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THE M E N ’S ISSUE

$ 4.95

AUGU S T 2 016 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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the

S E V E N

T I M ES

GAME Why join one club when you’re welcomed at seven as an owner at The Cliffs? Here you’ll delight in three clubs on stunning Lake Keowee or four in the majestic mountains — all just minutes to Asheville, Greenville and Clemson. Seven communities in all and from the moment you call The Cliffs home, they’re yours to enjoy. There isn’t one club that’s best, but we promise there is one for you. Come, be our guest and discover why we say, “There’s life, and then there’s living.”

866.411.5771 | CliffsLiving.com Homes and Homesites at Seven Carolina Lake and Mountain Communities G L A S SY

M O U N TA I N PA R K

WA L N U T COV E

K E OW E E V I N E YA R D S

VA L L E Y

K E OW E E FA L L S

K E OW E E S P R I N G S

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest SC 29690, Harry V. Roser, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Walnut Cove Realty, 158 Walnut Valley Parkway, Arden, NC 28704, Dotti Smith, Broker-in-Charge.

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FIRST

Glance

Car & Driver: Who: Model Sam Konduros sports formal wear from Rush Wilson, Ltd. What: Blue Ridge Sports Cars provided a vintage 1965 Shelby Cobra for our Men’s Issue model shoot. For the story, see page 72. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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Along for the Ride: Who: Model Sam Konduras pauses in a 1965 Shelby Cobra during a photo shoot for our Men’s Issue, under the bridge near Larkin’s Restaurant. For the story, see page 72. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey / Styled by Laura Linen

Challenge your body. Change your life. bonsecours.com

AUGUST 2016 / 7

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THE ONLY SCHOOL WHERE EVERY CLASS IS HELD ON THE PLAYGROUND.

Loaded with adrenaline-pumping activities, The BMW Performance Driving School is exciting and educational—and a lot closer than you think. Spend some time at the Upstate destination where higher learning takes on a whole new meaning. The lessons are more memorable too when given in brand-new Ultimate Driving Machines.® Get behind the wheel in a 1- or 2-Day M School and cultivate your high-performance driving skills. There’s even Advanced M Schools at several legendary tracks for those who really want a high-end racing level experience. We still offer Car Control and Teen Schools, Driving Experiences and Custom Group Events. Make your reservation today and graduate with honors from The BMW Performance Driving School.

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Contents

8 8

BACK SPIN

From the groundbreaking greens of the Piney Mountain Pioneers to the award-winning layout of the Chanticleer course, Greenville Country Club’s magic is all in the design. / by Steven Tingle // portraits by Eli Warren

8 9

LIFE IN THE FAST LANE Trade the passenger seat for three hands-on-the-wheel, pedal-to-themetal experiences of professional drivers at the BMW Performance Center. / by John Jeter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

19 THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

THE TOWN 25 ON Pics of the litter:

Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

37 WEDDINGS 43 TOWNBUZZ

Abstract painter Joe Everson fashions familiar faces; Yankee’s pitcher Mike Buddie takes to bat as Furman’s athletic director; golf course designer Beau Welling wears many caps; and more.

48

TOP BUNK

Windows down on a winding road— mountain bliss awaits at Highland’s Half-Mile Farm.

69 STYLE CENTRAL

Button down with a classic collared shirt; embrace your inner Bond courtesy of Peter Millar; and specialty sunglasses for every (good) sport.

78

MAN ABOUT TOWN

The Man is honest about one thing: he likes to tell lies, sweet little lies.

82 SIDEWAYS

A first-timer heads to southeast Alaska for the catch of a lifetime.

107 115 120 THIS PAGE: Purported designer of the Riverside course at Greenville Country Club, Donald Ross. For more, see “Back Spin,” page 88. Photograph courtesy of the Taft Archives COVER: Model Sam Konduros sits atop a 1965 Shelby Cobra provided by Blue Ridge Sports Cars. For more, see “The Look,” page 72. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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EAT & DRINK

Southern pitmasters serve smoked meats to savor at Euphoria’s barbecue brunch; swap kitchen sweats for outdoor-grilled steak kebabs.

DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

On display at the Columbia Museum of Art, photographer J. Henry Fair’s aerial masterpieces champion coastal ecology.

August

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THE NEW 2017

E300 Sedan

More than a stroke of genius. A masterpiece of intelligence. Athletically elegant outside, it’s in the E-Class cabin where your senses come alive. Vivid screens and flowing shapes entice the eyes. And from multitouch controls to aromatherapy and a hot stone massage, wherever you touch, it caresses you back.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter

Photograph by Cat her i ne Tolber t

))) For digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

Essence of Man

T

o bond is manly. Though I’m no expert on the inner-workings of the male species, I’m certainly privy to the interactions of men on a daily basis. And what I’ve concluded is this: man may die without woman, but he is downright morose without his ‘bro. Men need each other. Like Mutt & Jeff. Abbott & Costello. George & Jerry. To talk sports. Drink. Smoke. Hunt. Fish. Take things apart. Compete with each other, fuel adrenaline. From my observations, men seek men they admire. Men they strive to be. They want the esteem that can only come from their own sex. This plays out daily in offices, public spaces, men’s clothing stores, country clubs, motor clubs, hunting clubs, boating clubs, and other manly gathering places. Our Men’s Issue is really an ode to male bonding as much as it is a celebration of their refined pursuits, their need for a rush, and even their admitted shortcomings. Perhaps there is no experience that can fulfill the collective needs of man than the game of golf. For one, the game brings one close to nature. Then, there is the aspect of dress: though time has shifted sartorial rules, men are still apt to wear more tailored looks than they would, say, to the gym. Of course, there is simply being together, as a foursome of ‘bros, bonding while swinging and drinking and smoking fine cigars, talking about all manner of things while showing off new toys to make the others a tad jealous. Finally, it’s the thrill of the sport itself, which isn’t the adrenaline rush of racing but rather the slow burn of betting, or waiting for the kill, or watching for the tug on the line. It’s crushing a drive. Sinking the putt. Winning the pot. If you’re a man reading this, and you’ve never stepped foot on a course, does that make you less manly? Nah. Golf certainly isn’t the only way to embrace manhood. But it is one of the ways to be a gentleman, a competitor, and to hang with your friends. It isn’t only a man’s world. We all know that. But, from what I can tell, behind every good man isn’t only a good woman—it’s a brotherhood.

Photographs by Will Crooks

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @lbknobel

Style editor Laura Linen, art director Paul Mehaffey, and assistants craft the look for our cover shot. Model Sam Konduros poses with a 1965 Shelby Cobra, courtesy of Blue Ridge Sports Cars. For more on the clothing and the car, turn to page 72.

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Photo: Sean Hartness

Putting Greenville on the map!

Museumgoers in Paris admire the GCMA's Robert Colescott (1925 -2009) painting Les Demoiselles D’Alabama (Des Nudas), which was inspired by Picasso's Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. The painting was included in the exhibition Picasso Mania, organized by the Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, the Centre Pompidou, and the Musee national Picasso in Paris.

It’s no secret in the art world that the Greenville County Museum of Art is among the country’s top American art museums. Visitors come to the GCMA year round to see one of the world’s largest collections of works by Andrew Wyeth. Folks also come to see the museum’s impressive collection of paintings and prints by America’s most renowned contemporary artist, Jasper Johns. And plenty of people plan a visit to see the museum’s acclaimed Southern Collection, which ranges from Federal portraits to contemporary works. What you might not know is that the GCMA is regularly asked to lend artwork to the world’s most prestigious museums here and abroad. From Boston to Barcelona, works of art that belong to the permanent collection of the Greenville County Museum of Art are exhibited and appreciated all around the globe. Of course, you can see them right here at home. #the1andonlygcma

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm admission free

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NewYork

Whitney Museum of American Art

Beauford Delaney, 1901-1970 Washington Square, 1952

Philadelphia

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Gari Melchers, 1860-1932 Woman Reading by a Window, 1905

Los Angeles

The Museum of Contemporary Art

Red Grooms, born 1937 Painting from “A Play Called Fire,” 1958

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Berlin

Deutsches Historisches Museum

Selected museums that have featured works on loan from the GCMA: Atlanta High Museum of Art Barcelona Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona Berlin Deutsches Historisches Museum Boston Boston Athenaeum Museum of Fine Arts

George Bellows, 1882-1925 Massacre at Dinant, 1918

Houston Museum of Fine Arts

Paris

London Royal Academy of Arts Tate Modern Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais

Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art New York City Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum The Metropolitan Museum of Art The Whitney Museum of American Art Paris Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais Philadelphia Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Savannah Telfair Museum of Art Seattle Seattle Art Museum

Robert Colescott, 1925-2009 Les Demoiselles D’Alabama (Des Nudas), 1985

London

Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art Venice Peggy Guggenheim Collection

The Tate Modern

Vienna Osterreisches Museum fur angewandte Kunst (MAK) Washington, DC Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden National Gallery of Art National Portrait Gallery The Phillips Collection

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Georgia O’Keeffe, 1887-1986 Abstraction, 1916

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admission free

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BEAUTIFUL 2-STORY NORTH MAIN CONDO 3BR/2.5BA - $265,000

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST EPIC ADVENTURE?

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com PAUL MEHAFFEY ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR Abby Moore Keith EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

2-A Edge Court, Greenville 29609 | MLS #1323060

First time I saw Antelope Canyon. My heart just dropped. —PM

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka Heidi Coryell Williams CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Jack Bacot, Kathryn Davé, JOHN JETER & Chris Simmons CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Bobby Altman, Chelsey Ashford, Robin Batina-Lewis, Will Crooks, JIVAN DAVE, Whitney Fincannon, Katie Fiedler, Jake Knight, Gabrielle Grace Miller & ELI WARREN

Soaring vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, master bedroom on main level, two bedrooms and bath on second floor. Spacious balcony overlooks N. Main Park. Easy walk to restaurants and shops downtown!

I walked around DC once, seeing lots of monuments and museums. At some point, I realized I was really far from my car, so I had to run across town to find it.—EW Traveling the east coast of Australia with my brother. —HA

EDITORIAL INTERNS HAYDEN ARRINGTON Olivia McCall EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Andrew Huang Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Jenny Hall, Donna Johnston, Annie Langston, Nicole Mularski, Lindsay Oehmen & Emily Yepes

Vietnam. Flew into Hanoi, then to Danang, then drove the famous Hwy. 1 to Saigon. Unforgettable. —JJ

Earlier this year I traveled to Tres Isletas, a tiny town in a remote area of Argentina, to photograph the process of making premium hardwood lump charcoal used for grilling. With a loose itinerary, being fully-immersed in authentic Argentinian culture gave way to some interesting experiences.—JD

Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com Danielle Car DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

MARGUERITE WYCHE & ASSOCIATES

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

LAURA McDONALD, Realtor Associate (864) 640-1929 LMcDonald@WycheCo.com

More Than Just A Realtor.

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 8) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

120 E. Round Hill Road | Green Valley | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 23 acres | MLS 1317041

101 Woodland Way | Alta Visa Area | $1,550,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1322062

111 Rockingham Road | Parkins Mill | $2,250,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1312091

221 Cureton Street | Augusta Road Area | $967,500 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1313889

20 Ferncreek Lane | 3+ acres | $979,500 3 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath

607 McDaniel Avenue | Alta Vista | $998,500 4 bedooms, 3 full bath, 1 half bath | MLS 13063041

SOLD

100 Putney Bridge Lane | Simpsonville | $799,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 13159298

17 W. Prentiss Avenue | Augusta Road Area | $925,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1316669

230 Riverside Drive | GCC Area | $875,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 13086073

SOLD

NEW

PRICE

3BR/2.5BA - $265,000

1745 N Main Street | North Main Area | $565,000 3 bedooms, 2 full bath | MLS 1318462

2-A Edge Ct. | North Main Area | $265,000 3 bedooms, 2 full baths, 1 half baths | MLS 1323060

16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 29601 www.wycheco.com 864.270.2440

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213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $785,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

864-270-2440 mwyche@wycheco.com

864-640-1929 lmcdonald@wycheco.com

Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

864-630-0826 bjohnson@wycheco.com

864-201-6001 swithington@wycheco.com

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A vibrant mixed-use development is taking shape on more than 1,000 acres of untouched real estate within the city of Greenville. A smart, flexible plan comprises diverse housing at varying price points, thriving commercial districts and an array of recreational amenities. Fostering a walkable environment, Verdae’s vision ranges from corporate headquarters and niche offices to a village square filled with specialty retailers, local restaurants and professional services, all interconnected by pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, a lush central park and abundant greenspace. It’s happening at Verdae.

Garden photo by Promotion Imaging, LLC

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Verdae Development Visit Our New Corporate & Sales Office 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 300 Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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August 2016 SEAL

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

To be totally honest, if you weren’t swaying to this English musician’s “Kiss from a Rose” hit song on prom night in 1995, you had to be doing something wrong. True, he has countless music awards under his belt and nine studio albums to his name—including last year’s 7—but Seal continues to deliver a mesmerizing and versatile sound. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, Aug 23, 7:30pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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List z

z There are only a few places in the world where it’s socially acceptable to stuff your face with a one-pound funnel cake and eight corn dogs—in less than 30 minutes. Sure, this year’s festival will be loaded with favorites like the Ferris wheel, magic shows, and a petting zoo, but the brave at heart can also take in the acrobatics of the Winn Thrills of the Universe. So go ahead, wedge a few more wads of cotton candy in those cheeks— it is the fair after all.

TRAIN WITH ANDY GRAMMER

CHOP! CANCER UPSTATE

There are some things that you just can’t escape. Andy Grammer’s “Honey, I’m Good” is on that list, with the smash single pulsing through every airwave in 2015. The up-and-comer will be joined on stage by seasoned veteran rockers Train, whose musical catalog is highlighted by hits like “Meet Virginia,” “Hey, Soul Sister,” and “Calling All Angels.” Recently, the band has released a collection of Led Zeppelin covers, paying homage to the original gods of rock n’ roll.

Help determine the next cooking victor of the Upstate all while fighting cancer at the second annual CHOP! Cancer event. Testing the kitchen skills of 18 local Upstate celebrities, the event features an online voting poll that puts you in charge of the contestant’s fate alongside a panel of professional judges. All proceeds benefit the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, August 26, 6pm. $125. (864) 255-5010, chopcancerupstate.com

Upper SC State Fairgrounds, 3804 Calhoun Memorial Hwy, Greenville. Aug 25–Sept 5. Weekdays, 4pm; weekends & Labor Day, noon. (864) 269-0852, upperscstatefair.com

Heritage Park Amphitheatre, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Tues, Aug 16, 7:30pm. $30-$75. (864) 757-3022, heritageparkamphitheatre.com

Photograph courtesy of Heritage Park Amphitheatre

UPPER SC STATE FAIR

zWhat-Not-To-Miss /

Photograph courtesy of CHOP! Cancer

THE

VISIT US TODAY FOR A TEST DRIVE.

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2448 Laurens Road, 864-297-4529 BradshawInfiniti.com 7/18/16 2:03 PM


SHE—THE UPSTATE WOMEN’S SHOW

AN EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND

A celebration of all things fierce and fabulous, SHE Greenville invites women of any age to join in the fun at the “ultimate girls’ weekend.” Indulge your inner shopper at the vendor marketplace, pick up tips on planning the perfect dinner event at the Culinary Stage, or get crafty at any one of the local artist workshops. And don’t miss the famed SHE Greenville fashion shows, where countless cutting-edge fashions are sure to inspire your next wardrobe makeover. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Aug 5–7. Fri, 1–8pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, Noon–6pm. $5+. shegreenville.com

Singer and songwriter Lyle Lovett may have achieved worldwide popularity during nearly 40 years in the music industry; however, he has maintained loyalty to his Texas roots with a distinct union of country, blues, and folk genres. As charming as he is talented, Lovett’s stage presence is legend. With the addition of his large band comrades, on everything from steel guitar to fiddle, this evening is a guaranteed showcase of favorite tunes and downhome storytelling.

Acid-wash jeans and beehive hairdos are trends that have (thankfully) gone the way of the buffalo, but throughout thousands of bad wardrobe decisions, rock and roll has continued to live on. Join a group of spectacular Upstate talents as they shake, rattle, and roll through three decades of classic tunes from the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s. It’s a vibrant evening of musical wonders sure to leave you singing long after the curtain closes. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Aug 5–14. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. Juniors, $25; seniors, $33; adults, $35. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

August 2016 Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

ROCK AND ROLL IS HERE TO STAY

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, Aug 14, 7pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Inspired Confidence The QX80 Limited adds an even higher level of craftsmanship to the Infiniti QX80’s undeniable presence. Welcome lighting under stainless steel side steps, unique exterior badge, darkened chrome trim, and a dark-chrome finish on substantial 22-inch wheels all translate into refined ruggedness. Travel in the QX80 and savor comfort that could only come from dedication to each individual.

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List z

THE

Quick HITS BLINK-182

z If you were lucky enough to have cool parents who let you buy the unedited versions of Take Off Your Pants and Jacket and Enema of the State, Blink-182 was your entry into the angsty, tongue-incheek realm of skater punk music. Though down one original member (vocalist Tom DeLonge made his exit last year), the band has seen recent success with the addition of Matt Skiba and the release of the “Bored to Death” single in April. As if you needed another reason to dust off that studded belt. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, Aug 3, 7pm. $32-$83. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

12TH ANNUAL LAKE LURE OLYMPIAD

z Even if you’ll never make the cut for the real Olympics (mostly because you’d look like an impaired snail trotting alongside Usain Bolt), you can still show off your stuff at this sports festival. This three-day olympiad welcomes competitors of all ages to participate in events like the 10k dam run, Lake Lure triathlon, and “race to the rock.” And for the more leisurely sportsperson, golf and pickleball will also be on the roster. Chimney Rock State Park, Lake Lure, NC. Aug 12–14. Times, prices vary. lakelureolympiad.com

SLOW FOOD UPSTATE’S EARTH MARKET

z This isn’t your average market—Earth Market is certified by the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity, meaning you can expect highquality taste without any of the GMO-mystery of the average grocery store. Happening monthly on the third Thursday through November 17, this community-run farmers’ market focuses on local, seasonal, and chemical-free produce. Support the local food movement and stock up on fresh fruits, veggies, and other local bites. Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery, 2015 Cedar Lane Rd, Greenville. Thurs, Aug 18, 2–6pm. slowfoodupstate.com

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS— REMEMBERING WOMEN IN JAZZ

z Photo albums are nice. Diaries can be amusing. But, sometimes, the best way to tell a story is through the power of music. Enter in Nadia Valentine and her aging Grandmother Sandra, a pair of women destined to inherit a valuable piece of property—but there is one caveat: the building must be turned into a jazz club. Join greats like Billie Holliday and Ella Fitzgerald as they unravel family history and mysteries galore—as told through the experience of music. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Aug 19–20. Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 1pm & 7:30pm. $43-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

2016 Mutt Strut Man’s best friend is often the first to cuddle after a long workday or turn a blind eye when we eat an entire pizza in one sitting. Now, it’s our turn to give back by participating in the 5th Annual Mutt Strut. Benefitting the Greenville Humane Society, the Mutt Strut invites runners of all ages (and legs) to take on 2 miles of natural scenery through the Upstate, beginning at the aptly named Mutt Market, where contestants can visit a vendor village of local goods and a special Canine Corner. Greenville Technical College, 506 S Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. Sat, Aug 27, 8:30–11am. $25. ghsmuttstrut.com

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SEAL AUGUS T 23

Keller Williams August 4

LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND AUGUST 14

AN EVENING WITH

The Revivalists August 26

CHRIS THILE SEPTEMBER 13

Ben Folds SEPTEMBER 15

RON WHITE OCTOBER 6

BROADWAY 2016-2017

It’s not too late to guarantee your seats for the 2016-17 Broadway series. Get season tickets now! Original Broadway cast of An American in Paris; Photo by Matthew Murphy

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Town

ON THE

Susan & Jeff Wienke, Kelly Childress

Jen & Matt Moreau, Emilie & Brady Hollenbeck

Mill Village Farms’ Sunday Supper June 19, 2016 Mill Village Farms welcomed a soldout crowd to the 52-acre Serenity Farm to kick off its third annual Sunday Supper. This year’s farm-tofork experience featured Food & Wine’s “Rising Culinary Star” Chef Nate Whiting, a Johnson & Wales graduate and executive chef of 492 in Charleston. Guests enjoyed a fivecourse meal with three wine pairings in support of Mill Village Farms’ community efforts.

Katie & David Walsh

Photography by Jake Knight

))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Linda Lee & Joe Angello

Dan Weidenbenner with Sean, Satreva & Ramiah Dogan

Tricia Reynolds & Traci Cassas Adrienne & Ryan Mullins

Ben & Jessika Davis

Hal & Minor Shaw, with Katie & Rob Howell

Mollie & J.J. Puryear

Liz & Mario Brown, with Bob & Jennifer Houde

Adam Scher & Wendie Schneider AUGUST 2016 / 25

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ON THE

Town

Viviane Tramat, Matt Zedler & Mark Mulfinger

Opening Reception for Flat Out Under Pressure June 4, 2016 Gregory & Lois Parker Marlowe Whitaker & Clyde Fowler

Hallie & Nathan Bertling Yelitza Diaz & Aldo Muzzarelli

Tami Cardnella & Garland Mattox

The Metropolitan Arts Council hosted a reception for the artists that participated in Flat Out Under Pressure, a challenge to create a work of art in 24 hours. After being juried, the contributed works were displayed in an exhibit for the opening reception and awards ceremony. The event was held at the Metropolitan Arts Council with refreshments provided by Good Life catering for the 200 guests in attendance. Eight artists were chosen to have their work replicated and displayed on downtown Greenville’s Main Street recycling bins next year. Winners were (in order of placing, 1st–8th): Aldo Muzzarelli, Diane Kilgore Condon, Teresa Roche, Garland Mattox, Judy Verhoeven, Sunny Mullarkey McGowan, Katy Cassell, and Karen Leigh. Photography by Jake Knight

Paul Flint, Blake Smith & Kim Dick

Cedric & Meisha Adderley

Lisa, Rachel & Paul Clark Diane Condon & Jan Wesley

Melissa Stroud & Macee Lominade

Courtney Thomas, Caroline Tomas Calder, Leora Riordan

Kim Haines & Michelle Simpson

26 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Anna Dean & Joanna McCauley

Jerry & Anne Weisner

Jon Blair, Rebekah Windal & Sarah Kwon

Ruth Neil & Laddie Neil

Michelle Parker & Ginny Williams

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Barb Blair & Teresa Roche Collaborative Show June 23, 2016 Barb Blair of Knack Studios and Teresa Roche of Art & Light Gallery hosted an evening full of artistic inspiration with the opening of their collaborative show HOT HOUSE: Full Sun + Minimal Water. Guests explored the unique pairing of Blair’s 2016 Summer Furniture Collection with Teresa Roche’s abstract paintings. The event was catered by the Village of West Greenville’s soonto-come restaurant GB&D and featured a jungle-inspired installation by Martin’s Nursery. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Michelle Simpson & Stephanie Burnette

Katie Stewart & Erin Bainton

Belinda & Kiah Bellows

Jane McLenn & Teresa Roche

Will Roche & Andrew Huang

Bianca Rollins & Jean Wilson Freemon AUGUST 2016 / 29

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ON THE Hillary & Michael McCrary

Town

Alexander Harrison & Sarah Grace Kivett

Summer Solstice Sunday Supper June 25, 2016 The Solstice Supper Foundation celebrated its third annual solstice event with a Sunday Brunch at Vin & Zen off the Swamp Rabbit Trail. The Whole Lamb & Music affair featured the talents of Chef John Fink of San Francisco’s The Whole Beast, which included a decadent fourcourse meal. Guests enjoyed the musical talents of Joe Thrasher Jr., and proceeds directly benefited NEXT High School Foundation’s Greenhouse Project, an organization preparing students for life’s challenges post high school.

Tom Atkinson & Dee Derrick

Photography by Jake Knight Joe & Nadine Latham

William Timmons & Sarah Anderson Asher & Hayley McDougall

Chris Miller, Justine Miller, George Dubose & Sarah Maxwell

Tonya Morin & Lorraine Svilar

Jenny, Zach & Sophia Eikenberry

Joel Douglass & Jennifer Clark Travis Hall, Paul Fulmer, Samantha Shaw & Abigail Mitchell

Heidi & Tom Billotto

Rudo Sibande & Rebecca Heiss

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RESPECTED FOR A REASON We knew that you were a person of integrity and professionalism. HE REALLY MADE IT EASY FOR US AND GUIDED US THROUGH THE ENTIRE PROCESS.

Tom was exceedingly patient and worked overtime to meet our expectations. My experiences with Tom have been fantastic and I look forward to many more, he is a true gentlemen.

He continued to come up with more ideas and helped us to reach a larger audience.

We would recommend him and would call him again in the future.

Always been impressed with his professionalism, timeliness, and attention to detail. I have seen first-hand the respect the clients have for him and the true relationships he builds with them.

ONE OF THE FINEST PEOPLE YOU COULD EVER KNOW AND IS A TRUE CLASS ACT.

You always had our best interest at heart. People like Tom are an endangered species these days.

He markets your property as promised and is innovative when faced with a property that is hard to sell. Is business like in contract negotiations.

Securing the home was not easy and Tom worked hard to get the deal done. Throughout the process, Tom has been honest, helpful, friendly, efficient, organized and professional. HE CAME TO THE TABLE WITH INNOVATIVE IDEAS OF HOW WE COULD MARKET OUR HOME. You provided great and knowledgeable insight to guide us – again, with our best interest first.

I trust him and I highly recommend him.

He

is straigHt forward about property values. If we made another move, you’d be the first person we’d call.

You went above and beyond.

IMPRESSED WITH HIS PROFESSIONALISM AND ATTENTION TO DETAIL.

My wife and I will absolutely be working with Tom again.

We keep going back to Tom Marchant and his company because of his professionalism, great business ethics and he’s just lots of fun! His understanding of the business is thorough.

Tom is the only Realtor I’ve ever worked with buying or selling that really had my best interest at heart. TOM MARCHANT REALTOR 864.449.1658 | TomMarchant.com Call Tom for a private showing or to strategically market your proper ty.

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Khristin Stephens, Meg Foster, Todd A. Janssen, Carol Janssen & Matias Mariani

Camilla Escobar & Myles Moore

Tim & Sarah St. Clair Stanton & Brantley Horne

Michael & Susan Cinquemani

Sandy Burn & Michele Senac 32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Greenville Little Theatre’s 90th Anniversary Gala

Armin & Sara Oehler

May 1, 2016 Ninety years of exceptional entertainment is certainly something to celebrate, and guests did just that at Greenville Little Theatre’s annual anniversary gala. The party featured a selection from Rick Erwin’s, Saskatoon, and The Bakery of Augusta, and also included a spectacular Broadway Tribute from some of GLT favorites. More than $40,000 was raised to benefit its programming. Photography by Gabrielle Grace Miller

Bob and Bev Howard

Brian Lux, Melinda Davis Lux, & Adam Scher Churck Hinton & Cara Morris

Christi & Frank Mobley with Sally Morris & Jonathan Cote

Laura & Andrew Moore

Jerry Dempsey & Kay Foster AUGUST 2016 / 33

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You Complete Me. Come into Old Colony now through August 31st and save 10% on all accessories in the store. Some of our best selling accessories include artwork, lamps, rugs, decorative pillows, candlesticks, bowls, figurines, and more. We have everything you could possibly need to finish the look of any room. Sometimes it really is the little things that matter.

Save Big on the little things.

Additional 10% Off Lighting

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Sale extended through August 31st!

Accents

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F I L

E L H A T KE I T A S E

neighborhood

A

with a view

Chances are you’ve never seen premier lakefront property quite like this. Our final phase of Peninsula Ridge is now available. Lake living is at your fingertips. Carefree and understated, The Reserve is where neighbors become best friends and every day brings a new adventure. Being close to your favorite getaways, just 16 miles from Clemson and 30 miles from Greenville, makes it the perfect opportunity to make Lake Keowee home. To learn more about life at the lake, visit ReserveAtLakeKeowee.com/Town. Homes from $500K-$3M+ and homesites from $100K-$950K.

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Olivia McCall

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Maggie Rawlins & George Douglas III June 5, 2016

Growing up across the street from one another, Maggie Rawlins and George Douglas couldn’t avoid the path from a childhood friendship to the realization that there was something more. Years of neighborly companionship aside, they couldn’t deny the evident magnetism between them. After dating for a year, the couple took a walk through their old neighborhood together. Upon reaching the point between their two childhood homes, George dropped to one knee and asked Maggie to be his wife, the perfect memory made in the place where it all began. The ceremony was held at Cannon Green in Charleston, where the bride and groom celebrated with an unconventional funfetti cake—perhaps reminiscent of their childhood years together—alongside family and friends. Maggie is a model with CW Management, Wilhelmina Miami, Iconic Germany, and Storm London, and George works for The Brandon Agency. The couple now lives in Charleston. SEAN MONEY + ELIZABETH FAY AUGUST 2016 / 37

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TOWN

Weddings Jamie Daughtry & Justin Bishop May 28, 2016 A unique token to remember a momentous day is something a couple will cherish forever. Jamie Daughtry and Justin Bishop met at North Greenville University, and a year and a half later, Justin proposed on Greenville’s iconic Liberty Bridge. Jamie was so thrilled that she said yes—twice! When it came time for their wedding at Greer First Baptist Church, a handmade unity cross became a special symbol to remember the significant commitment made to each other that day. Close friends living in Canada, whom the couple had met on mission trips, created the cross piece-by-piece. Their reception was held at Larkin’s Sawmill, not so far from where Justin asked Jamie to be his wife. Jamie is a student leadership coordinator at North Greenville University and Justin is an auditor at TD Bank. The couple now lives in Greer. TAYLOR AND NICOLE CASH // TAYLOR CASH PHOTOGRAPHY

Erin McChristian & Stephen Gary April 23, 2016 Imagine gazing across the breathtaking landscape viewed from the Biltmore Estate’s elegant veranda, only to turn around and catch a sight that makes the previous scene pale in comparison—the love of your life down on one knee. Erin McChristian and Stephen Gary had met six years before that beautiful proposal during their first week as students at Furman University, and became a couple only four short months later. In planning the wedding, Erin and Stephen prioritized a ceremony suffused with personal touches and familiar faces, which included the writing of their own vows. Erin’s uncle was chosen to perform the ceremony and her father serenaded (guitar in tow) an original song written by a family friend. It was intimate and symbolic, the perfect, personal celebration. The wedding took place at the Loom at Cotton Mill Place in Simpsonville. The couple now lives in Greenville, where Erin is a grant manager at Clemson University and Stephen is a project manager at the Whitaker Group. CRYSTAL AND KEITH CARSON // RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

Amy Ray & Andrew (Drew) Thomas May 13, 2016 After years of short conversations and sporadic encounters with Drew Thomas, Amy Ray’s urge to walk her dog in downtown Greenville led to a chance crossing that would make all the difference. Casually strolling past the Verizon store on Main Street—where Drew worked at the time—Amy heard a familiar voice calling her name. She turned to find Drew, and they briefly spoke as they had countless times before. That evening Drew called, this time to ask her out, and four and a half years later, he popped the question where it all started—right in front of the Verizon store. Friends and family were waiting to celebrate at Sip, a preview of their destination wedding at the Secrets Silversands Resort in Puerto Morelos, Mexico. The weeklong festivities included 41 friends and family members—the perfect opportunity to bond while surrounded by white sand and crystal clear water. Amy is a realtor at Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner Realtors and Drew is a field account executive at Synnex Corporation, both in Greenville. MARY BETH THOMAS // MARY BETH CREATES

HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

Realtor Joan Rapp (center) poses with happy clients and friends Brian Brigham Lehman (right) owner of The Galleries of Brian Brigham and Interior Designer Jonathan Reyes (left).

“When I realized we had to relocate our business, my thoughts went immediately to Downtown Greer due to its quaintness and growth. During my estate sales I had come to meet Joan Rapp as a customer and found out that she worked with The Marchant Company. Knowing that I needed help and guidance in finding the right building I asked if she would be willing to help me. We ultimately found a historic building on Trade Street that wasn’t even on the market and our forever home became a reality. The transition was made so much easier because of Joan’s knowledge and expertise, and we are now finally settled. Not only did we find our forever home, we found a wonderful friend. If ever in the market for buying or selling please don’t forget the name Joan Rapp and The Marchant Company.” — Brian Brigham Lehman, Owner of The Galleries of Brian Brigham

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

864.467.0085 | www.MarchantCo.com | Realtor Joan Rapp - 864.901.3839 RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

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Ridges Lifestyle THE

CITY CONVENIENCE MEETS MOUNTAIN LIVING Located 10 minutes from Downtown Greenville, our 18 lot master plan community offers luxurious mountain living within reach of one of America’s favorite cities. Tour the community now, and ask about our lot home packages available!

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Artwork photographed by Dan Lyles; courtesy of Joe Everson

TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Jaw Dropper Artist Joe Everson finds expression in rebellion

AUGUST 2016 / 43

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

HOMETOWN: Midland, Michigan / SCHOOL:

Northland International University / STUDIO SPACE: Taylors Mill, 250 Mill Street, Taylors, SC ARTISTS OF CHOICE: Henry Asencio, VOKA, Leonardo da Vinci, Picasso / RECENT EXHIBITIONS:

Solo Exhibition at the Warehouse Theatre, HeroesCon, SC Comicon

Captionhead: text here text here

Face Value Abstract realist Joe Everson portrays beauty in distinguished style

J

oe Everson likes to break the rules. Inspired by a former art teacher’s advice (a riff on Picasso’s own words)—“The best artists learn the rules so they know how to break them”—Everson decided early on to take a divergent path. A rebellious spirit, he believed class assignments were a waste of time, much preferring his own abstract form of expression than heavily moderated direction. After high school, Everson faced the uncertainty art careers bring, and opted for something more stable. But his need to create got the better of him, and when he ultimately found himself in Greenville years later, he knew it was time to take the plunge. “I feel like a lot of people think they have to do it one way. It’s hard not to because there’s a lot of security in that,” he says. “But high risk is good reward sometimes.” Everson created his first studio out of a laundry room three years ago, and he has been coasting on the reward ever since. Perhaps the most daunting question for any artist is what legacy to leave behind. Everson points out that “for a while, it was the guy that could technically see something and make it perfectly like you’re seeing it. But I’ve changed from that,” he says. Much of Everson’s work is centered on figures, and specifically faces. In his Faces of the Past series—or, as he says, “some of my favorite people that I’ve ever been influenced by”—his goal is to convey essence. He mentions a strong influence by his grandmother, a professional photographer in the film days, who encouraged him to capture the eyes of a person. Seeing something much

more dimensional than a canvas—the verity of the eyes, soul, and spirit—has become what he desires for people to contemplate when viewing his work. Using vivid colors and generous brushstrokes, this animated undertaking brings forth personality through color. Working in brilliant color is somewhat of a new endeavor for Everson, who only started painting about four years ago. Before that, a monochromatic style dominated his work. One of his favorite pieces, however, is devoid of color. The portrait is quietly striking, the contrast between dark and light dramatic yet understated. “It was a moment in time,” he explains. “I saw beauty, and I wanted to capture it.” Sitting across from the artist in his studio at Taylors Mill, he mentions jokingly that after seeing the light change across my complexion, he could draw me right then. “Light inspires me,” Everson explains, smiling. “My grandmother taught me to see everything through light. Light is everything, and I’ve never looked at the world differently.” That may be the best kind of rebellion.

Artwork photographed by Dan Lyles; courtesy of Joe Everson

/ by Olivia McCall // portrait by Eli Warren

44 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Artwork photographed by Dan Lyles; artwork courtesy of Joe Everson

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7/14/16 5/9/16 11:07 12:36 AM PM


Towner

UP

Pitcher Perfect Just like at Yankee stadium, Mike Buddie readies Furman University athletics for a winning era / by Jack Bacot

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

I

n the world of college sports, Furman University has hit a home run. Their new appointed leader, the gentleman heading the university’s athletic department, is former New York Yankees pitcher Mike Buddie. A combination of finesse and power, he’s the perfect athlete; and with his cool business demeanor, Buddie enters the game intent on scoring the winning run. Mike Buddie was named the school’s tenth athletic director in July 2015, and as Furman president Dr. Elizabeth Davis explains, he’s quite the catch. “Mike’s experience as a student-athlete, professional baseball player, development officer, athletics administrator, and member of the NCAA Division 1 Baseball Committee afford him the expertise he needs to fulfill the aspiration articulated in Furman’s Vision 2020: become a national exemplar of how a strong Division I athletics program may be compatible with academic excellence.” No small job, but for a guy who has taken the mound in historic Yankee stadium and shut down the best hitters in major league baseball, it’s no pressure. In his lifetime of athleticism, Buddie has left a trail of accolades in his wake. A three-sport star at his high school in Berea, Ohio, he caught the winning touchdown pass for the school’s first state football championship his senior year. Choosing baseball, he went to Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC, on an athletic scholarship as a pitcher. For a university that has fielded some great baseball teams, he still holds the program’s single-season record of 138 strikeouts, set in 1992.

Good Call: Former New York Yankee Mike Buddie brings an impressive athletic pedigree to his role as athletic director at Furman University, where he’s determined to bolster the success of its student-athletes and position the school as a potential host of next year’s NCAA Championships.

Buddie earned a bachelor’s degree and was drafted by the New York Yankees in the fourth round of the 1992 MLB Draft. He spent five seasons in the major leagues, including the Yankees’ 1998 World Series team as part of a two-season stint in New York before spending three years with the Milwaukee Brewers. He even had a brief moment with Hollywood. Buddie retired from professional baseball in 2004 and returned to Wake Forest, where he worked his way up to assistant athletic director. Now at Furman, we talked to Buddie about pitching, the pros, and teaching Kevin Costner how to throw. What was going through your mind the first time you walked out to the pitcher’s mound in Yankee stadium? >> I came in as relief pitcher in the fourth inning against Oakland with the bases loaded and one out. We were down 12 to 8. All I was thinking was “don’t screw up.” I got out of the inning, and the Yankees scored five runs the next inning, and I ended up getting the win. Not a bad start. Who was the most feared hitter you faced in professional baseball? >> I was pitching in the era of rampant steroid use and pitched against Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, Barry Bonds, Tony Gwynn, and others. My best was pitching to McGwire on July 4, and I struck him out on three pitches. What was your go-to pitch? >> I’m right-handed and had developed a slider in high school and perfected it as I got older. I threw my fastball around 92 mph and my slider was 86 mph. However, my slider would go about 59.5 feet and then drop. I can’t explain how to throw it, but it got me to Yankee stadium.

46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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As an Ohio native, what was it like coming home to pitch against the Cleveland Indians? >> Oh, wow, I grew up going to Indians games as a kid and always dreamed of playing there. It was surreal. I had loads of family, teachers, and friends in the stands. The Yankees knew it was home for me and set me up to pitch the game. The Yankees won. It was one of the best experiences of my life. Is it true that you taught actor Kevin Costner how to pitch? >> Yankees owner George Steinbrenner told a film crew they could use Yankee stadium, but any extras had to be real baseball players—not actors. He felt strongly about not disrespecting the pinstripes. The film was For the Love of the Game, and Kevin Costner was the star. My baseball roommate’s agent was with the same agency group as Costner’s. He couldn’t do it because he was getting married at the time of filming, so he recommended me. I had to teach Costner some basics of how to act on the pitcher’s mound, what a professional pitcher would do, how you should respond to a situation, all so he looked believable as a professional pitcher. In addition, I got to play the starting pitcher for the opposing team in the movie. Kevin was a gentleman, and I enjoyed the experience. What was your first impression of Greenville? >> My first impression was not great. I came here for the ACC baseball tournament in 1990, ’91, and ’92. We played in the old Greenville Braves stadium. I later learned that what I thought was Greenville was actually Mauldin. We never saw the Greenville that exists today. What can we expect from Furman athletics? >> My first goal is to develop the best student-athletes in the NCAA. This has nothing to do with budgets or winning teams. We expect our studentathletes to work as hard in the classroom as they do in their sport. You pick a school for the next 40 years of your life—not the next four. Winning will come by developing those studentathletes into the best they can be, and that attitude will result in winning teams. Furman is leading the area’s bid for the NCAA Championships, something Greenville (and all of South Carolina) has not had the opportunity to host in 15 years. What are our chances? >> Our chances are extremely good, but being out of consideration for so long is difficult to overcome. Compared to other markets, we are blessed with great facilities, strong community support, and a welcoming market. The logical sports are men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, softball, volleyball, golf, lacrosse, and we are considering other sports. It’s a quick process, and we will know by December if we are selected as a host university and city. Hosting a NCAA Championship in any sport is a great honor and a huge responsibility, but I am certain that FurmanGreenville is a winning combination that will provide a great experience for all fans and the student-athletes.

))) READ MORE OF BUDDIE’S INTERVIEW AT TOWNCAROLINA.COM. FOR MORE ON FURMAN UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS, VISIT FURMANPALADINS.COM.

AUGUST 2016 / 47

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TOP

Bunk

Room & Board: A spectacular view of Apple Lake (right) along with luxurious amenities, nightly hors d’oeurves, and a complimentary two-course breakfast guarantee that guests of Half-Mile Farm will leave their cares behind.

ft)

Cabin Fever

Luxurious respite and rustic charm await at Highland’s Half-Mile Farm / by M. Linda Lee

A

cool Tuesday afternoon finds my husband and me in our car, zigzagging across the Blue Ridge bound for a mid-week respite at Half-Mile Farm in Highlands, North Carolina. Just before the main intersection of the little mountain town, we catch sight of the Half-Mile Farm sign, after a few turns off US-64W. The gravel driveway loops lazily past three cabins—individually owned, but part of the inn’s offerings—and a six-acre lake before landing us under the inn’s elegant white porte-cochere. 48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photographs courtesy of Half-Mile Farm

Comfort(er) Zone: Visitors to Half-Mile have their pick of cottage, courtyard, or farmhouse rooms, as well as access to the copious amenities offered by sister property Old Edwards Inn—just a few miles down the road in Highlands.

Inside the renovated 1882 farmhouse, innkeeper Vivian Littlejohn greets us with a warm smile and explains the amenities available to her sole guests for the night: wine and hors-d’oeuvres in the living room at 5:30 p.m.; fresh-baked cookies—and milk, if you wish—before bedtime; and a delicious, complimentary twocourse breakfast prepared by Chef Jason in the light-filled dining room in the morning. A pixie of a woman with twinkling blue eyes and a charming Georgia drawl, Vivian leads the way to our courtyard room, which is one of 11 in the courtyard buildings; there are another four upstairs in the original house. She pauses in the breezeway to point out the pantry and bid us help ourselves to snacks, sodas, and water.

In our room, Littlejohn demonstrates the remotes for the fireplace, TV, and temperature gauge. A matelassé spread covers the bed, and drawers are built into a wall next to the fireplace. The Keurig coffeemaker rests on a side table, a spacious jetted tub awaits in the bathroom, and a small balcony faces an expanse of green woodland. The overall effect—one of rustic luxury. As much as Half-Mile Farm seems to have been plopped in from another world, it’s only a five-minute drive to the myriad shops and restaurants on Highlands’ Main Street. Guests have access to all the amenities of the farm’s sister property, Old Edwards Inn, including Madison’s Restaurant, the Wine Garden, the spa and fitness center, and golf at the nearby Old Edwards Club. The farm has had a series of owners throughout the years, including Jack Henry who added the two courtyard wings with his complete renovation in 1999. Seven years later, Henry sold the inn to the Messer family, who ran it until the Old Edwards Hospitality Group purchased the property in 2015. The rhododendrons and mountain laurel rimming the property burst with purple and pale pink blooms, and two bright red canoes beckon from their dock on Apple Lake. I imagine the landscape would be equally appealing in winter, when you could cuddle up in front of the parlor’s stacked-stone fireplace with a glass of wine and a view of the lake. Although Half-Mile Farm has long entertained guests as an inn, the homespun ambiance from its days as a private residence remains—both in the décor and the sincere hospitality of the staff. “We treat you like you’re family come to visit,” says Vivian Littlejohn. “We just don’t make you do dishes.” Half-Mile Farm 214 Half-Mile Drive, Highlands, NC (828) 526-8170, halfmilefarm.com. High-season rates start at $240/night.

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Profile

Renaissance Man Beau Welling has designed a life without a dull moment / by Steven Tingle // photograph by Will Crooks

B

eau Welling is sitting at a large table covered with maps, plats, and drawings in his office in downtown Greenville when his phone vibrates. He picks it up and glares at the screen with obvious irritation. “I think this is the greatest thing ever and the worst thing ever,” Welling says, holding up his iPhone. “It allows us to be so efficient, and allows us to be busy and working all the time, but the connections are at a distance. They are not rich.” Welling spends a lot of time thinking about connections, and why they are vital. As a golf course designer, Welling’s goal is to bring people together to connect with an experience that is both aesthetically pleasing and strategically challenging. As a member of Tom Fazio’s firm, Welling helped design and redesign some of the most remarkable golf courses in the world: Sage Valley, the Seaside course at Sea Island, the Canyon course at Barton Creek, Pinehurst #4, and many more.

“Creating spaces and places that get people to slow down, have a cup of coffee, have a conversation, play a round of golf, whatever it is, that’s pretty exciting to me.” —Beau Welling

Coursing Through: Having designed worldrenowned golf courses with Tom Fazio and now via his own firm, Beau Welling is famous in the golf world. But with degrees in physics and international business, Welling has a diverse, and unusual, repertoire.

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After a decade with the Fazio team, Welling had an itch to branch out on his own and diversify beyond golf. So, in 2006, he started his own firm, Beau Welling Design. He now has offices in Greenville and Asheville and works on projects all over the globe including Dubai, Portugal, and Tianjin, China, where Welling recently co-designed the 27 Club, a 27-hole course with each hole designed in collaboration with a major-championship winner. One of his most recent projects, Bluejack National in Houston, in which Welling worked alongside Tiger Woods, has been said to “evoke the look and feel of Augusta.” But “golf course designer” is just one piece of Welling’s repertoire. He studied landscape architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design and Irish drama at Trinity College in Dublin. He has a degree in physics from Brown University and one in international business from the University of South Carolina. He’s been both an investment banker and a poet. And he’s currently an urban planner, a landscape designer, a strategic thinker, and somewhat of a Renaissance man. He estimates that he’s on the road three quarters of the year, and when he’s not laying out a new course or urban center, his attention is on his true obsession, curling. Welling is the U.S. representative to the World Curling Federation, which led to him spend four and a half weeks at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. To share his love of the sport, Welling created the Palmetto Curling Club in Greenville in 2010. The club now has about 70 members who can be found most Tuesday evenings sliding and sweeping across the ice of the Pavilion Recreation Complex in Taylors. Welling grew up in Greenville, and when he left for college he swore he was leaving for good, but now he can’t imagine calling any other place home. “I love living in Greenville, and I love seeing it continue to evolve and progress,” he says. Now Welling is helping shape that evolution, with his firm serving as the urban planner on the Camperdown project, the redevelopment of the Greenville News site that will include office space, a hotel, apartments, and a large public plaza where Welling hopes people will gather and connect. “To be involved in some projects downtown that are helping to shape and take Greenville to the next step is particularly rewarding,” he says. “Our firm is involved in very diverse things, but the thread that connects them all conceptually is this idea to bring people together and gather. Creating spaces and places that get people to slow down, have a cup of coffee, have a conversation, play a round of golf, whatever it is, that’s pretty exciting to me.”

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Design All in the Family: Driven by a passion for making well-built skiff boats, Matt and Ralph Mitchell work diligently as the sole craftsmen of Santee Boats, based in Fountain Inn, SC.

Rock the Boat Father and son team Ralph and Matt Mitchell of Santee Boats construct sleek watercrafts / by Mary Cathryn Armstrong

// photography by Eli Warren

T

he buildings on Greenpond Road sit back a leisurely distance from the asphalt pavement that snakes its way through the city of Fountain Inn. Were it not for a vivid crimson paint job, the structures might barely be noticeable amongst the cluster of wild shrubbery and imposing trees. Well, that and the small arsenal of watercraft lined out front. Inside this makeshift workshop, Ralph Mitchell and his son Matt diligently construct their masterpieces. The father-son duo is the sole operator of Santee Boats, a fledgling company dedicated to preserving craftsmanship and tradition on the open water. With the delicate precision of a surgeon exacting the first cut, they coat a mold with layer after layer of fiberglass fabric, set with resin, shoot it with color, and wait. The floor is littered with shards of material, the air heady with the smell of chemicals mixed with summer humidity. It takes about a week’s worth of nine- to ten-hour shifts to complete one vessel, but according to Mitchell, the “hands-on process” is a cornerstone of the business. AUGUST 2016 / 55

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BY

Design

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du Hands On: Ralph Mitchell and his son Matt currently make two models, the Santee 160 (left and top) with tiller steering and the Santee 160 Center Console. The boats are simple and functional, but exceptionally well made: one requires about a week’s worth of nine- to ten-hour shifts. Focus is on craftsmanship and customer specifications.

“Some manufacturers start out small, and lose their sight as they expand. That’s when everything crumbles,” he explains. “Our passion is doing one thing really, really well instead of chasing dollars.” Mitchell’s storage warehouse is rife with remnants of what he refers to as his “past stints”—the ears of a Bugs Bunny mold from days in the amusement park industry poke out from a cardboard box alongside a custom motorcycle tailpiece. But for a man who professes to have always “enjoyed being around boats,” the transition from a longtime career in fiberglass to the development of his own line seemed only natural. That, coupled with the necessity for smaller skiffs in a market dominated by expensive large-scale models, make up the origins of Santee Boats. When Mitchell’s son Matt decided to trade serving for seafaring, everything else fell into place. “What I was looking to create was a product that was economically priced and could be used for anything from freshwater bass fishing to skimming the coastal marshes or casting shrimp nets in the deep ocean,” Mitchell says. “Our boats have that crossover quality.” The Santee style, he continues, was conceived with the “active outdoor sportsman” (or woman) in mind, and can be tailored to the buyer’s specificities. Need a camo wrap for duck hunting? They can do that. Want a dock box for easy boat-side storage? Yep, they make those too. Although he admits his own fishing endeavors have since taken a backseat to the growing business, Mitchell is relishing the recent resurgence of enthusiasm for outdoor recreation in the Upstate. “I think there was a time when the onslaught of computers and video games really ate into the outdoor industry,” he observes. “Now, with the economy picking back up, people are taking more of an interest in their boats and fishing, which has been great to see.”

“What I was looking to create was a product that was economically priced and could be used for anything from freshwater bass fishing to skimming the coastal marshes or casting shrimp nets in the deep ocean,” Mitchell says. For now, the line comes in two iterations: tiller steering for increased speed and space, or the center console model for longer hauls. And don’t be deceived by the vessel’s canoe-like shape—the wide, rounded bottom provides more than enough stability and balance. Don’t believe it? Just check out the YouTube video of Mitchell’s son Matt steadfastly circling the boat’s edge with little more than a wobble. Mitchell is already planning ahead for the future expansion of Santee Boats, with more varieties in design and dealers to move the product. The mechanics and technologies may change, but like the Santee—“people of the water”—from which the company derives its name, the passion for boating culture will remain a constant. “Having access to water certainly makes boating more appealing, but it’s still something that’s big all across the country,” Mitchell says. “When my son and I visited the area around the Cooper River, he remarked that there were boats in nearly every driveway. Those are the people we’re trying to reach.” To see more of Santee Boats or where to purchase, visit santeeboats.com.

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PAST

Lives

Shadow of a Legend Forty years after his greatest fight, Joe Frazier is still Muhammad Ali’s best opponent

Photograph courtesy of Getty Images

/ by Hayden Arrington

I

n boxing, as in life, there are two sides to every coin, two stories to every fight—the favorite and the forgotten. For some unknown reason, the magnitude of one man’s accomplishments always outweighs that of his opponent, reducing the latter to nothing more than “the other guy.” For Mayweather that “other guy” was Pacquiao, for Leonard it was Duran, and for the late Muhammad Ali, it was Smokin’ Joe Frazier. By the time Frazier had ascended the heavyweight throne in 1970, Muhammad Ali had transcended the status of boxer, establishing himself as a revolutionary for his refusal to go to Vietnam. It didn’t matter that Frazier had racked up an impressive win streak, that he had worked his way up from Beaufort, South Carolina, farm boy to Olympic gold medalist, or that he had knocked out nearly every opponent his predecessor had faced. He hadn’t beaten Ali, and, until he did, he would forever be known as the latter. The two men would go on to fight three times over a four-year stretch in what would become the most famous trilogy in the history of the sport. In the end, Ali would come out on top, besting Frazier for two of the three and reestablishing what the public already knew. To his credit, Joe Frazier never had to win the war. He didn’t even have to win a fight. All Frazier had to do was step into the ring with the greatest of all time, to have the audacity to challenge a legend. Today, in the wake of Ali’s passing, the public has long forgotten the names of his opponents—all of them, that is, except for Joe Frazier. Somehow, in the shadow of Muhammad’s legacy, Frazier has established himself as much more than “the other guy.”

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Deep Water: (clockwise, from left) Mate and angler Charles Stuart works the dredge about 50 miles off shore; 80-lb. bent-butt rods handle the big fish; Greenville-owned Miss Wy is a 53-foot Ricky Scarborough custom Carolina sportfish docked in Georgetown; large bait fish and a mix of lures attract the coveted blue marlin; angler Stokely Holder is a Greenville attorney by day but grew up fishing off shore with his father and brothers.

Tides that Bind An Upstate boat and its young crew of fishermen, family, and friends carry forward the traditions of the sea, with a focus on sustainability and fun / by Heidi Coryell William s

A

// photography by Katie Fiedler

bout this time last year, the Greenville-owned Miss Wy—a 53-foot Ricky Scarborough custom Carolina sportfish boat with twin 800-horsepower Detroit Diesel engines—was riding high. Her eleven-member crew had won the Georgetown Blue Marlin Tournament (the second and biggest of four invitational billfish tournaments in last year’s statewide circuit) by releasing three blue marlin on their last day of fishing. Less than a week earlier, they’d caught two blue marlin, one a “massive blue marlin,” estimated by professional blue marlin fishermen to be in the range of 700- to 800-plus pounds. Less than a week after the Georgetown tournament, they were out fun-fishing and caught another marlin. And then just a few days later, at the Bohicket Marina Invitational near Johns Island, on their first day of fishing that tournament, they released two more “blues.”

“It was an incredible couple of weeks of fishing,” recalls Stokely Holder, a Greenvillebased attorney, husband, and father, who grew up fishing off the South Carolina coast with his father Ed and three brothers. Ed’s name is synonymous with his successful company, Holder Electric Supply, and is the owner of Miss Wy. His three sons— Stokely plus Paul, a commercial real estate professional who lives in Charleston, and Lindsey, a well-respected boat mechanic there, are among the crew. Along with seven other friends and family members who are split between the Upstate, Columbia, and the coast, plus a Georgetown-based captain and first mate, these men are the Miss Wy—a tight-knit club of kindred spirits born of the land but drawn to the sea and, more specifically, to the sport of blue-marlin fishing in their home state, South Carolina.

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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stokley holder

SWEET INSPIRATION Named after the family matriarch Wyline, Miss Wy is a family affair—but that family extends beyond bloodlines. Wives, children, sisters, grandchildren, and many family friends enjoy the boat during the off-season—and in the celebratory hours that often follow a long day of tournament fishing. “We all raise families, but it is a great time to be with the guys,” says Ed, (or “Big Ed,” as he’s known on the boat), who jokes that everyone on Miss Wy works for him, so his job is to “sit up top and watch,” whether it’s overseeing the fishing crew or watching his eight grandchildren pile on the back end of the boat. But tournament billfishing is their boys’ club. All around the world, to catch a blue marlin is the thrill of most fishermen’s lives. The adage of the sea for hauling in these monstrous billfish: “Hours of boredom followed by seconds of sheer chaos.” The boredom is often referred to as “the grind,” which means getting from one place to another, dealing with rough seas and storms, rigging and re-rigging, clearing weeds off of

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“teasers” and lures. It’s waiting for something to happen. The chaos is the “bite” or “hit,” or more specifically, the screaming reel that follows, so powerful and so ripping that the fishermen know almost immediately that they’ve hooked a blue, well before they’ve brought anything boatside. Off the coast of South Carolina, there are other, smaller billfish that might hit a line, including white marlin and sailfish. Sometimes a mahi or a wahoo might strike and latch on. “Most bites and fights are all different,” Stokely offers. That’s why it is so important to have a crew that trusts one another. Because when there’s a strike, particularly a blue marlin strike, they spring into action in an almost choreographed series of movements. One angler, sometimes two, leap to the “fighting” chair—one person steers the chair while another reels, as the rest of the crew moves quickly to clear the other lines. A couple of crew members put on thick gloves in preparation to help “wire” the fish: someone holds it; someone else gets the hook out. And because photos and video are key for catch-and-release fishing, and required on the Governor’s Cup circuit for billfish, Go Pros are pointed in every direction, to make sure what’s been reeled in is captured on camera. It’s an excitement punctuated by yelling and rapid movement. “But that’s what it’s all about when you get to that point,” Stokely says. “You put in a lot of hard work and get yourself in a position to catch a nice fish. And to do it in South Carolina, it really is the thrill of a lifetime.”

REBORN AGAIN As Miss Wy finishes its second full year on the competition circuit, the North Carolina custombuilt boat has been good to its crew. Discovered “for sale” by highly-acclaimed blue marlin fisherman Matt Wilkinson (now captain of Miss Wy but also past winner of the Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament, as well as a number of other tournaments along the Eastern seaboard and current owner of Georgetown Charters). He knew the pedigree of the boat. In a past life, she had been originally called Trophy Box, owned then by the acclaimed fisherman Gray Ingram (currently of the world-renowned Big Oh). It had a history of catching billfish. However, having changed owners, it was in a state of disrepair.

It’s waiting for something to happen. The chaos is the “bite” or “hit,” or more specifically, the screaming reel that follows, so powerful and so ripping that the fishermen know almost immediately that they’ve hooked a blue.

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Bait & Switch: (clockwise, from left) Captain Matt Wilkinson at the helm; first mate Michael Tuberville and Charles Stuart in “the grind” of fishing; the crew of Miss Wy works the rods even as bad weather rolls in; the crew works as a seamless team to bring in tournament blue marlin.

PREFERRED LURES:

TECHNIQUE:

// Black Bart, Pakula,

// Early in the season on Miss

Mold Craft, Makaira

Wy, the crew prefers to pull mostly lures and sometimes a large bait fish like a mackerel, a bigger bait to attract a bigger fish. Then they mix lures and baits later in the season, which most people pull on the surface. In tournaments, the boat normally runs six lines and four teasers but that can change depending on conditions. The combination often consists of two dredges, two squid chains, and six lines with hooks—usually a mix of lures with two or three lucky ones always in “the starting lineup,” including those that have earned affectionate titles such as “Candy Man,” “Rizzo,” and “Weedy One.”

ROD: // 80-lb.-class, bent-butt rods that can handle a big fish. The short rigger positions are preferred, because the action on the end of the line is visible from the boat.

BREAKING THE SURFACE: // Miss Wy generally pulls dredges, anywhere from a couple feet below to 10 feet below water, mimicking a school of fish. When the fish goes to those and realizes it can’t eat anything on it, it will usually become more aggressive. That’s when the blue will go straight to a larger bait with a hook where the fish typically breeches the surface when it bites, so the boat gets to see the blue marlin devour the bait, and the fight can begin.

BLUE MARLIN TYPICALLY REACH 11 FEET IN LENGTH AND WEIGH BETWEEN 200 AND 400 LBS. FEMALES ARE TYPICALLY 3 TO 4 TIMES LARGER THAN MALES AND CAN REACH WEIGHTS UP TO 2,000 LBS.

SPOTTING A BLUE: // The blue marlin will come up on a teaser, usually very close to the back of the boat, which makes it up close and personal. Whoever is on the rod may pull the bait away to keep the interest of the fish, which makes the fish hungrier. Often times, the marlin will change color, parts of it turning electric blue, which means it’s excited. The tail and the peck fins, or body of the fish, become visible.

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TOWN

Extra Lured In: (clockwise, from left) Owner Ed Holder has been fishing the coast of South Carolina for decades; angler Charles Stuart puts the finishing touches on a dredge— sometimes the marlin will get so excited when it sees the lure that it will breech the surface and turn electric blue; bait fish are strung by Robert Rodelsperger to mimic a school of fish behind the boat.

TEAM BUILDING THE GREENVILLE REEF IS JUST ONE OF SOUTH CAROLINA’S 45 PUBLIC FISHING REEFS, LOCATED ABOUT 20 MILES OFF THE COAST OF GEORGETOWN IN 85 FEET OF WATER NEAR THE MOUTH OF WINYAH BAY. THE REEF’S CREATION WAS PARTIALLY FUNDED BY THE GREENVILLE SALTWATER SPORTFISHING CLUB, WHICH IS NO LONGER A FORMAL ORGANIZATION, BUT IT REMAINS A COMMUNITY OF UPSTATE FISHERMEN WHO FREQUENT THE GEORGETOWN COAST. A 105-FOOT TUGBOAT WAS SUNK ON THE GREENVILLE REEF IN 2005 AND THE SPOT IS NAMED THE “RALPH H. SKELTON REEF” IN MEMORY OF FORMER GREENVILLE SPORTFISHING CLUB MEMBER RALPH HARRISON “ITCHE” SKELTON WHO DIED AT 84 IN 2004.

(Latitude, Longitude): 32 56.623”N, 078 57.587 ”W

“I said, ‘We want that boat. We should make her right,’” Wilkinson offers after a morning spent at sea. “Capt. Matt,” as he’s called by the crew, grew up on the water in Georgetown and has worked on boats his whole life. He knew what needed to be done to make her right. And after nine months of work, that’s exactly what he did: Part fishing vessel, part yacht, it blends the comforts of a damn-fine home (think two refrigerators, a couple of ice machines, spacious sleeping quarters, full bathrooms, and a salon, which is basically a living room that seats six) with some of the most precise fishing technology available. The latter is paramount when competing on the billfish circuit: blinking, beeping electronics range from services that help fishermen determine where conditions are best to fish-finding units. Satellite television and interior air conditioning come in handy when catching up on golf (when nothing’s biting, of course), and it’s not too shabby after-hours either, inviting cocktails and conversation as the sun dips below the horizon. It makes the hour-long to week-long stretches pass pleasantly when not much is biting. And then come the antics.

When the fishing is slow, there’s music (and, no, it’s not all Jimmy Buffet) and lounging and lots of laughter. The crew stays cool “like kids,” with ice cream cones and Popsicles, and they stay satisfied with plenty of good food and jokes at one another’s expense. At port, there are plenty of other Greenville-area fishermen who make up a modest, familiar community of Upstate expats at sea. There is a slate of nicknames and unofficial titles: David Snipes, or “Bunny,” is director of food, entertainment, and the “air guitar” band. Michael Tuberville, the official first mate, is “Magic Mike” and sometimes “Tum Tum.” Michael “Lalich” is the Icy Pop manager when he’s not a mate or an angler. Paul (“Paulie D”) Holder is the gaff man, when he’s not acting as beverage director. “AV” Lee Prickett serves as the official audio and visual director, as well as serving as a mate and wireman, while Charles “Chuck” Stuart is a mate and angler that helps AV Lee capture much of the underwater videography that has earned Miss Wy a cult following. (Some of their film footage now runs on a loop at the Georgetown Maritime Museum.) Robert “Roberto” Rodelsperger is mate, angler, and unofficial “director of R&D and purchasing” (shopping). While Blair Hendricks, or “Ralphie,” gets the title of intel director when he’s not serving one of his true roles as gaff man, angler, or chair driver. One can only imagine who he’s doing intel on. There is even the occasional costume (think Ricky Bobby mullet wigs and star-spangled T-shirts) that makes its way on deck. “There’s no telling what somebody is going to do next,” says Stokely (“Stoke,” who serves as logistics coordinator when he’s not acting as a mate or an angler). His day job often keeps him in suit and tie, but so do the other crew members’ full-time gigs as lawyers, entrepreneurs, and professionals of various stripes. Come Thursday or Friday, they each shed their formal wardrobe for a saltwater uniform: boardshorts, a T-shirt, baseball cap, and deck shoes. They are a team without jerseys or numbers, but a team nonetheless, which becomes paramount the moment the end of a rod begins to quiver. Because the strike is just the start.

64 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Shirt, No Shoes: Fashion, like life, is easier without the drama. If you agree, say hello to your new favorite dress shirt. Whether you’re a workaholic or a weekend warrior, Mizzen + Main’s Blackman dress shirt is ready to go when you are. Wrinkle-free, moisture-free, and drama-free, with an effortless blend of style and comfort, no matter who is wearing it. For more, see page 70.

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THE ITEM

Under the Collar The classic white button-down always scores

LEG ROOM : Mizzen + Main, Blackman men’s shirt in white, $125; Peter Millar White Crown sport boxer, $35; Daniel Wellington 40mm leather band watch, $229. All from Smith & James; bangle mix: bamboo twist bangle, $10/ea (set of 3); (previous page) wooden bangle, $20/ea (set of 3); wooden bead with silk tassel, $24. All from 4 Rooms.

Special thanks to model Kaylee Henderson, courtesy of Millie Lewis Greenville

/ by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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Rush


Special thanks to model Kaylee Henderson, courtesy of Millie Lewis Greenville

23 West North St., Greenville, SC 29601 864.232.2761 | www.rushwilson.com Open Mon.-Sat. 9:30am - 5:30pm; Closed on Sunday

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THE LOOK

That’s Classic Life is too short for a test drive

/ by Laura Linen // photography by Paul Mehaffey

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1965 SHELBY COBRA: Blue Ridge Sports Cars lent this Shelby CSX 4985 Continuation Cobra for our shoot. The date-period-correct details, such as the side oiler and the top loader 4 speed gearbox, make the car virtually indistinguishable from older models. The driving experience is exactly like older, multimillion-dollar Cobras.

Special thanks: Model Sam Konduros (Millie Lewis Greenville); hair & makeup, Isabelle Schreier; Rodney Butterfield and Catherine Von Canon of Blue Ridge Sports Cars; Table 301

ON SAM: (opposite) Peter Millar Hawthorn windowpane soft jacket in dark fuschia blossom, $898; R Hanauer pocket square, multi-colored, price upon request; Peter Millar jeans, $145: all from Rush Wilson, Ltd. Peter Millar Tar Heel bluecheck sport-shirt, tailored fit, spread collar, $198, from Peter Millar corporate Fall 2016; available at Rush Wilson, Smith & James, and Jack Runnion; TISSOT Men’s PRC200 racing watch with black leather strap, $525, from Hale’s Jewelers; Ralph Lauren sunglasses, boots, belt: all model’s own; (this page) Peter Millar custom-design white dinner jacket, $995; R Hanauer white-linen pocket square with black trim, $50; R Hanauer black satin bow tie/ cummerbund set, $155: all from Rush Wilson Ltd.; Tag Heuer men’s link stainless-steel watch with black pinstripe dial, $3,400, from Hale’s Jewelers; Kawika Maui Jim sunglasses, $289, from Mast General Store

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THE OBJECT

Raise Your Glasses Take the glare off with specialty sun shades / by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

WHETHER FOR HUNTING OR FISHING, CLIMBING OR HIKING, NOTHING SAYS CLASSIC COOL LIKE A PROPER PAIR OF SHADES. FROM THE DURABILITY OF THE FANTAIL FRAME TO THE LIGHTWEIGHT MODEL OF THE BREAKWALL, THESE POLARIZED LENSES WILL PROTECT YOUR EYES BUT NOT DIM THE VIEW.

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GOOD SPORTS: 1. Ray Ban Classic Aviator blue lens for the beach, Fowler’s Pharmacy, $20 0 ; 2. Costa Fantail black frame, blue lens for the fishing, Fowler’s Pharmacy, $199; 3. Maui Jim Breakwall extra lightweight for the run or hike, Mast General Store, $169; 4. Native Haskill lightweight chrome maple frame, amber lens for the hunt, Mast General Store, $159

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Pretty Little Lies At least the Man is honest about one thing: his daily fib count

O

ne day last winter the beautiful blonde who inexplicably enjoys my company purchased a blue velvet jumpsuit. She’d ordered it online and right after the UPS man delivered it, ran into the bedroom to try it on. “What do you think?” she said, walking back into the living room a few minutes later. My first thought was that she looked like Grover from Sesame Street. My second thought was that perhaps I might be able to squeeze into this outfit on Halloween and do my best Prince impersonation. My third thought was the final one: “Darling, you look fantastic.” I consider myself to be a very honest person, but that being said, I am also a prolific liar. I tell lies all day long. Not big ones mind you, not the kinds of lies that lead to divorce proceedings or jail time. I tell little lies. Lies like, “Of course, Roscoe is a beautiful name for a baby,” and “Yes, Mother, I will call you again tomorrow,” and “I Have Read and Agreed to the Above Terms and Conditions.” So last week, as an experiment, I started counting my lies and was not surprised at how quickly they began to add up. Yesterday was Tuesday, and I told twenty-three lies, including “Sorry, I don’t have any change,” and “I’ll be there in five minutes.” The day before, I told eighteen lies including “I’ll have the story finished by tomorrow,” and one of my personal favorites, “Honey, this kale is delicious.” Last Sunday, I told upwards of fifty lies before I lost count. I was visiting

my mother who had recently redecorated her house. No further explanation necessary. But while some people lie in order to cheat and steal, my lying is merely a symptom of my laziness. I don’t lie to hurt anybody. I lie because I often lack the energy to explain the truth. Even with good friends, I generally take the easy route. When they ask, “Hey, how are you? I always say “Fine,” instead of, “I’m not at all well. There’s a mole on my neck that’s starting to change color. My son hasn’t cut his hair in eighteen months, and he’s beginning to look like Crystal Gale on steroids. The IRS continues to send me notices, and my mother keeps asking when I’m going to have something published in Reader’s Digest. And last week they rearranged everything at the Publix, and now I can’t find a damn thing. Oh, and my check-engine light has been on for three months, and the tattoo I got on my hip when I was eighteen of a palm tree silhouetted against a sunset is unfortunately still there and crystal clear. My blood pressure is high, my cholesterol is through the roof, and my hair keeps disappearing from my head only to reappear on my back or out of my ears. How are you?” Today is Wednesday, and so far I’ve told sixteen lies. But I’m sure I’ll hit thirty by the end of the day. It will probably happen at the check out line in Publix, when the nice woman ringing up my groceries asks, “Did you find everything okay?”

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SIDE

Ways

Hook in the Sea In pursuit of southeast Alaska’s Chinook salmon and Arctic ambience, some conquests prove more elusive than others

I

t’s 4:30 a.m. and the Alaskan sunrise is sneaking through my curtains. The sound of the Pacific beckons me, proving that nature knows no snooze button. The wilderness air is so crisp it almost stings my lungs, instantaneously transforming me into a morning person. I gaze off at the fishing boats in the distance and begin to hear the rest of the Waterfall Resort rustle. It’s king salmon, or Chinook, season, and there’s fishing to be done. Waterfall, the first of two lodges that bookend my Alaskan stay, is one of the region’s most popular, and it is awake. Sleep, I quickly learn, is nowhere near as plentiful as the fish in southeast Alaska. Especially when the kings are running. The season for these prized salmon lasts from eight to ten weeks, and everyone is here to catch their limits, which vary year to year. During my trip in June, that’s two kings per person, per day, with a maximum of six to be caught per year. Down at breakfast, the energy is kinetic. Eager anglers pile their plates

high with biscuits and gravy and smoked salmon with bagels and cream cheese, regaling each other with stories of yesterday’s catch. Once everyone’s seated, a Waterfall employee shouts for the attention of the crowd to announce the winners of the daily King of Kings Salmon Tournament. The tables rumble with chants and applause after each is announced. Though there’s a decidedly frat-house vibe to this early-morning gathering at Waterfall, there are women fishing, too. A young woman caught yesterday’s second-largest king, a 37-pounder. “I’ve got this,” I think to myself, convinced that my uncle’s stellar outdoorsman abilities must be written within my DNA.

Photog r aph s cour tes y of t he Steamboat Bay Fi sh i ng Club

/ by Chris Simmons

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ADULT KING OR CHINOOK SALMON MIGRATE FROM THE SEA TO THE FRESHWATER STREAMS AND RIVERS OF THEIR BIRTH IN ORDER TO MATE, SPAWN ONCE, AND THEN DIE. KING SALMON ARE EASILY THE LARGEST SALMON; ADULTS EXCEED FORTY POUNDS, WITH INDIVIDUALS MORE THAN 120 POUNDS HAVING BEEN REPORTED.

Photog r aph s cour tes y of t he Steamboat Bay Fi sh i ng Club

From Sea to Shore

And so we set off for our first full day of fishing, cutting through the glassy Alaskan waters in our 25-foot cabin cruiser. Despite my ambitions, day one turns out to be more of a wildlife-watching excursion than an episode of Deadliest Catch. We spot humpback whales bubble feeding, stunning bald eagles soaring, and even a few sea otters floating about, but our haul is far from record-breaking—a few rockfish and a barely legal-size halibut. The other boat in our group has much better luck, catching the first shinyskinned kings of the trip. “Maybe switching things up tomorrow will do it,” I say to myself as we pull up to Steamboat Bay Fishing Club, our home for the next few nights. While Waterfall sits on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island in an unincorporated community, Steamboat is on the more secluded Noyes Island in the Alexander Archipelago of southeast Alaska. Motoring in, we’re greeted by the bay’s two resident humpbacks cresting for air as we pull into the docks. The oversized, log-cabin-style lodge surrounded by cedars couldn’t possibly be more welcoming after a long day at sea. We swap our traditional yield-sign-yellow waders from Waterfall for Steamboat’s sleek black rain gear—which we admittedly didn’t really need thanks to high-sixty-degree summer weather and only a few scattered showers—and head inside. Steamboat Bay is the more sophisticated, refined, and intimate alternative to most Alaskan resorts. Steamboat sleeps just sixteen in its lodge, and boasts an admittedly less casual, less raucous atmosphere than many Alaskan resorts, which can accommodate ninety-plus guests. That’s not to say it’s lacking in the fun department: There are pool and poker tables; an

Cast Away: Getting to southeast Alaska via seaplane is an aerial tour of the Alaskan wild in and of itself. Keep an eye out for silhouettes of whales and other wildlife; (above) Steamboat Bay Fishing Club is a refined, backcountry escape, with fine dining, whiskey, and sophisticated accommodations like pool and poker tables, complimentary kayaking, and an outdoor sauna with glass walls.

outdoor sauna with glass walls overlooking the bay; complimentary kayaking; and a wellstocked bar that’s part of the property’s allinclusive rate. For those looking for even more privacy, the property has recently opened the Residence, an überluxe separate cabin that sleeps eight, complete with its own craft beer taps, a floor-to-ceiling fireplace, and a transparent floor for viewing salmon traveling upstream to spawn in the fall. After-Hours Ambience

After showering off the day, I head to the dining room to meet the rest of my group and the other lodge guests for pre-dinner canapés and cocktails. Chef Katherine Cook, who hails from Portland, Oregon, prepares all sorts of tasty treats during our stay, from smoked fish pâté and a punchy Italian cioppino with locally caught seafood, to authentic baked Alaska—a decadent treat consisting of ice cream and cake topped with meringue. The property also offers a cook-your-catch service, and the luckier anglers in my group are happy to share some of their ample salmon. AUGUST 2016 / 83

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Ways

SIDE

Fish Out of Water: Waterfall Resort and Steamboat Bay may be wildly secluded, but the Ketchikan Airport is a quick 90-minute seaplane ride from Seattle, Washington. Season / Alaska provides year-round fishing, though locales and species may vary depending on the time of year. Peak season for salmon fishing lasts from May through September, with five major species spread across the season.

Groups usually pool their catch. Expect to come back with between twenty and eighty pounds of fish per person. Be sure to talk to your pilot or flight crew beforehand to discuss the added weight on the return flight. Though it isn’t recommended for freshness, flash-frozen fish can be shipped via FedEx. Consider shipping your luggage instead of your prized catch if you have gone over the weight limit.

“I’ve been to a lot of these lodges in my day, but nothing like this,” says one of our tablemates, while sipping on a Lagavulin whiskey served over ice smoked with local alder wood. When I return to my room, a snifter of Courvoisier and a dark chocolate truffle are waiting on my bedside stand. I take the goodies outside to enjoy while soaking in the hot tub. Sipping on my cognac, I gaze at the crest in the mountainous forest, creating the perfect frame for the full moon to rise inside. The air is still and silent. I contemplate how magical this place is, and how small I am amid the Alaskan wild. The Endless Pursuit

I wish I could say the days that came were vastly different from my first, and how with the help of the right coach, I became America’s Next Top Angler. Or how I hooked the Big One, but after an arduous fight, one of those universally hated sea lions snatched it, making it the One That Got Away. Despite the comfort of the property’s new boats—which include microwaves and an onboard restroom, a major luxury when you’re out at sea all day—all I keep catching are rockfish and halibut, which due to their flat, unstreamlined bodies are a long, frustrating fight, like pulling a semi up from the deep seafloor. Delicious eating, but I have to admit, being the only one of the entire group not to catch a king puts the competitive athlete in me on edge. I follow instructions for “mooching”—or dropping the bait to the seafloor and immediately pulling up—to a tee, and they Just. Won’t. Bite. A fellow angler and I even make Swedish Fish offerings in an attempt to break my curse. I ask my guide Everett Athorp what gives. “It’s not your turn,” he says, effortlessly imparting native wisdom on my frustrated soul. In addition to being an excellent guide and professional nerve soother, Athorp also creates the stunning traditional Haida woodwork pieces on display at Steamboat. He’s a master at creating what’s known an “Alaskan beer bong,” plucking giant fronds of seaweed from the ocean and chopping

Stay / Current land package rates for Waterfall Resort are $4,295 for three nights; $5,495 for four nights, plus $435 for the round-trip seaplane from Ketchikan, which is about 60 miles east of Waterfall. Waterfall is an unincorporated community on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Current all-inclusive rates for Steamboat Bay Fishing Club on Noyes Island are $5,825 for three nights; $7,695 for four nights, which includes the seaplane fare. Rates can and do change without notice throughout the year. Noyes Island is in the Alexander Archipelago of southeast Alaska, and it lies just to the west of Prince of Wales Island. Credentials / The Alaska Department of Fish and Game requires all anglers to carry a valid fishing license whenever they’re fishing. The state also requires a king salmon stamp when fishing for king salmon. Most resorts provide guests with the service of processing these documents on behalf of the State of Alaska.

Noyes Island

GULF OF ALASKA

off the top of the bulb to create a funnel that conveniently fits an entire Alaskan Pale Ale for chugging. Let’s just say a cold one alongside a piece of Steamboat’s signature cold fried chicken has an uncanny ability to take the edge off when the fish aren’t biting. Hooked on a Feeling

On our last morning, my group, all of whom have caught their kings, gears up and rallies for me to catch mine. I swap boats and see if Matt Romaine—who’s been hooked on Steamboat since he first came out in 2008— and his notoriously hard-core guiding style might suit my competitive personality. He cautiously eyes the fish tracker as we head out to one of the ten main fishing spots in the area, and he instructs us to drop our lines. Within moments, Geoff Stevens, who is standing just a few feet away from me, has a massive king on but suddenly loses it. Romaine shouts at us to drop our lines in an attempt to hook it before it swims off, and I feel an unfamiliar tug on my line. They always say a king’s bite just feels different; like true love’s first glance, you just know. Romaine instructs me as my line arches into the water, but I’m not making any headway. He grabs ahold of my line and reels. “You got Alaska,” he says as he unhinges my hook from the rocks below. As we head back to catch the seaplane to Ketchikan, I feel utterly humbled. In an age when humans can do everything from create 3D clones to control the temperature of our own homes with the swipe of an app, it’s rare to feel so out of control of our environment. I might not have the trophy fish, but I now “get” the beauty of Alaska: You can have the fanciest equipment, the newest boat, the best teacher, and, still, you are beautifully and undeniably at the mercy of Mother Nature.

Photog r aph s cour tes y of t he Steamboat Bay Fi sh i ng Club

Travel / Ketchikan International Airport is the point of access for all seaplane transfers. Seaplane is the preferred method to get to both properties, and, in fact, is the only way to get around most of the remote parts of Alaska. Seaplane transfers are arranged through the resorts, and are typically done through Promech Air.

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Back Spin

RUN OF THE

FAIRWAYS & GREENS: Heyward Sullivan was instrumental in the creation of the famed Chanticleer course of Greenville Country Club; (right) prior to Greenville Country Club, several enthusiasts created a course on Piney Mountain, circa 1900. They came to be known as the “Piney Mountain Pioneers.”

All historical photographs reprinted from Greenville’s Augusta Road by Kelly Lee Odom (Arcadia Publishing, 2012); (right) courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society, Coxe Collection

of

THE GAME OF GOLF IN GREENVILLE WAS NOT BORN SO MUCH AS IT WAS MADE, BY MEN OF ACTION AND MEN OF FORESIGHT

by STEVE N TI NGLE

portraits by E LI WA R RE N

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LINKS IN TIME: (this page) GCC head-professional Dave Ferguson tees up a ball on what is now the 14th fairway at Riverside. (opposite) The Piney Mountain group, led by later club president Captain Ellison Adger Smyth, for med a stock company to lease and purchase Sans Souci, the 57-acre estate and mansion of for mer governor Benjamin Perry, built in 1871. The Victorian mansion was reconfigured to become an early clubhouse, complete with dining facilities and a bar.

many century-old private golf clubs, Greenville Country Club’s origins can be traced back to a group of prominent men infatuated with a bizarre new game. In the late 1800s, a new sport called golf was gaining popularity in the Northeast and slowly working its way across the country. Inspired by the performances of the great players of the day, men like Harry Vardon and James Braid, golf enthusiasts were forming clubs, raising money, and building golf courses. Often built with nothing more than picks and shovels, these early courses were rudimentary at best. In 1895, that group of prominent men in Greenville, men with last names like Sirrine, Capers, Blythe, and Beattie, created a primitive nine-hole golf course at Piney Mountain, complete with a grounds crew of grazing sheep and the shade of a boulder serving as a makeshift clubhouse. This core group of golfers, who came to be known as the Piney Mountain Pioneers, had created a club that over the years would twice change locations and eventually evolve into the Sans Souci Country Club, and finally the Greenville Country Club.

Like

Photograph (opposite) courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society, Coxe Collection; (this page) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club; (Donald Ross) courtesy of the Taft Archives

Donald Ross (far right) purportedly drafted a layout of the Riverside course, but what is known for certain is that golf course architect William Langston completed the final design on-site.

ALTHOUGH THE ORIGIN OF THE MODERN GAME IS ATTRIBUTED TO 15TH CENTURY SCOTLAND, EARLIER FORMS OF GOLF CAN BE TRACED TO ANCIENT CHINA AND ROME.

FIRST TEE Golf courses change. They’re designed, and years later often redesigned. They’re lengthened and rerouted, expanded and enhanced. But there are limits to what the land will allow. When the Greenville Country Club (GCC) course, now known as Riverside, opened in the summer of 1923, it was light years ahead of the crude layout built amidst the rocks and bramble of Piney Mountain. The course is thought to have been originally laid out on a topographical map in 1919 by famed golf course designer Donald Ross. But what is known for certain is that the final

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World View Special Agent Kirby’s photographs bring to life the myriad faces and experiences of his eastern travels: (clockwise from topleft) Kazakh laborers take a break to sing Russian folk songs; a Kazakh man met at a Soviet park; Oleg, the poet; rows of tea on a plantation in Matsetsa, Russia; a Kazakh woman at an outdoor market. To view more of Kirby’s work, go to mkirbyphotos.com, or see it in person at Coffee Underground and Art & Light Gallery, both in Greenville.

Photograph (opposite) courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society, Coxe Collection; (this page) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club; (Donald Ross) courtesy of the Taft Archives

“ G e n t l e m e n , I k n o w t h a t y o u s a i d y o u w a n t a g r e a t c h a m p i o n s h i p g o l f c o u r s e ,” S u l l i v a n remembers f amed golf course architect Rober t Trent Jones saying. “I can remodel this c o u r s e a n d m a k e i t b e t t e r , b u t I c a n n o t m a k e i t a g r e a t c h a m p i o n s h i p g o l f c o u r s e .”

layout was completed on site by golf architect William Langston. The course was not especially challenging, or even interesting for that matter. Even after a redesign in 1962 by local architect George Cobb, which included seven new holes across the Reedy River, the course was never going to be used in the same sentence with “championship layout.” Around that time, some of Greenville’s more serious golfers, especially those who were newcomers to town, were joining the recently opened Green Valley Country Club, which was considered by many to have a much better golf course. Seeing the writing on the wall, by the mid 1960s, the GCC’s board was looking into significantly upgrading the Riverside course and turning it into the championship layout the club deserved. Just by chance, a young board member named Heyward Sullivan made a suggestion—a suggestion that would lead the remodeling effort into a completely different direction and culminate in the creation of what is today considered one of the best golf courses in South Carolina: Chanticleer.

SWING CHANGE Heyward Sullivan practically grew up at Greenville Country Club. His parents, the owners

of Hale’s Jewelers, were prominent members of the club, and Sullivan enthusiastically took up the game of golf at age 12. “I was taught by a Scottish pro named David Ferguson,” Sullivan says. “He always wore a shirt and tie, and in the winter he’d wear a tweed hat and a tweed jacket. He was right out of a movie.” After serving in the military as a liaison officer, Sullivan returned to Greenville in the early 1960s to assist his brother in taking over the family jewelry business. Sullivan joined Greenville Country Club in 1962 and has been a member ever since. By 1966, Sullivan was on the club’s board and also serving as the greens chairman. With all of the talk going on about upgrading the Riverside course, Sullivan made a suggestion: He thought it would be a good idea to call up a certain golf course architect and ask for help. “At that time, the greatest golf architect in the world was Robert Trent Jones,” Sullivan says. “He stood alone at the top, and everybody else was below him.” For the uninitiated, Robert Trent Jones is still considered to be one of the masters of modern golf course architecture. During his 70-year career, Jones built or rebuilt some 400 courses in 45 states and 35 countries. This is the man who designed Spyglass Hill, Firestone, and Hazeltine. For a small club in Greenville, South Carolina, calling on Robert Trent Jones was like a high school trumpet player calling on Miles Davis. “We didn’t really think we could get him, but we were determined to at least give it a try,” Sullivan says. So, armed with a budget of $300, Sullivan made the call, only to be told that Mr. Jones was out of the country working on a golf course for the king of Morocco. Sullivan left a message, and a week later Jones called back and agreed to help. Soon one of Jones’s assistants, a young golf course architect named Ron Kirby, visited the club to take a tour of the course and assess its potential. “Kirby didn’t make very many positive comments,” Sullivan says. “I was hoping he would jump up and down and say ‘This is fantastic! We can do something great here.’ But when we got through, all he said was, ‘I’m going to go back and report to Mr. Jones. You’ll hear from us soon.’”

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ON COURSE

CLUB CHAMPIONS: Captain Joe Sirrine congratulates 1937 Carolinas Amateur Golf Tournament winner Lewis Johnson and runner-up Frank Ford.

Jane Cothran was considered the first great Upstate golfer, placing second in the 1940 Women’s National held at Pebble Beach and winning three Biltmore Country Club invitationals.

GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB, FROM CENTURY TO CENTURY, BY TOM FINLEY, WILL BE PUBLISHED LATER THIS YEAR. FINLEY BEGAN RESEARCHING THE HISTORY OF GREENVILLE COUNTY CLUB IN 1989 WHEN THE GCC BOARD ASKED HIM TO BECOME THE CLUB’S FIRST HISTORIAN. FINLEY’S RESEARCH AND ENTHUSIASM FOR SHARING THE HISTORY OF GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB WERE INVALUABLE TO THIS ARTICLE. THE BOOK WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE GCC WHEN PUBLISHED. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT GCCSC.COM.

ones told the group that there was just not enough land to remodel the course, and what land there was not all that great. But then Jones started asking questions: How many members do you have, do you have a waiting list, how much is the initiation fee and monthly dues? After hearing the answers, the golf architect made a bold statement. “Well, here’s what you need to do,” Sullivan remembers Jones saying. “You need to build a second golf course.” Jones went on to tell the group that based on the numbers they had given him, if they could recruit 225 new members, the initiation fees would pay for the construction of the course and the dues would cover the annual maintenance. At the time, the club had a little over 600 members. Jones tasked the board with finding a good piece of land and promised once they’d found it he would return. A week later, a Greenville real estate developer named R.E. “Red” Hughes had found seven large tracts of land that might serve the club’s purposes.

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Photograph courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society, Coxe Collection; ( Jane Cothran) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club

A week went by, then two, and soon Sullivan and the board started to get nervous. Just when they were considering looking for other alternatives, Jones called to say he would be coming down to visit the following week. “I picked him up at the airport and brought him to the club,” Sullivan says. “He was just a really nice, charming man. And he asked a lot of questions about Greenville and what kind of economy we had.” At the club, Jones, Sullivan, and a few other club officials hopped on golf carts and toured the course. Jones turned out to be much more talkative than Kirby and offered design suggestions throughout the tour. The group was feeling fairly confident about the potential of remodeling the Riverside course, but when they arrived back at the clubhouse and settled in for lunch, Jones made a comment that caused their hearts to fall. “Gentlemen, I know that you said you want a great championship golf course,” Sullivan remembers Jones saying. “I can remodel this course and make it better, but I cannot make it a great championship golf course.”

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“ Yo u n e e d t o b u i l d a s e c o n d g o l f c o u r s e .” J o n e s w e n t o n t o t e l l t h e g r o u p t h a t b a s e d o n the numbers they had given him, if they could recr uit 225 new members, the initiation f ees would pay f or the construction of the course, and the dues would cover the annual maintenance. At the time, the club had a little over 600 members. Jones tasked the board w i t h f i n d i n g a g o o d p i e c e o f l a n d a n d p r o m i s e d o n c e t h e y ’d f o u n d i t h e w o u l d r e t u r n . A we e k l a t e r, a G re e nv i l l e re a l e s t a t e d eve l o p e r n a m e d R . E . “ R e d ” H u g h e s h a d f o u n d s eve n l a r g e t r a c t s o f l a n d t h a t m i g h t s e r v e t h e c l u b ’s p u r p o s e s .

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society, Coxe Collection; ( Jane Cothran) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club

World View Special Agent Kirby’s photographs bring to life the myriad faces and experiences of his eastern travels: (clockwise from topleft) Kazakh laborers take a break to sing Russian folk songs; a Kazakh man met at a Soviet park; Oleg, the poet; rows of tea on a plantation in Matsetsa, Russia; a Kazakh woman at an outdoor market. To view more

VISIONARY STANCE: In addition to his leadership roles at Greenville Country Club, Sullivan is an excellent golfer in his own right, as the South Carolina Amateur Champion (1967), the runner up in the U.S. Senior Amateur (1996), and third-place winner in the British Senior Amateur (1997).

of Kirby’s work, go to mkirbyphotos.com, or see it in person at Coffee Underground and Art & Light Gallery, both in Greenville.

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The proposal to obtain part of the Hughes property and contract Jones to design the new course passed the board with f lying colors. By the spr ing of 1968, bulldozers and graders were all over the site. “The grading contractor was a local company that had never done a golf course b e f o r e ,” S u l l i v a n s a y s . “ N o w , t h a t m a y n o t s o u n d l i k e i t ’s a b i g p r o b l e m , b u t t r u s t m e , i t ’s a pretty big problem. Those guys had done r unways and roads, so all they knew was straight ahead and flat. Tr ying to get them to create shaped f airways and slopes and contours was a b i g c h a l l e n g e . We l i t e r a l l y h a d t o g e t o u t o n t h e c o u r s e a n d s t a n d i n t h e w a y o f t re e s a n d o t h e r t h i n g s a n d w a v e t h e m o f f b e c a u s e t h e y ’d c u t s t r a i g h t t h r o u g h a n y t h i n g i n s i g h t .”

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GROUNDS MANAGEMENT: (On top) The new clubhouse, which included tennis courts, a swimming pool, and an 18-hole golf course, opened in 1923. A bulldozer clears the way for Chanticleer on land owned by real estate developer Red Hughes. Fallen trees litter the Chanticleer course in the wake of a tornado in 1978. (Bottom) Billy Delk plays in the 1949 Club Championship.

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Country Club

ones returned and took a tour of each property. “The land was scattered out all over Greenville,” Sullivan says. “One of the big plots was out on what’s now Hudson Road and another was way down Augusta Road.” After showing the group six properties, Red Hughes led them to the seventh. He’d saved the best for last. “Red said he wanted to show us a piece of property that he owned,” Sullivan says. “He had just started a development right off of Faris Road, and he had about ten or twelve homes that had already been built. It was a big piece of land.” The property was heavily wooded, and Sullivan says at the time he couldn’t imagine how a golf course could be built on it. “But Mr. Jones got quite excited,” Sullivan says. “He liked the terrain and liked that it was only about ten minutes from the other club.” Hughes knew a golf course would increase the value of his development project, so he offered to give the club enough of the land to build their golf course if they would promise to build it and operate it. “I thought this was an absolutely fabulous opportunity,” Sullivan says. The proposal to obtain part of the Hughes property and contract Jones to design the new

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Photographs (left) courtesy of the Greenville Country Club; (right) courtesy of Hughes Development

course passed the board with flying colors. By the spring of 1968, bulldozers and graders were all over the site. “The grading contractor was a local company that had never done a golf course before,” Sullivan says. “Now, that may not sound like it’s a big problem, but trust me, it’s a pretty big problem. Those guys had done runways and roads, so all they knew was straight ahead and flat. We literally had to get out on the course and stand in the way of trees and other things and wave them off because they’d cut straight through anything in sight.” he Chanticleer course opened on September 12, 1970, and soon the club had taken in 225 new members whose initiation fees ultimately paid for the construction and whose yearly dues would cover its maintenance. Jones’s math was right on the money. The course was quickly recognized as one of the top clubs in the state, and in 1989 was ranked No. 51 on Golf Digest’s list of America’s One Hundred Greatest Courses. In 2001, the course was remodeled by Robert Trent Jones’s son Rees Jones, who has said that Chanticleer was always one of his father’s favorite courses. Chanticleer is currently listed by Golf Digest as the 13th best course in South Carolina. Now at age 79, Heyward Sullivan doesn’t play as much golf as he used to. But press him a little and he’ll admit that he was the South Carolina Amateur Champion in ’67, and the runner up in the U.S. Senior Amateur in ’96, and placed third in the British Senior Amateur in ’97—each an extraordinary achievement. Now he plays about once every couple of weeks and maybe a little more if a good friend twists his arm. Asked if he wonders if the Chanticleer course would exist if he hadn’t made the suggestion to call Robert Trent Jones fifty years ago, he’s quick to sidestep the credit. “I made the suggestion, but the club made the decision,” he says. “However you look at it, it definitely changed our history dramatically.”

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LIFE I N T HE

FA S

G E T T IN G BEH E V E N - K E E IN D T H E W H E E L W IT LED PROF E S S IO N A L H T H R E E O F T H E IL LU D R IV E R S A T B M W P E S T R IO U S , S U R P R I S IN RFORMAN C E C E N T E G LY R

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01 / BMW professional driver Donnie Isley

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02 / Isley races in the competitive Formula Vee, a restrictive class named after the classic VW Chassis. 03 / Donnie Isley

BMW PERFORMANCE CENTER’S DRIVERS C A L L I T A N “A D U L T D I S N E Y L A N D O N W H E E L S .” T H E 2 . 3 - M I L E M A G I C S P I N D O M , WHOS E COURS ES RANGE FROM A CURVY LO O P F O R T I M E L A P S T O A N O F F - R O A D C HALLEN G E TO A 3 0 0 - FOOT- D IAM ETER PO LI S H ED S KI D PAD, AI N’T NO M ICKEY MOUS E DRIVE IN TH E GREER COUNTRYS IDE. Each year, roughly 15,000 people get behind the wheels of $1 million worth of brand-new inventory, and every day the center’s half-dozen professional instructors let corporate groups, school outings, and other adventure-seekers go full throttle.

“You guys are going to be bonded at the hip at the end of the day,” Doug McGrath, the center’s corporate sales/ marketing man, tells one group. With two people always in each car, he says, pointing to one of the men in the briefing room, “The way Sean’s driving, you think you’re going to die, but then it’s your turn, and payback is hell.” When your office furniture zips from zero to 60 in less than five seconds, you’re among those lucky few firmly in the driver’s seat of your passion. Meet three of them: DONNIE ISLEY Just outside the Performance Center’s light-flooded briefing room, wheels squeal on the summer-seared track. Inside, 14 guys who would otherwise be at their windows-and-doors company are itching to get behind the wheel. Donnie Isley, their instructor today, knows how to start their ignitions. “I trained with both Homeland and Secret Service, so if you need to know the proper way to ram another car, talk to me after you leave here with your car, and I’ll show you how to do that, but not with one of ours.” Outmaneuvering terrorists, protecting “the package” in a motorcade, and racing through a pitch-black course while wearing night-vision goggles are skills he never dreamed he’d learn before joining BMW full time in 2006. Before that, the 59-year-old Arden, North Carolina, native worked in the heating-oil business, though he started racing in 1981. Several years ago, Isley was part of a cross-training program with the Feds and BMW. “They’re training people in things that will actually save their lives in combat, and, of course, we train people to keep them alive, as well, but this is more defensive driving. Theirs is more offensive and defensive driving.” With his charges, Isley stays on the offensive about defensive driving. “You have to be progressive with the throttle, not aggressive,” he tells the jittery bunch. “If you come out of the corner and just mash that throttle, like most of the males want to do, you’ll quickly find the back of the car trying to pass the front of the car.” The secret, he says, comes in listening to the machines. “Until I started working here and was able to do this day after day, that’s when I really started understanding what the car was actually communicating.”

Photograph (Isley racing) by Rob Bodle (opposite) photograph (Laura Hayes driving) by Fred Rollison

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Photograph (Isley racing) by Rob Bodle (opposite) photograph (Laura Hayes driving) by Fred Rollison

04 / Laura Hayes

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05 / Hayes’ car boasts a 1999 Protoform P2, sponsored by Digital Intelligence.

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06 / The FV class has been one of the most competitive SCCA (Sports Car Club of America) classes since its inception more than 50 years ago. 07 / All FV vehicles feature a Volkswagen engine, front axle, transmission, and drum brakes. 08 / A suited-up Hayes looks toward the race ahead.

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hese days, he takes that language to Europe, South America, and coast to coast, winning races and occasional driver-of-the-year awards, while, unlike the others, getting additional adrenaline rushes with skydiving and hang-gliding. In life, it seems, as with cars, he says, “It’s living on the edge, being able to control that car right to its limit.” Within a week of her first trip to a racetrack, Laura Hayes L AU RA H AYE S saw her dad buy the family a “quarter-midget.” The mini-racer looks like a cross between a toaster and a souped-up go-kart, whose single-cylinder engine tops out at 30 mph in the rookie class—ideal for Hayes to start her racing career. She was only 8 years old. “We haven’t looked back since then,” she says from her home in Fletcher, North Carolina. In her rearview now, the 26-year-old veteran sees 100 career wins. At 18, she surprised everyone when she left home just outside of Sacramento, California, to chase her stock-car dreams on the East Coast. The professional racing circuit proved impregnable because enormous bankrolls are required to field toptier teams.

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he money kind of dried up,” she says, “so I had to go find a real job and I happened to have my resumé with me when I came to Greenville. I happened to walk into the lobby one day and asked if they needed any help. They called the next day and asked me to come in.” At the Performance Center, she’s neither the youngest driver nor the only woman. But she’s used to being both. “It was a little bit of an issue when I was younger: ‘The little girl’s beating up on all the boys!’ We got protested a lot. My dad worked for NASA, so they used to call him a rocket scientist, and everybody thought we were running rocket fuel, and we were cheating, but everyone else was super-supportive. “It’s even better now today. I don’t have any other drivers who mind having a girl driver out there.” As for her fellow instructors, she says, “They’re fantastic guys, and we’re all friends now. They always say, ‘You’re just one of the guys, and I say, ‘Thanks, guys, it’s cool, but I am a girl, you guys.’” For fun, she races Formula Vee: “Vee” for “Volkswagen.” The cars’ open-wheel chassis—that’s without fenders, fellas—house VW Beetle engines with 60 horsepower; Hayes drives 600-hp Beemers in her day job. The 120-mph, 45-minute spins are all about strategy, not speed, she says. “There are no pit stops; you’re pretty much driving at 100 percent from the drop of the green to the checkered.” Still, she keeps that daredevil spirit. “I just bought a motorcycle a few weeks ago,” she says of the BMW R9T she bought before her third trip to the Nürburgring. “Probably the stupidest thing I’ll ever buy in my life because of all the silly drivers on the road.” Funny, Hayes can say anything she wants to about “women drivers.” MIKE RENNER’S German last name translates loosely to “runner,” but he stretches that a bit to “racer.” Several years ago, he joked that his middle name was Schnell, or “fast.” It stuck. Now he’s “Speed Racer.” “It was just the speed and the noise and the competition,” the Greenvillian says of his passion for cars since growing up in NASCAR country and watching races on Wide World of Sports. In the mid1970s, he and a friend heard a commercial about a Formula 5000 race at Road Atlanta, the 2.54-mile course two hours south of here. Back then, you could stand above Turn 6 and actually see into the cockpits. One of the drivers that day was the legendary Mario Andretti. That threw Renner into overdrive. Now 59, he still races, 32 years after his earliest and hairiest crash: “It was on the first lap. I went over a blind crest, and this car had spun, and when I went over the hill, I was headed right for his door.” Wham! After a 180-degree spin, he flipped a couple of times and landed on four wheels in the middle of the track. “It was a pretty big impact and a pretty wild ride.” In 1999, when the Performance Center opened, Renner couldn’t believe his good fortune. “For them to open up the track 15 minutes away from where I live, it’s just amazing how the pieces fit together.” At the beginning of July, he returned from the famed Nürburgring, a Grand Prix track that winds 12.9 miles through three medieval German towns and changes elevation 1,000 feet. “If you’re a car guy, it’s the place. It’s a badass racetrack.” Before that, he and a teammate won two classes in the One Lap of America race, a spinoff of Cannonball Run, the 1981 classic about a daredevil cross-country race. In today’s legal, weeklong version, drivers race 3,000 miles across America, stopping at seven tracks along the way for time trials. “It’s not as safe as sitting on the couch,” he admits, “but I’ve always enjoyed sharing with people something I’m so passionate about. The reality is I’ve met so many great people and driven tracks at so many different places, and they pay me to do it.”

“IT WAS ON THE FIRST LAP. I WENT OVER A BLIND CREST, AND THIS CAR HAD SPUN, AND WHEN I WENT OVER THE HILL, I WAS HEADED RIGHT FOR HIS DOOR,” RENNER SAYS. WHAM! AFTER A 180-DEGREE SPIN, HE FLIPPED A COUPLE OF TIMES AND LANDED ON FOUR WHEELS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TRACK.

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School Is in Session Take your seat, literally. Get behind the wheel of the Ultimate Driving Machine® at the BMW Performance Driving School. Located next to the BMW Manufacturing Plant in Spartanburg, the $12.5 million driving school features a two-mile track with decreasing and increasing radius turns, elevation changes and straightaways. It also includes a polished concrete skid pad and five water walls to avoid. Several types of classes are offered, including Teen School, Car Control, Drives, Tours, and even Motorcycle Training. There is also a 64,000-square-foot facility with conference rooms, a café, gift shop, and more for those looking for an adventurous corporate meeting or outing.

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12 / Behind the wheel 32 years after a major accident 13 / M2’s iconic black kidney grill 14 / 7-speed dual-clutch (paddle-shift) transmission 15 / M Performance Exhaust with carbon-fiber tips

09 / Mike Renner

10 / Renner’s customized BMW M2

11 / M2 decal

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“No Place Like Home” — A Ruby Slipper Event Join us for a gourmet dinner, a fabulous silent auction, and a special benefit appearance by

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TABLES FOR TEN, $500 INDIVIDUAL TICKETS, $75 SPONSORSHIP, $1,000-$25,000 HABITATGREENVILLE.ORG

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8TH ANNUAL AUGUST 18-28 Local restaurateurs team up to offer you the chance to experience some of the area’s best cuisine at an appetizing price!

PUTTING OUR BEST

FOOD FORWARD

Be sure to check www.greenvillejournal.com and social media for participating restaurants, menus, and more!

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Join Us

Join The Cliffs for a spectacular evening of tasting and toasting as we sample more than 150 incredible wines, enjoy delectable food pairings and chef stations, a beer garden supported by local North and South Carolina breweries, handcrafted spirits from around the world, enlightening culinary demonstrations throughout the evening, live music and lots of dancing.

OCTOBER 1 | 6:00 PM | THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK

To purchase tickets: go.cliffsliving.com/grandtasting Presented by

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Holy Smokes

Photograph by Brennan Wesley

Euphoria’s Sunday Brunch sends barbecue believers to hog heaven

Fan the Flame:

Southern pitmasters will present premier pork fare at Euphoria’s Barbecue Brunch in September.

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Plate

It’s the Pits:

Texas pitmaster John Lewis welds his own custom smokers to produce a unique flavor that is nationally renowned.

Photograph ( John Lewis) by Jody Horton; photograph (barbecue) by Chrys Rynearson

HOT

Fire Branders The best Southern barbecue heats up Euphoria’s Sunday Brunch: Fired Up! / by M. Linda Lee

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arbecue for breakfast? Absolutely. This year, man, meat, and fire will headline the Euphoria wine and food festival’s Sunday Brunch: Fired Up!, as ten distinguished pitmasters from across the South stoke their coals adjacent to Fluor Field. “As a food, wine, and music festival, we want to shine a spotlight on the best of the country’s culinary scene,” says Brianna Shaw, the festival’s executive director. “Since South Carolina stakes its claim as the birthplace of American barbecue and has more than 220 barbecue restaurants across the state, we felt strongly about having a barbecue event.” Among the meat maestros featured will be Sam Jones of Skylight Inn BBQ in Ayden, North Carolina; Elliott Moss of Buxton Hall in Asheville; Wyatt Dickson of PICNIC in Durham; and John Lewis, of the new Lewis Barbecue in Charleston, whose beef brisket wowed attendees at last year’s launch party. Barbecue holds a certain nostalgia for Elliott Moss, former chef at The Admiral in Asheville. His boyhood roasting experience was standing in front of a fire in Florence, South Carolina, as his father cooked a whole hog instead of a turkey for Thanksgiving. Moss—whose signature vinegar and pepper sauce at Buxton Hall echoes the flavors he recalls from childhood—slowcooks pasture-raised pigs over low embers. After he pulls the meat, he blends in vinegar with his hands. “The vinegar mixes with the fat in the meat, kind of like a pork vinaigrette,” he notes. Wyatt Dickson also does whole hog barbecue, and dubs his sauce the “Great Carolina Compromise” for its blend of vinegar and tomato. To get the

best-flavored, well-marbled meat, Dickson partners with Ryan Butler from nearby Green Button Farm, who raises heritage, free-roaming pigs without the use of hormones, antibiotics, or GMOs. “My relationship with my pig farmer is the most committed one in my life at the moment,” he quips. At PICNIC, Dickson smokes his pigs skin-side down over oak for up to 24 hours at 225°F in custom-built, eco-friendly smokers. As part of Euphoria’s Saturday afternoon lineup, Dickson and John Lewis will lead a barbecue class, demonstrating different methods for smoking meat and offering a few tricks of the trade. “The class will focus on the basics, because I think that’s the most important thing,” says Lewis, who welds his own custom smokers. “I’ve spent a lot of years working on my craft and think the fundamentals—like what meat to cook with, what temperature to use—are the building blocks that get you to the next level.” Euphoria’s Sunday Brunch: Fired Up! will take place on Sunday, September 25, 10 a.m.–2 p.m., in Greenville’s West End. For tickets and details, go to euphoriagreenville.com.

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Get Sauced:

Chef Elliott Moss’s signature vinegar and pepper sauce echoes the flavors he recalls from childhood.

(PIT)MASTER CLASS

Take your “cue” from the experts:

Photographs (Elliott Moss and burning coals) by Paul Mehaffey

/“Don’t feel compelled to follow a recipe,” advises Elliott Moss. “Substitute what you do like” (for example: soy for salt, maple syrup for sugar; coriander for cumin). “And don’t make the mistake of using too much charcoal.” / Wyatt Dickson counsels backyard ’cue masters to give themselves plenty of time. “Don’t be in a hurry,” he cautions. “Lower and slower is better. And remember, cooking barbecue is supposed to be fun. Keep it simple and don’t take it too seriously.” / Texas pitmaster John Lewis is a firm believer in quality product: “Buy the best premium protein you can find,” he says. “Also, it’s all about trial and error, so don’t get discouraged if your first try isn’t perfect. Try different rubs, temperatures, and smokers until you get a product you like.”

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KITCHEN

Aid

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Dinner Out

Ditch your kitchen for grilled steak kebabs / by Kathryn Davé

// photograph by Jivan Davé

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common cooking wisdom at this time of year is to avoid turning on the oven at all costs. Such advice sends Southerners running to their grills, and I am one of them—but not because I fear a hot kitchen. (Just ask my family, who sweated through my homemade pie obsession last summer). I will always choose flavor over comfort, but at the peak of summer, not much beats the smoky, visceral taste of a wood-fired grill. The appeal of the grill extends far beyond the plate, however. Outside, there are no dishes to be done, counters to clean, or TV to watch while your dinner cooks. There are only cicadas and good company, and if you’re doing it right, a cold beer or glass of rosé to sip. I like to grill some lessexpected dishes—heaps of radishes, marinated eggplant, stone fruits for dessert later—but summer also calls for the classics. Burgers. Corn on the cob. Kebabs. Whether they’re the main attraction or part of a larger feast, steak kebabs are sure to be a crowd-pleaser. Swapping the standard peppers and onions for small, flavor-packed shallots and grape tomatoes updates this grilling favorite, and a balsamic-red wine marinade makes them irresistible. So: fleeing a hot kitchen or chasing the best flavor? It’s all the same when a kamado grill is the end destination.

AMP UP YOUR GRILL-GAME 1. Upgrade your grill. Trade your trusty kettle or gas grill for a kamado-style grill, a ceramic, charcoalfired grill that’s part smoker, part grill, and part wood-fired oven. The dome shape and ceramic walls promote air circulation and heat retention, while an ingenious vent system gives you precise temperature control. Food comes off the grill juicy and tender, with a smoky flavor no other grill can match. 2. Consider your fuel. Friends don’t let friends use briquettes. But really. Briquettes are made with chemicals and glue that can ‘off-gas’ unwanted flavors inro your food. If you want a clean burn and deep, true flavor, only natural, hardwood lump charcoal will do. Pro tip: bigger chunks will burn longer, perfect for smoking and slow cooks. 3. Timing is everything. If you wouldn’t dream of putting a ribeye in the oven to slow roast alongside potatoes, don’t put them on the grill simultaneously either. Map out your cookout in advance so your proteins and veg each get their appropriate amount of cooking time. 4. Handle with care. A sturdy pair of leather, heat-resistant gloves is as essential as a meat thermometer for serious grillers. A quality pair will allow you to quickly turn skewers, carry hot trays, or adjust grill grates. (Welding gloves are great for this!)

STEAK, SHALLOT & TOMATO KEBABS Yield: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS ¾ c. dry red wine ½ c. balsamic vinegar 2 tsp. Dijon mustard ½ c. olive oil 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper 2 large shallots, sliced 1.5 lb. sirloin steak, trimmed into 1-in. cubes 1 pint whole grape tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Whisk together first 7 ingredients. Transfer about ¾ c. of the marinade to a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and reduce by half, until slightly syrupy. Turn off heat and reserve. 2. Meanwhile, pour the rest of the marinade over the cubed steak, tomatoes, and shallots in a glass dish or plastic bag, turning to coat. Marinate in refrigerator for at least an hour and up to 8 hours. 3. Bring marinated mixture to room temperature about 30 minutes before grilling. Light a medium–hot fire in the grill. In the meantime, thread steak, tomatoes, and shallot slices onto metal skewers. 4. Place skewers directly on the grill and cook about 3–4 minutes per side for medium rare steak. Baste skewers with the reserved marinade reduction during grilling and remove from heat when done.

))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Designed for Downtown

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Emily Michko and Lenzi Waits, designers for Designed for Downtown, have their hands full this summer. Both have moved from Clemson to downtown Greenville in order to be closer to their work and to the downtown life of Greenville. Greenville Drive games, Fourth of July concerts, and just enjoying the incredible number of restaurants all provide excitement after their days in the design studio. Business is booming, with parent company AJH Renovations, LLC expanding its presence in the downtown area with even better design capabilities. Give us a call today to design your custom home or tailor-made renovation.

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114 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN AMERICAN GROCERY

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the Royal Red shrimp with fettuccine, tomatoes, chile, and fines herbes; next, have an entrée of salt-crusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red wine jus, and finish with pastry chef Ben Snyder’s peach shortcake. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com AUGUSTA GRILL

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what a meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you tuck in at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats to entrées, sandwiches, and of course BBQ, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s focus on flavor and execution extends to its cocktail program, which features seasonal drinks, whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. The Thistle, pictured here, is a riff on a Manhattan, with bourbon, amaro, and Velvet Falernum (a syrup infused with lime zest, ginger root, cloves and other spices, sugar, and almond). It’s finished with a peel of lime, a rustic garnish to a toast-worthy drink. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 2976000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection— along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers. $$, L, D. 631 S. Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com BREAKWATER RESTAURANT

A hotspot serving drool-inducing food (pan-seared scallops with butternut squash risotto) and creative drinks, Breakwater’s candy-apple-red accents (the bar, dining room chairs, and wall decor) meld with mirrors and glass to produce a unique New York City-meets-Lowcountry vibe. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 802 S Main St. (864) 271-0046, breakwatersc.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR AUGUST 2016 / 115

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DINING

FREE PIZZA? Yes!

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Guide

HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Delicious Thin Crust Pizza * Fresh Salads * Homemade Ice Cream * Craft Beer & Soda

Expires 08/302016

TM816

99 Cleveland Street Greenville,SC 29601 864-558-0235

35 S. Main St. Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-610-0527

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food.” Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 3737300, thenosedive.com OJ’S DINER

Wine, Simplified Our boutique shop is the perfect place to explore and purchase fine, low-production wines from across the globe. We also offer craft beers and gourmet cheeses as well as weekly flights and educational tasting events. Or take advantage of our special order process with convenient pickup in Travelers Rest.

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides; the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and the way God intended.

$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing down the Eastern seaboard on a fresh beach breeze, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

BEER AND PUBS DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

A traditional dive-bar with an inventive menu, Dive ‘N’ Boar caters to barbecuelovers. This neighborhood gastropub has 25 different local beers on tap, specializing in house-infused liquors and locally-sourced cocktails. Stop by on the weekend for live music and a meal, or meet up with friends for drinks on their screened-in patio. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com

RESTAURANT 17

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up freshbaked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the market’s wine selection. The menu changes daily, but expect expertly prepared dishes like line-caught rainbow trout and pork crepinettes. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 5463535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef.

12 S. Main St., Downtown Travelers Rest Tues-Thur 12-7 • Fri & Sat. 12-8 • Sun 1-5

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beerbutt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere.

TastingRoomTR.com 864.610.0361

SMOKE ON THE WATER

$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Taproom, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the post-Drivebaseball crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben—are perfect soul-warming remedies. Designed to transport guests to Ireland, the pub features Dublin-crafted bar and booths, famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, and a warm spirit of hospitality. $$-$$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is walking distance of North Main, featuring

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a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh.

615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com

$-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub sits right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast.

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. Tastemaker Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, housemade shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about.

$-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com

$-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com

THE GREEN ROOM

THE VILLAGE GRIND

$$$, B, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222, highstreethospitality.com/ the-green-room/

$, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

The Green Room’s changing menu features standout dishes for any time of day. Enjoy brunch on the weekend with eggs Benedict or stuffed French toast with raspberry cream cheese. For dinner, the sweet chipotle meatloaf is the ticket. Wash it down with selections from the tap and a premium Belgian/German leaning beer list.

MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday.

THE MANLIEST steak in town.

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton St, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar.

Locally Owned, Award Winning

DELIS & SANDWICHES SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl’s Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses,

BRUNCH – LUNCH – DINNER Private Dining for Retirement Parties, Birthdays, Business Dinners, Corporate Events

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Uptown Greenville | 864.286.9018 | CityRange.com AUGUST 2016 / 117

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DINING

Guide

Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com

GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More!

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 104 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefsdeli.com

$-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

ETHNIC

EUROPEAN

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room.

Book your private party with us! Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 608B South Main St. · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100

HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

www.ChicoraAlley.com

2MA15

Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

From the savory sweet curry of the chicken rendang to the fresh, updated take on shrimp lo mein, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp married together with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce, then topped with a fried egg.

TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

Sunday Brunch both locations 11 am - 2:30 pm

$$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 933 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 232-3255

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. $$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more.

$$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork, grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice. $, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com PURPLE INTERNATIONAL BISTRO & SUSHI

A stone’s throw from Fluor Field, this sushi haven serves an Asian mix with Japanese, Korean, Thai, and Asian-fusion entrées. The udon with Prince Edward Island mussels, mahi-mahi with a spicy crawfish glaze, or roasted duck are worthy options. The latter, perfumed with star anise, is roasted to order—and well worth the wait.

DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville favorite. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glace, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), BR (Sat– Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 5090142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 2719895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

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RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching.

made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. With your tots, try a meatloaf sandwich: a thick slice of meatloaf topped with homemade pimiento cheese and served between two slices of grilled ciabatta bread.

$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

$. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

THE TRAPPE DOOR

PIZZA

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 4517490, trappedoor.com

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

FOOD TRUCKS ASADA

The vibrant Latin culture of San Francisco’s Mission District comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote relleno de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in a creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo sauce); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw.

$-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday; food truck schedule varies. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. See your average mac n’ cheese transformed when owner Nick Thomas stuffs this country comfort inside a mild poblano pepper. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies. (404) 372-2266 CHUCK TRUCK

Like the paint splatters on the truck, the Chuck Truck’s burgers explode with intense flavors delivered by local ingredients. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a freshly ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewoodsmoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com

MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families, parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, and now at a new, second location near Cleveland Park, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pizzas made from local ingredients. Try a signature pie like the Tommy, with creamy roasted garlic sauce, mozzarella, pecorino romano, caramelized onions, mushrooms, spinach, and peppadew peppers. Don’t neglect dessert, either. The homemade ice cream (in a bowl, or in a float) is a throwback treat that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben and Jerry.

Delicious Flavor... Always in Style

$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-1406; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 5580235, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

J.B. TINGLE’S

J.B. Tingle’s “Farm to Fender” mantra puts local farms first. This food truck bases their weekly menu on the freshest ingredients available from surrounding Upstate farms. Next time, try the hurricane veggie-buttered panini: grilled Great Harvest white bread, melt-in-your-mouth havarti cheese, Thai basil aioli, and farm-fresh veggies. Or, if you can find JBT around brunch, grab the shindig breakfast taco—the perfect companion to a mimosa. Follow JBT’s Twitter account for weekly schedules. $. Schedule varies. Twitter: @jb_tingles THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have

• Full Service Catering • Full Bar • Private Cooking Classes Available • Intimate Rehearsal Dinners (on premises for up to 55 guests) TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

BOCCA PURE ITALIAN RISTORANTE Authentic Italian Cuisine 2660 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville 864.271.7877 | www.boccapureitalian.com

))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Wine List • Nightly Chef’s Specials • Open for Dinner at 5 pm Monday - Saturday AUGUST 2016 / 119

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Thru Aug 20 AUGUST

Thru Aug 13 SISTERS OF SWING Who would have ever thought that three sisters from Minnesota would become a singing sensation and legendary icon in the music world? You may have heard their famous vocal stylings a la “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” and “Rum and Coca Cola,” but you may not know the true story behind their ascension into the halls of superstardom. With equal parts drama, comedy, and song, Sisters of Swing is a can’t-miss summer production. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

These days, women sit at the helm of some of the globe’s most successful companies, like IBM and Yahoo. But back in the ’70s, females in the workplace were only considered useful if they could pour a good cup of coffee. Such is the challenge presented to three women facing sexism in the office, marriage infidelity, and other growing pains on the homefront. With revenge to men on their hearts, the ladies form an unbreakable friendship as well as a plot—and that’s where the fun really starts. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2 & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

3

BLINK-182

If you were lucky enough to have cool parents who let you buy the unedited versions of “Take off Your Pants and Jacket” and “Enema of the State,” Blink-182 was your entry into the angsty, tongue-in-cheek realm of skater punk music. Though down

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Photograph (Keller Williams) by Aaron Dietrich of The Grateful Web

DOLLY PARTON’S 9 TO 5


CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS one original member (vocalist Tom DeLonge made his exit last year), the band has seen recent success with the addition of Matt Skiba and the release of the “Bored to Death” single in April. As if you needed another reason to dust off that studded belt. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, 7pm. $32-$83. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph (Keller Williams) by Aaron Dietrich of The Grateful Web

WILLIAMS 4 KELLER The Grateful Dead and The String

Cheese Incident are only the tip of the jam-band iceberg. Keller Williams, however, is a bird of a different flock. Williams’s gracefully deceptive use of musical looping has earned him the title of a one-man jam band, often giving the illusion of multiple players while his fingers fly across an assortment of instruments. Toeing the line between an assortment of genres, Williams is sure to quench the freewheeling thirst of any music lover. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 8pm. $25-$50. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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KELLER WILLIAMS Thurs, August 4, 8 p.m. $25-$50. TD Stage at The Peace Center A one-man jam band sensation, Keller Williams graces the TD Stage with his musical looping and instrumental talents this August.

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4–6 ANNUAL

MOUNTAIN DANCE AND FOLK FESTIVAL

5–7 SHE—THE UPSTATE

WOMEN’S SHOW A celebration of all things fierce and fabulous, SHE Greenville invites women of any age to join in the fun at the “ultimate girls’ weekend.” Indulge your inner shopper at the vendor marketplace, pick up tips on planning the perfect dinner event at the Culinary Stage, or get crafty at any one of the local artist workshops. And don’t miss the famed SHE Greenville fashion shows, where countless cuttingedge fashions are sure to inspire your next wardrobe makeover. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, 1–8pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, Noon–6pm. $5+. shegreenville.com

5–14

ROCK AND ROLL IS HERE TO STAY

Acid-wash jeans and beehive hairdos are trends that have (thankfully) gone the way of the buffalo, but throughout thousands of bad wardrobe decisions, rock and roll has continued to live on. Join a group of spectacular Upstate talents as they shake, rattle, and roll through three decades of classic tunes from the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s. It’s a vibrant evening of musical wonders sure to leave you singing long after the curtain closes. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. Juniors, $25; seniors, $33; adults, $35. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

5–20 DADDY’S DYIN’ WHO’S GOT THE WILL?

Familial dysfunction takes on a whole new face with this comedic production written by Del Shores. Their ailing father on his deathbed, four quarrelsome siblings return to the family home to say their final goodbyes—and cause plenty of ruckus. With no shortage of arguments, secrets, and plenty of laughs, you may leave this play feeling a little more relieved about your own family issues. Abbeville Opera House, 100 Court Sq, Abbeville, SC. Fri, 8pm; Sat, 3pm & 8pm. Adult, $20; senior, $18; student, $10. (864) 366-2157, theabbevilleoperahouse.com

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Photograph (Tarocco) courtesy of Fox & Beggar Theater

Find your way back to your roots at this annual event, held in the mountains of North Carolina. For three evenings, a variety of performers from the Blue Ridge to Appalachia will light up the stage, exhibiting their skills in singing, clogging, folk dancing, pickin’, and much more. Already scheduled to perform this year are the Whitewater Bluegrass Company, the Green Valley Cloggers, the Folk Heritage Smooth Dancers, and Spirit Fiddle—and that’s just the first night. Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 S Pack Square, Asheville, NC. Thurs–Sat, 7–10pm. Adults, $22; under 12, $12. (828) 257-4530, dwtheatre.com


Sat, 10am–5pm. Free. andersonlibrary.org

10–11

TAROCCO: A SOLDIER’S TALE

6ELECTRIC CITY COMICON

Some of television and film’s most popular productions including The Walking Dead, Captain America, and Batman have all come from one place: comic books. Catch the next big thing before it hits the airwaves at this family event. Featuring plenty of panels—both the illustrated and the discussion kind—as well as professional cosplaying, video games, and anime screenings, the ComiCon will also host special guests like The Steampunk Chronicles’ author Kady Cross, My Little Pony! writer Jeremy Whitley, and illustrator of The Creeps Chris Schweizer, among others. Anderson County Main Library, 300 N McDuffie St, Anderson.

There are some shows where audiences are purely spectators. Then there are those like Tarocco, where the viewers become inextricably threaded into the fabric of the action. Presented by Asheville’s Fox & Beggar Theater, the play uses a variety of media including live action, puppeteering, dance, and more to tell the story of one WWI soldier who calls upon the power of imagination to escape the tragedy around him. With outstanding visuals and original songs, this is one fantasy you won’t want to wake from. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed–Thurs, 7:30pm. $26. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

ANNUAL 12–14 12TH LAKE LURE OLYMPIAD

Even if you’ll never make the cut for the real Olympics (mostly because you’d look like an impaired snail trotting alongside Usain Bolt), you can still show off your stuff at this sports festival. This three-day olympiad welcomes competitors of all ages to participate in events like the 10K dam run, Lake Lure triathlon, and “race to the rock.” And for the more leisurely sportsperson, golf and pickleball will also be on the roster. Chimney Rock State Park, Lake Lure, NC. Times, prices vary. lakelureolympiad.com

13

SUPERHERO 5K

A brightly colored cape and some Spandex may not help you

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Photograph (Tarocco) courtesy of Fox & Beggar Theater

TAROCCO Wed–Thurs, August 10–11, 7:30pm, $26. The Peace Center Brought to Greenville by Asheville’s Fox & Beggar Theater, Tarocco’s interactive performance takes viewers on a WWI soldier’s fantastical adventure.

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AN EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Sun, August 14, 7 p.m. $45–$65. The Peace Center A fusion of folk, blues, and country genres, Lyle Lovett and His Large Band wow audiences with classic tunes and down-home storytelling.

run any faster, but at least you’ll still look pretty stylish. This road race will kick off at the Kroc Center before winding its way through Downtown Greenville and beyond. Proceeds from the 5K will benefit the Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club of Greenville, which provides local youth with responsible, fun, and educational after school activities. The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Community Center, 424 Westfield St, Greenville. Sat, 8am. Youth, $30; adult, $35. raceroster.com

band has released a collection of Led Zeppelin covers, paying homage to the original gods of rock n’ roll. Heritage Park Amphitheatre, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Tues, 7:30pm. $29.50$74.50. (864) 757-3022, heritageparkamphitheatre.com

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AN EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND

ANGELA COX PHOTOGRAPHY

SHOES | HANDBAGS | ACCESSORIES

Singer and songwriter Lyle Lovett may have achieved worldwide popularity during nearly 40 years in the music industry, however he has maintained loyalty to his Texas roots with a distinct union of country, blues, and folk genres. As charming as he is talented, Lovett’s stage presence is legend. With the addition of his large band comrades, on everything from steel guitar to fiddle, this evening is a guaranteed showcase of favorite tunes and down-home storytelling. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 7pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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864 271 9750 | museshoestudio.com 2222 Augusta Road, Greenville

TRAIN WITH ANDY GRAMMER

Not unlike that perm you got before picture day in 4th grade, there are some things that you just can’t escape. Andy Grammer’s “Honey, I’m Good” tops that list, with the smash single pulsing through every airwave in 2015. The up-and-comer will be joined on stage by seasoned veteran rockers Train, whose musical catalog is highlighted by hits like “Meet Virginia,” “Hey, Soul Sister,” and “Calling All Angels.” Recently, the

18

SLOW FOOD UPSTATE’S EARTH MARKET

This isn’t your average market— Earth Market is certified by the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity, meaning you can expect highquality taste without any of the GMO-mystery of the average grocery store. Happening monthly on the third Thursday through November 17, this community-run farmers’ market focuses on local, seasonal, and chemical-free produce. Support the local food movement and stock up on fresh fruits, veggies, and other local bites. Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery, 2015 Cedar Lane Rd, Greenville. Thurs, 2–6pm. slowfoodupstate.com

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19–20 7TH ANNUAL

DIRTY DANCING FESTIVAL

You’ll have the time of your life at this celebration of the hit 1987 flick—much of which was filmed on the shores of Lake Lure itself. In honor of this place in history, the community hosts the twoday festival, the highlights of which include a screening of the film, watermelon games, and dance lessons. And what Dirty Dancing Festival would be complete without a lake-lift competition? Just don’t ever try to put Baby in the corner. Morse Park Meadows, 2932 Memorial Hwy, Lake Lure, NC. Fri, 7–10pm; Sat, 9am–5pm. Adults, $25; children, $10. dirtydancingfestival.com

19–20

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS— REMEMBERING WOMEN IN JAZZ Photo albums are nice. Diaries can be amusing. But sometimes, the best way to tell a story is through the power of music. Enter Nadia Valentine and her aging Grandmother Sandra, a pair of women destined to inherit a valuable piece of property—but there is one caveat: the building must be turned into a jazz club. Join the greats like Billie Holliday and Ella Fitzgerald as they unravel family history and mysteries galore—as told through the eyes of the music. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 1pm & 7:30pm. $43-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

FOR THE 20 BATTLE CROWN 2016

These were probably the kids that spent hours banging on Mom’s pots and pans with a wooden spoon, but hey, that’s what Tylenol is for, right? Thankfully, those talents have since paid off, and now these university

drumlines from across the Southeast will have the opportunity to strut their stuff on the field. Emceed by local radio personalities, students from NC A&T, SC State, Alabama State, and more are set to square off for the crown—may the best line win. Sirrine Stadium, 100 Cleveland St, Greenville. Sat, 3:30–6:30pm. $15-$20.

23 SEAL To be totally honest, if you

weren’t swaying to this English musician’s “Kiss from a Rose” hit song on prom night in 1995, you had to be doing something wrong. True, he has countless music awards under his belt and nine studio albums to his name—including last year’s 7—but Seal continues to deliver a versatile and mesmerizing sound. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $65-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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SEAL

Photograph courtesy the Peace Center

Tues, August 23, 7:30 p.m. $65–$95. The Peace Center With romantic hits like “Kiss from a Rose” and “Love’s Divine,” English singing sensation Seal will have you flying like an eagle.

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SC 25–Sept 5 UPPER STATE FAIR

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CHOP! CANCER UPSTATE Fri, August 26, 6 p.m. $125. TD Convention Center Benefitting the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance, this culinary event showcases the kitchen prowess of local personalities. Get your ticket to see these local celebrities battle it out—and you can help judge alongside professional chefs.

There are only a few places in the world where it’s socially acceptable to stuff your face with a one-pound funnel cake and eight corn dogs—in less than 30 minutes. Sure, this year’s festival will be loaded with favorites like the Ferris wheel, magic shows, and a petting zoo, but the brave at heart can also take in the World of Wolves and the gravity-defying acrobatics of the Winn Thrills of the Universe. So go ahead, wedge a few more wads of cotton candy in those cheeks—it is the fair after all. Upper SC State Fairgrounds, 3804 Calhoun Memorial Hwy, Easley. Weekdays, 4pm; weekends & Labor Day, noon. (864) 269-0852, upperscstatefair.com

CANCER UPSTATE 26 CHOP! Help determine the next victor of

the Upstate all while fighting cancer at the second annual CHOP! Cancer event. Testing the kitchen skills of 18 local celebrities, the event features an online voting poll that puts you in charge of the contestant’s fate alongside a panel of professional judges. All proceeds benefit the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance. 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, 6pm. $125. (864) 255-5010, chopcancerupstate.com

REVIVALISTS 26 THE Hailing all the way from the Bayou

State, the Revivalists have as many faces to their music as they do members in the band. Effortlessly gliding between tinges of classic rock to rhythm and blues to gentle

Photograph courtesy of CHOP! Cancer Upstate

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acoustics, the seven-piece outfit packs plenty of heat. Whether accompanied by a blaring trumpet, the soft tickle of piano keys, or a smooth note of sax, the Revivalists are carving out a niche in the music world that is decisively their own. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 8pm. $30. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

26–27 WILLIAMSTON SPRING WATER FESTIVAL

Williamston’s own downtown festival is the perfect send-off to summer, featuring plenty of activities that the whole family can enjoy. The annual event will be headlined by local music acts, but that’s not all the Spring Water Festival has to offer. Crafts, displays, auto shows, food vendors, and other live entertainment will be on hand for visitors, making this one hometown festival you’ll visit time and time again. Mineral Spring Park, 121 W Main St, Williamston, SC. Fri–Sat, free. springwaterfestival.com

movements, the concert follows the dreams of one little boy who finds himself fast asleep in the American Museum of Natural History, awakening countless fantasies. This portion of the World Masterwork Series will showcase the talents of Christopher Tavernier and Nolan Anthony, two budding pianists on the verge of musical superstardom. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sat, 7–9pm. $8-$10. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

OF 27 CARNIVAL THE ANIMALS

Although it originally debuted in 1886, Camilla Saint-Saëns’ Carnival of the Animals has transcended the boundaries of time as one of the Romantic composer’s most popular pieces. Comprised of 14 separate

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Follow the Cool Breezes ...and the next thing you know, you’ll be in Linville. With average summer temperatures in the mid 70s, we’ve been a sanctuary for lowlanders for over a century.

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Too many chefs in the kitchen can be a good thing. Join us for a Guest Chef Dinner Saturday, Sept. 24th | 7pm

Farm to Fork: All-Female Chef Dinner | $150

Vivian Howard, Teryi Youngblood and Heidi Trull at Serenity Farm

North Meets South: A Dinner of the Carolina’s | $150 Joe Kindred at American Grocery

Pop: A Champagne Dinner | $150 Justin Devillier at Hall’s Chophouse

Southern Roots: Stella’s Southern Bistro | $150 Suzanne Cupps at The Loft at Soby's

Fire & Cider Pop-up! | $150

Craig Diehl, Adam Dorris, Mattie Beason of Black Twig Cider House with Bacon Bros. Public House at a Surprise Location

Coast to Coast: Michelin Star Dinner | $350

Featuring 3 Michelin chefs, including Curtis Duffy at Lazy Goat

Tickets for all events on sale now at euphoriagreenville.com

Remember To Mark Your Calendars | SEPTEMBER �����‚ ���� SUPPORTED BY

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312 Chamblee Blvd., Greenville

4 Cromwell Ave., Greenville

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1320439 · $759,900

5BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323934 · $749,000 Wilson Associates Blair Miller (864) 430-7708 wilsonassociates.net

YOUR LISTING HERE

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Melissa Morrell (864) 918-1734 GreenvilleAgent247.com

146 Faris Circle, Greenville

2 London Ct., Greer

279 Ridge Way, Simpsonville

Coldwell Banker CAINE Margaret Smith (864) 270-1108 www.cbcaine.com/agents/margaretsmith

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Mike Wallace (864) 275-4451 BigMikeWallace.com

Marchant Company Valerie Miller (864) 430-6602 ValerieJSMiller.com

103 Sorrento Dr., Greenville

10 Hollingsworth Dr., Greenville

Wilson Associates Nick Carlson (864) 386-7704 wilsonassociates.net

Coldwell Banker CAINE Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 cbcaine.com/Agents/JaneMcCutcheon

4BR, 3BA · MLS#1324063 · $650,000

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1324664 · $580,000

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1314911 · $612,300

3BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323854 · $524,500

4BR, 3BA · MLS#1322465 · $599,000

19 Avens Hill Dr., Greer

6BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1316632 · $522,000 Coldwell Banker CAINE Virginia Abrams (864) 270-3329 www.cbcaine.com/agents/virginiaabrams

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine.

111 E. McBee Ave., # 303, Greenville 2BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1325665 · $499,000 Wilson Associates Blair Miller (864) 430-7708 wilsonassociates.net

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6 Linfield Ct., Simpsonville

4BR, 3BA, 1 Hf BA · MLS#1321704 · $479,000 Coldwell Banker CAINE Virginia Abrams (864) 270-3329 www.cbcaine.com/agents/virginiaabrams

To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston @communityjournals.com

7/18/16 7/15/16 10:04 4:56 PM AM


SECOND

Glance

Bird’s Eye View

A

glance out of an airplane window reveals a perspective foreign to the average eye. This unique angle compelled J. Henry Fair to pursue the aerial view, photographing the earth from above—far above. His large-scale photographs balance on the edge, not only between land and sea but also between spheres real and surreal. From dazzling sunlight streaming through wetlands alongside cerulean currents to the shadowy, ash-filled veins seeping across land wreaked by coal combustion, Fair is well-versed in the language belonging to our environment. A passion that keeps the preservation of our coastal land at the forefront of the mind, the photographer provides images that remain relevant in the wake of environmental damage while reminding us of the breathtaking artistry that the South Carolina coast manifests.—Olivia McCall

J. Henry Fair’s show Eyes On the Edge: J. Henry Fair Photographs the Carolina Coast is on display from August 19 until October 23 at the Columbia Museum of Art. For more information, please visit columbiamuseum.org.

J. Henry Fair, Beachgoers at Myrtle Beach, 2016. Color photograph; 50”x70”; courtesy of the artist

J. Henry Fair offers an abstract look of the world from above

132 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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™ and A Diamond is Forever™ are Trade Marks used under license from The De Beers Group of Companies. ™, © Forevermark Limited 2014–2015. Forevermark™,

IT ’ S A LO N G J O U R N E Y TO B ECO M E TH E O N E . In our constant pursuit of absolute beauty, every Forevermark ® diamond undergoes a journey of rigorous selection. This is why less than one percent of the world’s diamonds are worthy of the Forevermark ® inscription – our promise of beauty, rarity and responsible sourcing.

JEWELER

LOGO PLACEHOLDER

532 Haywood Road | Greenville, SC | 864.297.5600 | www.halesjewelers.com

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TOWN August 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN August 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com