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Adventure

Rising

GREENVILLE DADS TRANSFORM INTO BONAFIDE DAREDEVILS

Risk & Reward D.I.Y. OPTIONS TO CHALLENGE AND CHARM YOU THIS SUMMER

Rock the Boat TAKE TO WATER IN A FOLDING KAYAK J U N E 2 014 TOWNCAROLINA.COM


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A TINY DEVICE. A BIG HEART CARE BREAKTHROUGH. RIGHT HERE IN THE UPSTATE.

High-risk heart valve patients often are too weak for open-heart surgery. Now, these patients have a second chance at life, thanks to a minimally invasive breakthrough at Greenville Health System. With this procedure, called TAVR, an artificial heart valve is implanted through a small incision in the leg or in the chest. It’s just the latest breakthrough from the region’s cardiac leader—and another reason more people trust their hearts to GHS. Learn more at ghs.org/MyHeart.

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FIRST

Glance Head of the Table: The view of Table Rock from Caesars Head State Park, Cleveland, SC (photograph by Paul Mehaffey)

48 8 T TOOWWN N / / t ot ow wn nc ca ar or ol i l ni na a. c. co omm


Contents 15

THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

THE TOWN 21 ON Pics of the litter:

Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

34

WEDDINGS

39

TOWNBUZZ

49

Painter Tami Cardnella, Green Hill Landscaping, a full slate of outdoor summer festivals, and more.

TOWN PROFILE

Ian Nigh of Maritime Supply Co. crafts custom-made, vintageinspired nautical jewelry.

53 STYLE CENTRAL

Stay afloat in the summer heat with folding kayaks and breezy duds fit for the waterfront.

58

61 SIDEWAYS

Luxury takes an adventurous turn in the pristine waters of North Carolina’s Crystal Coast along the Southern Outer Banks.

79 EAT & DRINK

Star chef Justin Burdett shines at Ruka’s Table in Highlands, NC; plus seasonal inspiration for basil.

86 DINING GUIDE 88 TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

96 SECOND GLANCE

Muted colors and subtle shapes characterize painter Lee Hall’s abstract landscapes.

6 6

ROAD WARRIORS They’re middle-aged professionals by day, but by night, they’re daredevils hurtling down Caesars Head on souped-up skateboards. Welcome to the Tribe.

// by Steven Tingle

2 7

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

D.I.Y. ADVENTURES Risk meets reward with local thrills on rock, land, air, and water.

// by Blair Knobel, Mamie Morgan, Jac Valitchka, & Heidi Coryell Williams // color illustrations by Alice Ratterree

MAN ABOUT TOWN

The Man channels his inner Steve McQueen on the BMW Performance Center test track.

THIS PAGE: Kayaker on the Green River Narrows. For more on taking to local rivers, see “Water Walk,” page 54. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey. COVER: The Tribe stands silhouetted at dawn on Bald Rock, near Caesars Head. For more, see “Road Warriors,” page 66. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

10 TOWN / towncarolina.com

June


Groundbreaking Safety, Earth-embracing Performance and Road-taming Confidence

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EDITOR’S

Letter

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR SENIOR EDITORS M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka

Inside Out

ASSISTANT EDITOR Andrew Huang

W

e live close to the edge every day. But it is often difficult to feel this via our normal routines, which seem a flat line to the thrills of speed or height. So, we seek adventure—what is new, different, and challenging—to touch something extraordinary. The truth of the matter is that daily life is the ride, and if we’d remember that more often, we’d probably have little qualms about anything. But adventure magnifies risk, which is the cornerstone of reward. And outdoor adventure—by rock, land, air, and water (see “D.I.Y. Adventures,” page 72) —is a direct way to engage with fear, freedom, and accomplishment, to push personal limitations and connect with something bigger than ourselves. Maybe even touch a spiritual dimension. Adventure requires us to let go and to trust. In turn, we feel a greater sense of being— in essence, we feel more alive. Take carveboarders, for example. Skateboarding, matured. These aren’t teenaged half-pipe wannabes. They are lawyers, doctors, executives. Husbands, fathers (see “Road Warriors,” page 66). Think of it as Fight Club without the punches. Flying by night, or before sunrise, down the asphalt slopes of Caesars Head. Extreme? No doubt. A brotherhood living like comic-book idols. Dads, bonding in the name of adrenaline. Perhaps we feel more connected when we defy death. It could explain the psychology of fraternity pranks, or middle-aged daredevils. Or anything that challenges our notion of what’s comfortable, predictable, and easy. The catch to adventure is—it isn’t easy. And, in general, many of life’s worthwhile pursuits aren’t. Reward is richer when you feel you’ve earned it. Whether a beer, a meal, or a mountaintop view, it’s sweeter after the sweat— and if you live to tell the tale, you’ve never felt better.

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox Courtney Tollison Hartness Laura Linen Mamie Morgan Kathleen Nalley Stephanie Trotter Heidi Coreyll Williams CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford Jivan Davé Karsten Delap Eric Graham TJ Grandy Kate Guptill Alice Ratterree Cameron Reynolds EDITORIAL INTERN Casey Lovegrove

Holly Hardin PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Whitney Fincannon MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Kristi Jennings Donna Johnston Annie Langston Lindsay Oehmen Pam Putman Kate Madden COMMUNIT Y SPONSORSHIPS & EVENTS MANAGER kate@towncarolina.com

Emily Price DIGITAL STRATEGIST

THE CATCH TO ADVENTURE IS—IT ISN’T EASY. AND, IN GENERAL, MANY OF LIFE’S WORTHWHILE PURSUITS AREN’T. REWARD IS RICHER WHEN YOU FEEL YOU’VE EARNED IT. Editor-in-chief Blair Knobel on her first climb at Chimney Rock State Park last month

12 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Lorraine Goldstein Sue Priester Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS TOWN Magazine (Vol. 4, No. 6) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, PO Box 2266, Greenville, SC 29602, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit towncarolina. com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, PO Box 2266, Greenville, SC 29602. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.


Come, be impressed!

Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light

Andrew Thomas Schwartz (1867-1942) The Bathers, c. 1920 oil on canvas 40 x 521â „ 8 inches

through September 21 Sun-drenched and spontaneous, these American Impressionist paintings from the GCMA collection invite viewers to consider the ideas and techniques that opened the door to modern visual expression.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

GCMA-2814 TOWN Impress "Bathers".indd 2

admission free

5/14/14 11:00 AM


the hollingsworth park community is growing.

Hollingsworth Park’s newest neighborhood, Braydon, will launch custom home construction very soon. Offering a similar architectural style found in Ruskin Square, lot sizes are slightly larger and feature side driveways that lead to privately-positioned garages. Already extremely popular, availability in this prime location will not last long. Other Highlights Include: • Sidewalks, Pocket Parks and Beautiful Street Lighting • Adjacent to Legacy Square and Legacy Park • Neighborhood Amenity Pond and Walking Trail • Maintenance-Free Lawns • Homes Priced from the High $300s

Braydon is an Approved Builder Team Community

Sales Offiice Open Daily • 3 Legacy Park Rd., Greenville, SC (864) 329-8383 • verdae.com


List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

z

TOP OF THE

List

June 2014

Photograph by David McClister; courtesy of Anti- Records

NEKO CASE

Singer-songwriter Neko Case has been on the music scene for two decades, crafting a brilliant career as a member of Canadian indie rock band The New Pornographers, and shining as a talented solo artist. Her gritty, authentic sound on her latest album The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You proves she’s here to stay. Case will share the stage with singer Laura Veirs, whose folksy style has garnered her critical acclaim since the early 2000s. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave, Asheville. Thurs, June 26, 8pm. Advance, $28; door, $30. (828) 225-5851, theorangepeel.net

JUNE 2014 / 15


List z

COUNTING CROWS WITH TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

SLOW FOOD EARTH MARKET Let’s be honest: one of the best parts of summer is enjoying all the fresh fruits and veggies that the season has to bear. But there’s no need to venture far for your basket-load of produce; local farmers are bringing their gifts here to you. While the slow food movement continues to grow, so does customer demand, and this market provides all the clean, local, chemical-free goods you can think of. Perfect for those light alfresco recipes or healthy eats any day of the week.

Perhaps more famous than lead singer Adam Duritz’s signature dreadlocks is the band’s multiplatinum 1993 album August and Everything After, which spawned hit singles “Mr. Jones” and “Round Here.” With the anticipated release of their new album this fall, the Crows are slated to play an evening of old favorites and new material. Joining them will be fellow California rockers Toad the Wet Sprocket, who rose to fame on the ’90s alternative scene with fear. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, June 15. 7:30pm. $65-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

NOMA Square, 220 N Main St. Wed, June 18, 11am– 3pm. Free. slowfoodupstate.com

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / ART GARFUNKEL As one-half of the legendary Simon & Garfunkel duo, Art Garfunkel’s soaring vocals and strong stage presence were the envy of every musician. But after a vocal ailment left him sidelined from the stage, Garfunkel is making a powerful return with a series of intimate shows that bring audiences back to a time of simpler songwriting. A combination of narrative and performance, this comeback is one that cannot be overlooked. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Thurs, June 5, 8pm. $65. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Chapman Cultural Center

THE

. SHOES HANDBAGS ACCESSORIES

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1 6 MUSE_hlfH_TOWN T O W N / t o wJune14.indd ncaroli1 na.com

5/8/14 1:53 PM


While the Upstate is known for being famously bike-friendly, this summertime event gives us a chance to show off our farm chops, as well. The 60-mile route through minimally populated rural farmland is broken up by local farm stops, where riders can sample and even purchase handcrafted treats and eats by the likes of Greenbrier and Double Blessing Farms. The ride culminates with the fabulous after party, where a farm-to-table meal will be served along with local music and farm tours.

The rain in Spain may stay mainly on the plain, but the Cockneyed princess comes to the Upstate in this Broadway classic. Flower girl Eliza Doolittle worries about where her next penny comes from more than her crooked English accent. That is, until she meets Henry Higgins, a dialect expert who vows to transform this simple dandelion into a fragrant rose by the Embassy Ball. Packed with plenty of comedy, sing-alongs, and heartfelt emotion, it would be a shame to miss this fair production.

Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. Sat, June 14, 7am–5pm. $69 registration. cycletofarm.org/ greenville

Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock. June 12–July 13; Wed–Sat, 8pm; Wed–Thurs, Sat– Sun, 2pm. $40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

EXPECTING GOODNESS SHORT-FILM FESTIVAL The path from screenwriting to film screening is not an easy one, but the Expecting Goodness Film Festival is making things a little easier for Upstate hopefuls. Started in 2012 by the Hub City Writers Project and HUB-BUB, the film festival unites local South Carolinians in the film industry to tell stories that are both relatable and historic to our culture. This short-film festival is a culmination of a months-long process of filmmaker application sorting and judging. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sat, June 14. Times and costs vary. expectinggoodness.com

June 2014 Photograph courtesy of Flat Rock Playhouse

MY FAIR LADY

Photograph courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

CYCLE TO FARM

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Quick HITS ANGELS IN AMERICA PARTS 1 & 2 z For many, 1985 was a time of questions, fear, and, above all, change. The first half of Tony Kushner’s two-part series, titled Millenium Approaches, tackles these issues and many more, as told through the eyes and personal relationships of eight characters living through it all. Perestroika, the powerful conclusion, digs deeper into the supernatural spectrum, with angels appearing to protagonist Prior Waiter as he battles the terrifying AIDS disease. Through a tangle of deceit, fear, and divine intervention, Kushner’s characters provide a startlingly truthful commentary on society and the future of humanity. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thru June 21, times vary. $30 per show. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

CHAUTAUQUA HISTORY ALIVE FESTIVAL: RISING TO THE OCCASION

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

z If the likes of Patrick Henry and Harry Truman had strolled in every once in a while, history class might have been a bit more interesting. Held in locations around the Upstate, the annual event hosts 25 free shows and features some of the country’s best historical interpreters. This year’s theme highlights those who made a difference in our country through the power of courage. Locations vary. June 13–22, times vary. Free. (864) 244-1499, greenvillechautauqua.org

GOLF FOR RELIEF z Hosted by the Greer Relief Agency, Golf for Relief puts players on the green to help raise some green for hunger and homelessness. The day starts off with a catered BBQ lunch courtesy of Smoke on the Water, followed by a 1pm teeoff time, where teams of up to four can compete for various awards and door prizes. Awards will be doled out for first, second, and third place in addition to longest drive, par-three score, and closest to the pin. There’s no better way to combine hobby and helping, so register your team today. Willow Creek Golf Club, 205 Sandy Run Drive, Greer. Mon, June 16, 11:30am–7pm. $100-$500 registration. (864) 801-2014, greerrelief.org

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA z In this he-loves-her-but-she-loves-somebody-else plot, Valentine and Proteus play the title characters, jumping at the opportunity to leave their Verona home to seek the wonders of Milan. There, they both fall for the same fair maiden, Silvia, and you can probably guess what happens next. Expect plenty of heroics and humor in this outdoor Upstate Shakespeare Festival adaptation. Amphitheatre at Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Thru June 15. Thurs–Sun, 7pm. Free. warehousetheatre.com

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Martina McBride One of country music’s most well-known crossover artists, Martina McBride has climbed the Billboard charts with hits like “Independence Day,” “A Broken Wing,” and “Concrete Angel,” not to mention an impressive mantel of Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association awards. Now the songstress is heading to the Peace Center to promote her newly released album Everlasting, a soulful collection of R&B covers. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, June 13, 8pm. $65-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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W I N N E R 9 T O N Y A W A R D S® I N C L U D I N G B E S T M U S I C A L

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The 2013 Original Cast of PIPPIN. Photo Credit: Joan Marcus

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Town

ON THE

Reedy River Wine & Jazz Festival April 25, 2014

Susan & Darrell Burnette

Beautiful weather, talented performers, wine and food tastings, and downtown Greenville as backdrop—it’s not hard to understand why the fifth-annual Reedy River Jazz and Wine Festival had its largest turnout to date, with nearly 700 attendees. The lineup included the Anderson University Jazz Ensemble, the Eric Barnhart Quartet, the Joe Gransden Quartet, and Loretta Holloway. Proceeds from the festival will assist the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas. Photography by Cameron Reynolds Austin Huff & Hannah Stroud

Joe & Kim Wehunt

Kim & Chris Bond

Andy & Ann Robinson

Derek & Melody Horton Blair & Kristen Miller

Janice Hudson & Joyce Purdy

Allen Harris & Tina Stutt JUNE 2014 / 21


MICHAEL J.

MICHAEL J. ORSECK

Greenville Tech Foundation Reception

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Donors, faculty, staff, and Foundation board members gathered at the Greenville Country Club to rededicate themselves to the cause of serving Greenville Technical College. Dr. Keith Miller, president of Greenville Tech, and Bob Howard, president of the Foundation, both made remarks on the benefits of the Foundation and its impact on the college. Their remarks were followed by a video presentation showcasing the positive learning experience students have at Greenville Tech. Photography by TJ Grandy

RESULTS IN A SAFE, CARING SETTING”

BLEPHAROPLASTY BODY CONTOURING BREAST AUGMENTATION / LIFT CARING SETTING” BUTTOCKS AUGMENTATION FACELIFT / NECKLIFT FAT TRANSFER LASER RESURFACING LIPOSUCTION YOUTHFUL REJUVENATION SLENDER SHAPE YOUTHFUL REJUVENATION SLENDER SHAPE Dr. Orseck performed a facelift, a necklift, an endoscopic This 46-year-old woman desired rejuvenation of her flanks RHINOPLASTY Dr. Orseck performed a facelift, a necklift, an endoscopic This 46-year-old woman desired rejuvenation of her flanks browlift and fat grafting to this 56-year-old woman’s and abdomen. Dr. Orseck performed a tummy tuck and browlift and fat grafting to this 56-year-old woman’s and abdomen. Dr. Orseck performed a tummy tuck and ®cheeks cheeks to refresh her look in a natural, youthful way. Smartlipo to restore her slim, pre-pregnancy appearance. to refresh her look in a natural, youthful way. Smartlipo to restore her slim, pre-pregnancy appearance. SMARTLIPO CELLULAZE Spartanburg, South Carol ina TM 864.560.6717 orseckmd.com BROWLIFT B EFORE

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DrOrsek JRpg Town May14.indd 1

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Dr. Keith Miller & Heidie Miller with Vicki & Craig Brown

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Bruce Eason & Jim Trant 22 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ON THE

Town

Artisphere 10-Year Anniversary Party April 24, 2014 Events as prominent and successful as Artisphere do not materialize out of thin air. There are countless individuals dedicated to organizing and executing, and, oftentimes, those individuals do not get the recognition they deserve. For the 10th anniversary of Artisphere, Ben and Becca Rook and Henry and Jamie Horowitz brought together previous presidents of Artisphere and integral staff members and supporters for an intimate evening of cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and thanks for their roles in helping the arts festival become such a huge success. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

A

Amazing historic home with incredible updates and only 9 minutes from Downtown Greenville! This unique home includes updates from new lighting, to plumbing fixtures, refinished hardwoods, tile flooring, new carpet, new paint, tiled bathrooms, and gourmet kitchen. And that’s not all! There is a 4 car garage with office, work-out room, bedroom, bathroom and entertaining bonus area; additional lower level entertainment area, bar and wine room, with French doors opening out to the large rock garden with fish pond and waterfall! Entertain outdoors on the 122 foot long deck with beautiful stone fireplace and fire pit; custom saltwater pool and cabana with grilling station, full bath and entertainment area. This house is ready for your family to call it home! 538 Crestwood Dr. Greenville, SC 29609 MLS: #1276652 5 Bedrooms 4 Full and 3 Half Baths 6600-6799 sq. ft. 3 Acres Schools: Paris Elementary Sevier Middle Wade Hampton High $1,250,000

Claire Blake & Cathy Campbell

Gordon D. Seay

Jamie Horowitz & Judith Aughtry

2014 Marchant Company Hall of Fame Agent of the Year

gordondseay@gmail.com

864-444-4359 Gordon JRpg TOWN June14.indd 1

5/8/14 12:19 PM

Rick Erwin & Ben Rook

Assistance by Dixie Dulin

Jennifer Whittle & Ingred Erwin

JUNE 2014 / 23


Liz & Matt Cotner with Joe & Linda Aneskievich

Linda O’Brien

Phil & Nancy Peterson

David & Lauren Sigmon

Susan & George Acker Henry Horowitz

John & Charlotte Verreauh

Megha Lal & Renuka Harper

Edward & Leigh Heidtman with Ann & Erik Whaley and Jane & Cliff Roy

24 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ON THE

Town

Artisphere Opening Night Gala

Margaret Hungerford & Barbara Orders

May 8, 2014 Balmy spring temperatures and—of course—the appreciation of great art brought 700 artists, patrons, and friends to a sold-out opening gala at the Courtyard by Marriott in downtown Greenville. Revelers enjoyed live music by the Voltage Brothers as well as performances by Element, a group of circus artists and acrobats from Charleston. All who were present joined in (with signature drinks in hand) for the TD Bank toast to the Artisphere festival’s 10th anniversary.

Jay Wilson & Jenny Woods

Cara Haggood, April Haggood, Mary Swain, Heather Scarborough & Cara Swain

Photography by Cameron Reynolds ))) Find more photos at facebook.com/ towncarolina

Gayla & Phillip Day with James Jones

Stephanie & Joseph Rohe

Mary Catherine & Charles Reyner with Martha McKissick

James & Caroline Van Hook

JUNE 2014 / 25


Linda & Mike Yopp

More home sweet homes. For more than 80 years. Since 1933, Caine has been the first name in Upstate real estate. Although a lot has changed in those eight decades, some things haven’t: people still rely on our dedicated team of agents, and they still look for our blue and white signs whenever they’re thinking of buying or selling. Learn more about both at cbcaine.com.

Rebekah & Jon Gregory

cbcaine.com

Lilly Cavanagh & Ron Rallis

Dave King, Christina Maddox, Netia King & Venetia King 26 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Jared Emerson & Gene Krcelic


ON THE

Town

Perspective Art Show with Jared Emerson April 17, 2014 Art in motion is Jared Emerson’s signature, and true to form, the painter created three live paintings at this fundraising art show. More than 300 guests attended, including a bevy of local and national celebrities: 17-time Tour de France cyclist George Hincapie, 2012 Miss South Carolina Ali Rogers, former USC quarterback Connor Shaw, Buffalo Bills running back CJ Spiller, Heisman winner George Rogers, and more. The event raised more than $50,000 for the Premier Foundation and the Adopt the Block program. Photography by TJ Grandy

Liz Wright & Abbie Wright

Brelyn Holmes, Shannon Mercado, Ally Woods & Charnice Mangle

Ali Rogers & Chelsea Vickerman

Mark DeMoss & Mark Ratchford JUNE 2014 / 27


TreesGreenville Releaf Party April 3, 2014

Look No Further…Perfect Family Home in TOP School District!

There was no better way to showcase TreesGreenville’s mission than to host their annual Releaf Party on the openair patio of Clemson at Greenville ONE. In addition to the fresh air and views of Main Street’s gorgeous spring foliage, guests enjoyed beer and wine, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and a silent auction. Proceeds from this event are used to support TreesGreenville’s efforts to plant and protect trees as well as promote the benefits of maintaining healthy urban and community forests. Photography by Cameron Reynolds

6 BR/4 BA/2 Hlf BA | 0.4 Acres | MLS 1278820 | $689,000

301 Breton Drive in Hammett Creek, a gated community! All brick, custom, one owner home! Three bedrooms on the main level! The second floor has the 4th bedroom, a full bath and a large family room. Bedrooms 5 and 6 on the lower level have full bath and large recreation room. The master with trey ceiling, the coffered ceiling in the great room, the arched doorways, built in book cases, and the Brazilian cherry hardwood floors are just some of the detailing. The kitchen is stunning with granite counters, custom cabinets, and walk in pantry. The breakfast room opens to the deck that overlooks the private backyard with waterfall. Extra parking pads, 3 car garages, and circular driveway. Award winning Riverside School district.

864.430.6602 Val jr Town June14.indd 1

Mary Ezzell & Lindsey Holzberger

www.valeriejsmiller.com

Award Winning Agent 2007-2013 Scott Jones with Mary & Gene Krcelic

Ann Jennings & Betty Teague

Signature Agent of the Year 2013 5/20/14 9:03 AM

Amy & JB Garrett

Kaylin Satterfield & Jessica Pigott 28 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ON THE

Town

MILLY EQUIPMENT

Fashion Show in NOMA Square

RAG & BONE/JEAN

April 12, 2014

ELIZABETH & JAMES The Hyatt Regency Greenville kicked off the outdoor season with a spring fashion show in NOMA Square. The show, in partnership with local shops Brooks Brothers, Cocobella Boutique, Traveling Chic Boutique, and Lululemon Athletica, showcased the latest styles for Easter, Mother’s Day, and graduation—not to mention sporty attire for taking advantage of the warm days ahead. DJ Skid provided tunes and atmosphere, while Millie Lewis models took to the runway to showcase boutique goods. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

DIANE VON FURSTENBURG BELLA DAHL MICHAEL STARS TOLANI DONALD PLINER AS by DF HUDSON ELLIOTT LAUREN ISDA ENVI ZOA

Barbara & Steve Strelec Bekah & Ray Hammond

Visit our facebook page for the latest news at www.facebook/greenvillecopperpenny. MCDANIEL VILLAGE • 1922 AUGUSTA ST. • SUITE 111 • GREENVILLE • 864.241.3360

CooperPenn jrpg Town Jun14.indd 1

David & Marie Carithers with Jasmine Thomson

5/12/14 5:14 PM

Madison Merrill, Savannah & Karyn Matteson & Tamara Merrill

PROOF O.K. BY: __________________________________________________

O.K. WITH CORRECTIONS BY:___________________________________

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY • SUBMIT CORRECTIONS ONLINE ADVERTISER: COPPER PENNY SALES PERSON: Walters PUBLICATION: GN-SPECIAL GLOSS

PROOF CREATED AT: 5/9/2014 12:46 PM PROOF DUE: NEXT RUN DATE: 06/07/14 SIZE: 4 col X 11.13 in

GN-0100723200 JUNE 2014 / 29


Greenville’s Design Destination Furniture Rugs Accessories Artwork

Lindsay Lukas & Katherine Davis

Nicole & Claude Robinson

IN-STORE PHOTO

F U R N I T U R E

Since 1946

Jack & Bobbie Jameson

J64

864-277-5330 | www.oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Rd (Exit 46 off I-85) Greenville, SC OldColony_JrPg_Town_June14.indd 1

5/12/14 2:41 PM

Kelley & AJ Norris with Adrienne & Charlie Patrick

James & Angel Trapp 30 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ON THE

Town

Hope Ball April 25, 2014 The 16th Hope Ball marked the most successful ball to date. More than 550 guests attended this annual fundraising event in support of the Cancer Society of Greenville County. Collectively, the ball raised more than $1.3 million, including a very generous gift of $500,000, plus an additional $250,000 endowment donation from Karen and Peter Iacovelli. All proceeds received remain within the Greenville community to assist more than 3,000 local patients and families. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Jared Hartzell & Asae Nakagawa

Assistance by Dixie Dulin

Randy & Victoria Skinner

Robin Wilson, Charles & Luanne Runge, Rhonda Riley, with Carey & David Hudson

Kathy Piccione & Angel Tollison JUNE 2014 / 31


Bill & Donna Lohr

We cater to your every need When one door closes, another opens, and that’s certainly been the case for Glen Sawicki, who closed the doors of Saffron’s West End Cafe to focus on his catering business and the Childrens Museum of the Upstate, run a busy delivery service for downtown businesses and form a new partnership with Midtown Artery on Pendleton Street.

Sawicki uses his extensive catering experience to provide the food, from elegant appetizers to buffet dinners to family-style meals. Whether at the gallery or in venues around town, Sawicki gets rave reviews for dishes like his fresh salads; gorgonzola-crusted filet mignon; cheese ravioli with fresh spinach, tomato and pesto; and decadent lobster mashed potatoes. See the menu at saffronscafe.com for an unbelievable array of items to suit any event and taste – including amazing desserts.

Saffron’s Catering

Sybil Bowen & Isabelle Forster

For Life’s Simple Pleasures 864.241.0401 • saffronscafe@yahoo.com Saffrons jr June14 Town.indd 1

5/15/14 7:12 PM

Anne Woods with Bob & Bev Howard

Ginnie & David Beard with Deborah Gibson & Tom Styron 32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Roselle & Bill Zuppinger


ON THE

Town

Greenville County Museum of Art’s 40th Anniversary April 22, 2014 The Greenville County Museum of Art celebrated 40 years of hard work and community generosity in building a permanent collection for the Upstate to enjoy. Museum Association members, as well as many former board and staff members, joined in the fun with a 1970s-themed party, disco ball included. The exhibition 40 Years on Heritage Green: Building Greenville’s Collection was on display, as well as photographs from the museum’s ribbon cutting and fifth anniversary.

a new image for

&

body

soul

Photography by Chelsey Ashford Allison Farr

Thomas McFadden, MD, FACS

Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery

Procedure: RHINOPLASTY From: Upstate, SC “My life has changed dramatically since my procedure! Dr. McFadden gave me back my confidence!” – K.B.

BEFORE

AFTER

“My results were exactly what I was hoping they would be! I still look like me, just a better version of me. People say I look different but they can’t pinpoint what it is about me that’s changed. I love that!” – K.B.

“Dr McFadden is one of a kind. He truly cared about me as a patient. Everything about Advanced Cosmetic Surgery was what it should be, always about the patient and making sure they are completely 100% happy with their services!” – K.B.

EXPERIENCE & CREDENTIALS YOU CAN TRUST Visit us online for a full list of services. “Come see me for results that will give you an outward AND inward transformation.” – Dr. Thomas McFadden

www.advancedcosmeticsurgerysc.com 29 Rocky Slope Road, Greenville ~ 864-252-0498 AdvCosmSurg jr Town June14.indd 1

5/8/14 11:03 AM

Loretta Stephens, Stephanie Bauknight & Kim Dick

Baker & Marguerite Wyche

Burt Reynolds & Carolyn Caborn with Ellie & John Mioduski JUNE 2014 / 33


TOWN

Weddings / by Andrew Huang

Nika Hanis & Samuel Lortz April 13, 2014 When Sammy and Nika arrived on the same day in January 2012 at Simpsonville’s City Church to be baptized, it’s unlikely that they knew their spiritual journeys would also lead them to meet their soul mates. The two began spending time together and began dating on November 1, 2012, at Clemson’s Carillon Gardens. They would stop by exactly a year later, on the way back from a day of hiking in Tallulah Gorge State Park, which is when Sammy decided to propose. The couple was married at Chattooga Belle Farm. Sammy, a commercial mortgage underwriter at Armada Analytics, and Nika, a hairstylist at Artistic Cutters, live in Greenville. PHOTOGRAPH BY LINDSEY & CRAIG MAHAFFEY // SPOSA BELLA PHOTOGRAPHY

Vanessa Berisha & Brent Phillips April 12, 2014

Elise Freeman & Geoffrey Kilgore April 12, 2014 Some meetings are too striking to write off as mere coincidence. For two years while Elise and Geoffrey were students at Clemson, they went to the same hairstylist, who insisted on setting them up. The would-be couple wasn’t interested, but Geoffrey and Elise would cross paths nonetheless at a party hosted by another mutual friend. The couple dated for four years. On a weekend before Christmas, they decided to see the Biltmore House in its holiday glory. After a tour of the house, the couple went to explore the grounds. With the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Biltmore as backdrop, Geoffrey asked for Elise’s hand in marriage. The couple was married at Westminster Presbyterian Church and held their reception at the Poinsett Club. PHOTOGRAPH BY ANGELA COX // ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY

Vanessa, an avid movie-watcher, was understandably nervous when the tour guide left her and Brent on the side of a mountain near Asheville. The couple had decided to go four-wheeling for Brent’s birthday and had been enjoying a day in the mountains. When the guide left to check the trail ahead and didn’t return, Vanessa thought they might be living out a scene from a horror movie. Thankfully, the excitement and shock came from Brent, who got down on one knee and proposed. The couple was married in a short ceremony at the Dutch Barn, followed by a fun-filled reception, complete with a photo booth. They now live in Greenville. PHOTOGRAPH BY CRYSTAL AND KEITH CARSON // RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

Katherine Heller & Shaun Cox March 22, 2014

While it’s suggested that couples both give and take, it’s rare that the back-and-forth extends to regular two hour commutes to see each other. For Katherine and Shaun, that dedication was commonplace when they began dating: Katherine was in graduate school at UVA, and Shaun was working near Washington, DC. After a year, Shaun moved to Chicago with Katherine when she graduated and began working in Naperville, IL. After 5 years of dating, Shaun took advantage of an unusually mild January evening and took Katherine for a stroll on the Naperville Riverwalk after dinner and popped the question. The couple was married in Katherine’s hometown of Belton at the First Baptist Church. PHOTOGRAPH BY ASHLEY JONES // SPOSA BELLA PHOTOGRAPHY

HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the area and were recently married, please e-mail ahuang@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Fresh ingredients.

Grilled North Carolina Flounder, Spring Peas and Asparagus ,Guanciale, Mint,

Fresh creations.

and Rich Ham Nage

www.Restaurant17.com 864-516-1254 Travelers Rest, SC


“Tom Marchant has a proven knowledge of the Augusta Road market. He was confident when pricing our home, and he sold it quickly at top dollar. Tom expertly advised me on the negotiations of my next purchase. I strongly recommend him as your real estate agent. Tom is a conscientious businessman and a true southern gentleman!” - Katy Glenn Smith

TOM MARCHANT 864.449.1658 | TomMarchant.com

227 MELVILLE AVENUE, GREENVILLE ·

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

$1,420,000 · 5 BR/4.5 BA

• Incredible outdoor living, lush landscaping • Coffered, trey, vaulted ceilings, exposed beams • 10’ to 14’ ceilings, 8’ doors • Energy Star rated by Duke Power • 3-car garage, alley access drive-thru driveway • Smart-wired with security system • Well-built with many LEEDS grade materials • Master suite up and downstairs • Wine room • Commercial-grade stainless appliances

7 MINUTES TO DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE · 3 MINUTES TO GREENVILLE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL · WALK TO AUGUSTA CIRCLE ELEMENTARY

Call Tom Marchant (864.449.1658) for a private showing or to list your proper ty.


No home here is the same.

Because no dream is the same.

Perhaps you wish to wake up to 50-mile views in every direction. Or read a book on your back porch, overlooking a quiet lake cove below. Whatever your dream home, whatever joys you want to experience with friends and family, The Cliffs can help bring your ideas to life. L I V E I N O N E C O M M U N I T Y . P L AY I N A L L S E V E N .

866.411.5771 | cliffscommunities.com


TOWN

Buzz

OUTSIDE THE BOX / BY DESIGN / PROFILE

Artwork courtesy of Tami Cardnella

Living Stills Tami Cardnella paints what naturally attracts her

JUNE 2014 / 39


OUTSIDE THE

Box

Organic Inspiration Tami Cardnella draws on flora and fauna / by Jac Valitchka

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Produce Section: Find more of Greenville artist Tami Cardnella’s work at tamicardnella.com

Cardnella and her voiceover-actor husband moved from Charleston two years ago and took on another project that wasn’t brushes and paints but a total renovation on what could best be described as an artist’s dream house (and studio), with gleaming sunlight through giant glass panes and plenty of open wall space for one of Cardnella’s hobbies: displaying her collections of such things as sugar bowl and casserole lids or salt and pepper shakers. But she’d rather hang other artists’ works than too many “Tami’s” at home, she says. Though, if she did, she has a wide range of subjects to choose from. Cardnella’s realist work was recently part of the Piccolo Spoleto Outdoor Art Exhibit (for her eighteenth year) back in her former hometown (by way of Colorado and California before that) in May. With spring in full bloom and gardens and trees and flowers bursting forth in their cinematic show, especially here in the South, Cardnella’s sure to find some organic source material that may perhaps make its way to her canvas. And, it’s so good you could almost eat it up.

Portrait by Paul Mehaffey; artwork courtesy of Tami Cardnella, photographed by Eli Warren

I

f Old MacDonald had his farm in Greenville, I’m betting artist Tami Cardnella would be commissioned to decorate his farmhouse walls with her oil paintings—especially “Pecking Order,” a 30” x 48” piece that features a cow, a pig, a lamb, and a rooster stacked on top of each other. Cardnella’s oeuvre goes well beyond these, however. Her recent show of more than 50 pieces hanging inside of Centre Stage Theatre featured still-life oil works including cats and cauliflower, a serene series on goldfish and koi, as well as flowers and teapots and a head of radicchio. She’s working on a landscape series, and considering a saints and angel series inspired by a trip during Holy Week in Mexico with her husband and her friend Teresa Roche, owner of Greenville’s Art & Light Gallery. But whether it’s dogs or dahlias, Cardnella is quick to dismiss the notion of the overwrought artist stereotype who needs to be struck by the muse to get to paint. “I’m not a B.S. artist, let’s just put it that way,” says Cardnella. “I’m not going to make up some wonderful story of why I painted that.” “Sometimes, it’s just the challenge of the subject matter,” she says as we chat inside Centre Stage, which looks like a mini gallery with her work on nearly every wall. But not everyone accepts that sometimes an eggplant is just an eggplant: a man who had seen her painting of an eggplant at the Spoleto Festival in Charleston called her when he got back home to Nashville. “He said, ‘I can’t stop thinking about that painting. Why did you paint that?’” Cardnella simply answered, “Because it was pretty. Because I wanted to.”


A

fternoon tea, debutante parties, special-event dinners. A typical week for Emile Labrousse, executive chef at Greenville’s venerable Poinsett Club, can entail planning and preparing literally thousands of meals. So how’s a guy to relax? When this chef has a day off, he heads for the Green River near Saluda to indulge his other passion: fly fishing. A day spent fly fishing is, he says, “a Zen moment that lasts seven days.” Labrousse started to fish—and to cook—as a young boy in Périgueux, in southwestern France. “Growing up, my living room was the outdoors,” recalls the chef. “I would forage for mushrooms in the woods and ride 30 miles outside town on my little red bike to fish in the Dordogne River.” After high school, Labrousse attended culinary school


BY

Design

Beauty Reclaimed Green Hill Landscaping creates garden spaces fit for Eden / by Kathleen Nalley

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

S

outherners love their landscapes: the fragrance of lilac and tea olive in the spring, the color as irises rise and grasses thicken, the trickling of water from a backyard fountain, all a metaphor for movement and growth and life itself. For Southerners, landscapes are opportunities: places of enchantment, spaces of solitude and repose, an escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Joe Zawistowski of Green Hill Landscaping knows this all too well. Raised on a cranberry farm by a father who also operated a landscaping business, Zawistowski was born with a green thumb. After obtaining his college degree in landscape design and construction, and operating a successful landscaping company in Wisconsin, Zawistowski relocated his family to Greenville four years ago because of the ripe climate and the friendly people. “I’ve always liked working outside, driving tractors, building things,” he says. “I’m basically a big kid at heart.” Much more an artist than businessman, Zawistowski works with clients to create lush landscapes filled with flora and fauna, water features and outdoor fireplaces, and water and fire features combined into striking focal pieces. Imagine a boulder delicately cut for light to shine through, or

fire seemingly dancing on top of water, and you get an idea of Zawistowski’s artistry at work. “I’m in the business of creating a statement, a memory, something that sticks in your head,” he says. Zawistowski often incorporates reclaimed materials from old, torn down mills, and other unlikely places into re-imagined pieces that breathe new life: an old fire hydrant becomes a fountainhead; historic timbers become an outdoor swing or daybed; hand-crafted brick becomes a focal mosaic on an outdoor fireplace. It’s this signature style for which Zawistowski has become known. “I am always on the lookout for old, odd things I can use in my designs. I scour the roads and side roads for discarded treasures,” he says. Always with an eye on the future, Zawistowski “constantly tries to up the ante,” by continuously learning about cutting-edge sustainable practices. He’s currently designing a swim pond in which an ecosystem will filter water safe for human swimming. He also conducts seminars on organic and edible landscapes and rainwater harvesting. While Zawistowski designs each landscape and each piece with his client’s aesthetic foremost in mind, he admits that,“Everyone wants a water feature. They just may not know it yet.”


Earth Mover: Joe Zawistowski creates ethereal gardens like this one, as well as outdoor spaces and furniture made of reclaimed materials. See photos of Zawistowski’s work at landscapingforthewelllived.com. Check out his upcycled products at the Southern Home and Garden Show at the TD Convention Center, September 19–21.

JUNE 2014 / 43


FIELD

Guide

Triple Set

The U.S. National Whitewater Center offers air, land, and water adventure

/ by Stephanie Trotter

T

he ultimate adrenaline rush of summer is waiting for you at the U. S. National Whitewater Center in Charlotte, an easy hour and a half up I-85. Think extreme amusement park where Olympians train. The 500-acre facility on the Catawba River features activities that push visitors to their physical and mental limits. Those ready to jump-start their heart have a variety of air, land, and water assaults to attack. Test your courage with the following:

CANOPY TOUR Grab a bird’s-eye view of the Catawba River and Tuckaseegee Ford as you fly through the tree canopy on a series of zip-lines, sky bridges, and rappels. The horizon is breathtaking from 60-feet up in the hardwoods. The Twilight Canopy Tour offers yet another unique perspective. MEGA ZIP This one-of-a-kind zipline soars over Class III & IV rapids. Riders launch from the Mega Tower and fly for almost a quarter of a mile. A park favorite and considered a “must do.” MEGA JUMP Ready for a gut-check? This is it: a controlled, realgravity free-fall, straight down off a four-story-high tower. (Afraid of heights? Don’t look down; focus on the horizon and step off!) CANYON CROSSING & CANYON SPUR Advanced adventure courses for high-rope enthusiasts ready to literally take their skill to a higher level. Loop out over the canyon beyond the gorge and South Ridge at heights of 50 feet and up.

LAND

WATER

MOUNTAIN BIKING More than 20 miles of trails ring the complex from easy cruisers to steep terrain, teeth-jarring crushers. All offer woodland and river viewing.

WHITEWATER RAFTING & KAYAKING Ride the rapids in the world’s largest man-made re-circulating river. All rafts include a professional guide to escort you through Class II, III, and IV whitewater rapids. Kayakers can take to the foam and shuttle through slalom racing events.

ROCK CLIMBING Ascend the 46-foot high climbing wall on belay. It features dozens of ropedclimbs, serving various skill levels. At the top, take in the whitewater rapids before rappelling down. TRAIL RUNNING & HIKING Wind your way through 20 miles of scenic paths along the Catawba River. Difficulty levels are color-coded for elevation changes. Leashed dogs are welcome.

RODEO RAFTING An extreme step up from adventure rafting to attack the most aggressive lines in the river. Conquer drops, waves, and technical turns using kayak-style maneuvers. Be prepared to swim in this advanced activity. FLATWATER ADVENTURES Paddle between the banks of the scenic Catawba River in a kayak, or sample the latest craze: stand-up paddle boarding. No experience required and you’ll immerse yourself in the peaceful bliss of nature. WHITEWATER SUP It’s one thing to stand-up paddle board on a quiet lake or calm river. Now try to remain standing on the turbulent tops of Class III rapids.

Special events run during the summer, including Micro Brews Cruise, Zipline & Dine, festivals, and races. Some day activities run at specific times and have space limitations. Pre-register to secure your spot. Visit usnwc.org prior to your visit.

44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

AIR


200 Industrial Drive Greenville, SC (864) 232-2545

7412 Asheville Highway Spartanburg, SC (864) 327-4025

1104 Salem Church Road Anderson, SC (864) 225-0012

629 Market Street Hendersonville, NC (828) 233-0180

GREENVILLE | SPARTANBURG | ANDERSON | HENDERSONVILLE

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Monday-Friday: 9-5; Tuesday: 9-7; Appointments Available www.prosourcesupply.com LOCALLY OWNED

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JUNE 2014 / 43


TOWN

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Field Days Take advantage of a summer festival season in full swing / by Casey Lovegrove

JUNE CHAUTAUQUA: RISING TO THE OCCASION

SPOLETO FESTIVAL USA

An American establishment since 1874, Chautauqua is the practice of the philosophy that to go forward, you must first look back. Famous figures—Patrick Henry, Clara Barton, Harry Truman—walk out of the history books to converse with the audience and encourage deeper intellectual exploration. Gather under a large tent on a summer evening and witness history talk back.

As the home of Spoleto USA, Charleston becomes the capital of all things performing arts. Theatres and churches are graced with operatic voices, fluid dancers, and melodic concerts performed by both established and rising artists. This festival runs the gamut of art forms worthy of these historic settings, but there is one thing you’re guaranteed to hear at every show: resounding applause.

LOCATIONS VARY, GREENVILLE, SPARTANBURG, & ASHEVILLE, NC. JUNE 13–22. TIMES VARY. FREE. (864) 244-1499, GREENVILLECHAUTAUQUA.ORG

LOCATIONS VARY, CHARLESTON, SC. MAY 23–JUNE 8. PRICES VARY. (843) 579-3100, SPOLETOUSA.ORG

SOUTH CAROLINA FESTIVAL OF FLOWERS

UPSTATE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

The local gardens are not the only reason crowds flock to Greenwood in June, but they do provide a beautiful backdrop for a weekend packed with concerts, art displays, and wine tastings. You decide whether or not horticulture is worth all the fuss after you see an impressive 14-foot giraffe in the uptown topiary display.

No one does infidelity, tragic betrayal, and unrequited love quite like Shakespeare, whether it determines the fate of an ancient empire or the happiness of a Verona couple. Each year the Warehouse Theatre facilitates Greenville’s tribute to the Bard with outdoor performances in Falls Park, so forgo the movie theatre for a patch of grass on the world’s stage.

LOCATIONS VARY, GREENWOOD, SC. JUNE 1–30. TIMES AND PRICES VARY. (864) 223-8411, SCFESTIVALOFFLOWERS.ORG

Backyard Bash: This summer, trade in air-conditioned comfor t for these irreplaceable outdoor encounters.

AMPHITHEATRE AT FALLS PARK, GREENVILLE, SC. THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, MAY 22–JUNE 15; ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, JULY 10–AUG 3; THURS–SUN, 7PM. FREE. WAREHOUSETHEATRE. COM/UPSTATE-SHAKESPEARE-FESTIVAL

JULY ATLANTA STREET FOOD FESTIVAL

It’s fitting that a big city like Atlanta hosts an equally big food fest, but nothing can prepare you for the mouthwatering aromas wafting from 40 food trucks. From barbecue and fried green tomatoes to organic Japanese cuisine, this is a field day for your taste buds. Musical performances and amusement rides will help pass time between helpings—that is, if you haven’t passed out in a food coma. PIEDMONT PARK, 1320 MONROE DR NE, ATLANTA, GA. JULY 12, NOON–8PM. PRICES VARY. ATLANTASTREETFOODFESTIVAL.COM

FOLKMOOT USA

More than a two-week festival featuring international music and dance, Folkmoot is a meeting of people. Groups travel from abroad to converge upon Western North Carolina to participate in a cultural exchange that redefines the meaning of global village. Countries to be highlighted this year include Taiwan, Turkey, Colombia, and Romania. LOCATIONS VARY, ASHEVILLE, HENDERSONVILLE, & WAYNESVILLE, NC. JULY 18–27. PRICES VARY. (828) 452-2997, FOLKMOOTUSA.ORG

SOUTH CAROLINA PEACH FESTIVAL

Nothing tastes of summer like a South Carolina peach at the peak of ripeness— certainly a simple pleasure worth celebrating. In mid-July when peach production is at its height, Gaffney buzzes with cook-offs, sporting events, pageants, and arts and crafts shows. With a dessert cook-off and peacheating contest kicking off the weekend, you can literally take a bite out of this festival. LOCATIONS VARY, GAFFNEY, SC. JULY 17–19; JULY 25–26. PRICES VARY. SCPEACHFESTIVAL.NET 46 TOWN / towncarolina.com


We have a homesite reserved for your family.

A New Release 14 Years in the Making. The Reserve at Lake Keowee, voted Best Upstate Community, is putting two new neighborhoods on the map. For a limited time, you have the opportunity to reserve your homesite in Edgewater Park or Penninsula Ridge, premier lakefront neighborhoods near the Marina Village. Special incentives are also available this spring. Call about our Reservation Program and to schedule your Preview Visit.

877.922.LAKE (5253) ReserveAtLakeKeowee.com

Greenville’s Lake Address

Participating Golf Course

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits of value, if any, of this property. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy where void by law.


TO

48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TM


TOWN

Profile Brand-New Vintage: Ian Nigh keeps Maritime Supply Co.’s assembly and production entirely in the USA, including commissioning a small foundry in the Southwest to make his trademark anchors.

Casting Anchor Ian Nigh swells the market with hand-crafted nautical accessories / by Ruta Fox // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

I

an Nigh, owner of Maritime Supply Co., just leased a spot in the gigantic repurposed industrial space known as Taylor’s Mill in Taylors. He’s located right above Due South Coffee, and it’s a good thing. He’ll need the caffeine buzz to stay awake, as his business is poised to catch the crest of the wave known as “burgeoning home-grown entrepreneurial venture.” Nigh, at 23, already has two years of experience creating, making, and selling a line of nautically inspired necklaces and bracelets that appeal to a young, stylish crowd of both men and women seeking the “vintage authenticity” that his brand offers. A Greenville native, Nigh attended Greenville Tech, taking 3-D design and sculpting classes and indulging in his love for making things with his hands. After being inspired by some nautical accessories that a friend showed him, he decided to try designing some rope and anchor bracelets of his own using 16-gauge copper wire that he fashioned on a custom-made jig. During the weekend of Thanksgiving 2012, egged on by his family, he created his own “Black Friday” promotion for his Etsy shop, and to his surprise everything immediately flew out the door. So long Greenville Tech, hello full-time at Maritime. “I view my pieces like wearing a mini-sculpture,” he says. “I’ve always been fascinated by hardworking fishermen and their rugged lifestyle. What I aim to do with my collection is to truly embody the rustic old soul of America. My customers appreciate the timeless, well-worn look of my pieces, and owning and wearing one is kind of like wearing your favorite weathered denim shirt or broken-in pair of shoes—it becomes a part of you.”

Nigh started the business by researching on the Internet and discovered a small foundry in the Southwest, then commissioned them to make his signature anchors, which keeps his production made in the USA. Everything else is made-to-order and assembled by Nigh in his studio. The wood accents on the anchors are birch, which are handtooled, hand-shaped, hand-stained, and hand-finished. The anchors are cast with the Maritime logo, and come in two colors: burnished silver, a combination of bronze and nickel, and burnished copper, made from a combination of bronze and copper. They are hung on metal chains for necklaces, or knotted onto round leather cords for bracelets. The Captain’s Link bracelets are fashioned from American-made twisted cotton rope or braided leather and showcase two interlocking “Duncan” knots. The Buoy collection, with seafaring names like the Skiff, the Coble, and the Dory are rope bracelets which feature a striped JUNE 2014 / 49


Profile

“I aim to embody the rustic old soul of America. Wearing one is kind of like wearing your favorite weathered denim shirt—it becomes part of you.”—Ian Nigh wooden bead that Nigh has hand-cut, hand-sanded, handpainted, and distressed to look aged. Quality and durability are hallmarks at Maritime—Nigh will replace any bracelet that breaks free of charge. The popularity of Maritime Supply Co.’s goods has garnered fans across the country, and even piqued the interest of retail stores from Oregon to Maine. Without using any advertising or traditional PR, Nigh has harnessed the power of social media to spread the word. He is reverential about the photo-sharing application Instagram. “Through Instagram, I’ve been able to interact with men’s fashion bloggers, customers, and an amazing amount of incredible photographers.” Search @maritimesupplyco with the hashtag #anchorsinthewild, and you’ll find shots of the necklaces and bracelets in gorgeous natural settings such as waterfalls, winding roads, mountaintops, and beaches. “I’m addicted to Instagram. It’s been such an incredible way for me to get my product out to the public at no cost.” Recently, though, the company got some high-wattage buzz when hometown singing sensation Delvin Choice sported a Maritime Supply Co. necklace and bracelet on NBC’s mega-hit show The Voice. 50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Setting Sail: Ian Nigh (far left) infuses nautical inspiration throughout his inventory, from anchors to buoys to sailing knots. For more, visit maritimesupplyco.com

Eventually, Nigh would love to open his own shop in Greenville, but for the time being he’s reaching out to local retailers who might be interested in carrying his collection, which retails around $20 to $52. Next up, he’s launching an apparel line called Wildwood Supply that will feature tee shirts brandishing rustic outdoor themes and iconic images of nature such as mountains and log cabins. Those will be designed by artist Zach Landrum, who’s responsible for the creative Maritime logo and the design of the anchor. Nigh and Landrum are buddies who are outdoor adventure junkies. Both are hiking and camping aficionados who are deeply inspired by nature as well as the growing hand-craft movement happening in Greenville. Maritime Supply Co. is the perfect storm: youthful entrepreneur, well-made product, and a new twist on nautical—always in style.

Photog r aph s (center produc t s) cour tes y of Ian Nig h

TOWN


The Pergola @ Roost, located in the Hyatt Regency is a unique place to plan your next social or

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corporate event, bridal shower or family reunion. Cuisine is prepared by Executive Chef Elegant private dining in the heart of downtown.

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OPENING SOON! ENROLL YOUR CHILD TODAY! Primrose School of Greenville 404 Houston Street | Greenville, SC 29601 864.370.8118 | PrimroseGreenville.com

Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2014 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for ‘fact’ source and curriculum detail.

MARCH TO SOLD TEAM...62 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE...POWERFUL! March to SOLD, thank you for your help with my parents’ transition. As you know, these moves are sometimes hard, but your courtesies and attention to detail made this painless. I know they both appreciated the low pressure but helpful guidance in their navigating this major life change. Thank you very much. – David

Anne, Jolene and Brian…you were a true joy to work with and with your extensive knowledge of the area, your team was able to take what my husband and I were looking for in terms of budget, square footage, type of neighborhood, distance from downtown and work and turn it into our dream home! – Nicole & Nate

Thank you for all your help. You went all out to get the right folks in to prepare my house for sale and in a timely fashion. Without your team this sale would have never closed. I feel a load off my shoulders, here again it would not have happened without you. – Rachel

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville

www.MarchantCo.com Brian Marchant 864.631.5858 brian@marchantco.com Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688 jolenewin@aol.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES MarchToSold hlfH Town June14.indd 1

JUNE 2 0 1 12:35 4 / PM 51 5/19/14


1

5 Cool Summer Gifts…

at Vignettes!

Start an Arm Party with Southern Gates and Charleston Gates! Also lots of earrings and pendants including College of Charleston for your Graduate.

2 3 4 5 Surround yourself with Lori Bonn’s sizzling new sterling slides for bracelet or ring encrusted with Swarovski and gemstones.

Add to your Arm Party with Angelica recycled metal American made charm adjustable bangles with hundreds of designs including Graduation 2014 and monograms!

Chamilia’s new bangles are perfect for your Grad – select the 2014 Dated Diploma, Good Luck, Tasseled Grad Hat or “Reach for the Stars”.

Local Gifts!

Vignettes-gifts

1276 Woodruff Rd., Greenville | 864.675.9977

52 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Don’t buy cheap clothes Buy good clothes, cheap. 1922 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 labelsgreenville.com | 864.631.1919 J24

Give them a great sendoff with American made Greenville memorabilia including the QR coded living Greenville book!


Central

STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

Splash Down

Photog r aph cour tes y of Folbot

Foldable kayaks by Charleston-based company Folbot dare you not to jump in

Wet & Wild Folbot, a Charleston-based kayak manufacturer, specializes in lightweight, folding kayaks perfect for spontaneous summer adventures. For more, see page 54.

JUNE 2014 / 53


TOOL

Box

Water Walk

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lthough 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in water, it sometimes seems impossible to stay cool in the dead of summer. Folbot makes that task a little easier with their lineup of portable kayaks. Founded in 1933 in London, England, as a specialist in folding boats, Folbot eventually moved to New York City, and then to Charleston in 1953. Each of Folbot’s skin-on-frame kayaks is designed to collapse in its own backpack, which means grab-n-go is a viable option (and the method of choice) when it comes to indulging in spontaneous water sports.

Charleston manufacturer Folbot’s kayaks fold to fit your life / by Andrew Huang

(1) COOPER Streamlined, long, and thin, the Cooper gives you the ability to get where you’re going, fast. At 16.5 feet, the Cooper is the longest kayak in Folbot’s arsenal. ( 2 ) GREENLAND II Folbot’s largest kayak, this 2-person model is designed to haul you, a friend, and all your supplies for days-long expeditions off the grid. (3) YUKON Wide and stable, the Yukon provides plenty of space in the cockpit and in the boat for comfort and payload capacity on extended trips. (4 ) GREMLIN This kayak is designed for close quarters—both on land and on the water. At just 27 pounds, carting the Gremlin is an afterthought, while its diminutive size on the water enhances maneuverability in confined waterways.

2

3

4

54 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Folbot 4209 Pace St, Charleston, SC (800) 533-5099, folbot.com

Photog r aph s cour tes y of Folbot

1


Seabrook Marchant

Anne Marchant

IT’S LOCAL... AND PERSONAL

Brian Marchant

Tom Marchant

Lisa McDowell

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100 W. Stone Avenue | Greenville, South Carolina | 864.467.0085 | Property Management: 864.527.4505


FOUND

Objects

Set Sail

Make a stylish port of call / styled by Laura Linen // photograph by Eric G raham

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1 HIT THE DECK Coral boat shoes, $148. From Brooks Brothers, 1 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8425, brooksbrothers.com 2 GRAB BAG Carrie tote, $265, by Tory Burch. From Monkee’s of the West End, 103-A Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 239- 0788, monkeesofthewestend.com 3 SEA GAZE Madras Wayfarer sunglasses, $155, by Ray-Ban. From Brooks Brothers. 4 SHOE SAIL Canvas peep-toe wedges, $69, by Lucky Brand. From Muse Shoe Studio, 2222 Augusta St, # 5, Greenville. (864) 271-9750, museshoestudio.com 5 WATER ESSENCE Le Pliage cosmetic bag, $ 50, by Longchamp. From Pink Bee, 105 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 271-4332, pinkbeeonline.com 6 WIND-WHIPPED Polka dot square scarf, $26. From Muse Shoe Studio. 56 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Dance for your Health. Better Breathing, Balance and Brains.

DANCE VENTURES GREENVILLE’S DANCING SCHOOL FOR ADULTS

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Intermediate and advanced levels can join an existing class.

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Visit us at gvltec.edu or call (864) 250-8000.

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Visit www.gvltec.edu/Bo to learn more about Bo’s story.

email: shunnicutt@bellsouth.net

DanceVent Town June14 4thS.indd 1

GetThere.

5/12/14 5:25 PM

122 North Main Street, Greenville | 864.365.5501 | www.travelingchicboutique.com Mon-Wed 11am-7pm; Thurs-Sat 10am-8pm; Sun 12-5pm

TravelingChic hlfHTown June14.indd 1

J U N E5/15/14 2014 57 3:04/ PM


MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Road Test The Man lives out a fantasy and realizes the thrill of his own life

A

t no place is the inner child of a middle-aged man so obvious than in the driver’s seat of an automobile. No matter what we may drive, from mini-van, to sports coupe, to SUV, every man sits behind the wheel thinking the driving skills of James Bond live somewhere deep inside him. It was March of 1986 when I received my driver’s license and the keys to a 1979 Buick Estate Wagon, complete with artificial wood trim. And since that day, and through many vehicles, I have known with certainty that I could outmaneuver and outrun any bad guys who may suddenly give chase. Of course, this is coming from the man who thinks 60 in a 55 is “pushing the envelope.” To test my theory, I called my friend Matt Mullins, the chief driving instructor at the BMW Performance Center, and asked if he would take me out on the track. Some would say Matt is living the dream. He’s a professional race driver and has worked as a stunt driver on films such as Talladega Nights. Plus, he looks like a movie star and gets to fly around a test track in BMWs all day long. When I arrived at the Performance Center, Matt started with a short PowerPoint presentation about seating and mirror positions, braking distances, and where one’s hands should be on the wheel. (It’s 9 and 3 by the way.) Then we went out to the track and hopped into a 2012 BMW M3. As we approached an area called the Skid Pad, Matt punched some buttons on his walkie-talkie and an irrigation system sprang to life, shooting water across the donut-shaped cement. “We’re ))) Catch up on the Man at towncarolina.com/blog 58 TOWN / towncarolina.com

going to work on drifting,” Matt said, as I tightened my seat belt. We circled slowly with the front left tire close to the inner edge of the ring. Then Matt “tapped” the accelerator bringing all 414 horses to life and sending the back end of the vehicle into a fishtail. He compensated with continual and lighting-fast adjustments to the steering wheel and accelerator, performing a perfectly controlled drift around the entire circle. When we came to a stop, Matt looked at me and said, “OK, your turn.” I stared ahead blankly. He then asked if I was ok, saying I looked pale. I told him that was because all of the blood had just gone to my trousers. For the next half hour, Matt let me burn up the tires on a $60,000 BMW. I never got the hang of drifting, and it finally occurred to me that maybe performance driving is not inherent, but something cultivated over years of training and practice. Later in the Performance Center Café, Matt and I sat over plates of German sausages and sauerkraut (when in Rome) and discussed his driving career. Listing his accomplishments, Matt seemed most excited to tell me about the time he wrote an article that was published in an auto magazine. “I really wish I could write,” he said. “I wish I could, too,” I responded, attempting to show him that I’m prone to bad humor and that the trousers comment was not meant literally. He said he’d love to get more articles published, and I told him I’d love to get paid to drive fast. For the next few minutes we ate in silence, lost in our thoughts. Two men on either side of a fence, admiring the other’s greener grass.


“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 23 West North St. | Downtown Greenville | 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com


June 22 • 2-4pm

OPEN HOUSE

Welcome Home Green Valley Subdivision | 250 Foot Hills Road 5 Br, 3 Ba, 3 Hlf Ba | 4600+ SF | 1.41 Acres MLS 1278144 | $574,900 This lovely Green Valley home is located on a large corner lot, and on the golf course. A traditional southern, all brick home, you’ll find ample space for entertaining as well as getting away. The main floor features a formal living area, den, screened patio, newly renovated kitchen with new appliances, ceramic tile floors and plenty of storage. Down the hallway another section of the home features a full bath, an office or bedroom area as well as a large den/family area that opens up to the pool. Upstairs are four large bedrooms, two full baths and plenty of windows allowing for tons of natural light. Outside you’ll find a large front yard with a private feel, bordered by shrubs and bushes, with a large oak tree providing a shady area in the summer. To the side of the home you’ll find gardens and a water feature, perfect for relaxing in the evenings and reading a book. In the back you will find a particularly private oasis where you will want to spend your time. A large salt water pool with a recently renovated stone patio is a secluded spot for outdoor enjoyment. With the renovations the homeowner has completed, this home is in turn key condition and ready for new owners!

James Akers, Jr. 864.325.8413

James@JamesAkersJr.com

WelcomeHomeGreenville.com

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

119 Cleveland Street | Greenville 864.298.0072


SIDE

Ways Wave Front: Wild horses (left) and a historic lighthouse (right) are found within the Cape Lookout National Seashore.

M

Photographs courtesy of the Crystal Coast Tourism Authority

Shore Patrol There’s plenty to discover on North Carolina’s pristine Crystal Coast / by Andrew Huang

ost of the time, balance is an abstract concept for me: work-life balance, a balanced diet, a balanced checkbook. But standing atop a paddleboard in the middle of coastal marsh, balance suddenly becomes much more literal. Not that I’m in any mortal danger—this section of marsh is only three feet deep—but I’d rather not add to the layer of pluff mud on my legs. I’ve already fallen in once, and I’m not keen to repeat the experience. Balance, with which I’m now overly concerned, is also a convenient metaphor for where I am: the Crystal Coast of North Carolina, so dubbed for its incredibly clear waters. This 85-mile stretch of the southern Outer Banks is about two hours north of Wilmington, North Carolina, and exists solely because of balance. The barrier islands, interior waterways, and coastline that make up the Crystal Coast are the byproduct of a delicate equilibrium between tides, waves, sediment, and, more recently, human development. Out of this balance, the Crystal Coast derives a unique blend of leisure and adventure, opportunities that make this a suitable destination for nearly all appetites. Much of the coastline has the feel of pristine, barelytouched wilderness, aided in large part by Croatan National Forest’s 160,000 acres of pine forests and coastal wetlands. While trails and campsites crisscross and dot the Croatan’s interior, there’s also the opportunity to explore this wetland habitat from the water. Michael Crews, owner and operator of Emerald Isle’s Hot Wax Surf Shop and Paddle Sports, offers surfboard and paddleboard rentals, instructional camps, and even guided tours through the Croatan and its neighboring

JUNE 2014 / 61


SIDE

Ways EAT Amos Mosquito’s Restaurant and Bar Chef Luke Maguire may run the kitchen (which specializes in sushi and modern American cuisine with a focus on local seafood), but the locals run the stage with Thursday night karaoke. 1603 E Fort Macon Rd, Atlantic Beach, NC. (252) 247-6222, amosmosquitos.com Arendell Room A retro speakeasy that’s all craft cocktails, exposed brick, and Edison lighting—a slick urban counterpoint to the Crystal Coast’s laidback beach atmosphere. 715 Arendell St, Morehead City, NC. (252) 240-2753, arendellroom.com Village Market Gourmet sandwiches may be the focus of this locally owned deli’s menu, but the key lime pie steals the spotlight. Find other local foods in the grocery section of the shop. 7802 Emerald Dr, Emerald Isle, NC. (252) 354-6592, villagemarketofei.com PLAY Beaufort Historic Tours Historically a target for pirates (including Blackbeard), the danger to life and property has thankfully subsided, although the charm of this maritime village remains. Tours of the town’s historic buildings and burial grounds are available, as are double-decker bus tours of the historic district. 100 Turner St, Beaufort, NC. (252) 728-5225, beauforthistoricsite.org Cape Lookout National Seashore Protected beaches make Cape Lookout prime for secluded seaside camping. Ferries to the islands depart from the main visitors center at Harkers Island, as well as Beaufort and Morehead City. 1800 Island Rd, Harkers Island, NC. (252) 728-2250, nps.gov/calo Fort Macon A key defensive installation against pirates and in the Civil War, the fort overlooks the Atlantic, Bogue Sound, and Beaufort Inlet. Demonstrations of the fort’s cannons are hard to ignore. 2303 E Fort Macon Rd, Atlantic Beach, NC. (252) 726-3775, ncparks.gov/ visit/parks/foma/main.php Hot Wax Surf Shop and Paddle Sports The shop offers rental equipment that runs the gamut: long boards, short boards, body boards, stand-up paddleboards, and kayaks. Get in the water yourself, or take a few cues from Hot Wax’s surf camp instructors. 200 Mallard Dr, Emerald Isle, NC. (252) 354-6466, hotwaxsurf.com NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores One of three North Carolina aquariums, this location recreates local aquatic environments, including scale models of shipwrecks in the area. 1 Roosevelt Dr, Pine Knoll Shores, NC. (252) 247-4003, ncaquariums.com/pine-knoll-shores

Captionhead: text here text here

Olympus Dive Center Wreck diving, shark diving, technical diving—whatever your interest, or if you’re just learning, there’s plenty to see off the Crystal Coast. Half, full, and extended day charters are available, as well as twilight dives. 713 Shepard St, Morehead City, NC. (252) 726-9432, olympusdiving.com STAY

Coast Is Clear: (clockwise, from top left) Shrimp & grits at Amos Mosquito’s Restaurant; surfing on the Crystal Coast; inshore fishing; a diver in the NC Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores’ display tank; the brick casemates at Fort Macon.

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Ann Street Inn Booking one of the 16 individually decorated rooms in the 1872 Carriage House Inn lands you smack in the middle of all the downtown action. 707 Ann St, Beaufort, NC. (877) 266-7814, annstreetinn.com Emerald Isle Realty Something for everyone isn’t hyperbole for Emerald Isle Realty. The company manages more than 700 rental homes, cottages, and condos, including luxury oceanfront “sand castles.” (866) 586-6980, emeraldislerealty.com


Photographs (shrimp & grits, surfboard, fishing, aquarium) courtesy of the Crystal Coast Tourism Authority

waterways via stand-up paddleboard—which is more or less how I’ve found myself immersed in the Croatan’s waterways. Of course, there’s more summer fun to be had the closer you are to the ocean. To the east of Croatan National Forest, pristine natural conditions take on a distinctly coastal feel at Cape Lookout National Seashore, which covers 56 miles of protected beaches across three main islands. The islands, accessible only by boat, remain mostly untouched although the historic Cape Lookout Light Station is one exception. The station is comprised of a 163-foot-tall lighthouse built in 1859 and additional support buildings. Naturally, it behooves to go on one of the self-guided tours of the station, which culminates in a 207-step climb to the top of the lighthouse. The unimpeded view is well worth the effort. For an even more off-the-grid experience, Cape Lookout National Seashore also allows camping on the islands, including Shackleford Banks, home to a population of wild Spanish horses. But if you truly want to get wet, then scuba diving is what you’re after. Drop by the Olympus Dive Center for an impressive program of scuba diving charters, from spearfishing and shark diving. Then there are the 19 shipwrecks Olympus frequents— ships sunk as a mixture of artificial reefs and casualties of World War II—including the German submarine U-352, discovered in part by Olympus founder George Purifoy. The Gulf Stream’s nearby flow keeps underwater conditions warm and clear, with visibility topping 75 feet and water temperatures hovering between 70ºF–80ºF in the summer. But we can’t all stay at sea or remain in the wilderness forever. Exploring and adventuring can be exhausting, and, besides, it would be an incredible oversight to leave the Crystal Coast’s beaches unenjoyed. Bogue Banks, a 21-mile long barrier island separating Bogue Sound and the mainland from the Atlantic Ocean, has beaches on the sound-side as well as the ocean-side. Although private and rental homes occupy most of the beachfront real estate in Bogue Banks’s communities of Emerald Isle, Pine Knoll Shores, and Atlantic Beach, there are public access points to nearly all the beaches. Finding a stretch of sand to call your own is just a matter of walking a bit, even in the high season. Another bonus? The beaches on Bogue Banks are oriented eastto-west, which makes it possible to view the sunrise and sunset from the same place. Intoxicated by sun, waves, the pure exhilaration of adventuring, it’s difficult to find motivation to shake off the sand and roll up the beach towels—or, in my case, scrape off mud. Unfortunately, getting away is not the same as running away.

The barrier islands, interior waterways, and coastline that make up the Crystal Coast are the byproduct of a delicate equilibrium. Out of this balance is a unique blend of leisure and adventure— opportunities that make this a suitable destination for nearly all appetites.

JUNE 2014 / 63


Treat Yourself To An Original.

A PREMIER SOURCE FOR UNIQUE LIGHTING

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F

or more than a century of summers, guests have returned to this stunning mountain retreat for the cooler temperatures, exceptional service—and the challenge of a Donald Ross original. Our 122nd season is underway, and with it, a new day spa to enjoy. So go ahead. Treat yourself to the Eseeola experience.

Lamps & Shades • Repair & Restoration • Custom Design Lighting • Consultation

Harrison 4thS Town Mar14.indd 1

at Linville Golf Club

175 Linville Avenue Linville, North Carolina 28646 www.Eseeola.com

Call Today for Reservations: 800-742-6717

M34A

3021 Augusta Street, Greenville, SC 29605 harrisonlighting.com | 864.271.3922

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Severino Alvarez

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swagger by appointment

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Introductory 1-hour massage session* MassageEnvy.com

Convenient Hours · Franchises Available Open 7 Days: M-F 8am-10pm, Sat 8am-8pm, Sun 1pm-8pm *One-hour session consists of a 50-minute massage and time for consultation and dressing. Prices subject to change. Rates and services may vary by location and session. For a specific list of services available, check with the specific location or see MassageEnvy.com. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. Each location is independently owned and operated. © 2013 Massage Envy Franchising, LLC.

64 TOWN / towncarolina.com

• • • • •

men’s & women’s styling wardrobe/closet consultation personal shopper special event styling www.severinoalvarez.com film & photography styling 864.918.1875


@ g n i n e p p a h s ’ t Wha Yappy Hour Every 2nd Wednesday of the month from 6-8pm Leash up your pup and join us at NOMA Square for pup-tinis and treats! Live music.

June 11

July 9

August 13

Yoga @ NOMA Square Select Saturdays at 8:30am Extra mats provided | Free Admission

June 21

July 19

August 23

Live Music Thursday & Friday Night Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive 5:30pm every Thursday night Greenville Heritage Main Street Fridays 5:30pm every Friday night

220 North Main Street | Greenville, SC 29601

Why Choose Us?.

Custom Building...Re-defined! Building your dream home doesn’t have to be difficult. Now, with two professionals handling the details, your dream will become a reality. Lisa McDowell has teamed up with Hollison Custom Homes making dreams come true... easily. Whether you own a lot/land already, or need help finding one, take advantage of our expertise. We will personally walk you through every step of the process and share our knowledge with you to ensure you are making the best decisions when constructing your new home. Contact us today and let’s get started on a home that fits your lifestyle.

Lisa Antonelli-McDowell

864-421-3072

Hollison Custom Homes

LisaAMcDowell@allentate.com

www.HollisonHomes.com

www.WOWLisa.com

LisaMc hlfH Town June14 v2.indd 1

Building is easier than you think.

Just ask our clients... “Scott and Lisa are a dynamic team that pulls together the perfect product – your new home … not a house … a home. Sure, you personalize it with your furniture and your curtains, and they facilitate you getting that, as well, but your touch is made easier with their support and direction.” — The Turner’s

“No need to worry, we didn’t even have to be there, everything was taken care of by Lisa and Scott. They knew exactly what we wanted! They took all the stress and worry out of building and we even had FUN! They built us a beautiful home we are proud of...! I have recommended them to my family and friends.” — The Delahoussaye’s

“What we thought was going to be a nightmare, turned out to be a DREAM! Building our new home with Lisa and Scott has been a really fun experience! We looked for years to find a home that fit the needs for our family and Lisa said, Why not build? They made it so easy we regret not doing this sooner!” – The Pinochet’s JUNE 2014 / 65 5/16/14 9:13 AM


Road Warriors

66 TOWN / towncarolina.com


THEY ARE FATHERS, HUSBANDS, AND PROFESSIONALS. BUT BY THE LIGHT OF A FULL MOON, THESE MEN TRANSFORM INTO LARGER-THANLIFE VERSIONS OF THEMSELVES. LIKE WEREWOLVES, ZOMBIES, OR COMIC-BOOK AVATARS, THE TRIBE TAKES TO THE ASPHALT TO BOND, TO DEFY, AND TO LIVE OUT A FREEDOM FANTASY IN THE FLESH . By St e v e n T i n g l e

P h o t o g r a p h y b y Pa u l M e h a f f e y

JUNE 2014 3 / 6 77 1


THEY CALL THEMSELVES THE TRIBE. DURING THE DAY, THEY ARE A LOOSE COLLECTION OF MIDDLE-AGED PROFESSIONALS WALKING THE TIGHTROPE THAT STRETCHES BETWEEN WORK AND FAMILY. THEY ARE CLEAN-CUT, RESPECTABLE MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY: ATTORNEY, MORTGAGE BROKER, COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AGENT, DERMATOLOGIST. THEY ARE HUSBANDS, FATHERS, AND CAR POOL DRIVERS. THEY PAY THEIR TAXES AND SERVE ON BOARDS, AND THERE'S NOT A BEARD NOR TATTOO AMONG THEM .

DOWNHILL MOUNTAIN BIKE HELMET // Rob Howell (“The Commish”) ripped off the visor for better aerodynamics and visibility, and added a headlamp secured with Velcro. “It might seem excessive for 40 mph, but I’d rather spend $100 on a helmet than $1,000 on jaw reconstruction and be out of work for a few weeks,” he says. SIXSIXONE PRESSURE SUIT FOR DOWNHILL MOUNTAIN BIKE RACING // The hard, plastic spine and shoulder, elbow, and forearm plates offer solid protection from bad wipeouts. “It came in handy the first night I used it, as I found myself airborne and face up at 20 mph. You can see the mangled reflector tape left behind,” Rob says.

HOME DEPOT GLOVES WITH GLUED-ON TEFLON SLIDING PUCK //

But like mythological creatures, the full moon transforms these men into mutations of their daytime selves. As the moon rises, the Tribe’s bow ties, blazers, and flat-front khakis give way to full-face helmets and body armor. Gone too are their given names, they are now known as Roadrash, Guardrail, Counsel, and the Commish. As midnight approaches, the Tribe make their way to the top of Caesars Head where they mount what appear to be oversized skateboards with inflated rubber tires. With a single push, they begin to glide down the mountain, releasing colorful sails that billow behind them like the capes of superheroes. It is during this 40-mile-per-hour, 12-minute descent that these men are truly free, where they transcend the bounds of traditional middle-aged recreation and form a bond as strong as the gravity that pulls them down the mountain. These men have discovered a shared passion that feeds the needs of connection, adventure, and adrenaline. And it’s as simple as a moonlit ride down a twisting mountain road on a plank of wood mounted to four small tires. These men are either geniuses, or complete idiots. So, how did these seemingly mild-mannered professionals come to be riding carveboards at 40 miles per hour down a mountain in the These men have middle of the night? Like most crazy discovered a shared ideas, it started with a YouTube video. passion that feeds the Rob Howell, a.k.a. the Commish and needs of connection, the loose organizer/mother hen of adventure, and the Tribe, is a commercial real estate adrenaline. And it’s a agent as well as an avid surfer and snowboarder, two sports not very simple as a moonlit conducive to the Upstate. Searching the ride down a twisting Internet for activities that would hone mountain road on a his balance and flexibility, he came plank of wood mounted across a carveboarding video. “It looked to four small tires. They like fun and that it would be a good are either geniuses or way to practice surf and snowboard moves,” he says. So, in 2011, Rob complete idiots. bought a carveboard on Craigslist and started searching for places to ride.

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“I had an actual pair of sliding gloves that I destroyed in one run because our tail wind made my sporting-sail ineffective. These have worked great ever since. An emergency slowdown technique is to grab the front wheels of your board and use your hands as friction brakes. This leaves tire tracks on your gloves,” says Howell.

At first glance, a carveboard looks like a redneck skateboard, complete with lift kit and oversized tires. But the architecture of the board is meant to mimic the moves used in surfing. In fact, carveboards were invented by California surfers and snowboarders looking for something to do on days with no surf or snow. The boards can tilt close to 45 degrees, which allows riders to carve, or turn back and forth sharply, to control their speed. The carveboard riding style mimics the squiggly line of an EKG, which seems appropriate since an increased heart rate is a side effect. Howell forwarded the YouTube video to his friend, Greenville attorney Nathan Galbreath, a.k.a. Counsel. “He was begging me for about a month and half saying, ‘You’ve got to come out and try this thing,’” says Galbreath. “And I kept thinking, I don’t know, I haven’t been on a skateboard since I was eight years old.” A surfer and snowboarder himself, Galbreath finally relented and joined Howell for a


FLY BY NIGHT: With top speeds nearing 40 miles per hour, the Tribe has adopted a homegrown uniform of full face helmets, body armor, nylon sails, and puck-adorned gloves, not to mention carveboards modified to handle the stresses of bombing down Caesars Head.

ride. “I had an absolute blast and for the next two months we would ride in the evenings maybe once or twice a week.” Now there were two cheerleaders for the sport, and one by one Howell and Galbreath began bringing others into the fold. Guys like Rob Rogers, a.k.a. Roadrash, “because he’s prone to losing skin during a ride, plus he’s a dermatologist,” explains Howell, and mortgage broker Bert Karrer, a.k.a. “Guardrail,” “because he somersaulted over one, or maybe it was a hedge.” The rides started out small. “We went to the North Main area and rode on the streets there, which are steep,” say Howell. “Then we discovered the downtown parking decks, which were great because they had elevators.” The Tribe wasn’t aware that carveboarding, like its distant cousin skateboarding, is illegal downtown and punishable by a $500 fine and 30 days in jail, which seems severe considering the other forms of transportation,

from golf carts to pedal cabs to Segways, that are welcomed on Main Street. “So we got kicked out of the parking decks, and we promised never to return,” says Howell. “But then we thought, where can we get a longer ride.” Galbreath had a location in mind. The road descending from Caesars Head State Park past Bald Rock and on down toward Highway 8 is a six-mile ribbon of broken pavement, potholes, and traffic. To avoid the latter Howell and Galbreath made their first run before daybreak. “The very first ride at Caesars Head was scary,” says Howell. “We didn’t know the road very well. It took us about 55 minutes to go down the mountain.” The early rides were a series of trial and error and the beginning of an evolutionary process that would soon have the Tribe descending the mountain in a fifth of the time of that first ride. Carveboards are not built for speed. At about 15 miles per hour, the loose springs and tall board

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height can cause “speed wobble,” a trancelike oscillation that feeds off of the board’s forward momentum until it exceeds the limits of the axles and wheels. “Speed wobbles get worse before they get better,” says Howell, implying that a rider eating pavement is the most common outcome. But 15 miles per hour is not exactly “adventurous,” and the Tribe was itching to go faster. Eventually Howell hooked up with Matt McLean, co-owner of Invert Skate Shop on River Street, who helped the Tribe retrofit their boards with stiffer springs and lower deck heights, creating what the men call “Frankenboards.” They are more stable, ride stiffer, and are capable of much faster speeds. As the speed increased so did the danger. “We had a couple of guys get concussions,” says Howell. “Then we realized bike helmets were probably not the right headgear so we started using full face helmets.” Soon the Tribe was decked out with chest pads, knee and elbow pads, and heavy gloves. They began riding at night, specifically during full moons, which they found offered the perfect mix of low traffic and good visibility. And then, one of the members discovered something that would forever change the look and feel of their rides down the mountain. “I think Bert must have seen it first in a YouTube video,” says Howell. “Then his wife got him one for his 40th birthday, and he wore it on a ride. Of course we all made fun of him. We called him the flying squirrel.” What Karrer had discovered was a “sporting sail,” a small parachute-like piece of nylon that attaches to the rider’s wrists and ankles. When the rider is in a tucked position, picture a ski jumper descending a slope, the sail is pulled tight to the back. But stand up and spread the arms and the sail deploys, catching air and slowing the descent. The sails give the riders much more control over the speed of the board and soon every member of the Tribe was wearing one. “Before the sails, you had to really plan where you could get rid of speed,” says Howell. The Caesars Head descent is full of switchbacks and hairpins in between sections of long straightaways. As tempting as it might be to build up speed in a straightaway, a rider without a sail must prepare for the impending turn, by starting to carve, long before it approaches. “If you don’t brush off speed before those sections, you are going to come in way too fast,” says Howell, “and you’re either going to ride it out or eat it.” With the braking capability of the sails, there is no need to carve, and the speeds the men now reach approach 40 miles per hour. “It’s like pointing it straight down a black diamond on skis or a snowboard,” says Galbreath. “It’s pure exhilaration.” Riding a modified carveboard six miles down a mountain road is rife with complexities, not the least of which is how to get back to the top. On the first few rides, the Tribe would run back up Caesars Head, a full day’s exercise for most people but just a respite between rides for them. Then they started bringing several cars to the mountain, driving one to the top, leaving it, then driving another, and continuing the loop until there were no cars left at the bottom. Then

someone had the idea of a virtual ski lift, a chauffeur who could shuttle the whole Tribe in an SUV up the mountain after every descent. The driver’s name is Colin, a lanky mountain biker in a Clemson cap who has no desire to step on a carveboard, modified or not. “I’m happy just driving,” he says. Soon the Tribe was descending Caesars Head on a fairly regular schedule. But always on the lookout for how to ratchet things up a notch, Howell decided the Tribe needed a challenge. A friend of his had recently completed the Leadville 100 mountain bike race in Colorado. “If you finish in a certain time period, you get a big, fancy, cowboy belt buckle,” says Howell. “I thought, I don’t have time to train for that race, but I really want a belt buckle like that.” This inspired Howell to create the “13 Moons Challenge.” “There are 13 full moons in a year,” he says. “So we thought if you ride every single full moon in a year, you should have a belt buckle to commemorate it.” The challenge started in the summer of 2011. “We designed it and sent it off to a custom belt buckle maker in Colorado,” says Howell. “I think now we have ten guys who have one.” These are guys like Chris Laundra, a.k.a. Flintstone, a 60-yearold fireworks sales rep who first showed up with a board the other Tribe members deemed “prehistoric.” “It was circa 1988,” says Howell. “We named it the Carvesaurus.” Then there’s Ty Houck, who has the longest professional title of the group: Director of Greenways, Natural and Historic Resources for Greenville County Recreation District. “We call him Sasquatch,” says Howell, “because he’s tall, and we’re not very creative.” On a couple of rides, the Tribe has been “pulled over” by the authorities, but Howell says all they need to do to get a pass is stop, pull off their helmets, and show that they’re “just a bunch of old guys out having fun.” The sight of a group of clean-cut, middle-aged men riding souped-up skateboards and dressed as if auditioning for American Gladiators must frazzle the circuits of county law enforcement officials, because according to Howell, “They just say, ‘Well, ok, you guys be careful.’” In addition to their late-night, mountainside escapades the Tribe occasionally comes alive during the day. “We have a thing called Hell Yeah Friday!,” says Howell. “That’s where we, as a group, try to get Friday off and go fit in as many sports as we can in a day. We leave the house before sunrise and go do some combination of climbing, mountain biking, carveboarding, kayaking, and trail running.” Asked what the wives think of all this—the carveboarding, the nicknames, the belt buckles, the Hell Yeah Fridays—Howell just shrugs. “I think it’s somewhere between they’re amused, and they’re glad that we have this bond. They know we need this to maintain our sanity.” The Tribe’s descents down Caesars Head are not races, although Howell admits, “You don’t want to be the last one down the mountain.” The rides aren’t even about staying in shape for surfing and snowboarding. No, these moonlit rides are about camaraderie. About exhilaration. About freedom.

With the braking capability of the sails, there is no need to carve, and the speeds the men now reach approach 40 miles per hour. “It’s like pointing it straight down a black diamond on skis or a snowboard,” says Galbreath. “It’s pure exhilaration.”

MAD MEN: White collars by day, billowing capes by night: Rob Rogers, Chris Laundra, Rob Howell, and Bert Karrer transform into the Tribe— Roadrash, Flintstone, the Commish, and Guardrail—a community of carveboarders (including Nathan “Counsel” Galbreath pictured on the cover), navigating the asphalt of U.S. Hwy 276 from Caesars Head by the light of a full moon.

PICTURE GLIDING DOWN CAESARS HEAD AT NIGHT, THE MOON FULL, THE STILLNESS OF THE FOREST, THE ONLY SOUND COMING FROM YOUR FREAK FLAG BILLOWING BEHIND YOU. IT'S AN OTHERWORLDLY EXPERIENCE THAT VERY FEW PEOPLE GET, SAYS HOWELL. MAYBE THAT SOUNDS CHEESY, BUT IT SEEMS MORE FUN THAN GOLF. JUNE 2014 / 71


BY BLAIR KNOBEL, MAMIE MORGAN, JAC VALITCHKA, & HEIDI CORYELL WILLIAMS COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS BY ALICE RATTERREE

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Photograph by Karsten Delap of Fox Mountain Guides

STRETCH YOURSELF, REACH NEW HEIGHTS, PUSH YOUR BOUNDARIES, AND CHOOSE YOUR ADVENTURE. WHETHER BY ROCK, LAND, AIR, OR WATER, WITH REWARDS TO MATCH, IT MAY BE TOUGH TO DECIDE WHICH IS BETTER: THE THRILL OR THE CHILL.


ROCK ON:

Fox Mountain Guides based in Pisgah Forest offers instruction for beginners to experienced climbers.

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REWARD ROCK STEADY FOX MOUNTAIN GUIDES HELPS CLIMBERS RISE TO THE CHALLENGE BY BLAIR KNOBEL

hether for preservation or comfort, we’re loath to take risks—except, perhaps, when we choose adventure for the fun of it. Then, we’re either a hero or just plain dumb. In honesty, I was simply curious and wanting a challenge, but I didn’t expect fear as I drove to Chimney Rock State Park to meet Derek DeBruin, a certified climbing instructor with Fox Mountain Guides, for a two-hour intro climbing session. Based in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina, Fox Mountain Guides is the only Southeastern climbing school accredited by the American Mountain Guides Association and is also the largest, serving multiple locations of North Carolina, including Pisgah Forest, Chimney Rock State Park, Linville Gorge, and the Piedmont. It also offers guiding in Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, New Hampshire, and Argentina. The staff are certified, years-long practitioners, and for them it isn’t just a job.“This is a lifestyle. After a day of instruction, I usually go back out and climb,” Derek says, which soothed me as I suited up in the provided harness, helmet, and shoes. We headed to a rock that looked docile in comparison to many at Chimney Rock’s 1,000 acres of rock, water, and serenity. The slab, DeBruin says, is so called because of its smooth face and slight angle. He shimmied up the back like a spider, and quickly anchored a rope system. I barely got off of the ground on my first attempt. The slab was slippery, and it was difficult to find footholds. Derek instructed me to push up with my toes, while keeping my heel flat, which was unusual and challenging, and made me feel I’d scrape myself badly.

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STE P UP: Editor-in-chief Blair Knobel makes her rock climbing debut at Chimney Rock, courtesy of Fox Mountain Guides,

foxmountainguides.com

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So, he moved us to a different location, this rock much taller but with a sizeable crack along its height to allow for a more convenient hold. Derek scaled the length with multilimbed agility, secured the rope, and rappelled back down. I fastened it to my harness with a double figure-8 knot; then, with hesitancy, proceed to climb. Surprising myself with the relative ease of my initial ascent, I kept going. But as I got higher, fear tore through my mind: what if, what if, what if? The doubts kept coming, until I decided I couldn’t proceed. I’d gotten a taste of it, gotten halfway. Enough to write this article. Enough to say I tried. Derek moved up to me with superhuman ease. He looked me in the eye.“You don’t have to go further, if you don’t feel comfortable.You can come down. But, just know that you can do this if you want. I’ve got you. You’re safe.” For me, it was a linchpin moment, and suddenly this experience became much more than of rock and rope.With the calm of a guru, Derek reminded me of my inherent power and that I was protected.All I had to do was take a step forward, make an effort, and to trust. It hit me that this experience parallels a much grander universal truth: that I can choose comfort or the climb. My steps won’t always be steady, and I might even slip. But I am always protected—and it pays to trust my experience, and to keep going.

SEVEN SOWS BOURBON & LARDER ASHEVILLE, NC

Asheville, North Carolina, a 25-mile drive northwest, is a worthy reward for your efforts, with many menus reflecting seasonal programs and farm-to-table dining. Seven Sows Bourbon and Larder is a relatively new spot downtown, on Biltmore Avenue, near the famed Orange Peel music venue. The rustic charm of Seven Sows is balanced by a neon bar sign flashing “Memphis Recording Service” and a garage door that opens to an umbrellaringed patio. Chef Mike Moore’s menu is tinged with the cuisine of his eastern North Carolina roots, Southern at heart but dressed in worldly panache. Small

and large plates make up the roster, which frequently changes based on what’s in season. The restaurant’s motto “cook what you know” stands true, with recent selections including a mix of local beets and strawberries on a tangle of arugula, with chèvre and a pickled quail egg, and local asparagus with a soft egg, mushroom hash, hollandaise, and the wonderfully flavorful Mangalitsa ham of an Austrian rare breed. The ham, produced in Smithfield, NC, is available via the Seven Sows larder, which stocks several local items for sale at the restaurant. (And don’t miss the buttermilk fried chicken.)—BK

77 Biltmore Ave, Asheville, NC. (828) 255-2592, sevensows.com

P I G OU T:

In addition to being co-owner of Seven Sows, Chef Mike Moore is the creator and director of The Blind Pig, an Asheville-based underground supper club benefitting local charities—not to mention hundreds of foodie followers.


DREAM RIDE THE “EXPERIENCE XD CLIMB” WITH GEORGE HINCAPIE OFFERS THE ULTIMATE CYCLING PACKAGE BY JAC VALITCHKA

O

HOTEL DOMESTIQUE

Photographs (rock climbing) by Karsten Delap of Fox Mountain Guides; (cycling) courtesy of Hotel Domestique

EVENT DATES June 15–18 July 20–24 August 17–21

h, it begins innocently enough.There’s a wine tasting the night before, followed by a private dinner prepared by a renowned chef.Then, in the morning, you’ll enjoy coffee before a vitality-boosting yoga session. Next, you’ll be served breakfast, probably outside amid a stunning landscape that offers the promise of infinite possibility. And then, much like a symphonic build-up to a thundering crescendo, you and your muscles will begin the three days of Hotel Domestique’s Experience XD cycling package: Climb with George Hincapie. The serpentine climbs through the Blue Ridge offer not only world-class cycling, but world-class views. Restaurant 17 is Domestique’s shining star and offers Chef Adam Cooke’s inventive dishes for lunch and dinner. The rooms are French-chalet/chateau–inspired, which you’ll need after winding your way through the mountain passages, starting with Monday’s ride through the Green River Cove and Camp Old Indian, which takes about three hours.The second day is a four-hour trip through Skyuka Mountain and Howard Gap, followed by day three’s destination, the threehour ride of the Greenville Watershed and University Loop. But, you’ll soon have relief:That morning ride gives way to a replenishing lunch and pampering massage by five-time Tour de France massage therapist Jeremiah Ranegar.You’ll have enough time and space with the outside lounge areas, or the newly opened cafe adjacent to the main dining area, to reflect on your twowheeled adventure before a private dinner at 17 preceding an evening fireside chat with Hincapie, with 16 Tours de France and five Olympic Games in his accomplished career. The intimate setting is first fostered by the size of the group, which is limited to 15.Topof-the-line road bikes are provided, as well as a support vehicle for each ride, staffed by a pro bike mechanic.The luxury accommodations, five-star meals, and time with Hincapie will have you feeling like a champion cyclist even if your thighs are trying to convince you otherwise.

COST: Individual rider $5,000 Couples (both riding) $7,000 Couples (one riding, one guest) $6,000

hoteldomestique.com

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WAT E R PA R K :

REWARD THE PURPLE ONION SALUDA, NC

LINE DRIVE THE GORGE IN SALUDA, NC, WILL SEND YOU SOARING BY MAMIE MORGAN

heir mutual love of the outdoors is what drove Sara Bell and her husband Tim to open Saluda’s Green River Adventures in 2006.“Once I learned how to kayak in college,” she says,“it became all I wanted to do.” On a twenty-one day trip to Costa Rica, where the Bells hosted a group of teenagers and focused on a heavy whitewater component, the couple discovered the area’s burgeoning zip-lining business.“When you cut down to it,” she says, “flying from treetop to treetop, from above the canopy and within it, is not something the general public is used to having access to.”The Bells, who have long since gained the support of Saluda and its residents, waited for the right time and land availability; they opened the Gorge in May of last year. The Gorge’s half-day-long canopy tour, the steepest and fastest in the United States, traverses 1,100 feet of elevation and includes a sky bridge, three rappels, and eleven zip-line opportunities. As a lover of new experiences and all things outside, I couldn’t wait to partake in my first zip. But with that excitement came some reservations as well, which culminated in one basic thought: I really am not up for dying today. But I learned quickly that perhaps the Gorge’s numberone asset, aside from the pristine topography, is their knowledgeable and patient staff of guides. The leadership of James and Ben relieved any anxiety and allowed for an exhilarating morning of fun, sightseeing, and education. The Gorge with Green River

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Adventures, thegorgezipline.com

NOR T HERN EX POSURE: Saluda itself is at once unique and accessible. Sara Bell noticed something interesting in the aftermath of our economy’s devastating crash. Retail sales, expectedly, plummeted. “However, the sales in adventure tours,” she says, “doubled. People began valuing life experiences more and making the acquisition of things less of a priority.”

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Located between Asheville and Greenville, Saluda serves as a quiet respite that houses so much to explore and enjoy. With Saluda Mountain Lodge in town and Arbor Cabins at Lake Lure—both of which boast stunning views—the area is outfitted perfectly for a simultaneously adventurous and relaxing getaway. The Purple Onion is known for its gracious hospitality and regionally inspired cuisine, and has been a Saluda staple for more than 15 years. Located just minutes from the Gorge on the small yet thriving Main Street of town, the restaurant

showcases local music favorites, ranging from Citizen Mojo to (my personal favorite) the Shane Pruitt Band.

After an outing in the woods, I like to indulge in a long afternoon meal and a beer (or several beers, depending). The Purple Onion is one of those haunts where everything looks delicious and yet I always return to the Duck Rabbit Milk Stout pimento cheese (trust me) and their Appalachian Grown Green Plate special, which changes daily and features prepared, seasonal veggies. Their beer selection is concise, with an emphasis on local breweries, including French Broad, Highland, Mother Earth, and Starr Hill.—MM 16 Main St, Saluda, NC (828) 749-1179 purpleonionsaluda.com

Jocassee Outdoor Center offers waterfall tours by kayak or pontoon boat; boat rentals (ski, pontoon, and kayak) complete with shuttles to the Devils Fork remote access point; fishing supplies; as well as provisions for hiking, camping, kayaking, waterskiing, swimming, paddle boarding, and diving. These offerings along with a small café make this a go-to spot when heading to the relatively remote Lake Jocassee.

SUMMER (RE) TREAT:

Once you’re on this end of the Upstate, you may as well stay awhile longer and check out one of the newest additions to the on-water entertainment scene: Lake Keowee’s The Lighthouse. The restaurant, event center, and cabana bar offer casual to dressy-casual dining on the water as well as a diverse menu, stunning views, and an inviting specialty cocktail menu. For a refreshing treat, ask for the Lighthouse Bellini. The Clemson Blue Cheese Fondue satisfies as a flavorful starter made with local Clemson Blue Cheese.

The Lighthouse, 1285 Doug Hollow Rd, Seneca (864) 888-4446, lighthousekeowee.com

Green River Adventures offers the steepest and fastest zip-line in the United States; (below) writer Mamie Morgan suits up for her ride.


ranslated from Cherokee, Jocassee means “place of the lost one.” Indeed, it’s easy to lose oneself in the clear, blue-green waters of this manmade mountain lake. Lake Jocassee is a gem of a waterway, seated in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Chain and surrounded by the Jocassee Gorges—a series of steepsloping lands and surging mountain streams that make it unlike anything else in the Southeast. About an hour removed from Greenville proper, Lake Jocassee is an easy day trip, although during the busy summer months, you may find yourself waiting another hour or so to get on the water at the lake’s single public entry point: Devils Fork State Park. Devils Fork offers the only public boat ramps and lake access (with a few hundred parking spaces), as well as campsites, picnic areas, nature trails, and mountain villas for rent. For the outdoorsy set, plan on renting a kayak or booking a kayak tour. Jocassee Outdoor Center

Photographs (zip lines) courtesy of Green River Adventures and Mamie Morgan; (Lake Jocassee) courtesy of the SC Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism

T

LAKE ESCAPE JOCASSEE IS A WORLD REMOVED FROM THE REST OF THE UPSTATE BY HEIDI CORYELL WILLIAMS

offers both options. If you plan to go without a guide, they’ll deliver you and your kayak to the lake and pick you back up when you’re done. You can also choose to be dropped at one of the three Foothills Trail access points, and paddle down the entire lake to your pickup destination. For the less intrepid, Jocassee Outdoor Center also offers boat rentals and waterfall tours by boat, providing an easy option for enjoying the lake’s rugged surroundings from the comfort of a pontoon. Lake Jocassee’s 7,500 acres are almost entirely surrounded by wild, protected land. The result is scenery that’s more akin to Oregon or Alaska than the Upstate. Ask fellow boaters for directions to the nearest waterfall, and they will kindly direct you around one of those corners to something spectacular. Jocassee Outdoor Center 516 Jocassee Lake Rd, Salem, SC (864) 944-9016, jocasseeoutdoorcenter.com

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THE

R E S TA U R A N T & B A R

2 3 W. W A S H I N G T O N S T

Belgian inspired cuisine and over 150 belgian beers TRAPPEDOOR.COM

864-451-7490

Marmalade

BREAKFAST ~ LUNCH ~ BRUNCH Open 6am till 3pm daily Dinner hours: Thursday, Friday and Saturday 5pm till 9pm Ask about BYOB ~ Bring your own wine, no corkage fees.

906 W Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 864-201-3485 www.marmaladeofgreer.com

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EAT&

Drink

PIT STOP / IN SEASON / OPEN BAR

Spear Witness: Executive Chef Justin Burdett looks locally for his culinary inspiration, such as this monkfish wrapped in housemade prosciutto with asparagus, spring peas, and trumpet mushrooms.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Greens Envy Ruka’s Table in Highlands, NC, highlights the best of the region

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PIT

Stop

Table Turner Ruka’s Table in Highlands, NC, boasts local cuisine by a star chef / by M. Linda Lee

// photography by Paul Mehaf fey

T

here are myriad reasons to go to Highlands, North Carolina. This charming little mountain town, its Main Street chockablock with outfitters, shops, and designer boutiques, makes a perfect jumping-off point for the area’s fabulous hiking trails, waterfalls, and golf courses. Recently, however, I tackled the two-hour drive up the serpentine curves of US-178 North and US-64 West for a single purpose: to dine at Ruka’s Table. A protégé of Hugh Acheson at 5&10 in Athens, Georgia, and Steven Satterfield of Miller Union in Atlanta, Executive Chef Justin Burdett has been garnering well-deserved attention for what he calls his “Appalachian Southern” cuisine since he took over Ruka’s kitchen two years ago. In December 2013, he was lauded among the year’s rising stars by starchefs.com. This past March, Burdett was one of five featured chefs cooking at the Charleston Wine + Food Festival’s New + Notable Dinner. In April, he was invited to cook at the James Beard House in New York City. Burdett, who took first place on the seventh season of the Food TV series Chopped on his birthday in 2010, has always been, in his words, “infatuated with food.” “My Nanny would let me punch out biscuits and make dumplings to stew with chicken,” he recalls fondly. Though he’s worked with his share of top chefs, it’s his grandmother that Burdett credits as his inspiration. “If I had to choose one last meal,” he claims, “I’d go to my Nanny’s house and ask for one of everything.” 80 TOWN / towncarolina.com

An avid cookbook reader who has “S-L-O-W F-O-O-D” tattooed across his fingers, Burdett forages for local sumac and ramps, and features seasonal proteins such as venison and trout. While you will find duck and sweetbreads (“for originality”) on his menu, you won’t find a Lowcountry boil, as it’s “not relevant” to Ruka’s location. The chef is also nuts for pickling vegetables: “Being from the South, I have to put a pickle on everything.” The tasting menu Chef prepared that evening began with a taste of spring: an eye-catching salad of brightgreen fava beans, lardons of bacon, and shaved radish, dressed with ramp vinaigrette. Next, a perfectly cooked pan-seared scallop nestled in a sunny orange-carrot “broth,” while thin slices of kumquats played tart against sweet. Monkfish was wrapped in house-made prosciutto, keeping company with spring peas and roasted trumpet mushrooms. Burdett brilliantly employed the rich molasses tones of sorghum to glaze a piece of pork belly, as well as to marry with mustard as a jus for buttermilk fried quail with apple waffles. After a salt caramel chocolate tart with sea salt caramel ice cream, I tore myself away, delighted that I’d made the trip. Ruka’s Table 163 Main St, Highlands, NC (828) 526-3636, rukastable.com Drive time from Greenville: 1 hr, 43 min


Land Locked: (This page) Buttermilk fried quail and apple waffles with a sorghum mustard jus; (opposite) Executive Chef Justin Burdett is a protégé of chefs Hugh Acheson and Steven Satter field and won Food Network’s Chopped competition in 2010; just-plucked ramps; fava bean and radish salad with lardons and ramp vinaigrette; pan-seared scallops in orange-carrot broth with sliced kumquats

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IN

Season

Herb & Legend Basil is a multipurpose addition to savory and sweet dishes / by M. Linda Lee

BLANCHING BASIL IS ESSENTIAL IF YOU PLAN TO FREEZE THE HERB (CHOPPED UP IN A LITTLE OLIVE OIL) OR COOK IT FOR A LONG TIME.

I

f you believe medieval folklore, the herb basil relates to the basilisk, a terrifying mythological beast with the head of a cock and the slithering body of a serpent. The basilisk, whose name derives from an ancient Greek word meaning “royal,” could kill with one piercing look from its huge eyes, not to mention its venomous bite. A single basil leaf, however, was thought to ward off the fatal effects of both the basilisk’s stare and its venom. In modern times, we’ve developed more practical uses for Ocimum basilicum. A member of the mint family native to Asia and Africa, basil comes in 60 varieties. Sweet Genovese basil stars in pesto and makes an incomparable insalata Caprese when coupled with garden tomatoes and fresh mozzarella. With its cinnamon and clove nuances, spicy Thai basil is essential to curries and other Asian dishes, while the ruffled leaves of purple basil add color and texture to salads. Basil grows equally well in containers or in the garden, according to Meredith Mizell, manager of Red Fern Farm in Gray Court. If you grow basil in a container, she advises, fertilize it with fish emulsion every other week. Harvest the herb by trimming it back as far as two leaf nodes on the stem so the plant will yield more leaves. Basil soothes digestion and is also a good source of vitamins K, A, and C, as well as manganese and copper. And it never hurts to keep a sprig of basil in your pocket, just in case you encounter a basilisk! BLUEBERRY-BASIL SHRUB

FRENCH PISTOU IS ONE OF MEREDITH MIZELL’S FAVORITE USES FOR BASIL . UNLIKE ITS ITALIAN COUSIN, PESTO, PISTOU IS MADE WITHOUT CHEESE AND PINE NUTS.

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

“Herbs are underrated for dessert,” claims Mizell, who likes to pair basil with any type of berries. In summer, she makes basil-infused simple syrup to drizzle over a fresh fruit salad.

METHOD: Combine the blueberries and chopped basil in a medium bowl. Lightly crush the berries with a large spoon or potato masher to release the juices. Stir the mixture until the basil is well-incorporated. Add the sugar and stir to incorporate. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for 12–36 hours to macerate. Make sure there is a good amount of liquid surrounding the fruit and herb before continuing. Strain the mixture through a stainless-steel mesh strainer. Lightly press the mixture to expel any remaining juice. If there is any undissolved sugar remaining in the bowl, scrape it out into the syrup. Add the vinegar to the resulting syrup and whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the finished shrub into a sterilized bottle, cap it, and refrigerate. Some sugar may collect at the bottom of the bottle, so give it a shake daily for the first few days after bottling. Mix the shrub with sparkling water for a summer cooler, or use it to create your own cocktails. The shrub will keep for a year in the refrigerator.

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

INGREDIENTS: 1 cup fresh blueberries, rinsed 1/4 cup chopped purple basil leaves, firmly packed 1 cup white sugar 1 cup apple cider vinegar


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OPEN

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Cool Aid Summer cocktail puts fresh-picked basil front and center / by Kathryn Davé

GARDEN PARTY 1 serving INGREDIENTS: 4–6 juicy blackberries 3–4 big basil leaves 1/2 oz. ginger simple syrup* 1 lime wedge 1 1/2 oz. gin Soda water

L

ate this spring, I realized that I lacked a garden. While most of my friends were building raised beds and dutifully incubating seedlings in makeshift greenhouses, I had been busy planning cocktails for my end-of-summer beach vacation. Alas, plantin’ time came and went—and suddenly it dawned on me that when my friends were tasting the summer’s first homegrown, sun-warmed tomatoes, I’d be staring at my empty cocktail shaker. The thought was enough to inspire an immediate trip to the store for terra cotta pots. Sure, it was too late to plant virtuous cucumbers and lettuce, but, by golly, I could repot the basil plant biding its time on my kitchen windowsill. After all, basil is a cook’s friend in summer. And what takes a fresh-picked, freshsliced tomato from good to sublime? A smattering of hand-torn basil.

Basil is also a friend to cocktail lovers. A little adds zip and nuance to summer standbys, like gin and tonics or mojitos, and it truly shines when you give it a starring role. Like the one it plays in Garden Party, a drink I mixed up as my salute to early summer abundance. A classic smash is made by muddling mint with sugar, before adding liquor and soda water. In my take, I swapped basil for the mint, brought in some blackberries, and tempered the sugar with a bit of fresh ginger and lime. It tastes exactly the way we hope our gardens will: lush, bright, alive.

* To make ginger simple syrup, simply combine 1/4-cup finely chopped fresh ginger, 1 cup sugar, and 1/2-cup water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and let boil for one minute. Remove from heat, cool, and store for later use.

84 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Photog r aph by Jivan Davé

METHODOLOGY: Muddle blackberries, basil leaves, and ginger syrup in the bottom of a rocks glass until berries are smashed and basil has been bruised. Add one large ice cube or two smaller ones. Finish with a generous squeeze of lime, gin, and enough soda water to top it off. Stir before serving.


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DINING

Guide

Quest Brewing Co. Committed to producing premium brews while minimizing their environmental impact, Quest uses malt from Asheville and Greenville-roasted coffee beans to support the local economy. Now you can support your craft beer enthusiasm and sustainability with a single sip. Tues & Wed, 4–8pm; Thurs & Fri, 4–9pm; Sat, 12–9pm. Tours: Sat, hourly from 1–4pm. Closed Sun & Mon. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

BREWS WITH DAD BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. $$-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington

St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com BREVARD BREWING CO.

Owner Kyle Williams prides himself on brewing the best of

both hemispheres. While Brevard Brewing specializes in German lagers like the Munich Dunkel (a drinkable dark beer with chocolate undertones), American brews like their signature IPA are not to be forgotten. Mon–Thurs, 3–10pm; Fri

& Sat, 12pm–12am; Sun, 2–10pm. 63 E Main St, Brevard, NC. brevardbrewing.com BREWERY 85

This small brewery near Mauldin is attracting outsized attention with their nationally reviewed Sweet Tea Sour, an Arnold Palmer disguised as single hop ale, now on tap for those warm summer afternoons when you can’t decide if you’d rather have a cold brew or a glass of lemonade.

Thurs & Fri, 4–7pm; Sat, 12–5pm. Closed Sun–Wed. 6 Whitlee Ct, Greenville. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience and expertise collide at the Community Tap. Take your time to browse their extensive selection— more than 180 local, national, and international brews—or fill up your very own TCT growler on the go at one of their ever-rotating taps. Mon–Thurs, 11am–8pm; Fri & Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, 1–6pm. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

CORK & TAP

Located across from the historic Mills Mill turned luxury lofts, Cork & Tap gives you a chance to sample your wine or beer selection from their inventory on site. And while you’re staying, you might as well treat yourself to the boutique cheese platter to complement your beverage of choice. Mon–Sat,

12pm–12am. Closed Sun. 409 Mills Ave, Greenville. (864) 241-2022, corkandtap.com

THE GREENVILLE BEER EXCHANGE

Tucked off of Main Street, the Greenville Beer Exchange is overflowing with all the craft beer varieties you could want (more than 1,200 choices, but who’s

KEY : Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sunday Brunch = SBR 86 TOWN / towncarolina.com


BARS, CAFÉS, & RESTAURANTS counting?). Broaden your horizons— and taste buds—with brews from all over the country. Mon–Sat, 11am– 9pm; Sun, 12–6pm. 7 S Laurens St, Greenville. (864) 232-3533, greenvillebeerexchange.com

GROWLER HAUS

If you’re ready to branch out, let the folks at Growler Haus offer a personal recommendation from their tap lineup. With 12 local and national brews to choose from at their Anderson location and more than 24 in Spartanburg, there’s no excuse to leave without your fresh new discovery in hand. Mon, 5:30– 11pm; Tues & Wed, 3–9pm; Thurs, 3–11pm; Fri & Sat, 12–11pm. 313 N Main St, Anderson; 113 N Church St, Spartanburg. (864) 225-0057, growlerhaus.com

THE GROWLER STATION

With stores and express locations nationwide, the Growler Station boasts a foam-free method for a faster, cleaner growler fill. Greenville’s new downtown location has selections from Brewery 85, Thomas Creek, and Quest Brewing on tap, making this Growler Station your one-stop-shop for all of your Upstate favorites. Mon–

Wed, 11am–9pm; Thurs–Sat, 11am– 10pm; Sun, 1–6pm. 109 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 400-8327, growlerstation.com HANS & FRANZ BIERGARTEN

Hans & Franz resides within a Civil War–era brick building, next door to the strip mall housing Two Chefs Deli. Dig into traditional German fare: schnitzel, bratwurst, spaetzle, fleishkäse, and the like. Of course,

you’ll want to wash it down with one of the German or Belgian beers on the extensive international list.

$$-$$$, L (Thurs–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). 3124 S Highway 14. (864) 627-8263, hansandfranzbiergarten.net LEXINGTON AVENUE BREWERY

Lexington Avenue Brewery features unique takes on classic pub entrées, regular concerts, and fresh beers brewed in-house. Much of their menu, including the grains for their American brews, are locally sourced, giving this Asheville establishment a true community appeal. Mon & Tues, 11:30am–12am; Wed– Sat, 11:30am–2am; Sun, 12pm– 12am. 39 N Lexington Ave, Asheville, NC. (828) 252-0212 lexavebrew.com LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pregame watering hole and after-work hangout. Gather with friends around the long bar to enjoy one of the nearly 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com

MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s looks to be family friendly for both the Harley-set as well as the postDrive-baseball crowd. “Start your engine” with a plate of Tabasco fried pickles, washed down (quickly, no doubt) with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. $$-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St,

macsspeedshop.com

Photog r aph s (Quest Brewi ng Co.) by Chelsey A sh ford ; (T he Velo Fel low) by Paul Meha f fey

NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. A wide range of beer (local, domestic, international), wine, and an ambitious menu that hits nearly every continent make it hard not to dive in. With Chef Spencer Thomson, formerly of Devereaux’s, now in charge of the kitchen, look for an elevated gastro pub experience for every meal. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S

Main St, Greenville. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com PISGAH BREWERY

THE VELO FELLOW Cozy in a funky way, the Velo Fellow is a hip pub under the Mellow Mushroom. Burgers and sandwiches form the core of the menu, which includes fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, and—in a twist—tofu Marsala. Enjoy a rotating roster of craft brews on tap, as well as a formidable selection of domestic and international bottles. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

This brewery’s lineup is full of adventurous flavors, like the banana and spicy clove in their Tripel or the hint of citrus and bubblegum in their Belgian Golden. Local Dynamite Coffee Roasters and French Broad Chocolate Lounge provide ingredients for the darker beers, ensuring a taste unique to the region. Mon–Wed,

4–9pm; Thurs, Fri & Sun, 2–9pm; Sat, 12–9pm. Brewery tours: Sat, 2:30pm. 150 Eastside Dr, Black Mountain, NC. (828) 669-0190, pisgahbrewing.com

RJ ROCKERS

With the distinction of being the first brewery in Spartanburg, RJ Rockers

has gone from a small downtown establishment to a name recognizable across the Southeast. The company is also environmentally conscious, so you don’t have to feel like a Son of a Peach while you drink one. Tours and tasting: Thurs & Fri, 5–7pm; Sat, 12–4pm. 226-A W Main St, Spartanburg. (864) 585-2337, rjrockers.com SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN BREWERY

Run by husband and wife team Andy and Kelly Cubbin, Southern Appalachian Brewery offers a taste of downtown Hendersonville. Try pairing locally baked pretzels or pizza with one of their five signature beers, or have your dinner delivered while playing a round of cornhole.

Wed–Fri, 4pm–close; Sat & Sun, 2pm– close. 822 Locust St, Hendersonville, NC. (828) 684-1235, sabrewery.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off of Main Street in Travelers Rest, this new addition gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering options like their Raspberry White Ale and frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become your favorite place to cap off a Saturday afternoon.

Mon–Wed, 4–9pm; Thurs, 4–10pm; Fri & Sat, 12–10pm; Sun, 1–6pm. 26 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2424, swamprabbitbreweryandtaproom.com THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek name has been a familiar sight on Greenville beer menus and shelves for more than ten years, but it’s worth visiting the home of the well-known River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the brandnew tasting room and soak up some sun on the brewery’s patio. Tours

by appointment. Closed Sun. 2054 Piedmont Hwy, Greenville. (864) 6051166, thomascreekbeer.com THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew), and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). $$, L, D.

Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

JUNE 2014 / 87


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Thru June 22

Thru June 21 ANGELS IN AMERICA PARTS 1 & 2

JUNE

Thru June 15 THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA In this he-loves-her-but-she-lovessomebody-else plot, Valentine and Proteus play the title characters, jumping at the opportunity to leave their Verona home to seek the wonders of Milan. There, they both fall for the same fair maiden, Silvia, and you can probably guess what happens next. Expect plenty of heroics and humor in this outdoor Upstate Shakespeare Festival adaptation. Amphitheatre at Falls Park, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs–Sun, 7pm. Free. warehousetheatre.com

THE LAST FIVE YEARS Like many things worthwhile, marriages aren’t easy. Jason Robert Brown’s raw perspective on one such doomed matrimony shines a spotlight on relationship failures— shown from both sides of the story. Although the main characters Cathy and Jamie only interact once in the musical, the audience is privy to a detailed timeline of their love, as told from backward and forwards order. It’s real and it’s heartbreaking, but that’s what makes it powerful. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville. Wed–Sat, 8pm; Thurs, Sat–Sun, 2pm. $40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

1985 for many was a time of questions, fears, and, above all, change. The first half of Tony Kushner’s two-part series, titled Millenium Approaches, tackles these issues and many more, as told through the eyes and personal relationships of eight characters living through it all. Perestroika, the powerful conclusion, digs deeper into the supernatural spectrum, with angels appearing to protagonist Prior Waiter as he battles the terrifying AIDS disease. Through a tangle of deceit, fear, and divine intervention, Kushner’s characters provide a startlingly truthful commentary on society and the future of humanity. The play is presented in partnership with the Upstate’s Year of Altruism. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Times vary. $30 per show. (864) 2356948, warehousetheatre.com

4–7

Proving that a few words can pack a serious punch, the 22nd annual Southern Fried Poetry Slam draws in 200-plus spoken word poets for a heated competition with thousands of dollars at stake. Taking place in downtown venues from Coffee Underground to

88 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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SOUTHERN FRIED POETRY SLAM

Chicora Alley, the four-day battle of words includes six bouts of performance poetry every evening, in addition to workshops, open mic shows, and panels. The finals will be held at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre. Downtown Greenville. Times and costs vary. witsendpoetry.com

5

ART GARFUNKEL

As one-half of the legendary Simon & Garfunkel duo, Art Garfunkel’s soaring vocals and strong stage presence were the envy of every musician. But after a vocal ailment left him sidelined from the stage, Garfunkel is making a powerful return with a series of intimate shows that bring audiences back to a time of simpler songwriting, a combination of narrative and song. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Thurs, 8pm. $65. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org


CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Photograph (poet Glenis Redmond) by Paul Mehaffey

5–8

SCENES DE CARMEN

Concert Big Band with cocktails in hand. Sponsored by McKinney Dodge Chrysler Jeep, the evening features cash prizes for the best dressed as well as dance lessons for the left-foot inclined. Greenville Downtown Airport, 100 Tower Dr, Greenville. Fri, 7–10pm. $55. senioraction.org

What better way to spice up the summer nights than with this sizzling love triangle straight from Seville? Presented by GLOW Lyric Theatre, the production showcases selected scenes from Georges Bizet’s famed Carmen opera, featuring the supreme vocal stylings of Metropolitan Opera tenor Hugo Vera and Austin Lyric Opera mezzo-soprano Liz Cass. Follow along through the sordid affairs of Don Jose, Carmen, and Escamillo in this sizzling Latin tale. Younts Center, 315 N Main St, Fountain Inn. Thurs–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. Adults & seniors, $25; juniors, $15. (864) 409-1050, glowlyric.com

6

11–14

For nearly four decades, the Mighty Moo Festival has been the premier event for downhome fun and local attraction—all in celebration of the USS Cowpens veterans and crew. The festival kicks off Wednesday evening with uplifting gospel music, then continues through the weekend with live music, carnival rides, and even a cornhole tournament. And what Southern festival is complete without a bakery contest, beauty pageant, and, yes, a Main Street marching parade. Locations vary, Cowpens. Wed–Sat, times vary. cowpensmightymoo.com

G.I. JIVE: A VINTAGE USO STYLE PARTY

Long before “twerking” was even a part of our vocabulary, guys and gals got down with the Lindy Hop on the dance floor. The USO-style party encourages guests to don their Swing Era or wartime uniform best, twirling the night away to the sounds of the Upstate Senior

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234 Westfield St. | Greenville | 864.271.4377 | poshpawsgreenville.com JUNE 2014 / 89


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12–July 13 MY FAIR LADY The rain in Spain may stay mainly on the plain, but the Cockneyed princess comes to the Upstate in this Broadway classic. Flower girl Eliza Doolittle worries about where her next penny comes from more than her crooked English accent. That is, until she meets Henry Higgins, a dialect expert who vows to transform this simple dandelion into a fragrant rose by the Embassy Ball. Packed with plenty of comedy, sing-alongs, and heartfelt emotion, it would be a shame to miss this fair production. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock. Wed–Sat, 8pm; Wed–Thurs, Sat– Sun, 2pm. $40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

Frame Designs

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MARTINA MCBRIDE

One of country music’s most well-known crossover artists, Martina McBride has climbed the Billboard charts with hits like “Independence Day,” “A Broken Wing,” and “Concrete Angel,” not to mention an impressive mantel of Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association awards. Now the songstress is heading to the Peace Center to promote her newly released album Everlasting, a soulful collection of R&B covers. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $65-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

13–14

BLUE RIDGE BARBECUE FESTIVAL

There are few things more enticing than a plate full of piping hot barbecue. But how about countless plates of piping hot barbecue? Now in its 21st year, the Blue Ridge Barbecue Festival unites roasting teams from all around in a fullout competition for the esteemed Governor’s Trophy. And like any good fest, the schedule is loaded with craft fairs, music, and a classic car show. Harmon Field, 117 Harmon Field Rd, Tryon. Fri–Sat, 10am–11pm. Admission free until 2pm; after 2pm, adults, $8; under 12, free. blueridgebbqfestival.com

New Paintings by South Carolina Artist M I KE W I L L I AM S Residential and Commercial Framing

www.framedesignsedhouse.com 90 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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1322 East Washington St., B#1 Greenville, SC | 242-2255 Tues. - Fri. 10am - 5pm; Sat. 10am - 3pm

13–14

WILDFIRE WEEKEND FOR MEN While some guys’ weekends bring to mind an abundance of testosterone and bicep flexing, this clean-cut alternative focuses on the importance of spirituality and inner strength for whole body wellness. This year’s big draw includes guest speakers Phil, Alan, and Jase Robertson of Duck Dynasty, as well as football superstar Tim Tebow. Sports demos, hunting workshops, and faith conferences are also on tap. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 6–10:30pm; Sat, 7am–5pm. $129. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena. com

13–22

ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY Sure, we all have our “off” days, but Alexander takes it to a whole new level in this musical production of Judith Viorst’s classic children’s book. A few early morning mishaps soon set the tone for Alexander’s entire day. From cavities to lima beans and railroad train pajamas, this kid just can’t catch a break. The lesson learned? Bad days happen to everyone. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 1:30 & 5:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm. Adults, $26; juniors, $17. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org


13–22

CHAUTAUQUA HISTORY ALIVE FESTIVAL: RISING TO THE OCCASION If the likes of Patrick Henry and Harry Truman had strolled in every once in a while, history class might have been a bit more interesting. Held in locations around the Upstate, the annual event hosts 25 free shows and features some of the country’s best historical interpreters. This year’s theme highlights those who made a difference in our country through the power of courage, and includes discussions by Clara Barton, Henry, Truman, and Robert Smalls. Locations vary. Times vary. Free. (864) 244-1499, greenvillechautauqua.org

14

COLIN MOCHRIE & BRAD SHERWOOD

In the decades before Wayne Brady was asking people in bee costumes to step on down for Let’s Make a Deal, he shared the Whose Line Is It Anyway? stage with these two funnymen. Now the duo brings a live version of their hit television show to Greenville, taking cues from the audience for big laughs and good fun. Just don’t be shy if you plan on attending—you may be called on stage to participate. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $35-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

14

CYCLE TO FARM

14

EXPECTING GOODNESS SHORTFILM FESTIVAL The path from screenwriting to film screening is not an easy one, but the Expecting Goodness Film Festival is making things a little easier for Upstate hopefuls. Started in 2012 by the Hub City Writers Project and HUB-BUB, the film festival unites local South Carolinians in the film industry to tell stories that are both relatable and historic to our culture. This short-film festival is a culmination of a months-long process of filmmaker application sorting and judging. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Times vary. Ticket prices vary. expectinggoodness.com

15

COUNTING CROWS WITH TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

Perhaps more famous than lead singer Adam Duritz’s signature dreadlocks is the band’s multiplatinum 1993 album August and Everything After, which spawned hit singles “Mr. Jones” and “Round Here.” With the anticipated release of their new album this fall, the Crows are slated to play an SIlverSalon 4thS Town Apr14.indd evening of old favorites and new material. Joining them will be fellow California rockers Toad the Wet Sprocket, who rose to fame on the ’90s alternative scene with fear. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 7:30pm. $65-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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3/13/14 1:22 PM

Photograph (Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood) courtesy of the Peace Center

While the Upstate is known for being famously bike-friendly, this summertime event gives us a chance to show off our farm chops, as well. The 60-mile route through minimally populated rural farmland is broken up by local farm stops, where riders can sample and even purchase handcrafted treats and eats by the likes of Greenbrier and Double Blessing Farms. The ride culminates

with the fabulous after party, where a farm-to-table meal will be served along with local music and farm tours. Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Rd, Easley. Sat, 7am–5pm. $69 registration. cycletofarm.org/ greenville

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16

GOLF FOR RELIEF

EVITA

Hosted by the Greer Relief Agency, Golf for Relief puts players on the green to help raise some green for hunger and homelessness. The day starts off with a catered BBQ lunch courtesy of Smoke on the Water, followed by a 1pm tee-off time, where teams of up to four can compete for various awards and door prizes. Awards will be doled out for first, second, and third place in addition to longest drive, par three score, and closest to the pin. There’s no better way to combine hobby and helping, so register your team today. Willow Creek Golf Club, 205 Sandy Run Drive, Greer. Mon, 11:30am– 7pm. $100-$500 registration. (864) 801-2014, greerrelief.org

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The rise of Argentinian leader Eva Perón is set to song by masters of musical theatre Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Though it eventually evolved into a major motion picture starring Madonna as Perón, nothing can compare to hearing the words of “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” or “You Must Love Me” sung live. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $45-$75. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

26

Singer-songwriter Neko Case has been on the music scene for two decades, crafting a brilliant career as a member of Canadian indie rock band The New Pornographers, and shining as a talented solo artist. Her gritty, authentic sound on her latest album The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You proves she’s here to stay. Case will share the stage with singer Laura Veirs, whose folksy style has garnered her critical acclaim since the early 2000s. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave, Asheville. Thurs, 8pm. Advance, $28; door, $30. (828) 225-5851, theorangepeel.net

S LOW FOOD EARTH MARKET

Let’s be honest: one of the best parts of summer is enjoying all the fresh fruits and veggies that the season has to bear. But there’s no need to venture far for your basket-load of produce; local farmers are bringing their gifts to you. While the slow food movement continues to grow, so does customer demand, and this market provides all the clean, local, chemicalfree goods you can think of. Perfect for those light alfresco recipes or healthy eats any day of the week. NOMA Square, 220 N Main St. Wed, 11am–3pm. Free admission. slowfoodupstate.com

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92 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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27

Photograph (Evita) courtesy of the Peace Center; artwork courtesy of the Greenville County Museum of Art

SUMMERWORKS FINALE PERFORMANCE

Sure, Black Swan made us all look a little differently at the high-stakes, high-rewards world of ballet. But the beauty and poise of intensive study cannot be denied. The culmination of Carolina Ballet Theatre’s rigorous three-week collaboration between students and ballet professionals, the Summerworks series is the pinnacle of what happens when determination meets art. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $15. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Thru Sept 1 GREENVILLE DRIVE BASEBALL

There are few things more American than sipping a cup of warm beer while watching ball. But there are also few better ways to while away the warm days. Baseball is America’s pastime for a reason, and cheering on the Drive as they take on teams from Charleston to Florida is sure to become your family’s favorite pastime. Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Time and cost vary. greenvilledrive.com

Thru Sept 21

Thru Aug 27

LEGACY OF IMPRESSIONISM

SC BLUE REEDY RIVER CONCERTS

Free concerts are never frowned upon here in the Upstate, especially when the talent runs the gamut from jazz to reggae and blues. Families are strongly encouraged to attend this summertime series, the likes of which has previously hosted Lionz of Zion, Hot Gritz, and The Soulfeathers. Spread out your blanket and pack up dinner. It’s time to head outdoors. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7–9pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/ PublicInfo_Events/RRNCS.aspx

While Impressionism exudes decades of beauty and familiarity, its beginnings were steeped in experimentation. The characteristic play of light and shadow was a catalyst for many artists to explore new avenues of art as language versus image. Legacy of Impressionism showcases 40 artists from this era, and includes pieces by renowned voices like Gari Melchers and Helen Maria Turner. Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St, Greenville. Wed–Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 271-7570, gcma.org

Showcasing Greenville's most unique properties

   



Specializing  in  the  Augusta  Road,  Downtown,   North  Main  and  Parkins  Mill  neighborhoods.

www.VirginiaHayes.com JUNE 2014 / 93


Estates Homes as distinguished as our readers.

213 Sunset Pointe Way

4BR, 4.5BATH · MLS#20151954 · $1,700,000 Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC Ivy Nabors (864) 660-8401 www.cliffscommunities.com

3 Joshua’s Place

The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards®

The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards®

5BR, 5Full/3Half Bath · MLS#20147814 · $6,495,000 Justin Winter Sotheby’s International Realty www.JustinWinter.com (864)481-4444

5BR, 6BATH · MLS#20144657 · $1,950,000 Justin Winter Sotheby’s International Realty www.JustinWinter.com (864)481-4444

124 Wood Sage Court, Waterfront with Dock

820 Top Ridge Drive

6BR, 5.5BATH · MLS#1279289 · $1,695,000

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS Joy Steverson (864) 337-0625

300 Highridge Parkway

108 Elderberry Way, Waterfront with Dock

5 Peters Fork Lane

5BR, 5.5BATH · MLS#1277378 · $1,500,000

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS Melissa Morrell (864) 918-1734 www.greenvilleagent247.com

613 Brixton Circle

5BR, 6.5BATH · MLS#1260284 · $1,430,000

4BR, 3.5BATH · MLS#1250865 · $1,395,000

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS Kathy Cassity (864) 678-5250

Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC Vince Roser (864) 660-8422 www.cliffscommunities.com

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS Melissa Morrell (864) 918-1734 www.greenvilleagent247.com

The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards®

208 Holland Road

1574 Gap Creek Road

818 Alder Point Way, Waterfront with Boat Slip 4BR, 4.5BATH · MLS#20152362 · $989,000 Justin Winter Sotheby’s International Realty www.JustinWinter.com (864) 481-4444

4BR, 4.5BATH · MLS#1276443 · $984,000 Coldwell Banker Caine Virginia Abrams (864) 270-3329

5BR, 3.5BATH · MLS#1278749 · $989,900

6BR, 3.5BATH · MLS#1277118 · $750,000 Hamilton & Co. | Keller Williams Realty Dan Hamilton (864) 527-7685 www.MyGreenvilleHome.com


930 Old Williamston Road

27 Hobcaw Drive

4BR, 3.5BATH · MLS#1277669 · $630,000

5BR, 4.5BATH · MLS#1278197 · $615,000

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS Kathy Cassity (864) 678-5250

Hamilton & Co. | Keller Williams Realty Dan Hamilton (864) 527-7685 www.MyGreenvilleHome.com

201 Sunset Drive

4BR, 3.5BATH · MLS#1277268 · $594,900 Coldwell Banker Caine Debi Garrison (864) 630-8334 www.cbcaine.com/agents/debigarrison

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com

Look for our family of brands ALL AROUND TOWN.

www.communityjournals.com


SECOND

Glance

Natural Colors

L

ast December, while visiting the Jerald Melberg Gallery in Charlotte, I became transfixed by a large, muted abstract. I learned that the artist Lee Hall had earned great acclaim in the 1960s and 1970s, exhibiting alongside Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko and earning the Child Hassam Purchase Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1977. Hall, who holds a Ph.D. from New York University, found the world of academia more rewarding than the New York City gallery scene. She ultimately served as president of the Rhode Island School of Design, while continuing to paint privately. Recently, Hall, a North Carolina native, donated more than 300 works to the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte. Her work, inspired by landscapes and her travels, is in the permanent collection of dozens of museums, including our own Greenville County Museum of Art.—Courtney Tollison Hartness, Ph.D.

An exhibit of Hall’s works will be on display at Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd, Ste 10, from May 29 through June 28. Join Jerald Melberg on June 21 from 11am–noon at the gallery, for coffee and conversation about Hall’s works.

96 TOWN / towncarolina.com

(left) Lee Hall, Sea Night Shadow Window, 1978; watercolor, 14” x 11”; (right) Lee Hall, Quarry Façade, 1976; watercolor, 14” x 11”; artwork courtesy of the Jerald Melberg Gallery and Hampton III Gallery

Lee Hall’s meditations on nature take form in muted colors and subtle shapes


The breathtaking view atop the Blue Ridge Escarpment at Caesars Head State Park

There’s breathtaking and then there’s taking time to breathe. On rare occasions you find a magical place where you can experience both. From majestic mountains to sparkling lakes, rolling rivers to cascading falls… yeah, we’ve got that. Welcome to our world. To learn more, call 800.717.0023.


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TOWN June 2014  
TOWN June 2014  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals.