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Food Issue CELEBRATE THE SEASON WITH THE BEST CHEFS, EATS, AND FESTIVE DRINKS

Culinary Art: Still life with ingredients from The Pasta Addict’s kitchen; for more, see page 102.

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TRAVELERS REST

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114 Keowee Club Rd $2,950,689

256 Mtn. View Pointe Dr $2,455,672

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5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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187 Fisher Knob Road $1,945,676

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Buyers • Sellers Builders • Developers Homes • Land • Townhomes • Condos • Lots

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Where peak views meet peak conditions, all year. That’s the rare beauty of The Cliffs. This legendary collection of seven private lake and mountain club communities, only minutes from Greenville, offers the very best of the Carolina mountains. From the four-season climate and southern hospitality to year-round golf by legends like Fazio, Nicklaus and Player and the like-minded who enthusiastically call The Cliffs home, all seven clubs are yours to enjoy with a single membership.

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FIRST

Glance

Festive Gathering: Chef Michael Olbrantz brings the flavors of Mexico to Mercado, one of the new restaurants in Gather GVL, coming in 2019. For more, see “Crossing Borders” page 92. Photograph by Jivan Davé.

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LUXURY SERVICE AT EVERY PRICE POINT MOUNTAIN VIEWS, 30 ACRES

600 N Glassy Mountain Rd, Landrum $1,950,000 | MLS# 1367638 Meg Atkinson (843) 601-4191 DOWNTOWN VIEWS

59 Grand Vista Dr, Ridges at Paris Mnt $1,199,000 | MLS# 1369348 Holly May (864) 640-1959

29 ACRE ESTATE

570 Lawson Fork Rd, Inman $1,895,500 | MLS# 1346112 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

136 High Rock Ridge Dr, Cliffs at Glassy $1,295,000 | MLS# 1346118 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918

WALKING DISTANCE TO DOWNTOWN

317 Hampton Ave, Hampton Pinckney $1,049,000 | MLS# 1377474 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

200 Knightsridge Rd, Cliffs Valley $849,950 | MLS# 1361066 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

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106 Fire Pink Way, Cliffs at Glassy $825,000 | MLS# 1356127 Spencer Ashby (864) 344-0333 5 ACRE ESTATE

100 Spring Valley Rd, Greenville $674,900 | MLS# 1373464 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

109 Southkee Rd, Travelers Rest $821,200 | MLS# 1367871 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345

1029 Woodburn Rd, Spartanburg $685,000 | MLS# 1366189 Holly May (864)-640-1959

TO BE BUILT

61 Blacks Dr, Greenville $649,999 | MLS# 1377631 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

120 Plantation Dr, Woodruff $649,000 | MLS# 1362902 Damian Hall Group (828) 808-8305

VIEW FULL LISTINGS ONLINE AT BlackStreamInternational.com/s=town

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LUXURY SERVICE AT EVERY PRICE POINT SOLD

UNDER CONTRACT

123 Greybridge Rd, Lake Trollingwood $644,900 | MLS# 1368180 Holly May (864) 640-1959 Zach Herrin (864) 990-1761 INCREDIBLE VIEWS

108 May Apple Way, Cliffs at Glassy $499,000 | MLS# 1369764 Debra Owensby (864) 404-8295

203 Southview Ledge Rd, Glassy Mtn $575,000 | MLS# 1353158 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins (843) 696-7891

1551 Highway 56, Spartanburg $500,000 | MLS# 1347108 John "Clark" Kent (864) 784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins (843) 696-7891

AUGUSTA ROAD

29 Sylvan Dr, Pleasant Valley $439,800 | MLS# 1374988 Michael Mumma (864) 238-2542

416 Santa Cruz Way, Simpsonville $425,000 | MLS# 1377681 Holly May (864) 640-1959

2 Weycroft Ct, Creekwood $279,900 | MLS# 1379475 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865

26 Brookdale Ave, Greenville $242,000 | MLS# 1373046 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345

LAKEFRONT CORNER UNIT

144 Harbour Pointe, Lake Keowee $349,000 | MLS# 1379442 Kennie Norris (864) 608-0865 UNDER CONTRACT

DOWNTOWN LIVING

LOTS FOR SALE 4988 Jordan Rd, Greer 10 acres | $325,000 | MLS# 1376531 50 Grand Vista Dr, Greenville .82 acres | $199,000 | MLS# 1369582 3545 Jug Factory Rd, Greer 3.5 acres | $199,900 | MLS# 1371949

114 Caledonia Dr, Easley $218,000 | MLS# 1380064 Shannon Donahoo (864) 329-7345

14 B Knoxbury Terrace, Greenville $200,000 | MLS# 1378292 Joye Lanahan (864) 404-5372

30 St. Mary's Way, Marietta 9.6 acres | $99,000 | MLS# 1375963

BUYING OR SELLING? CALL US TODAY AT (864) 920-0303

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Get what you really want this year! BE S UR E TO S TO P BY AN D F ILL O UT YO UR WISH LIST 103-A Augusta St | Greenville, SC (864) 239-0788 M-Sat: 10am - 6pm, Sun: 12 - 5pm monkeesofthewestend.com

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Contents 14 21

EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

29 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

44

WEDDINGS

49

TOWNBUZZ

Experience Christmas through the eyes of the Old Masters at the Greenville County Museum of Art; Model Trains Station at Taylor’s Mill is on the right track; a grad of the SC Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities, Wonza Johnson brings Broadway to his home state; and a foolproof gift guide for all your foodie friends.

THIS PAGE: Anthony Pepe’s fresh spaghetti, which he makes in his home kitchen. For more see “La Pasta Vita,” page 102. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey Cover photograph by Paul Mehaffey

61 OUT OF TOWN

Tired of consumer Christmas? Rediscover simple holiday charm at Virginia’s Colonial Williamsburg­—where history and hearty meals make the season bright.

SPORT 69 TOWN When buying for an avid outdoorsman,

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TOWN ESSAY

111

EAT & DRINK

127

DINING GUIDE

138

TOWNSCENE

148

SECOND GLANCE

it’s best to get technical.

73 STYLE CENTRAL

This year, go rogue with your door décor; stuff these refined wares into your sportsman’s stocking; and buying from sister-run shop Given is a true gift.

82 MS. BEA WRIGHT

Ms. Wright suggests self-care can provide the clarity needed in complex relationships.

84 MAN ABOUT TOWN

When a presumptuous cat commandeers his porch, The Man realizes he has a few things in common with his feline friend.

2 9

CROSSING BORDERS

From Spain to Asheville, Chef Michael Olbrantz has worked in a lot of kitchens. But the one he’s most excited to helm will be at Gather GVL, where he’ll whip up Yucatán-inspired fare at his restaurant, Mercado. / by Kathryn Davé // photography by Jivan Davé

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Through her grandmother’s handed-down kitchenware, a writer discovers homecooking is where the heart is. The chemist-and-chef team behind Oak Hill Café & Farm offer inventive dishes; sip on Christmas cocktails at this kitsch holiday pop-up; find the perfect bottle for every friend with our giving guide; local coffee shops that care; and did someone say pavlova?

Got plans? You do now. CreativeSoul Photography showcases the beauty of natural hair at Spartanburg’s UPSTATE Gallery on Main.

02 1 LA PASTA VITA

Anthony Pepe’s love for his grandmother’s eggplant parmesan spiraled into an obsession with authentic Italian cuisine. The former New York City mixologist now hopes to share his pasta passion with Upstate fans. / by Steven Tingle // photography by Paul Mehaffey

December 11/16/18 3:10 PM


Happy Holidays from

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter December Highlights Hamilton, Sir

Performer Wonza Johnson returns to Greenville as cast member of a Broadway epic: page 52

Good Tidings

Settle into a historic holiday experience at Colonial Williamsburg: page 61

Tech Speak

Gear guys, get ready to geek out with our guide to all things outdoor tech: page 69

A Southern Food Legacy

Photograph by Chelsey A shford

After inheriting her grandmother’s heirlooms— one writer discovers the warmth of Southern fare through vintage kitchenware: page 88

The Future of Food

Crossing Borders

Food hall Gather GVL spotlights the culinary talents of Chef Michael Olbrantz: page 92

La Pasta Vita

Authentic Italian cuisine comes handmade from The Pasta Addict’s kitchen: page 102

Good Chemistry

A chance meeting led Chef David Porras and chemist Lori Nelsen to create the inventive food venture Oak Hill Café & Farm: page 112

A

few weeks ago, I experienced culinary wizardry at its finest. The gorgeous episode of Netflix’s Chef’s Table with Chicago’s Chef Grant Achatz prompted me to add “Dine at Alinea” to my bucket list. Thankfully, I put a check beside that dream on September 27, describing it as a Willy Wonka adventure (minus the fizzy lifting drinks and skindiscoloring bubble gum). Chef Achatz is young, intense, wildly creative, and a cancer survivor (of the tongue, no less). At Alinea, he defies culinary convention, combining science and art to create a new food language. Each element of the meal is intentional and interactive, from the centerpiece on the table, to the layers of aroma, flavor, and presentation, to the orchestrated dance of the servers. This is the most entertaining meal I’ve experienced, and perhaps the most experimental. After all, magic is a mix of science and creativity, and a willingness to break the rules. Essentially, Achatz is making up his own—the essence of creative work of any kind. In Greenville, we are in the midst of a food evolution, a call to our “food destination” proclamation. Thankfully, we have much to look forward to in 2019, with food halls, collaborative concepts, and a restaurant that aims to elevate cuisine to an Alinea-like plane. Drink culture is also keeping pace, with beer, cocktails, coffee, and wine excelling in quantity and quality. Food is a gateway to culture—to tradition, art, science, pleasure. As it firmly roots itself here, let’s toast to the diversity of what we have, and the excitement of what’s to come. May your table be full this season, Balloon, helium, green apple—the whimsical, delicious, and hilarious ending note to the tasting at Alinea.

I’d love to hear from you.

Photograph by Blair K nobel

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

Have a story idea, comment, or question? Write to me at blair@ towncarolina.com.

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

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WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MEAL OR DINING EXPERIENCE?

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com Fish sticks and apple Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

sauce. Day care. Go figure.

PAUL MEHAFFEY ART DIRECTOR A meal with the family I lived with in France—on Christmas Eve—where the fare was simple, yet elegant, satisfying but not too much, and the grandfather of the family sat me next to him so I could have the first taste of the wine grown on his property for centuries.

LAURA LINEN STYLE EDITOR Abby Moore Keith ASSISTANT EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS KATHRYN DAVÉ Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka

My first Michelinstarred restaurant? The 4am bacon, egg, and cheese sammie I devoured after giving birth to my first child? The very best dinner party we’ve thrown yet? Food is a stamp on my memory, and I am glad to have far, far too many to choose one.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Stephanie Burnette & Zoe Nicholson

Merry and Bright My most memorable dining experience was an early date with my future wife. We went to a now-closed Moroccan restaurant in Savannah, and spent the evening trying to fend off an aggressive belly dancer.

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS, ILLUSTRATORS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, TIMOTHY BANKS, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Connolly, Will Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Joel German, Jason & Tara Massey, Alice Ratterree, Cameron Reynolds & Eli Warren Andrew Huang EDITOR-AT-L ARGE

Holly Hardin VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KRISTY ADAIR Michael Allen Amanda Walker Emily Yepes DIRECTOR OF SALES ED IBARRA & Donna Johnston MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

I ate with my family on the Queen Mary when it was anchored in Long Beach, CA.

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp, MEREDITH RICE, Caroline Spivey & Liz Tew Jane Rogers MAGA ZINE ADVERTISING SPECIALIST Kristi Fortner ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER Sue Priester CONSULTING MEMBER Susan Schwartzkopf EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

Plumbing, Lighting, Hardware 400 E MCBEE AVE., SUITE 109, GREENVILLE, SC 29601 | 864-527-3841 A DIVISION OF CREGGER COMPANY, INC.

Saskatoon’s. It’s fun trying a variety of wild game and other foods I have never experienced.

Indulging in a hot bowl of jok (savory rice porridge) in Thailand’s Mae Hong Son province. Very similar to grits. Tasted like my Southern roots, halfway around the world.

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 8, No. 12) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The Cottage Group, a division of Dillard-Jones Builders, is excited to present the Upstate’s very own Southern Living Custom Builder Program Holiday Showcase Home. This custom cottage is located in Bella Grove, one of Hollingsworth Park’s newest neighborhoods. This smart-sized, custom built cottage will be furnished for the holiday season by Tribus Design Studio. Don’t miss this exciting opportunity. Visit cottagegroup.com for tour and ticket information.

bella grove

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BELLA GROVE

COTTAGE noun / cot•tage / \’kä-tij\

A small home with a big life. Maintenance Free Lawns • Cottage Homes from the High $400s • Walking Trail to Legacy Park Custom Built by Exclusive Preferred Builders • Close to Future Swamp Rabbit Trail Extension

Visit the Sales Office for a Personal Tour 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 • Greenville

(864) 329-8383 Verdae_TOWN_BG TOWN_blank page.indd September 6 2018.indd 1

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December 2018 Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

HAMILTON Alexander Hamilton may have been a founding father, first secretary of the treasury, and creator of the New York Post, but he’ll go down in twenty-firstcentury history as the star of a record-breaking Broadway smash. Following its 2015 premier, the Lin-Manuel Miranda–penned musical became a virtual overnight sensation, captivating international audiences, critics, and celebrity fans across the board. Told through a series of significant events in the statesman’s life using a medley of pop, hip-hop, R&B, and showtunes, Hamilton is inspiring, exciting entertainment fit for history and Broadway buffs alike. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Dec 4–16. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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MAKERS COLLECTIVE’S HOLIDAY POP UP SHOP

CHRISTMAS ON THE ROCKS

We’ve all seen the questionable effects child stardom can have on a young soul, but what do you suppose has happened to some of our favorite holiday characters? Did Charlie Brown have a breakdown after that dinky tree finally bit the dust? Did Cindy Lou Who develop an inexplicable affection for hairy men? Why do miracles only occur on 34th Street? Drown your holiday sorrows in a sea of bourbon eggnog (minus the ’nog) in this realistic portrayal of life after the big screen.

From the folks who bring you the wildly popular Indie Craft Parade comes the Holiday Pop Up Shop, a collection of original gifts crafted by local artisans. The temporary marketplace will include handmade jewelry, artwork, home décor, wearables, edibles, and even a few must-haves for the kiddos. It’s a great opportunity to do double duty: you provide invaluable support to your local artists and wrap up that holiday gift list. 1239 Pendleton St, Greenville. Dec 1–16, Thurs–Sun, 10am–7pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. Free. makerscollective.org

The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St. Dec 6–23, Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

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Photograph by Wallace Krebs, courtesy of The Warehouse Theatre

Photograph by Jivan Davé

FRANK CAPRA’S IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

If you can sit through this classic screen-to-stage performance without tearing up, you may be a true Grinch. After losing the company his father struggled to build and putting the finances of an entire town in jeopardy, businessman George Bailey is at his wit’s end. Peering over a New York bridge, he contemplates suicide, believing that his nonexistence is more valuable than his entire life. With the help of angel-to-be Clarence, George soon realizes that the biggest gift of all is life itself. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. Dec 6–16, Wed, 7:30pm; Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-28. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

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2ND ANNUAL UGLY SWEATER BAR CRAWL

NEW YEAR’S EVE 2019 SOUTHERN GALA

Grandkids rejoice! It’s finally time to put that cardigan your Nana knitted you six years ago to good use. Don your tackiest garb and get your jollies at 12 downtown watering holes—including Chicora Alley, Vine Nightclub, On the Roxx, and more—where specialty Christmas cocktails and festive fare will be waiting. There are even a few giveaways in store—you know, if you’re into the whole regifting thing.

Start 2019 off with a bang—and with a good cause in hand! Proceeds from the glitzy soirée will benefit the National Alliance of Mental Illness in Greenville and Tell Every Amazing Lady about Ovarian Cancer, two Upstate organizations dedicated to improving the overall mental and physical health of our community. Your ticket includes access to three open bars, savory appetizers, an interactive photo booth, tunes by Jumping Jukebox, and, yep, a Champagne toast at midnight complete with confetti.

Downtown Greenville. Sat, Dec 8, 2–10pm. $15. eventbrite.com

Hilton Greenville, 45 W Orchard Park Dr. Mon, Dec 31, 8:30pm. $100-$135. southerngala.com

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA Frosty, schmosty. This progressive rock TransSiberian Orchestra is about to turn the same ol’, same ol’ holiday standards upside down on its twentieth anniversary tour. Bursting forth with unbridled energy and musical power, The Ghosts of Christmas Eve is a journey through the band’s greatest hits. It’s just like chestnuts on an open fire—if those chestnuts were brilliant light displays and that open fire was some blazing pyrotechnics. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Fri, Dec 7, 4pm & 8pm. $40-$77. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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Your Trusted Energy Experts Providing Safe, Smart Power

We’re “all-in” for smart power… and for working together to use energy wisely. Questions about solar power, batteries or generators? Call the Energy Experts today!

800-240-3400 • blueridge.coop A Service of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

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List z

THE

Quick HITS DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL

z When Charles Dickens penned his now-famous novella way back in 1843, we doubt he imagined Kermit the Frog starring as Bob Cratchit. Regardless, this Dickens’ tale of a soul reborn is a holiday classic with an amazing message. Albeit a little revamped, this musical version promises to unite all your favorite characters from Tiny Tim to Jacob Marley for an uplifting story of what’s truly important in life. Don’t be afraid to sing along—you never know when the ghosts might pay you a visit. The Logos Theatre, 80 School St, Taylors. Thru Dec 22. Thurs, 11:30am; Fri–Sat, 7pm. $27.50. (864) 268-9342, thelogostheatre.com

GREENVILLE POINSETTIA CHRISTMAS PARADE

Photograph by Ken Settle, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

z It’s a family tradition! For decades, downtown Greenville’s procession of festooned floats has been the way to jumpstart your Christmas spirit. Pile on the jingle and the jangle with plenty of festive carolers, displays, and holiday cheermeisters in tow. Keep your eyes peeled for the Big Man in Red—he’s been known to make an appearance down the chimney. Main St, Downtown Greenville. Sat, Dec 1, 6–7:30pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/1330/Poinsettia-Christmas-Parade

FLASHING RED—ART SHOW AND SALE RECEPTION

z Art, fine fare, wine, and beer—all for a good cause? Consider us present. AID Upstate hosts its first-ever Art Show and Sale Reception at Indigo Flow & Art Studio in honor of World AIDS Day. More than 25 regional artists will show and sell, but stay for special words from author and pastor Deb Richardson-Moore, Clark Nesbitt, and Beth Batson. All benefits from the drop-in event will serve those living with HIV in Greenville, Pickens, Anderson, and Oconee Counties. Indigo Flow & Art Studio. 1272 Pendleton St, Greenville. Sat, Dec 1, 4–7pm. Free, donations welcome. aidupstate.org

LAUGHING ALL THE WAY

z If you’re looking to make those spirits bright (and a few bells on bobtails ring), we suggest heading to Centre Stage for its annual holiday hullabaloo: a veritable fruitcake chock-full of comedic sketches, time-honored classics, Christmas choreography, and sing-along favorites. If this doesn’t tickle your tinsel, nothing will. Centre Stage, 501 River St. Dec 6–22, Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $22-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

TOM STANLEY STRUCTURES

z Artist Tom Stanley grew up in a small mill town, and his mother ran a boarding house. Early studies of mechanical and architectural drafting show up in the work he’s currently exhibiting at the Hampton III Gallery, and include the remnants of his earliest fascination with houses, façades, and man-made environments. Winner of the 2018 Verner Award, which honors outstanding achievements in the arts in South Carolina, Stanley will be on hand to discuss his concept that a place that people live in is not just a shelter, but a significant heartfelt idea. Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd, Ste 10, Taylors. Thru Dec 31. Coffee and Conversation, Sat, Dec 8, 11am–noon. Free. (864) 2682771, hamptoniiigallery.com

Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band He’s had Hollywood nights. He’s gone against the wind. He’s been down on Main Street. But you’ll be able to find Bob Seger right here in Greenville when he makes a stop on his Runaway Train tour. The rocker has been around since the 1960s, popping out hit after hit like “You’ll Accomp’ny Me,” “We’ve Got Tonight,” and, of course, Tom Cruise’s infamous underwear-sliding anthem, “Old Time Rock and Roll.” Sure, he’s got a few miles on the ol’ odometer, but like they say, rock and roll never forgets. Seger will be joined by special guest Nancy Wilson of Heart. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St. Thurs, Dec 20, 7:30pm. $47-$125. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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Town

ON THE

GCMA Fine Arts & Design Weekend Preview Party October 11, 2018

Jason & Donna Adams

Noelle Wilson & Loretta Stephens

Larry Kiss & Todd Edwards

Stephen & Mallory Daniel

It was a black-tie affair for about 500 patrons who participated in the kickoff evening for the Greenville County Museum of Art’s annual Fine Arts & Design Weekend. Guests not only had the first opportunity to peruse and purchase from the show’s 26 visiting fine art, antique, and design dealers, but were also treated to live jazz tunes, an address by keynote speaker and lifestyle expert Danielle Rollins, and tasty hors d’oeuvres including lobster rolls, collards, beef tenderloin, and smoked salmon.

Barry McElreath & Denise Corey

Gayle, Carrie & Bryant Brown

Laura Greyson & Charley Edmondson

Anne, Bill & Ally Masters

By Bonfire Visuals

Flavia Harton, Tom Snider, Connie McDowell, David Seaver, Michelle Seaver, Dr. Stephen Yarborough, & Jennifer Yarborough

Lilly & Mark Antebi

Travis Garner, Delie Fort & Alan DeCredico

Terry Grayson-Caprio & Mike Caprio

David & Bonnie Dixon

Michael Redmon & Alan Ethridge

Clay Rainey & Tom Angermeier

Steven & Angela Sawyer Stephen & Mary Ridgeway with Susanne Norwood & Jonathan Norwood

Bev & Bob Howard with Anne Woods

Gayle & Bryant Brown

Fabian & Liz Unterzaucher with Andreas Heinzelmann

Lynn Greenlaw & Joan Herlong DECEMBER 2018 / 29

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11/16/18 10:52 AM


For to us a child is born, to us a son is given,

Ronda Reynolds Smith & Alexandra Bille Brahe

and the government will be on his shoulders.

October 19, 2018

And he will be called

Furman University welcomed more than 70 guests to celebrate the debut of Lineage: Tom Flowers & Family at the Thompson Art Gallery. Featuring an array of mixed-media crafted by three generations of visual artists (including Furman’s longtime art department head, Tom Flowers), the exhibition’s opening was highlighted with a discussion by Mark Flowers on his father’s dedicated influence to the creative arts community. Guests enjoyed food provided by the university’s Bon Appetit catering services.

Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

By Fourth Dimension Photography

– Isaiah 9:6

Merry Christmas!

Lineage: Opening Reception for Tom Flowers & Family

Barbara Jackson, Bill Allan & Hannah Poe

Tom Marchant, REALTOR

Charles & Dianne McGee

Finley Buchanan, Campbell Sullivan & Marta Lanier Olivia Corso & Ann Ludlow

Bob Chance, Mark Flowers & Ross McClain

864.449.1658 | Tom@TomMarchant.com

Joel Wilkinson & Jim Campbell

Beth Love, Glen Miller & Steven Chapp

30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town Siobahn Saul, Camilla Styles & Edward Anderson

An Extracurricular Evening for Public Education Partners

109

September 23, 2018 Greenville County Public Schools took the spotlight at the 18th annual Extracurricular Evening, hosted at East Court Street’s rooftop locale, Avenue. Downtown eatery Rick Erwin’s furnished delicious cuisine for the soirée, and tunes were provided by the Fine Arts Center Jazz Quartet. An Extracurricular Evening helps maintain vital support to strengthen our area’s public education system through community collaboration and grassroots initiatives.

grants totaling

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Hubert Yarborough & Susan McLarty

By Jack Robert Photography

more than

organizations touched since 2006

550 members

Mimi Melehes, Brent Williams & Penn Williams

Shaniece Criss

Derek Lewis, Angel Williams & Kenny Whaley

We invite you to join Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville.

Chiles & Betsy Steifle

Channing & Chris Laughridge

greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

2018-2019 Partners Joel & Jenn Douglas with Jessica Parker DECEMBER 2018 / 31

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Doug Dorman & Jennie Beaudine

Marion Crawford, Angi Einstein & Flavia Harton

June Bradley & Claudette Corbert

Pam Carroll, Megan Schwab & Anne Crowell

Rick Cunningham & Leah Parisi

Terhune & Denise Sudderth

Charles Hardaway, Allen Armstrong & Robert Hardaway Anna Britton Madden & Sarah Carter Farmer

Nancy Whitworth & Lynn Harton Jimmy Martin, Brenda Martin, Denise Code, Merl Code, John Hackney & Janice Hackney Betty Teague & Bev Howard

Rick Davis

Stacey Bradshaw, Rich Bradshaw, Sue Chamberlain, Charles Chamberlain & David Hogde Blair Knobel & Susie White

Dr. Larry Gluck

Sarah Arbogast, Beth Wilson, Cheryl Wiggins & Anne Carpenter

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town Jared & Carey Martin

Charitable Giving Awards October 30, 2018 Hosted by the Community Foundation of Greenville at the Poinsett Club, and presented by Elliott Davis, the annual Charitable Giving Awards recognized six Upstate individuals and organizations for their continued contributions to the Greenville community. This year’s honorees were fêted with cocktails and delectable hors d’oeuvres and enjoyed special video presentations.

Angi Einstein, Frank O’Brien & Marion Crawford

Allie McGillick, Daniel Leshman & Marquet Mensing

By Dove Light Photography

Will Hunt & Emily Bridges Bev & Bob Howard with Diane Perlmutter

Tracy & Tricia Lukanic

Sarah Carter Farmer & Frank Williams

Eric Hardaway, Todd Hardaway, Sydney Taylor & Misty Hardaway

Isabel Forester & Joyce Alexander

Rick Davis, Sue Priester, Tracy Hardaway & Bob Morris

John Kaup, Liz Seman, Kate Kaup & Shaniece Criss

Anna Britton Madden, Sarah Carter Farmer & Mills Hall

William Crawford & Dan Adams DECEMBER 2018 / 33

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ON THE

Town

GSO Patron Party Symphony Tour of Homes Linda O’Brien with Michelle & David Seaver

October 2, 2018 Nancy Teachey & Marty Bollman

Selena Riddle & Richard Warder

Ellie & John Mioduski Bob Howard, Kay Foster & Jerry Dempsey

Laura Arnold with Jane & Ian Clarke

Nancy Stanton

The Guild of the Greenville Symphony kicked off its 40th annual Symphony Tour of Homes with an elegant patron party at a private Upstate residence. Nearly 140 GSO supporters convened to sip Champagne in the grand foyer and nosh on lavish hors d’oeuvres served in the dining room and patio area by Jan Steele Catering. Pianist Sandra Beckham kept the music going throughout the evening as guests strolled the home’s lovely outdoor gardens. By Chelsey Ashford Photography

Derek & Allison Masquelier with Robert Smith

Roselle & Bill Zuppinger

Diane Reynolds, Mazza Filipi & Carol Hinton

Jane Clarke & Carolyn Beckie Sue & Daryl Fisher Lib Richardson, Kitty Richardson Allen, Anne Barr & Rosa Eisenstandt

Luba & Edvard Tchivzhel with Linda Grandy

Terry & Pam Weaver

Roz & Stan Smith

Karl Sedlarz, Barbra Hyde-White & Charlie Sabo

Susie & Andy White

Norman & Sharron Glickman

Margaret Wasson & Nancy Stanton

Janette Whelchel, Diana Ferrazza & Carol Toth

Dixie Dulin, Linda Grandy & Thad Dulin

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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SYNNEX Share the Magic Evening Gala October 6, 2018 The Greenville Convention Center opened its doors to more than 1,200 attendees for SYNNEX’s 8th annual fundraising fête. The evening’s itinerary included both silent and live auctions, dinner service, and a live entertainment program. Proceeds raised from the magical occasion directly benefit local organizations A Child’s Haven, Clement’s Kindness, Pendleton Place, and Make-A-Wish South Carolina.

Lynn Mitchell with Charles & Ericka Brewer

By Fourth Dimension Photography Tawanda Dogan & Bobby Johnson

Alan Buttery, Silvia Buttery, Kathleen Wentworth, & Karla Hirshorn

Anna Friddle & Courtnay Laws Ian & Madeline Fleming

Kenny Ridgell, Tate Brody, Tao Brody & Alex Young

Rita Handler & Francisca Serem

Ralph Sweeney & Osa Benson

Jay Revson & Katie Nutaitis

36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Larkin’s Picnic for the Park October 6, 2018 Larkin’s Catering and Events hosted an al fresco dining experience on the Village Green at the Courtyard by Marriott Downtown Greenville in support of the Cancer Survivors Park. The picnic-style outing featured casual outdoor seating, a delicious lunch menu, wine samples, and musical accompaniment to set the tone for a perfect afternoon.

Molly Bozeman & Taylor Goodman Mario Brown with Dan & Jenny Weidenbenner

By Fourth Dimension Photography

Joshua Goodwin & Lynda Leventiswells Beth Leatherman, Patti Crawford, Laura Coleman Nickles & Mary Catherine Loftus

Brantley Gentry, Rhett Brown & Bruce Wise

Heidi Aiken & Jeff Martin

Heather Couch & Meghan Demm

Christina Murphy, Lynda Leventis Wells, Bob Munnich, Larkin Hammond, Kay Roper & Bruce Wise DECEMBER 2018 / 37

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ON THE

Town

Chip Wiper, Nan Minor & Elisabeth Lee

Campfire & Cocktails for YMCA’s Camp Greenville October 11, 2018 Stacie Simpson & Jenna Johnson

Mike Baker, Tracy Baker, William Coates, Joanne Avery & Geoff Taylor

Will Hodge, Mary Duff & Mike Rayneri with Daniel & Taylor Munch

Daniel & Lauren Conner

Tyler Thornburgh & Ashley Allison

Henry Robertson & Ned Barr

Camp Greenville’s abiding tradition as an Upstate staple was toasted (literally) with a unique outdoorsturned-indoors event at the Rutherford. Some 150 alumni, parents, and friends of the camp gathered at the Sunrift Adventures–decorated venue to swap stories over craft libations, Frogmore stew, and barbecue courtesy of Henry’s Smokehouse. And, of course, there were specialty s’mores on hand for stacking and snacking. By Jack Robert Photography

Jenna Howard & Debbie Henson

Chip Wiper

Kathryn McMahon, Patrick McInerney, Valerie Pascoe & Catherine Schumacher

Deanna & Sam Franklin

Joe Cruz, Sanders Sullivan & Harris Courson

Jacob, Ethan, Zach & Phil Barbie & Dennis Jefferson

Anna & Jennifer Crittenden

Kacey Eichelberger, Chip Wiper & Kacee Lominack

Michael Moore, Zack Hall & Rachel Young

Anna Hodge, Marie Monroe & Jeff Dunlaevy

Valerie Pascoe, Cory Harrison, Kathleen Johnson & Nicholas Patton

Hope Scheving & Erica Snyder

Jay Cush & Julie Cush with Daniel McCord

38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Jennifer Blair & Mary Hellen Kelly

Meals on Wheels’ 50th Anniversary October 16, 2018 The meal delivery organization commemorated fifty years of service— and more than 12 million dishes distributed—in the Upstate with an anniversary bash at downtown’s Avenue event space. Meals on Wheels donors, clients, volunteers, families, and other supporters mingled over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres while honoring the program’s faithful commitment to serving homebound individuals throughout the Greenville community. By Jack Robert Photography Dani & Jackson Holt

Laryn Weaver & William Johnston

Andrew & Donna Cajka with Lee Anne Scales & Austin Goforth David Sudduth

Meredith Rice & Richie Godfrey

Your wedding modern & timeless

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Cornell Davis & Dedra Simmons

Becky Lilla & Angela McConville

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com Westin_hlfV_TOWN Dec17.indd 1 town_dec_ott wf+mac.indd 40

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11/16/18 4:47 PM


ON THE

Town

Greenville ALS Clinic Mixer October 19, 2018 Greenville’s Kroc Tennis Center served up a fun evening of community tennis for players from across the area during the #TouchedByALS mixer. Designed to benefit the Greenville ALS Clinic at the Greenville Health System, the evening also included a raffle of fantastic company-donated gifts, with funds raised from the event put toward assistive tools for ALS patients throughout Georgia and the Carolinas.

Susan Tankersley & Libby McMillan Henson

Create more Time, Space and Peace this holiday season.

Joe Henson & Suzy Hobbs

By Bonfire Visuals

Van & Mandy Merchant

Now Open! Our Legacy Square

at Verdae Showroom and Design Center Perry Brewer & Diane Zeager

3 GENERATIONS OF CLOSETEERS

Tammie Hoy & Teresa Strait

Greg Rudell & Sheila Hinson

Libby McMillan Henson & Joe Henson

Greenville Showoom & Design Center Legacy Square at Verdae, 340 Rocky Slope, Suite 104 www.carolinacloset.com | 864.288.0257 DECEMBER 2018 / 41

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ON THE Hannah Peeples & Micah Klein

Maggie Jones, Diane Hopkins-Hughs, Mary Lou Huntoon & Gary Huntoon

Greenville Open Studios Preview Party at the Metropolitan Arts Council November 3, 2018

Alan Ethridge, Hank McCullough & Merietta McCullough Frank Huguenin & April Huguenin

Anne Howson, Annette Burdette & John Casey

John Glymph & Ann Malphrus

Gayla Day, BJ Koonce & Phillip Day

Town

A week ahead of its annual fall weekend, the Metropolitan Arts Council opened gallery doors for an evening of art appreciation. Guests enjoyed light refreshments and drinks while enjoying a special preview of works by Open Studios participants, on display through the Square Affair exhibit. By Dove Light Photography

Cece Burnett & Michelle York Kelley Barnhardt & Jay Barnhardt

Liz Daly-Korybski & Vera Gomez Kevin Brinson, Gina Beck, Myson Jones, Gladys Sosa, Erica Lynn & Sylvester Lynn

Susan Peart & David Peart

Biff Dickerson, Peggy Dickerson, Cameron Dickerson, Brady Dickerson, Joy Dickerson, Emmy Dickerson, Davis Dickerson & Andrew Judkins

William Clinkscales, Patrick Clinkscales & Amelia Clinkscales

Mary Jo Franks & Rebecca Stockham

Elizabeth Mira & August Spencer

Janina Tukarski Ellis & Pat Kilburg

David Novak, Kathy Young Albertelli, Lisa Marlo Bethea & Paul Bethea

Edwige Lacorne, Paulin Lacorne, Nadia Barbotin & Benoit Lacorne

Dinah Johnson, Bill Johnson & Julie Fish

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Located on scenic Lake Hartwell directly across from Clemson University, Lakeside Lodge offers a unique experience combining the amenities of a high-end resort with the benefits of condominium ownership and rental potential.

LAKESIDE LODGE CLEMSON. IT BELONGS HERE. AND SO DO YOU.

Under Construction | Priced from the mid $200s | Financing Available Visit our Sales Center at 906 Tiger Blvd. in Clemson 864-775-5550 | WWW.LAKESIDELODGECLEMSON.COM The information contained herein concerns a Rule 506(c) private placement of securities. All purchasers must be accredited investors as defined in federal securities laws.

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Zoe Nicholson

Amanda Pouch & Frank Stern October 13, 2018

F

amily is everything. And for Greenville natives Amanda Pouch and Frank Stern, it’s family they have to thank for bringing them together. Set up on a blind date by two aunts, Amanda and Frank spent their first evening together at The Bohemian restaurant on Stone Avenue. The two instantly clicked. Exactly three years later, at the exact same spot where fate and family brought them together, Frank proposed to Amanda. She happily accepted.

44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Much like their first date, the couple’s wedding was truly a family affair. The ceremony took place at Trinity Church of Greenville with Amanda’s brother officiating. The bride looked elegantly chic in a Hayley Paige gown with a bouquet and arrangements from Bloom. The reception was held on Amanda’s aunt’s lawn, the al fresco setting providing a relaxed atmosphere to celebrate the newlyweds. A painting by the bride’s mother greeted guests as they arrived, while the groom’s brother treated the newlyweds to classic croons

Family First: Amanda Pouch and Frank Stern’s magical reception took place in the bride’s aunt’s backyard—three tents were illuminated by candlelight and Edison-bulb strands and decorated with greenery and white flowers in Canton vases.

with Charleston-band Return of the Mac. The Bakery Off Augusta provided a show-stopping five-tiered almond cake with amaretto and fresh roses. It was a night for friends, fun, and, of course, family. The couple resides in Greenville, where Amanda works as an accountant at Find Great People, and Frank is an associate attorney at Turner Padget Graham & Laney. GABRIELLE GRACE PHOTOGRAPHY

DECEMBER 2018 / 45

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TOWN

Weddings Hannah Allchin & Milton Alfred Smith III July 7, 2018 When Milton (Mills) Smith showed up to his birthday party on Lake Bowen, he had no clue he was about to receive the greatest birthday gift of all—his future bride. Hannah Allchin didn’t know many people at the party, but she hit it off with the birthday boy and they began dating. After two years, Mills was ready for a different celebration. During a weekend getaway, the couple attempted to catch the sunset, but it was too foggy. Thankfully, Mills had another romantic gesture in mind, and that night, he asked Hannah to be his forever. The wedding took place at Avenue, where the couple’s out-of-town guests were welcomed with gift bags featuring Hannah and Mills’ favorite local goodies. Hannah wore a gown from a shop in her hometown of North Canton, Ohio—a piece of home with her on her big day. The couple lives in Spartanburg, where Hannah is a manager at Timken, and Mills works in sales at Blue Ridge Log Cabins. RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

Barrett Clayton & Lauren Childers July 21, 2018 When Barrett Clayton and Lauren Childers met during their senior year at Clemson, neither suspected they were meant to be together. Life had other plans, however, and a year later they hit it off in downtown Greenville on their first official date. What started as friendship soon became courtship, and two years after their romantic relationship began, Barrett was prepared to pop the big question. Wanting the day to be special, he suggested an impromptu trip to Château Élan in Georgia. A breathtaking view of the vineyards served as the perfect backdrop for Barrett to propose to Lauren. The ceremony was held at First Presbyterian Church in downtown Greenville, the same spot Lauren’s parents made their vows almost 30 years before. The bride wore a gown from The Poinsett Bride, and guests danced the night away to the tunes of The Mighty Kicks. Lauren and Barrett continue their love story in Greenville, where Lauren is a medical student at the University of South Carolina Medical School, Greenville campus, and Barrett is director of secondary markets at Lima One Capital. SPOSA BELLA PHOTOGRAPHY

Jordan Johnson & Kelsey Beals May 19, 2018 If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Or in Jordan Johnson and Kelsey Beals’ case, fall in love. After Kelsey’s kickball team thoroughly beat Jordan’s in the league championship, Jordan recognized an opportunity and recruited his competitor for his flag football team. Eventually, competition turned to romance and the two began dating. Three years later, while on a sunrise walk along the beach, Jordan dropped to one knee and asked Kelsey to be his wife. After a joyous “yes,” the newly engaged couple returned to Jordan’s family at the beach house to celebrate their victory in the game of love. The ceremony was held in downtown Greenville at First Presbyterian Church, where Jordan is a lifelong member. The reception took place at The Rutherford, and guests enjoyed treats by Good Life Catering and Swamp Fox Donuts. Thanks to Kelsey’s creative mother and sisters, the whole affair was splendidly whimsical with homemade bouquets and décor. Kelsey and Jordan begin their new chapter in Greenville. Kelsey owns GIFT Counseling Center for Wellness, and Jordan works at Francis Produce Company. LAUREN MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Artwork courtesy of the Greenville County Museum of Art

A Christmas Story: Madonna and Child with Angels by Master of the Greenville Tondo, late 15th century. Oil on panel.

Divine Art

This Christmas, experience the renowned works of the Old Masters DECEMEBER 2018 / 49

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Framing History The Greenville County Museum of Art presents the Old Masters works of the Museum & Gallery at Bob Jones University / by Abby Moore Keith

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t’s Christmastime, the season of festive window displays, twinkly lights, and rotund, white-bearded men in red suits. But behind all the hustle and ho-ho-ho, the Christian community celebrates a quieter story—the humble birth of a baby born some two thousand years ago in rural Palestine. A child’s tale to some, a message of hope to others, there’s no denying it’s a dramatic narrative, one that’s been brought to life by some of the most celebrated artists of all time. Geniuses of figure and fresco, the Old Masters—think Raphael, Da Vinci, Correggio—dominated the art world for centuries with their portrayals of biblical scenes. Their paintings hang in famous museums across the globe, but surprisingly, a large sample can be found here in Greenville. Since its inception in the early 1950s, The Museum & Gallery at Bob Jones University has amassed one of the largest collections of Old

Master paintings in America. In fact, it boasts more than 400 hundred works of European religious artwork from the 1300s to 1800s, plus 2,000 objects (including furniture, carvings, sculpture, and textiles) spanning 45 centuries of Western culture. Twenty-two paintings and one sculpture are now on display at the Greenville County Museum of Art. “It’s a good taste of what there is to enjoy in the whole collection,” Erin Jones, director of M&G, explains. She sits surrounded by several massive paintings in the midst of the gallery on the Bob Jones campus. The space is closed as they pursue a more accessible location downtown, making the Sampling the Old Masters exhibit at the GCMA a timely presentation. “It’s a beautiful collection that they have,” says GCMA curator Chesnee Klein. “It’s great to collaborate with them.” She guides me to several circular

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Artwork courtesy of the Greenville County Museum of Art

Hark the Herald: (Left to right) Madonna and Child with an Angel by Sandro Botticelli, 1444–1510. Tempera on panel; Landscape with the Baptism of Christ by Salvator Rosa,1655. Oil on canvas; Christ Disputing with the Elders by Rutilio di Lorenzo Manetti, 1628. Oil on canvas. Sampling the Old Masters displays 22 paintings on loan from the Old Master Painting Collection of the M&G at Bob Jones University.

paintings, termed tondos, hanging in the gallery space, including Madonna and Child with an Angel by Early Renaissance artist Sandro Botticelli, and one attributed to the Master of the Greenville Tondo. (Yes, Greenville.) Because the artist is unknown—most likely a pupil of Raphael’s fifteenthcentury instructor, Pietro Perugino—his name is derived from the place that carries his most representative work, in this case, our Upstate hometown. Thirty-two works are attributed to the Master of the Greenville Tondo, on display in galleries from Princeton to Venice. Other highlights include the only full series of the Four Evangelists, (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), along with works by famed Flemish painters Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, and Mabuse’s Madonna of the Fireplace. In the depicted scene, Mary sits by a hearth, a naked baby Jesus squirming in her lap. The domestic nature is charming, though the cultural context can be historically confusing. The home is decorated in the Dutch-style of the Northern Renaissance with draping linens and distinct tile floor patterns, and instead of an olive-brown Jewish woman in first-century garb, Mary is a red-headed Flemish lady in late fifteenth-century wardrobe. While it may seem strange for first-century figures to be portrayed through the lens of Flemish culture, M&G’s Erin Jones encourages the audience to lay aside modern assumptions and instead view the artwork through the lens of the painter. For example in the Mabuse piece, Mary’s

arm is outstretched, testing the air to ensure its warmth and dryness—the ideal environment to change a diaper. A fireplace bellows rests on the floor and a fifteenth-century baby walker with little wooden wheels sits in the corner. “These paintings are time capsules from the past,” Jones says. “They hold clues to history.” She gestures to a large piece resting in the corner of the M&G space. It pictures Christ’s ascension to heaven, but from the lens of clouds; the viewer is looking down on the apostles below. The painting was created by French illustrator Louis Auguste Gustave Doré in the 1800s, right after the invention of the hot-air balloon. It’s an aerial perspective that would have been revolutionary at the time, Jones explains, but can be underappreciated by the modern-day viewer. “They still have stories to tell,” says Jones. And for a stunning artistic telling of the original Christmas story, Sampling the Old Masters is well worth a viewing. Works from the M&G at Bob Jones University are on display at the GCMA through December 30. Other pieces of the collection are on loan to the Georgia Museum of Art, the Museum of the Bible in D.C., and others across the globe. M&G director Erin Jones will give a special tour of the exhibit on Sunday, December 9, at 2pm. For more information visit gcma.org or bjumg.org. DECEMBER 2018 / 51

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Hamilton, Sir South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities grad Wonza Johnson comes back to Greenville in the role of a lifetime / by Jac Valitchka

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is name means “the one who shall be king.” He was accepted to Juilliard— and turned it down—and his very first audition out of college was for the cultural phenom that is Hamilton The Musical. He ended up landing the second national tour (coming to the Peace Center, December 4–16). He’s worked hard to get where he is—and where he’s going? Only his agent might know for sure, but we’re betting the phone is ringing off the hook, because according from fans and reviews, his performance of Hamilton is off the chain. Ladies and gentlemen, meet Wonza Johnson.

Tell me about your name. >> It’s West African. My dad is from Ghana, and it means ‘the one who shall be king.’ I get ‘Wonza’ all the time, but it’s actually [pronounced] ‘Won-zay.’ Congratulations on the success! How did you get to this point? We know the Governor’s School here in Greenville played a part. >> I started performing around fifth grade and auditioned for the community playhouse where I am from in Lancaster County, South Carolina. They were doing Tom Sawyer, and I got cast in one of the supporting roles, and the director said, ‘You know, in every scene you kind of steal the show. I think this is something you really want to do.’ So I ended up going to the magnet program called Andrew Jackson Middle School, which is arts-focused and drama-focused. The bus would drive me from Lancaster to Kershaw, and then around the time of middle school, I got my real taste of the Governor’s School, and I loved, loved, loved it. I thought it was the level of training that I should be getting and everything felt right. I ended up going to the two-year residential program and getting the best training acting-wise. I found my passion for musical theatre. I actually got in Juilliard and ended up not going. It was an alumni of our program and a faculty member who said, ‘If you really have this passion for musical theatre, this really might not be the school that’s right for you because you won’t get that training.’

Photograph by Brian Jones

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Stage Presence: Wonza Johnson takes to the stage this month in Hamilton. A graduate of the SC Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities, Johnson recently screentested for the next Ryan Murphy (of Glee) project and has the distinct honor of receiving his own day at the middle school from which he graduated: October 26th is now Wonza Johnson Day at Andrew Jackson Middle School in Kershaw, SC.

Wow! How many people turn down Juilliard, you know? >> Hearing someone say that made me feel like University of Michigan really was the right choice for me—and it was because I ended up being in the best musical that has been created in the last few years, and it’s a phenomenon, and I’m playing Alexander Hamilton, which is an amazing role for an actor in the world of musical theatre. The training that I got from Michigan, and, of course, the training that I got from Governor’s School set me apart. Right. >> I wouldn’t have gotten to where I am without the Governor’s School because it got me everything that I really needed and set me up for the right path. Explain this to me. Some nights you play the lead, Hamilton, and then sometimes you won’t? >> I’m in the ensemble; I’m an onstage understudy. There are six male ensemble tracks, and I’m man five. I play three different parts. I go on for the actor who plays Hamilton on Tuesday, just to start the week off because it’s such a taxing role. I have a lot of roles that I understudy and cover. It’s been very challenging and very rewarding because it’s the hardest job I’ve ever had in my life. When you’re here in Greenville, will you play Hamilton? >> Yes, I’ll play him twice. On the first week, the last Sunday night show, and on Tuesday of the second week.

Photograph by Brian Jones

How do you keep all these roles straight? >> Since the track that I do every night is second nature, I like to focus on another track just to review it and watch them. I have these things called tracking sheets, which mark everyone’s entrances and exits and traffic and props that they pick up. So if I’m going on—I usually get a twoor three-hour notice—I’ll read that and review it and do my best to compartmentalize each person as something completely different. When is this wrapping? >> We have dates for five years. I just talked to my agent, and we’re trying to figure out what’s next for me because it’s hard to be auditioning in New York when I’m on tour. No matter what, I’ll always be a part of the Hamilton family . . . I want to use this as a launching pad and keep my career going. I don’t know what is next, but as long as you put in the work and set goals, you’ll end up where your path is meant to lead you.

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An iconic Christmas toy chugs through the Taylors Mill / by Stephanie Trot ter // illustration by Timothy Banks

ed Ryder BB guns, Flexible Flyers, and Lionel trains. Certain toys tug at the heart, soaked in holiday nostalgia. Yet while the gun and sled gather cobwebs in the attic, Lionel trains are clicking down the track at Taylors Mill. In fact, Model Trains Station is sending hundreds of cars, cargo to caboose, around the bend in what’s billed as South Carolina’s largest Christmas display. “We have HO, G, N, and O scale trains,” explains club chairman Bob Rayle. “Yep, just like railroad, get it?” he asks with a canny smile. There’s a lot to smile about as Model Trains Station celebrates its one-year anniversary in the 16,000-square-foot space. Rayle reveals, “The club has grown by 20 percent, and we have more

displays going up. We’re always adding to what we have.” Local train enthusiasts formed the club in 2010 and bounced around several locations before finding the long-term lease in Taylors. Now, the non-profit is putting up permanent displays to share members’ passion with the public. “It’s like doing a painting,” Rayle says, describing the elaborate layouts. “It’s the artistry of making something look real.” Setups include an exact replica of Baltimore’s Amtrak Station (valued at more than six figures), the real German town of Schönweiler complete with nearby Alps, and a miniature circus train with hand-carved, wooden cars and

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On the Rails: Model trains and the real Norfolk Southern are rumbling down the track at Taylors Mill, just in time for the holidays.

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animals. “My first train set was one my dad brought home from work. My brother and I built it when I was about eight,” the 74-yearold recalls. “So many children today have never seen a model train. There’s Thomas on TV, but to actually see one, they’re just amazed. There’s something here for the one-year-olds to the 98-year-olds, because everybody sees it differently.” With a Roundhouse for birthday parties, Archive Room for collectors, and play tables for toddlers, Model Trains Station provides an engaging ticket for all. Members even encourage visitors to dust off their own locomotives and bring them in to ride the rails. Sixteen-yearold Griffin Gilbert volunteers at the station alongside his grandpa. “He got me interested in trains, and it’s what bonds us,” the teen admits. “I love trains. I hope to pass this on to my kids.” Model Trains Station is open Thursday–Sunday, located at The Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, on Dock 3 across from 13 Stripes Brewery. Adults, $6, kids, $4. Santa will visit the station on Saturday, December 15. For more information, visit modeltrainsstation.com.

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Table Escape: A food and wine experience at The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Walland, Tennessee, makes a delectable gift for your favorite foodie.

Delight the foodies in your life this holiday with our picks for a gift they’ll truly savor / by Kathryn Davé

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ive thanks for foodies, for they are the easiest to please this holiday season. Sure, their palates may be refined, but their passion is simple: the pursuit of good flavor. You know who they are, these significant others who plan entire vacations around restaurant reservations, friends who talk about obscure fermentation techniques until your eyes glaze over, family members who find their happy place in the kitchen. Honestly, you could stick a bow on some perfect produce or a hunk of nice cheese and they’d probably be delighted—but if you really want to make the foodie you love smile, we’ve rounded up a handful of tasty gifts.

QUITE A SPRE AD // BUTTER DISH Nothing says, “I recognize your good taste,” like this lovely ceramic butter dish handmade by Greenville ceramicist Darin Gehrke. In a wink to those who know, it’s perfectly sized to fit a golden butter log from Happy Cow Creamery—a gift in itself, as any Upstate foodie can tell you. $45, Darin Gehrke Studio, 1205 Pendleton St, Greenville

T WIST & SHOUT // LE CREUSET PEPPER & SALT MILLS Amp up their cooking and lift their spirits with the poppy, colorful salt and pepper mills from French legend Le Creuset. Delivering the unparalleled flavor of freshly ground salt and pepper is a breeze thanks to the mills’ elegant design; the hard part is choosing which hue you’ll wrap up. $38 each, The Cook’s Station, 659 S Main St, Greenville

Score major brownie points when you gift a fun, empowering, hands-on cooking class that will leave you and your pal equipped and inspired to take your new culinary skills home. Bonus: participants enjoy a delicious meal together to close every class. $40, topics vary, Swamp Rabbit Café, 205 Cedar Lane Rd, Greenville

PERFEC T FINISH // FIG BALSAMIC VINEGAR Even foodies fall into ruts sometimes, which is why a standout ingredient like this complex fig balsamic vinegar can do so much to recharge the routine. Dress a salad, simmer it down into an elegant reduction, top a luscious scoop of ice cream (really!)—don’t worry, they’ll definitely know what to do with it. $16 for 375mL, Palmetto Olive Oil Company, 2243 Augusta St, Greenville

MORNING GLORY // METHODICAL COFFEE SINGLE-ORIGIN SUBSCRIPTION Treat refined palates to a perfect morning cup with an exciting coffee subscription that celebrates terroir. Each single-origin selection showcases distinct flavor profiles that express the particular soil, climate, and year the coffee was grown—perfect for friends who geek out over tasting notes. $20–$80+, Methodical Coffee, 101 N Main St, Greenville

CHEF ’S TABLE // CHEF FOR A DAY It’s hard to imagine what could make food lovers happier than this best-ofboth-worlds package. They’ll suit up in a personalized chef coat for four hours of private instruction and serious cooking in a Table 301 kitchen with one of the company’s chefs, take a break to change and relax, and come back that evening to savor the exciting, multicourse meal they made at a table with three friends. $500, Table 301, shoptable301.com

CULINARY ADVENTURE // BLACKBERRY FARM EPICUREAN GETAWAY If you want to pull out all the stops, whisk your foodie away to epicurean destination and celebrated luxury resort Blackberry Farm, tucked into the foothills of the Smoky Mountains. Considered one of the pioneers of the farmto-table renaissance, Blackberry Farm’s food and wine program has won multiple James Beard Awards and will leave you inspired, delighted, sated, and grateful—and that’s just how you’ll feel after breakfast. Call for rates and availability; (800) 557-8864, blackberryfarm.com

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Buy-one-get-one-free tickets to the best shows in town This year, give your family and friends a gift that will last all year long. For a donation of just $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard valid for buy-one-get-onefree tickets for one time at each of the following venues. In just two uses this gift pays for itself and using it is a great way to sample Greenville’s fabulous cultural amenities.

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OUT OF

TOWN REGIONAL ESCAPES AND GLOBAL DESTINATIONS

Door Stopper: Festive decorations adorn Colonial Williamsburg’s antiquated architecture.

Good Tidings Historic holiday charm awaits in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

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Merry & Bright: A visit to the Williamsburg Inn (right)—with its roaring fireplaces and bright décor—is a sure way to stir up the holiday feels of Christmases past. The historic town boasts countless colonial nods (left) including 88 original structures, thanks to the philanthropy of oil king John D. Rockefeller Jr.

Colonial Christmas

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ith each passing year, the Christmas holidays seem to become more and more materialistic. Halloween barely passes before department stores display trees festooned with shiny ornaments and TV commercials begin hawking the mountain of toys and gifts that loved ones absolutely must have. To me, it seems the original meaning of Christmas has been lost somewhere amid the bright wrappings and bows, the online marketing and the crass commercialism. So I wanted to seek out a place with a simpler holiday philosophy: Colonial Williamsburg. With the vision of sipping a glass of wassail before a crackling fire in a cozy eighteenth-century tavern in my head, my husband and I booked three nights at the Williamsburg

Inn, the elegant Colonial Revival lodging that has held court since 1937. We get our first taste of the Williamsburg holiday spirit by arriving at sunset and seeing the inn’s façade—including its two-story columned portico—and the trees out front, glittering with thousands of white lights. Inside, the lobby is flanked on either end by fireplaces, whose burning logs cast a warm glow across a space decorated with a large Christmas tree in front of the windows. Ah, we’re off to a good start. A six-hour drive northeast of Greenville, in the Tidewater region of Virginia, Williamsburg dates to 1699, when colonial

Photographs (top left) courtesy of Visit Williamsburg; (above opposite) courtesy of the Williamsburg Inn

Wrap yourself in historic holiday grandeur during a weekend stay in Williamsburg, Virginia / by M. Linda Lee

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legislators moved their capital inland from Jamestown. Christened for William III of England, Williamsburg reigned as the center of politics, education, and culture of the Virginia Colony for eight decades of the most formative years in America’s history. When the Virginia capital was moved to the more centrally located city of Richmond in 1780, Williamsburg reverted to a quiet college town and remained that way until 1926, when philanthropist John D. Rockefeller Jr. visited with his family. Rector of Bruton Parish Church, the Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin, took this opportunity to approach Rockefeller with his dream of preserving the city’s historic buildings. Bruton walked the oil magnate around the colonial capital, and Rockefeller was impressed with the historical significance of the structures he saw. What began as a modest project to preserve a few key buildings ballooned into a major restoration, encompassing 85 percent of the core of the eighteenth-century town. Rockefeller later referred to his original stroll through Williamsburg’s historic streets as “the most expensive walk I ever took in my life.” Today, 88 of the 600 historical structures in Colonial Williamsburg are original. The rest are reconstructions. The historic restoration centers on mile-long Duke of Gloucester Street. Across the street from the inn, the unpaved avenue is anchored on the east

by the colonial Capitol—home to the oldest legislative assembly in the New World—and on the west by the College of William and Mary, established in 1693. Roughly in the middle is Bruton Parish Church, with an active body for more than 300 years. Throughout the month of December, Colonial Williamsburg hosts a staggering array of holiday programs: Christmas teas in restored taverns, evening fife and drum performances by torchlight, caroling and concerts, festive meals, and tours and talks recounting colonial holiday traditions. It kicks off each year on the first Sunday in December with the Grand Illumination. This event echoes the eighteenth-century illuminations that marked the birthday of a reigning monarch, a significant military victory, or perhaps the arrival of a new colonial governor, with fireworks and other festivities. As part of the twenty-first-century celebration, the Christmas season is ushered in with musical performances and three fireworks displays lighting up the night sky simultaneously behind the Governor’s Palace, the Powder Magazine, and the Old Capitol. Walking down Duke of Gloucester Street, I am smitten with the decorations adorning the doors and windows. In lieu of a carnival of holiday lights, the houses along this street have single candles in their windows (though now they’re electric). Fanciful wreaths and swags crafted from natural materials—fir boughs, DECEMBER 2018 / 63

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magnolia leaves, peacock feathers, dried flowers, oyster shells—hang on doorways and in windows. In colonial times, these would not have appeared until the day after Christmas, Boxing Day, the start of the traditional 12 Days of Christmas that ended with the Feast of the Epiphany on January 6. Although many of the modernday wreaths are adorned with fruit, including apples and oranges, in early Virginia citrus fruit was a precious commodity. If you were lucky enough to have an orange, you wouldn’t think of wasting it on a wreath. In its heyday, Williamsburg was a world-class city, where you could purchase pretty much anything you wanted, from fine silks to French wines. Now, as then, small shops punctuate the historic area, and, at the west end, past the ice-skating rink, Merchants Square marketplace holds contemporary retailers and restaurants. We browse the fine colonial-inspired gifts and home accessories at Williamsburg Craft House and stock up on sweet souvenirs at the Wythe Candy Shop before ducking into The Cheese Shop for a tasty lunch. In colonial times, Christmas Day was just like any other day. English colonists attended services at Bruton Parish Church, then went about their business. The holiday parties, for which the city was well known, started on December 26 and ran throughout the 12 Days of Christmas. Gifts, if given at all, were presented on Boxing Day to those who served you in some way. While consumerism did not play a part in old Williamsburg during Christmastide, excessive eating and drinking did. At lavish holiday parties, often lasting for three days straight, wealthy hosts set out tables teeming with Virginia ham, wild turkey, oysters, figgy pudding, and mincemeat pie, all washed down with cider, Madeira, rum punch, and port. Admittedly, modern festivities at Colonial Williamsburg are not devoid of commercialism; there’s a separate fee for many of the holiday programs, and dinners in the historic taverns aren’t inexpensive. Even so, we delighted in walking tours of the historic area as well as peanut soup and prime rib at the King’s Arms Tavern. It was uplifting to take a page from the early days of America’s history, hundreds of years before cell phones and social media, to awaken the gentle spirits of Christmas past.

STAY The Williamsburg Inn Canopy beds and fine period furnishings fill the 62 spacious rooms here. Between the spa, two outdoor pools, and the elegant Rockefeller Room restaurant and Restoration Bar, the inn possesses all the elements of modern luxury, clad in colonial garb.136

E Francis St, Williamsburg, VA, (757) 220-7978, colonialwilliamsburghotels. com/accommodations/ williamsburg-inn

EAT King’s Arms Tavern One of Colonial Williamsburg’s four historic taverns open to the public for meals, the King’s Arms (established in 1772) serves hearty chophouse fare, accented by colonial recipes. 416 E Duke of

Gloucester St, Williamsburg, VA. (855) 240-3278, colonialwilliamsburghotels. com/dining/kings-arms-tavern

Rockefeller Room A contemporary American menu in a refined colonialera atmosphere is what draws folks to the finedining restaurant at the Williamsburg Inn. 136 E

Francis St, Williamsburg, VA. (800-447-8679), colonialwilliamsburghotels. com/dining/rockefeller-room

Fat Canary This upscale bistro in Merchants Square dishes up such seasonal American cuisine as crispy Rappahannock oysters, house-made mozzarella with Virginia ham, and free-range guinea fowl. 2410 W Duke of

Gloucester St, Williamsburg, VA. (757) 229-3333, fatcanarywilliamsburg.com

PLAY Holiday Programs Held from morning until night every day in December, a panoply of programs runs the gamut from music and dance to dining and decorations. For the complete schedule, check online at

colonialwilliamsburg.com/ special-events/holidayplanner

The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg Located under one roof, the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum and the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum both merit a visit. The former houses more than 400 pieces of folk art that John D. Rockefeller Jr’s wife Abby began collecting in the 1920s, while the DeWitt Wallace displays the world’s largest collection of Southern furniture and a significant group of British ceramics among its many treasures. 326 W Francis St,

at Henry St, Williamsburg, VA. colonialwilliamsburg. com/art-museums

Photographs (above left) courtesy of The Cheese Shop; (above right) courtesy of Visit Williamsburg

Marching Orders: (left to right) Settled in the midst of Merchants Square, The Cheese Shop serves up select cheeses, charcuterie, and specialty sandwiches; Colonial Williamsburg’s holiday program includes weekly Fife and Drum marches down Duke of Gloucester Street, a can’t-miss of the town’s many historical experiences.

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Sport

Gear Shift

Impress the gadget guru in your life with these top-of-the-line tech tools

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

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WHAT THE TECH : Clockwise from top center (1) GoPro Fusion from REI Greenville; (2) Garmin Fenix 5x plus watch from REI Greenville; (3) Goal Zero Venture 30 recharger from Mast General Store; (4) Columbia River Knife & Tool M16 -14D Tanto Desert pocket knife from Mast General Store; (5) Garmin inReach mini satellite communicator from REI Greenville; (6) Leatherman Squirt PS4 multitool in blue from Mast General Store. (Opposite): La Sportiva spire GTX from REI Greenville.

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GHS Cancer Institute. World-class therapies where you live. Video and more at ghs.org/cancerfacts.

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Twig Out: Update your door with a mix of greenery like this wreath from Twigs, interspersed with magnolia leaves, holly, evergreen boughs, and more.

All the Trimmings Spruce up holiday décor with varied greenery DECEMBER 2018 / 73

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THE HOME 1

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Fir Real: Order one of these premade beauties from local florists ROOTS, 2249 Augusta St, (864) 241-0100, or from Twigs, 640 S Main St, (864) 242-2242. 2

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Take a Bough

When it comes to wreaths—deck your door with something different // photography by Paul Mehaffey FA-LA-LA: While a balsam fir wreath with a bright red bow can bring cheer to any ol’ Ebenezer Scrooge, up the ante on your holiday decking with a few alternative twigs. All about the DIY? Gather discarded magnolia leaves and tie them together, or combine holly clippings with a few boughs from the backyard cedar. If you prefer your wreaths premade, consider one of these from ROOTS of Greenville (1,3) and Twigs (2,4). Whether twined with grapevine or sprinkled with pine needles, your holiday décor is sure to add a little “fa-la-la” to the festive feel. Now go ahead and top off that eggnog.

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World-Renowned Oncologists by Your Side With the region’s only blood and marrow transplant unit, and access to national clinical trials not available elsewhere, Levine Cancer Institute brings you the best in cancer care. And with 25 locations across the Carolinas, you get the care you need, where you need it.

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THE GOODS

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Merry Gentleman Slip a trinket or two into your sportman’s stocking // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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FIELD FAVORITES: (left to right) William Henry Damascus copper wave folding knife with fossil mammoth tusk from Hale’s Jewelers; Outdoor field pocket watch from Orvis Greenville; and Hults Bruk compact hatchet from Orvis Greenville.

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THE

SHOP Sister to Sister: Located next to Shaw’s Pharmacy near Fork & Plough in Greenville, familyrun shop Given sells ethically sourced, socially conscious goods crafted by artisans around the world. For more about the store, visit givengoods.com.

Kindred Spirits Four sisters sell trendy, socially conscious goods through their passion project, Given / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Cameron Reynolds

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is the season to shop. And this year, the Reese sisters hope hearts will rule when it comes to picking out presents. Specifically, they want shoppers to purchase with purpose—to look beyond the person receiving the gift to the person who made it. “Buying is a powerful choice. We can each make a difference with where we put our money,” explains the oldest of the four, Erin. “It’s really important to be conscious consumers. There’s a human being behind every product, whether it’s clothing, a candle, or Christmas ornament. Their lives are valuable.” Holiday music fills the air, as Erin restocks shelves inside Given, the sisters’ store on East North Street, just a few steps from Fork & Plough. The back wall features bright purple and lush green blankets, each made by a woman at risk in Bangladesh. A center table holds scented soy candles poured by Tha Thay, a refugee from Burma. Tassels, totes, and towels from East Africa, Rwanda, and Peru spill from displays alongside on-trend clothing and colorful cards. Goods sold within the airy, 900-square-foot boutique are helping to feed children around the world, remove women from the sex-trade, and educate young and old. The entire shop is curated with socially conscious items, made using fair-payment principals, by sisters whose souls are like-minded in mission. It’s taken several years to transform their vision into a brick-and-mortar concept cementing worldly causes. “It started with a conference we attended that opened our eyes to human trafficking, world hunger, and global crisis,” recalls Erin. “We all left feeling like we needed to do something.” The Reese ladies prayed for a year, conducted research, and even made detailed lists of each other’s skills to devise a way to partner and create change. Beth works with preschoolers. Jessie sells insurance. Caitlin conducts marketing. Erin had retail experience, managing local shops Swoozie’s and InsideOut at Home. Three years later, the creative quartet returned to the conference to launch Given with $1,500 in seed money.

After running a website and pop-up shops out of Erin’s home, the siblings opened the store next to Shaw’s Pharmacy one year ago. “The more we sell, the more we can buy from these companies that are paying living wages and creating sustainable communities,” says Erin. “The more orders they have, the more people they can employ, and it’s a circle of continued success. It’s really fulfilling when a jewelry designer you’ve been buying from for several years says she just bought her first home, or the lady who pours candles is able to send her kids to college.” Several of the shop’s 30 vendors are local, including Jocelyn Conrad, founder of Jocie Pots, who also gives back to groups assisting those in need. “When someone purchases my pottery, it gives me joy knowing there’s a purpose behind it,” shares the artist. “It’s really important to know your items are not made in a factory with poor wages and poor practices.” She also admires the aesthetic at Given. “It’s modern and contemporary, with prints and colors you can use in your closet.” New Delhi, India. Jinja, Uganda. Greenville, South Carolina. Every penny spent at Given empowers a life in a corner of the world. “Being able to help others in this simple way, it’s a blessing,” says Erin. “There are so many things that are so big, you don’t know how to help. In doing this, we can be a small part of making some of those vast problems a bit less.”

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Thank You

for another successful Greenville Open Studios!

The Board of Directors and staff of the Metropolitan Arts Council and the 143 participating artists would like to thank those businesses and individuals for making Greenville Open Studios 2018 the absolute best weekend for Greenville’s visual artists. We appreciate their commitment to the arts in Greenville and look forward to working with them in the future. A big round of applause to the following for ensuring the success of Greenville Open Studios.

The Fredric E. Hasert Memorial Trust

Design Strategies SEW-Eurodrive

Pelham Architects, LLC Hughes Investments, Inc. Janette W. Wesley & Renato Vicario

South State Bank

The Traute E. & Roland H. Engeler Family

The Don & Zelma Waggoner Foundation

Budweiser of Greenville

Elliott Davis, LLC The Priester Foundation

NAI Earle Furman, LLC

ADG Preferred Payroll, Inc.

T & S Brass & Bronze Works, Inc.

The Fred Collins Foundation City of Greenville Special Events Department

The Greenville Drive Margaret & Duff Bruce Robojuice

The Peace Center

Coldwell Banker Caine BMW Manufacturing Company, LLC

Greenville County Accommodations Tax The Capital Corporation

The Greenville Journal

Greenville Health System

Michelin North America

Community Foundation of Greenville

Haywood Congaree Self Storage WYFF TV-4

Stay connected with Greenville arts year-round by visiting the arts calendar on our website: www.greenvilleARTS.com @macARTScouncil | #gvlARTS

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36,000 assaults are reported to law enforcement every year in South Carolina

More than 90% of women murdered by men are killed by someone they know

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Peachtree Shopping Plaza 1311-A West Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 864-877-1500

Buy a Sub. Share Some Love! Not your average sandwich company. Along with serving the highest quality product, Jersey Mike’s also partners with Safe Harbor to help abused women. When you buy a sub from Jersey Mike’s you are helping families in the Upstate.

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MS. BEA

Wright

I Before You In Ms. Bea’s experience, releasing expectations and focusing on one’s self leads to healthier relationships

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ave yourself first! The instructions are clear. When the oxygen mask drops from the airplane ceiling, task number one is to put your mask on. Take care of yourself, before even attempting to assist anyone else, even a baby. The second directive to breathe normally may be expecting more than I will ever be able to achieve in such a circumstance, but I will save that topic for another day. Out of context this command sounds a bit selfish, but the oxygen mask instruction has application—beyond air travel—in our relationships. If you are feeling wrecked, you are much more susceptible to danger and hurt than when you enter a relationship feeling confident and emotionally healthy. Perhaps counterintuitive, but a cold fact of life is that you have to take care of yourself first if you want to be in a healthy relationship with anyone else. This rule of thumb applies to all relationships—friends, coworkers, significant others, and even within families. Just because you grew up with someone or married into a family doesn’t mean your interactions will always be peachy keen. Sometimes we must admit that a relationship is broken or perhaps too unhealthy to bear. What to do when you reach this breaking point? With friends, perhaps you make an intentional decision to stop talking, texting, hanging out, etc. But within a family, challenging relationships are trickier. Whatever the situation, it is good to remind yourself—and often—that you can only control your own actions. Save yourself rather than try to fix the other person. My relationship with my late mother-in-law was fraught with angst and challenges, especially at the beginning. I was a busy, successful, and confident professional. Yet I found myself constantly questioning and seeking her affirmation. I needed her to demonstrate

in word and deed that she believed I was a good daughter-in-law and mother to her grandchildren. (My own mother never let me doubt that she thought I was fabulous, after all.) The harder I tried, the more frustrated I became, never sure of exactly where I stood with her, convinced I was a disappointment in ways I could not understand. Eventually I opened my eyes and saw the bag of air dangling in front of me, and I grabbed it. I saved myself. Once I accepted that our relationship was never going to be the inspiration for a Norman Rockwell painting, I began to take care of myself first. My actions were always respectful and loving, but I let go of my expectations of what I would receive in return. I controlled only what I could control—myself. By the end of my mother-in-law’s life, we had actually become close—loving, accepting, and respectful of one another to the best of our abilities. Often, saving yourself means seeing what’s right in front of you. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.

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DECEMBER 2018 / 83

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Purrfect Pair After a stray cat takes over his porch, The Man begrudgingly considers feline friendship

A

couple of months ago, a stray cat I’d never seen before strolled onto my porch, hopped up in a chair, and glared at me sternly. The cat was white with a scattering of black spots. It was clean and seemed healthy but had no tag or collar. After a few minutes the cat jumped down, descended the stairs, and wandered across the driveway where it disappeared under a tangle of bushes. The next day the cat reappeared and took its position on the chair across from me. We looked at one another for a while and then the cat left as abruptly as it had appeared. This phenomenon occurred daily for the next week. I didn’t feed the cat or pet it, but every day it would show up, climb in the chair, and then stare at me as if I owed it money. I’ve never been an animal lover. In fact I have spent most of my life avoiding animals at all costs. Animals have teeth, and they bite people. And cats have teeth as well as claws, which means they could do a lot of damage. And even if they’re harmless, cats just aren’t that inspiring to be around. At least a dog is happy to see you when you walk in, wagging its tail and jumping for joy even if you’ve just shuffled down to the mailbox and back. Return home from a three-year stint in prison, and a cat will just sneer at you with a look that says “Oh, you’re back? I hadn’t realize you’d left.” Cats are aloof and moody. They’re apathetic and lazy, and seem to suffer from delusions of grandeur. Cats and I

have too much in common. The relationship would be doomed from the start. During the second week of the cat’s daily visits, I found myself in the pet food aisle of the grocery store. I stared at the choices and shook my head, wondering what I had become. I selected a cheap bag of dry food, and when I brought it to the checkout line the woman behind the register said, “Ohhh, what kind of cat do you have?” I gave her the same look the cat had been giving me for the past few days then responded: “I don’t have a cat, I have an intermittent squatter.” Now, four months later, the cat is living on my porch full time. I’ve named it Cat, and although I feed it daily I have yet to touch it. It still stares at me more often than I feel is appropriate, but at least it doesn’t try to climb in my lap or instigate some type of petting ritual. We share the porch in a sort of armed truce. But I can’t help but wonder where this cat came from and why it appeared. Perhaps it showed up to teach me a lesson: that even selfish curmudgeons have a tiny bit of compassion hidden somewhere deep inside them. Or that despite my years of fear and remonstrations, I actually do have a fondness for animals. Or maybe the cat is here to teach me that caring for a living creature can nurture my soul and expand my capacity for tenderness and grace. Or, maybe, it’s just hungry.

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ALLIGATOR BELTS WITH ENGRAVABLE BUCKLES

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Craving Something Sweet?

Van’s Chocolates began in 1968 when Peg and Russ Vanderlois took a few family recipes, and turned them into something much more. After starting the business in Appleton, WI, they relocated to Hendersonville, NC in 1992. Since then, Van’s has become a Hendersonville tradition for both locals and tourists alike. In 2014, Will and Celeste Ralston moved to Hendersonville to purchase Van’s. Will’s journey as a chocolatier began in 2009 when he took over a fledgling chocolate business in Melbourne, FL. Over the course of the 6 years that he was there, he honed his skills and gained invaluable knowledge of the chocolate business. He has brought those skills to Van’s in order to continue to grow the business, including opening a second store in Greenville, SC in July of 2018. The focus has always been on high end, hand-made chocolates, and that is how it will stay. As the largest supplier of chocolate to the Biltmore House, Will plans on keeping the high level of quality that the Vanderloises established and will not change any of the time-tested recipes.

1264 Pendleton St, Greenville, SC 29611 | vanschocolates.com | (864) 729-8520 Van's Choc Full TOWN_blank page.indd Dec18.indd 6 4

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Art. Culture. Style.

Handcrafted Get TOWN magazine in your mailbox every month. 12 issues $65. Subscribe today at

TOWNCarolina.com/subscribe

Beautifully

HAMPTON STATION | 1320 HAMPTON AVE. EXT. #202A, GREENVILLE SC 29601 864.735.8379 | TANYASTIEGLERDESIGNS.COM

DECEMBER 2018 / 87

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TOWN

Essay

A Southern Food Legacy When her grandmother bequeaths a handful of vintage cookware, a young writer struggles to reconcile the art of cuisine with modern demands / by Abby Moore Keith

// illustrations by Alice Rat terree

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hen I was 23, my grandmother sat me down on the yellow stool in her kitchen and started doling out my birthright. I had driven the four hours from Greenville to her small farm for a weekend visit the night before, and I remember it was cold for southeast Georgia. The camellias in her yard had begun to unfold, and the sweeping pastureland was crisp with the coolness, bare trees stretching naked among the pines. As I perched on the stool in the kitchen, a mingling sense of dread and expectation rumbled in my stomach next to my morning coffee and grits. Seated in her mobility scooter, my grandmother had armed herself with a grabber tool, one of several handy instruments she’d acquired in later years to assist in the continued occupation of her cooking kingdom. Like many women of her generation, Jessie Kate Buie was queen of the kitchen. Her rule had remained unattested for decades, and no amount of asthma or arthritis would dethrone her. At 91-years-young, Mrs. Buie still whipped up the best pound cake in Bulloch County, and today I would inherit a few prized weapons from her cooking arsenal. She squeezed the handle of the grabber like a trigger, extended plastic fingers pinching open cabinet doors and pulling out centuries of pots and pans. For utensils too heavy or too far for her reach, she commanded me off the stool and into the cabinet depths. I pulled out colanders and cast irons that had been used to feed my family for generations. There was a punch bowl with matching blue cups and an aluminum-fluted pie plate, cookie sheets and wooden spoons and mason jars of all shapes and sizes. As appliances piled onto the linoleum, my feelings of apprehension increased. Objects I did not recognize added to the growing mass—some more like torture tools than kitchenware. A flat rectangle of metal punctured

with treacherously shaped holes looked like it would grate skin as well as cheese, and I swear the contraption for peeling apples had once been used on witches during the Middle Ages. But my true discomfort stemmed from a more present reality. I had little experience in the art of food preparation. Growing up, my mom had made most of our meals, good ones too. Sure she’d taught me the basics—I could operate a Kitchen Aid if I had a hankering for chocolate chip cookies, and I knew the dish with the pointy triangle was for juicing lemons—but I was a year out of undergrad on a quest to find the perfect career. I worked a lot, and ate granola bars and $5 takeout from the local Cuban joint. The extent of my food prep typically involved easy-cook noodles or some homemade variation of Taco Bell’s nachos plate. I was a modern woman, living in a modern world with the luxury not to cook. My grandmother grew up in a rural town on a farm with four sisters and a brother. The produce they planted supplemented much of their cuisine: black-eyed peas, okra, sweet corn, and lima beans that were shucked, washed, pickled, canned, or frozen. Preparing and preserving were part of her education, a way forward in life. But I think it went further than necessity for my grandmother. For as long as I could remember, cooking had been her raison d’être, and the long kitchen table, her stage. For breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, she gathered loved ones together to enjoy something

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Vintage Kitchen:

While visiting her family in rural southeast Georgia, a young professional struggles to adapt her grandmother’s cooking prowess to her own busy lifestyle.

For as long as I could remember, cooking had been my grandma’s raison d’être. For breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert, she gathered loved ones together to enjoy something delicious. delicious. I’d sit there as a child, feet dangling, slurping her crab stew, the creamy goodness blending into the white ceramic bowl. A covered cake plate meant she’d made her secret pound cake, and she’d always set the frozen strawberries aside to thaw in the afternoon, waiting to top my slice after dinner if I’d eaten all my greens. Each August, just in time for my birthday, the steamy hiss of the pressure cooker signaled a fresh pot of boiled peanuts. I’d sit there for hours popping them into my mouth, sucking the salty smooth insides through the cracked exterior. My grandmother crafted every dish with care, spending countless hours in the kitchen slicing and frying and creating. She made what we loved to eat because she loved us, warm meals her preferred means of communicating affection. So on that chilly afternoon when she proudly handed over a host of homeware—including that hazardous-looking cheese skinner—a weight of responsibility settled into seeping regret. This was her legacy, and I had little ability or incentive to continue in her footsteps. My mother, aunts, and sister had all been here before, and all were more than capable of utilizing cookware to create good food for people they loved. Lastly, she handed me a pecan pie—nuts gathered from the ground outside the pasture—the aluminum-fluted plate with her name etched in marker on the bottom an added bonus. I returned home to my work and my roommates full of sticky sweet pie, feeling slightly guilty for stashing the box of appliances in the pantry, where it remained mostly forgotten. Until the night when my roommate got engaged and we needed a punch for her party. I pulled the wide blue bowl with its sweet little cups out of the box, and Googled a quick recipe. Based with ginger ale and sparkling wine, it turned out bubbly and yummy and we all went back for seconds. And then a friend helped move a

sofa, and an apple pie seemed like the best way to say thank you. I could use my mom’s recipe, and I was certain Grandma had put the peeler in that box. A flour sifter came out when I made Grandma’s secret pound cake for a birthday party, and I even managed to regularly use the cheese grater without slicing (too much) skin. Over the next year, the vintage cookware made its way out of the box and into cabinets, and when I called my grandmother to ask about boiling my own peanuts, a brand-new pressure cooker showed up at my door a week later, instructions included. A few months after I turned 25, my grandmother passed away. As one tends to do when someone dear is lost, I wrestled with regret for not gleaning more from her knowledge and experience when I had the chance. There are many cooking tips I never asked her about, never learned, and while her recipes remain, I would much rather be sitting on that yellow stool in the linoleum-lined kitchen, paying close attention, taking notes, and watching her work wonders. For the holidays this year, my mother, sister, and I will don aprons in a different kitchen. We’ll cook and craft a scrumptious spread of Southern dishes, and I will watch and learn and perhaps even teach them a trick or two. And while many of our utensils will be bright and new, a few well-worn heirlooms might find themselves in the mix. If you were to lift up the pecan pie, I bet you’d find a faded “Jessie Kate Buie” etched in permanent marker on the bottom of the pan. DECEMBER 2018 / 89

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How to CHARCUTERIE “Charcuterie” is a fancy word for “delicious.” Make your own platter with our Lowes Foods brand snacks!

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C HE F M I C H A E L OLBR A NT Z’S P UR S UIT OF GOOD F OOD TOOK HIM AL L OV E R T HE WO R LD BE F OR E H E F E LL IN LOVE WIT H ME XICA N CUISINE. NOW, HE P RE PA RES TO P OUR T H AT LOVE INTO A NE W KIND OF FAST-CASUAL E X P E RI E N C E AT GAT H E R GVL, GR E E NVILLE ’S UP COMING FOOD HAL L .

CROSSING BORDERS BY K AT H Y RN DAV É

PHOTOGRAPHY BY J I VA N DAV É

DECEMBER 2018 / 93

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“ULTIMATELY, IT ALL COMES DOWN TO THE FACT THAT I LOVE THINGS THAT ARE DELICIOUS," Chef Michael Olbrantz says. This is not the narrative anyone expects to hear from a young chef these days. I ask him how he got his start, where his love for food originated—and he doesn’t have a tidy answer for me. “It just happened,” he says. Like love and babies and callings can just happen, it did. He was a high school kid watching Alton Brown, and now, after chasing his love of food around the globe, he’s settled in Greenville, preparing to open his first restaurants. Yes, restaurants, plural—four in fact, all in partnership with his friends and co-owner/chefs, Paul and Sarah Klaassen, and all located at Gather GVL, Greenville’s first al fresco food hall slated to launch next spring. The Olbrantz and Klaassen lineup includes HenDough, a Greenville outpost of the Klaassens’ popular Hendersonville chicken and donut shop; KO Burger; Al Taglio, Roman-style pizza; and Mercado, the Mexican restaurant most connected to Olbrantz’s heart. He agreed to cook for our chat, pulling together a menu that hints at Mercado’s cuisine and highlights some of his favorite flavors. In a world where chefs are celebrities, restaurants are travel destinations, tasting menus are crafted for Instagram posts, and everyone’s a foodie, we have come to expect, maybe even idolize, a certain kind of chef story. Cue the dramatic orchestral music and lush footage of a chef foraging at dawn, am I right? Here’s the thing—Olbrantz did the fine-dining tweezer thing, has the European stage under his belt, and can geek out over some beautiful ingredients, but they aren’t his story. He was a regular teenager who fell in love with cooking and didn’t look back. Born and raised in Asheville, his first serious culinary job was in the kitchens of the Biltmore Estate where he met Paul Klaassen—a sous chef at the time who became Olbrantz’s mentor, friend, and eventual business partner. Come high school graduation, Olbrantz had a moment of doubt about cooking as a career, so he went to the University of Pittsburgh to study neuroscience or economics. And yet. “I missed cooking immediately,” he says. He was back at the Biltmore kitchens by next semester. “Don’t go to culinary school,” Klaassen advised him. “You can learn everything you need working in the kitchen.” Olbrantz took his advice, put his head down, and worked hard until he was ready for the next step—a stage in Europe. He found himself in Spain at Madrid Fusión, attending classes given by world-famous chefs and feeling generally underwhelmed, until he wandered into Chef Ricard Camarena’s class on rice. The chef’s passion was so electric that Olbrantz immediately asked if he could come stage at his restaurant, a Michelin onestar in Valencia. The stage was transformative. Educational. Eye-opening. “I realized that this wasn’t the kind of food I wanted to be cooking. Standing over a plate and putting 15 different kinds of little flowers and herbs on a dish that already has 20 different vegetables in it . . . I thought to myself, I don’t know if this is

H

“I CA N ’ T G E T E N OU G H OF TH E BALAN CE OF Y U CAT E CA N FOOD. I T ’ S S P I CY, WI TH A LOT OF AC I D — M E AT S M A R I NAT E D I N BI TTER OR AN GE OR L I M E , L OT S OF U SE OF SM OK E AN D U N DE R G ROU N D C OOK I N G, P I CK LED ON I ON S, A N D H A BA Ñ E RO S A L S A E V E RYWH ER E. I TH I N K I T ’ S ON E OF T H E M OS T V I BR AN T, BR I GH T C U I S I N ES OF M EX I CO.” — CHEF MICHAEL OLBRANTZ

EAR TH T O N ES :

The traditional techniques and ingredients Olbrantz discovered during his travels in Mexico show up everywhere in his cuisine, from the tortillas he hand- rolls and presses to the dark cones of unrefined sugar cane that inspired his dulce de calabaza (previous spread).

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F R ES H STAR T :

Olbrantz swears that chilaquiles, a simple dish made from tortilla chips that have been fried and tossed in salsa verde, is the world’s best hangover cure. You won’t need a hangover to appreciate his version, however, which he layers with crema, queso fresco, and shaved onion before topping the whole pile with a sunny egg.

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T cooking,” Olbrantz laughs. Such an epiphany was a bit dizzying. After all, fine dining had been his goal, the path that led to multicourse menus and Michelin stars. The first dish Olbrantz serves me—sikil pak, a traditional pumpkin seed dip from the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico—was worlds away from the ones he carefully plated in Spain. Similar to hummus or guacamole, sikil pak is not a looker. There is no asymmetry or edible flowers, just smooth swirls of the creamy dip and a pile of fresh tortilla chips. But the flavor! Smoky, roasted pepitas and the zip of habañero. He says he could imagine offering this at Mercado, and I can imagine eating it there, with a basket of chips steadily disappearing and a beer sweating in the sun.

How he got from Spain to the Yucatán is a long story, but once again, credit is due to his teenage self. The years of Spanish he studied in high school and his early admiration for Jonathan Gold, the famous LA Times food writer known for elevating ethnic cuisines, had made an impression on him. After wrapping up a job in a Portland restaurant, Olbrantz decided to get serious about exploring the food that interested him. He went to Mexico. A two-month tour turned into a whirlwind two years of traveling, learning, tasting, growing as he pingponged from Mexico to America and back again. In the Yucatán, Olbrantz fell in love. “I can’t get enough of the balance of Yucatecan food. It’s spicy, with a lot of acid—meats marinated in bitter orange or lime, lots of use of smoke and underground cooking, pickled onions, and habañero salsa everywhere. I think it’s one of the most vibrant, bright cuisines of Mexico,” he says. I understand what he means when I taste the next dish he sets in front of me: a Yucatecan specialty, panuchos de pavo, which are small tostadas stuffed with beans and fried, topped with achiote turkey, pickled onions, and fiery habañero salsa. Spicy and earthy and meant to be eaten with your hands, the panucho is a good example of the kind of food Olbrantz wants to cook now—simple, but precise in its balance and technique. Simple, but treated seriously. It’s the kind of food he started cooking when he fired up his food truck for the first time. It was early 2016, and Olbrantz decided that Asheville needed a little “vitamin T,” as the saying in Mexico goes (tacos, tortas, tamales, tostadas, etc.—you know, the good vitamins). For almost two years, Vitamina T

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“I LIKE T H E ID E A O F A S MA N Y PE O P L E A S P OS S I B L E B EING AB LE TO T RY A M A ZIN G F O OD, E S P E C I A L LY DIF F ERE N T F O O D AT A PLAC E LIKE M E R CA DO, W IT HO UT H AV IN G TO S PE N D A LOT OF M ON E Y TO DO IT,” OLB R A N T Z S AY S .

rolled from brewery to brewery, building up a loyal following and delighting people with Olbrantz’s take on Mexican food. Bolstered by his success with Vitamina T, Olbrantz was excited when the opportunity to partner with the Klaassens in Gather GVL arrived. “The more I worked in finer restaurants, the more I realized as great as that food is, it’s not something most people can eat every week, or even every month. I like the idea of as many people as possible being able to try amazing food, especially different food at a place like Mercado, without having to spend a lot of money to do it,” he says. Mercado is inspired by traditional Mexican cantinas, the casual places you can find all over the country where you go in to have some drinks and stay for a while, snacking on little bites with every round. The spirit is the same as that of the classic tapas bars Olbrantz experienced in Spain: relaxing, sharing, warm hospitality. Like a true cantina, Mercado will have a full bar, and Olbrantz and the Klaassens plan to emphasize Mexican drinks such as micheladas (beer, lime juice, and tomato juice), tequila, and mezcal. (Non-drinkers, no worries: Olbrantz also envisions a rotating line-up of agua frescas, including the agua de jamaica he pours me, a sweet, tart, hibiscus-flavored refresher.) When Olbrantz plates his chilaquiles for me, his brow wrinkles in focus. Chilaquiles is a humble dish, designed to use up leftover tortilla chips, but his version gets his full attention and skill. It makes a good picture of Olbrantz’s approach. Mercado, along with the other three restaurants he’s co-creating, is fastcasual, or “accessible” food as he calls it. But it’s fast-casual from the mind of a fine chef—a chef who pours all his creativity, passion, and technique into tacos rather than tasting menus. While Olbrantz starts work on the last course, dulce de calabaza, he briefly laments the underlying racism in how the food world has long misunderstood or ignored the beautiful, complex cuisines of Mexico—a tide that has only recently begun to turn. Chefs like Olbrantz are part of the change. He spoons some squash—the calabaza—onto the plate. The squash has been soaked in water and cal (pickling lime) so that it can be poached at length without disintegrating. The results of this ancient technique are deceptive: vibrant orange squash slices that hold their shape, only to give way to a blissful, custard-like inside with each bite. Olbrantz finishes it with a dark, cinnamon flavored syrup made from piloncillo, cones of raw Mexican cane sugar, and curls of queso de bola. Is it sublime and surprising and yet, somehow, simple? Yes. The technique is ancient. The presentation is not fussy. But the taste has taken me somewhere—and that’s what Olbrantz hopes to accomplish around the casual, communal tables of Gather GVL. “Handing someone a taco or something they’ve never tried before and watching their eyes light up as they bite into it, seeing them get excited about trying something delicious—that feeling is why I do it,” Olbrantz tells me. Love is the answer for almost any question you could ask about Olbrantz’s cooking. Why be a chef? He loves good food. Why open four restaurants at once? Because it’s four times the cooking and the fun. Why pizza and burgers? “Because we love to eat them,” he laughs. Why Mercado’s emphasis on Yucatecan food? Because he wants Greenville to experience the same infatuation with the region’s flavors as he did. He quotes Anthony Bourdain, patron saint of all who love food, reminding me that Bourdain says chefs were in the “pleasure business.”

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Olbrantz agrees, adding: “At the end of the day, I want people to feel happy because of what they’re eating.” Just before we part ways, Olbrantz confirms I have what I need because he’s leaving the country for Rome. “Gotta go research that Roman-style pizza,” he says, grinning, eyes truly twinkling. Like he says—the man just loves things that are delicious. Mercado is slated to open next spring 2019 inside Gather GVL, an outdoor food hall coming to Greenville’s West End.

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TAC O S Y MA S :

The menu for Mercado was inspired by Mexican cantinas where patrons linger over rounds of drinks and snacks, like sikil pak, a Yucatecan pumpkin seed dip served with tortilla chips (opposite top) before moving on to heftier bites, like panuchos de pavo, small refried tostadas stuffed with beans (right).

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L A

P A S

S AU C E M A S T E R :

Anthony Pepe is a pasta addict, his love for Italian cuisine inspired by his grandmother Rosie’s home-cooked Sunday Suppers. Now he crafts his own takes on pasta dishes from his home kitchen in Simpsonville.

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T A

V I T A

DIRECT FROM LONG ISLAND, ANTHONY PEPE AND HIS WIFE, JENNIFER, BECAME SOCIAL MEDIA STARS BECAUSE OF THEIR HOMEMADE PASTA DISHES. THE PEOPLE HAVE SPOKEN, AND THE PEPES ARE PLANNING TO OPEN THEIR FIRST RESTAURANT IN D O W N T O W N G R E E N V I L L E NEXT YEAR. BY S T E V E N T I N G L E P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y P A U L M E H A F F E Y

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and Second Avenue in New York City. The restaurant was run by Denis Franceschini, the former executive corporate chef for the Cipriani Group in New York. It didn’t take long for Anthony to realize he was in a different culinary world, far from the hearty comfort foods of Grandma Rosie’s kitchen. “Bar Italia is where my pasta addiction really started,” Anthony says. “It’s where I started learning about true Italian dishes, not Italian American.” Within his first week at Bar Italia, Anthony tried Franceschini’s veal ragu—it was unlike anything he’d ever had. “I’d grown up with meat sauce,” Anthony says. “And it varies through Italy, from north to south. It’s generally three types of meat, veal, pork, and beef, but this one was just veal with a little bit of carrot, celery, onion, a little wine, milk, and stock, and it just cooked down. It was this wonderful sauce, and it wasn’t tomato heavy because there was no tomato at all besides a little tomato paste. I remember thinking ‘What is this?’ It didn’t look like anything I had seen. The sauce wasn’t this heavy, deep red; it was this light bright orange. It was a whole new world that I was slowly starting to discover.”

T H E

Sunday Supper. It’s an Italian-American tradition that brings families together over spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna, and eggplant parmesan. But the foundation of the dinner, the star of the show, is the Sunday Gravy. It is not an exact science, but the classic Sunday Gravy is generally a slow-cooked sauce of onions, canned tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, basil, and various meats including Italian sausage, meatballs, and braciole (rolled flanksteak stuffed with chopped parsley and grated Pecorino Romano). The sauce takes hours to cook and reduce while the smells of fresh garlic and tomatoes fill the kitchen. The meats slowly become tender and juicy while absorbing the flavors of the sauce. When finished, the sauce is a rich, deep red, and it’s lavished on spaghetti or ziti or rigatoni and sopped up from the plate with garlic bread. It’s a sauce that is passed down through generations. Sunday Gravy is the quintessential Italian comfort food. And for Anthony Pepe it is the reason for his pasta passion. “My grandma Rosie loved to entertain,” Anthony says. “You didn’t go in there without eating, and you always walked out full. She made all these great Italian meals. And on Sundays she would have a big pot of red sauce with braciole, and hot and mild sausage. Meatballs were always frying on Sundays, and she’d put one in a napkin for us and we’d eat it like a piece of fruit. She was always cooking and you never questioned what you were having for dinner. Her eggplant parmesan was what she was known for. Everyone in the neighborhood would come out when she was making eggplant parmesan.”

THE NEIGHBORHOOD WAS EAST MEADOW on Long Island where Grandma Rosie kept Anthony well fed. But despite Anthony’s love of eating, he was never all that interested in cooking, other than watching Emeril Lagasse on Saturday mornings. Anthony was more drawn to the art and science of craft cocktails. “I did the whole mixology thing,” he says “Experimenting with ingredients and techniques. Making the same drink fifteen different ways and seeing what I could do different.” Anthony began honing his cocktail knowledge as a bartender at Bar Italia, an upscale Italian restaurant on 77th Street

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C I AO T I M E :

Anthony Pepe, right, is a mixologist by trade, crafting cocktails at local Italian oysteria, Jianna. But his side passion for per fecting pasta in his home kitchen has slowly gained a following through the tantalizing images on his Instagram, @ThePastaAddict, photographed and run by his wife, Jennifer.

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For the next decade Anthony experimented with pasta and sauces the same way he had with craft cocktails. He worked in his home kitchen mastering, as well as putting his own spin on, classic Italian dishes. It was a full-on addiction. And it’s followed him to Simpsonville where he moved, along with his wife, Jennifer, and his two young children, in 2017. “We started coming to the area about ten years ago to visit family,” Anthony says. “We love New York, but it’s so fast-paced and when you have two young kids it’s hard. I would be on the train coming home from work and my wife would be on another train going the other way to go to work. The lifestyle was tough. So we decided to come down here and make a life for ourselves.” Anthony took a bartending job at Jianna, but in his spare time he continued to research and cook at home. One day when Anthony had made a particularly eye-catching pasta dish, Jennifer, who has a background in photography, grabbed her camera and snapped a picture. She created an Instagram account under the name @ThePastaAddict and uploaded the image. “Then it became an everyday thing,” Anthony says. “I would make something and we’d post it on Instagram. The pictures are all beautiful but what you don’t see is the kids throwing flour in the background and dough flying around.” Soon the @ThePastaAddict account had 1,000 followers, and people were reaching out asking where they could try Anthony’s cuisine. “People would say ‘Your food looks beautiful, where are you located?’ I would tell them I’m not located anywhere—this is my kitchen at home.” As the fan base grew and catering inquiries started pouring in, Anthony and Jennifer began to wonder if they should consider taking things to the next level. “We had created this community and people were interested in what we were doing,”

FLOUR POWE R :

Anthony has experimented with authentic Italian cuisine for more than a decade. After moving to South Carolina with his family—wife, Jennifer, son, Anthony (opposite far right), and daughter, Adrienne—the Long Island native began rolling out his own pasta and creating restaurant-quality dishes that gained a robust following on Instagram. Pepe plans to feature such dishes as Spaghetti agli Scampi (above center) with spaghetti, chopped Gulf shrimp, Calabrian chili, white wine, shrimp stock, fresh lemon juice, roasted tomato, garlic, fresh herbs, and herb breadcrumb at his forthcoming restaurant in downtown Greenville.

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Anthony says. “That’s when we really started thinking that maybe we could do something more. It’s a lot cheaper than New York to start something here. Our thought was to create something casual and relaxed but where you could get great pasta at a great price.” That thought is now almost a reality. If things go as planned, Anthony and Jennifer will have a small brick-andmortar location in downtown Greenville sometime in the spring of 2019. “We’re working out the details now,” Anthony says. “But it really looks like it’s going to happen.”

IN THE MEANTIME ANTHONY CONTINUES

“YOU CAN USE THE SAME INGREDIENTS IN THE E X A C T P R O P O R T I O N S , B U T E V E RY D AY I T W I L L B E A L I T T L E B I T D I F F E R E N T. I T TA K E S A L O T O F E X P E R I E N C E A N D K N OW L E D G E TO L E A R N H OW TO W O R K T H A T D O U G H .” — A N T H O N Y P E P E

to cook at home and expand his repertoire, including making his own pasta. “In New York there were a lot of stores you could go to buy fresh pasta,” Anthony says. “So we didn’t start rolling out our own pasta until we moved here. It’s a very difficult skill to acquire. You can use the same ingredients in the exact proportions, but every day it will be a little bit different. It takes years to get it down; it’s really an art form. It takes a lot of experience and knowledge to learn how to work that dough.” What started with Sunday Suppers at Grandma Rosie’s house on Long Island is about to come full circle for Anthony. He and Jennifer are passionate about the opportunity to bring his addiction to the Greenville community. They both realize it will take hard work but with talent and determination they feel they are ready to make a go of it. “I’m not a trained chef,” Anthony says. “I’ve never worked a line at a restaurant. So we’re excited to see if we can do it.”

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Season’s Eatings: Christmas comes early in this modern interpretation of a holiday dish by Chef David Porras from the upcoming Oak Hill Café: juicy chicken brined and cooked sousvide, pumpkin purée, and a liquid cranberry gel.

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CITY

Dish

Food Science: Chef David Porras and chemist Lori Nelsen (pictured at Oak Hill Farm, right) show off their collective creative spirit with tapioca croquettes made with blue cheese from Blue Ridge Creamery (left); confit garlic crème fraîche with a bundle of fresh greens (above right); and scallops in tomato water garnished with wood sorrel (far right).

Good Chemistry

United by a passion for food—chemist Lori Nelsen and Chef David Porras experiment with flavor at Oak Hill Café & Farm

/ by M. Linda Lee // photography of cuisine by Paul Mehaf fey; por trait by Eli Warren

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ou never know who you might meet at a party. When Lori Nelsen—analytical chemist and manager of Furman University’s biogeochemistry lab in the earth and environmental sciences department—attended a party to welcome new faculty members in August 2016, little did she guess the gathering would bring her closer to fulfilling her dream of running a restaurant. Nelsen had been toying with the idea of opening a restaurant for several years, and had gone so far as to buy a 1940s-era house on 2.4 acres off Poinsett Highway, about three miles south of Furman. The next thing on her list—a chef. As it happened, an introduction to David Porras was all she needed. The Costa Rican-born chef happened to be at the party with

his wife, Karen Allen, one of the new professors in the department. “We sat and talked for an hour or so,” Lori recalls. “It was really wonderful to have a similar vision, along with the geekiness of our chemistry interests and interests in food and health.” Although the two hit it off instantly, Porras had serious reservations about enlisting in another venture— he’d been scammed in a restaurant project in Costa Rica before he and Karen moved to Georgia in 2010. But the future restaurant site won him over, with its adjacent plot of land perfect for a small farm. “When I saw the

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property, my mind just exploded [with possibilities],” Porras exclaims. Shortly afterward, he came on board as chef and partner of Oak Hill Café. The fact that both partners are self-proclaimed chemistry geeks means the café will include a small room devoted to research and development. From David’s description, it will resemble a chemistry lab, stocked with a freeze drier, centrifuge, and other equipment for culinary experiments. Those experiments will draw on produce from the on-site garden. Finger limes, Buddha’s hand citrus, turmeric, ginger, ground cherries, and hibiscus number among the less-familiar plants that will be grown on Oak Hill farm, which is tended by Furman alum and avid organic gardener Aaron von Frank and Chris Miller of That Garden Guy. Logs from trees felled for the site’s development have been seeded with 12 different types of mushrooms. Porras and Nelsen are further united by a love of cooking. “I was one of those kids who was always next to my mom asking, ‘What are you doing?’ and tasting whatever she was cooking,” David admits. He earned his master’s degree in technique, product, and creativity at the Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastián, Spain, whose instructors included Michelin-starred chefs and alumni of El Bulli (a restaurant world-renowned for its experimental cuisine before closing in 2011). “David just blows me away with his creativity,” crows

Lori, who will join Porras in the kitchen. “He really is a genius. He continually amazes me with the ideas he has. I’m very thankful for his energy and his passion.” Even when Porras creates a sandwich, it’s not without a large measure of contemplation. Making their own bread is not enough. “We will work to make the best bread for each sandwich,” the chef explains. “With meat products, we’ll spend a lot of time understanding what the animals eat, and why. If they eat grass, what kind is it? That way, we can trace the flavor profiles.” Scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2019, Oak Hill Café will serve breakfast and lunch on weekdays, brunch on Saturday, and dinner Thursday through Saturday. While Thursday and Friday evenings will feature an à la carte menu, Saturday-night dinners will allow Porras to channel his inner mad scientist to concoct a multicourse tasting. “There will be no menu on the table because I want people to be open-minded,” he declares. She’s a self-taught cook; he’s a self-taught food chemist. Together, they have their café concept down to a science. “We want to continually innovate and learn and create, and challenge diners in Greenville to open their minds to new ways of looking at food,” Nelsen says. “We’re trying to break some barriers.” Oak Hill Café & Farm, 2510 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. oakhillcafe.com DECEMBER 2018 / 113

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OPEN

Bar

Shake It Up:

Spiced cranberry, rosemary, and a mist of absinthe amplifies the holiday cosmo at Asheville’s MG Road. Experience its holiday pop-up bar, Miracle, through December 31.

Bell Ringer A cocktail pop-up named Miracle is in its sophomore year at Asheville’s MG Road Bar & Lounge / by Stephanie Burnette

Christmas lights that swag across the basement bar’s ceiling). Seasonal-themed cocktails in festive settings with over-the-top décor, costumes, playlists, Christmas carol karaoke, and holiday glassware aplenty make Miracle a pop-up to attend more than once. Parties thrown throughout the event, which ends on December 31 with an all-out New Year’s Bash, are a hallmark of the brand. The team at NYC’s Mace creates the roster of Christmas cocktails each year served exclusively at Miracle bars. There are 12 of them including two shots (one naughty and one nice, of course). Highlights include a Snowball Old Fashioned complete with butterscotch rye, wormwood bitters, spiced Demerara, and a hand-packed slow-melting shaved ice ball; and a Christmapolitan, mixed with vodka, spiced cranberry sauce, rosemary, elderflower, lime, and an absinthe mist. In Asheville, Durst believes Miracle amplified the holiday spirit with patrons last year. “The pop-up sort of took over everyone’s mentality. The culture at MG Road is a fun, eclectic environment, and with such a small staff we really take pride in our work. I can’t wait for the whole month long of holiday Christmas madness.”

BA D SA N TA ( S E R V E D H OT ) Hot Milk Punch with Barbados rum, Trinidad overproof rum, Batavia Arrack, pineapple juice, lemon juice, almond milk, 8 spices, coconut water, coconut oil

JINGLE BELL NOG Cognac, Pedro Ximenez Sherry, brown butter, cinnamon, cherry, vanilla, almond milk, cream, sugar, egg, nutmeg

KOALA-LA, LA LA, LA LA LA LA Gin, pine, dry vermouth, lime, eucalyptus syrup, orange bitters

A N D A PA R T R I D G E IN A PEAR TREE Reposada tequila, pear brandy, mezcal, spiced brown sugar, lime, egg white, club soda, Angostura bitters

Photograph courtesy of MG Road Bar & Lounge

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pop-up bar born out of necessity just five years ago in the Big Apple has become a bit of a global phenomena with 80 locations for just five weeks a year. Miracle is the brainchild of Greg Boehm, who couldn’t quite get his New York City bar Mace open by year’s end in 2014, but, refusing to miss the holiday season, launched a hyperkitsch, all-things-Christmas cocktail pop-up that captured the fancy of imbibers. “The growth of Miracle and the love that guests have for this concept has been completely amazing,” says Miracle brand manager Joann Spiegel. Asheville’s MG Road Bar & Lounge jumped on board last year, becoming one of very few Miracle locations in the South. And, unless you’ll be in Atlanta over the holidays, the next closest Miracle is in Durham, North Carolina, at Alley Twenty-Six. MG Road is the Bombayinspired bar of the James Beard darling Chai Pani Restaurant Group, which includes a stellar beverage program at Buxton Hall Barbecue. “We’re a party bar with a cocktail persona,” MG Road general manager Lexy Durst says of Asheville’s Wall Street establishment (noting the quantity of year-round

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THE

Buzz

Spin the Bottle Remix your gifting strategy this year with handpicked beverages for every taste / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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hether you find it agony or more fun than Christmas morning itself— the season of endless searching for holiday gifts is upon us. Our solution? Bypass the hunt with a bottle of booze, handpicked for every person on your list. We’ve selected a few of the year’s most special, surprising, and delicious bottles—and with labels this nice, you won’t have to wrap a thing. Tie a ribbon on that sucker, tuck it under your arm, and get ready to spread some good cheer.

THE BOTTLE TO MAKE THEIR CHRISTMAS MORNING ANGEL’S ENVY FINISHED RYE $125, Poinsett Beverage, 2616 Poinsett Hwy.

The “angel’s share” is the whiskey that evaporates during the aging process. When Master Distiller Lincoln Henderson (the same man who created Woodford Reserve) tasted this incredibly smooth whiskey, he suspected the angels might want a bigger cut. The limited production rye is finished in barrels that once housed Caribbean rum, which adds deep, complex flavors. You’ve never had a rye quite like this one.

THE BOTTLE THAT’S JUST RIGHT FOR EVERY HOLIDAY DINNER PARTY ARNOT-ROBERTS 2016 EL DORADO VINEYARD GAMAY NOIR $30, The Community Tap, 217 Wade Hampton Blvd.

Bottoms Up: Upgrading your holiday gifts from bad sweaters and butter cookies to special bottles? We’ll drink to that.

THE BOTTLE TO MAKE A COCKTAIL FIEND SMILE AMARO NONINO $43, Bouharoun’s Fine Wines & Spirits, 301 Falls St.

Yes, this amaro will look impossibly cool on their bar cart, but the silky, herbal, Italian digestif really delivers on the drink game, too. Made by an Italian family famous for their grappa, Amaro Nonino is a bit lighter, but no less complex, than some amari, and plays a starring role in popular cocktails.

THE BOTTLE FOR EVERY IMPOSSIBLE-TO-BUY-FOR BRO IN YOUR LIFE BLACKBERRY FARM BREWERY CLASSIC SAISON $15, Greenville Beer Exchange, 7 S Laurens St.

If he geeks out over craft beer, he’ll like this Belgian-style farmhouse ale. If he’s a Millerfrom-a-can kind of guy, he’ll like this beer, too. It’s rare that a beer can appeal to such different crowds, but that’s the beauty of saisons—crisp, easydrinking with faint citrus notes and a clean finish.

THE BOTTLE TO IMPRESS YOUR IN-LAWS WHO LOVE TO TALK ABOUT THEIR TRIP TO WINE COUNTRY SMITH-MADRONE 2014 CABERNET SAUVIGNON $54, Northampton Wine + Dine, 211 E Broad St.

This estate-grown, terroirdefined Cabernet is made by a producer who has been quietly, humbly making wine high up a mountain in Napa Valley for decades. No hype or marketing glitz here—just an elegant, balanced wine that will be lovely now or down the road if they choose to cellar it.

Gamay is a bit of a trending grape varietal these days, and for good reason. Made by two visionary California vintners, this light-bodied red is delicate and jubilant, with notes of red fruit and a soft finish. It’s very food-friendly, so pack this one along for all your host gifts: if they decide to open it immediately, it will pair with almost anything.

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SIDE

Dish Cups of Love: At three area coffee shops, Bridge City, Exchange Co., and Mountain Goat, cups overflow with concern for those in need.

This community hub, which opened in early 2015, serves coffee drinks as well as baked goods made from scratch, including gluten-free, diary-free, and vegan items. More significantly, it provides the couple with a way to raise awareness for orphan care in the area. “This shop is a reflection of the culture of our family,” declares Mike. Even the venue’s name echoes their mission to “live their lives in exchange for others.” Last year, the Bacaros launched a group called FYI (Future Youth Independence), which builds community around youths aging out of foster care, providing a support network to help them achieve success. As Mike puts it, “The driving force behind what we do is the sacrifice we make for the kids.”

Good Brew

M O U N TA I N G OAT

Local coffee shops bolster lives through creative partnerships, job opportunities, and adventure programs / by M. Linda Lee

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ust about everybody appreciates a good cuppa joe. Perhaps that’s what makes coffee an ideal vehicle for giving back to the community. From tutoring at-risk youth to providing foster families for area children, the owners of three coffee businesses are dedicated to making their communities better, one pour-over at a time.

BRIDGE CITY COFFEE 1 5 2 0 WA D E H A M P T O N B LV D, G R E E N V I L L E ; B R I D G E C I T Y.C O F F E E

When Greg Ward and his business partner, Jon Quigg, started roasting and selling ethically sourced coffee last spring, they set a mission to “build value and hope in people through coffee.” As they prepare to open a brick-and-mortar shop on Wade Hampton Boulevard, the duo will work with local organizations such as Mill Village Farms, Jasmine Road, and Miracle Hill Ministries to provide jobs and training for

young adults (ages 18–24). By offering a year-long training curriculum at the coffee shop, Ward and Quigg hope to set these folks up for a successful future. Their three-tier business model rests on ethical sourcing, employee training, and giving back to the community at large. “The goal,” says Ward, “is to teach our employees who they are and, just as importantly, who they are not. This includes helping them learn what their strengths and passions are and how to align those to have lasting and fulfilling employment in the future.”

E XC H A N G E C O . 1 1 0 S M A I N S T, S I M P S O N V I L L E ; ( 8 6 4 ) 75 7-1 6 7 0 , E XC H A N G E C O C O F F E E .C O M

As foster and adoptive parents themselves, Mike and Roxanne Bacaro advocate for children in need of a home through Exchange Co., the shop they own in the clock tower plaza in downtown Simpsonville.

1 2 0 S H AW S T, G R E E N V I L L E ; ( 8 6 4 ) 7 3 5 - 0 8 2 1 , M O U N TA I N G OAT G V L .C O M

Tucked away off Rutherford Street, Mountain Goat opened in August to help at-risk kids connect with nature. Its name nods to GOAT (Great Outdoor Adventure Trips), the nonprofit that owner Ryan McCrary established in 2009. GOAT, which offers free guided excursions for at-risk youth, virtually runs on coffee. The shop funds the non-profit and serves Methodical coffee, baked goods from Upcountry Provisions, and pizza from D’Allesandro’s. The storefront also provides classroom space and an adjoining bike shop. The former is used to tutor middle and high school students from the nearby Poe Mill neighborhood, while the latter furnishes mountain bikes for outdoor adventures. Mountain-biking, backpacking, rock-climbing, and stand-up paddle-boarding number among the excursions. “I’d love to see the shop staffed mainly with kids from the neighborhood,” says McCrary, an avid outdoorsman whose group serves 1,000 kids each year and helps them finish high school. “It would be great one day if one of those kids graduates from high school and comes back to manage the shop.”

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“We need joy as we need air. We need love as we need water. We need each other as we need the Earth we share. We are blessed that there is within our reach enough of all we need.” — Maya Angelou

THINK FRESH & HEALTHY

eat healthy YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

SERVE YOUR HOLIDAY GUESTS THE CREAMIEST ALL NATURAL ICE CREAM! …AND DON’T FORGET HAPPY COW’S FAMOUS EGG NOG FOR THE HOLIDAYS! AGED CHEDDAR CHEESE • BUTTER • EGGS WHOLE MILK • CHOCOLATE MILK • BUTTERMILK SAUSAGE • CHICKEN • SALMON • LOCAL SC SHRIMP SWEET POTATOES • AND MORE!

Linda’s Macaroni

VARIETIES OF APPLES 99¢ per lb.

GOUDA CHEESE made with Happy Cow Raw Milk

2 LB. PURE CREAM HAPPY COW BUTTER

SWEET POTATOES 39¢ per lb.

&

Cheese Recipe 3/4 Cup Uncooked Macaroni 1 Tsp Salt and 3 Cups Water Cook til tender (9 minutes). Drain and rinse CHEESESAUCE: 1 Cup Happy Cow Aged Cheddar 2 Cups Happy Cow Hoop Cheddar 2 Cups Happy Cow Whole Milk 3 Eggs Beaten Combine Milk and Eggs. Stir together. Grease bottom of 8x8 casserole. Pour in noodles. Spread grated cheese over noodles. Pour liquid over top. Stir lightly. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes until knife comes out clean. Enjoy!

“Where Quality is a Reality”

Chemical free, no artificial additives; pure fresh milk & local produce 332 McKelvey Road, Pelzer 864-243-9699 Just off Hwy 25, 2 miles south of Ware Place, left on McKelvey Road 1 mile Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am-5pm, Sun. closed

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KITCHEN

Aid

On Pointe: The ethereal, marshmallow-like pavlova was named for the Russian ballerina who inspired it.

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INSTRUCTIONS:

PAVLOVA WITH LEMON CURD AND RED FRUIT Yield: 12

INGREDIENTS:

T

his all started with a ballerina. Well, it turns out, not exactly—but Australia and New Zealand would have you think otherwise. The fight has stretched on for decades, each country confident in its status as victor. The reason for this Down Under duel? Enter the pavlova, a light, airy, dramatic dessert said to be inspired by world-famous Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. She toured both Australia and New Zealand in 1926, and whole nations were entranced—so much so that they devised a crisp, billowy meringue dessert that was as light and elegant as the ballerina’s ethereal performances. Australia claims that a chef in Perth first invented the pavlova, while New Zealand insists that they were the first to publish a recipe for it. Each country has embraced the pavlova as part of their national culture, paying no mind to research that indicates the meringue dessert actually originated in Germany and migrated to America long before Pavlova ever took the stage on her world tour. Origin-story squabbles aside, the pavlova really delivers in the drama department. Clouds of meringue set into firm swoops and peaks that cradle tangy pools of lemon curd. Sweet whipped cream and bright red fruit lend textural and color contrast. It’s the perfect dessert to place in front of a guest with a flourish. With holiday feasts come all of the people we love most in the world. May this pavlova be the only drama at your table.

For the meringues 1¼ cups sugar 6 egg whites (reserve 3 yolks for lemon curd) Pinch of cream of tartar 1 tsp. white vinegar ½ tsp. salt 2 tsp. vanilla extract For the curd 2/3 cup sugar 1 Tbs. cornstarch 1/8 tsp. salt 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice 4 Tbs. unsalted butter 3 large egg yolks 2 tsp. grated lemon zest For serving Fresh whipped cream 1 cup raspberries 1 cup pomegranate arils

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Scatter sugar in a shallow baking dish and bake 10 minutes. Meanwhile, using an electric mixer on mediumhigh speed, beat egg whites, cream of tartar, and vinegar until foamy. 2. Remove sugar from oven and decrease temperature to 200°F. With the mixer running, gradually stream sugar into egg whites. Add salt and vanilla; beat until very stiff peaks form and meringue is glossy. 3. Scoop large spoonfuls of meringue onto 2 parchmentlined baking sheets to make 12 mounds. Make a slight indentation in the center of each mound with the back of the spoon, swirling out to create 3”-diameter rounds. 4. Bake meringues until dry and firm, about 2 hours and 15 minutes. Turn off oven and use a wooden spoon to prop door ajar. Let meringues cool completely in oven before removing. (Meringues can be made a day ahead and stored in an airtight container.) 5. Meanwhile, stir together 2/3 cup sugar, cornstarch, and salt in a heavy saucepan, then add lemon juice and butter. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, whisking, then continue to simmer, whisking constantly, 1 minute. Lightly beat yolks in a small bowl and whisk in ¼ cup of the lemon mixture, then whisk back into remaining lemon mixture in saucepan. Reduce heat to low and cook, whisking constantly, until curd is thickened, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and stir in zest. Cover the surface with plastic wrap and chill until cool, about 1 ½ hours. 6. To assemble pavlovas, top each meringue with a small spoonful of lemon curd. Garnish with fresh raspberries and pomegranate arils. Serve with whipped cream.

Holiday Drama

))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Pavlova, the famous Down Under dessert, makes a stunning presentation / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

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Be a Guest at your next party. Contact GoodLife Catering for all of your event needs.

Good Life Catering Co., LLC 1225 Pendleton Street, Suite 2 Greenville, SC 29611 Office 864.605.0130 goodlifecateringonline@gmail.com

www.goodlifecateringonline.com

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Inspired Location. Inspired Dining Experience.

restaurant17.com Located within Hotel Domestique 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest, SC

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B A S I L T H A I

C U I S I N E Family-owned

EXOTIC FLAVOURS

LIVELY ATMOSPHERE

AWARD-WINNING DINING EXPERIENCE

REFINED THAI

OPEN FOR DINNER EVERYDAY: 5 pm - 10 pm LUNCH: Monday - Friday 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM

9 North Laurens Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-609-4120 • EatAtBasil.com

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AUGUSTA GRILL

AMERICAN ADAMS BISTRO

The Adams family opened their bistro’s doors in February 2008 and have been serving up flair and flavor ever since. Expect classics like a burger with a chargrilled certified Angus beef patty, as well as out-of-the-box picks like the Jack Daniel’s Pork Chop, charbroiled in a sweet and tangy Jack Daniel BBQ glaze. Be sure to visit the outdoor patio during the warmer months—weather permitting of course. $-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 221 Pelham Rd, #100. (864) 370-8055, adams-bistro.com THE ANCHORAGE

With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include grilled Greenbrier Farms hanger steak, octopus carpaccio, and Chinese red shrimp and BBQ cabbage steamed buns. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, Bake Room bread, and pickled veg. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch, which is served on Sunday. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

ASADA

Vibrant Latin American cuisine comes to Greenville by way of ASADA, a brick-andmortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard serving traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes (right), a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution of upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly soughtafter blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 2976000, baconbrospublichouse.com BLOCKHOUSE

The Augusta Road crowd frequents the dark, cozy dining room here to knock back raw Gulf Coast oysters and happy-hour drink specials after work. An oldie but a goodie— 35 years strong and still kicking—Blockhouse offers a full menu of freshly prepared items including signatures like seafood gumbo and prime rib slow-roasted for eight hours. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1619 Augusta Rd. (864) 2324280, blockhouse.net BOBBY’S BBQ

At his new barbecue spot on Main Street in Fountain Inn, Tay Nelson smokes all the meat over oak wood in 1,000-gallon smokers. Named for his late father and brother (both named Bobby), the restaurant prides itself on its scratch-made sides and desserts. Go for the award-winning brisket and save room for the banana pudding.$, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed

BRICK STREET CAFÉ

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try mom’s spaghetti, Miss Sara’s crab cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D (Thurs–Sat). Closed Sun–Mon. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com

FORK AND PLOUGH

This newcomer is the quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly. With its casual, family-friendly feel, Fork & Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes like this barbecue local rabbit hash with bell pepper, onion, baby carrot, fingerling potatoes, mustard barbecue sauce, and poached eggs. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Tuesday. 1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun—fill the menu. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of the restaurant’s best dishes. $$, L (Tues–Sat), D

(Thurs–Sat), SBR. Closed Mon. 1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Sun–Weds. 1301 N Main St, Fountain Inn. (864) 409-2379, eatbobbys.com

Foxcroft Wine Co.

Photograph by Will Crooks

Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and panseared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D (Tues–Sun),

shop open 10am–11pm (Tues–Sat). Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 9064200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR D E CM EA MR BC EH R 2017 8 / 10 25 7

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Find Your New Home This Holiday Season 12 Years of Experience 2013 • 2014 • 2015 2016 • 2017 Agent of the Year for the Pelham Road Office 2013 • 2014 • 2015 2016 • 2017 Top 10 Agent in the Company Jennifer Van Gieson Real Estate

DINING

Guide

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

HARE & FIELD

Sister restaurant to Farmhouse Taco, Hare & Field serves comfort fare with upscale elegance. While the fried chicken skins in sorghum sriracha sauce are a sure starter, make your main meal the big mater sandwich slathered in basil aioli. Pair with the Hare & Field Trail Ale, crafted specially by Brewery 85 for the gastropub. $$. L, D,

SBR. 327 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0249, hareandfieldkitchen.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com HUSK GREENVILLE

email: jvangieson@cdanjoyner.com cell: 864.590.4441

WINE & DINE

Husk Greenville delivers legendary farm-totable concepts under Chef Jon Buck, who champions Southern fare by resurrecting dishes reminiscent of great-grandma’s kitchen. The ever-evolving menu offers starters—like the crispy pig ear lettuce wraps—then dives into heftier plates like the coal-roasted chicken, sorghum-flour dumplings, and shishito peppers. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskgreenville.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the gritz fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The banh mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sun–Mon. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 568-8115, facebook.com/kitchensyncgreenville

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

LTO BURGER BAR

Producers with passion. Served with pride.

Local ingredients. Casual experience. Exceptional taste.

Greenville’s Historic West End | 631 South Main Street 864-906-4200 | foxcroftwine.com/greenville

Chef Brian Coller has crafted a menu that steers the beefy American staple into unconventional (but totally delicious) territory. Take the Piedmont mullet ’85, with sloppy joe chili, bomb mustard, American cheese, and “phat” onion rings. For you Elvis enthusiasts, the King of Memphis is a hunk of burnin’ love concocted with banana jam, peanut butter, and bacon. $$, L, D. 2451 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 214-1483, ltoburgerbargvl.com

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE

Founded by three Alabama sons, this new ’cue joint hits the West Stone area

with Bama-style barbecue and traditional Southern sides. A fast-casual environment, grab a seat indoors or out—roll-up garage doors allow access to a pet-friendly patio— and enjoy a pulled pork platter or the fried catfish, all while cheering on your favorite football team on the flat screens. $-$$, L, D,

SBR. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite B (864) 5201740, moesoriginalbbq.com/greenville MONKEY WRENCH SMOKEHOUSE

Monkey Wrench Smokehouse comes by its name honestly, taking up space in a long-standing hardware store in Travelers Rest. This BBQ joint from the folks behind Sidewall Pizza and Rocket Surgery serves everything from ribs, wings, and veggies— all wood-fired. Steven Musolf wears the title of head chef and is the mind behind the menu. $$-$$$. D. Closed Monday. 21

N Main St, Travelers Rest. (585) 414-8620, monkeywrenchsmokehouse.com NORTHAMPTON WINE & DINE

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the thousands for sale, open it for a corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864)

271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and cocktails at its upstairs bar CRAFTED complement an ambitious menu of urban comfort food from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is a downtown hotspot. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Nick Graves like smoked scallop crudo with crème fraîche, grapefruit, hot sauce pearls, and Meyer lemon oil, and pork belly agnolotti with chestnuts, rapini, and saffron cream.

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or chef-designed. Ideal for group dinners or date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to

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D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202.

(864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S

Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE STRIP CLUB 104

BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

With a focus on farmhouse saisons and sour beers, Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect end-of-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find flavor-filled concoctions, such as the biggie mango, Eldorado saison, or the 2hop session IPA. Thurs–Sun. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com

(864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER

Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The small-batch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries 1708158 of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington

Contact an agent today. Just drop in the office, call, email, or visit statefarm.com

State Farm Bloomington, IL

St. (864) 735-0885, fireforge.beer GROWLER HAUS

The franchise’s West Greenville addition is its newest, rounding out the total to four Upstate watering holes. Growler Haus’s drafts rotate seasonally to bring you the best in local and national brews, so whether you’re a fan of IPAs, pilsners, ciders, pale ales, or wheats, they’ve got a cold one waiting for you. Just remember to throw in a homemade pretzel with beer cheese or a pork belly bao bun in between pints. $-$$,

State State Farm Farm Bloomington, Bloomington, IL IL

1708158 1708158

L (Fri–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). Closed Sunday. 12 Lois Ave. (864) 373-9347, growlerhaus.com

IRON HILL BREWERY

Hailing from Delaware, this award-winning brewhouse has planted roots in Greenville. Chef Jason Thomson turns out an ambitious menu, while head brewer Eric Boice curates craft beer. Take on evenings with the summer seasonal Clock Out Lager, an American lager with notes of grapefruit and pine. $-$$$, L, D. 741 Haywood Rd. (864) 568-

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LIABILITY BREWING CO.

United by a passion for Star Wars and craft brews—there may or may not be a storm trooper mural inside—fun-loving founders Dustin and Terry bring solid staples to the table at Liability Brewing Co. Located in an old electric company building in the new Weststone development, this new taproom pours creative flavors with even funkier names. Sip on a Carl von Cloudwitz, a New England IPA with a crisp finish. Thurs–Sun. 109 W Stone Ave, Suite D. (864) 920-1599, liabilitybrewing.co

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Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the rise & fight again IPA and the Sgt. Molly American wheat— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors

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13 STRIPES BREWERY

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery on Augusta, this brewpub is hoppy hour heaven. Expect to find a variety of their craft beers on tap, but branch out with the pub’s select draft cocktails or beer slushies. Live music, local art, and a rotating menu featuring shared plates and charcuterie round out the experience. 400 Augusta St.

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$$$, D (Tues–Sat). 104 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 877-9104, thestripclub104.com

631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

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Whether you’re a red-blooded meat eater or prefer a little pork, the Strip Club has it seared, grilled, basted, or blackened for your pleasure. Keep it simple with the “plain Jane” dish— house-aged Black Angus USDA prime strip—or spice it up with the carpetbagger, a filet mignon masterpiece paired with fried oysters, smoked bacon collards, and garlic mashed potatoes. $$$-

May the joy of the season bring you love and peace. Merry Christmas to a wonderful community! Agent Agent May May the the joy joy of of the the season season Street Address Street Address Ryan Pullicin bring you love and City, yougo loveright. and ®peace. peace. Here to bring help life City, State, State, Zip Zip State Farm Insurance Agent Phone Merry Christmas to Phone Merry Christmas to aa E-mail E-mail wonderful wonderful community! community! 864.220.2828

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This fashionable restaurant lends a modern, tasty addition to N. Main Street. Whenever possible, Roost sources food within a limited distance from producer to consumer; ingredients are often procured from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L,

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Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere Street Address collide at the Community Tap, Greenville’s City, State, Zip neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from a wide selection—180 local, Phone national, and international brews—or have a E-mail glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and Agent wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) Agent Name, Name,

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S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0901, rocketsurgery54321.com

6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com

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The Sidewall team trades slices for sliders with this craft concept, whose low-key bill of fare features snackable burgers like lamb topped with feta, spinach, and tangy harissa, and fried soft-shell crab with creamy paprika aioli. If you plan to drink your dinner, go for the Typhoon, with rum, dry curaçao, lime, lemongrass, curry, coconut cream, or The Prospector with bourbon and bitters. $$, D (Mon, Thurs–Sat), SBR. 164-D

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with its eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty howdy dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome.

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648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

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certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun.

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Regularly Scheduled Events Wine Tastings & Wine Dinners Private Rooms Available for Parties For ten years, Stella’s has maintained a commitment to quality & community by serving locally sourced ingredients. We pride ourselves on attention to detail, and professional & friendly service. Enjoy regionally inspired cuisine in our relaxed dining rooms!

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill satisfies as both pre–Greenville Drive game watering hole or after-work hangout. Inventive and hearty apps, such as the “Old School” chicken nachos, start things off before the main event of fish ‘n’ chips, the Liberty Club, or even a Signature Steak. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap.

Breakfast & Lunch Grab n’ Go Provisions & Handcrafted Coffees Full Service Lunch, Dinner & Weekend Brunch Patio Dining, Adjacent to Greenville’s Legacy Park

340 Rocky Slope Road, Greenville 864-626-6900 www.stellasbrasserie.com

Tuesday - Saturday starting at 8:30am Lunch Tuesday- Friday • Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Brunch- Saturday & Sunday • Closed- Monday

10 Year Anniversary Specials! $10 Nightly Burgers at the Bar (8:30 pm & after on weekends)

Every Monday - Anniversary Special: Lowcountry Seafood Features $10 Lunch / $20 Dinner • Half off Select Wines

684 Fairview Road Simpsonville 864-757-1212 www.stellasbistro.com

Open Lunch & Dinner Monday-Saturday Closed Sundays

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$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 7707777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St. (864) 239-0286, macspeedshop.com PINEY MOUNTAIN BIKE LOUNGE

and charcuterie, or nosh on the fabulous flatbread as a party of one. $-$$$, D. 3016

THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville brew lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy. (864)

605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

(864) 603-2453, pineymtb.com

L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

Eco-minded Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$,

UP ON THE ROOF

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With its classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250 RiverPlace. (864)

(864) 272- 6232, questbrewing.com

242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net

SIP WHISKEY & WINE

VAULT & VATOR

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers fine wines and whisky, there’s no better end to an evening than an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail). SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a collection of small plates is a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite. $-$$, D. 103

N Main St #400, (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgian-style farm ale is a golden dream) as well as frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become a favorite spot to cap off an afternoon. 26 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2424, theswamprabbitbrewery.com TASTING ROOM TR

Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale in-house, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite from the weekly wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday–Friday. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D

(Wed–Sat), Closed Mon–Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com THE 05

Priding itself on being Greenville’s neighborhood gathering place, The 05, so named for the iconic Augusta Road zip code, offers seasonal cocktails and spirits as well as a variety of tasty tapas—like the roasted red pepper hummus or the chorizostuffed dates braised in Rioja wine and topped with whipped goat cheese. If you’re bringing the whole gang, opt for the cheeses

2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com

T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

Augusta St. (864) 412-8150, the05.net

Part taproom and part full-service cycle shop, the Piney Mountain Bike Lounge offers the perfect pit stop after a long day of riding the trails. Local craft brews, wine, and cider complement a daily food truck schedule of popular mobile eateries. Kids (and adults) can enjoy the pump track out back. 20 Piney Mountain Rd, Greenville.

QUEST BREWING CO.

S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville

Named for a former vault elevator in the underground expanse, this hip downtown joint puts a twenty-first-century spin on fashionable speakeasies of yore. Small plates of charcuterie, hummus, and cheese are simple yet refined, providing enough bite to not overpower the establishment’s true star— the cocktail list. The menu includes both signature and traditional libations; your only task is picking your poison. $$, D, Closed Sun–Mon. 655 S Main St, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 603-1881, vaultandvator.com

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR.

1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com YEE-HAW BREWING

Beers that celebrate good times with good company? Count us in. This Tennessee native serves up a mix of fine ales and lagers, including a World Beer Cup-Winning Dunkel dark lager. Diverse seasonals crop up with every change of the temperature giving guests a taste of something new. Gather with friends to find out which flavor fits your fancy. $-$$, L, D. 307 East McBee Avenue, Suite C. (864) 605-7770, yeehawbrewing.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head comes to Greenville with a wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves— you can’t go wrong with the GreenVillain topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café serves a wide-range of globally inspired dishes for lunch and dinner. For Sunday brunch, try the Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy to Pattyo-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864)

520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an almond brothers smoothie. $, B, L, D. 600 S Main St. happyandhale.com MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crêpes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the mega breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maplepeppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste

CAFÉS BARISTA ALLEY

Looking for that midday pick-me-up? Pop over to Barista Alley, where exposed brick walls and wide wooden tables create the perfect ambience to converse with a warm mug in hand. Satisfy your caffeine cravings, but don’t miss out on Barista Alley’s colorful array of green, berry, peanut butter and chocolate smoothies. $, B (Mon–Sat), L, D

(Mon–Sun). 125 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 655-5180, baristaalley.com BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End joint. Find fresh fare in organic salads as well as fruit and veggie-rich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options available, of course. $, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe

COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info CRÊPE DU JOUR

Much more than offering “really thin pancakes,” this downtown establishment brings a taste of Europe to the Upstate with delicate, delicious French fare. The diverse menu includes breakfast options like the bacon, egg, and potato, and for lunch and dinner, the tomato pesto. Crêpe du Jour also serves up specialty cocktails, coffee beverages, and wine. $$, B, L, D (Tues–Sun). 20 S Main

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

St, Greenville. (864) 520-2882

Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 2980005, fallscottage.com

Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. In their new digs, the coffee shop sports a café vibe, with breakfast pastries, ice cream, and cold lunch items complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR.

RISE BISCUITS DONUTS

Fresh buttermilk biscuits. Hot-from-the-oven maple bacon doughnuts. Debuting its first SC outfit, Rise Biscuits Donuts pumps out biscuit sandwiches and hush puppies, to apple fritters and confection-bedecked doughnuts. While the spicy chickaboom sandwich is a crispy punch of fire, satisfy your sweet side with the crème brûlée doughnut, flametorched and filled with custard. $, B, L. 1507

Woodruff Rd, Suite D, Greenville. (864) 4028240, risebiscuitsdonuts.com TANDEM CRÊPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR.

DUE SOUTH COFFEE ROASTERS

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com GRATEFUL BREW

A brew joint where you can enjoy both varieties—coffee and a cold one—Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order espressos or pour-overs, all from Counter Culture coffee. Celebrating our area, and that it’s always five o’clock somewhere, half of the beer taps are locally crafted brews. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com KUKA JUICE

If you’re hard-pressed for a fresh fix—Kuka

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Juice has just the ticket. Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out cold-pressed craft with healthminded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into the taco ’bout it bowl with romaine, walnut meat, salsa fresca, black beans, avocado, and pepitas with cilantro lime vinaigrette. Paninis, bowls, smoothies, toasts, and more also available. $, B, L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

often synonymous, Farm Fresh Fast might change your mind. The restaurant’s mantra is simple: build sustainable relationships with local farms and provide nutritionbased, customized meals. We suggest the almost heaven burger with a fresh patty from Providence Farm, or the seasonal cobb salad—featuring Kaland Farm eggs and a house-made apple pie moonshine vinaigrette. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Saturday.

METHODICAL COFFEE

860 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 518-1978, eatfarmfreshfast.com

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, wine varieites, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D.

methodicalcoffee.com O-CHA TEA BAR

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 2836702, ochateabaronline.com SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ & GROCERY Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is woodfired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds. $, B, L, D.

205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by Due South and serves flaky treats from Bake Room. $, B, L. 1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

DELIS CAVIAR & BANANAS

FARM FRESH FAST

While “fast food” and “healthy” aren’t

$-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com TABLE 301 CATERING & KITCHEN

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, this operation adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D.

On-Trend Vintage for the Home On-Trend Vintage Vintage for for the the Home Home On-Trend

Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

On-Trend Vintage for the Home

UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade stecca bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormonefree meat on just-baked white focaccia bread. Don’t miss The Grove on Friday nights—live music, a rotating tapas menu, and craft beer and wine. $, B, L, D. Closed

Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC ARYANA

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani, and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 2367410, aryanagreenville.com

Lots of Vintage & New Christmas!

Chinoiserie, Farmhouse, Mid-Century, Boho, Classic... Chinoiserie, Farmhouse, Farmhouse, Mid-Century, Mid-Century, Boho, Boho, Classic... Classic... Chinoiserie, Whatever ‘cottage’ means for your style and budget, you’re sure to find it in our livelystyle vintage Whatever ‘cottage’ means for your your and shop. budget, Whatever ‘cottage’ means for style and budget, you’re sure to find it in our lively vintage shop. you’re sure to find it in our lively vintage shop. Chinoiserie, Farmhouse, Mid-Century, Boho, Classic... Whatever ‘cottage’ means for your style and budget, you’re sure to find it in our lively vintage shop.

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L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s chopped salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

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A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B,

RICK’S DELI & MARKET

1607 Laurens Road McAlister Court Shopping 1607 Laurens Road 1607 Laurens Road Center 1607 Laurens Road Shoppes @ Gower Wed-Fri 10-5Shopping & Sat 10-3 McAlister Court Center McAlisterNew Court Shopping 1607 Laurens Road Expanded Hours! Center

Wed-Fri 10-5 & and SatSaturday 10-3 10-3 Open McAlister Tuesday-Friday 10-6 Court Shopping Center Wed-Fri|10-5 & Sat 10-3 (864) 423-9661 cottagegrovevintage.com Wed-Fri 10-5 & Sat 10-3

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BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

BASIL THAI CUISINE

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the concept with Basil Thai in the Aloft building downtown. Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/greenville

FONDA ROSALINDA

For almost 20 years, Rosalinda Lopez has been serving up fresh renditions of Mexican recipes across from Bob Jones University. Her repertoire lists a wealth of tasty beef, pork, chicken, seafood, and vegetarian dishes— including the ever-popular chile rellenos—but don’t pass up a starter of chips and Rosalinda’s homemade tomatillo salsa. $$, L, D. 1124 N. Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 292-7002, facebook. com/rosalindasrestaurantgreenville

GOLDEN LLAMA

Lomo saltado, ceviche, rotisserie chicken, and other Peruvian classics form the core of the menu at the Golden Llama, but you won’t regret the bistec a lo pobre—beef tenderloin, plantains, and potatoes, topped with a fried egg. The eatery’s two no-frills storefront locations (the second one in Five Forks) sport golden-hued walls and offer dine-in and carry-out service. $, L, D. 2435 E. North St. (864) 373-9958, goldenllama.net

IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modernAmerican elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should try the Punky Brewster roll: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com

JI-ROZ

True, it would be fantastic if the Greek Festival happened year-round. But until that day, pop into this authentic Mediterranean eatery with modern flair. Take a light lunch on the outdoor patio with a Kalamata olive and fetatopped Greek salad or a classic gyro wrapped with your choice of lamb, chicken, or veggies. At dinner, try something more indulgent like the vegan moussaka. $$, L, D, Closed Sunday.

644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 3739445, jirozgreenvillesc.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

KOREAN BBQ

This hole-in-the-wall won’t wow you with its simple interior, but its selection of ban chan (side dishes) will spark your palate with snapshots of flavor before you dive into bowls of bibimbap (rice mixed with vegetables, meat, and an egg) or yukejang (a

spicy beef and vegetable stew). $$. L, D. 1170 Woodruff Rd. (864) 286-0505 MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crêpes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their homegrown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathed in a soy-based broth.

$, L, D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 OTTO IZAKAYA

Modeled after the informal, after-work drinking holes of Japan, Otto Izakaya is the latest dining concept unveiled by Peter Lieu and Doug Yi—longtime owners of Lieu’s Bistro restaurant. The menu invites guests to embrace familiar favorites—spicy tuna and BBQ eel rolls with assorted nigiri and sashimi—while expanding palates to new tasting territories a la the mac ‘n’ cheese loaded with Panang curry, jack cheese, and radiatori pasta or banh mi sliders with chili pork and spicy mayo. $$, D. 802 S Main St; 15 Market Point Dr, Greenville. (864) 568-5880; (864) 568-8009, otto-izakaya.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B.(864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St. (864) 2413012, pomegranateonmain.com

SACHA’S CAFÉ

Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on Colombian food at Sacha’s. Arepas are available with ingredients like beans, chorizo, avocado, shredded beef, and more stuffed inside (rellenas) or piled on top (encima). The patacones, or deep-fried plantains, are thick and sweet. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com SAFFRON

It’s worth braving Woodruff Road to visit this Indian eatery. At lunch, the daily buffet lays out a wallet-friendly selection of curries, rice dishes, and chef’s signatures. The a la carte dinner menu boasts a staggering variety, but

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the yogurt-marinated chicken tikka cooked in a clay oven or the lamb saag stewed with spinach, ginger, and garlic are excellent options. $, L, D. 1178 Woodruff Rd., Ste.

16. (864) 288-7400, saffrongreenville.com SAIGON FAST FOOD

Contrary to its name, Saigon Fast Food is a sit-down restaurant. Inside, the small room is spiffed up with green-clothcovered tables and a host of condiments in the middle of each. Folks come here for steaming bowls of pho—a fragrant broth made with rice noodles and your choice of other ingredients (meats and vegetables)—and an extensive menu of Vietnamese specialties to wash down with a glass of bubble tea $ -$$. L, D. 1011 N

Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 235-3472 SWAD

Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soulsatisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $ -$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D.

Closed Sunday.1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com JIANNA

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli with local tomatoes, corn, and chanterelle mushrooms (right). $$-$$$, L (Sat–Sun), D. 207 S Main

St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com KAIROS GREEK KITCHEN

This Charleston restaurant makes its Upstate mark by serving up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like made-in-Mount Pleasant falafels next to slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the homemade tzatziki sauce. Turn any meal into a pita wrap or bowl with your choice of fresh spreads like hummus, baba ganoush, or fat-free dill yogurt.$-$$, L, D. 1800 August St. (864) 520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the

crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

LIMONCELLO

The latest addition to the Larkin’s line-up, this ristorante serves up Italian cuisine out of the former Playwright space on River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards across the region. After you’ve had your glass, grab a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato.

$$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy the arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D

(Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

PORTOFINO’S

You’ll find Italian-American classics to feed every member of the family at this Greenville icon. For two decades, the familyowned restaurant near Greenville Mall has been pleasing palates with a generous menu of pasta, seafood, and saltimbocca. For the gluten-sensitive, sautéed vegetables can be substituted for pasta in many of the dishes $, D. 30 Orchard Park Dr., Ste. 22. (864) 627-7706, portofinossc.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday

& Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, Chef Jeff Kelly offers a local twist on French staples—blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR.

340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com

VILLA FROSI

A Greek and Italian restaurant with traditional flair, Villa Frosi hits Wade Hampton with Southern European staples. Sample specialties like the spanakopita, the seafood fettuccine, or go straight for the pizza. Finish with a slice of limoncello cake, and you’ll be booking you’re Mediterranean dream cruise, pronto. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 2520 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 520-0298, resto. tpsitetesting.info

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DINING

Guide

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville hot chicken or Thai shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $,

schedule varies. (404) 372-2266, facebook. com/automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck. com

CLUCK SQUEAL AND FRIENDS

Owner Jeff Selzer brings an inventive flare to his food truck fare. Expect staples like the fried chicken sandwich and the black & bleu burger, but don’t miss out on fan-favorite crab Rangoon or Jamaican jerk tacos with tropical pico de gallo. Check the Cluck Squeal and Friends Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $, schedule varies. (864) 395-9720, facebook.com/clucksquealfriend ELLADA KOUZINA

Greek cuisine hits the Greenville scene in this big blue traveling kitchen. Traditional treats are always available off the spit, the lamb and chicken gyros are Mediterranean heaven, and their special take on Greek fries are the ideal pre-meal snack. Check social media for weekly schedules. $, schedule

1185, mitmfoodtruck.com ROBINO’S

Chef Robin’s vision of freshly sourced fare with a home-cooked feel comes to fruition in Robino’s Food Truck. Though mainly featuring Italian food, this truck shucks out a wide variety of American classics, such as the chicken potpie with puff pastry or the garden burger. For those with dietary limitations, the vegan lasagna is a great go-to option. $, schedule varies. (864) 621-3064,

robinosfoodtruck.com ONE LOVE FUSION

Catch a summertime vibe year-round every time you drop by this Caribbean-inspired restaurant-on-wheels. Wrap your hands around One Love’s take on traditional favorites; the tropical gyro is rolled up with fresh mango slaw, pico, seared lamb and beef, and jerk-infused tzatziki sauce, while the Jinju hero comes topped on a grilled roll with kimchi, Italian sausage, provolone, and tangy Asian sauce. $, schedule varies. (864)

399-9392, facebook.com/OneLoveFF SMOKIN’ BLUES BBQ

Smokin’ Blues keeps things hot with a smorgasbord of savory sauces and smoked staples—pulled pork, beef brisket, pulled chicken, and ribs—that can be enjoyed solo or packed into sandwiches and tacos. For a treat that’s extra smokin’, go for the glutenfree loaded fries or homemade chips piled high with pork, white BBQ sauce, sour cream, pickled jalapenos, and three-cheese sauce. $, schedule varies (864) 444-4752,

mysmokinblues.com

GRAVY TRAIN FOOD TRAILER

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $, schedule varies. (864) 735-8413,

5708, hoponthegravytrain.com KEEPIN’ IT FRESH

As healthy as it is tasty, Keepin’ It Fresh food truck serves up a diverse menu of locally sourced cuisine guaranteed to please your appetite and your waistline. Catch them at Grateful Brew and the Swamp Rabbit Brewery and Taproom for a crispy fried Brussels sprouts salad, mouthwatering shrimp taco topped with peach slaw and guava crema, or a golden-brown fried fish plate. $$, schedule varies. (864) 386-5050,

@keepinitfreshtruck_gvl

679-B Fairview Rd., Simpsonville, SC | 864-228-2920

Treat yourself to a plethora of sandwiches from mobile marvel Meat’n in the Middle, each topped with your choice of a mouthwatering sauce. Try their Crystal Pistol Chicken with sautéed onion, jalapenos, pepper jack cheese, and mango-habanero sauce, or go for the bun length dog from Nathan’s. For those with dietary limitations, the vegetarian tacos are an excellent alternative. $, schedule varies. (864) 723-

varies. (864) 908-5698, facebook.com/ elladakouzina2013

Dive into this over-the-border (no, not that border) delicacy, hailing straight from the land of maple syrup. The Gravy Train puts their own spin on Canada’s signature gravysoaked, cheese-curd-sprinkled French fry dish à la the chorizo fryerito layered with black beans, homemade chorizo, avocado ranch, and cheddar, and the Reuben-style corned beef poutine drizzled with Thousand Island dressing, smothered in Swiss, and doused in sauerkraut. $, schedule varies. (864) 326-

Inspired by historic wrought iron gates throughout the South. ClarksFineJewelers.com

MEAT’N IN THE MIDDLE

New Fall Collecti KICKIN’ PIG BAR-B-QUE PIG TRUCK on Now If you’re in the mood for some authentic Availab le Southern eats, look no further than the Kickin’ Pig’s on-the-go ’cue truck. Go for the smoked bologna sandwich seasoned with BBQ rub and finished with cole slaw, or grab a fork and dig into the BBQ Sundae, a non-confectionary concoction of pulled pork, potato salad, slaw, and sauce of choice. $, schedule varies. (864) 608-6187, kickinpigbbq.com

THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

thoroughfarefoodtruck.com WE GOT THE BEETS

Proving that not all street food is created equal, We Got the Beets is Greenville’s very first plant-based food truck. This crueltyfree fare encourages diners to “celerybrate” vegan eats. Favorites include the Philly grilled cheese with marinated portobello mushrooms and cashew mozzarella cheese, and the sushi sandwich with sushi rice, Korean BBQ jackfruit, and more in a nori sheet pocket. $, schedule varies. @wegotthebeetsfoodtruck

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from 27 taps downstairs and 31 upstairs—are what bring patrons to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a long list of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

© 2017 All rights reserved. Southern Gates® collection is a registered trademark of The Cargo Hold, Inc. Designed and distributed in Charleston, SC.

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COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitan-style pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margherita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. Location information available on their website.

$, L, D. Location varies. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com D'ALLESANDRO'S PIZZA

Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s Pizza brings its dough lover’s paradise to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. Created with quality ingredients, D’Allesandro’s pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy a variety of savory pizza, calzones, and even signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk Dr, Greenville.

(864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com GRIMALDI'S PIZZERIA

Experience Big Apple flavor without the bustle at this NY-style brick-oven pizzeria. Serving up pies and calzones in a traditional yet chic environment, Grimaldi’s is dedicated to authenticity, down to the imported NYCwater used to craft their dough. Grab a slice of the buffalo chicken pizza, or build your own, just don’t miss the daily house-made cheesecake or wine pairings. Located in Magnolia Park Shopping Center, it’s an ideal spot to snag a bite before a cinematic viewing. $, L, D. 1025 Woodruff Rd, St. K101.

(864) 412-1032, grimaldispizzeria.com SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L,

D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com STONE PIZZA

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat

& Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com TOSS PIZZA

Located in the South Ridge Apartment Community, the TOSS menu is loaded with artfully crafted pies that are a far cry from your typical pepperoni. Head far east with the Phuket Thai pie, based with curry sauce and topped with peanuts, arugula, and shiitake mushrooms. The chile relleno is guaranteed to light a fire in the ol’ belly— thanks to a few poblano peppers. $$, L, D.

823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 2830316, tosspizzapub.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D.

Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

&

TACOS CANTINA 76

NOW BOOKING

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76, where the tacos shine. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St. (864)

Holiday Parties! P R I V AT E R O O M S AV A I L A B L E CUSTOMIZED BANQUET MENUS

631-2914, cantina76.com

FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with the campfire s’mores. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 164

72 BEERS ON TAP CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF® BRAND STEAKS & BURGERS

S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0586, farmhousetacos.com

HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4PM - 7PM

NEO BURRITO

Hailing from Asheville, North Carolina, this locally owned spot takes—the burrito. Stop in for spicy tacos, cheesy quesadillas, zesty breakfast burritos, fresh salads, and more. Save room for the chipotle BBQ chicken burrito or the farm burrito, packed with rice, kale, hummus, beets, cilantro, cabbage, and more. $, B, L, D. 1268 Pendleton St. (864)

SUNDAY BRUNCH 11AM - 3PM 941 SOUTH MAIN STREET DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

552-1054, neoburrito.com

LOCATED IN FRONT OF FLUOR FIELD AT THE WEST END

PAPI’S TACOS

864.770.7777 / LIBERTYTAPROOM.COM

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $, L, D. 300 River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

TIPSY TACO

Dishes here bear the creative touch of Trish Balentine, former owner of Corporate Deli. Her made-from-scratch menu items include tamales, burrito bowls, and all the other Tex-Mex suspects. “Tipsy” nods to the bar, where you can swill tequila flights, frozen margaritas, and house-infused spirits. Take your pick of three locations—two in Greenville and one on Fairview Road in Simpsonville. $$, L, D, SBR. 15 Conestee Ave,

(864) 558-0775, and 215 Pelham Rd, (864) 603-1144, tipsytaco.net WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp bungalow golden ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the atmosphere pairs perfectly with its festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with a house-crafted margarita. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217

Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

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Scene

TOWN z ot Do N

Miss

DECEMBER A FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE CHRISTMAS Thru Dec 22nd; Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$55. Flat Rock Playhouse. Catch all your favorite carols and Christmas characters at Flat Rock Playhouse’s singular holiday review.

Thru Dec 22 A FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE Turn the Christmas cheer up a notch at Flat Rock Playhouse’s one-of-a-kind holiday review, combining the best in yuletide anthems with dynamic set design and eye-catching dance moves. Audiences will have more than just Rudolph to light the way during their journey from the North Pole to the scenic mountainside and back again; keep your eyes peeled for a cameo from the Big Man in Red himself in this all-new production of last year’s smashing success. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $17-$55. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

Photograph by Treadshots, courtesy of Flat Rock Playhouse

CHRISTMAS

TAILORED

by DESIGN

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Thru Dec 22 DICKENS’ A CHRISTMAS CAROL

When Charles Dickens penned his now-famous novella way back in 1843, we doubt he imagined Kermit the Frog starring as Bob Cratchit. Regardless, this Dickens’ tale of a soul reborn is a holiday classic with an amazing message. Albeit a little revamped, this musical version promises to unite all your favorite characters from Tiny Tim to Jacob Marley for an uplifting story of what’s truly important in life. Don’t be afraid to sing along—you never know when the ghosts might pay you a visit. The Logos Theatre, 80 School St, Taylors. Thurs, 11:30am; Fri–Sat, 7pm. $27.50. (864) 268-9342, thelogostheatre.com

Thru Dec 25

ANDERSON CHRISTMAS LIGHTS For most of us, attempting to connect thousands of Christmas-light strands usually ends with a few choice words and several strong cocktails. However, a few decades in the business seems to make things a little bit easier. Each year, this dazzling exhibition packs on the bling with even more

LED displays, animations, trees, and a Santa’s Lodge with fireside treats provided courtesy of Mrs. Claus herself. Proceeds raised are donated to local charities in the Anderson community. 520 Woodcrest Dr, Anderson. Mon–Sun, 5:30–10pm. $10. (864) 933-2547, andersonchristmaslights.com

Thru Dec 30

LIGHTS BEFORE CHRISTMAS Columbia’s longest-running holiday light show returns with all the jolly good fun you remember. Besides a zoo full of more than a million dazzling, bright displays, the outdoor adventure also includes an animated story tree, nightly visits with St. Nick, and a Jingle Bell Bonfire perfect for toasting marshmallows. Riverbanks Zoo & Garden, 500 Wildlife Pkwy, Columbia. Mon–Sun, 5–9pm. Under 2, free; ages 2-12, $10; 13 and up, $12. (803) 779-8717, riverbanks.org

no further than this makeshift ice rink right in the heart of downtown Greenville. In addition to a wide range of holiday events hosted on the ice each season, the open-air rink also has plenty of warm-you-up staples like hot cocoa for sale. Bring your own blades or rent a pair, just try to keep the Tonya Harding moves to a minimum. 206 S Main St, Greenville. Mon– Thurs, 3–8pm; Fri, 3–9pm; Sat, 11am–9pm; Sun, 11am–7pm. Adults, $10; ages 4-12, $8; children under 4, free. (864) 4675751, iceonmain.com

has been the way to jumpstart your Christmas spirit. Pile on the jingle and the jangle with plenty of festive carolers, displays, and holiday cheermeisters in tow. Keep your eyes peeled for the Big Man in Red—he’s been known to make an appearance down the chimney. Main St, Greenville. Sat, 6–7:30pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/1330/ Poinsettia-Christmas-Parade

POINSETTIA 1 GREENVILLE CHRISTMAS PARADE It’s a family tradition! For decades, downtown Greenville’s procession of festooned floats

Thru Jan 21

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Jazz sensation James Tormé brings his sultry vocals to this holiday presentation, joined by the International Ballet and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra.

Photograph courtesy of James Tormé

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BON SECOURS ST. FRANCIS TEDDY BEAR LUNCHEON

Sure, many of us grew up with more stuffed animals than we had bedspace, but for some, a new Teddy Bear is the perfect friend to spend the holidays with. Kids and parents can enjoy a special brunch together with their furry companions, before taking in a Christmas performance. Crafts will be on deck to keep little hands busy and add that special dash of cheer to the family fridge. All new stuffed animals will be donated to needy children and proceeds will benefit the St. Francis Festival of Trees causes. Hyatt Regency Greenville, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Sat, 11am–12:30pm. $15. (864) 2551040, stfrancisfoundation.com

SANTA 1 SAFARI With all that wind and snow at the

North Pole, can you really blame Santa Claus for vacationing down South for a few days? Join Jolly Ol’ St. Nick for an enchanting afternoon of milk, cookies, and Christmas list wishes at the Greenville

Zoo. Whether you’re naughty or nice, you’re guaranteed to have a wildly good time. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Sat, 11am– 1pm. Included with zoo admission. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

CARILLON 1 CAROLINA PARADE

To celebrate 65 years of holiday spirit, Columbia’s annual Carolina Carillon parade will pack in even more “Music! Magic! And Mistletoe!” than ever before. Considered the official holiday parade of South Carolina, the procession kicks off on Gervais and Bull Streets before winding its way through the downtown area in a flurry of festively adorned floats, marching bands, dance drill teams, local celebrities, special guests, and yep, Santa Claus. Downtown Columbia. Sat, 9:45am. Free. (803) 545-3100, carolinacarillon.com

The Community Foundation of Greenville bridges philanthropy and purpose by offering planned giving services, donor-advised funds and administering charitable endowment funds in support of a better community.

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1–2 The son of celebrated

HOLIDAY AT PEACE

musician Mel Tormé (a.k.a. the Velvet Fog) and English actress Janette Scott, it’s no surprise that James Tormé has been able to take the entertainment world by storm. As an uber-talented jazz singer with plenty of charisma to spare, Tormé has racked up numerous awards for his stirring vocal prowess and performance style that holds up as a perfect throwback to the crooners of yore. Tormé joins forces with the International Ballet and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra for a special holiday showcase, where St. Nick himself is sure to drop by with the missus for a quick naughty-or-nice check up. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

1, 8, 15

2018 HOLIDAY MARKET ON MAIN STREET Designed to mirror ol’-timey markets in Germany, Simpsonville’s own hometown fête offers a wide range of handmade goodies perfect for stuffing those stockings. Sip on warm cider while you browse through a variety of local artisans, admire the city’s merry decorations and listen to a few seasonal tunes performed live by local carolers. If you’re not merry at the end of the night, then you’re just not trying hard enough. Downtown Simpsonville. Sat. Free. (864) 963-3781, simpsonvillechamber.com

BEST CHRISTMAS 1–9 THE PAGEANT EVER Ah the Herdman kids—our favorite band of no-good, rowdy stinkers. But what to do with six kids who just can’t seem to find the path of straight and narrow? Why, put them in the town Christmas Pageant of course. Though loyal churchgoers hem and haw about the questionable cast selections, what seems like perhaps the worst idea in the history of time itself quickly turns into a holiday winner, with plenty of laughs and good cheer along the way. Gunter Theatre at The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 10am & 1:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. $19-$28. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

wearables, edibles, and even a few must-haves for the kiddos. It’s a great opportunity to kill two birds with one stone: you provide invaluable support to your local artists and wrap up that holiday gift list. 1239 Pendleton St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 11am– 5pm. Free. makerscollective.org

ST. FRANCIS 1–31 2018 FESTIVAL OF TREES

Whether it’s the crisp green smell, glittering lights, or the mystery of gifts underneath, it’s not difficult to find something to love about Christmas trees. St. Francis Foundation invites you to take in all the wonder at their annual holiday event, where dozens of brightly decorated trees will be on display at downtown hotels, with dozens of local businesses, schools, and organizations vying for the title of Best Tree. Profits from the fundraising event will go towards the Bon Secours St. Francis Adolescent & Young Adult Inpatient Cancer Center. Various hotels, Greenville. Free. (864) 255-1040, stfrancisfoundation.com

PAIRINGS 3 PAGE Booze and books? Sign us up!

M. Judson joins forces with in-house dessertery The Chocolate Moose to match a delicious selection of gourmet wines to their literary counterparts for a spirited evening of libations and lively discussion. Choose from one of the featured books to nab your sample—or really go for the gold with an entire bottle of vino! M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers, 130 S Main St. Mon, 6:30–8:30pm. $30. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com

1–16

INDIE CRAFT PARADE HOLIDAY POP UP SHOP From the folks who bring you the wildly popular Indie Craft Parade in the fall comes the Holiday Pop Up Shop, a collection of original gifts crafted by local artisans. The temporary marketplace will include handmade jewelry, artwork, home decor,

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436

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A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS! Dec 6th; Thurs, 8pm. $14-$16. Bob Jones University. Performed by the Bob Jones University Symphony Orchestra and led by division chair Michael Moore, this collection of seasonal tunes is sure to make your season bright.

4–16 HAMILTON Alexander Hamilton may

have been a founding father, first secretary of the treasury, and creator of the New York Post, but he’ll go down in twenty-first-century history as the star of a record-breaking Broadway smash. Following its 2015 premier, the Lin-Manuel Miranda–penned musical became a virtual overnight sensation, captivating international audiences, critics, and celebrity fans across the board. Told through a series of significant events in the statesman’s life using a medley of pop, hip-hop, R&B, and showtunes, Hamilton is inspiring, exciting entertainment fit for history and Broadway buffs alike. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

MERRY CHRISTMAS! 6 AFact:VERY you can never get too much Christmas music at the holidays. With that in mind, the Bob Jones University Symphony Orchestra will feature choir members and soloists in presenting a collection of seasonal tunes. Led by division chair of music Michael Moore and the department of music theory and technology’s Warren Cook, this cheery celebration is sure to bring you plenty of holly jolly. Founder’s Memorial Amphitorium at Bob Jones University, 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. Thurs, 8pm. $14-$16. (864) 770-1372, bju.edu

CHRISTMAS 6–15 EVERY STORY EVER TOLD (AND THEN SOME!)

Why bust your hump trying to make it to multiple merry productions in town when you can just knock it all out in one sitting? That’s the idea behind this dash through the snow . . . er show presented by the Spartanburg Little Theatre. Three actors are set to take on every jingle bell, night before Christmas, and red-nosed reindeer on Santa’s list—with barely time for a sip

of eggnog in between! Chapman Cultural Center Black Box Theatre, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Thurs–Sat, 8pm. $20. (864) 585-8278, spartanburglittletheatre.com

CAPRA’S IT’S 6–16 FRANK A WONDERFUL LIFE

If you can sit through this classic screen-to-stage performance without tearing up, you may be a true Grinch. After losing the company his father struggled to build and putting the finances of an entire town in jeopardy, businessman George Bailey is at his wit’s end. Peering over a New York bridge, he contemplates suicide, believing that his nonexistence is more valuable than his entire life. With the help of angel-to-be Clarence, George soon realizes that the biggest gift of all is life itself. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm; Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

6–16

JUNIE B. IN JINGLE BELLS BATMAN SMELLS!

Author Barbara Park’s best-selling precocious first-grader with a big heart is back at it again— and this time, she’s brought the Christmas spirit! With the school’s Holiday Sing-Along fast approaching, Junie B. is all kinds of excited to strut her stuff on stage. But with her enemy May set on wrecking her sleigh full of fun, Junie B. must figure out what the true meaning of the season is. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Thurs–Fri, 7pm; Sat, 11am–3pm; Sun, 3pm. $14-$28. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

6–23

CHRISTMAS ON THE ROCKS

We’ve all seen the questionable effects child stardom can have on a young soul, but what do you suppose has

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Photograph by Bob Carey, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

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happened to some of our favorite holiday special characters? Did Charlie Brown have a breakdown after that dinky tree finally bit the dust? Did Cindy Lou Who develop an inexplicable affection for hairy men? Why do miracles only occur on 34th Street? Drown your holiday sorrows in a sea of bourbon eggnog (minus the ’nog) in this realistic portrayal of life after the big screen. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $35. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

LAUGHING ALL THE WAY If you’re looking to make those spirits bright, (and a few bells on bobtails ring) we suggest heading to Centre Stage for their annual holiday hullabaloo: a veritable fruitcake chock-full of comedic sketches, time-honored classics, Christmas choreography, and sing-along favorites. If this doesn’t tickle your tinsel, nothing will. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $22-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

Frosty, schmosty. This progressive rock Trans-Siberian Orchestra is about to turn the same ol’, same

z ot Do N Photograph by Bob Carey, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

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IN GREER 7 CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING

It may not be Rockefeller Center, but the City of Greer sure lights an impressive tree. In addition to setting the tone for all the holiday fun to come, this familyfriendly evening also features special live performances, craft stations, s’moresmaking, and lots of bouncy entertainment for the little ones. Greer City Park, 301 E Poinsett St, Greer. Fri, 5–8pm. (864) 215-0848, cityofgreer.org

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ol’ holiday standards upside down on its twentieth anniversary tour. Bursting forth with unbridled energy and musical power, The Ghosts of Christmas Eve is a journey through the band’s greatest hits. It’s just like chestnuts on an open fire—if those chestnuts were brilliant light displays and that open fire was some blazing pyrotechnics. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 4pm & 8pm. $40-$77. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

VERY MERRY LOCAL 8 THE CHRISTMAS MARKET

It’s time for Santa’s elves to take a load off. Each year, the Travelers Rest Farmers Market hosts this seasonal bazaar at Trailblazer Park, where a variety of eclectic artisans and crafters have set up shop to peddle everything from jewelry to pottery, edibles to wearables. There will be hot cider and cocoa to keep you toasty, plus a visit from you-know-who. Trailblazer Park, 235 Trailblazer Dr, Travelers Rest. Sat, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 610-0965, travelersrestfarmersmarket.com

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ANNUAL UGLY 8 2ND SWEATER BAR CRAWL

Grandkids rejoice! It’s finally time to put that heinous cardigan your

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA Dec 7th; Fri, 4pm & 8pm. $40-$77. Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Jam out to holiday hits this Christmas through the orchestra’s extravagant light displays and electronic rock presentation.

Frances and Wilbern met at the age of 18 and

have been married for 70 years. A daily hot meal and well-check from a Meals on Wheels volunteer allow them to stay in the home they built together.

Help us care for neighbors like Frances and Wilbern for years to come by giving generously at www.MealsonWheelsGreenville.org/donate. A friend to the homebound since 1968.

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Nana knitted you six years ago to good use. Don your tackiest and get your jollies at 12 downtown watering holes—including Chicora Alley, Vine Nightclub, On the Roxx, and more— where specialty Christmas cocktails and festive fare will be waiting. There are even a few giveaways in store, you know, if you’re into the whole regifting thing. Various locations, downtown Greenville. Sat, 2–10pm. $15. eventbrite.com

ANNUAL 8 28TH REINDEER RUN

You might not be able guide Santa’s sleigh at night. Or even fly, for that matter. But you can at least pretend while dashing through downtown Charleston’s historic district alongside thousands of other merrymakers. The 5K race raises funds for the MUSC Children’s Hospital and the Charitable Society of Charleston endowment, which helps provide funding for local non-profit organizations in the Charleston community. Downtown Charleston. Sat, 9am. $30-$50. reindeerrun.org

NUTCRACKER 9 2018 TEA PARTY

Way more fun than pouring imaginary beverages in your teddy bear’s plastic mug, this unique holiday gathering

serves up more than a warm cuppa’. the International Ballet’s Nutcracker ensemble will be there to take photos, sign autographs, and host a special performance of their signature dance.

Refreshments and other sweets will be served, and kids will go home with a collectible nutcracker and keepsake photo with the DewDrop Fairy. The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St. Sun, 3–5pm. $30. (864) 879-9404, internationalballetsc.org

Charles Jennens’ libretto and is widely considered one of classical music’s most influential works. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. Adults, $30; students, $15. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

WITH SANTA 9 BRUNCH The only thing better than a

CAROL 18 CHRISTMAS ON AIR

brunch with bottomless mimosas? Brunch with Santa! Larkin’s yearly daytime dining experience includes platefuls of farm-fresh omelets, fourcheese baked macaroni, fried chicken, shrimp and grits, fluffy waffles, cheddar biscuits, and plenty else to get your tummy rumbling. Little ones can make their own reindeer feed for Rudolph and parents; we’ve got you covered with tasty white sangria. Larkin’s Sawmill at North Main, 22 Graves Dr, Greenville. Sun, 10:30am–2pm. $22$44. larkinscatering.com/ brunchwithsanta

Taking it back to an era before flat screen TV’s and LED technology, this old school production of the Charles Dickens’ classic is a festive feast for the ears. Gather round the radio and tune in as Ebenezer Scrooge and his spectral visitors come to life— sandwiched between a few vintage commercials of course. Live musical accompaniment and holiday treats will also be on hand to sate your senses. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $50. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

WITH THE 18 CHRISTMAS CHORALE: HANDEL’S

He’s had Hollywood nights. He’s gone against the wind. He’s been down on Main Street. But you’ll be able to find Bob Seger right here in Greenville when he makes a stop on the Runaway Train tour. The rocker has been around since the 1960s, popping out hit song after hit song like “You’ll Accomp’ny Me,” “We’ve Got Tonight,” and of course, Tom Cruise’s infamous underwear-sliding anthem, “Old Time Rock and Roll.” Sure, he’s got a few

MESSIAH

This annual holiday collaboration starring the Greenville Chorale, the Chorale Orchestra, and special soloists is set to present a renowned musical composition. Written by George Frideric Handel in 1741, the threepart oratorio—broken into distinct, magnificent musical movements—is based on works of Scripture from

SEGER & THE SILVER 20 BOB BULLET BAND

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miles on the ol’ odometer. But like they say, rock and roll never forgets. Seger will be joined by special guest Nancy Wilson of Heart. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $47-$125. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph courtesy of Perpetual Groove

NUTCRACKER 21–23 THE For most of us, the sight

of a giant mouse king invading our bedroom at night is enough for several years of therapy. For young Clara, it’s just the first part of an amazing adventure through a fantastical land of sugar plum fairies, gingerbread soldiers, and one very dashing nutcracker prince. The International Ballet’s production of the holiday classic will be accompanied by Edvard Tchivzhel and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, in addition to guest artists Adiarys Almeida and Taras Domitro of the San Francisco Ballet. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$62. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

27 Hailing from the Hostess City PERPETUAL GROOVE

of Savannah, jam rockers Perpetual Groove have been bringing the funk since 1997. After a brief hiatus, the band cropped back up with a Kickstarter campaign to craft their first new album of material in seven years— Break the Silence. Perpetual Groove’s national tour includes a stop in the

Upstate, where their iconic tunes and incredible lightshow will make for one groovy evening. The Firmament, 5 Market Point Dr, Greenville. Thurs, 9pm. $20-$25. firmamentgvl.com

YEAR’S EVE 2019 31 NEW SOUTHERN GALA

Start 2019 off with a bang—and with a good cause in hand! Proceeds from the glitzy soirée will benefit the National Alliance of Mental Illness in Greenville and Tell Every Amazing Lady about Ovarian Cancer, two Upstate organizations dedicated to improving the overall mental and physical health of our community. Your ticket includes access to three open bars, savory appetizers, an interactive photo booth, tunes by Jumping Jukebox, and yep, a Champagne toast at midnight complete with confetti. Hilton Greenville, 45 W Orchard Park Dr, Greenville. Mon, 8:30pm. $100-$135. southerngala.com

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PERPETUAL GROOVE Dec 27th; Thurs, 9pm. $20-$25. The Firmament. Savannah crooners Perpetual Grove come to the Upstate with their iconic jams, lightshow included.

HOT 31 FAMOUSLY NEW YEAR

The Palmetto State’s capital city toasts eight years of famously free fabulousness with the largest fireworks display in South Carolina, a variety of local food trucks and brewers, and a stacked musical lineup. Street performances, a kids’ carnival, and a Main Street ice rink round out this near-perfect New Year’s Eve. Downtown Columbia. Mon, 6:30pm. Free. famouslyhotnewyear.com

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TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Caroline Spivey at 864.679.1229 or cspivey@communityjournals.com TOWNEstates_Dec18.indd TOWN_blank page.indd 6 2

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The season’s most beloved classic comes back to life. Featuring internationally-renowned dancers Adiarys Almeida & Taras Domitro FRIDAY, DEC. 21, 7:30 P.M. SATURDAY, DEC. 22, 7:30 P.M. SUNDAY, DEC. 23, 3:00 P.M. THE PEACE CENTER

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DECEMBER 2018 / 147

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hen defined by popular culture, standards of beauty become streamlined, one-dimensional. Atlanta-based artists Regis and Kahran Bethencourt seek to highlight and celebrate African-American refinement in Empowerment through the Lens of AfroArt at Spartanburg’s UPSTATE Gallery on Main. In Baroque-like portraits of young girls in period-piece clothing, the nationally celebrated husband-and-wife team of CreativeSoul Photography showcases the natural elegance of Afro hair through stylized portraiture. By celebrating children of color, their bold imagery empowers the expression of true beauty.—Abby Moore Keith Empowerment through the Lens of AfroArt will be on display through December 29. The UPSTATE Gallery on Main is located at 172 E Main St, Spartanburg, and is open Tuesday–Saturday, noon–5pm. For more information, visit uscupstate.edu.

Photographs (2) courtesy of CreativeSoul Photography

Empowerment through the Lens of AfroArt celebrates natural beauty

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TOWN December 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN December 2018  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...