBS BROAD AND RIVER PUB

The former Playright pub has been rebranded as the Broad and River Pub. The focus is still on pub food but with refreshing diversity, such as fresh salads, smoked trout deviled eggs, and housemade molé pulled pork on a corn scallion griddle cake with jicama slaw. Dessert includes the famous Guinness chocolate cheesecake. Enjoy Sunday brunch on the large patio outside. $-$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, highstreethospitality.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at The Community Tap, Greenville’s neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from their extensive selection—more than 180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass or two from one of their ever-rotating taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macspeedshop.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a

silver-plated brouilleur.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com THE GREEN ROOM

Lana Smith lana@blackstreaminternational.com

The Green Room has a revamped menu, which presents Southern fare and American cuisine with a bent towards sustainably raised meat and fish, as well as local produce. Try the pan-seared New York duck breast with rainbow Swiss chard, beech mushrooms, sweet potato purée, and cherry Cognac glacé, or the wild-caught shrimp and grits, with local Adluh Mills grits, pepper confetti, Andouille sausage, charred okra, and a shellfish broth. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222 MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon.

516 S Bennetts Bridge Rd., Greer 208 Briarwood Dr., Simpsonville $275,000 $299,300 4 Bedrooms, 2 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms 3 Bedrooms, 2 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms 2,501 sq.ft. MLS#1333944 3,141 sq.ft. MLS#1331783

$$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad.

$-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday. 615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

104 Pheasant Trail, Greenville $230,000 3 Bedrooms, 2 Full Bathrooms 2,310 sq.ft. MLS#1336299

133 Reserve Dr., Piedmont $125,000 River Reserve Residential Lot 0.92 ac MLS#1334160

6 Monet Dr., Greenville $925,000 3 Bedrooms, 3 Full & 1 Half Bathrooms 4,321 sq.ft. MLS#1336098

864-608-8313 | blackstreaminternational.com MARCH 2017 / 101

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DINING

Guide

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS

SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh.

$, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the Mid-Century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600

DELIS & SANDWICHES

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Suite 107, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

ETHNIC ASADA

Vibrant Latin culture comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote rellenos de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo suace); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw. $-$$. Closed Sunday & Monday. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864)-770-3450, asadarestaurant.com BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room.

$$, L, D. Closed Sundays. 605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com CANTINA 76

CAVIAR & BANANAS

GENERAL ADMISSION

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$. B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the Classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s Chopped Salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

For over two decades, the unforgettable caricature of veteran comedian James Gregory has stood grinning: his shirt un-tucked, his arms outstretched, a carefree welcome to a down-home, hilarious comedy experience. Storytelling at its best.

March 4, 7:30 p.m. | Mauldin Cultural Center mauldinculturalcenter.org | 864.335.4862

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76. Although ripe with golden-brown chimichangas and zesty enchiladas, the menu’s real star is the taco selection. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 631-2914, cantina76.com HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

$-$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

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MEKONG

lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main.

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork, grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice.

$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching.

$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for

RISTORANTE BERGAMO

$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese.

M A I N S T A G E P L AY P R E S E N T E D B Y S O U T H

C A R O L I N A

Generously sponsored by Harry & Sheila Bolick and Sharon & Greg DeFelice

A Hilariously Divine Comedy

$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and soon to open on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 558-0235, sidewallpizza.com

THE OFF-BROADWAY HIT COMEDY

VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Music by Alan Menken • Lyrics by Glenn Slater Book by Cheri Steinkellner & Bill Steinkellner

MAR 16 – APR 8 THU-SUN

MAR 21, 22

GET TICKETS

864.233.6733

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OUR 2016-2017 SPONSORS

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Don’t Miss Out!

To feature your own b usiness or to suggest a business you would like to see in Behind T he Counter call today 8 , 64-679-120 5.

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SEASONS CAFE AND CATERING

Mural by Brigitte Selby

Julie Ellis and Mark Bergstrom, co-owners of Season’s Cafe and Catering, have traveled the world, held a variety of jobs and worked at some of the Upstate’s – and the nation’s – top restaurants. They brought that experience and knowledge together to accomplish something they hadn’t seen done in the area: “We wanted to do ordinary food in an extraordinary way,” Bergstrom said. “Let’s not have a hundred things on the menu – let’s pick ten things and do them better than anyone else on the planet.” Their steadily growing clientele, both in the cafe and at a range of catering events, vouch that they have done just that. Their turkey sandwich is no ordinary turkey sandwich, but is made with fresh turkey roasted in the oven that day on-site, accented with housesmoked bacon, Swiss and pesto mayo on a croissant. “We’re a scratch-made restaurant,” Ellis said. “We do all of our own remoulades and aioli, we smoke our own pastrami. We do this classic food but with a little Southern flair.” The business opened 15 months ago after Ellis had met Bergstrom at Virginia College of Culinary Arts, where he is program director and she was a student. Ellis had started out as a teacher and then worked for American Express, spending nine years in Asia before she moved back to America and decided to enroll in culinary school. Bergstrom, who also teaches, had taken the job at the school after a culinary career that included high level jobs in restaurants in Boston and London. Bergstrom said Ellis stood out as a student thanks to her experience, talent and “passion for food. That’s something you can’t teach,” he said. “We wanted to do Ellis cites Bergstrom as the ideal business partner ordinary food in an because she views him as a mentor. “He’s my inspiration extraordinary way.” and the reason I got into this,” she said. They collaborated on the Seasons concept that focuses on their individual strengths and passions, including cooking classes taught Bergstrom, catering for business and other functions, ready-made meals to go for families to pick up, and a cafe that was away from downtown but wasn’t far – and could draw the growing Mauldin/Simpsonville/ Pelham Road crowd. Catering is Ellis’ passion, and she often creates beautiful spreads for large parties and delicious lunches for large business events. “I love beautiful food, and I like getting to use that personal touch,” she said. In addition to its popular lunch, the cafe recently started serving dinner on Fridays, featuring items like shrimp and grits and salmon with beurre blanc.Though items like mac and cheese bites with jalapeno or homemade hush puppies are indulgent, the cafe has also made thousands of healthy paleo meals, which are a hit. Some clients order up to 20 to-go meals – both the healthier and the more indulgent varieties – every week. Bergstrom’s passion for food extends beyond the work day, as he loves to spend time in his garden, where he grows food for his family. He also raises chickens for fresh eggs. Bergstrom and Ellis are excited about the future for Seasons as the area around it continues to develop. “It is growing, and we’ll grow along with it,” he said.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PARKKONEN PHOTOGRAPHY

WHISTLE STOP AT THE AMERICAN CAFE Whistle Stop at the American Cafe has been a landmark in Travelers Hawkins credits her team of employees for carrying on the family Rest since it was opened in 1945. But the restaurant you walk into today legacy. “We want friendly, smiling faces who are proud to be a part of the has new life, thanks to Vickie Vernon Hawkins. rebirth of the oldest cafe in the Upstate.” Hawkins didn’t necessarily plan to take over the family One of those team members is her nephew, Shay Waldrop. “It’s the crew that keeps business. In 2013, her uncle’s funeral procession made He works as a busser and a food runner, as well as Whistle this train on the track. one ‘last stop’ at the building on Main Street, which had Stop’s “resident artist”, designing coloring sheets for the Every person who works been for sale since he retired in 2009. “I was overcome children every month. “It’s the entire crew that keeps this here is an important part with emotion”, Hawkins said. “I felt like my uncle and my train on track. Every person here plays an important part of our success.” grandfather were teaming up on me from heaven, telling of our success.” me to buy it and keep it in the family.” The growth she’s seen in her hometown is a source of She and Craig Sikkelee gave the restaurant a facelift pride for Hawkins. “When I was growing up, we always went before reopening in January of 2014. The Whistle Stop now has a rooftop ‘downtown’ to Greenville to shop and dine out. Now everyone is coming dining area, called Victoria Station, complete with an outdoor fireplace and ‘uptown’ to Travelers Rest. It has become one of the new hot spots in the bar service. The dinner menu is filled with Southern delicacies, like Fried Upstate, thanks to the Swamp Rabbit Trail and the Whistle Stop. I’m very Green Tomatoes and Shrimp n Grits. And the Little Red Caboose offers proud of it.” kid-friendly selections, which all come in train-shaped boxes. Guests with a sweet tooth will want to check out Petticoat Junction, for homemade desserts like Mama Styles’ famous pecan pie. The Caboose Express serves delicious old-fashioned shakes, floats, ice cream, smoothies and Hawaiian Shave Ice from a walk-up window behind the restaurant. The cafe features a vintage steam engine and a replica of the Swamp 109 S. Main Street, Travelers Rest Rabbit Train, as well as an electric train that chugs around the ceiling. A 864-WHISTLE train whistle blows every time Vickie’s cell phone rings. And if you need to

1054 E. Butler Road, Suite A, Greenville 864.297.6516 seasonscafeandcatering.com

make a reservation, just call 864-WHISTLE.

whistlestopattheamericancafe.com

Photography by carol boone stewart

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91 grants totaling $4.2 million in 10 years

72 more than

organizations touched since 2006

530 members

We invite you to join Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville. greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

2016-2017 Partners

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BOOK BALLET 4 JUNGLE Ever been asked if you were raised

1–5

2017 SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT It’s been twelve years too long since Greenville last hosted the SEC Women’s Basketball Tournament. Top competitors from universities around the South will hit the hardwood for an all-out basketball brawl to be crowned the queens of the court. The tournament will feature 14 teams in single-elimination play for the title, currently defended by the University of South Carolina Lady Gamecocks. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Times and prices vary. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

GRAS IN THE 3 MARDI ELECTRIC CITY

A lot more tame than, say, vying for the most beads on Bourbon Street, Anderson will laissez les bon temps rouler once again. Douse yourself in Mardi Gras garb the moment you step through the door, and browse the makeshift Jackson Square marketplace. Additionally, the evening will include a silent auction, live band, and themed eats from local vendors. Anderson Civic Center, 3027 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Anderson. Fri, 7–11:30pm. $35. andersonscchamber.com

A DREAM: A 4 PLANT PAJAMA BLACK-TIE SOIREE

The words “black tie” typically conjure up images of uncomfortable heels and even more uncomfortable bowties. Instead, this soiree swaps lavish for lounge-y, encouraging guests to don their comfiest duds to raise money for the Barbara Stone Foundation. Eats and treats will be provided by Good Life Catering along with the Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery, with specialty cocktails shaken and stirred all night long. The Barbara Stone Foundation

TAX-FREE MUNI BOND PROFICIENCY Raymond James plays a significant role in underwriting new South Carolina municipal bonds. We can keep you informed about new municipal issues before they come to market.

RECENT RAYMOND JAMES NEW SC MUNI ISSUE South Carolina State Public Service Authority Revenue Bond • Price: $109.42 • Coupon: 5% • Maturity Date: 12/1/2056 • Callable Date: 12/1/2026 • Call Price: $100 • Rating: A1/AA-/A+

Contact one of our financial advisors to get notified when new SC municipal bonds are issued. GREENVILLE COMPLEX

SCmunicipalbonds.com | SCbonds@raymondjames.com | T 864.289.2159 There are risks associated with an investment in a municipal bond, including credit risk, interest rate risk, prepayment and extension risk, and geographic concentration risk. Interest from municipal bonds may be subject to or exempt from federal income tax. Bonds with exempt interest may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax, or state or local taxes. Bonds may incur capital gains taxes if sold or redeemed at a profit. * Interest is generally exempt from federal taxation and may also be free of state and local taxes for investors residing in the state and/or locality where the bonds were issued. However, bonds may be subject to federal alternative minimum tax (AMT), and profits and losses on federally tax-exempt bonds may be subject to capital gains tax treatment. Raymond James & Associates, Inc. member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC

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MARCH

by wolves? This kid actually was. Rudyard Kipling’s classic children’s tale receives the Carolina Ballet Theatre treatment, weaving the tale of young Mowgli, his bear father-figure Baloo, and an entire slew of rainforest personalities with imaginative choreography and lively musical accompaniment. Will he stick to the life he knows or return to humanity? Either way—it’s a jungle out there. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. $25. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photographs courtesy of Carolina Ballet Theatre

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS provides specialty programs and other essential care for those living with disabilities in the Upstate. The Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 25 Draper St, Greenville. Sat, 6–11pm. $75. eum-8377.ticketbud.com/ plantadream

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

DESSERTS 4–5 MUSICAL AND MAGIC

There’s no need to feel guilty; these tasty indulgences are completely calorie-free! Joined by master violinist Roman Kim, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra will showcase delectable works by composers Antonin Dvorak and Gioachino Rossini—the latter a tune you may recognize from the film A Clockwork Orange. Watch as Kim’s musical prowess explodes off the stage, with Niccolo Paganini’s Violin Concerto serving as the powder keg. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$69. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

NASHVILLE 8–18 CLASSIC ROADSHOW

The ghosts of Music City U.S.A. still roam Nashville’s streets, their influence felt from the marquee’s glow to the countless hopefuls playing

z ot Do N

Miss

late-night bar sets. In honor of the city’s profound role in American history, this show starring Katie Deal and Jason Petty pays homage to Nashville’s most notable with tunes by Patsy Cline, Merle Haggard, Tammy Wynette, and many more. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$50. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

LEE JONES AND 9 RICKIE MADELEINE PEYROUX

MUSICAL DESSERTS AND MAGIC March 4–5. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $18–$69. The Peace Center. Combining the talent of violin virtuoso Roman Kim and the musical genius of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, this exceptional showcase features works by composers Dvorak and Rossini, making it a truly noteworthy event.

Sultry and saucy are the words of the day for this duo of powerhouse female vocalists, whose combined stints in the spotlight total more than half a century. It’s a little old school mixed with a bit of the new; Jones’s raw, sensual persona has made her a music legend, (not to mention one of VH1’s “100 Greatest Women in Rock & Roll”) while Peyroux’s soulful stylings have garnered comparisons to that other queen of jazz blues— Billie Holiday. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Sponsored by

Greta & Graham Somerville Featuring

March 24 - April 15 by Arthur Miller

Chip Egan and Mimi Wyche

warehousetheatre.com • 864.235.6948 ALL MY SONS is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

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LUKE BRYAN March 11. Sat, 7pm. $50–$75. Bon Secours Wellness Arena. A country king from the sands of south Georgia, Luke Bryan’s twangy tunes take fans on a tour of all that’s endearing about this music genre—think dirt roads, pick-up trucks, cold beer, and cowboy boots.

band has released an album nearly every year since their record debut in 2001. A seven-member ensemble, Casting Crowns’ second album, Lifesong peaked at the number-nine slot on the Billboard 200, and received a Grammy Award for best pop or contemporary Gospel album. The “Very Next Thing” tour celebrates the 2016 album of the same name, and will feature guest performances by Unspoken and Danny Gokey. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, 7pm. $25-$75. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

LEE 10 AMOS From bartender and second-

Now open in downtown Greenville’s Noma Flats

grade teacher to opening for acts like Bob Dylan, Adele, and Paul Simon, Amos Lee seems to have found his calling. The songwriter’s ability to meld together elements of folk, rock, and soul has spawned six studio albums and a fanbase dedicated to the art of gritty, passionate tunes. The songwriter’s 2016 album, Spirit, debuted at number three on the

Billboard Top Rock charts, proving that whether he’s behind a desk or a microphone, Amos Lee is here to teach you a thing or two about music. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

COWARD’S 10–19 NOEL BLITHE SPIRIT

Remember the saying, “Let sleeping dogs lie”? The same goes for dead exwives. Seeking to do a little research for his upcoming novel on the occult, author Charles Condomine requests the help of kooky medium Madame Arcati. But Charles soon gets more than he bargains for when the ghost of his deceased ex, Elvira, comes a hauntin’. The madcap comedy has been around for more than 75 years, so you know it’s got the chops to split your sides. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$25. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

CINDERELLA 11 THE PROJECT BOUTIQUE

Yeah, like you’ll ever wear chiffon again. The annual Cinderella Project is sponsored by the SC Bar Young Lawyers Division, and acts as a “fairy godmother” to teenage girls in need of that special “oomph” on prom night. Donations of gently used gowns and other accessories are dropped off throughout the Upstate, with each county hosting special “boutiques” where young ladies can select their perfect prom ensemble. Aldersgate United Methodist Church, 7 Shannon Dr, Greenville. Sat, 8–Noon. cinderellaprojectsc.com

Follow us on Instagram and Facebook 233 North Main Street, Noma Flats across from The Hyatt Greenville | 864.241.3360 | shopcopperpenny.com 108 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

CROWNS 9 CASTING The contemporary Christian rock


BRYAN 11 LUKE Once a top songwriter for

country stars Travis Tritt and Billy Currington, Luke Bryan stepped into the spotlight with 2007’s “I’ll Stay Me” and never looked back. Since then, the swoon-worthy singer has dropped a string of successful singles that are tailor-made for late nights, cold beers, and cowboy boots. So raise that solo cup with pride and sing along to “Country Girl (Shake It for Me),” “That’s My Kind of Night,” and “Kick the Dust Up” during Bryan’s Upstate stop of the “Kill the Lights” tour. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, 7pm. $49.75-$75. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

THE 11 RACE HELIX—UPSTATE

A flurry of rich, bold color. Exotic, fiery music. Twinkles of light. Dynamic motion. You may not know where to look first when the curtain opens on this stunning musical production. Crafted by Shruti and Vaibhavi Merchant, Taj Express invites the audience to travel more than 8,000 miles and through centuries of diverse Indian filmmaking culture—known today as Bollywood. Featuring original scores by Oscar-winning composer A.R. Rahman, the international hit is a non-stop, inspiring journey you won’t soon forget. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 6:30pm. $25-$45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

16–Apr 8 SISTER ACT

Based on the 1992 hit movie starring Whoopi Goldberg, Sister Act made its musical debut in 2011. The sensational stage show follows Deloris Van Cartier, an aspiring nightclub singer who dreams of seeing her name in lights. Those aspirations are put on hold when Deloris

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Race the Helix returns for a third year, inviting runners to participate in a 5K trail run and one mile walk/run at Lake Conestee Nature Park. Inspired by the Shenal family’s struggle to fight their daughter’s rare chromosomal disorder, Race the Helix

12 TAJ EXPRESS: THE BOLLYWOOD MUSICAL REVUE

Stone & Tile Restoration Marble s Granite s Stone s Travertine Terrazzo s Concrete s Vinyl s Corian Polishing Restoration Maintenance

BEFORE BEFORE

AFTER AFTER

Grout & Tile Cleaning & Sealing

BEFORE BEFORE AFTER seeks to raise awareness for genetic diseases. Funds raised from the event will benefit the Greenwood Genetic Center Foundation and research. Lake Conestee Nature Park, 840 Mauldin Rd, Greenville. Sat, 9am. $15-$25. go-greenevents.com/ HelixUpstate2017

11

BLACK & WHITE BALL

The glitz and glamour of a romantic evening in Paris is the motif of this year’s Black & White Ball, held by the Guild of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. The black-tie “Cirque de Lumière” will include specialty cocktails, seated dinner, live band, and both silent and live auctions to whet your shopping appetite. As always, proceeds from the evening will fund continuing seasons of musical magic with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. Westin Poinsett Hotel, 120 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 6pm. $160. (864) 370-0965, guildgso.org

witnesses her boyfriend commit murder, and she is forced into protective custody at a convent. The habit will never be the same! Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

AFTER Residential and Commercial

OF 16–18 MERCHANT VENICE

Shakespeare’s sixteenth-century comedy comes tinged with drama and suspense as it unfolds a story of vengeance, greed, justice, and forgiveness. Seeking a loan to woo the heiress Portia, the lovesick Bassanio approaches his friend Antonio. With no money between them, the men take out a loan from a Jewish lender named Shylock, setting a chain of events in motion that will turn the lives of everyone involved upside down. Rodeheaver Auditorium at Bob Jones University, 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm. $23-$43. (864) 242-5100, bju.edu

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EXPERIENCE DANCE IN GREENVILLE with INTERNATIONAL BALLET www.internationalballetsc.org

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PATRICK’S DAY BEER 17 ST. RUN 5K

Drink. Run. Repeat. That’s the idea behind this annual St. Patrick’s Day tradition, where four stops throughout the Heritage Park course will serve frosty brews to get you pumped for the next goround. Post-run, enjoy Irish tunes at the amphitheater and of course, more beer. The run’s proceeds will fund the Simpsonville Rotary Foundation. Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Fri, 5pm. $30. gogreenevents.com/event/id/5299

Storytime Ballet

Favorite Children's Stories Come to Life at Your Neighborhood Library! FREE SATURDAY MORNING FUN!

WOMAN: 17 CELTIC VOICES OF ANGELS

Performance + Meet & Greet Hughes Main - 11:30AM

17–19

NCAA DIVISION I MEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

WHILE ENJOYING AN EVENING OF ENTERTAINMENT AND INTERNATIONAL CUISINE

April 7 7 PM OLD CIGAR

WAREHOUSE

Vlada Kysselova, Artistic Director

Swan Lake &Other Works

Sponsored by Charlie & Pam Walters

APRIL 21-22 Enjoy an evening of cherished classics as well as premier originals by local Resident Choreographers, Alexander Tressor & Juliana Jordan

PEACE CENTER GUNTER THEATRE www.peacecenter.org Peace Center Box Office: 864-467-3000

© Jerry Finley Photography

Long before it’s whittled down to the Final Four in Phoenix, the Well will serve as one of eight venues hosting the country’s elite athletic teams. The family-friendly event will include first and second rounds of tournament play, setting the scene for an electrifying weekend of nothing but net. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri–Sun. $228-$300. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

18

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Take a break from dying your beer green to appreciate some real Irish culture. Breathtaking vocals and storied heritage have become calling cards for Celtic Woman’s multifaceted live shows, often accentuated with traditional dance and talented musicians. New to the quartet is singer Tara McNeill, who began performing with members Mairead Carlin, Eabha McMahon, and Susan McFadden during last year’s Home for Christmas symphony tour. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $55-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

ST. PADDY’S DAY DASH & BASH Pro tip: Jameson after jogging. Start off the day with a timed 5K “dash” through the downtown area, before ending up at Fluor Field, where live music and refreshments await you at the Paladin Plateau picnic area. As for the “bash” portion of the day, a kids’ fun run, silent auction, and costume contest are in store. Downtown Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. Free-$35. stpaddysdashandbash.com

19 CHICAGO It took 108 years for the Cubs to

bring home a World Series title, but it’s taken these hometown heroes only 50 to rack up American Music Awards, three number-one charttopping singles, and a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. While the band reached early success with hits like “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” and “25 or 6 to 4” from their first two albums, more contemporary tunes—“I Don’t Wanna Live Without Your Love” and “Look Away”—have proven Chicago’s staying power. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 7:30pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph by Naomi Gaffey, courtesy of the Peace Center

Next Presentation: "ELLA BELLA BALLERINA AND SWAN LAKE" SATURDAY, APRIL 1

Simpsonville - 10AM

TOWN

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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ANN WILSON OF HEART March 23. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45–$65. The Peace Center. Get ready to break out your air guitar; rock diva Ann Wilson is hitting the stage with a handful of her hard rock tunes. Expect to head bang to a few solo songs, familiar covers, and anthems from her band, Heart. Oooo, Barracuda.

ARE FROM 21–22 MEN MARS, WOMEN ARE

Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

We’re more of the mindset that men are from Planet Leave the Seat Up, and women are from Planet Do Whatever You Want. But this works, too. Playing off author John Gray’s bestseller, the stage production stars a solo actor, combining stand-up material, theatrics, and comedy for a unique take on the many differences between the sexes. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 8pm. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

24–Apr 2

FROM VENUS—LIVE

WILSON OF HEART 23 ANN Ann Wilson knows rock and roll.

Fronting the band Heart with sister Nancy, Wilson was a trailblazer for women in hard rock, penning rowdy female anthems such as “Crazy on You,” “Barracuda,” “Magic Man,” and a handful of solo work. Wilson’s Peace Center set will be a mixed bag of the singer’s career highlights, featuring original tunes, familiar covers, and, of course, plenty of Heart. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St,

ROALD DAHL’S WILLY WONKA The jury’s still out on whether winning an entire chocolate factory would be worth having to deal with those orange, slightly sinister Oompa Loompas on a daily basis. Sleep with one eye open, amirite? Adapted for the stage from Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, this musical confection stars all of the scrumdiddlyumptious characters you remember, including the man in the purple hat. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Thurs–Fri, 7pm; Sat, 1pm & 5pm; Sun 2pm. $12.50-$25. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

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24–26 CHAMBER EXTRAVAGANZA

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Greenville’s chamber orchestra ends the season with a bang—and a big surprise. Featuring solo performances by trombonist Stephen Wilson and bassoonist Amy Yang Hazlett, conductor Edvard Tchivzhel will guide his band of merry musicians through a series of three thrilling works by top film and theater composers. The last song of the evening? You’ll just have to wait and see. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $44. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

24–25 DANSYNERGY: CELEBRATING WOMEN

CHAMBER EXTRAVAGANZA March 24–26. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $44. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center. Highlighting performances by trombonist Stephen Wilson and Amy Yang Hazlett, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra will play pieces from composers Korngold, Nino Rota, and Kurt Weill, and end the evening with a secret surprise song.

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You may think of ballet as stiff tutus, seemingly endless solos, and that harsh wing-growth scene from Black Swan. In an effort to continuously usher this beautiful art into the twenty-first century, DanSynergy symbiotically combines dance along with an eclectic mix of local artists to tell riveting stories and celebrate the impact of women in our community. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri–Sat, 8pm. $15-$25. (864) 542-2787, champanculturalcenter.org

24–Apr 15

ALL MY SONS

American playwright Arthur Miller captures the fragility of friendship and betrayal in this 1947 play. During World War II, Steve Deever and Joe Keller’s joint business was responsible for the deaths of 21 Air Force pilots when their cylinder heads were found to be cracked. Steve took the fall, while Joe walked away scot-free. Fast-forward, and the men’s families soon begin dusting off the past, uncovering hidden truths and learning that some wounds never heal. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 2356948, warehousetheatre.com

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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WIND & FIRE 25 EARTH, Do you want the funk? Then

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a healthy dose of Earth, Wind & Fire will do just fine. Ever since the late ’60s, the orchestral-pop tunes of EWF have defined the music of generations, integrating elements of smooth funk with international flavors that are timeless beyond measure. If you aren’t up and grooving by the end of the night— wait, who are we kidding? No one can resist the “Boogie Wonderland.” The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

OF THE Apr 2 TASTE UPSTATE

Eight Greenville restaurants unite to throw down some of the best cooking our beloved foodie community has to offer. This year’s event will be a New Orleans–style brunch, featuring gospel and jazz musicians, lethal Bloody Mary’s, mimosas, and enticing cuisine from around the Upstate. Taste of the Upstate will provide muchneeded funding for Loaves and Fishes, an organization dedicated to supplying food for local pantries and distribution programs. ZEN Downtown Greenville, 924 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, Noon–3pm. $35. loavesandfishesgreenville.com

EARTH, WIND & FIRE March 25. Sat, 8pm. $65-$95. The Peace Center. Do you remember . . . the last time you boogied the night away? In case you’ve forgotten the funk, Earth, Wind & Fire takes the stage to help you bring back those smooth moves you left behind. Hippie hair optional.

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5 Gaujard Ct., Greer

5BR, 5BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1320265 · $1,625,000 Wilson Associates Kathryn Curtis (864) 238-3879 wilsonassociates.net

205 Capri Ct., Greenville

5BR, 4BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1327511 · $869,000 Lil Glenn Co., LLC Lil Glenn (864) 414-0331 Lilglenn.com

338 N. Glassy Mountain Dr., Landrum 3BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1336964 · $650,000 American Eagle Realty, LLC JoAnn Roser (864) 237-3424

201 Boulder Dr., Piedmont

4BR, 3BA · MLS#1318251-20174711 · $462,900 McAlister Realty Stan McAlister (864) 292-0400 BuilderPeople.com

Estates TOWNEstates TOWN_blank page.indd Mar17.indd6 2

108 Turner Forest Ln, Simpsonville

21 Collins Creek Rd., Greenville

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

6BR, 5BA, 3Hf BA · MLS#1337123 · $1,249,000

4BR, 5BA · MLS#1337118 · $1,068,000

131 Haddon Ln., Greer

15 Hemingford Cir., Simpsonville

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Becky Orders (864) 270-0743

Coldwell Banker Caine Susan Gallion (864) 350-3434

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1334706 · $750,000

298 Old South Rd., Duncan

5BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1335866 · $495,000 Wilson Associates Linda O’Brien (864) 325-0495 wilsonassociates.net

207 Boulder Dr., Piedmont

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1296201/20162719 · $458,900 McAlister Realty Stan McAlister (864) 292-0400 BuilderPeople.com

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1337347 · $711,000

30 Sycamore Ridge Dr., Simpsonville

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1337401 · $465,000

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Christine Kurta (864) 346-7200

204 Weatherstone Ln., Simpsonville

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1335606 · $404,900 Coldwell Banker Caine Linda Wood (864) 905-5244 coldwellbanker.com/agents/Linda-Wood-29601

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com 2/19/17 2/20/17 9:56 5:27 PM PM


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SECOND

Glance

Dream Catcher

D

reams dwell in the domain of the fantastic; it takes a true creative to translate imagination into reality. Celebrated surrealist painter Salvador Dalí possessed the artistic prowess necessary to present the impossible, which the Columbia Museum of Art showcases in Salvador Dalí’s Fantastical Fairy Tales. A fusion of the literary and visual arts, the exhibit dives into the realm of the remarkable with Dalí’s whimsical representations of our favorite folktales. Thirty-six prints personify stories from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to Don Quixote to the works of Hans Christian Andersen, all in the surrealist style so characteristic of one of the most beloved artists of the twentieth century.—Abby Moore Keith

Salvador Dalí’s Fantastical Fairy Tales will be on display at the Columbia Museum of Art from March 11 to May 21. Located at 1515 Main St. in Columbia, the museum is open Tues–Fri, 11am–5pm, Sat, 10am–5pm, and Sun, Noon–5pm.

(left to right) Salvador Dalí, A Mad Tea Party, 1969. Heliogravure on Japon nacré. Advice from a Caterpillar, 1969. Heliogravure on Japon nacré. Artwork courtesy of the Columbia Museum of Art.

Salvador Dalí brings imagination to life with fairy tale prints at the Columbia Museum of Art

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TOWN Mar. 2017  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN Mar. 2017  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com