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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

F RO M LO N G DAYS I N H I D D E N G A R D E N S TO L E I S U R E LY E S C A P E S A T M O U N TA I N V I N E YA R D S — REVEL IN THE SWEETNESS OF THE SEASON

S E C R E T

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Cover art by Annalisa Fink; for more, “Seeing Green,” page 42.

JUN E 2021

TOWNCAROLINA.COM


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B E CAU S E YO U WO U L D M OV E M O U N TA I N S F O R M OM E N T S , J U S T L I K E T H E S E .

Mountain & Lake Keowee Real Estate in Seven Private Club Communities. An Active and Elevated Lifestyle Awaits You and Your Family. Plan Your Real Estate Tour

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864.326.3126

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cliffsliving.com/town

I N S P I R I N G I N EV E RY D I R E C T I O N

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 and 3430 Walhalla Highway, Six Mile, SC 29682, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales NC, LLC, 1908 Brevard Road, Arden, NC 28704, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. Copyright: © 2021 Cliffs Land Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.


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MAGNOLIA HALL

ELGIN, SC

455 McKinney Road $10,750,681 102 Island View Circle $5,999,045 5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 4 Half Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, 4 Half Bathrooms

5 Bedrooms, 8 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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1908 Roe Ford Road $3,950,617

410 Top Ridge $2,225,685

209 Privello Place $2,200,681

5 Bedrooms, 7 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

6 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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PARKINS MILL AREA

711 Crescent Avenue $2,200,601

228 Byrd Blvd $2,100,605

12 Orchard Meadow Lane $1,499,607

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

400 N Main St #502 $1,150,601 16702 Brown Ave Ext $1,085,627 1027 S Main Unit 100 $999,601 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom


Sometimes, She Lets Her Clients Do the Talking. “I was so pleased with Joan Herlong’s performance as our Real Estate Agent in the recent sale of our house, I actually asked for her permission to write a review of her work. Selling our house was not something that came easy to my wife and me. It was time to part with our dream house, and I started by contacting Joan about two years ago, after noticing her magazine ad. For the past twenty years, we were spending the majority of our time in the Charleston area. It was time to act. On a drive back to Greenville I called Joan and a funny thing happened -- she answered on the first ring (something that seems to be a trait.) I stated my intentions, referenced the magazine article, and asked if she would be interested in looking at our house in consideration of the general market. She agreed and we met the following day in my house. We had a good meeting because just about everything she said basically made sense to me. The key for her was that going to market should be preceded with a thorough property inspection with corrective measures taken as needed. In line with that thought, a full inspection was scheduled and completed the following day (she was able to arrange it that fast!). In review, she responded to my call immediately on Monday; we met on Tuesday, toured the house inside and outside and arranged for an inspection on Wednesday; on Thursday as we met again. I could not believe what we had accomplished in just four days. It was a mere TWO YEARS before I was able to get back to Joan, who again answered on the first ring without any additional questions as to my whereabouts, or asking what had taken me so long etc. We had completed all the fixes Joan had recommended before and were ready to proceed with a sale. She was still ready to help us. Before contacting Joan again, we had also contacted another agent with whom we had transacted a deal, four or so, years earlier, and who had seen our house previously. That agent’s projected price sent my wife and me into a virtual state of depression. That is when I went back to Joan, whom I had thought was not only a really good Real Estate Agent, but also an astute business person. I had my own business and I had exposure to many executives in the plastics industry and others like Coca cola, and I say this because Joan carries out her business, in a very similar professional manner. She is all business and her eye never comes off the ball! And here is the best part, we listed our with Joan house for almost $175,000 more than the other Agent’s suggested price, and it sold to the first person in the door! And one last detail: just as we were about to go officially on the market, another house in our neighborhood listed, which had updates and some other features that might suggest that we had to lower our planned price. Joan guessed that this other house would sell on the first day because it was priced too low, and it did. She did not allow that to change her pricing strategy for our home. My point is that Joan listens to the seller and considers all angles, and is a delight to work with.” — T. Calnon 900 Thornblade Blvd.

“Joan is as savvy as they come and gives impeccable guidance throughout the home selling process. I never considered Joan as just my realtor, but a partner in selling our home. Truly a pleasurable experience. She gets 10 stars on a 5 star scale.” — J.W. 205 Sanders Place “Joan can be a lot of fun, and she thinks she’s hysterical, but when it gets right down to it, she’s all business. You want her on your side of the table. She’s probably lost count of the number of deals we’ve done over the years, but I haven’t. When a deal is a no-brainer it might seem like it doesn’t matter whether you have an agent, or who that agent is. But there’s no such thing as a no brainer. When a curve ball pops up, no one ever sees it coming, but she just handles it. Sometimes I think she even likes a good curve ball, likes the challenge. I had a buyer once “who didn’t feel good about the purchase,” wanted us to “please be nice and let her out.” I personally didn’t know what to do, and didn’t want to seem mean, but we had a deal. Joan advised us to let her out alright, but she also advised us that we were entitled to keep the $5000 earnest money, and the lawyer she referred us to confirmed that. It’s not about nice or mean, it’s about protecting her client’s interests. And when someone won’t honor the deal, that’s not exactly “nice.” The fact that she can make me laugh out loud is a bonus, but she’s so scary-good at this real estate thing it’s not funny. “ — JM Client For Life

864.325.2112. Call her, she always calls you right back. Joan Herlong: Greater Greenville’s Number One Realtor OF THE DECADE, source MLS Sales Volume 2010-2019. Each affiliate independently owned and operated.


First Glance

Photograph courtesy of The Biltmore Company

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GRACE HERLONG LOVELESS 864.660.3925

Grace@JHA-SothebysRealty.com Instagram: @HomesWithGrace

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The hills of southern Appalachia offer a unique climate for growing grapes. Biltmore Estate’s vineyards (above) are a majestic aspect of the grounds and the Biltmore Winery. Read about the winery’s new spring release Révant and three other can’t-miss vineyards in our feature article, “Earth & Vine,” page 72.

AUGUSTA ROW LUXURY DOWNTOWN TOWNHOMES STARTING IN THE MID 500’S

EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

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Contents

JUNE 2021

72

EARTH & VINE

The lower Blue Ridge has become a burgeoning region for growing good grapes, and these four vineyards are close enough for an afternoon jaunt. by m. linda lee, lauren maxwell

& J. Morgan McCallum

“Winemaking starts in the vineyard. That’s the key: to be in your vineyard every single day, watching those grapes, knowing the soil and seasons.” —Sofia Lilly, Overmountain Vineyards

ON THE COVER

Artwork by Annalisa Fink, acrylic on panel (this page) New grapes begin to sprout on a vine at Marked Tree Vineyard in Flat Rock, North Carolina; For more area wineries, see “Earth & Vine,” page 72. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Settle in. But never settle for less. For its second generation, the smallest Mercedes-Benz SUV advances in innovation while adhering to its family values. The Mercedes-Benz User Experience (MBUX) drives a new generation of user-friendly tech. Its natural, intuitive speech interface is easy to learn because it can learn you. The 2021 GLA 250 SUV

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Base MSRP excludes transportation and handling charges, destination charges, taxes, title, regitration, preparation and documentary fees, tags, labor and installation charges, insurance, and optional equipment, products, packages and accessories. Options, model availability and acutal dealer price may vary. See dealer for details, costs and terms.


Mount Pleasant’s Post House Inn offers quaint luxury and stellar food and drink in a serene coastal setting. by kathryn davÉ

14 EDITOR’S LETTER 19 THE LIST 27 ON THE TOWN 33 WEDDINGS 68 MS. BEA WRIGHT 70 MAN ABOUT TOWN 89 DINING GUIDE 94 TOWN SCENE 100 SECOND GLANCE

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CHANGE OF PACE

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Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Photograph by Kirk Robert

Contents

BEACH BEAUTY Prep for pool season with these smart swimsuits from our favorite boutiques. styled by Chelsey ashford

41 5355 57 6155 81 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

Rediscover the energy of our area’s natural wonders through painter Annalisa Fink; PR marvel David Hawkins makes catchy tees for charities; Upstate auto dealer and beloved philanthropist Tim McKinney looks to leave a lasting legacy.

Tucked away from the Charleston buzz in charming Mount Pleasant, Post House Inn invites travelers to grab a glass and stay a spell.

Fueled by his lifelong love of cycling, retired Airman Carlo Franco operates bike shop Velo Valets mere minutes from the Prisma Swamp Rabbit Trail in Sans Souci.

This summer, embrace bold and beautiful in these classic swimsuit styles; City of Greenville gardener Joey West reveals the magic behind the Rock Quarry Garden; find the ideal shears for your yard and your kitchen.

Greenville’s new residential community Hartness goes green with Village Kitchen; culinary master Anthony Harris brings his global experience to Holly Tree Country Club; summer veggies take center stage in this sheet pan shrimp and squash recipe.


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BUYING? SELLING?

Visit TheFurmanGroupSC.com/testimonials where you will find many more 5-star reviews from satisfied clients we had the privilege of serving.

The Furman Group (Patrick & Samantha) were absolutely spectacular throughout the whole process! We recently returned from overseas and had a tight timeline to find and purchase a home. Patrick asked specific questions to make sure he fully understood our goals and tailored the home search to maximize the use of our time. He was well versed with negotiations and had quality contacts in the industry to make sure everything went smoothly on our end. His diligence and commitment allowed us to close early and just prior to a holiday weekend. We highly recommend Patrick with no reservations!

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Editor’s Letter

Photograph by Blair Knobel

HOME AGAIN

I

’ve been thinking a lot about place, where we set anchor. When we transition from one home to another, one city to another, one job to another, or must endure a challenging life moment that skews our compass, we’re left feeling groundless. Like stirred-up sediment, the view is muddy until it settles. And it takes time to settle. June feels like an in-between state, when the momentum and frenzy of the previous months merges with the languor and long days of summertime. Like a rock dropped into water, or dirt kicked up in a pond, we are suspended for a moment in a slower season. I welcome this change of pace, even though I tend to buck transition. I am in the midst of moving into another home, and while I look forward to making fresh memories and embracing a new space, I am mentally cataloguing all of the precious parts of the longtime home I’m leaving. This place has been mine for a while, and though it is only a structure, I feel connected to it in an intimate and personal way. Humans are built for attachment. But when we step back, we understand that what we are seeking outside of ourselves, we’re also seeking within. To feel at home anywhere requires us to feel at home within ourselves, though we can be inspired, stimulated, moved, comforted, and held by the spaces we inhabit.

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This edition touches on the in-between spaces, those that aren’t our own but that help us recharge. Think deep woods, secret gardens, and nearby vineyards. Among many stories that celebrate the comfort of quiet places, we give thanks for our sheer luck of closeness to wineries on par with more popular wine regions, and we offer must-stops to and from four standout regional vineyards: Eagle Mountain Vineyards & Winery, Marked Tree Vineyard, Overmountain Vineyards, and Biltmore Winery (see “Earth & Vine,” page 72). Inevitably, as summer unfolds, we’ll fall into a familiar rhythm and find our routines. The days will ring of laughter and cicadas and overflowing gardens bursting in fragrant blooms. June is the jumping-off place, the beginning of it all. Moments of transition mean that something important has come to an end, but only then can we welcome a new beginning—and the promise of shimmering days to come. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


UNITED COMMUNITY. ALMA THOMAS. Know her name. Hear her voice. You may have already heard about the museum’s new Alma Thomas painting. We can’t wait for you to see it when we re-open this fall! Born in Columbus, Georgia, Alma Thomas (1891-1978) graduated from Howard University and taught art in a Washington, DC, junior high school for 35 years. It was not until her retirement from teaching in 1960 at age 68 that she began her career as a full-time artist. Inspired by the New York School and Abstract Expressionism, her artwork focused on color theory and experimentation, and she frequently exhibited with other Washington Color School artists, including Sam Gilliam, Morris Louis, and Kenneth Noland. In 1972 at age 81, Thomas became the first African-American woman to attain a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The new acquisition of Thomas’s work is among the rarest examples of her final full year of experimentation (1977); one of her “hieroglyph” paintings that shows a new direction in the work of the 86-year-old artist and a culmination of her experimentation with color effects--a truly original statement.

Alma Woodsey Thomas, 1891-1978 untitled (Composition in Rainbow Colors), circa 1977 acrylic and pencil on canvas

The GCMA is grateful for the continuing support of United Community Bank Foundation.

Help us to continue the work of building the African-American Art Collection that Greenville deserves. The GCMA annual fund-raising campaign, Art for Greenville 2021, will support the purchase of more than 30 works by African-American artists, including this painting by Alma Thomas along with work by Beauford Delaney, David Drake, William H. Johnson, Hughie Lee-Smith, Thomas Sills, Merton Simpson, Leo Twiggs, John Wilson, and Hale Woodruff.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Corporate Partner

GCM-21-05-Thomas UC Town Ad May 2021.indd 7

Temporarily closed for construction

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Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Abby Moore Keith

MANAGING EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

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Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Laura Linen Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Beth Brown Ables, Jack Bacot, Lauren Maxwell, J. Morgan McCallum, Kathryn Norungolo, Angie Toole Thompson & Ariel Turner CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS & STYLISTS

Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Connolly, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Jason & Tara Massey, Carter Tippins & Eli Warren Andrew Huang

EDITOR AT LARGE

Maddie De Pree

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Hardin

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kristy Adair, Michael Allen & Kim Collier Donna Johnston

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Sangeeta Hardy, Mary Placito & Heather Propp Hays Sligh

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER

Allison Gambone

ACCOUNT MANAGER CLIENT SERVICE MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell & Camden Johnson Kristi Fortner

ACCOUNTING & HUMAN RESOURCES

Sue Priester

CONSULTING MEMBER

Susan Schwartzkopf

GENERAL MANAGER

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 6) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.


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THE LIST THE MONTH’S MUST-DOS

SHOVELS & ROPE Children’s book authors, festival curators, and film producers, husband-and-wife duo Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst are best known for their contribution to the music world. Both were solo artists in their own right before banding together to record Shovels & Rope in 2008, thus launching a permanent act and a musical style that fuses roots, indie, folk, and rock. The pair has produced four studio albums together, including the most recent, By Blood, released in 2019. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, June 11, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photography by Curtis Millard

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The List ROCK THE LOT: DRIVE-IN CONCERTS

As part of its mission to showcase talented independent filmmakers, Reedy Reels screens entries in categories from shorts to features and student works to foreign films. A highlight among the 40 films presented this year will be The Girl Who Wore Freedom, an awardwinning documentary about the Allied forces who liberated Normandy on D-Day, which, as it happens, will be shown on the 77th anniversary of D-Day.

Celebrate National Cancer Survivor’s Day with a weekend of drive-in concerts at the Downtown Airport. On Friday, experience Yacht Rock Revue, a tribute to the soft rock of the ’70s and ’80s. Saturday evening brings Houndmouth, with their unique alternative blues sound. Adult beverages and food trucks will be available on-site. Live bands perform rain or shine, and proceeds benefit the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

The only golf tournament on the Korn Ferry Tour that pairs amateurs with celebrities in a three-day better-ball competition, the BMW Pro-Am rotates between courses at Thornblade Club and Cliffs Valley. This year the event goes green by introducing measures such as increased waste receptacles and recyclable and biodegradable food and beverage packaging. Proceeds benefit numerous Upstate organizations through South Carolina Charities, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the event.

Greenville Downtown Airport, 100 Tower Dr, Greenville. Fri & Sat, June 4 & 5, 6–10pm. Ticket passes for a car of 6 people start at $300 on Fri and $150 on Sat. (864) 255-5010, rockthelotgvl.org/#cspa

Thornblade Club, 1275 Thornblade Blvd, Greer; Cliffs Valley, 250 Knightsridge Rd, Travelers Rest. June 10–13. Thurs–Sun, gates open at 7am. Tickets range from $15 for a one-day pass to $150 for a Skybox Club ticket. (864) 297-1660, bmwcharitygolf.com

Photograph courtesy of Yacht Rock Revue

South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 153 Augusta St, Greenville. June 4–6. Continuous showings Fri, 6:30– 9pm; Sat, 10am–9pm; Sun, 10am–8pm. Tickets range from $12 for a single film to $85 for a weekend screening pass. (864) 353-7787, reedyreels.com

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Photograph courtesy of BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX

REEDY REELS FILM FESTIVAL


M. JUDSON POP-UP SUPPER: GRITS & GROCERIES

AN EVENING WITH JAKE SHIMABUKURO Renowned as “the Jimi Hendrix of the ukulele,” Jake Shimabukuro has been playing this fourstringed instrument since he was four year old. After becoming a YouTube sensation in 2005, the virtuoso has topped the Billboard World Music Charts with three of his albums: Gently Weeps, Peace Love Ukulele, and Grand Ukulele. Come spend an evening on the lawn behind the Peace Center, where this remarkable performer will leave you awestruck at the sounds he can coax from the ukulele. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, June 15, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

You’d better get there early when Heidi and Joe Trull, owners of Grits & Groceries in Belton, bring their lip-smackin’ version of Southern cooking to the pop-up suppers downtown at M. Judson. This time, their menu will feature braised beef brisket with roasted vegetables from local Parisi Farm. Beer and wine will be available for purchase, as will delectable desserts from the bookstore’s Camilla Kitchen. M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, June 2, 5pm. $13/plate. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com

AAU KARATE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

With more than 100 years of history and 700,000 members nationwide, Amateur Athletic Union is as popular as it is exciting. Come witness the best of the best as karate champs model their greatest moves. Plus, the AAU has donated more than 170,000 Feeding Children Everywhere meals, 10,000 clothing items, and 3,000 bottles of water to survivors of natural disasters, so you can feel good for giving them your support. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. June 29–July 3. Tues–Sat. Times vary. (407) 934-7200, aaukarate.org

BROAD VIEW PRICING FROM THE $400’S

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Nestled in the heart of downtown, Broad View will be Greenville’s premier city-living experience. With units already pre-selling, the development will feature thirty-eight luxury condos with rich finishes and incredible amenities. Find McBee Station shopping at your fingertips, Peace Center entertainment steps away, and immediate access to Falls Park and the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Broad View is center to it all, yet tucked away to serve as a sanctuary of upscale, luxury living.

3 0 1 E B R O A D S T. GREENVILLE, SC 29601

ELIZ A BETH “ BETH” CRIGL E R BCRIGLER@CDANJOYNER.COM 864.420.4718 Text “BroadView” to 59559 for more details.

LIMITED OPPORTUNITIES REMAINING* B R OA DV I E W GR E E NV I L L E . COM

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The List

Quick HITS TD SATURDAY MARKET

z If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Set your alarm on Saturday mornings and come shop early for a variety of spring greens and lettuces, plus seasonal delights such as fresh strawberries, carrots, turnips, and radishes. Being healthy never tasted so good! Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Thru Oct. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

GREENVILLE HERITAGE SOUND CHECK

z Put your hands together for live concerts! Though it was virtual last summer, this series of outdoor concerts will light up the TD Stage behind the Peace Center this year through September. The June lineup runs from the R&B sounds of The Jamie Wright Band to the country stylings of Angela Easterling & the Beguilers. Seating will be in T-Mobile Safe Space Pods of four people each. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. June 2–30. Weds, 6–9pm. $10 each, sold in groups of 4. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov/1814/Greenville-Heritage-Sound-Check

JAMES GREGORY

Photograph by Gwinn Davis

z He’s country, he’s casual, he’s not politically correct. Maybe that’s why audiences flock to see James Gregory perform his special brand of homespun humor. Raised in a rural town outside Atlanta, Gregory tells things as he sees them. You’ll feel like you’re sitting on the front porch with him as he transports you to a simpler time through his real-life stories, told without the crutch of vulgarity. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, June 5, 7:30pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

GREENVILLE TRIUMPH

z If you’re searching for the perfect summer evening, look no further. Our advice? Ditch midweek worries and head to the sprawling Greenville Triumph stadium (family and friends optional). Once you’re there, take it easy: grab a beer, kick back, and admire the fancy footwork of Greenville’s favorite soccer superstars. Greenville Triumph, 900 Woodside Ave, Greenville. Wed, June 16 & 23, 7pm. $10–25. (864) 203-0565, greenvilletriumph.com

FRESH FRIDAYS ON THE GRAND LAWN z Peppery greens, succulent fruits, and

crisp vegetables: you’ll find these and more at Hartness’s Fresh Fridays on the Grand Lawn, where local farmers and artisans flock to display their summer goods. With kid-friendly entertainment and family activities, the sprawling lawn and outdoor market can keep everyone entertained. Vendors appear on the third Friday of each month through Labor Day. The Grand Lawn at Hartness, 3500 S Highway 14, Greenville. Fri, June 18, 5:30-8:30pm. Free. (864) 9200375, hartnessliving.com

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Greenville Drive After sitting out last season owing to COVID-19, the Greenville Drive is back and raring to hit one out of the park. Come on out to the ballgame to watch the Drive play at their home field and appreciate all those things you love about baseball in Greenville: hotdogs, beer, the scale model of Fenway Park’s Green Monster. For the time being, social-distancing policies are in place. Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Thru Sept 5. Dates & times vary. General admission, $10. (864) 240-4500, greenvilledrive.com

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THE MUSICAL

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FOREVER Broadway magic returns to Greenville! Become a season ticket holder to experience it all with the best prices, extended payment plans, and guaranteed seating for nine spectacular shows. For performance dates and more information, scan the QR code with your phone’s camera.


Saturday, Aug. 28 | Portman Shoals Marina, Lake Hartwell

Dragon Boat Upstate Festival

15 years. One goal: fighting cancer. Our dedicated Dragon Boat Hall of Fame members share a common goal: to help eradicate cancer. And they embody the spirit of the event – teamwork, perseverance and a shared passion to raise money to fight cancer right here at home. Cancer hasn’t stopped because of the pandemic, and neither have we. Our Hall of Famers invite you to join them by paddling in the race against cancer. Together, we can make a difference. Support these paddlers by donating at DragonBoatUpstateSC.org. The Prisma Health Cancer Institute Dragon Boat Hall of Fame: AccessHealth Big Daddy AKA Teensy’s Abbey Paddlers, in memory of Alan Howard Larry Brotherton cb events Mike Coe Stephanie Cofer - Interim HealthCare Countybank Richard Cox The Cunningham Family

Acey Deiwert Annette Dunphy Carmen Brotherton Clancy Crawford Eco Waste Solutions Jessica Edenfield Connor Evins Sarah Evins Fabri-Kal Cancer Containers John Frame Gina Franco The Freeman Family

David Freeman Tim Garrett* Family of Natalie Gibson Amy & Hunter Gibson, Jean Pendergrass Ragin’Cajuns/SCOCF Larry Gluck Grainger Jenny Green Matt Gregg Harper Corporation Ken Harper

Deb Ingalls - Interim Healthcare Stephanie Henkin South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation ITOR Biorepository Team Jani-King of Greenville Jim Kaltenbach Lisa Littleton Annie Maertens Julie Martin Amanda McGee

McNaughton-McKay Electric Company MDC Team Heather Meadors Anita Miller Matt Olinger Tim Olmstead Donna Phipps Krista Ramirez Carolyn Reeves Release The Kraken I Allyson Steffen

Release the Kracken II Shane Steffen, Rita Handler-Coli, Kellie Lindsey & Dori Valin Becky Rich Janet Rigdon* Chris & Andrea Roberts Roers SCOCF in memory of Sarah Harrison Brandon Scott - Team DPR Sally Smith Tru Blu and CRU Winn the Fight *deceased

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On theTown ARTISPHERE STREET PARTY M AY 6, 2021

It was a beautiful night for hundreds of VIPs to take a sneak peek at the work of 88 artists before Artisphere officially opened. When they weren’t mingling with the artists and each other under the stars, attendees sipped libations from Liquid Catering, swayed to tunes spun by a DJ, and noshed on heavy hors d’oeuvres provided by Table 301, 1800 Drayton, and West End Events at Fluor Field.

Cherington Shucker, Robin Aiken & Darin Gehrke

Photography by JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Meredith & Douglas Piper

Jay Webster & Candice Hunter

Will & Reid Murphy

Sara Stoner & Celena Stoner Edward Heidtman, Kathy Fincher, Leigh Heidtman, Chris Fincher, Ann & Eric Whaley

Megan Riegel & Alan Ethridge

RJ & Andreana Snyder, Kelly Ford, Nick Carlson & Carmen Putnam

Ana Gibson & Alexx Carswell

Matthew & Katie Leckenbusch

Bracken Sansbury & Teresa Roche

Laura & Paul Rousseau JU N E 2021 I

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On the TOWN

Stephen Bosak & Marcus Tate

Ana Gibson, Grace Hartley & Christen Clinkscales

Parker Babbe, Hayley Bledsoe & Katherine Rainey

SHOES HANDBAGS ACCESSORIES Mackenzie Keaton

Glen Locke, Laurie Locke, Elena & Mike Azzarita

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE 864.271.9750 INSTAGRAM @ MUSESHOESTUDIO

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Morgan Conroy & Adriana Perdigoto

Donald Barbour, Sarah Nelson & Tay Nelson


On the TOWN EUPHORIA ROAST & TOAST A PRIL 25, 2021

The weather couldn’t have been more perfect for the 225 revelers who got an early taste of euphoria at this alfresco spring fête at the Old Cigar Warehouse. Folks feasted on oysters from Jianna and small plates by local chefs including Adam Hayes (Larkin’s), Tay Nelson (Bobby’s BBQ), Heidi Trull (Grits and Groceries), and Shaun Garcia (Soby’s), while the Erica Berg Collective played catchy tunes. Specialty cocktails came courtesy of Beam Suntory.

Trusted. Admired. Respected.

Chelsea & Ricky Pun

Photography by JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Matt James Funeral Director/Manager Newly Appointed Greenville Area Manager

L Drew Erickson & Shaun Garcia

Heather Frazier & Madison Garrett

Susan Schwarzkopf & Steve Koenemann with Phil & Sherry Jackson

ike founder James F. Mackey before him, Matt is passionate about the Greenville community. His passion and dedication led to his recent appointment as the Greenville Area Manager to the Dignity family of locations within the Upstate. Matt initially discovered his life’s purpose while working a part-time job at a small funeral home during the school holidays. “I felt humbled by the opportunity to help people during the most difficult time of their life. This is a way to truly make a difference.” Indeed, Matt carries on a long tradition of compassionate expertise. Throughout his career, families and his co-workers alike respect his dedication to helping families of all faiths celebrate and remember the ones they love most. Two words come to mind when asked to describe him, trusted and admired admired.. A graduate of Georgia State University, Matt is a faithful member of Brushy Creek Baptist Church and enjoys spending time with his wife, two daughters, and English Cream Golden Retriever, Lady.

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On the TOWN

KENTUCKY DERBY VIEWING PARTY AT FLUOR FIELD M AY 1, 2021

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Greenvillians donned their fanciest spring hats to watch the Kentucky Derby at Fluor Field—on the Jumbotron, of course. Frosty mint juleps and a successful silent auction completed the sunny afternoon. Auction proceeds benefited First Tee Upstate, an international youth development organization that builds character through the game of golf.

Nicole & Rick Amundsen

Photography by DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Matt Wollnick & Morgan Shock

Steve & Dee Smith

Jon Waters, Grace Morales, Tiffany & Charles Davis

Greenville’s Salon

Zac Cariens & Leslie Simpkins

WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON 794 E Washington Street

864.235.3336

wilsonsonwashington.com @wilsononwashingtonsc

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Zac Cariens & Leslie Simpkins


On the TOWN

PINK BEE GRAND OPENING A PRIL 28, 2021

Friends and customers old and new turned out for the grand opening of Pink Bee in their new space, which was festooned by balloons courtesy of Kristy’s Balloon Décor. Good Life Catering laid out the tasty bites, while Veuve Clicquot provided the bubbly. Partyers got first dibs on the new Lilly Pulitzer merchandise plus the chance to win great giveaways.

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Leigh Ann Miller & Mark K. DeMoss

Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Louisa Jacobs & Kendall Hoke Angela Turner, Meredith Turner & Ashley Turner

Helen Matthews with Ginger & Rick Miller

Greenville’s Salon

Thad & Dixie Dulin

WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON 794 E Washington Street

864.235.3336 Morgan Nichols & Adam Leonard

Lindsay Powers & Lisa Darby

wilsonsonwashington.com @wilsononwashingtonsc JU N E 2021 I

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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

Greenville sweethearts KALEY SANFORD & COREY JENNINGS tied the knot at The Venue at Falls Park. By Sposa Bella Photography

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Weddings

KALEY SANFORD & COREY JENNINGS APRIL 2, 2021

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any a love story would be lost without the serendipitous mutual friend, like the one who introduced Kaley and Corey. Just two-and-a-half years after they started dating, Corey organized a surprise proposal in their home. He knew Kaley preferred small gatherings, so after she said “yes,” they enjoyed a catered meal with a beautiful table setting on the porch with family. Another surprise came later, when their

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friends hosted a party to honor the couple’s engagement. Kaley, in a Madison Carolina gown and her mother’s veil, committed to Corey in an intimate, family-centered ceremony at The Venue at Falls Park. The pair lives in Greenville, where Kaley works as a speech-language pathologist and Corey is a business analyst. —Kathryn Norungolo By Sposa Bella Photography


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Weddings

MORGAN YARBOROUGH & ALEX ALBRECHT ARIL 9, 2021 They say best friends make even better life partners—an adage Morgan and Alex can attest to. The couple met almost a decade ago while attending Winthrop University, and remained dear friends until 2018, when Alex moved to Greenville and upped the ante on their relationship status. Under the guise of snapping holiday photos for friends, Alex lured Morgan to Caesars Head the following December, where he proposed to his best friend surrounded by a beautiful mountain sunset. Their small, intimate ceremony at Aurora Farms included vows under a willow tree, followed by a Champagne toast. The two are settling into their recently purchased home in Taylors.—KN By Jack Robert Photography

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VirginiaHayes.com • 864.313.2986

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DOWNTOWN

LIVING AT ITS BEST.

NATALIE SMITH & BENJAMIN CAPELL MARCH 26, 2021 A mutual friend introduced Natalie to Ben, and after exchanging a few messages, they met in downtown Greenville for a coffee date and a visit to the art museum. Ben was immediately smitten with Natalie, and after a few weeks they decided to get serious, despite the fact that Ben was in graduate school at Appalachian State. The distance was no match for the couple’s determination, as they explored Greenville, Asheville, and Boone together and scheduled many FaceTime dates in-between. A few days after Christmas last year, Ben picked up Natalie in Boone and took her to a secluded spot in the community park to ask her to be his wife. Nearly four months later, at Green Valley Country Club, Natalie and Ben said “I do” in an intimate ceremony with close family and friends, against the backdrop of a handmade wooden cross that symbolized their shared faith. In a happy addition to their wedding day, Ben accepted a job in Greenville, where the couple looks forward to starting their new chapter.—KN

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Photography by Kassidy Gomes JU N E 2021 I

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Weddings

CATHERINE LYNCH & CAMERON PEADEN MARCH 27, 2021

A love of theater brought Catherine and Cameron together. Both were involved with the Academy of Arts in Taylors and were selected to perform in the American High School Theatre Festival in Scotland; they met during rehearsals. Just before leaving for Scotland, the pair started dating and did so long-distance (Cameron lived in Fountain, North Carolina) for a little over four years. In 2019, Cameron proposed just before Christmas at the amphitheater in downtown Greer, where Catherine’s mom was waiting to preserve the moment in pictures. Catherine and Cameron tied the knot a little over a year later at Cleveland Park in Spartanburg. The couple recently bought a house in Greer.—KN By Sabrina Fields Photography

e opy, or’s

TAYLOR BEARD & TAYLOR MILLS SEPTEMBER 20, 2020 On Taylor Beard’s first day at her new job, she met Taylor Mills, who was interviewing at the same company. A few months later, after a lunchtime soccer game in the courtyard at work, Mills asked Taylor out. They became inseparable, and for Valentine’s Day the following year, Mills surprised his bride-to-be with a trip to New York City. Fresh off the plane, he drove Taylor to Central Park, where friends had set up a picture-perfect backdrop for his proposal. Taylor said “yes,” and was treated to another surprise when the couple returned to their hotel to find friends waiting to celebrate with them. Just seven months later, the two were married by Mills’s father at South Wind Ranch in Travelers Rest. The couple lives in Greenville.—KN By Sabrina Fields Photography

GRACE MANN & PALMER PRIMM DECEMBER 5, 2020 Grace and Palmer met once while both were attending Clemson, but it wasn’t until a few years later on a camping trip with mutual friends in Grayson Highlands, Virginia, that the two made a connection. Just ten months after that trip, Grace was walking with a friend on one of the trails near The Potter’s Place in Pickens when she noticed there was a note with her name on it nailed to one of the trees. Along the path she read several more notes from Palmer before discovering him underneath a canopy, down on one knee. Owing to COVID-19 restrictions, their wedding was a family affair, with everyone pitching in with décor and day-of preparations. Grace said “I do” to Palmer at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Charlotte, her childhood parish, dressed in an Allure Romance gown from Poinsett Bride. After the ceremony, their friends gathered outside to send the couple off in style. Grace and Palmer now live in Greer, where she is a sales and marketing administrator and he is a project engineer.—KN Photography by Emily Barbee

hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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Design and Build the Ultimate Backyard Experience ARE YOU OUTDOOR READY?

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town buzz INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Painter ANNALISA FINK captures the vibrancy of the Appalachian woods.

Artwork courtesy of Annalisa Fink

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

SEEING GREEN ANNALISA FINK FOCUSES ON WOODLAND MAGIC IN HER LUSH NATURAL PAINTINGS by Angie Toole Thompson • portrait by Will Crooks

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s a kid, painter Annalisa Fink sought out the company of trees. “I was a shy kid,” she admits. There was a grove of massive sycamores surrounding her childhood home. “At night I would lay on the roof and hang out with the trees, feel them moving around me” she remembers. “They must have been hundreds of feet tall.” It’s weird how feeling small—feeling surrounded—can give us a sense of security. It does, though; and for Annalisa, the looming wildness of nature takes center stage in her bold, nature-praising paintings. “I always felt most happy and free [with the trees]. They made me feel safe.” Staring at Annalisa’s recent rhododendron works feels like standing in a Southeastern woodland on a hot summer day. At first, there’s a nearly blinding shock of green. Then, darkness—

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something you can’t see but you can feel. Finally the brazen picture softens and you see a spectrum of light and a dancing pattern of leaves. “Rhododendrons are so articulated. They’re such beautiful, simple shapes. There’s a real rhythm to them.” Working within a limited palette, Annalisa paints from photographs she’s taken on hikes. Like her childhood roof, the woods surround her with energy, peace beyond words. “I bring the photograph home, and it’s nothing,” she laughs. Her task, she muses, is to mimic the experience. “Leaves are so . . . there’s so many. It’s like a beautiful puzzle. I can immerse myself in it; it gives my brain a rest from the things I want to perpetually worry about.” Rhododendrons pull Annalisa in, giving her particular set of life circumstances a preternatural assignment—to translate their magic. “In a beam of light, all these colors exist. When I paint, I’m working with less than what’s in nature,” she says. Her paintings enunciate the possibility of green—the intensity of hot pink or electric aqua. They go beyond mere transcription—there’s a heat to them, a humidity. You can almost hear the cicadas thrumming through Annalisa’s paintings. Annalisa is no stranger to the shifting sands of life. For starters, she’s a mother. For those who aren’t, read that as paragraphs of selfless pivoting and unexpected punches. She’s also currently moving houses—a practice in patience and mindfulness all to itself. She struggles, like countless others do, with an anxious mind. And then, she’s a person trudging through the pandemic world. “Living with uncertainty is learning that you are okay, that you can be okay.” It’s more a practice than anything, and one that Annalisa has embraced. The same inner voice that called her to her childhood rooftop to lie under the sycamores calls her to lovingly paint her rhododendrons. “I love their balance between delicateness and strength. Each branch has a leaf that it has to let go. I identify with that whole cycle.” Find Annalisa Fink’s work locally at Art & Light Gallery in the Village of West Greenville: artandlightgallery.com/artist/ annalisa-fink

Artwork courtesy of Annalisa Fink

Drawn to nature as a child, Annalisa Fink translates the natural world into verdant canvases of rhododendron plants, and other flora and fauna. Her work is currently on display at Art & Light Gallery in the Village of West Greenville.


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TB • VISIONARIES

BACK TO GOOD PUBLIC RELATIONS PRO DAVID HAWKINS SHINES A SPOTLIGHT ON AID UPSTATE AND OTHER LOCAL CHARITIES by Stephanie Trotter • photography by Will Crooks

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avid Hawkins doesn’t want revenge, he doesn’t want to get even, he simply wants to one-up all who wronged him by doing a great job. “Being gay in the nineties in the Upstate? It was bad,” shares the effervescent public relations guru. “It was violent, it was stitches, it was broken bones. Exactly what you’d expect.” He couldn’t get out of town quickly enough. After a 17-year exodus, Hawkins is back and literally making headlines, both for his clients and his charitable work. He’s risen above retribution, choosing to focus on living his best life, while assisting others along the way. “I want to serve my hometown in whatever way it allows me to do so,” he shares. “Through charity, through creativity, through commerce. Isn’t that the best revenge?”

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“This is my way to maintain the progress of moving forward and giving people a really fun way to extend themselves and those in the community.” —David Hawkins

Back in 2004, Hawkins secured a one-way ticket north. Eight years flew by in New York City, handling media relations and marketing for A-listers in the world of fashion and reality TV. Runway shows and seating charts for Carolina Herrera and Badgley Mischka? No problem. Book deals, shoe lines, and hashtags for the stars of Bravo and Food Network? Done, done, and done. He eventually moved to the West Coast, lured by a new job and the warmth of the sun. “As much as I adore Los Angeles, I wasn’t meant to live there,” he jokes upon reflection. He also missed his mom. It was time to come home, but not too close. He landed in Asheville and entered retail, but after a couple of years, his life pivoted without warning upon hearing three words: “You have AIDS.” “It was touch and go at first,” he shares. “I had a fast-acting strain and went straight into the hospital. But eight years later, I’m super healthy and it’s now non-detectable in my body. There’s comfort in science, and it’s a powerful place to be transparent and an advocate for HIV people everywhere.” Unlike the wounded teen who left the Upstate, Hawkins has returned home a warrior fighting for awareness across his issues and others. Through his business, My PR Lab Public Relations, he tells the lifeaffirming stories of his clients, his causes, and himself. He’s known for producing catchy T-shirts that support local charities and is organizing the area’s first transand gender-expansive fashion show, set for late June. “This is my way to maintain the progress of moving forward and giving people a really fun way to extend themselves and those in the community,” he explains with excitement. “When I left all those years ago, I didn’t have a good taste in my mouth. But I’ve changed so much. Greenville’s changed so much. I like to say, we grew up at the same rate, and we’re now able to meet in the middle.” For more on Hawkins and his favorite charities and projects, visit mypr-lab.com.

Owner of My PR Lab Public Relations, David Hawkins spent years away from Greenville honing his marketing skills. Since returning home, he’s poured his energy into supporting AIDS awareness and local charities, including creating graphic tees whose proceeds benefit area nonprofits. The tees are available at Prowse with Moore, 3006 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 203-2822, facebook.com/ prowsewithmoore

AID Upstate

When Hawkins returned home HIV positive, AID Upstate became his lifeline for comprehensive care, including therapy, testing, and support services. For more than three decades, the group has evolved from a grassroots effort to a clearing house of resources, acting as a beacon to those navigating a new and difficult journey. Roughly 1,300 people living with HIV rely upon AID Upstate for assistance each year, while 2,500 tap into the group’s intervention protection services. Hawkins is determined to shine a light on AID Upstate and the disease. “Everybody knows someone who is HIV positive; you just don’t know it,” he declares. “And thank God for it. The medicines work! I hope in my lifetime there’s a cure, but until then, I’m going to be out here fighting, singing, and letting people know we’re healthy and a vital part of the community, and AID Upstate positions us to have access like everyone else.” For more, visit aidupstate.org.

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LU XURY S E RVIC E AT E VE RY PR ICE POI N T 356’ OF SHORELINE

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3 SOUTHBOURNE COURT PARKINS MILL $774,500 | MLS# 1434252 Della Scott 864.363.5722

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16 GATESEDGE TRAIL CLIFFS VALLEY $655,000 | MLS# 1442092 Katrina Campbell 864.567.5188

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TB • TOWN EXTRA

LIFE OF SERVICE LOCA L BUSINESSM A N TIM MCK INNEY CONTINUES TO GI VE, EVEN THROUGH UNTHINK A BLE CIRCUMSTA NCES by Jack bacot • photography by Paul Mehaffey

A

disease like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) takes no prisoners. There’s no time for a trial. You can appeal to every court in the land, but it’s no use. ALS has no mercy. The sentence is quick but drawn out. You’re put on a firing line and then made to wait. ALS is just plain mean. Better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, ALS is an always-fatal neurodegenerative disease that basically means your brain stops talking to your body. They sort of disconnect over a short period of time. People with ALS lose their ability to walk, talk, eat, and eventually breathe. It’s an insidious and paralyzing disease with no cure. To make things even worse, while your body is shutting down, you’re completely aware mentally and emotionally. In other words, you get to stand by and watch. Tim McKinney is a successful businessman in his 50s and still in the prime of his life. You probably know him better as the name behind the McKinney Dodge, Chrysler, Jeep, RAM

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and McKinney Mazda auto dealerships in Easley. You know, the television commercials with the cute kids or beautiful models, or . . . Tim. In addition, he owns an aviation charter business out of the downtown airport, an apartment development in Pickens, a few other small businesses that he has consolidated, along with a commercial real estate business in Charlotte centered around 65 prime acres. Not bad for a kid from West Virginia who grew up working with his dad on a car lot since age 11. Who was first in his family of six to go to college. Who graduated and then moved to Charlotte to work—where else?—for car dealerships, learning the ins and outs of the business. In 1998 when he saw that a Dodge, Chrysler, RAM, Jeep dealership was up for sale, he took a huge risk, purchased the dealership and moved to Easley. This was when these brands weren’t exactly popular. While they have been around for a long while, there was no RAM 1500 truck or Jeep Renegade in 1998. His dealerships are known for their customer service especially when you bring your car or truck in for repairs. The employees at a McKinney dealership act as if you’ve just arrived for a mani/pedi. They pamper you and you understand why there’s “customer” in customer service. But this isn’t magic—a big part is how you treat your employees. In the world of buying and selling cars, the turnover rate is exceptionally high. Ask any employee at the McKinney dealerships, and you will find that most have been there ten years or more. They’re treated exceptionally well and they’re a loyal bunch. Just ask them the last time they paid for lunch, and they will happily tell you that Tim buys them lunch almost every day. Tim has giving in his DNA. •••

Tim is a giver by nature. He loves to help, especially those charities near and dear to his heart. As expected, he has a long list of near and dear, and a big heart. Tim’s a dog guy. So, naturally, the Greenville Humane Society is at the top of his list for giving back. It’s said that at one of the parties he hosted at his home for the Humane Society, there was a dog in every room. Tim never has a party at his home just for fun. His parties are always for someone else—the underserved, those in need, those hurting, or those with incurable diseases. That’s Tim. When Tim donates, it is impactful. The charities on his list include (in no particular order): Meals on Wheels of Greenville County, Greenville Humane Society, Oconee Humane Society, The Children’s Museum of the Upstate, South Carolina’s Children Theatre, Center Stage, Metropolitan Arts Council, Cancer Society of Greenville, Cancer Society of Pickens, Salvation Army, Senior Action, Clemson University Foundation, and too many more to list. He just doesn’t have the ability to say no. He’s definitely not all bark—he has bite. But there is a lot of barking in the lobby of the Greenville Humane Society’s “Healing Place Tim McKinney Lobby.” The Healing Place is


Owner of the McKinney Dodge, Chrysler, Jeep, RAM, and McKinney Mazda car dealerships, Tim McKinney has channeled his successful business ventures as a force for good, contributing millions to Upstate charities, including the Humane Society of Greenville and the South Carolina Children’s Theatre. McKinney was diagnosed with ALS in the spring of 2020.

“Tim has been a hero to our organization and has been our lead sponsor every year. He’s a wonderful friend.”—Debbie Bell, executive director, South Carolina Children’s Theatre

an important part of the Humane Society that helps animals that others would most likely “put down.” The Healing Place is what got Tim involved with the Humane Society back in 2010. Since then, he has been the largest donor each year. He was on the board of directors for six years and just recently resigned because of his health. “Tim is one of those larger-than-life personalities,” says Kim Pittman, who retired in late 2020 after fourteen years as CEO of the Greenville Humane Society. “He leads by example and sets the bar for giving very high.” When the Humane Society launched its capital campaign in 2014, Tim was the pacesetter. “We raised $3.3 million, and Tim’s gift was a large portion of the total raised,” says Pittman. “He’s been a lifelong friend to the Humane Society. We’ve benefited from his leadership, generosity, and friendship.” The local arm of the American Red Cross thinks of Tim each month when they receive a check from the DMV. “Tim not only gives big, he was instrumental in our Red Cross vanity license plate program, which continues to provide revenue to this day. We are so grateful for all he’s done,” says Lisa Colby, executive director of the Upstate SC Chapter of the American Red Cross. With no children of his own, Tim decided to support many organizations that help children. “He really appreciates the things we do for young people through our outreach programs, not just theater,” notes Debbie Bell, executive director of South Carolina Children’s Theatre. “Tim has been a hero to our organization and has been our lead sponsor every year. He’s a wonderful friend.” Tim is the guy that at Christmas actually searches for the Salvation Army Santa outside multiple stores while most of us turn a blind eye. He takes pleasure in dropping money into the pot. He knows it will be used for good, and that brings him joy. He has also become one of the Salvation Army’s biggest Secret Santas. “I didn’t have children of my own, but I found joy in knowing I could make a few hundred kids’ Christmas morning happy and exciting,” he says. Also a pilot, Tim has owned up to thirteen airplanes. His favorite was his workhorse Beechcraft King Air 200. He used planes as an integral part of his business. At one time he owned a small jet. At his expense, he has donated the use of the jet (and his other planes) more than he ever got to fly them. When the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) was looking for a way to safely and quickly transport critical organs, Tim gladly loaned them his jet. The smaller planes were often used to get needy families to special healthcare facilities. If you know anything about the cost of owning, flying, and maintaining an airplane, then you know these were substantial gifts. In total, over the past fifteen years, it’s estimated that Tim has given just north of $5 million to charities in the Upstate. In some circles this may not sound like a lot, but this is Greenville. This is life-changing goodness. His reward for all of this, while not really expecting one, was contracting ALS.

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TB • TOWN EXTRA Tim took a weeklong trip in late April to the Isle of Palms on the coast of South Carolina to spend time at the beach and to thank the ten caretakers that have helped him 24/7 through this difficult time. He rented a twelvebedroom, oceanfront home and had all meals catered. This was his thank-you note to them.

was off to the highly reputable Cleveland Clinic, who also suspected ALS but could not give him a definitive answer and suggested he come back in six months. The problem is ALS doesn’t have six months; it has a mind and schedule of its own. Things quickly worsened, and a month later he was off to see the medical team at Duke University. There, he met with a team of doctors that confirmed the worst and, in a frank and direct manner, explained his life expectancy, then asked if he wanted his parking validated. Not one to give up, Tim visited Johns Hopkins hoping for the best but got more of the same. Next he flew to Holy Cross in Fort Lauderdale in August to take part in a mass general drug trial that actually showed some hopeful signs by temporally reversing some of the symptoms. Temporarily equals a false sense of hope. He tried for another experimental drug therapy at the Mayo Clinic but failed a respiratory test and was excluded from the trial. By January 2021, he was already confined to a wheelchair and by March paralyzed from the neck down. “Losing the use of your legs and then your arms is a weird sensation,” McKinney explains. “Your brain tells them to move, actually expecting them to move, but nothing happens. It’s like you’re floating with no control.” •••

Based on U.S. population studies, the ALS Association estimates a little more than 5,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with ALS each year—that’s 15 new

“Less than a year ago, I was independent of my daily care, transportation, finances, etc. Now, I have to ask someone to scratch my nose or move my arm because I have lost all physical capabilities,” he says. •••

That’s why this part of his story is so crazy. In February 2020, Tim noticed a numbness in his right foot that eventually led to a foot drop. Doctors initially thought it was related to back troubles or nerve damage, but it progressed so rapidly that by springtime they suspected something more serious, something unthinkable—could it be ALS? “I have known Tim for nearly 20 years as his primary care physician. He strived to live a healthy lifestyle and made it a point to keep up with recommended health screenings,” says Dr. William Messer of Prisma Health’s Reedy Family Practice. “For these reasons, it was shocking to have him appear in my office in the very early stages of what turned out to be ALS.” It was suggested he get a second opinion. That June, Tim

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cases a day. Every 90 minutes, someone is diagnosed with the disease, and someone dies from it. It’s estimated that at least 16,000 people have the disease at any given time, which equals 16,000 deaths. An exhilarating life cut short so quickly by an incurable disease is hard to wrap your head around, especially for one who has given so much back to the community. What happens to the many charities, the cats and dogs he’s saved, the hearts he has helped, the ones whose spirits he’s lifted, and the ALS he wants to help cure? What happens when the giving stops? “I look at ALS as just one of many ways the human body will die. It’s a daily, hourly, by-the-minute reminder that we will all pass one way or another, and sooner or later. Yes, it’s aggravating and unfair,” McKinney says. For some reason, Tim has a great attitude and a sense of humor that is unexpected—just check out his Facebook page. You will immediately become aware that in situations in life when things look incredibly bleak and you’re walking on thin ice, Tim says, “Screw it—let’s dance.” “I’ve tried to live a life of grace, and I want to die with grace,” Tim says. “It’s very important how I leave this world.”


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*0% interest for up to 24 months applies to qualifying furniture purchases $3,500 & up. Custom furniture orders require a 25% deposit. Lower priced sales may qualify for other 0% Interest Financing programs. All Financing Programs are subject to credit approval. Equal monthly payments required. If original balance is paid in full by the due date, then no interest is charged. Current APR is as low as 23.91% and will vary by plan and financing partner. Other plans require minimum payment of 6% of remaining balance. Rate is subject to change without notice. See store for full details.


Escape To Your Own 6,000+ Acre Backyard BRMC presents families with a lifestyle that can be customized to you—a perfect blend of adventure, recreation, and relaxation. And with 3 paths to ownership, a life well-lived is waiting for you. Come home to Blue Ridge Mountain Club.

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Schedule your Discovery Tour to begin a life well-lived. ExploreBRMC.com I sales@brmountainclub.com I 828.520.2508 Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This information shall not constitute a valid offer in any state where prior registration is required. © 2021 Blowing Rock Resort Venture, LLC.


ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

In a building erected in 1896, Mount Pleasant’s Post House Inn combines rich history with contemporary flair.

Sink into quaintness, indulgence, and quiet at the POST HOUSE INN near Charleston.

Photograph by Kirk Robert

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ESCAPE • TOP BUNK

CHANGE OF PACE SOA K UP SLOW LI V ING AT POST HOUSE INN, MOUNT PLEASA NT’S CHA R MING NEW SEVENROOM HOTEL A ND TAVER N by Kathryn Davé

S

ome destinations take your breath away and some give you permission to let it out. Post House Inn belongs to the second category: a long, cleansing exhale. Before I arrived at the tiny coastal inn and tavern tucked into the historic district of Mount Pleasant, I thought the seven-room hotel would make a sweet little launchpad for standard-fare Charleston explorations. I didn’t know I was looking for a slow, cozy stay, but I believe that owners Kate and Ben Towill might have—that their instincts about what guests crave in a getaway have helped them create an immersive escape so enchanting you may never even cross the Ravenel Bridge into the Holy City. With breakfast included in your stay and a thoughtful bar and restaurant on the ground floor, you won’t need to. The inn’s structure—a “restaurant with rooms” as the Towills call it—was modeled after English

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pubs, with exceeding care given to making the circa 1896 building feel like the cornerstone of neighborhood life. The same care was applied to the inn’s renovation, in which Kate Towill, a former set designer, managed to lighten and warm the whole place while paying homage to the building’s history. Tall new windows let clean sunlight wash into the bar up front and the restaurant around back. Upstairs, the walls and trim are painted in deep shades of seaglass blue. Layered rugs and a boatload of antiques that the Towills carted down from Brimfield, Massachusetts, give the inn a rich sense of lived-in character. Each of the seven guest rooms is different, with its own furnishings, fixtures, wallpaper, and architectural features, but they share Towill’s talent for blending soulful antiques with fresh, energetic elements. The old wood-plank floors may creak delightfully, but you won’t sacrifice any modern hotel luxuries: crisp white bed linens, lavish Malin + Goetz toiletries, a carefully curated mini-bar, complete with emergency bowtie (it is the Lowcountry you’re visiting, after all). No bowtie


Photography by Kirk Robert; courtesy of Post House Inn

Slow down and relax at Post House Inn, a seven-room coastal retreat nestled by the water in Mount Pleasant’s historic district. Modeled after English pubs, the renovated inn offers breakfast, an inviting bar, and dinner so guests never need leave its quaint charm.

needed for dinner downstairs, though the seasonal fare from Chef Nathan Hood is as elegantly executed as any fine restaurant in downtown Charleston. Local, farmsourced ingredients and simple Lowcountry staples such as blue crab toast and fresh oysters sing, but that is no surprise coming from the Towills, who also created Charleston’s beloved Basic Kitchen. Tempting as Charleston’s attractions are, my big plans to enjoy them vanished once I settled into the rhythm of Post House Inn. I watched light and leaf shadows dance across the floor in my room. I took a long stroll through the shady Old Village neighborhood, popping into shops as I pleased. On the way back to the hotel for my late dinner reservation, I passed two little neighborhood girls in long, ruffled nightgowns pedaling their bikes home at dusk—the scene so ridiculously idyllic it seemed staged for cinema. “Where am I?” I thought dreamily, and then took a deep breath and stepped into the cozy glow of Post House. Post House Inn, 101 Pitt St, Mount Pleasant, SC. (843) 2037678, theposthouseinn.com. Rooms start at $225.

FOR A LUXURIOUS, LOW-KEY GETAWAY IN MOUNT PLEASANT, CHECK OUT THESE SPOTS:

Nico

The culinary team behind this lively French oyster and seafood bar trekked up and down the East Coast in search of the best oysters. Lucky for you, the hunt is over and happy hour is here. 201 Coleman Blvd, Mt. Pleasant. nicoshemcreek.com

Pitt Street Pharmacy

Stop in for a sweet treat from the soda fountain at this village icon where neighborhood kids keep monthly accounts to support their ice cream cone habit. 111 Pitt St, Mt. Pleasant. pittstreetpharmacy.com

Out of Hand

Beauty seems to be the common thread that ties together this charming home, floral, apparel, and skincare shop just a couple doors down from Post House. 112 Pitt St, Mt. Pleasant. shopoutofhand.com

Charleston Art Collective

Much of the art that adorns Post House Inn is sourced from this gallery just a few streets down from the inn. The gallery curates affordable, original art from a tight group of local artists. 414 Whilden St, Mt. Pleasant. artistcollectives.org

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There’s a different kind of medical school in Upstate South Carolina, a place where There’s a different kind of medical school in Upstate South Carolina, a place where tomorrow’s doctors train alongside today’s physicians and all members of the tomorrow’s doctors train alongside today’s physicians and all members of the interdisciplinary healthcare team from day one. The University of South Carolina interdisciplinary healthcare team from day one. The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville offers a hands-on, real-world experience that isn’t a School of Medicine Greenville offers a hands-on, real-world experience that isn’t a mere promise for the future, but a way of life. mere promise for the future, but a way of life. 607 Grove Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | info@greenvillemed.sc.edu | www.GreenvilleMed.SC.edu 607 Grove Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | info@greenvillemed.sc.edu | www.GreenvilleMed.SC.edu


SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

Carlo Franco pushes an incline at Paris Mountain State Park. He and other cyclists have conquered 37 laps up and down the mountain to complete the Everesting Challenge, climbing the same elevation as Mount Everest.

Avid cyclist CARLO FRANCO fosters adventure and community through his shop, Velo Valets.

Photograph by Will Crooks

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SPORT • PEOPLE

text here

WHAT A RIDE OW NER OF VELO VA LETS A ND AV ID CYCLIST CA RLO FR A NCO CLIMBS MOUNTA INS A ND BUILDS COMMUNITIES by J. Morgan Mc Callum • photography by Will crooks

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miles. Almost twenty-two hours in the saddle. An elevation gain of 29,029 feet—the altitude of Mount Everest. No breaks or shortcuts, just grit and dogged determination. If that sounds like a fun ride, you’re in good company with Carlo Franco: a cycling enthusiast, retired Airman, and co-founder of the Sans Souci bike shop Velo Valets. “Most people probably think, ‘You can’t be normal to want to do this ride 37 times, to essentially climb Everest.’ So I guess we’re crazy,” Franco concludes. He’s talking about a challenge known as “Everesting,” started by Australian cycling group the Hells 500, which entails riding one known bike route enough times to climb the elevation of Earth’s highest peak—without stopping. “I first attempted the climb on Father’s Day a few years ago, and almost got there,” says Franco, who made it to 32 laps up and back down Paris Mountain before thunderstorms, downed power lines, and fallen trees ended his endeavor around midnight. The next month, two friends approached him about giving it a go again


Driven by his passion for cycling, Carlo Franco (opposite and right) leads group rides and repairs bikes at Velo Valets, which he co-owns with Nate Evans in the Sans Souci neighborhood of Greenville.

as a group, and the trio completed the 37 required laps in record time. “It’s a tough climb,” Franco casually concedes, “but there’s just nothing like it.” Spend a few minutes with Franco, and it’s easy to see how the Colombia-born, Greenville-raised entrepreneur has been able to inspire others to attempt the impossible. His lifelong passion for bicycles, and for the cycling community, is infectious. “My dad was also an amateur cyclist. I wanted to be like him, so I used to ride his bike everywhere, even though it was too big for me. When I was 14, he bought me my first proper road bike, an ’86 Club Fuji. I still have it hanging in my shop. When I see it on the wall, it brings back good memories.” And for 35 years, his love of cycling—and service in the Air Force—took Franco to open roads all across the globe. “Wherever the military would send me, I’d take my bike. I’ve ridden all over Europe, England, France, Portugal, South America.” When Franco retired and returned to Greenville, intending to eventually move on, he quickly fell in love with the city. Adds Franco, “Everywhere I’ve been, there’s almost always a tight-knit cyclist community. And for such a small town, Greenville really has a huge cycling community.” The Sans Souci neighborhood, which means “carefree” in French, called to Franco and his plans for the future. “I’ve always

CARLO’S FAVORITE RIDES

wanted to own a bike shop. When my buddy Nate Evans came on board as business partner and co-owner, we opened Velo Valets.” And it’s not your average bike shop. Says Franco, “We set out to build something different. We do mostly service and mobile repairs; we don’t have bikes here for sale. If we do sell a bike, it’s going to be completely custom. We help select every single part and build it piece by piece.” The shop also specializes in fitting bikes to riders. “We use this amazing machine—it’s one of only six in the entire U.S.—and it fits you down to the millimeter of where you need to be on a bicycle. Next, we transfer those numbers to the bike of your choice. That way, when you ride, you’re comfortable and more efficient. You’re putting out as much power as you possibly can.” When he’s not leading group rides out of the shop—from approachable 2-hour routes to 222-mile overnights to the coast and back—Franco is throwing his limitless energy into community initiatives. “We’re starting a Sans Souci bike-share program that will launch in the next month or so. You’ll be able to borrow a bike from us and take it on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, which is right down the street from the shop.” The cost of a rental? A donation of nonperishable canned goods, which will go to local nonprofits. Along with resident shop dog, Spokes, Franco lives above Velo Valets, where he is “pretty much surrounded by bicycles and cyclists all the time,” and wouldn’t have it any other way. “If working at the shop was just a job, I imagine I’d need to get away—but I love what I do, so it never gets old.” Velo Valets, 2901 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. (864) 841-VELO, velovalets.com

GREENVILLE: Paris Mountain. “We’re very fortunate to have such a beautiful and challenging climb in our backyard. As a ride leader, I’ve coached hundreds of people on the first time up the mountain, and the look of achievement on their face once we reach the top is always rewarding.” NORTH CAROLINA: Skyuka Mountain, Green River Cove, Saluda, Tryon, Flat Rock. UNITED STATES: Northern California, along the coast and the redwood forests. EUROPE: English countryside. SOUTH AMERICA: the mountains of Colombia. “It’s beautiful. You’re riding through the mountains; the temperature is amazing, mid-70s all year ’round.”

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Your generous gift helps Greenville grow as a diverse arts community. Original art by Jennifer Ardolino“Flower Power”

Curator

The Jean T. and Heyward G. Pelham Foundation

The Fred Collins Foundation

Aficianado

Connoisseur

Collector The Daniel-Mickel Foundation

The Graham Foundation

The Roe Foundation

Artisphere Benefactors: AFL Global, David & Ginnie Beard, Joe & Claire Blake, Blue Ridge Electrical Cooperative, Ann Bryan, Canal Insurance, Canvas, Cherry Bekaert, Christophillis & Gallivan, PA, Crawford Strategy, Fifth Third Bank, First Citizens Bank, Rod & Linda Grandy, Phil & Sara Gregory, Greenville Technical College, Henry & Jamie Horowitz, Rob & Katie Howell, Earle & Margaret Hungerford, IBERIABANK/ First Horizon, Greg & Leslie Ingram, KATANA Safety, Kentwool, Kimberly Kent, KW Beverage, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, Monkee’s of the West End, Carla & Mitch Norville, Bob & Charlotte Otto, Overture Greenville, Sidney Pearce & Sara Ellis Snelling, Saad and Manios, LLC, Hal & Minor Shaw, Southern First, Steve & Allison Spinks, Arch & Sara Thomason, Chuck & Sherri Timmons, TPM, Uptown Catering, Womble Bond Dickinson (US) LLP Artisphere’s Chairman’s Circle: Melissa Albergotti, Greg & Amanda Arscott, Art & Light Gallery, Bo & Judith Aughtry, Bob Barretto, Neil & Lindsey Batavia, Joe & Claire Blake, David & Kristine Berger, Charles & Ericka Brewer, William W. Brown, Brad & Cathy Campbell, Mike & Ann Chengrian, The Cook’s Station, Edwin & Andrea Cooper, Rusty & Maura Copsey, Craig Gaulden Davis, Tim Quinn & Sara Dadyar-Quinn, Dave & Nancy Derrick, John & Sunnie DeWorken, DP3 Architects, Vernon & Tarita Dunbar, Stephen Edgerton, Nathan & Sugie Einstein, Alan Etheridge, Find Great People, Ellis & Jane Harrison Fisher, David & Mary Gossett, Benny & Linda Hannon, Peter & Jean Helwing, Robert Hughes, Larkin’s on the River, David & Courtney Lominack, Foster & Madison McKissick, Scott & Beth McMillan, Metal Chem, Inc., Rachelle & Charlie Mickel, Cliff & Reschin Moore, Rob & Stephanie Morgan, Bob & Christine Nachman, Bob Morris & Lesley Pregenzer, Bob & Cindy Munnich, Frank & Linda O’Brien, Tom & Susan O’Hanlan – Sealevel Systems, Brian & Amy O’Rourke, Jeff & John Outten, Jack & Cindy Plating, Sue Priester, Kyle Putnam, Clay & Stephanie Rainey, Tim & Susan Reed, Rick Erwin Dining Group, LLC, Connie Shamlin & Olivier Badia, Paul & Precia Shaw, Jason & Laura Sippey, Jennifer Smith, RJ & Andreanna Snyder, Jo Sousa, MD, Carl Stecker, Ed & Anne Stein, Ron & Jennifer Stilwell, Chris & Heather Stone, Joe & Donna Sullivan, Mary & David Swain, Erin Swann, Tod N. Tappert, John & Kris Uprichard, Ralph & Lea Walker, Erik & Robin Weir, Wilson Associates Real Estate, Westin Poinsett Hotel, John & Michelle York, Ed & Susan Zeigler Friends of Artisphere: Andrew Baird & Jennifer Buckner, Barnhardt Foundation, Phil & Mignon Canale, Michelle Cauley, Childers Real Estate Holdings, Judy Iselin Cromwell, Don & Kimberly Cooley, Bob DiBella & Carol Savage, Annie Dodd, Elliott Davis, First National Bank, Virginia Hayes, Breeden & Daottie Hollis, Candice Hunter, Scott & Barbara James, Virginia Boyle Kolb, Kottkomm, Ben & Liza Lovelace, Graham & Emily Moseley, Orange Whip Golf, Joseph & Mary Lou Parisi, Derek & Missy Rick, Stephen & Mary Ridgeway, Shannon Robert & David Standard, Paul & Laura Rousseau, Francie Staub, Rick Stanley, Michael Stepanavage & Judy Harrison, Southern First, Joe & Bobbi Swann, Tribute Verdae Apartments, Waterleaf at Keys Crossing Apartments and Anne Woods. Volunteers: Boy Scout Troop 266, Greenville Concert Band, Hispanic American Women’s Association, Palmetto Statesmen, Vocal Matrix Chorus.


STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Millie Lewis model Angela Amezcua; hair and make-up by Isabelle Schreier/Belle Maquillage

Carve Designs Tamarindo top, $48; Carve Designs Mustique reversible bottom, $68. Both from Half Moon Outfitters; Le Specs sunglasses, $83. From Splash on Main; Love necklace, $137. From Custard Boutique. For more, turn to page 62.

Soak up summer vibes in luxe SWIMWEAR and accessories from local boutiques.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey, styled by Chelsey Ashford

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BEACH BEAUTY THESE CLASSIC SWIM LOOKS FLAUNT AND FLATTER styled by Chelsey Ashford • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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Model Angela Amezcua, courtesy of Millie Lewis; hair and make-up by Isabelle Schreier /

STYLE • THE LOOK

J U N E 202 1 I t o w n c a r o l i n a . c o m

riginally from Colombia and now making her home in Savannah, Georgia, designer Ana Barragan has created


Millie Lewis model Angela Amezcua; hair and make-up by Isabelle Schreier/Belle Maquillage

agan has created the stylish ecological brand,

(opposite left) It’s Now Cool white rib one-piece, $88. From Splash on Main; Temple Door earrings, $52. From Custard Boutique.

(left) Lilly Pulitzer Santiana agave green one-piece, $148; St. Armand’s raffia headband, $18; St. Armand’s monstera palm threader earrings, $28. All from Pink Bee; Altamaha necklace, $105. From Custard Boutique.

(left) It’s Now Cool The Signature Pant top, $70 & bottom, $60; Le Specs Fluxus sunglasses, $69. All from Splash on Main; St. Armand’s monstera palm drop earrings, $28. From Pink Bee.

(above) L Space by Monica Wise Parker top, $84; L Space by Monica Wise Portia bottom, $88; Physician Endorsed hat $42. All from Splash on Main; Wavy Gravy earrings, $35. From Custard Boutique.

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STYLE • THE HOW–TO

With decades of experience tending to our city’s beloved green spaces, Joey West has made a marvel of Greenville’s Rock Quarry Garden near Cleveland Park.

ROCK THE GARDEN JOEY WEST, L A NDSCA PING LEGEND BEHIND GREEN V ILLE’S ROCK QUA R RY GA R DEN, OFFERS HIS BEST GROW ING TIPS by Beth Brown Ables • photograph by Eli warren

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he Celts call them “thin places.” They’re those particular spaces where the veil between the spiritual and physical world seem to meet. Held within the hollow of a pre-Civil War granite quarry, Greenville’s Rock Quarry Garden on McDaniel Avenue near Cleveland Park feels like a sanctuary. Traffic muffles, a spring-fed brook sings over rocks, the entire space is verdant with native plants and colorful annuals. A waterfall cascades under an arched footbridge—the landscape is hushed, peaceful, and achingly lovely. A thin place. If the Rock Quarry Garden is a holy place, then its unassuming chaplain would be Joey West. For more than three decades, Mr. West has had his hands—quite literally—dirt-deep in the landscape of some of Greenville’s most beloved public spaces. He’s not an easy man to track down. There are few mentions of him in a Google search, no headlines, no photos. Instead, his work speaks in banks of flowers, tidy borders, crisp edging. In the City of Greenville, his handiwork is unmistakable and his work ethic, legendary.

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West didn’t intend to be a landscaper or even grow up gardening. In fact, he thought he’d be a mechanic, racing dirt track. But while working as a printer at a box warehouse, West knew he needed a change. Craving a job outdoors, he began working on a landscaping crew for the City of Greenville, tending flowerbeds and trees along Main Street. It was during that first year he encountered the Rock Quarry Garden and knew immediately it was special. Long rooted in the cultural landscape of Greenville since its founding by the Garden Club in the 1930s, the Rock Quarry Garden remains a sought-after spot for capturing significant moments: family pictures, wedding ceremonies, senior portraits. “It’s the natural beauty of the place, the way it sits down low offering privacy . . . it’s different than anywhere in the city,” West says. He married his wife, Nicole, in the garden more than 20 years ago, working extra hours that season cultivating his own Eden. “That year, the garden was booming. I had the pond so clean you could see fish swimming at the bottom,” he laughs. It remains one of his wife’s favorite places to visit. West sees his work as a legacy. “Over the years, I’ve put my own spin on the rock garden, and when I retire and pass it to the next person, they’ll put their own touch on it. I like it that way.”

GARDENING TIPS FROM JOEY WEST: Lately, I’m doing a lot of planter boxes. Even if you live in an apartment, you can have boxes with flowers, vegetables, whatever you like or desire. Know your area before you plant. Do some research. Test your soil. Mulch or use pine needles around plants to keep in moisture and combat weeds. Fertilize at the right time. Ask a gardening center for help with knowing what works for your yard. Plant three stages of plants in a bed in a stair step with the tallest in the back. Lantana, portulaca, vinca, and salvia grow well around here; they can take the heat all through the summer. They come in a variety of colors so you can pick what you like.


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Summit Crawl & Fireworks on Top of Sugar Mountain July 4

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STYLE • GEAR Victorinox Kitchen Shears $22

This model, with micro-serrated stainless-steel blades, includes a cavity designed to loosen stubborn jar lids. The Cook’s Station, 515 Buncombe Rd, Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com

SHEAR EXCELLENCE FROM PRUNING TO SLICING, FIND THE R IGHT PA IR FOR YOUR HOME by M. Linda Lee • photography by paul mehaffey

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hether you’re breaking open a lobster or pruning the rose bushes in the garden, having the right tool for the job makes it a snap. To that point, we’ve curated a selection of indispensable cutting implements for home and garden. Check out the kitchen shops, hardware stores, and nurseries below to ensure that you’ll always be on the cutting edge.

Kuhn Rikon Classic Snips $24

Classic Snips are springloaded for effortless cutting from meat bones to small branches. The blades selfsharpen as they rub together. The Cook’s Station, 515 Buncombe Rd, Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com

Fiskers Bypass Pruner $23

Designed with an ergonomic, sculpted handle and angled cutting head to reduce wrist fatigue, the Fiskers Pruner makes quick work of trimming shrubs. Duncan’s Home Center, 1506 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 233-6851, acehardware.com

Corona Dual Bypass Pruner $32

This durable garden companion has a patented dual-cut blade, perfect for making quick cuts with maximum leverage. Duncan’s Home Center, 1506 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 233-6851, acehardware.com

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Joyce Chen Unlimited Scissors $40

No matter if you’re right- or left-handed, Joyce Chen’s dishwasher-safe scissors go from kitchen to garden with ease. Martin Garden Center, 198 Martin Rd, Greenville. (864) 2771818, martinnursery.com


Bonsai Tools Shears $15

Bonsai enthusiasts will get greater control and faster action from the wide hand loops on these shears when trimming leaves, stems, and delicate shoots. South Pleasantburg Nursery, 1135 S Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 299-6677, spnursery.com

Maine Man Seafood Shears $5

For summer crab boils, you’ll need the curved blades and tapered tips on these sturdy shears to open shells and extract the delicate meat. The Cook’s Station, 515 Buncombe Rd, Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com

Red Rooster Razor Snip $20

Use this multipurpose tool with its two-inch stainless-steel blades for snipping garden herbs, trimming flowers, and even crafting. South Pleasantburg Nursery, 1135 S Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 299-6677, spnursery.com

Scizza Pizza Shears $30

Curved German stainless-steel blades slice from above to keep pizza toppings in place, while the spatula base slides underneath the pie so the blades won’t scratch your pans. The Cook’s Station, 515 Buncombe Rd, Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com

Red Rooster Bypass Pruner $40

With lightweight forged aluminum handles and an angled cutting head, the Red Rooster Bypass Pruner proves an excellent partner for gardening tasks. South Pleasantburg Nursery, 1135 S Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 299-6677, spnursery.com

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Ms. Bea Wright

GET A QUEUE WHILE CUTTING IN LINE IS CERTA INLY RUDE, MS. BEA LEAVES CONFRONTATION AS A L AST RESORT

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here is a game we all play whenever we approach a checkout line at the grocery store called “Find the Fastest Line.” Step one—assess the number of people in each line. Next, quickly gauge the number of items each shopper has in his or her basket. An often neglected but important final step is to observe how much produce is in the mix, as we all know that adds at least another minute. If we’re lucky, we spot a new cash register being prepped, and, with precise timing, we abort the chosen line and proceed to first place in a newly opened one. But sometimes, while patiently waiting in our chosen line, someone who wasn’t even in line walks up and claims the coveted first position at the newly opened register. They jumped the queue! Sometimes innocent, other times brazen, but always irritating, having someone break in line ahead of us is something we have all experienced. So, what do you do when someone blatantly ignores the unwritten etiquette of waiting their turn? My first piece of advice—don’t get angry. No question, the behavior is rude. But there are times when it matters less than others. For instance, if someone greets a friend while standing in line to enter a ball game and all parties have prepaid tickets with assigned seats, it’s not worth making a scene by protesting. You will come across looking mean-spirited, not only to the friends, but to the whole crowd gathered behind you.

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Now, more egregious is what happened to me recently. I entered a favorite lunch spot, assessed the line situation, and chose the line that had two women together as opposed to the line with three people standing individually. While patting myself on the back for my wise choice, in walked a group of three friends who were meeting the two ladies for lunch. With a wave from their buddy placing an order at the head of the line, the newcomers all promptly proceeded ahead of me in line. I was dumbfounded. Trust me. I was not happy. But they were excited to be enjoying a meal together. I knew that if I expressed my anger, it would do nothing more than make me look petty, trifling, and a bit cold-hearted. So, I took a breath and let it be. Silence is not mandated when someone jumps in line at the airport, post office, or at a packed store, especially during the holidays. My suggestion is to make an ally with someone in line with you. Look around and ask, “Did you see that guy break in line in front of us?” With support, you can then approach the individual who dared to break protocol. Even then, as you consider your confrontational remarks, be polite. Give the benefit of the doubt. It is highly possible that the person did not even know where the line started. A simple, “Hey, did you know the line starts back there?” will be much better received and perceived than an attack. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.


Man About TOWN

SNAKE CHARMER WHEN SERPENTINE V ISITORS SURPR ISE THE M A N IN HIS NEW HOME, HE QUESTIONS WHETHER THEY A RE PEST OR PA L by Steven Tingle

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he snake was on the screened-in porch. It was black and gray and no thicker than a pencil, curled up in a circle about the size of a coaster. Jess yelled for me when she noticed it, and I’d rushed out to see what was wrong. “Oh no,” I said. “I’m going to have to catch it.” The fact I hate snakes is no secret. Everyone who knows me is well aware of the terror these beasts inflict on me. I’m not ashamed. I’ve even written about it previously in this magazine. I’ve shared my fear with friends and strangers, my doctor and my therapist, and my family, including, of course, my mom, who always rolls her eyes and says, “Grow up.” Growing up was the problem. I was raised on a mountainside in Western North Carolina in a home surrounded by woods. There, it was not uncommon for a snake to glide under the garage door or sun itself on the deck with the entitlement of a house guest. From early spring until late fall I was on full alert. A black garden hose, a length of dark rope, a piece of gray tubing on a shelf—I screamed and fled from a variety of inanimate objects during my childhood.

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When Jess and I purchased our house last summer, I was too excited to think about the possibility of snakes. But a week after we moved in, I noticed one by the front porch. A few days later, a long black one slithered across the patio and into the back lawn, which I refused to mow for three months. When our security camera caught one shimmying up the brick wall by the basement door, I decided it was time to get proactive. I ordered a snake grabber from Amazon, the longest one available. It’s so long the post office was unable to deliver it, and I was forced to pick it up in person and haul it through the parking lot while trying to ignore people staring at a guy carrying a giant box with the words Extra Long Reptile Tongs written on the side. On the screened-in porch, I extended my reach and gingerly trapped the small snake in the grabber’s metal fangs. It writhed like a tiny demon and I took a photo of it with my phone as proof of my bravery. After I dropped the still-very-much-alive snake in the woods behind our house, Jess suggested I put the picture on Nextdoor, a social media community for our neighborhood, to see if anyone could identify it. I posted the photo along with a note saying that the snake had scared the living jeepers out of me and I wanted to know if it was poisonous. A neighbor responded to say I’d caught a harmless juvenile rat snake that was actually good to have around because they eat mice and voles. I was tempted to tell him that mice and voles don’t make me wet myself, so I actually prefer them. A month later the comments on my snake post are still coming in. Most agree with the rat snake identification and repeat the ridiculous idea that they are beneficial. But one comment particularly stung. “It’s just a little snake,” a woman wrote. “Grow up, for cryin’ out loud!”


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PAUL MEHAFFEY

Earth &

Vine

&

No need to travel far to wine country. These CAROLINA WINERIES are producing standout bottles against a backdrop of stunning Appalachian scenery. Get out, explore, and savor the taste of your own backyard. B Y M . L I N D A L E E , L A U R E N M A X W E L L & J . M O R G A N M C A L L U M c

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Overmountain Vineyards is a 70-acre family-owned winery in the foothills of Tryon, North Carolina.

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FOR THE PHILOSOPHER

Marked Tree Vineyard

PAUL MEHAFFEY

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someone offers me a glass of grüner veltliner, I am almost certain to accept. I did not expect to find that intriguing Austrian grape when visiting Marked Tree Vineyard in Flat Rock, North Carolina, but there it was. I was given their 2018 vintage; putting my nose in the glass led me to anticipate tasting something floral or even musky––which I wasn’t against––but in a delightful twist, the wine delivered all the acidic brightness I’ve come to know and love from that particular grape. I took a bottle home and began to understand that Marked Tree, much like their grüner veltliner, is full of surprises. Marked Tree Vineyard is new on the scene in Henderson County, North Carolina’s burgeoning wine region, which was federally distinguished as an American Viticultural Area, or AVA, in 2019. Appropriately named the “Crest of the Blue Ridge,” Henderson County’s AVA was earned in recognition of the area’s distinctive microclimate, which provides optimal conditions for vine-growing thanks to its elevation in the lower Blue Ridge Mountains. Warm by day and cool by night, vines—and their winemakers—seem to be falling in love with Henderson County. The vineyard sits on Cherokee land and was named after routing systems used by native and indigenous peoples in forests across the United States. Tribes bent and coaxed young saplings to point towards critical resources in the wilderness, forming landmarks that would guide others on the trail. Though they’re disappearing, old marker trees can still be found around the country, and nodding to that tradition, owners Tim Parks and Lance Hiatt hope Marked Tree will invite visitors to pause and reflect on their own life’s journey over a glass of wine.

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n a region with a quickly-growing reputation, Marked Tree sets itself apart by selecting varietals that can flourish in very specific ways on their terrain. Their vineyards stand on sloped land that encourages water runoff on rainy days, yet still offers enough sun and rocky soil for vines to thrive. On the menu beside grüner veltliner, you’ll find terroir-driven varietals like petit verdot, cab franc, and vidal blanc, along with must-try blends.

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Marked Tree plans to highlight art, food, and beer from surrounding towns, and this month, they’ve partnered with the Arts Council of Henderson County on June 12–13 to present La Vie en Rosé, an art and wine festival featuring local artists and musicians. Visitors to Marked Tree can also enjoy yoga classes, offered weekly, and forest bathing, which is by appointment.

Summer’s gearing up, and lucky for us, Marked Tree spent the past few years crafting the perfect rosé for hot, southern summer days. Sweet Ellie Mae Rosé, named after one of the owner’s canine companions, is—as its name hints—just pleasantly sweet enough to cool you down. While you’re trying summer wines, be sure to sample their Chloe Rosé as well, a drier blend that won Best Rosé for its 2020 vintage in this year’s North Carolina Fine Wines Competition. If, like me, you often lean toward dry whites and lighter reds, you might enjoy starting with Marked Tree’s chardonel, which won a silver medal in the same competition for its 2019 vintage. The wine gives a definitive nod to one of its parent grapes, chardonnay, while standing elegantly on its own. Winemaking is both a science and an art, a partnership between owner and land, winemaker and vine. Marked Tree seems to respect that symbiosis, creating wine that has meaningful stories to tell. From the way harvests offered hope during a pandemic year to the ghost house whose chimney still stands by the tasting room, the stories told by this fledgling winery feel as old as time. —LAUREN MAXWELL Marked Tree Vineyard, 623 Deep Gap Rd, Flat Rock, North Carolina. (828) 513-3773, markedtreevineyard.com


F O R T H E N AT U R E L OV E R

Owners Tim Parks and Lance Hiatt named Marked Tree Vineyard (above) in Flat Rock, North Carolina, as an homage to native and indigenous people who bent young trees toward resources in the forest; these markers would guide others on the path. The vineyard produces terroir-driven varietals such as grüner veltliner (opposite top), petit verdot, cabernet franc, and vidal blanc, and has a tasting room (above right) at the vineyard as well as in Asheville.

Overmountain Vineyards Asheville

When Sofia Lilly confesses that her first crush was at ten years old, she isn’t talking about a childhood sweetheart. She’s inviting you

Biltmore Winery

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Marked Tree Vineyard

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Overmountain Vineyards

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Tryon Landrum 26 11

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into the pivotal moment she fell in love with winemaking. “We had a little basket press that I was obsessed with. It’s a lot smaller than what you’d find in bigger wineries, and takes a lot more time to work with, but we made a good amount of wine with it for several years,” Sofia says. Now the head winemaker at Overmountain Vineyards, she reflects back on those early days of making wine with her father on the porch in flip-flops. “My dad has been making wine since I was a child. We’d go down to the basement and there would be tables full of glass carboys with bubbling airlocks, and the whole room smelled like fermenting grapes and yeast.” Sofia and her father, Frank Lilly, have been crafting distinctive, fresh, French-inspired wines ever since. “I grew up with an inherent love of winemaking, because it was being done in my home,” she says. They planted their first vines in 1999, officially elevating their family homestead (and hobby) to commercial vineyard status.

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“We created Overmountain from the ground up. We built our home on the farm, and planted the vines all around us. I spent my childhood picking up stones and planting vines. My hands have bled all over this farm.”—Sofia Lilly, Overmountain Vineyards

When you first round the hill of fig trees, beestudded flowers, and blueberries to see the sweeping mountain views that frame Overmountain Vineyards and the upscale tasting room, it’s hard to imagine the property’s humble origins—but that’s what Sofia loves most. “We created Overmountain from the ground up. We built our home on the farm, and planted the vines all around us. I spent my childhood picking up stones and planting vines. My hands have bled all over this farm. After college, that’s what called me back to winemaking. I feel very tied to this land.” That connection is evident in Sofia’s commitment to natural winemaking. “We focus on manipulating our wines as little as possible. We don’t use a recipe—we let the vintages dictate how the wine will be. We’re not running our wines through filters that strip it of aromas and flavor profiles,” she says. In fact, 30 years later, how the family makes wine isn’t much different from her childhood: “We only add yeast and grapes, and we hand-bottle and label all of our products.”

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he result? A pared-down portfolio of approachable and aromatic, fresh and fruitforward wines that are light on the palate. “We specialize in stainless-steel fermented white wines and balanced red blends. We don’t produce big, heavy-alcohol wines. We’re going for balance,” Sofia adds. Balance is at the heart of all Overmountain Vineyards does, it seems. “We use sustainable agriculture techniques, and we’re an ASAP-certified farm [the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project]. We try to do as much as we can to give everything back.” When the team drops fruit to thin the vines, those grapes are either fed to the chickens for manure or composted. “Eventually, we’re hoping to get into distilling spirits [to make brandy] in which case, all the excess fruit would go toward that,” Sofia says. Years ago, many wouldn’t have thought of women being in the forefront of the wine industry, but that’s changing. “There are so many women winemakers now, and they are a force making their stamp on our industry,” Lilly says, mentioning role models that paved the way: Helen Turley, Heidi Barrett, Merry Edwards. “They have changed the industry for the better.” Despite her role as head winemaker—and her celebrated wines—Sofia still calls herself a farmer first and foremost. “At the end of day, winemaking starts in the vineyard. If we make sure the grapes on the vines are perfect, then winemaking is easy. That’s the key: to be in your vineyard every single day, watching those grapes, knowing the soil and seasons.” —J. MORGAN McCALLUM Overmountain Vineyards, 2012 Sandy Plains Rd #8799, Tryon, North Carolina. overmountainvineyards.com

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F O R T H E C U LT U R E M AV E N

Eagle Mountain Vineyards & Winery

Of all the wineries in Upstate South Carolina and Western North Carolina, there’s one thing that the new Eagle Mountain Winery has that no one else does. That something is winemaker George

(clockwise from opposite left) Rows of young vines at Marked Tree Vineyard; Sofia Lilly carries on the winemaking traditions of her father, Frank Lilly, at Overmountain Vineyards, producing French-style wines including petit manseng, cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, and petit verdot; Eagle Mountain Vineyards & Winery in Travelers Rest is set to open on June 20 with wines by heralded winemaker George Bursick.

Sofia Lilly makes a point to encourage reservations. “When you come to see us, we really want to spend time with our guests—to demystify the winemaking process and help you to learn, feel at ease, and really enjoy the entire experience. The reservation system allows us to take care of guests in the absolute best way possible.” Call (828) 863-0523 to make a reservation.

Bursick. Eagle Mountain’s director of winemaking, who hails from Sonoma County, California, is a master of his trade. One of the country’s most highly acclaimed winemakers, Bursick spent 20 years heading the wine program at Ferrari-Carano in Healdsburg, during which time he oversaw the expansion of their production from 5,000 to 500,000 cases a year and reaped myriad accolades for his wines. “The South has never had a winemaker with the experience and accomplishments of George Bursick,” crows Eagle Mountain’s president, Russ Gardiner. “He will instantly raise the bar for premium and ultrapremium wines being produced in the South.” You can taste six of those wines beginning on June 20, the day of Eagle Mountain’s grand opening. Though the 54-acre site now includes plantings of mildewresistant cabernet sauvignon, merlot, and malbec, those vines will not bear sufficient fruit for several years. In the interim, Bursick will make wines in California to serve at Eagle Mountain. To start, he will offer three whites (an Alexander Valley chardonnay, and a pinot gris and sauvignon blanc, both from Napa Valley) and three reds (a Napa cabernet sauvignon, a zinfandel from Lodi, and a Sonoma Coast pinot noir). Whether making wine with grapes from California or Travelers Rest, Bursick concentrates on body. “Everything we’ll be offering will be sexy, thick, voluptuous, mouthwatering,” he says. “I only produce the highest quality [wines]. That’s been my dream, my avocation, my life, my career—and my pressure.”

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rt is the fourth element of the Eagle Mountain experience. Paintings by James Armstrong decorate the walls of the tasting room, while sculptures by the likes of area artists Bob Doster and Tim Chorbadjian edge a walking trail alongside a tranquil stream. It’s all part of the winery’s


PAUL MEHAFFEY

CARTER TIPPINS

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Eagle Mountain Vineyards and Winery, 2330 Hwy 11, Travelers Rest. (864) 747-0336, eaglemountainwinery.com; beginning June 20, open daily, noon–6pm

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Beyond the Bottle

sylvan sculpture garden, which will eventually display 75 works, from artists near and far. At the grand opening, singer/songwriter Karl Lauber will perform on the patio, wine will flow, food trucks will be on-site, and charcuterie will be available for sale— presented in COVID-sensitive sealed boxes. Summer weekends will blend in ongoing events, such as Music on the Mountain every Saturday and Sunday afternoon, yoga by a waterfall on weekend mornings, and wine and cheese tastings led by Christian Hansen of Blue Ridge Creamery beginning at 4pm on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Sunday. Next year, when the winery’s outdoor amphitheater is completed, Gardiner hopes to bring in some big names for alfresco concerts. So, who knows, you just might catch George Bursick—who’s been playing drums since he was eight years old—realizing his wish to back up Edwin McCain.— M. LINDA LEE

NEAR MARKED TREE

NEAR OVERMOUNTAIN

Start your excursion with lunch at Flat Rock Village Bakery, where the potato pizza and Caesar salad should not be missed. To stretch your legs, stop for a stroll at the Carl Sandburg Home, a national historic site where trails and pastures of goats await. When it’s time to move on, continue to Hendersonville, where you might stop and see the dahlias at Bullington Gardens, a public botanical wonderland spanning 12 acres. To complete your day, enjoy a refined but laid-back dinner at Postero, a downtown Hendersonville favorite.

The foothills surrounding Overmountain are rich with farmto-table restaurants and outdoor excursions. Take in Big Bradley Falls, Little Bradley Falls, and Pearson’s Falls, or trek the trails at one of the many nearby conservations and nature preserves. Go fly-fishing or birdwatching near the stunning Lake Lure Flowering Bridge. Don’t miss the Tryon International Equestrian Center, home to world-class events, restaurants, and shops; and visit one of Sofia’s favorite farm-to-table restaurants, like The Rural Seed, or a famous local pizzeria, like Brick or Side Street.


THE BILTMORE COMPANY

FOR THE HISTORY BUFF

Biltmore Estate Winery

Don’t we all adore spring—the warm sunshine, the bright blooms, the trees bursting into emerald leaf? At Biltmore Estate, winemaker

Biltmore Winery carries on a longstanding tradition of production and preservation, which George Vanderbilt instilled while building his majestic estate. The winery released a new white this spring called Révant, an offdry white celebrating the land of the estate grounds.

NEAR EAGLE MOUNTAIN

NEAR BILTMORE

A favorite local hiking spot, the 3,000-acre Table Rock State Park boasts 12 miles of hiking trails just off Highway 11 (22 miles west of Eagle Mountain). Challenge yourself to the 3.6-mile uphill trek to the 3,124-foot summit of Table Rock, where you’ll be rewarded with a dazzling view over the Blue Ridge foothills. Two miles east of Table Rock State Park on Highway 11, Aunt Sue’s Country Corner dishes up down-home Southern cooking. Drop by for the Sunday Country Lunch to fortify yourself before winetasting at Eagle Mountain. Before you leave, browse the General Store and treat yourself to a cone at Aunt Sue’s Ice Cream House.

Clustered around the 1905 All Souls Cathedral, across from the entrance to Biltmore Estate, is a warren of little streets lined with shops and restaurants. Among the more unique shops, don’t miss the New Morning Gallery for bespoke local artwork and crafts, The Gardener’s Cottage for gardenthemed gifts and decorative items, and the luxury linens at Porter & Prince. When it’s time for lunch, look to The Corner Kitchen for a bowl of creamy corn and crab chowder or a lavendermarinated chicken breast atop a bed of greens.

Sharon Fenchak daydreams of spring too, but her musings turn toward a wine to usher in the season. Every year, Fenchak crafts a special blend for spring, and this year her efforts resulted in Révant, a crisp, versatile, off-dry white (a marriage of chardonnay, viognier, pinot grigio, riesling, semillon, and sauvignon blanc), whose name just happens to mean “daydreaming” in French. “Révant is a blend of aromatic whites with just a touch of sweetness,” Fenchak says. “On the nose and palate are orange blossom and citrus with hints of peach, apricot, and a touch of honey.” Even the label is captivating, with its enhanced photograph of an ornate detail from one of the hand-carved stone friezes on the façade of Biltmore House. Opened in 1985 and now located in the Antler Hill Village section of the 8,000-acre estate, Biltmore Winery produces 150,000 cases a year. Six different tiers of wines flow from the American Series, made in North Carolina from grapes sourced in California and Washington State, and the high-end Antler Hill Collection boasts several national award-winners. In-between, the Biltmore Reserve wines are all made with grapes from vineyards in North Carolina, including those grown on the estate. The winery’s flagship, Biltmore Reserve Chardonnay, falls in this category.

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n keeping with estate founder George Vanderbilt’s commitment to preservation and stewardship of the land, the winery staff is constantly searching for new ways to practice sustainability. Rows of grass between the vines prevent eroding soil from reaching local waterways. Water from nearby Long Valley Lake is used to irrigate the vineyards, and a bank of 7,000 solar panels not far from the winery generate energy for the estate. Crushed grape stems and skins are not wasted; they are used for mulch and compost on the grounds. Spent wine barrels become planters, and corks are recycled in partnership with Cork ReHarvest, part of the nonprofit Cork Forest Conservation Alliance. Designed to be enjoyed across the seasons, Révant appeals to many different palates. Try the straw-colored charmer with sushi, fish tacos, lox and bagels, or a simple round of Brie. “This wine is nicely balanced with acidity and sweetness, so it pairs beautifully with a wide range of dishes and occasions,” says Fenchak. “It’s perfect to serve at or take to your summer outdoor gatherings, but it’s also a nice choice to enjoy any time of year.”—M. LINDA LEE Biltmore Winery, 1 Lodge St, Asheville, North Carolina. Open daily, 11am–7pm. Access to winery and tasting are free with Biltmore Estate admission, which starts at $64. (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

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Good food. Good music. Good people giving back. For you. For our community. For euphoria. TICKETS ON SALE NOW // SEPTEMBER �����

euphoriagreenville.com


eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Village Kitchen’s Hartness Farm Salad highlights seasonal ingredients grown on-site, like this summer sampler with microgreens, cherry tomato, and radish.

At residential community Hartness, VILLAGE KITCHEN focuses on fresh fare.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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E D • CITY DISH

IT TAKES A VILLAGE FIND COMMUNIT Y A ND LOCA LLY SOURCED FA RE AT THE NEW V ILL AGE K ITCHEN AT HA RTNESS by M. Linda Lee • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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he planned community of Hartness on Greenville’s eastside recently got a new addition, and it’s a tasty one. Located just inside the entrance to the 444-acre development, the Village Kitchen holds sway in the retail complex that serves as the community’s hub. A hub is exactly what the restaurant is—a chic, urban space with communal tables and counter service, where executive chef Tanner Marino delights diners with his all-day menu. It’s a fast-casual spot where you can grab a muffin or pastry on your way to work, huddle over your laptop while you nosh on a buffalo chicken sandwich for lunch, or come back with the family in the evening to dig into flatbreads and small plates fired in the restaurant’s centerpiece pizza oven. Dishes play on the chef’s Southern heritage, while adding multicultural

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accents (Italian, Asian, Latin). Much of the produce on the menu comes from the sustainable on-site farm that is the result of a partnership between Hartness and Mill Village Farms (check out the public farmers market on June 18, at 5:30 p.m.). As the community’s heart in the Village Center, the restaurant weaves the Hartness family’s history into its space via a mural of patriarch Tom Hartness, who purchased the Pepsi Bottling rights in Greenville in 1940 and made his fortune developing packaging solutions for soft-drink companies. His collection of vintage soda bottles, dating from 1938 to 1982, fills the shelves above the counter. Village Kitchen holds about 100 seats, divided between indoors and outdoors. As the square footage is too small to accommodate a full bar, the restaurant will be launching a canned-cocktail program. “This space is not built to do a lot of things from scratch,” shares Marino. “So for now, we’re thoughtfully sourcing great ingredients and putting our own spin on them.” Though he was born in Michigan, Marino spent most of his life in the South. He earned his cooking chops in downtown Greenville at Devereaux’s with his mentors


At the new Village Kitchen at Hartness, Chef Tanner Marino (opposite) crafts Southern-inspired dishes with multicultural twists. The restaurant’s communal tables and counter service offer an open, casual vibe, perfect for family dinners or a quick lunch meeting.

Steven Greene and Spencer Thomson. After starting out as a pastry assistant, Marino worked his way up, over six years, to chef de cuisine. “That was my culinary school— on-the-job training,” he says. He was living with his wife and two small children in Chattanooga and working as the executive chef at the Westin when he heard about the opportunity in Greenville. “I wanted to come back for something special,” the chef explains, referring to the fact that he’ll be managing Village Kitchen as well as the catering and the future fine-dining restaurant at the boutique hotel currently under construction at Hartness. “I think this [is] an amazing opportunity. Just like everything with this property, the possibilities are endless.” Village Kitchen, 2000 Society St, Ste 100, Greenville. Open Tues–Fri, 7am–8pm; Sat, 8am–9pm; Sun, 10am–2:30pm. Closed Mon. (864) 686-7900, villagekitchenhartness.com

in the Kitchen A FEW OF CHEF TANNER MARINO’S STANDOUT DISHES:

Avocado Toast

A breakfast of champions, ninegrain bread is slathered with avocado spread, Roma tomatoes and scallions, and sprinkled with Red Clay Everything Spice.

Chicken & Waffles

Chef Tanner interprets this Southern classic with a cornmeal waffle, Red Clay Hot Honey, and a garnish of pickled okra and peppadew peppers.

Fig & Pig Flatbread

One of the chef’s favorites, this flatbread is layered with goat cheese, prosciutto, and Brown Turkey figs, and topped with arugula dressed in a red-wine reduction.

Hartness Farm Salad

The seasonally changing signature salad draws from fresh herbs and vegetables grown at the on-site farm.

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E D • YES, CHEF Son of Greenville educator Pearlie Harris, Chef Anthony brings his globe-trotting culinary career to the Upstate as the new executive chef at Holly Tree Country Club.

“You learn life all over. And about the stuff you take for granted, like how heavy your legs are. I got through it. I did not want to go through it,” the 59-year-old says. It also set him on a globe-trotting career trajectory that would take him to some of the highest-rated hotel and resort kitchens in the world, until 2020, when he found his way home.

When did you start cooking? I started working at a Kentucky Fried Chicken in high school. After that, I swore I would never work in a restaurant again. But, I needed money in college. I got a gig at this hotel in Dallas as a dishwasher. A couple weeks in, chef says, “This ain’t working out. Get yourself a jacket or get out.” So I got myself a jacket and learned how to make some salads. I started to up my game. I went from salads to sauté to grill to line supervisor. I worked there through college. When I tried to put in my two-weeks notice, they came out with a big check and sent me to culinary school. How much of an influence was your mother on your career? My mom is a great cook. But she doesn’t measure anything. I was always watching her. One day I was home and told her, “I’m trying to figure out that cornbread recipe,” and she said, “Come on up. I’m about to make some.” Her way of measuring was “just put it in your hand like this.” Don’t even ask how much and why. She doesn’t even know. Where has your culinary career taken you? As I say, “Have knives, will travel.” So let’s see, Texas, California, New York, Alaska, Wisconsin, Washington State, Oregon, Atlanta, North Carolina, Hong Kong, Dubai, Japan, the Philippines, Poland, and Rome.

What brought you back to Greenville? While I was working as

HOMEWARD ANGEL CHEF ANTHONY HARRIS, SON OF ICONIC TEACHER PEARLIE HARRIS, RETURNS TO HIS ROOTS by Ariel Turner • photograph by Paul mehaffey

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t took 40 years and a pandemic to bring Anthony Harris, now executive chef at Holly Tree Country Club, back to Greenville. Son of Pearlie Harris, the educator whose image is the main subject of an 18,900-square-foot mural on Greenville’s Canvas Tower, Anthony Harris left his hometown in 1980 in pursuit of a musical career. With a college degree in hand, he became a successful studio and touring musician, until a succession of health tragedies left him paralyzed and in a wheelchair while still in his twenties. Through months of rehabilitation, he regained the ability to walk.

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executive chef at The Club at 12 Oaks in Raleigh, COVID hit last March. As one of the highest-paid employees, I got furloughed. I started throwing out resumes but knew nobody was hiring. My best friend from Mauldin High School, Bobby Graydon, called me and said, “Look, we need you here. Your ma is in her 80s. It takes you five hours to get here. You could be only 20 minutes away.” So, two or three days later, I came down and talked to a board member and the GM. They called me the next day and offered me the job. I’ve learned here I’m not limited in what I can do, but I have to play to the audience.

What’s your favorite ingredient to cook with and why? Goat cheese or carrots. I did an Iron Chef when I was in New York that never aired, and the secret ingredient was carrots. There’s so much you can do with them. They can be sweet, savory, dessert, soup, salad, anything. And goat cheese, I just like it. FOR MORE interviews: TOWNCAROLINA.COM


TRANSFORMING A HOME INTO THE...

EXPLORE

Nature AND History THROUGH THE WORK OF TWO ACCLAIMED SOUTHERN ARTISTS

BILL JAMESON

"Anne and Brian Marchant have provided expert advice and guidance when helping me buy and sell nearly ten properties throughout the years. Their professionalism and experience have enabled Muncaster Financial Group’s expansion into our new office, allowing us to turn a historical home into a comfortable and inviting office environment for us to welcome our clients.” - RICHARD MUNCASTER,

Celebrating 30 years painting the landscape of Jones Gap State Park

RANDY AKERS

MUNCASTER FINANCIAL GROUP

Fading places that represent conflict and times of struggle

MAIN GALLERY C-ING YOUR WAY TO EXHIBITIONS BETTER PAINTINGS with Bill Jameson 3-Day Workshop: June 16 - June 18 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Tuesday, July 13 6:00 - 7:00 pm

101 ABNEY ST, GREENVILLE, SC 29611 ARTCENTERGREENVILLE.ORG · 864-735-3948

e

s ori e m ade m

by

m

June 4 - July 28 Opening Reception: First Friday, June 4 1:00 - 9:00 pm

ARTALK

with Bill Jameson and Randy Akers

864-467-0085 | MARCHANTCO.COM | INFO@MARCHANTCO.COM PHOTO CREDIT: CHRISTY HOLLYWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY JU N E 2021 I

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E D • KITCHEN AID

SUMMER SIZZLER SQUASH A ND SHR IMP SHINE IN THIS LIGHT A ND EASY SHEET PA N SUPPER by Kathryn Davé • photography by Jivan Davé

E

ver been handed a bulging plastic grocery bag stuffed with the overflowing bounty of a friend’s garden? It was probably full of squash and zucchini. There’s no denying that these are plentiful summer crops, especially in the warm South. Still, winter squash seems to get all the love. The problem is not the generous presence of squash in our summer lives, but the absence of the know-how to cook it. The same criticisms people make of the vegetable— watery, bland—are the properties that make zucchini and squash excellent vehicles for flavor, if you know how to treat them. No more half-hearted sautés or church potluckstyle stewing that leaves the squash mushy and meh. Start with varying your technique: try a slow roast, hard sear, or long braise until silky and meltingly tender. Or, you can think of your zucchini like a sponge and anoint the vegetable with oils to give it body, spices or herbs to bring flavor, and various acids to make it sing. This savory shrimp and squash sheet pan dinner was born from the second approach: douse the squash with flavor, pop it into a hot oven for a while, and see what emerges. Cumin and harissa take the starring roles here, bringing earthy heat to summer staples. A generous squeeze of lemon and a hefty handful of mint round out the mix with brightness and freshness. The prep is low-key, as summer meals should be, with most of the cooking time clocking in while the veggies are roasting in the oven—the ideal meal to crack open a beer and a book while you wait. Scoop the finished, flavorful shrimp and veggies into bowls of warm Israeli couscous and prepare to see summer squash with brand-new eyes.

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Stop giving summer squash the plain ol’ salt-and-pepper treatment. Spicy harissa and earthy cumin elevate it to new levels.


SHEET PAN SUMMER SQUASH & SHRIMP Serves 8–10

INGREDIENTS: ²/³ cup plus 4 Tbs. olive oil, divided 4 Tbs. harissa 3 tsp. ground cumin 4 tsp. kosher salt, divided 8 small squash and zucchini (about 3½ lbs.), cut into 1-inch chunks 1½ lbs. extra-large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 tsp. whole cumin seeds Zest from 1 lemon (reserve lemon for squeezing juice) ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper Generous handful of fresh mint leaves, for garnish 2 cups dry Israeli (pearl) couscous 2½ cups water

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 425°F. 2. In a small bowl or glass measuring cup, whisk together ²/³ cup of olive oil with the harissa, ground cumin, and 2 tsp. of salt. Divide the zucchini and squash chunks between two large rimmed sheet pans to ensure room for even roasting and then pour the harissa mixture over the vegetables, dividing between the two pans and tossing to coat evenly. Roast, tossing occasionally, until the squash is lightly browned and tender, about 25 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, pat the shrimp dry with paper towels. In a large bowl, whisk together 3 Tbs. olive oil, 1 tsp. cumin seeds, zest from 1 lemon, ½ tsp. pepper, and 1 tsp. salt. Add the shrimp and toss to coat. 4. Push the squash toward the edges of the pans, making room in the middle to divide the shrimp between the sheet pans. Arrange in a single layer and roast altogether until the shrimp are just opaque and the veggies are golden and tender, about 7 to 10 minutes. If your squash needs more cooking time, be sure to remove the shrimp before finishing the squash. 5. In a medium saucepan, heat the last 1 Tbs. of olive oil over medium heat. Add the 2 cups of dry couscous and stir, toasting it for about 2 minutes. Pour in 2½ cups of water, add 1 tsp. salt, and bring to a strong simmer. Lower the heat to medium-low and put the lid on, stirring occasionally, while the couscous continues to cook, about 10 to 12 minutes more. The couscous is ready when the water is absorbed and the couscous is tender, but al dente. Leave the lid on until ready to serve, then fluff couscous with a fork.

The prep is low-key, as summer meals should be—the ideal meal to crack open a beer and a book while you wait.

6. To serve, combine the shrimp and squash on a serving platter, tasting the vegetables first to see if they need any more salt. Finish with generous squeezes of lemon juice and a scattering of fresh mint. Spoon over warm couscous on individual bowls or plates. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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MAIN STREET STATUES

. Explore 864 is here SCULPTED HISTORY

Greenville’s impressive collection of public art includes statues memorializing some of the city’s most famous citizens — and one wild boar. Stroll down Main Street to view: MAX HELLER

by Tom Durham NOMA Flats Plaza, across from Hyatt Regency Greenville

Commemorating the former Greenville mayor, who served from 1971-79, for his many accomplishments, including the initiation of Main Street’s revitalization. SHOELESS JOE JACKSON

by Doug Young Main and Markley, at the entrance to Fluor Field

Commemorating the famed White Sox player with his bat, Black Betsy. VARDRY MCBEE

by T.J. Dixon Main and Court streets, across from the Westin Poinsett Hotel

Paying tribute to the “Father of Greenville,” whose legacy includes gifting the city with land for its first churches and schools. JOEL POINSETT

by Zan Wells Main and Court streets, in front of M. Judson Booksellers

A CURATED GUIDE TO GREENVILLE & BEYOND

Honoring the South Carolina statesman and amateur botanist who brought the first poinsettia flower to the U.S. from Mexico; located next to the Westin Poinsett Hotel, which shares his name. DICK RILEY

by Zan Wells Main and Broad streets, in the Peace Center Plaza

Memorializing the former South Carolina governor and U.S. secretary of education by depicting him reading to two children. STERLING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

*Present ad to take advantage of these by Mariah Kirby-Smith other offers. streets Loans between $5,000 West cornerwith of Main and Washington

special offers. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined and $9,999 will receive $50 cash back. Offers expire June 30, 2022.

Honoring students from the first Black public high school in Greenville; located in front of the former Woolworth Building, where Sterling high schoolers held sit-ins during the civil rights movement. CHARLES TOWNES

by Zan Wells Main Street and Falls Park Drive, across from the entrance to Falls Park

  

  

  

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Celebrating the noted Furman University graduate, who invented the maser and the laser, and won a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1964.

It’s our guide to Greenville and beyond, filled with the best things to do, see, eat, and explore all around the Upstate. Whether you’re a newcomer or a native, we hope Explore 864 will inspire you to support local businesses and explore our area.

IL PORCELLINO

In front of TD Bank Building

A fanciful bronze replica of the original Il Porcellino (“piglet” in Italian) cast in Italy in 1634 by Baroque master Pietro Tacca.

DOWNTOWN 520 W. Washington St.

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Explore 864 2021.indd 1

HEALTHY EATS FARM FRESH FAST

860 S. Church St., Greenville EatFarmFreshFast.com

The South’s first farm-fresh, fast-food restaurant, with a menu centered on local produce and hormone-free proteins. Pro tip: they deliver readymade meals, too! JASMINE KITCHEN

503 Augusta St., Greenville JasmineKitchen.org

A social enterprise lunch café. The scratch-made menu sources local items (including cheddar cheese yeast rolls made by partner Project Host) and offers many vegetarian, gluten-free and Keto options. This good food supports the good work of local nonprofit Jasmine Road. KUKA JUICE

580 Perry Ave., Greenville KukaJuice.com

The first cold-pressed juicery in the Upstate, with a mission to promote health and wellness to all. Also serving paninis, bowls, soups, toasts and smoothies. LEAN KITCHEN

5018 Old Spartanburg Road, Taylors 2017-B Augusta St., Greenville LeanKitchenCo.com

Order your copies of Explore 864 for $10.99 each by scanning the QR code or visiting CommunityJournals.com/Explore864.

Local franchise providing fresh-cooked meals to help people get healthy. Everything is made from scratch without frozen ingredients or added preservatives. SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY 2 W. Washington St., Greenville SouthernPressedJuicery.com

A haven for the health-conscious, with organic, power-packed smoothies, energy bowls and juices. SUN BELLY CAFÉ

1409 W. Blue Ridge Drive @SunBellyCafe

A Westside café turning fresh, wholesome ingredients into creative dishes. The plant-based menu changes with the seasons.

KNOW SECRET What’s in a name? While it’s called Bacon Bros. Public House, this innovative farm-totable gastropub will happily accommodate the vegetarian at your table. Just ask! 3620 Pelham Road | BaconBrosPublicHouse.com SUN BELLY CAFÉ

DWELL

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calling Greenville

HOME

The City of Greenville offers a diverse array of housing options, from single-family homes in traditional neighborhoods to urban lofts, apartments and condos. Beyond downtown Greenville, real estate is colloquially divided into communities like West Greenville, the Eastside, Blue Ridge, San Souci, Five Forks and the Golden Strip. Greenville County’s small, vibrant cities and towns include Greer, Taylors, Travelers Rest, Tigerville, Mauldin, Simpsonville and Fountain Inn.

Augusta Road Area

POPULAR GREENVILLE NEIGHBORHOODS: • Alta Vista • Augusta Road • Cleveland Forest • Gower Estates

• Montebello • North Main • Parkins Mill • Stone Lake Simpsonville

GREENVILLE HISTORIC DISTRICTS: • Earle Street • East Park • Hampton-Pinckney • Heritage

• Overbrook • Pettigru • West End

NEW URBAN DEVELOPMENTS: • Hartness • Hollingsworth Park at Verdae

LUXURY CONDOS/APARTMENTS DOWNTOWN INCLUDE: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Hartness

Downtown Greenville

GREENVILLE REAL ESTATE BY THE NUMBERS • 22 Neighborhoods in the City of Greenville

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• $254K Median Listing Home Price

ACCOLADES People love living in Greenville. The city has been recognized among the Top 10 Best Places to Live, per Livability.com and Men’s Journal; 10 Cities to Watch in 2020, per Worth.com; Best Places to Live, Live per Money Magazine; Best Places to Retire, per AARP; and Top 4 Best Places to Raise a Family, per MarketWatch.

  

• $123 Median Listing Home Price Per Square Foot • $247K Median Sold Home Price • 98.88% Sale-to-List Price Ratio • 70 median days on market Source: Realtor.com, February 2021

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DOWNTOWN ANDERSON

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98 E. McBee (indoor bike garage) 100 East (rooftop pool) 400 Rhett (saltwater pool and putting green) The Bookends (just steps from Main Street) The Davenport (historic property) District West (on the banks of the Reedy River) Ellison on Broad (rooftop lounge and a fenced-in dog park) The Field House (over Liberty Taproom) The Link Westend (open-air kitchen) Main & Stone (above Two Chefs) McBee Station (location, location, location) Ridgeland at the Park (hillside views of Cleveland Park) Rivers Edge (multiple shared Big Green Egg grills) South Ridge (above Biscuit Head)

THE ELECTRIC CITY

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Theatre Company are your ticket to live theater. Tour Bay 3 Artisan Gallery at the Anderson Arts Center or stroll through the Wren Pavilion Art Gallery to see the talent of local visual artists. GAMAC — the Greater Anderson Musical Arts Consortium — presents an annual Masterworks Series and performances by the GAMAC Orchestra, Chorale and Children’s Chamber Orchestra Chorus as well as the Anderson Symphony Orchestra and Electric City Big Band. Suds are definitely up downtown. Carolina Bauernhaus is a farmhouse brewery and winery that serves handcrafted ales, ciders and meads made with locally sourced ingredients — be sure to order a charcuterie board, too. Electric City Brewing Co. specializes in small-batch beer as well as house-roasted coffee. Find unique crafts on tap at Brews On Main. Drink to Southern hospitality — plus hand-cut fries — at Anderson’s oldest downtown pub, The Local Uptown. Uptown Enjoy authentic Celtic favorites at

McGee’s Irish Pub, where farm-to-table specials are sourced from the owner’s own family farm. Doolittle’s is popular for dinner, drinks and blue-plate lunch specials. SummaJoe’s is all about fresh, seasonal ingredients. Indulge in fine dining in a historic setting at Sullivan’s Metropolitan Grill. Earle Street Kitchen and Bar puts a Southern twist on creative dishes — don’t miss the chicken-fried chicken. CocoBon Chocolatier specializes in handmade confections; other sweet spots include Figs Café & Farmacy and eCity Java. Shopping local is a delight in downtown Anderson. The Kitchen Emporium & Gifts offers a smorgasbord of kitchen supplies and gourmet items. Spoil your best friend with something from Bark International and find cute clothes at Simply Country Chic, Plum Suede Boutique, Collectique and Blake & Brady. And remember, all purchases at Remnants Antiques support Shalom House Ministries. 864

© JAMES SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY

he revitalization of downtown Anderson is generating plenty of buzz. The Electric City pays homage to its past while sparking progress with a dynamic mix of local restaurants, retailers and venues within the city center. Generator Park celebrates William C. Whitner, whose ingenuity led to Anderson’s distinction as the first city in the United States to enjoy a continuous supply of electricity. A bronze sculpture of Whitner’s likeness is among an abundance of public art throughout downtown. Check out Anderson Arts Center’s SculpTOUR collection and explore the city via an installation of bronze birds titled Carolina Wrens: A Bird’s Eye View of Downtown Anderson. Go out(side) for entertainment at Carolina Wren Park, which hosts everything from local music to Shakespeare in the Park; there’s a splash pad for kids here, too. Electric City Playhouse and The Market

DRIVE

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[ TABLE ROCK STATE PARK ]

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A day at Table Rock State Park starts at the Visitors Center on the south side of State 11. Here, on the banks of 67-acre Lake Oolenoy — which is stocked with bass, bream, and catfish — staff can answer any questions you have about the park. The main part of the park, including all the trailheads, lies directly across State 11. Some 12 miles of trails lace these state lands, ranging from an easy 1.9-mile loop around Pinnacle Lake to the challenging 3.6-mile (one way) trek to the top of the granite mass of Table Rock. When you reach the 3,124-foot summit of Table Rock — a hike that takes about two and a half hours — and look down across the breathtaking patchwork of land below, you’ll understand why the Cherokee called this place “Sah-ka-na-ga,” meaning “the Great Hills of God.” If you’ve got the family in tow, check out the seasonal swimming hole at Lake Pinnacle, where you can relax on the small strip of sand while the kids splash in the water. Or rent a pedal boat and take a turn around the lake. Pack a picnic to enjoy at the shelter here before you hit the trails. Just across the road is the head of the Foothills Trail, which stretches 77 miles down to Oconee State Park (be sure to register at the trailhead kiosk). Exploring Table Rock State Park is a day well-spent, but if you want to stay longer, lodgings include tent and RV campsites as well as 14 renovated cabins. Table Rock State Park is located 158 Ellison Lane in Pickens. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaParks. com/Table-Rock. 864 138 / EXPLORING864.COM

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W H E R E TO E AT

N E A R BY

VICTORIA VALLEY VINEYARDS

PUMPKINTOWN GENERAL STORE & CAFÉ

LONG SHOALS WAYSIDE PARK

1360 S. Saluda Road Cleveland VictoriaValleyVineyards.com

3837 Pumpkintown Highway, Pickens @PumpkintownGeneralStore

Scenic Highway 11, Pickens Co.Pickens.sc.us

In season, enjoy a panini or a salad on the terrace overlooking the vines at this 47-acre winery off State 11.

Historic store-turned-café, serving a hearty breakfast complete with country ham, old-fashioned grits and giant pancakes. Lunch centers around what might be the best burger in the 864.

A frolicking little roadside park along Little Eastatoe Creek. Find it just off the highway between Table Rock and Keowee-Toxaway state parks, and enjoy the natural wading pool and rock waterslide – bring a tube to go faster!

COUNTY SQUARE SCTAC Suite 2100 240 Terminal R


Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program is updated regularly, and now The Anchorage is offering a weekly online market featuring pantry items, take-home dinners, and more. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR.

Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass.

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun &

Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D,

SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com

N E W CAMP Tucked into one of the “jewel box” spaces on Camperdown Plaza, CAMP is the newest venture from the Table 301 group. The menu, designed by executive chef Drew Erickson, sparkles with regional American small plates—Wagyu beef corndog, Yucatán-style pork tostadas, stuffed calamari—reimagined with twists inspired by the four years Erickson spent working with über-chef Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in California.

$$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 E Broad St, Greenville. (864) 514-2267, campgvl.com

Closed Tues. 1629 E North St. (864) 6094249, forkandplough.com

$-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com NEW

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque This West End staple returns with a refreshed menu focused on all things meat. Continuing in their sustainable partnerships and quality craft, pitmaster David Jensen throws out ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and more, plus a host of scrumptious sides. Expect a heavy tribute to bourbon and whiskeys at the bar, and don’t worry, you can still order a side of those famous pork rinds. $-$$. L, D, SBR.

722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskbbq.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then select an entrée from

the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily),

SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings, an ode to nature’s bounty. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–

Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

N E W Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Newly opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flat-iron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D.

$-$$. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 283-0940, reids.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D, FSBR. Closed Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-

seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

13 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all—whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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DON’T MISS OUR SUMMER 2021 OUTLET POP UP SHOP AT

LAKE KEOWEE THROUGH AUGUST 21 WED-SAT, 11AM-6PM

203 E MAIN ST, SENECA, SC 29678

(near Ram Cat Alley)

BARS & BREWERIES Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with bar bites. Try the Damn Good Burger featuring double beef patties, American cheese, onion rings, and Mars mayo on house-made brioche, served with a spicy pickle spear. Mixologists Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$. L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

N E W EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson

St. exilegvl.com

Splash on Main

807 S Main St Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 534-1510 www.SplashonMain.com 90

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Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,

complete with a gin trolley for tableside pours. $$-$$$. D. Closed Sun. 315 S Main St. junipergvl.com

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

N E W Servus Biergarten Housed in a former feed and seed in downtown Simpsonville, Servus Biergarten adds an international accent to the new Warehouse at Vaughns, a smorgasbord of family-friendly eateries with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating. From doppelbock to dunkel, German beers flow freely here, so stake out a seat at the bar to discover your new favorite. Of course, you’ll want to pair it with menu items such as bretzels, wurst platters, and more authentic Saxon fare. $. L, D. Closed Mon.

109 W Trade St, Simpsonville. (864) 7571660, servusgreenville.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

N E W Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, familyowned wineries that focus on sustainability.

fireforge.beer

Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

N E W Juniper Hop on the outdoor elevator at Camperdown Plaza to reach Juniper, the rooftop lounge atop the new AC Hotel. Expansive views abound, whether you’re sipping cocktails on the “lawn” at the Secret Garden, sharing modern American dishes in the plant-bedecked Greenhouse, or noshing on stone-fired pizza at Fire Box. True to its name, Juniper rolls out a bar program highlighting gin-based libations—

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you. 1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com


CAFÉS

Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community.

Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info N E W Dobrá Tea Tea is the new coffee at this cheery café in the Village of West Greenville, where you can choose among more than 100 different types of tea from around the globe. Pair your favorite cup with a gluten-free, vegan or vegetarian snack from the list of sweets and savories. $-$$. B, L, D. 1278 Pendleton

St. (864) 520-1832, dobrateasc.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the Taco ’Bout It bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207

$-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

N E W Parsley & Mint Mediterranean favorites like savory hummus and crispy falafel feature prominently at this brand-new eatery, while tangy tzatziki pairs perfectly with mouthwatering citrus chicken and tender lamb kofta. Homemade dressings elevate herbed flavor profiles to new heights. Bonus: the Main Street eatery features a floor-to-ceiling plant wall, making it the perfect spot for lunch and a selfie. $, L,

D. 600 S Main St. Unit 101. (864) 412-8199, parsleyandmint.com N E W The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, it’s delectable to any type of eater.

$, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 2367467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$,

NOW OPEN VILLAGE KITCHEN Greenville’s newest elevated fast-casual dining location— A delectable twist to classic southern cuisine.

Located at The Village Center within the Hartness community on South Highway 14.

B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The

2000 SOCIETY STREET, SUITE 100, GREENVILLE, SC 29615 @VILLAGEKITCHENHARTNESS • VILLAGEKITCHENHARTNESS.COM

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COAST APPAREL FOCUS: Apparel & Accessories A D D R E S S : 324 S. Main St., Greenville E S T. : 2 0 0 9

Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L. 1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC

Coast Apparel collections bring ease, style, charm, and dignity to men’s dressing. We do this by designing capsule collections that: • Care deeply for the details • Are grounded in classics and tethered to color stories • Are sensible for any situation • Are delivered with ease to fine men’s retail, through online experiences, and our own retail stylists. This spring we’ve crafted a line that embraces the seasons’ colors. The line will play perfectly through summer too. The products span from buttery soft slub tees and Pima cotton tees, to a range of fresh woven button downs, new 5 pocket stretch twill pants, jackets, vest, polos, quarter-zips and more. Coast Apparel FA/WI19 collection is available at our own Main St. and Augusta St. locations as well as over 40 preferred shops. To find a location near you go to CoastApparel.com

Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013

P R I C E : Va r i e s b y p r o d u c t

W E B : CoastApparel.com

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Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr.

(864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D.

1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

N E W TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, healthhappy bites, and coffee. $$, L, D. 36A S Main

St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn

St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm.@ sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms. $$-$$$, L (Sat–Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170

River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com


Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

Luna Rosa The streets of Italy intersect the streets of Greenville at Luna Rosa’s fresh spot on South Main, bringing more than just tasty gelato to the table.The Luna Rosa family celebrates the concept that community starts in the kitchen, and they welcome you into theirs for a meal. From cool gelato options—think exotic mango or piña colada—or a warm Monte Cristo. There’s plenty of flavor to fulfill your cravings. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 123 S Main St. (864) 241-4040, lunarosagelato.com N E W Paloma This restaurant on the ground floor of the chic AC Hotel is downtown Greenville’s new hotspot. The wraparound bar takes center stage in the stunning space, where glass walls open onto a small covered patio. Charcuterie, cheese boards, and Spanish-inspired tapas by Chef Fernando Coppola complement house cocktails.

$$-$$$. D. 315 S Main St. (864) 720-2950, palomagvl.com

Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun

& Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com

PIZZA Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage.

$$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is

simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. The shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk

PAID ADVERTORIAL

Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company This pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. $, L, D. 300 River

St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

Willy Taco Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta. Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the mother clucker—topped off with a margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon. 217

D

o you keep seeing ads and wonder what is StretchLab on Augusta Road? You’re not alone, and it’s definitely time tog r e e n v pay them a visit! StretchLab is an assisted

SEE WHAT OUR CLIENTS ARE SAYING: "I feel looser and more mobile during my workouts." - Ross H, 48 "Since I started with StretchLab, my running performance has improved and I recover faster. I can't believe how good I feel." - Knox Y, 15 "I love it at StretchLab! I find it fun and relaxing. It' s never too late to start." - Jan R, 82 “I have suffered from Planter’s Fasciitis for over five years, I finally have relief after regular sessions at StretchLab.” - Thomas C. 50 “I came to StretchLab because of lower back pain that prevented me from playing on the floor with my grandkids, the pain is gone and I can now enjoy life. I will always keep StretchLab in my health routine!” - Peggy G. 74

stretching studio. What do they do? Well, they stretch you! It is no secret that stretching benefits everyone. In this studio, all you have to do is relax and breathe deeply; your trained Flexologist will do the rest. Every day busy people need this service just as much as athletes. Sure, you can stretch yourself at home, but there is no way you can give yourself as deep a stretch as you will receive during each session at Stretch Lab. StretchLab is popular among neighbors of every age and activity level. Assisted stretching has been proven to improve posture, reduce muscle pain and tightness, prevent injury, enhance athletic performance, improve range of motion, promote better sleep and so many other positive qualities to your life! Why are you waiting? Book your half-price session today and see why people love StretchLab on Augusta Road!

Call 864-808-3125 orone-on-one assi visit StretchLab.com • Increase flexibility & ra

• Improve posture & rela • Improve sports perform • Reduce muscle & joint

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

Contact us to book your stretch!Contact Us to Book Yo

AUGUSTA ROAD

1922 Augusta St., Suite 1 1922 Augusta Street | Suite 111 | Greenville Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville@StretchLab.com | 864.808.3125 greenville@stretchlab.co

StretchLab.com

@stretchlabgreen

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Thru Sept 5

SALLEY MAVOR: SOCIAL FABRIC / UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM The Upcountry History Museum has partnered with award-winning fiber artist Salley Mavor on a second exhibition project: Social Fabric. Salley’s rich miniature worlds are bursting with hand-stitched characters, props, and scenery, all crafted with her distinctive blend of materials and personal style. The exhibition offers a three-dimensional look at cultural diversity, migration, and the beauty of humanity—making it a perfect artistic experience for all ages. Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10, children (4–18), $8. (864) 467-3100, info@upcountryhistory.org

Salley Mavor: Social Fabric / Upcountry History Museum | Thru Sept 4

Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Dates & times vary. General admission, $10. (864) 240-4500, greenvilledrive.com

Thru Oct

TD SATURDAY MARKET If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Set your alarm on Saturday mornings and come shop early for a variety of spring greens and lettuces, plus seasonal delights such as fresh strawberries, carrots, turnips, and radishes. Being healthy never tasted so good!

TRUST A WINNING AGENT WHO

THINKS OUTSIDE THE BOX TO GET RESULTS

beth nichols 864.991.9121

Beth@JHA-SothebysRealty.com

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Elevate your grill game with a visit to Revival Butchery. Your neighborhood butcher shop specializing in artisan sausages, prime-cuts, ribs, rubs, and so much more. 1296A Pendleton Street, Greenville, S.C. (912) 777-8000 | RevivalButchery.com

Photograph of Angela Easterling by Stacie Huckeba

Thru Sept 4

GREENVILLE DRIVE After sitting out last season owing to COVID, the Greenville Drive is back and raring to hit one out of the park. Come on out to the ballgame to watch the Drive play at their home field and appreciate all those things you love about baseball in Greenville: hotdogs, beer, the scale model of Fenway Park’s Green Monster. For the time being, socialdistancing policies are in place and masks are required.

Fabric relief, Birds of Beebe Woods by Salley Mavor

JUNE


Commerce Park, 110 Depot St, Fountain Inn. Fri, 7–9:30pm. Free. (864) 724-8044, fountaininn.org/201/Special-Events

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SOUNDS OF SUMMER MUSIC SERIES Fresh air, live music, good company— what better way to spend a summer Friday evening? Grab the family, load up your lawn chairs, and head for Commerce Park to hear some of your favorite bands. The June lineup kicks off with the soulful country sounds of the Jake Bartley Band, so feel free to get up and dance if the spirit moves you. The fun continues every Friday through September 10.

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SIMPSONVILLE SUMMER MUSIC SERIES & FOOD TRUCK RODEO Come for the food trucks and stay for the music at this concert series at

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TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Weds, 6–9pm. $10 each, sold in groups of 4. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc. gov/1814/Greenville-Heritage-Sound-Check

CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Wed, 6–9pm; music starts at 7pm. Free. (864) 838-8051, svillesummerseries.com

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Photograph of Angela Easterling by Stacie Huckeba

GREENVILLE HERITAGE SOUND CHECK Put your hands together for live concerts! Though it was virtual last summer, this series of outdoor concerts will light up the TD Stage behind the Peace Center this year through September. The June lineup runs from the R&B sounds of The Jamie Wright Band to the country stylings of Angela Easterling & the Beguilers. Seating will be in T-Mobile Safe Space Pods of four people each.

Greenville Heritage Sound Check | June 2–30

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Heritage Park. On June 2, it’s now or never to put on your blue suede shoes and get all shook up over the Elvis Tribute band. So bring your blankets and stake out a socially distanced circle on the lawn to get your summer off to a rockin’ good start.

CA

Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Sat, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

BE PART OF

SOMETHING BIGGER, BE THE CHANGE,

#BEJLG

WE ARE friends, professionals, mentors, game changers, mothers, volunteers, leaders, educators, artists, advocates, doctors, nurses, bosses, fundraisers, business owners, planners, and so much more! WE ARE the Junior League of Greenville.

JLGreenville.org/Join Join@JLGreenville.org

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M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 5pm. $13/plate. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com

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First Fridays at GCCA | June 4

FIRST FRIDAYS AT GCCA Spend the first Friday in June in the Village of West Greenville, perusing the works displayed in the Main Gallery and Community Gallery at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts. Bring the kids along; while you visit with the Center’s studio artists and ponder purchasing some local art, budding artists can exercise their own creative skills in a free activity. If you register for a class or workshop on First Friday, you’ll receive a 10 percent discount.

Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 1010 Abney St, Greenville. First Fri of each month, 6–9pm. Free. (864) 735-3948, artcentergreenville.org/firstfridaysatgcca

4–5

ROCK THE LOT: DRIVE-IN CONCERTS Celebrate National Cancer Survivor’s Day with a weekend of drive-in concerts at the Downtown Airport. On Friday, experience Yacht Rock Revue, a tribute to the soft rock of the ’70s and ’80s. Saturday evening brings Houndmouth, with their unique alternative blues sound. Adult beverages and food trucks will be available on-site. Live bands perform rain or shine, and proceeds benefit the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

Greenville Downtown Airport, 100 Tower Dr, Greenville. Fri & Sat, 6–10pm. Ticket passes for a car of 6 people start at $300 on Fri and $150 on Sat. (864) 255-5010, rockthelotgvl. org/#cspa

4–6

REEDY REELS FILM FESTIVAL As part of its mission to showcase talented independent filmmakers, Reedy Reels screens entries in

500members awarding 134 grants totaling over $7million

more than TOP PRODUCING

AGENT

2020

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS®

We invite you to join Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville. To learn more or to join GWG, go to greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

Maggie Aiken Toler

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2020-2021 Partners

Photograph courtesy of James Gregory.

M. JUDSON POP-UP SUPPER: GRITS & GROCERIES You’d better get there early when Heidi and Joe Trull, owners of Grits & Groceries in Belton, bring their lip-smackin’ version of Southern cooking to the pop-up suppers downtown at M. Judson. This time, their menu will feature braised beef brisket with roasted vegetables from local Parisi Farm. Beer and wine will be available for purchase, as will delectable desserts from the bookstore’s Camilla Kitchen.

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Center for Creative Arts

2


Photograph courtesy of James Gregory.

Thornblade Club, 1275 Thornblade Blvd, Greer; Cliffs Valley, 250 Knightsridge Rd, Travelers Rest. Thurs–Sun, gates open at 7am. Tickets from $15 for a one-day pass to $150 for a Skybox Club ticket. (864) 297-1660, bmwcharitygolf.com

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BMW CHARITY PRO-AM PRESENTED BY SYNNEX CORPORATION The only golf tournament on the Korn Ferry Tour that pairs amateurs with celebrities in a three-day better-ball competition, the BMW Pro-Am rotates between courses at Thornblade Club and Cliffs Valley. This year the event goes green by introducing measures such as increased waste receptacles and recyclable and biodegradable food and beverage packaging. Proceeds benefit numerous Upstate organizations through South Carolina Charities, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the event.

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JAMES GREGORY AT THE PEACE CENTER He’s country, he’s casual, he’s not politically correct. Maybe that’s why audiences flock to see James Gregory perform his special brand of homespun humor. Raised in a rural town outside Atlanta, Gregory tells things as he sees them, and you’ll feel like you’re sitting on the front

10–13

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Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. $45-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

CA

South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 153 Augusta St, Greenville. Continuous showings Fri, 6:30–9pm; Sat, 10am–9pm; Sun, 10am–8pm. Tickets range from $12 for a single film to $85 for a weekend pass. (864) 3537787, reedyreels.com

porch with him as he transports you to a simpler time through his reallife stories, told without the crutch of vulgarity.

Photograph of 2019 Champion, Rhein Gibson, courtesy of BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX

categories from shorts to features and student works to foreign films. A highlight among the 40 films presented this year will be The Girl Who Wore Freedom, an award-winning documentary about the Allied forces who liberated Normandy on D-Day, which, as it happens, will be shown on the 77th anniversary of D-Day.

BMW Pro-Am Presented by Synnex Corporation | June 10–13

Jay stinks at hoops... But when it comes to mortgages, he’s Air Jordan. 

Jay McDonald, Production Manager jmcdonald@primelending.com

NMLS: 659243

864.915.3031

750 Executive Center Drive, Ste. 107, Greenville, SC 29615

Jay doesn’t take himself Too seriously, But he’s serious about his business. *In purchase volume. As reported by Marketrac, powered by CoreLogic® for purchase units nationally for 2012-2017. All loans subject to credit approval. Rates and fees subject to change. ©2020 PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital Company. (NMLS: 13649) Equal Housing Lender. PrimeLending is a wholly owned subsidiary of a state-chartered bank and is an exempt lender in SC. V010918

#1 lender

in greenville JU N E 2021 I

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Greenville Triumph | June 16 & 23

TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000 peacecenter.org

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AN EVENING WITH JAKE SHIMABUKURO TD STAGE Renowned as “the Jimi Hendrix of the ukulele,” Jake Shimabukuro has been playing this four-stringed instrument since he was four year old. After becoming a YouTube sensation in 2005, the virtuoso has topped the Billboard World Music Charts with three of his albums: Gently Weeps, Peace Love Ukulele, and Grand Ukulele. Come spend an evening on the lawn behind the Peace Center, where this

remarkable performer will leave you awestruck at the sounds he can coax from the ukulele. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000 peacecenter.org

15

M. JUDSON LUNCH & LIT WITH PATTI CALLAHAN Booklovers, rejoice: NYT bestselling author Patti Callahan is coming to Greenville to talk about her newest novel, Surviving Savannah. This breathtaking book explores the 1838 sinking of the steamship Pulaski, or “The Titanic of the South.” A powerful examination of tragedy, resilience, and fate, her new read is a can’t-miss. Tickets include a three-course lunch at Soby’s (courtesy of fabulous chef Shaun Garcia) and a copy of the book. COVID-19 precautions will be followed per CDC guidelines at the time of the event.

M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, noon. $45. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com

16 & 23

GREENVILLE TRIUMPH If you’re searching for the perfect summer evening, look no further.

"I would recommend "I would "I would Alexis to anyone recommend recommend looking forto a anyone Alexis Alexis to anyone looking home. As anfor a looking for a home. As an she acts home. Asagent an agent she a friend whoacts agent sheasacts as a friend who constantly puts as a friend who constantly puts her clients & constantly puts her clients & their needs her clients & their needs ahead of her their needs ahead of her ahead of own." her own." own."

Alexis AlexisFurman Furman Your Friend RealEstate Estate Friend inin Real AlexisYour Furman

- Michael - Michael T. T.

- Michael T.

864.630.3952 | alexis@jha-sothebysrealty.com 864.630.3952 | alexis@jha-sothebysrealty.com

Your Friend in Real Estate

864.630.3952 | alexis@jha-sothebysrealty.com

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Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

SHOVELS & ROPE TD STAGE Children’s book authors, festival curators, and film producers, husbandand-wife duo Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst are best known for their contribution to the music world. Both were solo artists in their own right before banding together to record Shovels & Rope in 2008, thus launching a permanent act and a musical style that fuses roots, indie, folk, and rock. The pair has produced four studio albums together, including the most recent, By Blood, released in 2019.

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Triumph

11


Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

MITCH ROSSELL / TD STAGE Quench your country music craving with Mitch Rossell’s upcoming concert at the TD Stage. Since hitting the country scene, Mitch has drummed up a devoted fanbase, and for good reason: his songwriting is prolific, his artistry top-tier. (And if that wasn’t enough to convince you: he’s even opened for Garth Brooks.) Book your tickets before they’re gone—this concert is sure to sell out. Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, June 25, 7:30pm. $30-$50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org.

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HEMMINGS MOTOR NEWS GREAT RACE Drivers, start your engines: the Hemmings Motor News Great Race is coming to Main Street. This 38-yearlong tradition is not a traditional speed race, but a time, speed, and distance rally. The real draw, though, are the cars themselves; spectators will be able to walk around and view the vehicles, including fan favorites and killer vintage rides. The route will conclude at the Hyatt Regency on Main, roughly one week after it begins in San Antonio.

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Greenville Triumph, 900 Woodside Ave, Greenville. Wed, June 16 & 23, 7pm. $10-$25. (864) 203-0565, greenvilletriumph.com

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Our advice? Ditch midweek worries and head to the sprawling Greenville Triumph stadium (family and friends optional). Once you’re there, take it easy: grab a beer, kick back, and admire the fancy footwork of Greenville’s favorite soccer superstars.

Hyatt Regency, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Sun, 1–4pm. Free. (800) 989-7223, greatrace.com.

29–July 3

A AU KARATE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS With a century of history and 700,000 members nationwide, Amateur Athletic Union is as popular as it is exciting. Come witness the best of the best as karate champs model their greatest moves. Plus, the AAU has donated more than 170,000 Feeding Children Everywhere meals, 10,000 clothing items, and 3,000 bottles of water to survivors of natural disasters, so you can feel good for giving your support. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues–Sat. Times vary. (407) 934-7200, aaukarate.org

Mitch Rossell / TD Stage | June 25

SEAMLESS

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com JU N E 2021 I

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Second Glance

DOWN RIVER IN 1905, THE SA LUDA L A KE BECA ME A N INTEGR A L PA RT OF THE UPSTATE’S L A NDSCA PE

Created in 1905 via the Saluda River, the Saluda Lake sits a few miles from downtown Greenville, offering recreational opportunities like kayaking, fishing, and tubing.

T

he Saluda River, pictured above, begins roughly 10 miles northwest of Greenville, flowing down between Greenville and Pickens counties. In 1905, the river was dammed to create the Saluda Lake, which sits just twenty minutes west of downtown. The reservoir boasts a surface area of more than 300 acres and an average depth of about 20 feet and was created to generate hydroelectric power. Today, the Saluda Lake supplies fresh drinking water to Pickens County. The Saluda Outdoor Center, housed in the former Saluda River Yacht Club, offers tubing, paddle boarding, glamping, and cold brews via the forthcoming 13 Stripes River Lodge.—Maddie De Pree

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DISCOVER HARTNESS WHERE LIFE UNFOLDS IN THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WAYS

HARTNESS -LIVE THE LIFE YOU LOVE 864.920.0375 / HARTNESSLIVING.COM

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Second Glance

DOWN RIVER IN 1905, THE SA LUDA L A KE BECA ME A N INTEGR A L PA RT OF THE UPSTATE’S L A NDSCA PE

Created in 1905 via the Saluda River, the Saluda Lake sits a few miles from downtown Greenville, offering recreational opportunities like kayaking, fishing, and tubing.

T

he Saluda River, pictured above, begins roughly 10 miles northwest of Greenville, flowing down between Greenville and Pickens counties. In 1905, the river was dammed to create the Saluda Lake, which sits just twenty minutes west of downtown. The reservoir boasts a surface area of more than 300 acres and an average depth of about 20 feet and was created to generate hydroelectric power. Today, the Saluda Lake supplies fresh drinking water to Pickens County. The Saluda Outdoor Center, housed in the former Saluda River Yacht Club, offers tubing, paddle boarding, glamping, and cold brews via the forthcoming 13 Stripes River Lodge.—Maddie De Pree

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THE HOME HOMEOF OFYOUR YOURCHOICE, CHOICE, THE FOR THE THE LIFE LIFEYOU YOUEMBRACE EMBRACE FOR

IN-TOWN IN-TOWNLIVING LIVING THAT'S THAT'S OUT OUTOF OFTHIS THIS WORLD WORLD

T HART NESS, DON’ T BELIEVE T RADE-OF AT A HART NESS, WEWE DON’ T BELIEVE IN TIN RADE-OF FS. FS.

Choose home lifestyle Choose the the home thatthat suitssuits youryour lifestyle in a in a community created for your delight. community created for your delight.

9 COT TAGE DESIGNS ranging 930 to 2,200 9 COT TAGE DESIGNS ranging fromfrom 930 to 2,200

square feetfeet withwith 2 to25to bedrooms and and 1 to 3.5 square 5 bedrooms 1 tobaths, 3.5 baths, where simplicity meets beauty. where simplicity meets beauty.

26 26 VILLAGE DESIGNS ranging fromfrom 1,7001,700 to 3,600 VILLAGE DESIGNS ranging to 3,600

square feetfeet withwith 3 to35to bedrooms and and 2.5 to2.5 4.5tobaths, square 5 bedrooms 4.5 baths, offering limitless choices in coveted family homes. offering limitless choices in coveted family homes. Finding an in-town neighborhood with extraordinary amenitiesis isone oneofofthe thegreat greatchallenges challengesfor forfamilies families these these days. days. Finding an in-town neighborhood with extraordinary amenities At Hartness, don’t have to plan a weekend away experiencethe therich richvariety varietyofoflife. life.Every Everyday, day,the thehomes homes and and At Hartness, youyou don’t have to plan a weekend away toto experience surrounding lands of Hartness beckon embrace experiencesyou youvalue valuemost mostwith withthe thepeople people you you love. love. surrounding lands of Hartness beckon youyou to to embrace thethe experiences From 15 miles of community trails, a 180-acre nature preserve,and andponds pondsgalore—to galore—toits itsGrand GrandLawn, Lawn, Sports Sports From 15 miles of community trails, a 180-acre nature preserve, Garden, Boutique Hotel, Village Kitchen Restaurant, and CommunityFarm—Hartness Farm—Hartnessisisaamaster-planned master-planned respite respite Garden, Boutique Hotel, Village Kitchen Restaurant, and Community that’s nothing Upstate. Only minutesfrom fromdowntown downtownand andGSP. GSP. that’s likelike nothing elseelse in in thethe Upstate. Only minutes

3 ESTA T E TDESIGNS ranging fromfrom 3,3003,300 to 4,500 square 3 ESTA E DESIGNS ranging to 4,500 square

feetfeet with 3 to34to beds andand 3.5 to for gracious with 4 beds 3.54.5 tobaths, 4.5 baths, for gracious luxury and inspired elegance. luxury and inspired elegance.

AND T HIS IS JUST FORFOR START ERS.ERS. AND T HIS IS JUST START

OurOur award-winning design teamteam will will gladly workwork with with award-winning design gladly youyou to craft youryour family’s legacy home at Hartness. to craft family’s legacy home at Hartness.

Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal notice. Prices and availability Information is change. deemedAll reliable not supplied guaranteed. All properties subject to priororsale, change notice. of Prices and availability subject to specifibut cations by builder/seller, andare subject to change modifi cation.or It withdrawal is the responsibility the buyer or buyer’s subject to change. specifi cations supplied by builder/seller, and subject to /change modifi cation. It is the responsibility of the buyer or buyer’s agent to verify.All Equal housing opportunity – Dan Collins, Broker-in-Charge Collins or & Fine, LLC agent to verify. Equal housing opportunity – Dan Collins, Broker-in-Charge / Collins & Fine, LLC

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Profile for Community Journals

TOWN Magazine - June 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Magazine - June 2021  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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