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Meet

Sean

Brock FROM MCCRADY’S TO HUSK, THE JAMES BEARD AWARD WINNER CHAMPIONS A NEW TAKE ON SOUTHERN FOOD

Give Me Sugar

Food Capital

Rollin’ Out

FOUR GREENVILLE PASTRY CHEFS PRESENT THEIR FAVORITE HOLIDAY DESSERTS

RALEIGH, NC, GETS ITS SECOND WIND AS A PRIME CULINARY DESTINATION

UPSTATE CAFÉS & BAKERIES HAVE A LOVE AFFAIR WITH ALL THINGS FRENCH D E C E M B E R 2 017 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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E TAT ES TE! T S A INE PST E F HE U H T T IN

ME HO S C I E R TO ACR HIS N 3 O

CHANTICLEER

GCC AREA

100 Chapman Place $7,500,605

2513 Augusta St NEW PRICE $2,150,605

5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

Local Expertise, Global Reach

Featuring Fine Upstate Homes . . . Like Yours. ! ME ! ES L HO R C A 9 A SON 4.2 PER S ER’ ILD U B

OT E L OL R AC PO 3/4 ITH W

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GREEN VALLEY AREA

12 Lawson Way $1,135,605

1000 McElhaney Rd $999,690

5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms

4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms

EW ! D N NOW N A BR EADY R &

ALTA VISTA

ALTA VISTA

4 Cromwell Ave $649,605

403 Watts Ave $599,601

5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

LD SO

LD SO

PARKINS MILL

1225 Parkins Mill Rd $604,607 5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

LD SO

CLEVELAND FOREST

219 Boxwood Ln $567,601

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

BELTON

1215 Brown Rd $549,627 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

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D SOL

14 Parkins Glen Court Listed for $819,607

D SOL

D SOL

171 Chapman Road Listed for $899,605

D SOL & ED LIST

155 Faris Circle Listed for $914,605

D SOL

114 Woodland Way Listed for $924,601

217 Chapman Road Listed for $924,605

D SOL

D SOL

Selling Your Luxury Home? 107 Collins Creek Road Listed for $999,607

D SOL

53 Forest Lane Listed for $1,399,605

D SOL & ED LIST

Don’t choose Joan just because she’s beautiful... Choose her because she lists, and sells, more Luxury Homes. Choose her because she’s Greenville’s Number One Realtor*... Year after Year after Year...

509 Hidden Hills Drive Listed for $1,749,605

Local Expertise, Global Reach.

45 Rock Creek Drive Listed for $1,249,605

ED & LIST

D SOL

100 Chamberlain Court Listed for $1,299,605

S DAY 0 3 D IN SOL

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9 D IN SOL

S DAY

820 S Main Street Listed for $1,629,601

864-325-2112 www.jha-sothebysrealty.com Each office independently owned and operated.

D SOL

S DAY 4 2 IN

112 Putney Bridge Lane Listed for $1,750,681

D SOL

2045 Cleveland St Ext Listed for $773,607 *Source: Greenville MLS Sales Data: 2017, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012.

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FIRST

Glance

Nut Case: What: A fresh batch of pralines, made with pecans, butter, and sugar, is a Southern staple. Who: Table 301’s Stacie Amesbury serves up a deluge of delectables, including these babies, at Soby’s on the Side. She’s one of four Greenville pastry chefs taking sweets to new heights. For more, see “Sugar Mavens,” page 98. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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His touch we share. His healing we minister. bonsecours.com

DECEMBER 2017 / 5

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We bring the world to your doorstep. 23 ACRE EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

EQUESTRIAN / GOLF

365 Gano Drive, Woodruff $3,950,000 | MLS#1352921 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

275 Montgomery Drive, Spartanburg $3,250,000 | MLS#1350714 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

120 E Round Hill Road, Green Valley $2,495,000 | MLS#1335830 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

18243 Joe Brown Highway, Murphy, NC $2,495,000 | MLS#3326609 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

8 Moss Falls Lane, Cliffs at Glassy $1,945,000 | MLS#1346522 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

14 Timbers Edge Way, Cliffs Valley $1,495,500 | MLS#1353929 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

315 Wilderness Road, Tryon, NC $750,000 | MLS#1353054 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

30 Tilley Road, Cleveland $749,000 | MLS#1355490 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $699,000 | MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

4

UNDERSOLD CONTRACT

6 Chipping Court, Kellett Park $649,900 | MLS#1354930 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

111 Foggy Cut Lane, Cliffs at Glassy $645,500 | MLS#1346049 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

203 Southview Ledge Road, Cliffs at Glassy $575,000 | MLS#1353158 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

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SOLD

240 Grandmont Court, Charleston Walk $475,000 | MLS#1341159 Holly May 864-640-1959

30 Vaughn’s Mill Court, Hamptons Grant $429,900 | MLS#1343442 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

329 Harkins Bluff Drive, Dillard Creek Crossing $399,000 | MLS#1354586 Annell Bailey 864-346-0598 UNDER CONTRACT

416 Santa Cruz Way, Courtyards on West Georgia $393,928 | MLS#1352199 Holly May 864-640-1959

427 S. Pendernale Drive, Millbrook $299,900 | MLS#1353918 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

215 Love Drive, Travelers Rest $294,900 | MLS#1354255 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

423 S. Pendernale Drive, Millbrook $259,900 | MLS#1353721 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

2 Elletson Drive, Overbrook $226,900 | MLS#1354838 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

212 Brockman Avenue, San Souci Heights $219,900 | MLS#1353311 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580

UNDER CONTRACT

127 White Oak Drive, Brushy Creek Estates $219,900 | MLS#1354311 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

SOLD

123 Waterton Way, Waterton $214,900 | MLS#1354092 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

209 Gibby Lane, Bryson Meadows $169,900 | MLS#1354086 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

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The intersection at Stone Avenue, North Church Street and Wade Hampton is undergoing a transformation into Downtown Greenville’s next highly coveted walking neighborhood community. NorthPointe will feature both residential and retail opportunities – shops, cafes, and an anchor grocer – to serve the entire North Main District.

MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT 1 GROCERY STORE 284 APARTMENT UNITS 22,000 COMMERCIAL SQ. FT. 100 STEPS OFF STONE AVE. STRUCTURED ON SITE PARKING PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY AMENITIES To learn more about NorthPointe, visit

northpointesc.com

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| Just a Step Off Stone Creating a new vibrant pedestrian neighborhood off Stone Avenue

864.235.6317 | crhrealestate.com

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Contents 12 EDITOR’S LETTER 19 THE LIST See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

25 ON THE TOWN

0 9

Woodcarver Bill Apelian whittles classic Christmas characters; jive along to local talent Kylie Odetta’s jazzy tunes; Project Host Soup Kitchen feeds guests and trains chefs; Durham’s Unscripted Hotel recalls retro vibes; hit up the Commerce Club for Steve Doliget’s French-inspired fare.

With the grand opening of Husk Greenville, Chef Sean Brock is at the helm of a Southern food dynasty. But his true passion lies in preserving our food history. / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaffey

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

40 WEDDINGS 45 TOWNBUZZ

SOUL OF A CHEF

8 9

SUGAR MAVENS

Greenville’s greatest food havens have a sweet little secret. Behind the kitchen screen, there’s a pastry queen churning out scrumptious treats. / by Mary Cathryn Armstrong // photography by Paul Mehaffey

62 SIDEWAYS

From new takes on Southern comfort to pan-Asian fare, food culture is flourishing in Raleigh, North Carolina.

69 TOWN SPORT

Fencing may be an age-old sport, but Greenville’s Knights of Siena are a modern day club with a jousting spirit.

CENTRAL 75 STYLE Put a little sparkle in your Christmas

cheer with bright baubles; plate your holiday party with elegant wares.

MAN ABOUT TOWN 80 When it comes to bartenders, the Man prefers the traditional type—classic, polite, and sans the man bun.

BEA WRIGHT 82 MS. Whether they be soul sisters or

casual colleagues, Ms. Bea reminds us that good friends are worth celebrating.

111 EAT & DRINK

Pick the perfect croissant for your pastry craving; give yourself the gift of citrus-seared scallops; this season’s Champagne dreams come in pink.

121 DINING GUIDE 130 TOWNSCENE Got plans? You do now. 140

COVER: Sean Brock is a James Beard Award–winning chef and the creative genius behind Husk, McCrady’s, and Minero restaurants. But this homegrown Virginian is more than meets the eye. For more, see “Soul of a Chef,” page 90. By M. Linda Lee Photograph by Paul Mehaffey THIS PAGE: Crafted by Terrane Glass Designs’ Colin O’Reilly, this whiskey decanter was a winner of 2017 Garden and Gun’s Made in the South Awards. For more see “Blow by Blow,” page 56. By Steven Tingle Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

SECOND GLANCE

The RIVERWORKS Gallery explores the heart of the feminist in its latest exhibit, the f word.

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ING YOU A H S I W

Happy

HOLIDAY SEASON

www.CarltonMB.com (864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter December Highlights All That Jazz

Greenville’s own Kylie Odetta serenades the masses with her heartfelt beats and sultry tunes: page 48

Blow by Blow Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; hair and make-up by Desireé Rober ts ; sweater cour tesy of designer, A llyson A nsusinha

Terrane Glass Design’s award-winning vessels may be exquisite, but this graceful glassware comes from humble roots: page 56

North of the Border

With its top quality restaurant diversity, Raleigh, North Carolina, might just be the South’s next food mecca: page 62

Blade Runners

Forget football and grab a sword; this Upstate club brings fencing back in vogue: page 69

Merry & Bright

Sparkle up your holiday fêtes with festive gear and a few elegant adornments: page 75

Sugar Mavens

Some girls may be made of sugar and spice, but the female forces behind Greenville’s best pastry programs wield a well of ingredients to craft their refined fares: page 98

Yes, Chef

S

ean Brock’s wisdom is like his cooking: deep, with a Southern inflection. “Everything goes back to the dirt,” he says. Contributing editor M. Linda Lee recently sat with the James Beard Award winner at Husk Greenville, Brock’s Upcountry location of his popular restaurant that celebrates Southern food. Sean’s authenticity and warmth belie his celebrity—he’s appeared as a featured chef on PBS’s Mind of a Chef series, and is chef/partner of the Neighborhood Dining Group, which owns eight restaurants across the Southeast. He lives mostly in Nashville, where he has a penchant for collecting guitar pedals, nineteenth-century cookbooks, and French bulldogs. For Brock, food is more than a meal, more than just pieces and parts. To eat is not only an experience—it is transcendence, particularly when it comes to the flavors of home. Ingredients are historical markers, in the form of seeds. The food of our land is a key to time, not only defying it but defining it, as well. “Seeds are the keepers of stories,” he says. “They carry the wisdom of hundreds of years. Seeds tell a story about a very particular place and period of time and a family. If those seeds don’t survive, that story is lost. Seeds allow us to stay connected.” Sean Brock is a storyteller. “I have found that the true breakthrough discoveries are in the spoken word, through sitting down with someone and asking them what they ate as a kid and what their grandma cooked. Food is the great connector,” Brock says. As we sit with our friends and families this season, the chef’s philosophy comes into sharp clarity: the food we eat is the experience we live.

Blair Knobel, Editor-in-Chief blair@towncarolina.com (left) Blair Knobel at Husk Greenville with Sean Brock and Linda Lee, who wrote the cover story “Soul of a Chef,” page 90; Brock has many extracurricular passions, including collecting guitar pedals and playing electric guitar. Art director Paul Mehaffey photographed the chef on November 3, 2017, at his home in Nashville, Tennessee.

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

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Our Holiday Gift to you!

9 NEW EXHIBITIONS! NOW OPEN: Sidney Dickinson: A Connecticut Yankee in King Cotton’s Court Impressionism and the South Expressionism and the South Every Picture Tells a Story Jamie Wyeth Jasper Johns: What’s the Meaning of This? Andrew Wyeth: Recent Gifts, Loans, and Selections from The Greenville Collection presented by United Community Bank David Drake: The Greenville Collection Bryan Collier: Dave the Potter

CONTINUING ON VIEW: Grainger McKoy through December 31 Craig Crawford through January 21, 2018 Stephen Scott Young: Veterans Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

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WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE HOLIDAY MEMORY?

“The intoxicating smell of my mother’s Moravian spice cookies baking in the oven has always been the most evocative of Christmas for me. To this day, it brings back fond memories of the warmth of family.”

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR ABBY MOORE KEITH ASSISTANT EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. LINDA LEE Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka

“One Chrstmas it snowed, maybe half an inch, but to Southerners that’s blizzard territory. My dad and I scrounged up a snowman, and when our fingers got too red to handle, we went inside to coffee my sister had heated on the fire. It was glorious.”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, Terry Barr, STEPHANIE BURNETTE, Kathryn Davé, John Jeter, Jennifer Oladipo & STEPHANIE TROTTER

“Roasting and peeling chestnuts by hand with my dad on Christmas Eve to make dressing. I’d peel just one reeaaally slowly so he’d do the rest.”

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Connolly, WIll Crooks, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, Joel German, Alexander Harrison, Levi Monday & Eli Warren Andrew Huang EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Holly Hardin VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

“Trotter Tribe traditions include Dallas’ Tubafest early on December 24, followed by Tex-Mex at Chuy’s, and lastminute power shopping.”

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KRISTY ADAIR Michael Allen David Rich VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

“Experiencing Waffle House on Christmas ACCOUNT MANAGERS morning. John Clark, Maria Hall, Donna Johnston, Stephanie King, Rosie Peck, Caroline Spivey Surprisingly, crazy busy!” & Emily Yepes

Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Your wedding

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS

modern & timeless

Susan Schwartzkopf EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

120 south main street, greenville, sc 29601 864.421.9700 | westinpoinsettgreenville.com

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 7, No. 12) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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4 CROMWELL AVENUE • AUGUSTA ROAD/ALTA VISTA • $679,605

116 WILDROSE • GREENVILLE • $174,617

BRAND NEW home by Highland Homes, excellent local builder. Ideal location! Secluded cul-de-sac location in Alta Vista.

Open Concept, with a full separate formal dining room. Granite counters in kitchen & baths. NEW Stainless Steel Appliances.

15 SYLVAN DRIVE • GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB • $549,605

609 DOVE TERRACE • SWANSGATE • $229,605

Over 3,000 SF. The front entry greets you with a spacious living room, large picture frame window overlooking the tree-lined front yard.

2 Bedroom/2 Bath home in private, gated, 55+ community, walking distance to GHS and to Augusta Road shopping & dining.

The

Team

Covering Greater Greenville! • FREE professional staging • FREE professional photography and video • Your home advertised in every issue of Greenville Journal and Town Magazine

Matt Crider 864.444.1689

Leah Grabo 864.901.4949

www.jha-sothebysrealty.com Each office independently owned and operated.

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A growing neighborhood town center that welcomes everyone. Whether you visit, work or live here, Legacy Square is blossoming into a shining centerpiece filled with a thoughtful collection of local shops and services for all. Located at the heart of Verdae’s high-growth area, this multi-phase town center surrounds the northeast end of Legacy Park and will ultimately include 13 acres of quality commercial development that provides accessibility and convenience to area residents and more.

Join the Expanding List of Businesses Stella’s Southern Brasserie Carolinas Center for Oral & Facial Surgery Wagner Wealth Management NHE Property Management KDS Commercial Properties Dwayne Wood Architects Kathy Lenser Interiors Carolina Closets - Opening Soon!

Legacy Square Phase 2 design by DP3 Architects

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Holliday Dental YMCA at Verdae Majik Touch Lockers Park View at Verdae SCBIO Headquarters Verdae Development Caldwell Constructors

Rocky Slope Road at Legacy Park New storefronts are taking shape & Phase 2 development is underway. For sales and leasing info, call (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

December 2017

z

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List

Photograph by Eric Ryan Anderson

NEEDTOBREATHE Just a few fellas from nearby Seneca, South Carolina, the quartet has proven themselves as top dogs in the contemporary Christian rock genre. Last year’s release—Hard Love—was the band’s sixth studio album, a 12-track fusion of country, pop, and rock that received positive critical acclaim. In September, NEEDTOBREATHE embarked on the All the Feels tour, a national stint broken up into three versions of their iconic sound. Greenville will get a taste of the acoustic set—a first-time undertaking for these native rockers. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, Dec 12, 8pm. $40-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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List z

zWhat-Not-To-Miss /

INDIE CRAFT PARADE HOLIDAY POP UP SHOP

THE NUTCRACKER: ONCE UPON A TIME IN GREENVILLE

From the folks who bring you the wildly popular Indie Craft Parade comes the Holiday Pop Up Shop, a collection of original gifts crafted by local artisans. The temporary marketplace will include handmade jewelry, artwork, home décor, wearables, edibles, and even a few must-haves for the kiddos. It’s a great opportunity to kill two birds with one stone: you provide invaluable support to your local artists and wrap up that holiday gift list.

Carolina Ballet Theatre artistic director Hernan Justo adds a little hometown flair to this traditional holiday yarn, blending landmark Greenville spots with the majesty of the nineteenth-century original. When Clara receives a wooden nutcracker from her beloved uncle, she becomes so taken with the handsome creation that she soon finds herself caught in a whirlwind fairy tale of enchantment. Joining the CBT performance will be surprise star athletes and guest dancers from the Meyer Center for Special Children.

Photograph courtesy of the Makers Collective

UNITED COMMUNITY BANK ICE ON MAIN On the search for that good ol’ fashioned family Christmas? Look no further than this makeshift ice rink right in the heart of downtown Greenville. In addition to a wide range of holiday events hosted on the ice each season, the open-air rink also has plenty of warm-you-up staples like hot cocoa for sale. Bring your own blades or rent a pair, just try to keep the Tonya Harding moves to a minimum. Downtown Greenville, 206 S Main St. Thru January 31. $10. iceonmain.com

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Dec 22–23. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 2:30pm & 7pm. $20-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

CREATIVE

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com 20 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Photograph courtesy of the Greenville Little Theatre

Methodical Coffee Roasting Facility, 3 McBeth St, Greenville. Thru Dec 17. Thurs–Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. Free. makerscollective.org/holiday

Photograph courtesy of Redhype

THE


SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CHRISTMAS GOOSE

CHRISTMAS CABARET

Take your mind off all those Christmas quirks— Fruitcake! Greeting cards! Matching family onesies!—and dig into the tale of a crime most “fowl.” When a countess’s rare blue carbuncle is determined to be missing—stuffed down the throat of a goose, no less—Holmes and Watson are on the case. As the men of Baker Street get to the bottom of one mystery, another unfolds, and they discover that even crime doesn’t take a break over the holidays. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Dec 7–17. Thurs–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

The best and brightest from the Upstate’s singing community will be under the limelight for this outstanding yuletide revue. While the cabaret unwraps traditional standards from the likes of Bing Crosby and Brenda Lee, rock band classics from the Eagles are also on the bill to keep you entertained all evening long. The ribbon to top off the package? Extravagant desserts and vino catered by Greenville restaurants. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues, Dec 19, 7pm. $42-$52. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

JINGLE BELL RUN Color us impressed if you can make it through an entire 5K with jingle bells tied to your shoelaces. With a goal this year to raise $20,000, the Arthritis Foundation invites you to gear up in your most merry garb and battle the joint disorder in full force. Prizes will be awarded for top money raisers, so better start hitting up your relatives before they go gift shopping at the mall. Clemson University ICAR Millennium Campus, 5 Research Dr, Greenville. Sat, Dec 9, 8am. Registration varies. jbr.org

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville Little Theatre

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WE DO THE WORK. YOU TAKE THE CREDIT.

Be the hero this holiday season - at home and at your office. From scratch-made main courses and sides to decadent desserts, gourmet gift baskets, and wine. We invite you to holiday with us!

Planning your holiday event? For your social or business gatherings, C&B Catering has you covered. 864-235-0407

|

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List z

THE

Quick HITS WINTER DANCE

z Nationally recognized as one of the premier institutions for artistic studies, the Governor’s School dance students will strut their stuff in a two-night showcase event. Both performances will include contemporary, classical ballet, and modern pieces. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Dec 16–17. Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 2pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

ROPER MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY LIGHTS

z Somewhere between Candy Cane Lane and the marching toy soldiers, Clark Griswold is still out there checking every bulb. Pile up in the family truckster and join Roper Mountain and the Rotary Club at one of the Upstate’s most magical seasonal traditions. Make your way through thousands of brilliant, colorful displays before popping into the Winter Wonderland, where jolly old St. Nicholas and his elves will be waiting with a piping hot chocolate in hand. Roper Mountain Science Center, 402 Roper Mountain Rd. Thru Dec 30. Nightly, 6–9pm. $15. ropermountainholidaylights.com

THE CAKE

Photograph courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

z There’s a lot of little details that go into planning a wedding; honestly, who knew linen napkins were so darn important? The cake, however, is arguably one of the most important staples of wedding festivities. At least, according to Jen. The young bride is set to return home and marry the woman of her dreams—a bit of a shock for her small North Carolina town. Crafted by Bekah Brunstetter, of This Is Us fame, the new play explores the dynamics of friendship and the realities we face in playing politics with the heart. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Dec 1–17. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

GREENVILLE POINSETTIA CHRISTMAS PARADE

z It’s a family tradition! For decades, downtown Greenville’s procession of festooned floats has been the way to jumpstart your Christmas spirit. The 2017 parade promises to be no exception, piling on the jingle and the jangle with plenty of festive carolers, displays, and holiday cheermeisters in tow. And who knows? Your heart may just grow three sizes that day. Downtown Greenville. Sat, Dec 2, 6–7:30pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/1330/Poinsettia-Christmas-Parade

CHRISTMAS WITH THE CHORALE z Buddy the Elf may have said it best—the best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear. Fortunately, this annual holiday collaboration featuring the Greenville Chorale encourages audience participation. With a blend of joyful ditties sprinkled with a few sing-a-long tunes, you’ll be spreading enough cheer to last until next December 25. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Fri, Dec 8, 7:30pm. Adults, $30; students, $15; under 12, $5. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Trans-Siberian Orchestra Hey, turn down the Bing Crosby, Grandma! This progressive rock Trans-Siberian Orchestra is about to turn the same ol’, same ol’ holiday standards upside down. Bursting forth with unbridled energy and musical power, The Ghosts of Christmas Eve is a journey through the band’s greatest hits. It’s just like chestnuts on an open fire—if those chestnuts were brilliant light displays and that open fire was blazing pyrotechnics. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, Dec 8, 4pm & 8pm. $43-$74. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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THE PERFECT GIFT Give your loved ones the present of live entertainment by purchasing a Peace Center gift card. Head online or visit our Box Office to order one today!

“ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER HAS BROADWAY ROCKING!” – REUTERS

TH E T H M R H Y N NA IS GOYOU! GET

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BLUE MAN GROUP RAY CHARLES LES MISÉRABLES RENÉE FLEMING EARTH, WIND & FIRE AZIZ ANSARI JAMES TAYLOR COUNTING CROWS

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GEORGE CARLIN PENN & TELLER GOO GOO DOLLS JOE BONAMASSA MOMIX SOUND OF MUSIC BOB DYLAN MOODY BLUES TEMPTATIONS GREGG ALLMAN ARETHA FRANKLIN PIPPIN CHRIS BOTTI AVENUE Q STOMP AARON NEVILLE CATS RINGO STARR KING AND I CARROT TOP LANG LANG AVETT BROTHERS FINDING NEVERLAND DARIUS RUCKER DISNEY’S NEWSIES BUDDY GUY BOBBY MCFERRIN FRANKIE VALLI KEB’ MO’ WAR HORSE MAYA ANGELOU ALVIN AILEY PATTI LABELLE ART GARFUNKEL CYNDI LAUPER AN AMERICAN IN PARIS BILL MAHER MAMMA MIA! JOSHUA BELL CABARET FOUR TOPS SMOKEY ROBINSON CELTIC WOMAN THE BEACH BOYS CROSBY, STILLS & NASH SPAMALOT BOB NEWHART CINDERELLA ANNIE WILLIE NELSON SOUTH PACIFIC ANYTHING GOES HARRY CONNICK, JR. DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM MARY POPPINS GREASE JOFFREY BALLET BEAUTY AND THE BEAST THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY PETER FRAMPTON THE 5 BROWNS BOYZ II MEN BELA FLECK RIVERDANCE SARAH JAROSZ KINKY BOOTS CRYSTAL GAYLE MOTOWN THE MUSICAL MARY CHAPI N CARPENTER

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GROUPS

MOMIX SOUND OF MUSIC BOB DYLAN MOODY BLUES TEMPTATIONSMELISSA ETHERIDGE NICKEL CREEK DAVID SEDARIS MERLE HAGGARD STOMP AARON NEVILLE CATS RINGO STARR KING AND I CARROT TOP DENNIS MILLER ROBERT CRAY BILLY ELLIOT ROBIN WILLIAMS ONCE TOWN_DEC2017_THE LIST.indd 23 11/16/17 9:36 AM DISNEY’S NEWSIES BUDDY GUY BOBBY MCFERRIN FRANKIE VALLI GEORGE WINSTON HERBIE HANCOCK PHYLLIS DILLER LEANN RIMES


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Town

ON THE

Antiques, Fine Art & Design Weekend VIP Party October 12, 2017 Flavia Harton, Bob Howard & Anne Masters

Earle & Margaret Hungerford

Tom & Mary Jacqueline McGrath Miller Gaffney & Dorothy Shain

Nancy & Leonard Kupersmith Dr. John Fulcher, Carey York, Claudia York & Emmy Holt

Christi & Bob Nachman with James & Sarah Brice

John Charles & Kathryn Payne

Sharon Whitney & David Hill

By Fourth Dimension Photography

Steve & Jennifer Yarborough with Jane McCutcheon & Peggie Tanner

Jeanne & Alan Robinson

Tom Snider, Connie McDowell, and Claire & Joe Blake

Laraine & Milton Shockley

Another stellar year of the annual Antiques, Fine Art & Design Weekend premiered at the Greenville County Museum of Art’s black-tie evening, where 500 guests enjoyed exquisite servings of heavy hors d’oeuvres and a special Tuscan buffet while listening to live jazz musicians. CEO Lynn Harton of presenting sponsor United Community Bank and his wife, Flavia, joined AFAD Honorary Chairman Anne Woods to toast the event.

Bev Whittey with Cary & Donna Stroud

Rosa Eisenstadt, Pearlie Harris & Anita Davis

Lynn Harton with Liz & Fabian Unterzaucher

Lillian Darby & Alan Ethridge

Mary Lawson & Roselle Bonnoitt

Steve & Jennifer Yarborough

Travis Garner & Delie Fort

Marta Lousie & Lee Lewis

Connie Bryan & Flavia Harton

James & Sarah Brice with Becca & Ben Rook DECEMBER 2017 / 25

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The Greenville Polo Classic October 22, 2017 Kaley Sellery, Stephanie Trotter & Marissa Mizga

Spectators and sportsmen took to Historic Hopkins Farm for the 6th annual Greenville Polo Classic. Inspired by co-founder and WYFF News 4 anchor Nigel Robertson’s personal experience with ALS in his family, the match helps raise both awareness and funds for the Greenville Hospital System’s Neuroscience Institute. The classic commenced with a midday Champagne luncheon, followed by a riveting on-field match, the “Hats & Flats Parade,” the “Stomping of the Divots,” and closing ceremonies.

Ashlyn Marr, Devin Pierce, Riley Thacker & Michael Moriarty

By Fourth Dimension Photography Kim Redden, Joey Redden, Wyatt Pollitz & Lydia Calder

Ally Keith & Abby Keith

35 Westview Avenue

Trista Hahn, Christy Batson & Lisa Pace

$775,000

Rare estate opportunity! Tucked behind two stone columns, this 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath home on 1.22 acres in the desirable North Main Neighborhood. Beautiful split floorplan with master suite, walk in closet and large master bath. Gorgeous plank flooring in living room. Hardwood flooring throughout. Updated kitchen with sunroom, wet bar, granite countertops, and gas appliances. Huge walkout basement great for storage. Mature landscaping and fully fenced. Great property! J Dew

Robin Rosenberg, Teresa Hrubala, Dr. Jennifer Trilk & Lynne Jones

We’re Everywhere

Nick Carlson Mobile: (864) 386-7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net

Jake Duckworth, Heidi Griesbach, Tim Foley, Corine Bechard, Declan McCarthy & Riley Roche

26 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Nikita Brahmbhatt & Guadalupe Lopez

Daniel & Maja Cobb with Jessica & Seth Snyder

Rob Wharton

Jeff & Chris Steiner Kelsey McLaughlin & Nicole Tek

Paola Bracale

Stephanie & Andrew Wactor

J Dew, Jarrod Wiggins & Olivia Cleveland

169 Chapman Road

$809,000

Enjoy the peace and quiet of a gated community in this Charleston Style home. All new hardiplank exterior! Entertaining is a part of the real joy of owning this fine home. Open floorplan with spacious kitchen that opens to the family room. Master suite is on the main level with heated bathroom floors. Charming courtyard with fountain and private fenced rear yard and double porches. 10ft ceilings on the main level and 9ft upstairs. The quality of construction just doesn’t get better than this!

Jennie & Bruce Aughtry

We’re Everywhere

Sharon Wilson Mobile: (864) 918-1140 sharon@wilsonassociates.net Shane Thurston, Josh McCall & Brian Stanton DECEMBER 2017 / 27

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ON THE Virginia Vanvick, Melanie Scott & Caroline Reynolds

Bonnie Evatt & Ina Braxton

Margaret Hungerford & Ames Little

Town

Fashion on the TOWN Pop-Up Shop October 19, 2017

Erin Pittman & Anna Marie Howell

Claire Tenent, Kate Key, Rachel Parker, Allie Gregg & Laurie Moravec

Mary Lucy Reid, Rennee Dunlap & Katie Rockwell

Casey Snyder, Jonathan Russ & Traci Larkins

Kelley Gallo & Emily Watson

Upstate style-seekers had their interfashion-al passports in hand as they hunted down the latest trends at this year’s Fashion on the TOWN Pop-Up Shop. Hosted at McMillan Pazdan Smith’s Augusta Street location, the chic marketplace was the perfect finish line for the 2017 shopping crawl, which featured deals and steals at local retailers in the West End, Downtown, and Augusta Road. Participating pop-ups included clothing boutique Prowse on Main, handcrafted goods purveyor Sursy, P Squared, and a beauty “pit-stop” at Blend Hair Salon. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Ashley Reese, Amy Emery & Amy Moore

Angela Stone & Katie Boruff, Ali Cullen, Elizabeth Rouprich Annie Gilllig & Jeanie Phibbs Jennifer Fowlkes, Anne Marie Young, McCarley Lewis & Elizabeth Dannelly

Carly Lovinggood & Daniel Horton

Beatrice Ziegler & Becky Cavedo

Sarah Liebenrood, Tinsley Ponder & Emily Muldrow

Mary Kathryn Miller, Debra Howard & Jennifer Sfeir

Maggie Aiken, Lauren Foster & Sarah Cummings

Maria Prowse & Lauren Silvers

Elizabeth Phillips, Kim Phillips, Marie Miller & Michele Jordan

Anna Marie Jester & Asheton Reid

Abby Mowdy & Carly Isaacson

Laura McDonald & Mary Ann Childs

Graci Schultz, Rachel Breckenridge & Morgan Stinson

Janet Wall & Ingrid Erwin

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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WE’RE ALL DIFFERENT. WE’RE ALL THE SAME. When we need healing, we all want the same thing: expert care, tailored to our unique situation. Because when it comes to healthcare, everyone deserves the best.

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Client: Carolinas HealthCare

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For to us a child is born, to us a son is given,

Stephan Edgerton with Sophie & Scott Anderson

and the government will be on his shoulders.

Coldwell Banker Caine Presents Artist Joseph Bradley October 12, 2017

And he will be called

Coldwell Banker Caine fêted Greenville resident and nationally renowned painter Joseph Bradley at its Main Street Real Estate Gallery. The public opening was free to art-lovers and showcased the versatile range of Bradley’s widely celebrated body of work—all of which is available for purchase throughout the exhibition. Flourish helped organize the affair, and catering was provided by Concierge on Call.

Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

Chris Hayes & Joseph Bradley

– Isaiah 9:6

By Fourth Dimension Photography Callie Michalak & Jessica Rhoton

Merry Christmas! Tom Marchant, REALTOR

Jessica Hughes & Keaton Stroud

AJ & Kelley Norris

Keily Fulton, Marisa Stephens, Virginia Wilson, Lucy Pressly & Marielena Holsonback

JD Babuder & Peter Curnin

864.449.1658 | Tom@TomMarchant.com

Kiah Bellows Farley & Jacob Farley

Keaton Stroud & Elizabeth Hughes

Angela Reid, Stephan Edgerton, Betsy Varnadoe & Jennine Hamilton

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ON THE

Town

Gran Fondo Hincapie Celebrity Chef Dinner October 20, 2017 Cyclists and other guests of the 2017 Gran Fondo Hincapie mingled with special guest Patrick Dempsey—aka McDreamy himself—and celebrity chefs at Hotel Domestique during the Lexus Celebrity Chef Dinner. In between supping on slow-roasted lamb shoulder, potato gnocchi, and other delectable dishes crafted by star chefs like Table 301’s Michael Kramer and Matthew Accarrino from San Francisco’s SPQR, partygoers also sipped on signature Patron cocktails and wine pairings. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Dariusz Paczuski, Iliana Del Valle & Fede López

EMERGENCY POWER

FOR HOME SWEET HOME

Joel Goralski, Don King & Al Rutherford Elizabeth & Richard DuBose

Eric Skoloff & Jared Emerson

Patrick Dempsey with Ericka & Charles Brewer

Melanie & George Hincapie

Brittany Jester & Barbara Emerson Pam & Lee Foster

Brody Glenn & John Levine

Financing Available!

Erik Zabel & Larry Warbasse

• Professionally Installed • 24/7 Service

Sarah Anderson & Molly Shaw

Dan Everett, Connor Shaw, Bobby Julich & TJ Eisenhart

A Service of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

For information or a free estimate, call 1-800-240-3400 DECEMBER 2017 / 31

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Charitable Giving Awards

Nancy Stanton, JoAnn George & Ellen Stephen

November 1, 2017

Charlene Comer, Allen Armstrong & Marietta Bolt

The Poinsett Club provided the elegant backdrop for the annual Charitable Giving Awards, where guests and award recipients enjoyed an evening celebrating Greenville philanthropy. The Community Foundation honored the Greenville Literacy Association, Elliott Davis, Project Hope Foundation, Dick Wilkerson, Dr. Spence Taylor, and Ed Good for their consistent generosity and commitment to the betterment of the Upstate community. By Fourth Dimension Photography

Sharon Gibbs & Sunshine Norwood Mary Campbell & Ben Norwood

Thomas Ray, Branch Manager, NMLS#: 171228

Anna Smith, Bob Morris & Margaret Paylor

Stephanie Martin

Alex Lilla

Caleb LeGrand

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 260137

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 259691

Nick Decosimo & Jack Bacot with Crissy & George Maynard

Jordan Sherer

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 1470089

Brad Rollison

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 1021998

Robert Green & Joseph Rohe

David Zambelas

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 284229

Sue McInerny, Brenda Owens & Tracey Mulvaney

864.527.9980

400 Executive Center Drive, Suite 301, Greenville, SC 29615 Ark-La-Tex Financial Services, LLC d/b/a Benchmark Mortgage 5160 Tennyson Pkwy STE 2000W, Plano, TX 75024 NMLS ID #2143 (WWW.BENCHMARK.US). This advertisement is for general information purposes only. some products may not be available in all licensed locations. Information, rates, and pricing are subject to change without prior notice at the sole discretion of Ark-La-Tex Financial Services, LLC. All loan programs subject to borrowers meetings appropriate underwriting conditions. This is not a commitment to lend. Other restrictions may apply.

Christy Thomson & Sarah Fletcher

Ben Settle & Sonya Brown

Paula Noble & Mack Howard

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

George & Cathy Short

Susan Shi, Randy Fisher & Harriet Goldsmith

Priscilla & Johnny Hagins

Marilyn Mundy, Maj. Gen. Tom Wilkerson

Betty & Grey Geddie

Jerry Youkey & Kate Madden

Betsy Cates, Kenneth Cates & Doug Kroske

Handmade in Savannah, Georgia

TRUNK SHOW Dec. 3 1-5 pm Bob Morris, Katherine Poston, Howard Einstein, Joe Poore & Rick Davis Isabel Forster

SHOES • HANDBAGS • ACCESSORIES 864.271.9750 | MUSESHOESTUDIO.COM Linda Hannon, Rick Jiran, Theo Lane & Amanda Dow

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE DECEMBER 2017 / 33

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ON THE Sam Sorrow, Jesse Nance & Linda Campbell Pryor

Town

Greenville Open Studios Reception at the Metropolitan Arts Council November 4, 2017

Katie & Amelia Koch Caroline Quinn & David Young

Shane Bryant & Misty King

Christi Garland, Susanne Abrams & Bob Ripley

Photography by Jack Connolly

Jacob Farley & Kiah Bellows Farley, with Teresa & Will Roche

Mary Lou & Gary Huntoon with Mary Margaret Jones

Slava Zatsepa & Jacey King

In honor of its 16th annual Greenville Open Studios, the Metropolitan Arts Council launched into the weekend with an exhibition spotlighting the many artists who participated in the countywide art crawl the following weekend, November 10–12. In addition to the artistic ambiance, guests feasted on hors d’oeuvres and drinks at the MAC Gallery on Augusta Street.

Carole Tinsley & Rosa Eisenstadt

Margaret Pasztor & Vivian Morris

Marsha Elrod & Billy Clinkscales

Merietta & Hank McCullough with Teri Peña

Amanda Powell, Sergio Loaiza, Carlos Loaiza & Ryan Alden

Gregory & Lois Ann Parker

Alan Etheridge & Gayla Day

Alex Beck, Jason Beck & Rebecca Ellefson

Estelle & Stan Ross

Sharon Berlet, Betty Bercowski & Isabel Forster Angel Demarski, Matt Demarski & Jill King

Bo Pearson & Tara Kirkland

Logan Hood, Tayler Flowers & Mary Alston

Brenda & Gary Moss

Bill McLendon & Danielle Fontaine

Dan Krebs, Ken Beierlein & Jim Scheidler

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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SCGSAH Bocce Social October 1, 2017 It was all about the Bs—bocce and beer—when the Governor’s School for the Arts Foundation hosted the Bocce Social at Birds Fly South Ale Project. The Greenville community was invited for an afternoon of ball tosses and craft ales, peppered with a few pizza slices from Asheville’s Amazing Pizza Co. and iced treats courtesy of King of Pops. Live music with Hot Yoga added to the fun outing, and all donations will help sustain continuing activities and programs at the Governor’s School for Arts and Humanities.

Rafael Szypula, Molly Gorie, Caitlin Hayes & Michael Hayes

Clint & Sarah Davis

Dee & Brian Derrick

John Eastman & Robert McLaughlin

Betsy & Christian Tetsch with Erika & Cuyler Larson

6 Warner Street

$519,000

Charming 3-bedroom, 2-bathroom cottage in Alta Vista offers private backyard, spacious 2-car garage and separate workshop. Large raised patio provides room for outside dining and seating. Hardwood floors throughout home. Windows on all sides of the home provide an abundance of natural light, even on dreary winter days. Come see this darling home!

Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Madelene Tetsch, Grace Vine, Maggie Morton, Meredith Cook & Rachel Vick

Brian Hendricks & Kristin Eppinger

Pup: Bear, Kyle Fetterly & Maria Rolfes

Jonathan & Townsend Budde with Grace & Bobby Vine

We’re Everywhere

Laura McDonald Mobile: (864) 640-1929 laura@wilsonassociates.net

Sullivan Short & Bobby Barreto

Carol Flack, West Jones & Rachel Vick

36 TOWN / towncarolina.com WilsonLaura_hlfV_TOWN Dec17.indd 1 OTT_PART 3.indd 36

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ON THE

Town Warehouse Theatre Rocky Horror Gala October 27, 2017

A sold-out crowd of 230 guests joined Dr. Frank-N-Furter, Brad, Janet, and the rest of the Rocky Horror crew to dance the Time Warp at Warehouse Theatre’s annual gala. Themed around the cult classic film, the evening featured in-character performances by Upstate talent, as well as delicious foodie fare a la Saffron’s Catering. All proceeds raised from the event will continue to fund Warehouse Theatre educational programs and other arts initiatives.

Mary Helen Ezell, Will Avery & Brittany Bauer

Laura Blume with Tom & Debra Strange

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Connie Schulze & Peggy Karpick

Alan & Ellen Weinberg with Peggy & Steve Davis

Jay & Terri Newsom

Philip & Harriet Van Hale

Hannah Crissy & George Maynard & Colin Spellmeyer

Jim Killion & Jim Grow

Mike Sablone, Greta Somerville & Jason D. Johnson

2222 Augusta Street, Suite 7 Greenville, SC 29605 | 864.520.2486 Katie & Matt Leckenbusch

Ronn Carroll & Anne Calhoun

Kathy Sawyer & Linda Killion DECEMBER 2017 / 37

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Abby Moore Keith

Danielle Car & Jacob Brown September 16, 2017

C

ollege crushes come and go, but for these two Paladin sweethearts, it was textbook romance from the beginning. Danielle Car, a Furman freshman, had a secret crush on Jacob Brown, a junior. Little did she know Mr. Brown was harboring similar feelings, but both being the timid type, it took more than a year for the two to connect at a social event through the prompting of mutual friends. Their closet affections were soon brought to light, and four years of dating later, Jacob was ready to graduate to a lifetime commitment. Ever the planner, the groom-to-be asked his soon-to-be in-laws for

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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permission for Danielle’s hand in April, but didn’t pop the proposal until Furman’s homecoming weekend that November. While posing for a flashback photo with Danielle in front of the bell tower, Jacob dropped a knee and asked her to be his forever. She, of course, said yes, and the two married ten months later at Larkin’s courtyard with an upstairs reception in the establishment’s Shirley Roe Cabaret room. Danielle wore a Hayley Paige

Sweet Treats: As a tribute to their alma mater, Jacob’s groom’s cake was the Furman logo with a bell tower made of Rice Krispies treats. Party favors were cookie caricatures of the couple.

gown from The White Magnolia and carried a Statice Floral bouquet containing a lace ribbon from her mother’s wedding gown. Amanda Cox was the wedding planner and Gage’s on Augusta provided the invitations. The couple continues to live in Greenville, where Danielle is a marketing project manager for ScanSource, and Jacob is a small business credit officer at TD Bank. RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

DECEMBER 2017 / 41

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TOWN

Weddings Emily Rogers & Jordan Unruh June 8, 2017 If your love life is severely lacking, it’s never too late to enlist the services of an astute relative. Sometimes eccentric aunts make the best matchmakers. Emily Rogers grew up in Greenville and was close friends with Jordan Unruh’s aunt and uncle. Jordan, unfortunately, lived in Indianapolis. But when he happened to head to Greenville for college, it took a simple introduction through his wise relations for the sparks to fly. Emily and Jordan dated for two years until a road trip to the scenic vistas of Mount Washington in Pennsylvania became the backdrop for a romantic marriage proposal, to which Emily responded in the affirmative. The two said their “I do’s” at the Davenport in downtown Greer. With open brick walls and wood floors aglow with natural light, it was a sublime setting for their simple ceremony. Emily is a SBA loan specialist at United Community Bank, and Jordan is a fifth grade teacher at Thomas E. Kearns Elementary. CHRISTA RENE PHOTOGRAPHY

Daniel Maalouf and Lana Davida Powell May 20, 2017 True love doesn’t grow on trees—unless you’re Daniel Maalouf and Lana Powell, who sealed their love for all things outdoors, and each other, in a tree house on the banks of Lake Jocasee. Daniel and Lana met while working for Rogers & Callcott Environmental Engineering, and they quickly connected over a common appreciation for adventure. Before long, they were leading kayak tours to remote waterfalls, crafting Adirondack chairs, and two years later, Daniel proposed to Lana during a Christmas gift exchange. The couple planned the whimsical woodland wedding of their dreams by building their very own tree house getaway on family land at the lake. The now rentable residence—The Lost Treehouses of Lake Jocasse— was the perfect place to celebrate their special day, complete with a 12-layer wedding cake crafted by Lana’s mom and a doggy ringbearer named Jenga. Daniel and Lana live in Greenville, where they continue to work at Rogers & Callcott while pursuing their local businesses, Carolina Expeditions, The Wine O-Chair Co., and AirBnB rental The Lost Treehouses of Lake Jocasse. SARAH MARKO PHOTOGRAPHY

Michele Dickens & Jeff Johnson April 15, 2017 Not all love stories end like they do in the movies—let’s be honest, it’s not always rainbows and butterflies. Sometimes relationships derail, and we’re left wondering what in the world happened to our Hollywood happy ending. Michele Dickens and Jeff Johnson had both been married before, and when their marriages ended, they little expected a second chance at love. But their mutual friends weren’t about to let them live apart, and Michele and Jeff were eventually introduced. The couple dated for two years, spending time getting to know each other and their children—Michele has two boys and Jeff has two girls—until a fateful night on the beach in Charleston, when Jeff asked Michele to be his forever second chance. The two married at Summerall Chapel at the Citadel in Charleston, where Jeff had graduated two decades before. Michele wore a silk cami and tulle skirt by Needle & Thread. She is the principal designer and owner of M. Johnson Design (michelejohnsondesign.com), and Jeff is the owner of Garner Johnson. ARIELLE SIMMONS PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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the experience begins

when you walk in.

A Christmas Event

featuring Rolex – FlushFit - Slane & Slane - JB Star MBicego a r c o -BDecember i c e g o 14th - R o&b15th erto C o i n Coin - T A- G H e u e r20th Marco • Roberto December

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11/16/17 2:04 PM


Free in store and at home design consultation Ivet Ivanova Interior Designer

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Artwork by Bill Apelian; photograph by Eli Warren

TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Nick of Time

Bill Apelian carves Father Christmas in Old World flair

DECEMBER 2017 / 45

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

A Worthy Claus Bill Apelian crafts Old World St. Nicholas statues with deft design / by John Jeter

Santa, Baby: Bill Apelian’s carvings take hours of meticulous cuts, not to mention the fact that he colors and stains each by hand. It’s no surprise his Santas are of heirloom value.

// photography by Eli Warren

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o call Santa Claus some chip off the old block would be an unkind cut—it takes wood artist Bill Apelian 100,000 thoughtful strokes to bring just one St. Nicholas out of a new block. “He basically starts out as a square of wood, and then he’s not,” the carver says of the Old World figurines, which populate his Linden Wood Studio. It’s an honest-to-goodness Santa’s workshop in Greenville, where he fashions Father Christmases, finding relaxation amidst his chisels, gouges, and mallets. “This is really intense,” the affable Apelian says, caressing a paused Claus, one of three in progress at any given time. “You have to think threedimensionally all the time. You’ve got to make sure you leave enough wood when you carve, you can’t put it back. When you take it off, it’s done—now you’re going to have a beanie instead of a hat.” Apelian, 63, began whittling on a whim 25 years ago. Next thing you know, his daughters—Becky and Betsy, grown now—asked him to sculpt a cat, then a horse, then a Merlin. Soon, Apelian found his niche with Nick, a historical figure with an appealing backstory. Born around 280 A.D. in southern Turkey to a wealthy family, Nicholas gave away his riches. He also became a bishop and, later, patron saint of children, sailors, maidens, and wrongly condemned prisoners. “He was just a guy who’s trying to help,” says the former Marine captain and director of BJU Press. “And God called him to be a pastor.” Better yet, according to an ethnographer quoted in an Armenian publication, Nicholas’s mother was Armenian. Fancy that—Apelian’s Armenian, too, tracing his roots back a few thousand years to Syrian Christians who migrated to Eastern Europe. The family tree also includes German branches, which explains his Santas’ distinctive Old World characteristics. The statuettes, 11 inches to nearly 3 feet tall, are magical and gnomish, complete with elfin attire and, of course, copious amounts of facial hair. He colors each by

hand using artist oils or stains, the latter a nod to his influences—fourteenth-century German master Tilman Riemenschneider and Apelian’s Great-Uncle Martin, a German carver who died in the 1950s. “When I was a kid, and these were sitting around the house, I would stare at them for hours,” he says, holding one of Uncle Martin’s figurines, a Middle Ages–looking jester, circa 1930s. Apelian also carves sayings or scenes into some of his jolly basswood elves. Some carry props, such as miniature hand-bound leather books, which are reflections of Apelian’s wife, Dawn, who is a children’s author and novelist. “I think he’s brilliant,” she says, before echoing Bill’s words about how a Christmas character emerges, almost by magic, from the block: “I always try to give them a name based on what they look like. You can call him Santa, call him St. Nick, St. Nicholas.” By any name, his handiworks, about a dozen each year, are heirloom value, from $1,000 to $3,600. But let’s be honest, we’re talking Santa Claus. He’s priceless. The Linden Wood Studio, thelindenwoodstudio.com

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UP

Towner

All That Jazz Greenville songstress Kylie Odetta shares the magic behind her musical mastery / by Stephanie Trotter // photograph by Will Crooks

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he voice is unforgettable—light and dreamy, breathy and inviting, taking listeners on a well-trod journey of life, love, and loss. Thus, the juxtaposition when the spotlight shines upon fresh-faced Kylie Odetta. The 20-yearold Greenville native has graduated from playing Smiley’s Acoustic Café to touring with her own show, and opening for artists like Gavin DeGraw and Colbie Caillat. Not too bad for the girl whose first piano teacher dozed off during lessons. The indie artist took a break from the holiday hustle and bustle to share a cup of coffee near her family’s home in Five Forks.

Christmas Star: Join Kylie Odetta and a special guest opener for her annual “Secret” Christmas Concert on Sunday, December 17th. The show benefits the Barbara Stone Foundation, a local nonprofit providing opportunities to adults with disabilities. For tickets (and the secret location), visit kylieodetta.com/store.

Thanks for meeting us. How are your holidays going? >> Busy. We’re getting ready for my Annual Secret Christmas Benefit Concert. It’s going to be really fun with a silver and gold theme, and it benefits the Barbara Stone Foundation. The location of the show is a secret until you RSVP. You’ve done the concert several years now? >> I feel music is a connector and a healer, and I want to use it to help. I have a heart for giving back, specifically those with special needs, the homeless, and youth. My family instilled that in me.

“I feel music is a connector and a healer, and I want to use it to help.” ))) TO READ MORE INTERVIEWS, GO TO TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Tell us more about your family. Is everyone musical? >> My dad is a songwriter, as well. When we were younger, he would write songs and play his guitar and sing them to me and my brother before we fell asleep. My mom was in choir in high school. It was a very musical house. What did you listen to? >> Mom and Dad played a lot of Kenny Chesney and Sister Hazel. Top-40 radio. A lot of country music, which honestly I did dabble in when I first started. But I realized that wasn’t my personal style.

SO

LD

How would you describe your style? >> I would describe it as jazzy, R&B, but still pop-modern. But I kind of see music in colors. I see it as kind of warm pink, orange, yellow colors. Kind of like a sunset. Very warm and filled with love. Which sounds cheesy, but I’m a very cheesy person. Critics call you an old soul, praising the depth of your lyrics for someone so young. >> I can sympathize with people through my situations, but also about things I’ve never been through. I’ve been writing since I was eight. I realize very much it is a gift. I feel called to write about real life and through real interactions with people.

SO

LD

What’s your process when you write? >> When I first started writing, a lot of songs would come to me in the shower, but now I write on piano primarily. The music, melody, and lyrics all come at once, or I’ll have a thought throughout the week, like one line comes to me, and I’ll think that’s kind of cool and write it down in my notes, and I’ll go back to it later to build on it. You’ve penned more than 200 songs. Where are you now creatively? >> I always want to push myself. This past year was a tough one for me anxiety-wise. But I’m now in a new place where I want to push myself creatively, rather than just do what comes easily. You bounce back and forth from Nashville. Are you considering moving there? >> I have a great connection industry-wise there. My plan was to move there when I was 21. But the last time I went, I got an overwhelming feeling of no. God saying, ‘That’s not where you need to be.’ So, I’m reevaluating and making a new plan. I travel so much, but I do want to be somewhere where there’s more musical opportunity, so it’s kind of up in the air right now. How’s the new album, Undertow? >> We just released a video for the title track. We brought a real piano to Folly Beach. Three guys had to stand behind it in the water while we filmed. When the shoot was over, we put it close to the boardwalk to get in the morning. When my dad woke up, Folly police were dragging it away with a 4-wheeler, probably thinking it was random stuff people leave behind. A piano on the beach!

Passionately pursuing excellence

For more on Kylie’s latest album and upcoming shows, visit kylieodetta.com.

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TOP

Bunk

Metro Retro

The Unscripted Hotel’s modern revitalization draws on Durham, North Carolina’s past / by Ruta Fox

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he Jack Tar Motor Lodge was once a proud jewel of the downtown Durham, North Carolina, boardwalk. Built in 1962 with a distinctive Monaco-blue checkered exterior, the motel was a superior example of mid-century architecture. Sadly it fell on hard times, eventually spiraling downward into a home for squatters with caved-in ceilings, peeling paint, and an abandoned pool. In 1998, the verdict came to shut it down. But just three years later, it landed on the “Places in Peril” list from Preservation Durham, an organization working to protect the city’s unique heritage and sense of place. After a 20 million dollar facelift, the lodge was joyously reborn in July into a 74-room, dog-friendly hotel with the moniker Unscripted Durham, the first location for the new boutique brand under New York’s stylish Dream Hotel Group.

With a playful spirit aimed at the progressive, creative traveler, the hotel’s ’60s retro-vibe is evident when pulling underground to park. Unscripted’s excellent location means the car stays put, as Durham’s dining, drinking, shopping, and exploring can easily happen on foot within a several block radius. This former tobacco town is like Brooklyn in the South, with distinctive shopping and creative, hyper-local, chef-driven restaurants just steps from the hotel. There’s no stuffy lobby here, but rather a reimagined “rec room” area dubbed The Studio, doing triple duty as a cool bar, listening room, and meeting space. You’ll find a mix of locals and guests imbibing custom cocktails like a Negroni Americano or a Mrs. Hendricks. For breakfast, snacks, or dinner, the aptly named allday is the hotel’s mixed-use coffee bar, eatery, and sidewalk café. The Mash Up—with avocado, grilled sweet corn, Cotija cheese, and smoked paprika on griddled multigrain bread—is a must. Craft brews flow on-site at Pour Taproom. Book a room on the third floor, which leads out to a glittering turquoise pool with a South Beach–style bar and

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Photographs courtesy of Unscripted Durham.

Mid-century Marvel: The Mash Up (below left) is a must-eat at allday, Unscripted Durham’s eatery and coffee bar. The hotel’s retro feels, including the Monaco blue exterior (left), reflect the aesthetic of the original building, The Jack Tar Motor Lodge built in 1962.

Eat/Drink Bar Virgile Handcrafted, classic cocktail bar. Rue Cler French bistro fare. Mateo bar de tapas Lunch, brunch, dinner. Mothers & Sons Trattoria Regional Italian, handmade pasta. Pizzeria Toro Gourmet wood-fired pizza. Piedmont Restaurant Adventurous, seasonal, locally sourced dining. The Parlour House-made ice cream with flavors like Spiced Rum (vegan). Scratch Bakery Brunch, lunch, and legendary pies.

Shop Chet Miller Gifts, toys, candles, cards, barware, and men’s grooming items. Vert & Vogue Stylish boutique for women, with options for men featuring Billy Reid clothing. Vintage Vault ’50s and ’60s oneof-a-kind accessories for the home. Bungalow Tabletops, linens, and home décor. Area Modern Home Furniture with a midcentury slant.

rooftop pool deck lounge dubbed The Patio. Sip a drink under the nighttime stars on the heated patio, which overlooks Durham’s ever-changing skyline. The Patio also serves weekend brunch. Unscripted rooms are sleek and well-designed, with platform beds, bright white walls, and colorful geometric wallpaper. Bathrooms are hidden behind frosted glass and feature designer Jonathan Adler’s cheery line of shower amenities. Hit the gym, or settle in for the evening and queue up the smart TV. A basket of late-night nibbles beckons, sourced from local North Carolina brands like Big Spoon Roasters. Unscripted Durham forms the basis for a perfect weekend getaway. After all, doesn’t everyone deserve a second chance? Unscripted Durham, 202 N Corcoran St, Durham, NC; (984) 329-9500, unscriptedhotels.com

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TOWN

Profile

“I just love working with fresh produce, so it does not make sense to me to cook produce that is not in season.” —Chef Steve Doliget

A French Affair

The Commerce Club’s Chef Steve Doliget captures hearts with his worldly cuisine

/ by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Eli Warren

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f you are romance-averse and/or hungry, you might want to stop reading now. From racing on a motorcycle through Paris and Versailles, to speaking the same love language of food and art, to making dinner as simple—and romantic—as a glorious trifecta of good bread, cheese, and wine, French native Chef Steve Doliget and his wife Shara have the “this-is-like-a-scene-out-of-a-movie” thing down. When native Chicagoan Shara met Steve at Cyrano’s, the tiny French restaurant on the river in Chicago where they were both working, she was already fluent in French from her studies at DePaul and her travels to Paris. Steve won her heart, but also (and more importantly) the heart of her Algerian father who was also fluent in French. (Steve learned English by conversing with Shara’s American mother.) “I never introduced a boyfriend to my dad, especially throughout college,” Shara says. “That summer Steve would come over for a family dinner and he would make une tarte aux fraises, a French strawberry tart, and it’s not anything you can find here unless you go to a French bakery. It’s pastry dough and pastry cream and strawberries with

pistachios on top, and it was fabulous. He must have made 10 or 20 tarts that summer.” The chef, who took the helm at the Commerce Club in May, has worked the likes of the RitzCarlton and Four Seasons Hotel in Chicago (along with 10-table Parisian bistros), as well as one of the most venerable country clubs in the United States, Onwentsia Country Club in Lake Forest, Illinois. Doliget learned his trade as a six-year-old at the side of his grandmother when he traveled between Paris, where his father lived, and the countryside of Normandy to his mother’s family. The effect was indelible. “Every weekend, we went to my grandparents’,” says Steve. “We had

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Good Move: Chef Steve Doliget has years of experience cooking for high-profile restaurants in Paris and Chicago, where he met his wife, Shara. To escape the nonstop pace of the city, he and his family moved to Greenville, where Doliget has helmed the kitchen at the Commerce Club since May 2017.

lunch on Sunday and I remember getting there early in the morning, and my grandmother’s cooking and I’m seeing if she needs any help. And going to the street market and getting the meat and the produce, simple stuff, but I just remember the taste of it, and going in the summer to the market and getting some cantaloupe and just opening and tasting it, and that’s where I started.” Doliget never intended on Chicago, but as most of life’s random happenings portend, it was meant to be. “I always wanted to come to America,” says Doliget, sitting at the spacious Commerce Club bar, which overlooks the burgeoning expanse of the city’s downtown. “And then the cheapest airfare I could find was Paris to Chicago, so that’s how I ended up in Chicago.” And as for Greenville? It was Shara, who had vacationed in Charleston and Hilton Head as a child, who suggested South Carolina to shift gears from the hectic nonstop pace of Chicago. With their five-year-old son, Noah—who has his own kitchen knife, by the way, made from a French company, naturally, which he uses to help in the kitchen at home—they moved South last summer. The chef’s quest for challenges and learning keeps his interest piqued, but it’s the simplicity of what he’s known all his life that hallmarks his cooking, at home and at the club. “I just love working with fresh produce, so it does not make sense to me to cook produce that is not in season,” he says, “like getting corn on the menu in the middle of December doesn’t make sense. Since I’ve been here I’ve built a seasonal menu that’s going to be with what can be harvested during that period of time.” But on the chef’s dinner menu at home after a long 12-hour day? Cereal, he says, with a laugh, or maybe pasta with some egg on top. At Christmas however, it’s a full-fledged French feast. “As a kid it was always the same, we always start the meal with some escargot,” he recounts, “and then we have some sort of poultry, a pheasant or something—we don’t do a whole turkey—or beef tenderloin or something like that.” Then, too, there is a gratin dauphinois (potato gratin) with nutmeg and garlic, and lobster bisque. And for his amour? He had her at the tart, but it’s his mushroom risotto that makes her swoon. “There were nights in Chicago, and he’d come home at 10 or 10:30 p.m.,” Shara says. “He would ask if I had eaten, and I’d say, no, and he’d say, ‘Let me whip up something for you.’ So he would whip up mushroom risotto with chicken and aged Gruyere cheese. It was fabulous. If I’m ever sad or had a bad day, he’ll come home and make me mushroom risotto.” It’s funny; she didn’t even like mushrooms before they met. The Commerce Club, 55 Beattie Place, 17th Floor, Greenville. (864) 232-5600, clubcorp.com

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TOWN

Buzz

Sweet Charity Project Host Soup Kitchen offers more than a hot meal / by Stephanie Trotter

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// illustration by Alexander Harrison

ndustrial-size serving spoons and large chaffing dishes line the busy workstation at Project Host as Tobin Simpson conveys orders. The bearded instructor is guiding CC Pearce Culinary School students through turkey burger and sweet potato pie preparation. The filling meal is headed for hungry children at an after-school program on Greenville’s west side. The longtime chef left high-end restaurants to bake, broil, and grill at this non-profit. “Not that I don’t like making expensive, pretty food, but to know the food we create here is making a difference, it’s amazing,” he shares, while untying an apron. “To go to sites where we’re feeding 500 kids a day, that’s powerful.” What’s powerful is how Project Host, a one-time soup kitchen, has broken the tureen to become a facility fronting different programs to nourish the hungry and train the unemployed. Its culinary students take advantage of the free, 11-week long program to gain skills to work in Greenville’s thriving restaurant sector. Paraguayan immigrant Leah Bareiro was fresh out of high school when she first stepped up to this stove. “Going to Johnson and Wales was not an option, never,” she reveals. “This place gave me a head start and provided a safe place to learn and grow. It gave me endless possibilities.” Today the vivacious 23-year-old is a program graduate and a fine-dining line cook at Golden Brown & Delicious. Operating since 2003, the culinary school is preparing to expand its bakery division, so students can benefit from an additional six months of instruction. “It’s more intensive training where they can specialize in baking and pastries,” explains bakery director Mallory Boyd. “This will also

Soul Food: Not only a soup kitchen, Project Host offers multiple programs that feed the hungry and provide training for culinary students seeking job opportunities.

increase our time to do case management with them, and give them a stable income.” The catering division is another Project Host program, where students make money as they simultaneously polish their tools of trade and résumé. Executive Director Sally Green scans the kitchen, noting how flavors have changed. But the recipe is the same: help those in need by utilizing food. “I’ve been here since 1991,” she says with nostalgia. “I love the people I work with on both sides of the counter.” The committed leader knows the numbers—the soup kitchen once fed 250 a day, but gentrification around South Academy Street cut that in half. “People are still hungry,” she states. “They’re just further away, and so we go to them.” The soup kitchen still feeds 120 daily at headquarters with volunteer help. But culinary school cooks send three to five times as many meals to local churches and centers clustered across City View, San Souci, and White Horse Road. (And to keep things fresh and healthy, the soup kitchen frequently uses produce from its own garden—the first on-site, soup kitchen garden in the nation.) “I would love to say we’ll put ourselves out of business,” jokes Sally. “But sadly, I think we are always going to have these pockets of hunger. As our community grows and changes, the soup kitchen will continue to adapt. By going to where the people are, we have a good chance to help.” And that’s a hearty dish to feed the soul. To order specialty goods from the Project Host bakery, register for community dinners, volunteer in the soup kitchen, or work in the garden, visit projecthost.org.

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BY

Design

Blow by Blow Award-winning artist Colin O’Reilly crafts elegant glassware from a North Carolina mountain studio / by Steven Tingle // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

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Into the Fire: Colin O’Reilly creates his awardwinning glassware from years of art study and experience. After living and working in the Southwest, he now bases his studio Terrane Glass Designs in Spruce Pine, NC.

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t was in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where Colin O’Reilly had his epiphany. He had traveled to the Southwest’s creative mecca during a summer break from Kennesaw State University where he was studying art. He was interested in sculpture and hoping to land a summer job at a bronze foundry. If it hadn’t been a Sunday, that may have happened. But the foundry was closed, and Colin eventually wandered into a ’70s era hippie glass studio. He didn’t know a thing about glass, but what he saw blew his mind—the glowing furnace, the crucible filled with clear, melted glass, the blow pipe, the fluid motion of the artist, more of a ballet than a manufacturing process. Colin didn’t know exactly what was going on, but he knew bronze was no longer on the table. Today, if you travel the back roads of North Carolina to the tiny town of Spruce Pine, you can see firsthand what intrigued and inspired Colin many years ago. Inside a studio deep in the mountains, Colin hovers near a 2,000-degree furnace. The studio is quiet except for the sounds of ’90s rap drifting down from speakers mounted high above the workspace.

It’s difficult to understand what’s happening as Colin pushes a long metal rod into the furnace only to spin and remove it seconds later. Almost magically a glowing blob at the end of the rod takes shape, and within minutes Colin stamps his company mark on the bottom of a clear, elegant rocks glass. Using a set of tongs, he places the glass in an annealing oven to cool. Then the process begins again. “It is like a dance,” Colin says. “It’s a Zen moment and you lose track of what you are doing. But glass doesn’t hide anything. It’s unforgiving and every little mistake shows up. If you make a mistake, there is a visual history of it.” How Colin came to be at this studio in Spruce Pine is an artist’s journey. After spending the summer sweeping floors and playing with glass in the hippie glass studio in Sante Fe, Colin went on to study a formal approach to glass at the California College of the Arts in Oakland, California. He graduated with a BFA DECEMBER 2017 / 57

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BY

Design

in glass, and moved to Seattle to discover an elevated level of artistry. “Seattle is where I saw all of the possibilities because it’s really the hub of the glass world right now,” he says. “A lot of the old Italian masters have studios there. I saw what quality could be in glass. I had a job reloading glass into kilns but worked myself up to associate director so I really got to see how a studio works. I also got introduced to a lot of heroes of mine. I worked for several really skilled glass blowers just out of luck and being a nice guy.” Colin is not bragging. He is a nice guy and admits he was offered studio jobs more for personality than skill. But despite living in the epicenter of the glass blowing movement, Colin was anxious about his future. After the birth of their first child, Colin and his wife Rachel began to question raising a family in the city. Both from the South, Colin and Rachel longed to return to their roots. In the fall of 2015, they made Spruce Pine their home, and Colin began

assisting glassblower Kenny Pieper. “I moved here for this job with Kenny,” Colin says. “He wanted someone to assist him full time but he goes to shows and the studio was open during random blocks of the year, so I got a lot of blow time to develop my own work.” The work led to a whiskey decanter and matching rocks glass set, which Colin entered into Garden & Gun’s Made in the South awards, an annual contest for Southern-crafted products. Colin quickly forgot about his entry, preoccupied with the possibility of taking a second job to supplement his income. But when the publication selected his decanter and rocks glasses as the home category’s overall winner, Colin realized his work was more than a passion. Early next year, Colin will move into his own Spruce Pine studio, Terrane Glass Designs, with plans to expand his designs into lighting and functional housewares. But for now he’s focused on meeting the high demand for whiskey decanters and rocks glasses. When asked what brand of whiskey he pours into his glass after a long day spent in front of the furnace, he leans in and drops his voice to a whisper. “To be honest,” he says. “I don’t drink.” Terrane Glass Designs, Spruce Pine, North Carolina; terraneglass.com Heat Shield: Glassblowing is a meticulous process that requires skill and patience. The glass is heated in a 2,000-degree furnace, then shaped with tongs and cooled. The process repeats until the vessel reflects the shape the artist desires. O’Reilly refers to the process as a “Zen moment.”

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SIDE

Ways

North of the Border

Raleigh, North Carolina, emerges as a world-class food city with a local focus

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f every picture tells a story, imagine what a plate of food reveals. A chef’s experiences, trials, and travels all manifest themselves in the meals he or she cooks. And in Raleigh, those stories begin with Ashley Christensen. In Kernersville, North Carolina, Christensen grew up in a home where food took center stage. Her parents relished organic gardening, cooking, and entertaining, so her understanding of ingredients flowed naturally. Christensen moved to Raleigh in 1994 to attend N.C. State University, where the budding chef satisfied her need to cook by hosting dinners for friends. After college, she sought out restaurant jobs, and eventually scratched the itch to have her own restaurant by purchasing a 1945 luncheonette across from the Convention Center downtown. Christened with the eatery’s original name, Poole’s Diner opened in 2007, at a time when the city was in the throes of a revitalization. Raleigh’s hub held a handful of restaurants that catered to the business-lunch crowd in North Carolina’s capital, but the sidewalks virtually folded up after dark. “Raleigh was very much a city in transition,” Christensen recalls, “but you could tell it was heading toward something really neat.” Poole’s, with its inviting double-horseshoe Formica counter, re-ignited

downtown dining with comfort food reimagined through the lens of its chef’s childhood, her culinary mentors, and a harvest of local ingredients. Comfort lies at the heart of all Christensen’s concepts, which have grown to include five restaurants downtown. Her newest (until she opens her pizzeria late next year), Death & Taxes, occupies a 1907 structure that formerly served (at different times) as a mortuary and a bank. “In all our places, it’s about interpreting tradition through various filters,” explains the chef. “We don’t use the word customer. We only use the word guest, because we work very hard to celebrate hospitality as a relationship and not a transaction.” Another word Christensen doesn’t like to use is competition, as she prefers to think of Raleigh’s restaurants as complementing rather than competing with one another. She has always been happy to counsel and encourage people who come to her when they are considering opening a restaurant in the city.

Photographs (this page, left to right) provided by the Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau; (opposite, far right) courtesy of Phase 3 Marketing

/ by M. Linda Lee

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tion and Visitors Bureau; (opposite, far right) courtesy of Phase 3 Marketing

Culinary Capital: (opposite left) As a North Carolina native, Ashley Christensen grew up with a focus on local and organic foods, which inspires the fare at her five different cuisine concepts in Raleigh (including the famous macaroni au gratin at Poole’s Diner). Christensen encourages restaurant growth in her adopted city, like Chef Scott Crawford’s venture Crawford & Son, where the Wagyu short rib and cornbread pudding (right) is one of several creative plates on the menu.

Scott Crawford is one of those people. Last November, when the five-time James Beard Foundation semi-finalist for “Best Chef Southeast” opened Crawford & Son in the historic Oakwood neighborhood adjacent to downtown, Christensen welcomed him. “You belong downtown with us,” she told him. It’s that supportive atmosphere that sets Raleigh’s restaurant scene apart. A Pennsylvania native and formally trained chef, Crawford has been in the Raleigh area for 10 years, working initially at The Umstead Hotel and Spa in nearby Cary, where he elevated Herons restaurant to a Forbes Five-Star property. He exited Herons to be executive chef at Standard Foods in 2015, leaving Herons in the expert hands of Steven Greene (late of Devereaux’s in Greenville), whose forays into molecular gastronomy make a dinner there an evening to remember. At Crawford & Son, Scott plumbs the depths of American food in his vibrant and approachable takes on familiar fare. He delights in changing diners’ perceptions of local ingredients by using them in novel ways (shaving raw turnips on a salad, for instance). “We believe in creating great energy and warm service in the restaurant,” Crawford says of his lively neighborhood spot. Some of Raleigh’s food stories tell of faraway lands. Vansana (Van) Nolintha was born in Laos. When he was 12, his parents sent him and, soon after, his younger sister, to the United States to live with a family in Greensboro, North Carolina. At age 18, Van moved to Raleigh to attend N.C. State, where he graduated with a double major in chemistry and design. His graduate studies took him to Dublin to pursue a master’s degree in international peace and conflict studies. Finding it impossible to land a job in his

field during the 2008 recession, he went back to Laos to reconnect with his roots. When he returned to his adopted city, Van was inspired to do something to honor both his homeland and his parents. Bida Manda (the Sanscrit ceremonial term for father and mother), the restaurant he opened in 2012 with his sister, Vanvisa, was the result. “Bida Manda is our love letter to our parents, who sacrificed to send us to America so we could have a better life,” reflects Nolintha, who now considers himself as much a Southerner as a Laotian. “Sharing our food at the restaurant became a phenomenal moment of storytelling,” he notes. Indeed, his menu stacks up pages of narratives about his homeland, from the seafood that expresses the country’s proximity to the Mekong River to the complex sauces introduced by the French when they colonized Laos. Like Nolintha, Cheetie Kumar, chef/owner of Garland restaurant, also came to this country as a child. She moved to the Bronx from a small town in the Punjab state of India with her parents when she was eight years old. As an adult, her travels took her to college at the

EAT Bida Manda Green papaya salad over sticky rice and fragrant pork belly soup with coconut curry reveal the complex cuisine of Laos through bright flavors that explode in your mouth. 222 S Blount St, Raleigh. (919) 829-9999, bidamanda.com

Brewery Bhavana Bon Appétit magazine recently called out the dim sum at this new micro-brewery by Van Nolintha and partner Patrick Woodson, whose unique concept incorporates a flower shop and bookstore. 218 S Blount

St, Raleigh. (919) 829-9998, brewerybhavana.com

Crawford & Son In addition to the market-driven menu, nightly Blue Plate Specials (short rib lasagna, venison meatloaf, coconut bread pudding with paw paw anglaise) paint a picture of Crawford’s irresistible takes on the classics. 618 N Person St, Raleigh. (919) 307-4647, crawfordandsonrestaurant.com

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Ways

SIDE

Son Shine: (left and center) With gigs at Cary, NC’s famous Herons restaurant and then at Raleigh’s Standard Foods under his cap, Scott Crawford brings energetic and locally driven takes to American fare at Crawford & Son; (right) The Green Light delivers elegant cocktails in its “secret” location within The Architect Bar & Social Club.

EAT, cont’d Garland When sifting through Chef Cheetie Kumar’s tasty riffs on panAsian cuisine, don’t pass up the Bhel Puri, a savory snack of puffed crunchy rice, seasonal vegetables, peanuts, cilantro, and tart tamarind chutney. 14 W

Martin St, Raleigh. (919) 8336886, garlandraleigh.com

Poole’s Diner Ashley Christensen’s reimagined Southern comfort food embraces dishes as homey as her phenomenal mac ‘n’ cheese, and as sophisticated as panseared halibut with parsley pistou. 426 S McDowell St, Raleigh. (919) 832-4477, ac-restaurants.com/pooles

cacao plantations throughout Central and South America. No soy lecithin, emulsifiers, or artificial flavors sully the taste of their bittersweet bars and bonbons. Another of Raleigh’s rising sons, French master baker Lionel Vatinet opened his original La Farm bakery in neighboring Cary in 1999. A short drive from downtown Raleigh brings you to Vatinet’s new baking facility and café in Cary’s historic center, where this member of France’s prestigious artisans’ guild Les Compagnons du Devoir makes the dough for his exquisite experiments in bread. “The evolution of Raleigh’s food scene has been exponential,” declares Ashley Christensen. “Every time someone would open a restaurant, people would get excited about it and that gave others the confidence to invest in Raleigh too.” “It’s a great time to be a chef in Raleigh,” Crawford adds. “We have this awesome diversity happening and we have people who support new business as well as people who are driven to do great things. That’s a formula for success.”

DRINK Gallo Pelón Mezcaleria Mezcal flights are de rigueur in the upstairs bar at Centro restaurant, where Angela Salamanca interprets Mexican cuisine with a Colombian accent. 106 ½ S Wilmington St, Raleigh. (919) 835-0060, gallopelon.com

The Green Light Go upstairs in The Architect Bar and Social Club to seek out the cozy hidden speakeasy (hint: look for the green light on the bookcase wall). 108 ½ E Hargett St,

Raleigh. (919) 833-4949, thelocalicon.com/thegreen-light

Watts & Ward Libations flow freely in this new 1920s-style subterranean bar, which encompasses more than 6,000 square feet of chic lounge and bar spaces. 200 S Blount St, Raleigh. (919) 896-8016, wattsandward.com

Photographs (left to right) Scott Crawford and Crawford & Son, courtesy of Phase 3 Marketing; cocktail courtesy of Local Icon Hospitality

University of Massachusetts, and, from there, around the world as a rock musician. Kumar relocated to Raleigh in 1992, attracted to the city’s indie music scene. After pursuing music for many years, she succumbed to her friends’ urging to open a restaurant. “I’ve always loved food,” claims the guitarist-turned-chef. “I learned to cook before I learned to do almost anything else.” What began as a walk-up window downtown in summer 2013 solidified into a brick-and-mortar restaurant by December that year. Her cuisine enfolds the food her mother taught her to cook as a child in India, the Asian dishes she was exposed to during her travels, and produce from Raleigh’s downtown farmers’ market. “I love the migration of spices and exploring the commonalities between cuisines,” Kumar says. “I borrow from my memories when I cook.” In addition to running a restaurant, Cheetie still rocks her passion for music. The space upstairs from Garland houses the music club, Kings, and Neptune bar, in which she and her guitarist husband, Paul, are partners. And she still performs with him in their band, Birds of Avalon. The tale of Raleigh’s sizzling dining landscape wouldn’t be complete without a nod to a few of its many food artisans. Used by chefs including Ashley Christensen and Sean Brock, Videri Chocolate is handcrafted in a bean-to-bar operation in the city’s Warehouse District by Sam Ratto and his wife, Starr. The couple sources their predominantly fair-trade and organic beans from a select group of 64 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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When Ho! Ho! Ho! Becomes Oh! Oh! No! Now’s the time for Ho! Ho! Ho! The time for decorating, shopping, wrapping, baking, card-writing. And eating. Lots of eating. The time for exercise? Not so much. But the new year is around the corner, and when many of us get on the scales in a few weeks, Ho! Ho! Ho! will become Oh! Oh! No! Want to make 2018 a different new year? Greenville Health System (GHS) has a new approach to help you get in shape and enjoy better health. Follow this checklist to make 2018 your healthiest year yet!

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• • •

Join us as we launch our new online fitness community, MoveWell. We’ll provide monthly workouts from one of our fitness specialists, video of the exercise demos and online forums for participants to connect with each other, plus giveaways, community events and more. Bookmark GHS HealthCenter—your gateway to health information and education. View blogs posts, our A-Z Health Library, Healthy All Year calendar, podcasts and more at ghs.org/healthcenter. Find a primary care provider. If you need help finding Dr. Right-for-you, call 1-844-GHS-DOCS (447-3627). Sign up for MyChart and get reminders about important health screenings, communicate with your provider, view test results and medical history—all at your fingertips. Enroll at ghs.org/mychart.

We want to be more than a place you go when you’re sick—we want to help you achieve your best health. Let’s Go! Go! Go! in 2018!

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Half-Moon Outfitters 1420 Laurens Road Greenville, SC 29607 www.halfmoonoutfitters.com

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TOWN

SPORT THE BEST RECREATION ON LAND & WATER

On the Fence: Alan Blakeborough, founder ot the Knights of Siena Fencing Academy, is well known for professionalizing fencing across the country. He’s started four gyms in the Carolinas and has groomed several NCAA athletes.

Photograph by Levi Monday

Silent Knights An obscure Greenville fencing club touchés its way to the top, one parry at a time DECEMBER 2017 / 69

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TOWN

Sport

Blade Runners A fencing school on Greenville’s Northside quietly keeps a centuries-old sport alive / by Jennifer Oladipo // photography by Levi Monday

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blunt sword sits sheathed on our fireplace mantle because I couldn’t think of anywhere else to put it. My husband, Jarrod Orange, won it as the first-place trophy in a small fencing tournament at Greenville’s Knights of Siena Fencing Academy, where he’d taken up the sport six months prior. The win was surprising, but the academy’s very existence was the real shocker. Boasting a national championship and a founder, Alan Blakeborough, with a countrywide reputation for professionalizing fencing, the school somehow remains invisible to much of the community. The Knights of Siena gym on Rutherford Road is one of four locations in

the Carolinas founded by Blakeborough. It operates out of a nondescript brick building neighbor to an auto repair shop and what appears to be a defunct motel. Blakeborough brought his fencing schools to the area after successful runs in New York and Florida. The Greenville location spawned the 2006–2007 National Sabre Team champions (the first winning team from outside of California or New York) and groomed several successful NCAA athletes over the years. Yet it’s also home to a community of regular folks who found and fell in love with the sport long after their school days ended. “Star Wars, pirates, or knights in shining armor,” says Blakeborough, explaining the common motivators for people to take up fencing. “Or they’ve seen fencing on TV. I had a student who fences for NYU now because she saw fencing in The Parent Trap.” My husband turned out to be one of the romantics. “It’s something about the chivalrous, Old World kind of thing you can still access in modern times,” Orange says. “Plus, it’s a sport where I can still be competitive for a long time.” It’s true: fencing offers a lively yet sustainable workout for aging bodies. At 35, Jarrod could compete nationally in the one of five veteran categories, the last of which is for players 70 and older. Knights of Siena’s roughly 30 students range in age from seven to 54, and their backgrounds are just as diverse. Everyone fences everyone else, using whatever assets they have. Hal Roach, a 54-year-old attorney who has been fencing less than a year, cautions against assuming adolescents are less challenging. “They will beat you within an inch of your life, and not even break a sweat doing it,” he says. “They’re these tiny little people who will just slash you to ribbons.” While Blakeborough says fencing maintains the lowest injury rates of any Olympic sport, bruises are definitely part of the experience.

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Sword Play: (below) Alan Blakeborough (left) and Hal Roach, part of the fencing group Knights of Siena, set the stance for a match. Though quite a physical workout, many players contend the sport is more mental, like a game of chess.

“It’s something about the chivalrous, Old World kind of thing you can still access in modern times. Plus, it’s a sport where I can still be competitive for a long time.”—Jarrod Orange The physicality becomes easier to understand while watching monthly tournaments. Picture this: two ivory-clad, masked opponents step onto a red piste, the narrow 5-by-46-foot strip on which they fence. They tap swords twice, then raise them in the air in a gesture reminiscent of a toast. The opponents turn slightly and “toast” the referee as well, then bounce a bit at the knees and rock on the balls of their feet until they hear, “En guarde. Ready. Fence!” A flurry of jabs and explosive leaps are unleashed, with lunges so deep rear ankles graze the floor. A blade rakes audibly across a facemask. Backbends and sideways contortions aid in dodging attacks. They move like this until a loud beep! signals one of them has landed a blow, the “phrase” has ended, and the action halts. They reset, and begin again. And again. And again. Though they often end up sweaty and panting, Knights of Siena fencers say the true workout is mental. It’s like chess, so I’ve learned to look for the moment when a fencer breaks and is headed toward a loss, or has suddenly connected the dots and is about to win. It’s hard to watch when one combatant mercilessly exploits another’s weakness, racking up points before the latter can figure out how to counter. In fact, there’s precious little time to make corrections, which is where players find the thrill: bouts are two, three, maybe four minutes long. “You have to coach yourself as you go and counteract what your opponent is doing

and how they’re adjusting. And, you’re adjusting all while you’re actually doing it,” says Aaron Collins. “I have to plan my strategy as I go.” Collins, 42, began fencing in 2013 after watching his young son fence for about a year. Having played competitive sports his entire life, the Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital doctor says he enjoys playing the sport for fun, yet is among the many who relish it as a test of their individual mettle. His coach, Blakeborough, stresses that Knights of Siena train, succeed, and fail as a team. But they fence as individuals. Blakeborough says most of his peers doubted fencing would fly in the South. He acknowledges football, basketball, and baseball reign supreme in these parts, but he focused on what would make the business work regardless of culture. Surely any place a martial arts school could thrive, a fencing school could do the same. He says parents are often ambivalent about whether to enroll their children in fencing or martial arts until he points out fencing is a college sport, one with scholarships. As a parent, I, too, consider where this sport will take our family while wondering how to work a red, gold, and black sword into our holiday décor. I suspect this trophy only heightens fencing’s allure, and my husband aims to collect more. However, victory is fleeting in fencing. Two days after his swordwinning performance, he reported that his fellow club members—men, women, and children—had lain him to waste at practice. Of course, I wanted to say touché, but, of course, I did not. Knights of Siena, 1314 Rutherford Rd, Greenville; (864) 270-6172, info@knightsofsiena.com

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A HUGE SUCCESS The Board of Directors and staff of the Metropolitan Arts Council and the 145 participating artists would like to thank those businesses and individuals for making Greenville Open Studios 2017 the absolute best weekend for Greenville’s visual artists. We appreciate their commitment to the arts in Greenville and look forward to working with them in the future. A big round of applause to the following for ensuring the success of Greenville Open Studios.

Metropolitan Arts Council | 16 Augusta Street | Downtown Greenville Keep up with the arts in Greenville all year round by visiting our website, greenvilleARTS.com.

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@MACartscouncil #GVLarts

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MERRY CHRISTMAS! TOWN_blank page.indd 6

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

CUP OF CHEER: (on cup) Herend golden laurel teacup, Michele watch, & William Levine diamond bangle, all from Hale’s Jewelers; rose gold Jubilee earring jacket from llyn strong; (on Brooke) Maya J hoop earrings from J. Britt; stacking tsavorite garnet rings from Hale’s Jewelers; chrysocolla/ malachite cuff & tourmaline calla lily ring from llyn strong

Merry & Bright This season, shine in silver and gold

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THE LOOK

Festive Charm

Holiday parties call for an added touch

/ styled by Laura Linen

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

DRINK TO THAT:

(on Jordan) Blujacket Christian jacket, Robert Talbot tie & Christopher Lena tuxedo shirt, all from Smith & James (on Brooke) MISA velvet dress from J. Britt; Esmara faux fur stole from Lidl; Maya J crescent moon necklace and hoop earrings from J. Britt; Chrysocolla cuff from llyn strong

Special thanks to models Jordan Ackley & Brooke Butler / Marilyn’s Agency; hair & make-up by Desireé Roberts / Palmetto Pout Makeup Artistry

(on table) Herend golden laurel plateware & Simon Pearce water goblets from Hale’s Jewelers; Wing sterling silverware from llyn strong; Schott Zwiesel Champagne flutes, Belgian flax linen napkins, glitter candle & velvet runner from Pottery Barn Haywood Mall; Veuve Louise prestige sparkling rosé from Lidl

76 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

Featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra conducted by Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel

Starring Rachel York

With appearances by International Ballet and Santa & Mrs. Claus

Presented by

The Peace Center December 15 & 16 at 7:30 p.m. December 17 at 3:00 p.m.

For tickets visit www.greenvillesymphony.org TOWN H@P Full Page.indd 3

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THE GOODS

Silver Belles Set your season with the finest jewels around

/ styled by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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GET SET: 1. Cuff and stud set from Smith & James + Herend golden laurel plateware from Hale’s Jewelers; 2. Chrysocolla/malachite cuff from llyn strong + Cambria bowl from Pottery Barn Haywood Mall; 3. Tacori earrings from Hale’s Jewelers + Schott Zwiesel Champagne flute from Pottery Barn HM; 4. Eterno watch from Famiglia Vagilo in Greenville; 5. 3-part tsavorite garnet earring set + Wing sterling silver spoon from llyn strong; 6. Belgian flax linen napkin from Pottery Barn HM + Krypell bangle from Hale’s Jewelers; 7. Tacori green quartz ring from Hale’s Jewelers; 8. Tourmaline calla lily ring + Wing sterling silver fork from llyn strong 9. Michele watch from Hale’s Jewelers. 78 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Retirement Perfected. 10 Fountainview Terrace • Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Bar None

The Man laments the new-fangled mixology of today, preferring the age and elegance of times past

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few days ago I was sitting impatiently at a bar doing my best not to roll my eyes. This is not an irregularity. I spend quite a bit of time in bars for both personal and professional reasons, and over the past few years I’ve watched certain trends and attitudes trespass over the simple joys of having a proper drink. I’ve begrudgingly come to accept these changes. For example, I am no longer surprised when a bartender—sorry, a mixologist—sports knuckle tattoos or looks like he sleeps in a bus terminal. I’ve come to terms with cocktail menus that contain words like artisanal, housechipped, and bespoke. I no longer shake my head in disbelief when a vintage perfume atomizer is used to top my cocktail with an absinthe vapor. And, recently, when I waited several minutes for a bartender to attach a few sprigs of locally grown herbs to the side of my glass with a tiny clothespin, my scoffs were barely audible. But the one trend I refuse to accept is what I call the “Bartender’s Skim.” I’m sure you’ve seen this small but maddening embezzlement occur at various bars. You order a drink and watch as the bartender begins toying with beakers, eye-droppers, and mini bottles of housemade bitters. Then, after what seems like an eternity of combining, mixing, and stirring, the bartender finally strains the cocktail into a glass, and you become giddy with anticipation. But you must wait. Because just when you think the bartender is finished, he dips a tiny

straw into the glass to extract some of the liquid. He then puts the straw in his mouth and tastes the drink as if something could have gone so awry during the mixing process that the Manhattan you ordered, a drink he has made hundreds of times, is at risk of tasting like Diet Dr. Pepper. This is theft masquerading under the guise of quality control. When I want to escape today’s cocktail frustrations, I head across the country to the one place I know will never succumb to trends, Musso & Frank on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. The restaurant opened in 1919 and is so unapologetic about its age that the owners still refer to the second dining room, which was added in 1934, as the “The New Room.” To sit at the bar is to experience the elegant yet uncomplicated pleasures of a well-made drink. At Musso’s, a four-ounce martini is served in a two-ounce cocktail glass, while the remaining two ounces wait patiently nearby in a small carafe surrounded by crushed ice. It’s where bartenders born sometime during the Mesozoic Era talk of bouncing Steve McQueen and what type of Scotch Gore Vidal preferred (Black Label, neat). It’s a man-bun, neck-tattoo, drink-skimming free oasis of classic style and polished service where time stands still. It’s where a man can find the strength to tolerate the pretentious trends that will undoubtedly pass, and take comfort in the knowledge that some things will never change.

80 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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MS. BEA

Wright A one-sided friendship limps along until it can no longer stand. If you value the person and want them in your life, let them know it.

Honest to Goodness: Our lady wisdom has held a fair few friendships in her time, and knows the ins and outs of everevolving relationships.

Woman to Woman Ms. Bea dives into the breaks of our sisterly bonds 1 – Throw the ball back. There is a certain amount of

give and take in a healthy friendship. When the ball is in your court and it is your turn to reach out to someone, just do it. A one-sided friendship limps along until it can no longer stand. If you value the person and want them in your life, let them know it. 2 – She’s just not that into you. Akin to the above. If you

are always throwing the ball and never get a response, it may be time to admit that dog won’t hunt. Move on. No need to announce you are dropping them off your Rolodex, but you have something valuable to offer. Stop wasting time on someone who doesn’t appreciate just how fabulous you are. 3 – Be the friend that you would like to have in your life.

Be present when needed and also just for fun. Share some laughs and accept a few tears on your shoulder now and again. Honesty is expected, yet always be kind. Oscar Wilde summed it up well: “A true friend stabs you in the front.” So, if you have to get the knife out, remember to be gentle. I’m here if you need me. Until then, y’all behave.

Illustration by Bethany Williams

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great lunch date or conversation over cocktails is good for the soul. Recently I enjoyed lunch with a dear friend, something she and I do several times a year to catch up and stay connected. Our lunches are marked by lots of laughter and a plentiful exchange of free, good advice. By the end of the hour, we are fortified and ready to face the world, wiser and happier because of the time we spent together. During our latest lunch, my companion asked what I knew from a mutual friend who now lives in another city. I reported that I hear very little from our friend anymore. As we were discussing our absent friend, we both acknowledged a hurt that accompanies an unrequited friendship, especially when you were once close. The truth is, however, friendships ebb, flow, evolve. A friend during a time in your life may transition into an old friend whom you adore running into at the mall, but you are content not to see too often. Inevitably, the farewell greeting of “let’s get together” is just something to say. The intention to follow up on the hanging invitation fades faster than a spray-on suntan. It’s nothing personal—you’ve both moved on. Some people, such as my role model lunch companion, have a particular knack for cultivating and keeping friends, while others seem quite content as loners. But whether you have many friends or a few, friendships add value, dimension, and joy to our lives. Friendships are deserving of our attention. If you are feeling anything less than positive about a current friendship, then take action! Embrace the opportunity to make the relationship more fulfilling for all involved. 82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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LUXURY LISTINGS FROM T H E M A RC H A N T C O M PA N Y

15 Jervey Road PARIS MOUNTAIN AREA Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367

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2392 Roper Mountain Road ROPER MOUNTAIN ROAD AREA Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

WOODLAND PARK AT CLEVELAND FOREST Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

59 Grand Vista Lane THE RIDGES AT PARIS MOUNTAIN Kendall Bateman 864.320.2414

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Essay

Tides That Bind For a Greenville writer, memories of a childhood restaurant run as deep as the sea / by Terry Barr // illustration by Timothy Banks

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y mother tells this story: “When you were just a little boy, no more than three, we took you downtown to the movies, to see Snow White. And when we were leaving the theater, you looked up and started pointing at the big star sign across the street: ‘Fish, Fish!’ you yelled. So there was nothing else to do but take you into the Bright Star and get you some Tenderloin of Trout.” While I think that my mother might have projected some exaggerated control onto such a little boy (no doubt she, too, wanted a piece of trout), I also understand that when it comes to fish, I have never tasted any better, or hope to taste any better, than that served at Bessemer, Alabama’s, Bright Star, a Greek-owned restaurant that has been broiling or frying seafood since 1907. Tenderloin of Trout is no longer on the menu and hasn’t been for at least thirty years,

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but no matter. There are still a variety of red snapper dishes, shrimp features, oysters, clams, and homemade seafood gumbo. Every day. I haven’t lived in Bessemer since 1974, though I make frequent trips back to see my parents—my Dad died in 2000—and my childhood friends: Joe, Fred, Randy, Juanita, Jack, Jim, and the Mulkins. In those forty-plus year trips back, there has never been a time when I haven’t eaten at the Bright Star, and out of all of those occasions—what is five times forty-three?—there was one time I didn’t order a piece of fish, and that is when I tried the Beef Tenderloin Greek-style, which I have to admit was as tender and Learn more about Endeavor or apply to join at succulent as a piece of beef could be. endeavorgreenville.com. Still, the Bright Star ships its seafood in from the Gulf of Mexico several times a week to ensure freshness. The two brothers who own and manage the restaurant, Jimmy and Nicky Koikos, are there every

day except when Alabama plays football, and then only one of them leaves for the stadium, which is a mere fortyfive miles down I-59. I tell you all of this because though I have traveled to New Orleans, New York, Charleston, San Francisco, Paris, Prague, and Madrid, I have never tasted snapper or shrimp any better, and most often not as good, as that prepared by the Koikos brothers. Yes, Hank’s in Charleston is fine, as I’m sure Husk is. I can’t wait to try it to see what Sean Brock is all about. I love Greenville’s variety of restaurants and have found the crab cakes at Soby’s and the shrimp and grits at Simpsonville’s Stella’s to be the best in the state. I have sampled seafood at Sassafras, The Lazy Goat (excellent Paella), Larkin’s, Roost, Jianna’s, and I have enjoyed it all. I feel lucky to live in such a high-trending food town. Please believe me. Maybe seafood goes as honey goes, though. We are supposed to consume the honey that is produced locally as our bodies crave the resources they have adapted to. As transplanted Greenvillians, we buy ours from Pelzer now. It goes so well on granola or in Earl Grey. But I have Bessemer, the Bright Star, and the Gulf of Mexico in my blood and soul. I am in Bessemer right now actually, and last night, eleven of us, including my mother, gathered at the Star. I decided on the Snapper Throats—the best meat in the fish, so tender and warm that it literally melts down your own throat. Of course, the butter and Greek seasoning help. My daughter Pari, a Greenville native, and her husband, Taylor, dined with us, as did my wife, a native Persian. Pari ordered a full plate of fried crab claws, Taylor got the “Texas Special” (a piece of Greek snapper, a piece of beef tenderloin, and a bowl of lobster-crabmeat au gratin), and my wife chose the snapper Greek-style. During the dinner, my mother retold the story—and really, I can’t hear it enough—of my “Fish, Fish” childhood. We all laughed; we all nearly passed out, and I don’t know if that was from the fact that we had ingested just a few Bloody Marys, or that there was no food left anywhere on the table—except for a homemade roll or two—or from the reality that when you’re home, everything makes you want to burrow in, to rest in the world that comforts you the most. The life you had. The one that never really leaves. As we were exiting the Star and standing beneath the neon sign that beckoned to me all those decades ago— and still does—Fred told me about his and his wife Janet’s recent trip to Italy: “It was great, of course, but when we returned, everyone asked me to tell them what I ate there, assuming that it had to be better than anything I could ever eat here. But they’re wrong. Nothing over there could compare to the Bright Star’s red snapper or the food I get in many other spots in Birmingham (the big city fifteen miles northeast of Bessemer).” I hugged my friend because he’s so dear to me and because he’s right, and because I know exactly what he means. Of course I do. Fish. Fish. Terry Barr is the author of the essay collection, Don’t Date Baptists and Other Warnings from My Alabama Mother, published by Third Lung Press and available at local bookstores. His website is terrybarr.com, and he blogs for The Writing Cooperative at medium.com. He teaches Creative Nonfiction, Modern Novel, and Southern Film at Presbyterian College and lives in Greenville with his family. DECEMBER 2017 / 87

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SOUL of a chef IN 2010, SEAN BROCK WON THE JAMES BEARD AWARD FOR BEST CHEF SOUTHEAST. SINCE THEN, HE HAS CATAPULTED TO NATIONAL FAME AS A CHEF, COOKBOOK AUTHOR, AND TELEVISION CELEBRITY. NOW, HE BRINGS HIS CULINARY VISION TO GREENVILLE WITH HUSK RESTAURANT, UNITING DINERS WITH THE UPCOUNTRY FOOD OF THEIR FOREBEARS. THE CHEF’S TRUE OBSESSION ISN’T ONLY ABOUT COOKING—IT’S ABOUT KEEPING THE PAST ALIVE.

BY M. LINDA LEE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL MEHAFFEY

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onsider a head of lettuce. It’s odd to think that something so innocuous could be instrumental in setting one of America’s great chefs on his life’s journey. Yet, that’s pretty much what happened. Sean Brock, the muchlauded Southern chef, cookbook author, and culinary celebrity who just opened Husk restaurant in a gorgeously restored 1903 dry-goods store in Greenville’s West End, has wanted to cook since he was a teenager. “As a kid, I never said it out loud, but I was mesmerized by watching anyone in a professional kitchen in a chef coat with sharp knives and flames,” he admits. Brock landed his first restaurant-cooking job when he was in high school in southwestern Virginia. One day, the restaurant received a box of lettuce. While the other cooks were extolling the beauty of the leafy heads, Brock remembers tasting one and thinking, “This is really bad.” He couldn’t understand why all these people were getting so excited about tasteless lettuce. “I didn’t realize at the time where I would end up and how that moment would affect me,” Brock says. It was a moment that would define his cuisine. He was struck by the fact that the boxed lettuce lacked the flavor of the lettuce from his grandmother’s garden. Her lettuce carried the essence of the heirloom seeds that she saved from year to year and the soil in which it grew. “My entire cooking career has been a search for that flavor,” the chef declares—the alchemy of just-picked vegetables, treated with a light hand, and served with love. As a boy in the mountains of rural Virginia, Brock and his family ate out of the garden.

“WE DIDN’T EAT TOMATOES YEAR-ROUND; WE DIDN’T HAVE LETTUCE YEAR-ROUND,” HE POINTS OUT. “AND I NEVER EVEN NOTICED THAT AS A KID, BECAUSE I DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD HAVE TOMATOES YEAR-ROUND.

Eating and cooking with the seasons is in my DNA because it’s so connected to the earth. Everything goes back to the dirt.” After culinary school at Johnson & Wales in Charleston, Brock worked at Peninsula Grill. Eventually, he was tasked with buying the restaurant’s food, and he started working with local farmers. “That’s when I realized how special my grandmother’s collection of seeds was,” recalls Brock. “So every time I went home, I would beg her for some of the seeds she kept in prescription medication bottles in a cabinet.”

BROCK SOLID / Chef Sean Brock relaxes behind the wheel of his prized 1969 Plymouth Road Runner, which he purchased after selling his extensive bourbon collection. Imparting influence and inspiration on his cooking are Brock’s many passions, including collecting folk art and playing music. “My current obsession is the electric guitar,” he says. “I don’t go anywhere without my guitar. To me, it’s a symbol of the way I’m changing as a selfactualized person.”

Brock’s seed collection has evolved more than a decade later to include hundreds of varietals—so many he’s afraid to count them. Why are seeds so important? “Seeds are the keepers of stories,” he tells me. “They carry the wisdom of hundreds of years. Seeds tell a story about a very particular place and period of time and a family. If those seeds don’t survive, that story is lost. Seeds allow us to stay connected.”

ROOT BOUND

That connection is what triggered Brock’s headlong leap into researching cuisines and his quest for flavor. He approaches this work with the same single-mindedness he applies to everything that piques his insatiable thirst for knowledge. “When I want to research a cuisine, I start with agriculture,” Brock explains. “That leads me to subcultures and cultures, then I try to understand that, and the process just starts. All those influences add something to the pot, and that’s what gets me so excited about the future of Southern cuisine.” His first step is to download or buy everything from church community cookbooks to agricultural journals and field manuals. “The South is so diverse, I could spend my entire life studying the micro-cuisines and micro-regions,” confesses Brock. “It’s curiosity and fascination and being a nerd, but it’s also so enlightening and it changes my perspective, and that inspires my cooking.” He stops and looks across the room, suddenly conscious of his words. “Geez, I sound so serious,” he says, throwing back his head in laughter. “I’m really not that serious!” His newest project, however, is no laughing matter. Driven by a desire to unearth Southern food stories before it’s too late, Brock has begun interviewing grandmothers throughout the South using a hand-held recorder and a camera. “I have a fear that the generation

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“IT’S SAFE TO SAY THAT MY OBSESSIONS HAVE CONTRIBUTED SOMETHING TO SOUTHERN COOKING, AND THAT’S AMAZING. WHEN YOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO SOMETHING THAT BIG, IT’S A PRIVILEGE.”

that knows the most is fading away,” he laments. “The grandmothers have the wisdom and knowledge of the old ways, and that’s where great cooking lies.” “You have to realize that not everything is on Google,” Brock continues. “I have found that the true breakthrough discoveries are in the spoken word, through sitting down with someone and asking them what they ate as a kid and what their grandma cooked.”

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conversation about benne with Glenn Roberts, the visionary founder of Anson Mills in Columbia, South Carolina, ten years ago led to one such breakthrough. “Once he started talking, I realized the importance of storytelling and sharing and connecting with human beings,” says the chef. “When you taste benne for the first time, you’re imagining what sesame tastes like, and it’s completely different. Then you wonder why it’s completely different, and the dialogue begins with genetically engineering plants and breeding flavor out. Then benne can lead you into the difficult conversations about the slave trade. That’s the power of food. Food is the great connector.”

If Brock’s process sounds obsessive, it is. The chef’s passion pushes him to dive ever deeper into a subject, plunging down until he finds that elusive kernel of knowledge.

“I have a tendency to take everything way too far—it’s a psychological disorder,” HE QUIPS. “It’s not understanding moderation, and not having any desire to try to understand moderation. Why do I have to have 300 guitar

pedals? Why do I have to own every cookbook printed in the nineteenth century in America? That’s the kind of person I am. I enjoy information because I enjoy sharing it. I enjoy teaching and seeing how that changes people and things. It’s safe to say that my obsessions have contributed something to Southern cooking, and that’s amazing. When you can contribute to something that big, it’s a privilege.”

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Consuming passions

That intensity carries over to his interests outside of the kitchen. “My current obsession is the electric guitar,” he says. “I don’t go anywhere without my guitar. To me, it’s a symbol of the way I’m changing as a selfactualized person. I’ve been a novice guitar player since I was 14, but I got frustrated and gave it up and spent all my time cooking. I always wanted to take lessons but never did. Now I’m doing it. I study music theory every day. I take guitar lessons and practice at least three hours a day, and sometimes four or five.” Like everything else Brock tackles, this is no frivolous hobby. Galvanized by his adopted hometown of Nashville where he has friends in the music business, Brock has become smitten with north Mississippi hill country blues and hopes to record his own music. “For my great-grandkid to have a record with music that I’ve made, how cool is that? That would be so amazing!”

p

erhaps owing to his recent health challenges, the chef immerses himself in positive psychology, self-actualization, and anything to do with self-care. To that end, he seeks out alternative therapies such as Reiki, acupuncture, somatic experiencing, and lots of meditation. Then there’s his fixation with folk art, which has turned his Nashville home into a “folk art museum” that he shares with his two French bulldogs, Ruby and Linda. Brock began collecting the art in 2014, after a broken knee laid him up for weeks. While he was researching the Mississippi blues during his involuntary down time, his girlfriend suggested he might also like the Alabama folk artist Mose Tolliver. “Once I started doing research into folk art, it linked art, music, food, literature, and storytelling all together in a way that allowed me to truly understand what soul was,” Brock muses.

“You hear people talk about soul food, but what does that mean? To me, it means you take minimal things and make something extraordinary. When I was a kid, a typical meal would be soup, beans, cornbread, killed lettuces—that was the greatest meal on earth. It’s simply made from pantry ingredients, but it brought so much fulfillment, and it warmed my soul. Folk art does the same thing for me. And I get that same emotion from the blues. It hits my core. To me, that’s soul.”

Essence of the upcountry

In 2010, Brock hatched the idea of cooking with only Southern ingredients. The result was Husk, the chef’s ode to Southern cuisine in Charleston. That was the same year Brock brought home the coveted James Beard Award for Best Chef Southeast. Husk was named “Best New Restaurant in America” by Bon Appétit magazine in 2011. “Husk is Sean’s vision,” says David Howard, president of the Neighborhood Dining Group, of which Husk is a part. “Through Husk, Sean spreads the word about his philosophy of the South’s culinary heritage.” Brock,

however, seems to marvel at his restaurant’s success. “It’s been amazing to see the chefs that Husk has produced over the years and where the restaurant is now,” he adds. And it just keeps getting better. Travels to Japan over the past year have shaped the chef’s thinking about hospitality. The Japanese obsession with how the guest feels has prompted him to look beyond the kitchen. “Japanese hospitality anticipates the guests’ needs before the guests even know the needs exist,” observes Brock. “When you leave a restaurant in Japan, the owner or the chef is outside to tell you good-bye and thank-you, and they stand there bowing until you are out of eyesight to show appreciation. If you view hospitality as a service, what an opportunity that is.” When distilling regional Southern flavors at Husk, Brock is careful not to let creativity cloud the regional identity of his cuisine. His menu attempts to answer the question: “What is it like to eat in this place at this moment?” That sense of being present infuses all parts of the chef’s life. “Really appreciating the moment and being thankful for what you’re standing there doing, that gives you great respect for the people around you, from the guests to the team, and also the products.” As far as local products go in Greenville, Brock and his team are

“THE SOUTH IS SO DIVERSE, I COULD SPEND MY ENTIRE LIFE STUDYING THE MICRO-CUISINES AND MICRO-REGIONS.”

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“REALLY APPRECIATING THE MOMENT AND BEING THANKFUL FOR WHAT YOU’RE STANDING THERE DOING, THAT GIVES YOU GREAT RESPECT FOR THE PEOPLE AROUND YOU, FROM THE GUESTS TO THE TEAM, AND ALSO THE PRODUCTS.”

NEW MAN / Brock’s talent, commitment, and pursuit of Southern cuisine have propelled him to the spotlight as one of the best and most popular chefs in the United States. Personal setbacks, however, have come with that rise. Now, with a focus on selfcare, Brock is living with a commitment to health, of both body and mind.

currently focusing on the Three Sisters, beans, corn, and squash—the three main agricultural crops of the Cherokee and other Native American groups. “I’m most excited about continuing my research with Cherokee cooking, because I have Cherokee blood,” notes the chef. This is a daunting task, as there is hardly anything written on the subject. “You have to really dig for information about Cherokee cooking,” Brock claims. “Everything is considered—they even make yellow jacket soup. That provides so much inspiration for us. What else is out there in the wild that we can forage for and use in this cuisine that’s better for the environment and better for our bodies?”

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ean Brock feels a strong pride of place for the southwestern Virginia mountains where he grew up. “That’s where I was born and where my family has lived their whole lives,” he says. “Everything that happened to me there in my formative years made me who I am as a chef and as a human being.

That’s my place, and I can pay my respects to that place by carrying its stories on through food.”

Given Husk’s location in the Blue Ridge foothills, Husk Greenville brings the chef closer to his beloved mountains, as he continues to follow his personal canon of Southern cuisine. “There’s so much to explore here,” he maintains. “From a culinary standpoint, the Greenville area is an undiscovered world. What a great opportunity to make a small contribution to Upcountry cooking!” A look of gratitude lights up his face as if he is realizing something for the first time: “I get to do that for a living, I get paid to do that. I’m a lucky guy. And it’s a crazy journey.”

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S U G A R M A V E N S BETTY CROCKER MIGHT HAVE HER PICTURE ON A BOX , BUT THESE FOUR GREENVILLE-BASED PASTRY CHEFS ARE WHIPPING UP SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW IN THEIR KITCHENS. LIKE THE INDULGENT DESSERTS THEY SO LOVINGLY CRAFT , EACH OF THEIR STORIES IS UNIQUE AND LAYERED , A CONCOCTION OF MANY INGREDIENTS THAT , WHEN BLENDED IN JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNTS , COMES TOGETHER TO FORM SOMETHING PRETTY , WELL , SWEET. b y M A R Y C AT H R Y N A R M S T R O N G / P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y PA U L M E H A F F E Y

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“My family likes things very traditional and simple—oatmeal cookies, banana bread, things like that,” she says. “So when I make things at home to try, they’re not usually crazy about it. I can always rely on honesty from them!” The Anchorage, 586 Perry Ave, Greenville, (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

M E G H A N N E A L: R E S T A U R A N T 17

IRMA JOHNS ON: T HE ANCHORAGE

Christmas Day at Irma Johnson’s home is not unlike the festivities celebrated by millions of families across the United States; there’s gifts, sweets, all those other holiday trimmings. December 24th, however, is another matter. “My background is Mexican, so I grew up with different traditions than my husband,” Johnson says. “During the holidays at our home, it’s all about Mexico on Christmas Eve, and my kids can experience the culture and the foods that I ate growing up. The 25th, I give to him.” Johnson brings this sense of versatility and cultural conscience to The Anchorage in the Village of West Greenville. Her husband’s job demanded the family relocate frequently, and she picked up many of her culinary cues during years spent overseas and abroad. She met Chef Greg McPhee after a move to Greenville nearly three years ago, back when McPhee was executive chef of Restaurant 17 at Hotel Domestique. When McPhee made the jump from Travelers Rest to West Greenville, Johnson followed suit. They paired his proclivity for favoring local, seasonal components over truck-delivered fare with her fearless alacrity to put them into dessert form, and so far, it’s been a good fit. Her one stipulation? Never to make the same thing twice. “I am always thinking of what’s coming up next, what new seasonal products I can use,” Johnson says. “It’s fun to be introduced to these new ingredients so I can work them into desserts that I haven’t tried in the past.” Johnson doesn’t eat many desserts, preferring cheese and bread to the items she plates at the restaurant. She keeps a record of what she’s concocted in the kitchen, a visual guide that keeps her motivated and steers her away from getting too repetitive with her recipes. It’s a challenge, she says, to keep things fresh when so much has already been done before. But she has one audience who’s always willing to keep her straight.

J U S T D ES S E R TS :

(oppos i te top left) Irma John s on ca me to The Anchorage wi th Chef Greg McPhee when i t opened in Ja nua ry of thi s yea r. Her knack for cra fting fres h reci pes — like the pi s tachio s emi freddo wi th ca nd ied g inger (top rig ht) a nd the bu rnt lemon ta rt wi th deep chocola te ice crea m — keep s confection cu s tomers coming back.

“So, I hate sweets.” It’s an odd thing to hear from Meghan Neal; after all she is the pastry chef at Restaurant 17 in exclusive Hotel Domestique. But Neal quickly follows up with her reasoning. “But that’s just because I work with them all day. I still taste every single thing I make, every part that goes into my desserts, just to make sure things have that perfect balance of salty and sweet.” Inspired by her upbringing in the GreenvilleSpartanburg area, Neal’s ever-changing menu of dessert offerings are light on the chocolate and heavy on the staples her parents and grandparents used in the kitchen. She’s unabashed by butter, enamored with pecans, (pronounced “pea-cans”), and known to use Duke’s Mayonnaise once in awhile—a great way to keep things moist, she promises. So it wasn’t easy, the transition from cooking with little regard for health requirements to working on a property that hosts top cyclists—with top dietary restrictions—from around the world. “It was rough at first,” Neal says of those initial months. She’d been invited to Restaurant 17 by former Halls Chophouse co-worker Executive Chef Nick Graves, but wasn’t sure if she had the skills to plate her own creations. “Then I started getting ideas. Taking these kind of classic Southern things and seeing how I could make them different. It made me a whole lot better at my job, because I had to figure things out on my own without being taught.” s a member of a self-proclaimed “big dessert family,” Neal says the holidays have always been a favorite time of year. Although she typically denies their requests for pudding-based dishes with crushed-up Oreos and whipped topping, Neal says her baking becomes even more intimate when it’s shared with loved ones. “That’s the only time I truly get to see how someone reacts to my food,” she explains. “At work, people are sitting at their tables, and I miss it. When they’re right in front of me, I get to see how much they enjoy it. I’m just painting with sweets on plate, and I love it.” Restaurant 17 at Hotel Domestique, 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest, (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

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“I AM ALWAYS THINKING OF WHAT’S COMING UP NEXT , WHAT NEW SEASONAL PRODUCTS I CAN USE. IT’S FUN TO BE INTRODUCED TO NEW INGREDIENTS (LIKE PAWPAWS) SO I CAN WORK THEM INTO DESSERTS THAT I HAVEN’T TRIED IN THE PAST.”—IRMA JOHNSON

S TAC I E AMESBUR Y: TABLE 3 01 / S OB Y 'S ON T HE S IDE Among the bricolage of cupcakes, bars, cake pops, and other homemade decadent desserts that take up residence in the clear pastry case at Soby’s on the Side, one item stands apart. It’s simple enough—a sugar cookie decorated to match the holiday du jour—but to its creator, the baked confection is a symbol of personal history. “The holidays are about the comfort of traditions that you grew up with in your family,” says Soby’s on the Side pastry chef Stacie Amesbury. “My mom would always do decorated sugar cookies. I brought that recipe with me to work because I loved it so much.”

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RA I S I N G TH E C A K ES :

(left to right) Meghan Neal of Restaurant 17 crafts a creative take on sweet potato pie (dulce de leche, toasted marshmallow fluff, espresso mascarpone, candied pecans, and a cornmeal crust); red velvet cheesecake is one of several decadent desserts Stacie Amesbury makes for Soby’s on the Side during the holiday season.

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B A K E D T O C O N F E CT I O N :

(clockwise from opposite top left) Restaurant 17’s brunoise - cut Arkansas black apple tart with brown butter caramel, candied walnuts, and vanilla bean whipped cream; Meghan Neal, pastry chef at Restaurant 17, with pretzel buns ; peppermint brownies from Soby’s on the Side; SOTS (and Table 301) pastry chef Stacie Amesbury adds icing to a red velvet cheese cake; Chef Amesbury; pistachio -topped éclairs from SOTS ; Neal’s gold- gilded macarons ; Neal plates a delicate sweet potato pie.

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Amesbury’s devotion to baking began in an unexpected place—a high school job at the local Dunkin’ Donuts. It was one of the franchise’s few locations where the pastries were made in-house, and Amesbury often helped the bakers ice and decorate. Her picky palate made the decision to join the pastry ranks versus the culinary biz an even easier one; she simply refused to eat and cook things she didn’t like. But the biggest difference between the two facets of the industry, Amesbury says, is that baking is an exact science. And an unforgiving one at that. “In cooking, you can do a little bit of this, a little bit of that, and it still comes out okay,” she says. “With desserts, people are expecting it to look and taste a certain way. I can’t really get away with using too much baking powder or coffee extract instead of vanilla.” Rhode Island runaway—she couldn’t stand the cold and snow—Amesbury worked in Upstate New York, Florida, and New Jersey following her graduation from Johnson & Wales University. She and her husband moved to Greenville in July of 2012 to be closer to his parents and start a family of their own, and in August, she joined the Table 301 family. Her job doesn’t really feel like a “job.” At least not all the time. “I don’t feel like I just go into work,” Amesbury says. “I feel privileged to go into a place and make something new every day, to see the happiness on people’s faces after they eat something I’ve created.” Soby’s on the Side, 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

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"BAKING HAS ALWAYS BEEN MY LOVE LANGUAGE, BECAUSE I USE IT AS A GIFT. IT’S NOT SOMETHING PEOPLE JUST SIT UP ON A SHELF AND LOOK AT. WE CAN ENJOY IT TOGETHER." —HOLLY WHATLEY

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S H OLLY WHAT LE Y: C AV I AR

& BANANA S

She was wrapping up for the day. Holly Whatley’s work finished, the young pastry chef had retreated behind the Caviar & Bananas’ bake shop counter, chatting away on the phone while doing some cleaning, too busy to notice the man who’d made his way past the gleaming display cases and into her workspace. “Are you the baker?” he asked, a thick New York accent tilting the “er” upward so it came out like “ah.” Unsure of whether she should respond—did he eat something really terrible?—the Greenville native paused a moment before confirming that, yes, she was. “Phenomenal,” the stranger replied, gesturing towards the colorful collection of desserts ensconced in their glass chambers. “Just phenomenal.” That man and his wife still come by monthly. And they purchase one of everything in the case. It was a confirmation of sorts for Whatley, who says she felt unqualified and intimidated when C&B recruited her to helm the bakery as executive pastry chef. After all, she’d just spent two and a half years as an hourly “underling” at Charleston’s posh Peninsula Grill, crafting the restaurant’s famous coconut cakes even though, admittedly, she’s not a huge fan of the shredded fruit. Not to mention she’d already begun sending out résumés that advertised her business degree from Presbyterian College, not the culinary education she’d earned at the Art Institute of Charleston. Regardless, Whatley signed on to the C&B team, and a month or so later, the owners invited her to help open the

S H AR P C O O K I E :

(above) Holly Whatley left Charleston to come back to her Greenville home to head the pastry program at Caviar & Bananas ; (clockwise from opposite left) red velvet cookies, ginger bread cookies, and hot chocolate marshmallow cake are features on this year’s C & B holiday dessert menu, which Whatley created.

Greenville store. For the girl who grew up the baker in her household, it was a “full circle ticket” to return to the city that birthed her passion at an early age. “Baking has always been my love language,” Whatley explains. “Because I can use it as a gift. It’s not something people just sit up on a shelf and look at. We can enjoy it together.” That gift has been shared with Whatley’s friends and family for some time now. And since she’s created this year’s C&B holiday dessert menu, you’ll soon get to see what all the fuss is about. “I love the holidays because it’s like how we view the weekend when we’re dieting,” she laughs. “There’s no rules. It’s whatever you want, whatever makes you happy. And, for me, sweets are that comfort food.” Caviar & Bananas, 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com ))) FOR RECIPES, GO TO TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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ennessee Haven is an urban lifestyle boutique in Greenville’s booming, historic West End. Understated, yet exceptional. Sophisticated, yet casual. Awaken your curiosity and let your authentic self shine as you plan your very own loft, condo, traditional home or vacation sanctuary. Explore Hennessee Haven, a destination for unique home décor, great gifts and interior design services. For the fashion savvy woman looking for something special, Hennessee Haven will showcase select accessories and unique gifts to satisfy those guilty pleasures. Whether you are hosting a tailgate party or celebrating the holidays, be sure to include Hennessee Haven in your next event. Anticipate surprises with each visit!

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vy Salon is the premier AVEDA salon in the Upstate, with two locations, staffed by highly trained professionals striving to consistently exceed expectations. This holiday season we are showcasing “Ivy’s Favorite Things” - the perfect go-to gifts which benefit Janet Danner Joyful Ornaments - our favorite local charity which supports women in the Upstate struggling with cancer. Come see their handcrafted ornaments as well as our many value gift sets sets that can fit into any budget! Each of “Ivy’s Favorite Things” supports this wonderful local 501(c)(3) which goes above and beyond to care for their annual award recipients. They walk through the struggle with these women, to ensure all their needs are met. At Ivy, we are passionate to do our part in making a difference in our community offering you great hair and much more!

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hopping at our location at The Shops at Greenridge, off Woodruff Road, will surely make this Christmas memorable! We have a select quantity of unique styles in our store so you can be sure to find the perfect gift for every special woman in your life. From fashion-forward styles, to the best accessories this season has to offer, shop for your mom, daughter, and grandma…all in one location. Our selection is so affordable with stunning earrings starting at just $8.95, tops from $24.50, and jeans, no more than $79! We even have lines exclusive to LT. Not sure what to buy her? In store gift cards are always available! Find everything on her list this holiday season at Lizard Thicket Boutique!

We would love to show you what we are all about. Come visit us at our Downtown salon on Main Street, or our Eastside salon located at 3728 Pelham Road!

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Roll With It: Traditional viennoiserie is now available at several Upstate cafés and bakeries. For more, turn to page 112.

Oui, Oui! No need for a plane—Greenville’s got your croissants right here DECEMBER 2017 / 111

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ft)

CITY

Dish

Flake Out

Greenville’s bakeries are turning out more than cakes and cookies—they now have a French twist / by Stephanie Burnet te // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

SWA M P R A B B I T CA F É A N D G RO C E RY WAT E R T O W E R D I S T R I C T

ORDER THIS: CHOCOLATE CROISSANT A little over six years ago Mary Walsh and Jacqueline Oliver opened Swamp Rabbit with no culinary experience but a vision to offer local foods outside of a farmers’ market format. Today the market/café/ pizzeria is a mainstay of the Swamp Rabbit Trail in the heart of the Water Tower District and home to a chocolate croissant so aptly restrained that two should be ordered at the outset.

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he croissant never fails to amaze with its cathedral structure and buttery satisfaction, especially during winter months paired with morning coffee, tea, or cocoa. Is it Michelin’s influence or simply good fortune that’s brought not one, but five notable viennoiseries to Greenville? We offer a round up of these bakehouses who produce the lofty pastry.

BA K E RO O M V I L L AG E O F W E S T G R E E N V I L L E

ORDER THIS: CLASSIC CROISSANT Wade Taylor launched the artisan bakery with wholesale ambitions only to discover bakery-obsessed patrons lined down the street any time Bake Room opened to the public. His attention to detail, coupled with a German steam-deck oven, produces flaky crunch with downy interiors. Though he honed his craft at the French-leaning Persephone in Jackson, Wyoming, it’s locally milled grains that impart a Carolina stamp upon the classic croissant.

L E P E T I T C RO I S SA N T WEST END

ORDER THIS: ALMOND CROISSANT The new kid on the block is Le Petit Croissant under the tutelage of Chef Vincent Caradonna who brings a distinguished pedigree to his Main Street chocolatier (Girard in Paris, Tumbador in New York, The Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas). Pastry—including a decadent croissant filled with almond flour paste—is exactingly made in the West End shop, which also produces reams of caramels, fine chocolates, and flawless cream puffs.

U P C O U N T RY P ROV I S I O N S D O W N T O W N T R AV E L E R S R E S T

ORDER THIS: HAM & CHEESE CROISSANT The perfectly approachable bistro just steps off of Main Street in TR belies a storied past: owners Cheryl and Stephen Kraus studied at the French Culinary Institute in New York in preparation for opening Upcountry Provisions. A case filled with triple chocolate brownies, latte-frosted cinnamon rolls, and scones are enticing, but it’s a ham and cheese croissant that conveys the bakery’s métier in a single bite.

French Connection: Greenville’s growth has brought a surge of shops offering buttery pastries, filled with sweet and savory options, or left in exquisite simplicity.

B U T T E RC R E A M BA K E H O U S E H E R I TAG E G R E E N D I S T R I C T

ORDER THIS: ESPRESSO CROISSANT Karrie Daze honed her pastry skills in Europe following her husband Glen’s military career for 15 years. Now the two work side-byside at Buttercream Bakehouse just east of downtown Greenville creating renowned wedding cakes as well as pastry, Danish, and killer classic turnovers. A mini dark chocolate coffee croissant, made with illy espresso powder, is a stand out, especially when ordered via the bakery’s drivethrough window.

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KITCHEN

Aid

CITRUS-SEARED SCALLOPS WITH BACON Serves 2

INGREDIENTS:

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n December, all eyes are on the lights. We’re focused on the glitter of the holidays, the glow of annual gatherings, all that twinkles during this crazy, busy, magical season. Even our meal planning and cooking tend to turn outward this month: cocktail parties, baked goods, holiday feasts. I treasure the happy crush of a crowded kitchen—but I have also learned that some of the holiday season’s sweetest moments are the ones we often overlook. In a time where someone, something is ever tugging on us, it feels a little strange to put the phone away and pour a glass of wine just for yourself. It might not come naturally to skip your Monday night workout in favor of a slow stroll through the market, following your eyes and not your grocery list. And having the fishmonger wrap up a package of scallops for no special reason might stand out in a season where “special” is usually intended for others. But why spend all the celebration on the sparkle of your busy calendar? Can’t a quiet weeknight in early winter be occasion enough to put out the china and cook a lavish meal? Citrus-seared scallops pop off the plate and in your mouth in one complex burst of sweetness—orange grove sweet then ocean sweet, followed, perhaps, by the pleasing umami crunch of bacon. The clink of fork against plate, the swirl of straw-colored wine in your glass, the candle burning down while you linger at the table—winter’s gifts, all of them. This season, be present for them.

8–10 fresh sea scallops 4 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into lardons 2 navel oranges, divided 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. honey Zest of one navel orange Large handful of micro greens Kosher salt and pepper to taste

I treasure the happy crush of a crowded kitchen, but I’ve learned that some of the season’s sweetest moments are the ones we overlook.

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Pat scallops very dry with a paper towel. Season both sides generously with kosher salt and freshlycracked pepper. 2. Add bacon lardons to a cold, heavy-bottomed skillet. Bring heat up to medium and cook bacon until golden brown and crispy, turning as needed. Remove bacon to a plate with a slotted spoon, reserving the fat in the skillet. 3. While bacon cooks, zest one orange and then juice it. Whisk together orange juice, zest, apple cider vinegar, honey, and a pinch of salt in a small bowl. Set aside. Supreme the remaining orange and reserve segments. 4. Return the skillet to medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, add scallops and sear for 2–3 minutes. Flip and sear the other side for another 2 minutes. Divide scallops between two plates. 5. Working quickly, pour orange juice mixture into the hot skillet. Stir to loosen any browned bits for one minute; then spoon the reduced sauce over the scallops on each plate. Top with a handful of orange segments, crispy bacon, and micro greens. Adapted from recipes by Susan Spungen and Tyler Florence.

Savor the Present

Treat yourself to vibrant, citrus-seared scallops this holiday season / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

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OPEN

Bar

Champagne Dreams Amp up your holiday fête with a festive rosé / by Jac Valitchka // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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e should have seen it coming. With “Rosé All Day”–adorned coffee mugs, T-shirts, and tote bags, the pink drink is having yet another round of its 15 minutes. Rosé Champagne however, with a capital “C,” is, let’s say, less pool party and more posh. To earn the Champagne title, the wine must hail from the eponymous northeastern region of France, which means (spoiler alert!) prosecco and cava are sparkling wines, but alas, not Champagne. For the holidays—or, if you’re one of my best friends and it’s just a Tuesday—you might pop a top and declare the moment a true celebration, prevailing upon expectant guests, friends, and family the ethereal delight of Champagne. Unsure if your predilection is too indulgent? Be like Lily. Lily Bollinger, who for decades helmed the famed and still family-run Bollinger Champagne house. In her words: “I drink it when I’m happy and when I’m sad. Sometimes I drink it when I’m alone. When I have company, I consider it obligatory. I trifle with it if I’m not hungry and drink it when I am. Otherwise, I never touch it— unless I’m thirsty.”

TA I T T I N G E R P R E ST I G E ROSÉ, $67 This fizz is from Reims, the place that started it all. It’s a blend that takes more production and thus a little bit more cost to bring to life.

N AT H A L I E FA L M E T T E N TAT I O N RO S É E , $ 6 6 France’s Nathalie Falmet studied chemistry and has a diploma in oenology. She took over the family vineyard and produces a lovely bottle bursting with independent craftswomanship.

RUINART ROSÉ, $90 A splurge for sure, but also one of the oldest Champagne houses and most elegant sips to savor the sublime. Try it for a Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve showstopper. All of the above are available at Northampton Wine + Dine: 211A E Broad St, (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

ÉTIENNE CALSAC, ROSE DE CRAIE, $50

Ring Around the Rosé:

The most festive of bottles, pink Champagne is the way to bring life—and good times—to any holiday party.

Is it the limestone and chalk in the soil, or the limited-release, 1,300-bottle production that makes this bubbly a sure bet for a good time? Cheers to finding out. Available at The Community Tap: 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

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Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra

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FOCUS: Give the Gift of Music this Christmas! A D D R E S S : 200 East Saint John St., Spartanburg E S T. : 1 9 2 8

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unrift Adventures, ‘The Unique Outdoor Shop,’ has been outfitting customers with the best outdoor clothing and gear for more than 35 years. While the Upstate has seen tremendous change, Sunrift has stood the test of time and is still locally owned and operated by Bo Terry and his dedicated and experienced staff. Sunrift is in a historic cotton gin in downtown Travelers Rest, where a century ago ginned and baled cotton was loaded onto cars along the Greenville and Northern Railway (also known as the Swamp Rabbit Railroad). The old railroad bed is now the Swamp Rabbit Trail, and the old cotton gin is now an outdoor outfitter like no other. The store offers a great selection of outdoor gear and apparel. From bikes to kayaks, rain jackets to hiking boots, car roof racks to backpacks and tents, they have just want you need to enjoy life outdoors. Great brands such as Patagonia, The North Face, Merrell, Yakima, Hobie® kayaks and Kona bikes are featured throughout the store.

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hat could be better than the gift of music this Christmas? Under the baton of guest conductor John Young Shik Concklin, the iconic film scores of John Williams will come to life with the Spartanburg Philharmonic in the Spring of 2018. Enjoy an evening of magical and exciting tunes ranging from The Imperial March from Star Wars to Hedwig’s Theme from Harry Potter. You do not want to miss this wonderful opportunity to listen to these pieces performed live. Tickets are on sale now, just in time for Christmas. So go ahead and prepare for the look of absolute joy on your gift-recipient’s face! #giftgoals

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©2017 Distributed by Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits, Stamford, CT 06901. Please Enjoy Responsibly.

DECEMBER 2017 / 119

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

AMERICAN THE ANCHORAGE

Chef McPhee’s blue-bedecked restaurant is causing quite the splash. With a menu focused on hyper-local produce, it changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include Korean BBQ Octopus, Royal Red Shrimp Capelletti, and Timberock Farms Muscovy Duck. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, and Bake Room bread. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch, which is now being served Sundays. $-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com AUGUSTA GRILL

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler.

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRICK STREET CAFÉ

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try Mom’s Spaghetti, Miss Sara’s Crab Cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com

$$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Crêpe du Jour

Photograph by Andrew Huang

Much more than offering “really thin pancakes,” this downtown establishment brings a taste of Europe to the Upstate with delicate, delicious French fare. The diverse menu includes breakfast options like the bacon, egg, and potato or The Main Street with fresh fruit and granola (right). For lunch and dinner, try the tomato pesto or the Norwegian with smoked salmon, dill cream cheese, and arugula. But don't fill up—dessert comes sugary-sweet and Nutella-stuffed! Crêpe du Jour also serves up specialty cocktails, coffee beverages, and wine.

$$, B, L, D (Tues–Sun). 20 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 520-2882.

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR D E CM EA MR BC EH R 2017 / 10 25 1

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DINING

Because Brunch Should Not Be Limited to Just Weekends

Guide

GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun—fill the menu. Don’t miss Noodle Nights on Thursdays, complete with housemade ramen. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.comcom

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com INK N IVY

Located in the space formerly occupied by Corner Pocket, Ink N Ivy boasts a menu of American fare with an emphasis on fresh seafood. Lunch features staples like the charred salmon salad, and the evening menu tacks on entrées like the grilled scallops, topped with lime cilantro butter, and served on wilted chives, baby spinach, and roasted peppers. $$, L, D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 21 E Coffee St. (864) 438-4698, greenville.inkanivy.com

cusine out of the former Playwright space at the corner of River and Broad streets. Limoncello’s menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is the allItalian wine list, curated from award-winning vineyards from across the region. After you’ve had your glass, don't miss out on a bite of the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

LTO BURGER BAR

Chef Brian Coller has crafted a menu that steers the beefy American staple into unconventional (but totally delicious) territory. Take the “Piedmont Mullet ’85,” with sloppy joe chili, bomb mustard, American cheese, and “phat” onion rings. For you Elvis enthusiasts, the “King of Memphis” is a hunk of burnin’ love concocted with banana jam, peanut butter, and bacon. $$, L, D. 2451 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 214-1483, ltoburgerbargvl.com

NORTHAMPTON WINE & DINE

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the thousands for sale, open it for a corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, select the dining area for dinner from an everchanging menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food” from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main

St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com JIANNA

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on potato gnocchi, radiatori, and ricotta with truffle honey. $$-$$$, L, D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the Gritz Fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The Banh Mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 5688115, kitchensyncgreenville.com

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

TerraceRestaurants.com Downtown Greenville’s West End Open Daily at 8am

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

LIMONCELLO

The latest addition to the Larkin’s line-up, this ristorante serves up authentic Italian

OAKBLUE KITCHEN

Smoked, hand-pulled BBQ is a glowing centerpiece of this local eatery. Serving plenty of homestyle dishes, like the Tabasco-breaded hot chicken sandwich and pimento cheese appetizer, Oakblue also offers the Korean BBQ sandwich with hefty short rib, pickled Daikon radish, and spicy Gochujang aioli. $$, L (Tues–Sun),

D (Tues–Sat). Closed Mondays. 109 N Main St, Ste A, Greenville. (864) 520-2579, oakbluekitchen.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Nick Graves like smoked scallop crudo with crème fraîche, grapefruit, hot sauce pearls, and Meyer lemon oil, and pork belly agnolotti with chestnuts, rapini, and saffron cream. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

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RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed

wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the Nathan Hale Pale Ale and Machias Liberty Nitro Milk Stout— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

With a focus on farmhouse saisons and sour beers, Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect mid-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find flavor-filled concoctions, such as the Biggie Mango, Eldorado Saison, or the 2Hop Session IPA. 1320 Hampton Ave

Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com

ROCKET SURGERY

BREWERY 85

From the folks who bring you the heavenly pies at Sidewall Pizza comes a new craft concept. Trading slices for sliders, Rocket Surgery’s low-key bill of fare features snackable burgers with variations like lamb topped with feta, spinach, and tangy harissa, and the fried soft-shell crab with creamy paprika aioli and pickled red cabbage. If you plan to drink your dinner, go for the coconut and pineapple-infused “Painkiller” or “The Prospector” with bourbon and house-made bitters. $$, D (Mon, Thurs–Sat), 164-D S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610, 0901. ROOST

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com

SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com

SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

TERRACE

The Charlotte-based eatery brings a spread of flavors that embody the very definition of “Southern” cuisine—albeit with a little extra flair. Indulge in a crispy-fried chicken breast plated atop a warm Belgian (or red velvet) waffle with country ham steak for dinner, then head back the next morning to tuck into Terrace’s specialty breakfast casserole, a cheesy confection of sausage, eggs, and onions. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Sat), D, SBR (Mon–Sun). 654 S Main St. (864) 844-8024, terracerestaurants.com

B ARS & BREWERIES 13 STRIPES BREWERY

Providing patrons and patriots alike with a

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with their eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty Howdy Dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome. 6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at The Community Tap, Greenville’s neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from their extensive selection—more than 180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of their ever-rotating beer and wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com GROWLER HAUS

The franchise’s West Greenville addition is its newest, rounding out the total to four Upstate watering holes. Growler Haus’s drafts rotate seasonally to bring you the best in local and national brews, so whether you’re a fan of IPAs, pilsners, ciders, pale ales, or wheats, they’ve got a cold one waiting for you. Just remember to pepper in a homemade pretzel with beer cheese or a pork belly bao bun in between pints. $-$$,

L (Fri–Sat), D (Mon–Sat). Closed Sunday. 12 Lois Ave. (864) 373-9347, growlerhaus.com

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabascofried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D.

930 S Main St. (864) 239-0286 macspeedshop.com QUEST BREWING CO.

Committed to producing premium brews while minimizing their environmental impact, Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and sustainability enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature brews; the West Coast–style Ellida IPA packs a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon brewery tour, then follow up with

LIVE MUSIC HAPPY HOUR NIGHTLY Sunday Brunch 0:00am - 2:00pm Dinner Sun-Tues 5:00pm - 10:00pm Wed- Thur 5:00pm - 11:00pm Fri - Sat 5:00pm - 12:00pm 550 S. Main ST., Greenville, SC 29601 854.335.4200 HALLCHOPHOUSEGREENVILLE.COM

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DINING

Guide

an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 2726232, questbrewering.com

SIP WHISKEY & WINE

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers an array of fine wine and whiskey, there’s no better way to end your evening than with an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail) in hand. SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a curated collection of small plates guarantees a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite.

keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com VAULT & VATOR

Named for a former vault elevator that once took up residence in the underground expanse, this hip downtown joint puts a 21st century spin on the fashionable speakeasies of yore. The small plates of charcuterie, hummus, and cheese are simple yet refined, providing just enough bite so as not to overpower the intimate establishment’s true star—the cocktail list. The thoughtfully blended selection includes both signature and traditional libations; your only task is picking your poison. $$, D (Tues–Sat), Closed Sun–

$-$$, D. 103 N Main St #400, (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com

Mon. 655 S Main St, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 603-1881, vaultandvator.com

SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

THE VELO FELLOW

Located off of Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgianstyle farm ale is a golden dream) as well as frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become your favorite place to cap off a Saturday afternoon. 26 S Main St,

Travelers Rest. theswamprabbitbrewery.com TASTING ROOM TR

Wind down on the weekends at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale in-house, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what kind of vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a new favorite from the weekly featured wines or happy hours hosted Wednesday through Friday. And, yes—there is cheese. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon–Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville libation lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy.

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR.

1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy, floury, and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head has set up shop in Greenville with its wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether you like ’em slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves—you can’t go wrong with the Greenvillian topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com

UP ON THE ROOF

CHICORA ALLEY

RiverPlace. (864) 242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net UPSTATE CRAFT BEER CO.

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery off Augusta, Upstate Craft Beer Co. is hoppy hour heaven. Not only do they feature the best local and national brews on tap, this beer joint offers home brewsters all the gear and ’gredients needed to craft their own ale-inspired inventions. Make sure to try a naan pizza from the in-house kitchen. 400 Augusta St. (864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and rollup garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating

MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon. $$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 2422535, marybethsatmcbee.com

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad.

$-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “Incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an Almond

METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, wine varieites, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L.

101 N Main St, Ste D. methodicalcoffee.com O-CHA TEA BAR

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

(864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ AND GROCERY

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

(864) 605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make your spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With it’s classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250

Brothers smoothie. $, B, L, D. 600 S Main St. happyandhale.com

CAFÉS BARISTA ALLEY

Looking for that midday pick-me-up? Pop on over to Barista Alley, where exposed brick walls and wide wooden tables create the perfect ambience to conversate with a warm mug in hand. Sure, you can satisfy your caffeine cravings with a fresh espresso, cold brew, or chai tea. But you’d truly be cheating yourself by missing out on Barista Alley’s colorful array of green, berry, peanut butter and chocolate, and pineapple punch smoothies. $, B (Mon–Sat), L,D (Mon–Sun). 125 E Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 655-5180, baristaalley.com BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End juice bar. Find fresh fare in their organic salads, as well as their fruit and veggierich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options available, of course. $, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try the power-packed energy bowl like the Dragon Blood. This hot-pink concoction is based with a creamy mixture of dragon fruit, almond milk, and banana, then layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W. Washington St.

Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation? Woodfired pizza, of course. Sourcing every ingredient from local vendors, the everchanging toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. $, B, L,

D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the Mid-Century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263

Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

DELIS & SANDWICHES CAVIAR & BANANAS

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the Classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s Chopped Salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

$-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com

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SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

Serving up gourmet sandwiches on fresh made stecca bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a Devil Dog BLT with hormonefree meat on just-baked white focaccia bread. But don’t miss The Grove on Friday nights—live music, a rotating tapas menu, and a selection of craft beer and wine. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC ASADA

Vibrant Latin culture comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote rellenos de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in creamy spicy Chipotle-Guajillo suace); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw. $-$$. Closed Sunday

HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. For dinner, try one of the thali specials. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864)

241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should give the Punky Brewster roll a try: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com KANNIKA’S THAI KITCHEN

The family-owned restaurant serves up exotic recipes direct from owner Kannika Jaemjaroen-Walsh’s native Thai province, boasting plenty of traditional dishes like green and yellow curries, pad Thai, and the spicy/sour Tom Yum soup. But don’t miss out on Kannika’s specialty items, like the pla pad khun chai, a lightly fried red snapper filet doused with white wine and soy bean sauce, and the savory honey duck paired with carrots, cilantro, snow peas, onions, and fried shallots. $$$, L, D.

430 Haywood Rd, Ste B, Greenville. (864) 297-4557, kannikaskitchen.com JI-ROZ

The delicacy of Mediterranean cuisine greets Greenville at Main + Stone’s latest food joint, Ji-roz (YEE-ros). With its abundance of natural light, ocean blue decor, and authentic Grecian pottery, this farm-to-table concept transports patrons straight to the Santorini seaside. Do dinner tapas-style with a variety of small plates, or go straight for the gyro, complete with a fluffy pita wrap, tzatziki, tomatoes, onions, fries, and your meat of preference. $$, L, D, SBR. 644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 373-9445, jirozgreenvillesc.com

KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday.

& Monday. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com

BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

MEKONG

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday.

605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crepes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their home grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013

BASIL THAI CUISINE

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the unconventional concept which Basil Thai adds in the Aloft building downtown.Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen to start: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/greenville

MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathe in a soy-based broth. $, L,

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DISCLAIMER: *The Massage Envy franchise network, collectively, provides more skin care services than any other service provider nationwide. Offer good for first-time guests only. Prices subject to change. All session times include up to a total of 10 minutes for consultation and/or dressing, which occurs both pre and post service. Microderm Infusion sessions will vary in length depending on skin care needs and are not intended to diagnose, prevent, or treat any medical or skin condition. You should consult your doctor if you are experiencing any medical or skin care concern. Individual results may vary. Rates and services may vary by franchised location and session. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. Not all Massage Envy locations offer all services. For a specific list of services available or additional information about joining as a member, check with the specific location or see MassageEnvy.com. Each location is independently owned and operated. ©2017 Massage Envy Franchising, LLC.

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DINING

Guide

D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Hand Crafted. Locally Sourced.

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $ - $$, L, D. Closed

Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN ARYANA

♥ in Travelers Rest.

Tuesday- Saturday 11-9 • Sunday 11-4 • Monday closed

164 South Main Street, Travelers Rest, SC 864.610.0586 • www.farmhousetacos.com

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday

& Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

$$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demiglacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

10 ROAD OF VINES, TRAVELERS REST, SC 864 516 1254 / RESTAURANT17.COM

RISTORANTE BERGAMO

STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

THE LAZY GOAT

THOUGHTFUL FOOD AND DRINK

618 S Main St. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 236-7410, aryanagreenville.com

Made with

the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday.

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy the arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon– Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister restaurant to Simpsonville-based Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Situated in the burgeoning Hollingsworth Park area, Stella’s Southern Brasserie offers a local twist on French staples—such as blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries.

THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday.

23 W Washington St. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville Hot Chicken or Thai Shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies. (404) 372-2266, facebook.com/automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 884-3592, daveschucktruck.com ELLADA KOUZINA

Greek cuisine hits the Greenville scene in this big blue traveling kitchen. Traditional treats are always available off the spit, the lamb and chicken gyros are Mediterranean heaven, and their special take on Greek fries are the ideal pre-meal snack. Check social media for weekly schedules and booking opportunities. $. Schedule varies. (864) 908-5698, facebook.com/ elladakouzina2013

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ROBINO’S

Chef Robin’s vision of freshly sourced fare with a home-cooked feel comes to fruition in Robino’s Food Truck. Though mainly featuring Italian food, this truck shucks out a wide variety of American classics, such as the chicken potpie with puff pastry or the garden burger. For those with dietary limitations, the vegan lasagna is a great go-to option. $, Schedule varies. (864) 621 3064, robinosfoodtruck.com THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

P IZZA

TOSS PIZZA

Located in the South Ridge Apartment Community, the TOSS menu is loaded with unique, artfully crafted pies that are a far cry from your typical pepperoni. Head far east with the Phuket Thai Pie, based with zesty curry sauce, then topped with peanuts, arugula, and shiitake mushrooms. The Chile Relleno is guaranteed to light a fire in the ol’ belly— thanks to a few poblano peppers and ground chorizo. There’s even gluten-free options available. $$, L, D. 823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 283-0316, tosspizzapub.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday &

Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TACOS

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L,

D. 25 W Washington St. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitan-style pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margarita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. Location information available on their website. $, L, D. Location varies.

(843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brickoven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 6100527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

STONE PIZZA

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood fire oven. $$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes with pimento cheese or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken or the fried catfish with tartar sauce. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with a mouthful of campfire s’mores. $, L, D, SBR.

164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 6100586, farmhousetacos.com

Home to South Carolina’s Finest Cigar Selection

1921 Hwy 101 S, Greer // 864-968-1133 // SURGEON GENERAL WARNING: Cigar Smoking Can Cause Lung Cancer And Heart Disease.

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PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $$, L, D. 300 River St.

(864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok Shrimp taco or the Mushroom Potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp Bungalow Golden Ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext Suite 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the animated atmosphere pairs perfectly with their festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with one of their house-crafted margaritas.

$-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217 Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436 DECEMBER 2017 / 127

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105 Augusta St., Greenville | Monday–Saturday 10–6 | PinkBeeOnline.com | 864-271-4332

SHOP

SIP

EAT

REPEAT

Larkin’s announces the opening of the Haywood Mall location...

next to The Cheesecake Factory @GrillMarksHaywood

www.GrillMarks.com

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Making a Difference By Serving Our Community Are you ready for our delicious freshly baked breads? How does a scone, muffin, or croissant sound? Gluten and Hormone free meats and cheeses make the best sandwiches, especially when paired with our amazing baked goods. Stop by for a delicious sandwich, fresh baked bread and a signature peanut butter cookie!

Upcountry Provisions Bakery & Bistro Right Off the Swamp Rabbit Trail in Travelers Rest, SC

6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 | Open Mon. - Thurs., 7:30am-7:00pm; Fri. - Sat., 7:30am-8:00pm upcountryprovisions.com | 864-834-8433 UpCountryProv hlfH TOWN Dec17.indd 1

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TOWN

Scene Thru Dec 17

DECEMBER

Thru Dec 2

HOLIDAY FAIR

It’s the season of giving. Or, more importantly, the season of giving your pesky neighbor a run for their money with an epic battle of the Christmas decorations. Stock up your arsenal at the Crafter’s Village, which features a wide array of wreaths, ornaments, nativities, and other decor sure to set your home apart for the holidays. Then, stop by the Gift Bazaar and handpick a perfect present for that impossible-to-buy-for guy or gal in your life. Bonus points if you nab a fruitcake for your neighbor. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, 10am-8pm; Sat, 10am–6pm. Adults, $6; seniors, $5; under 12; free. (864) 233-2562, holidayfairgreenville.com

Ah, the Herdman kids—our favorite band of no-good, rowdy stinkers. But what to do with six kids who just can’t seem to find the path of straight and narrow? Why, put them in the town Christmas Pageant of course. Though loyal churchgoers hem and haw about the questionable cast selections, what seems like perhaps the worst idea in the history of time quickly turns into a holiday winner, with plenty of laughs and good cheer along the way. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 2pm & 7pm; Sun, 2pm. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

Thru Dec 17

INDIE CRAFT PARADE HOLIDAY POP UP SHOP From the folks who bring you fall’s wildly popular Indie Craft Parade comes the Holiday Pop Up Shop, a collection of original gifts crafted

Photograph of Joretta Knits bonnet, courtesy of Indie Craft Parade

THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER

AGENT IN

2016

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS®

VOTED BEST REALTOR®

OF THE UPSTATE

2015 2016 2017 864-616-4280 cell 864-371-6013 efax maiken@cdanjoyner.com MaggieAiken.com 130

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CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

Photograph of Joretta Knits bonnet, courtesy of Indie Craft Parade

by local artisans. The temporary marketplace will include handmade jewelry, artwork, home decor, wearables, edibles, and even a few must-haves for the kiddos. It’s a great opportunity to kill two birds with one stone: you provide invaluable support to your local artists and wrap up that holiday gift list. Methodical Coffee Roasting Facility, 3 McBeth St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 10am–7pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. Free. makerscollective.org/holiday

Thru Dec 22

A FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE CHRISTMAS Turn the Christmas cheer up a notch at Flat Rock Playhouse’s one-of-akind holiday review that combines the best in yuletide anthems with dynamic set design and eyecatching dance moves. Audiences will have more than just Rudolph to light the way during their journey from the North Pole to the scenic mountainside and back again; keep your eyes peeled for a cameo from the Big Man in Red himself. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, Sun, 2pm; Fri, 8pm;

Sat, 2pm & 8pm. $15-$50. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

Thru Dec 30

ROPER MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY LIGHTS Somewhere between Candy Cane Lane and the marching toy soldiers, Clark Griswold is still out there checking every bulb. Pile up in the family truckster and join Roper Mountain and the Rotary Club at one of the Upstate’s most magical seasonal traditions. Make your way through thousands of brilliant, colorful displays before popping into the Winter Wonderland, where jolly old St. Nicholas and his elves will be waiting with a piping hot chocolate in hand. Roper Mountain Science Center, 402 Roper Mountain Rd. Nightly, 6–9pm. $15. ropermountainholidaylights.com

Thru Jan 31

UNITED COMMUNITY BANK ICE ON MAIN On the search for that good ol’ fashioned family Christmas? Look no further than this makeshift ice

rink right in the heart of downtown Greenville. In addition to a wide range of holiday events hosted on the ice each season, the open-air rink also has plenty of warm-you-up staples like hot cocoa for sale. Bring your own blades or rent a pair, just try to keep the Tonya Harding moves to a minimum. Downtown Greenville, 206 S Main St. $10. iceonmain.com

HOLIDAY GALA 1season Say yassou to the 2017 holiday at the best Christmas party in town. For its 18th year, the annual black-tie-and-gown fête puts a Mediterranean spin on the season, inviting guests to nosh on Greekstyle cuisine and visit the streets of Mykonos island, where an array of exclusive items—fine jewelry, dinners, and vacations—are up for auction. Proceeds from the gala will benefit the local Ronald McDonald House charities that provide support and stability for families suffering medical tragedies. TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri, 6pm. (864) 235-0506, rmhc-carolinas.org

Architects of Fine Custom Homes Custom Home Design — New Homes · Renovations · Additions · Restorations www.NealPrinceStudio.com · 864.235.0405 · Greenville, South Carolina DECEMBER 2017 / 131

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Scene

CHRISTMAS CAROL 1–2 AWhen Charles Dickens penned

his now-famous novella way back in 1843, we doubt he ever imagined Kermit the Frog starring as Bob Cratchit. Performed by the Nebraska Theatre Caravan, this muppet-free version takes a more traditional approach to the classic cautionary tale, injecting music by John Bennett into the lively production. Join in the family fun, but beware: you never know when the ghost of Christmas past might pay you a visit. Rodeheaver Auditorium at Bob Jones University, 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm. $23-$43. (864) 242-5100, bju.edu

1–2 RUDOLPH You know Dasher and Dancer,

203 N. Main Street, Greenville, SC 864.240.7366

www.shopjbritt.com

Prancer and Vixen . . . you’ve just never seen them quite like this before. With Christmas day fast-approaching, Santa’s fleet of feisty fliers are prepping for their big moment. But when a test run goes awry, Mr. Claus is forced to rethink his entire reindeer situation. There’s a lot of competition afoot—er, ahoof—but we all know there’s one nose so bright it won’t let us down! Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, 4:30pm & 7pm; Sat, 2pm & 4:30pm. $10-$15. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

BALLET: 1–3 INTERNATIONAL THE NUTCRACKER For most of us, the sight of a giant mouse king invading our bedroom at night is enough material for several years of therapy. For young Clara, it’s just the first part of an amazing adventure through a fantastical land of Sugar Plum Fairies, gingerbread soldiers, and one very dashing nutcracker prince. Directed by Vlada Kysselova, the International Ballet’s production of the holiday classic will be accompanied by the

Greenville Symphony Orchestra and the “Snowflake Choir,” with guest performances by professional dancers Adiarys Almeida and Taras Domitro. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 10:30am & 7:30pm; Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

CAKE 1–17 THE There’s a lot of little details

that go into planning a wedding; honestly, who knew linen napkins were so darn important? The cake, however, is arguably one of the most important staples of wedding festivities. At least, according to Jen. The young bride is set to return home and marry the woman of her dreams—a bit of a shock for her small North Carolina town. Crafted by Bekah Brunstetter, of This Is Us fame, the new play explores the dynamics of friendship and the realities we face in playing politics with the heart. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

2

GREENVILLE POINSETTIA CHRISTMAS PARADE

2

HOLIDAY MARKET ON MAIN STREET

It’s a family tradition! For decades, downtown Greenville’s procession of festooned floats has been the way to jumpstart your Christmas spirit. The 2017 parade promises to be no exception, piling on the jingle and the jangle with plenty of festive carolers, displays, and holiday cheermeisters in tow. And who knows? Your heart may just grow three sizes that day. Downtown Greenville. Sat, 6–7:30pm. Free. greenvillesc.gov/1330/ Poinsettia-Christmas-Parade

Designed to mirror ole timey markets in Germany, Simpsonville’s own hometown bazaar offers plenty of handmade goodies perfect for stuffing those stockings. Sip on warm cider while you browse through a variety of local crafts, admire the city’s merry decorations, and listen to a few seasonal tunes performed live by local carolers. If you’re not merry at the end of the night, then you’re just not trying hard enough. Downtown Simpsonville. Sat, 2–8pm. Free. (864) 963-3781, members. simpsonvillechamber.com

2

The Community Foundation of Greenville bridges philanthropy and purpose by offering planned giving services, donor-advised funds and administering charitable endowment funds in support of a better community.

SAFARI SANTA

With all that wind and snow at the North Pole, can you really blame Santa Claus for vacationing down South for a few days? Join the Big Man in Red for a family-friendly afternoon of milk, cookies, and Christmas list wishes at the Greenville Zoo. Whether you’re naughty or nice, you’re guaranteed to have a wildly fun afternoon. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Sat, 11:30am– 1:30pm. Zoo admission required. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

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Photograph of Joe Bonamassa by Marty Moffat, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

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MAIN STAGE PLAY PRESENTED BY

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GREENVILLE POINSETTIA CHRISTMAS PARADE Dec 2; Sat, 6–7:30pm. Downtown Greenville. A city tradition for more than 75 years, the Poinsettia Christmas Parade spreads holiday cheer from Augusta to Main streets.

DEC 5 - 17 By Louise Roche U.S. PREMIERE

Tuesday - Sunday Matinees on Dec 9 & 16

2–10 SANTA CLAUS: THE NEW MUSICAL When he’s not making a list and checking it twice, you can bet Ol’ St. Nick is carefully working with his financial advisor elves on the perfect Roth IRA. But now that he’s officially announced his retirement, who’s going to take over operations in the workshop? Will they ever be ready for Christmas in time? Is he going to drive Mrs. Claus crazy when he just lays around watching the Golf Channel all day? You’ll just have to wait and see. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 10am & 1:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. $18-$27. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

2–10 DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE HOLIDAY

HAPPENING

Photograph of Joe Bonamassa by Marty Moffat, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

Just what is happening in downtown Greenville? The holidays, duh. Every year, the downtown area’s favorite hot spots band together for a unique weekend of local shopping, dining, and

activities—each with a special splash of holiday fun. Now in its 5th year, the Happening will have plenty of artistic entertainment, local vendors on hand, and, of course, more Christmas spirit than all of Santa’s elves combined. Downtown Greenville. Event locations and times vary. Free. downtownholidayhappening.com

GET TICKETS 864.233.6733

501 River Street Greenville SC 29601 info@centrestage.org

CENTRESTAGE.ORG

THE NIGHT BEFORE 3 ’TWAS CHRISTMAS

And all through the house . . . Dad was cursing Santa for dropping off a bicycle that wasn’t even assembled yet. OK, maybe that’s not how the story goes, but you get the idea. The Spartanburg County Historical Association invites you and the youngins to snack on hot cocoa and cookies while enjoying a very special reading of the classic holiday poem. You’ll even get the chance to make a keepsake tin punch ornament and snap a pic on the big guy’s lap! Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Sun, 2–4pm. Free. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

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SCHOOL OF ROCK

Polishing Restoration Maintenance

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Dec 5–10; Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. The Peace Center. Andrew Lloyd Webber puts a Broadway spin on this classic tale of the underdogs. Head bang along as wannabe superstar Dewey Finn turns straight-A students into a band of rockers.

5

JOE BONAMASSA

If the art of playing guitar is a language, then superstar player Joe Bonamassa must be a fluent speaker. The blues-rock guitarist brings his multitalented, versatile act to the Upstate, playing a mixed set of electric and acoustic hits that have crowned him a king of the blues. Whether he’s rolling through vintage covers or jamming out to one of his own original creations, Bonamassa is guaranteed to liven up your soul with the true spirit of rock and roll. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 8pm. $79-$149. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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OF ROCK 5–10 SCHOOL While it’s true that no one

can replace Jack Black as the original Dewey Finn in the 2003 film, this new Broadway smash musical—featuring tunes by Andrew Lloyd

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Webber—comes pretty close. Finn is a lovable loser who dreams of making it big as a bonafide rockstar—a feat that proves difficult when he gets kicked out of his own band. When a chance mix-up at an elite prep school puts Dewey in charge of some uptight kiddos in need of a little fun, he’s soon back on the path to superstardom. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $35-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

CHRISTMAS 5–17 HAPPY SHIRLEY

Sure, peace on Earth and goodwill toward men is nice and all. But would it really be the Christmas season if there weren’t some family drama? Shirley is just trying to make the holidays nice for her family, decorating the home and preparing the perfect dinner. This proves near impossible for the dogood mom, what with one daughter inviting strangers to the share the table and the other about to go into labor at any moment. Both relatable and heartwarming, Louise Roche’s comedy will liven up your yuletide. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $19-$34. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

7–9 & 14–16

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES

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Ever wondered what Santa Claus does the other 364 days of the year? Now’s your chance to find out. Told from the perspective of eight very un-PC reindeer, David Goode’s hilarious holiday tryst discloses all of the North Pole’s dirty little secrets. You’ll laugh. You’ll cry. You might get a little sick in the aisles. Seating is limited for the adults-only show, so nab your tickets today! Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Thurs–Sat, 8–9:30pm. $15-$20. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org

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7–17

SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CHRISTMAS GOOSE Take your mind off of all those Christmas quirks—Fruitcake! Greeting cards! Matching family onesies!— and dig into the tale of a crime most “fowl.” When a countess’s rare blue carbuncle is determined to be missing—stuffed down the throat of a goose, no less—Holmes and Watson are on the case. As the men of Baker Street get to the bottom of one mystery, another unfolds, and they discover that even crime doesn’t take a break over the holidays. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

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JINGLE BELL RUN

Color us impressed if you can make it through an entire 5K with tinkling jingle bells tied to your shoelaces. With a goal this year of raising $20,000, the Arthritis Foundation invites you to gear up in your most merry garb and battle the joint disorder in full force. Prizes will be awarded for top money raisers, so better start hitting up your relatives before they go gift shopping at the mall. Clemson University ICAR Millennium Campus, 5 Research Dr, Greenville. Sat, 8am. Registration varies.jbr.org

8 TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

Hey, turn down the Bing Crosby, Grandma! This progressive rock TransSiberian Orchestra is about to turn the same ol’, same ol’ holiday standards upside down. Bursting forth with unbridled energy and musical power, The Ghosts of Christmas Eve is a journey through the band’s greatest hits. It’s just like chestnuts on an open fire—if those chestnuts were brilliant light displays and that open fire was blazing pyrotechnics. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 4pm & 8pm. $43$74. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

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CHRISTMAS WITH THE CHORALE

Buddy the Elf may have said it best: the best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear. Fortunately, this annual holiday collaboration featuring the Greenville Chorale encourages audience participation. With a blend of joyful ditties sprinkled with a few sing-a-long tunes, you’ll be spreading enough cheer to last until next December 25. McAlister Auditorium at Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. Adults, $30; Students, $15; under 12, $5. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

SWEATER CRAWL 9 UGLY Grandkids rejoice! It’s finally time

to put that heinous cardigan your Nana knitted you six years ago to good use. Don your tackiest and get your jollies at eight downtown watering holes—including Ink N Ivy, Pour Taproom, City Tavern, and more—where specialty Christmas cocktails and festive fare will be waiting. There are even a few giveaways in store, you know, if you’re into the whole regifting thing. Downtown Greenville. Sat, Noon– 8pm. $15-$35. eventbrite.com

Your Baby, Your Way You want to have your baby in a way that’s right for you and your family. At Greenville Health System (GHS), our six upstate locations provide you with safe, convenient care and support for your unique birth experience.

TEA PARTY 10 NUTCRACKER Way more fun than pouring

imaginary beverages in your teddy bear’s plastic mug, this unique holiday gathering serves up more than just a warm cuppa’. The International Ballet’s Nutcracker ensemble will be there to take photos, sign autographs, and host a special performance of their signature dance. Refreshments and other sweets will be served, and kids will go home with a souvenir ornament. The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Sun, 1–3pm. $30. (864) 879-9404, internationalballetsc.org

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NEEDTOBREATHE

Just a few fellas from nearby Seneca, South Carolina, the quartet has proven themselves as top dogs in the contemporary Christian rock genre. Last year’s release—Hard Love—was the band’s sixth studio album, a 12-track fusion of country, pop, and rock that received positive critical acclaim. In September, NEEDTOBREATHE embarked on the All the Feels tour, a national stint broken up into three versions of their iconic sound. Greenville will get a taste of the acoustic set—a first-time undertaking for these native rockers. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 8pm. $40-$60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Our doctors, nurses and staff bring professional expertise, compassion and tenderness as they care for you and your baby. And our locations offer options to match your labor and delivery preferences: birthing balls, epidurals, tub labor, natural birth, water birth (Greenville Memorial Hospital and Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center only) and more. GHS Birthplace Locations in the Upstate • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center • Greenville Memorial Hospital • Greer Memorial Hospital • Laurens County Memorial Hospital • Oconee Memorial Hospital • Patewood Memorial Hospital For more information, please visit ghs.org/baby.

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12–16

FROSTY!

As residents of the South, it usually takes us about six hours to make a snowman—and about half a second for it to melt the next day. But it’s a white Christmas in New York City for Billy, who finds an enchanted hat that makes his snowy creation spring to life! Billy and Frosty set out on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure to find the young boy’s parents in the Big Apple, discovering fun, friendship, and the power of love along the way. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Tues, 10:30am & 7pm; Wed–Fri, 10:30am; Sat, 10:30am & 2pm. $15. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

AT PEACE 15–17 HOLIDAY As a Broadway star, Rachel York has taken on her fair share of challenging roles in Camelot, Les Misérables, The Sound of Music, and countless others. Now, the quadruple-threat talent is returning to the Upstate once again, joining the International Ballet and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra for a special holiday showcase. But the biggest celeb of the evening will be St. Nick himself, who will drop by with the missus for a quick naughtyor-nice check up. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St,

Greenville. Fri–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$59. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Greenville. Sat, 9am. Registration, $22-$57. (864) 423-1482, greenvillesantarun.com

16 ED HARRISON MEMORIAL CELTIC

16–17

CHRISTMAS

Although the event’s namesake, Ed Harrison, passed away five years ago, the spirit of this warm, multitalented musician continues to live on through this annual holiday showcase. Each year, an eclectic lineup of artists takes the stage at Hagood Mill to pay tribute to Harrison, kicking off the season with live bluegrass, folk, and mountain music performances. Hagood Mill, 138 Hagood Mill Rd, Pickens. Sat, 10am–4pm. Free. (864) 898-2936, visitpickenscounty.com

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SANTA RUN

Let’s face it, the holidays are a marathon for eating. And if you’ve been neglecting your paleo diet in favor of banana bread and fudge, it might be time for a different kind of activity. Enter the Santa Run, a 5K race that whips its way through downtown Greenville in a blur of red trousers and white beards. Runners are encouraged to play St. Nick dress-up, and this year will feature extra snow machines and a costume contest for pooches. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St,

WINTER DANCE

Nationally recognized as one of the premier institutions for artistic studies, the Governor’s School dance students will strut their stuff in a two-night showcase event. Both performances will include contemporary, classical ballet, and modern pieces. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 2pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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TEEN POETRY READING

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CHRISTMAS CABARET

It’s no secret that being a teenager can be difficult. But you’ve got to give extra kudos to these teens, who will present their original works of poetry to an audience for the first time ever. The Peace Voices workshop, led by poet-in-residence Glenis Redmond, encourages students to share their vital stories through spoken word. Ramsaur Studio, 101 W Broad St, Geenville, Mon, 5:30pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org The best and brightest from the Upstate’s singing community will be under the limelight for this outstanding yuletide revue. While the cabaret unwraps traditional standards from the likes of Bing Crosby and Brenda

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Photograph by Matthew Murphy, courtesy of the Peace Center

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Lee, rock band classics from the Eagles are also on the bill to keep you entertained all evening long. The ribbon to top off the package? Extravagant desserts and vino catered by Greenville restaurants. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $42-$52. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

22–23

Photograph by Matthew Murphy, courtesy of the Peace Center

THE NUTCRACKER: ONCE UPON A TIME IN GREENVILLE Carolina Ballet Theater artistic director Hernan Justo adds a little hometown flair to this traditional holiday yarn, blending landmark Greenville spots with the majesty of the nineteenth-century original. When Clara receives a wooden nutcracker from her beloved uncle, she becomes so taken with the handsome creation that she soon finds herself caught in a whirlwind fairy tale of enchantment. Joining the CBT performance will be surprise star athletes and guest dancers from the Meyer Center for Special Children. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 2:30pm & 7pm. $20-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

26–31

ON YOUR FEET!

From escaping with her family during the Cuban Revolution to Grammy Award–winning, charttopping albums and a near-fatal tour bus accident, singer and songwriter Gloria Estefan has seen

plenty of highs and lows. And this jukebox-style musical covers them all, documenting the powerhouse artist and crossover success as a Latin pop sensation—with husband Emilio always by her side. Featuring dynamic choreography, vibrant costuming, and hits like “Rhythm Is Gonna Get You,” “Turn the Beat Around,” and more, it won’t be long before you’re on your feet, too! The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $35-$95. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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DANCING WITH THE STARS LIVE!

We know you’ve got some pretty sick moves—like the sprinkler dance— but this one might be best left to the professionals. Top dancers will get their groove on live on the Well stage, during the Light Up the Night tour, which will highlight contemporary and ballroom performances starring Emma Slater, Alan Bersten, Jenna Johnson, Brandon Armstrong, and others. We don’t recommend challenging any of them to a danceoff after the show. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sun, 8pm. $66-$87. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

ON YOUR FEET! Dec 26–31; Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. The Peace Center. If you’re having trouble turning the beat around, do that conga to this show celebrating the life (and hits) of Gloria and Emilio Estefan.

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DECEMBER 2017 / 137

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TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Caroline Spivey at 864.679.1229 or cspivey@communityjournals.com 11/17/17 11:18 11:16 AM


May your days be cozy and bright. Wishing all of you a very

Merry Christmas!

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SECOND

Glance

Feminine Lines

T

o be a woman, in whatever cultural context, involves a unique amalgam of advantage and challenge. But to be a feminist, to be an active champion of female well-being, all too often involves the baggage of a degenerative stereotype. Its message has been hijacked: like the caustic f-word, it is considered a curse rather than blessing. Greenville Tech’s RIVERWORKS Gallery seeks to reclaim feminism’s power and tenability through the exhibition f word. A collection of works from four female artists—Brooklyn-based Katrina Majkut, Charleston’s Lynne Riding, and Upstate artists Katya Cohen and Alice Ballard—explores the complex curves of womanhood through a variety of media. From Majkut’s intricate and provocative cross-stitched contraceptives to Ballard’s regenerative ceramic pods, the exhibit invites more than contemplation. It calmly encourages redefinition, a polite push to embrace the true feminist spirit through female-forward thinking. —Abby Moore Keith The f word exhibition will be on display at Greenville Technical College’s RIVERWORKS Gallery through Saturday, December 16. Gallery hours are 1–5pm, Thursday–Sunday. An artists’ reception will be held on Friday, December 1, from 6–9pm.

Alice Ballard, Wall Pods. Photograph courtesy of the RIVERWORKS Gallery

The RIVERWORKS Gallery presents the forward works of four female artists

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16 Augusta Street, Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 www.greenvillearts.com

Get Carded for the Holidays Give the gift of buy-one-get-one free tickets.

Centre Stage Greenville Chorale Greenville Little Theatre Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Center (select shows only) South Carolina Children’s Theatre Warehouse Theatre

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GIVE THE GIFT OF ART:

The ArtCard makes the perfect gift for you friends and family this holiday season. With a donation of $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard valid for one time at each of the locations above for one full year.

LEARN MORE:

(864) 467-3132 mac@greenvilleARTS.com @MACartscouncil #GVLarts

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TOWN Dec. 2017  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

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