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Eco Loco GREEN LIVING IS MORE THAN A LIFESTYLE: IT’S A WAY OF LIFE

Plate Up FARM-TO-TABLE RESTAURANTS FOR YOUR NEXT MEAL

The

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J U LY 2 013 TOWNCAROLINA.COM


Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

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Dream Boat. Let’s make every weekend feel like a vacation.

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Equal Housing Lender Š 2013 CertusHoldings, Inc. All rights reserved. CertusBank is a trademark of CertusHoldings, Inc.


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No home here is the same.

Because no dream is the same.

Perhaps you wish to wake up to 50-mile views in every direction. Or cook with friends in your gourmet kitchen. Or read a book on your back porch, overlooking a quiet lake cove below. Whatever your dream home, whatever joys you want to experience with friends and family, The Cliffs can help bring your ideas to life. We offer not only meticulous, award-winning builders with years of custom craftsmanship— we offer a backyard with one million acres of protected mountains, lakes and waterfalls. To learn more about the unique opportunities and lifestyle offered by The Cliffs, please call 866.411.5773 or visit cliffscommunities.com L I V E I N O N E C O M M U N I T Y . P L AY I N A L L S E V E N . Photo courtesy of Morgan-Keefe Builders. Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal or state agency has judged the merits or value (if any) of The Cliffs properties. This information is not intended for, and is not an offer to, residents of any state where prior registration is required. Void where prohibited by law.


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CAROLINA FURNITURE & INTERIORS

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Happy 4th! We will be closed July 4 - 7 and every Saturday in July | Hours: Monday - Friday 9:30-5:30


Contents

8 6

ECO LOCO Cool living collides with eco-sensibilities at the junctures of transportation, urban planning, and style.

// by Kathryn Davé, Kathleen Nalley, and Steven Tingle

15 THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

21 ON THE TOWN

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

39 TOWNBUZZ

Artist Joseph Bradley, designer Eric Brown, cycling camps by Trek Travel, and a wave of revitalization sweeping Greenville.

57 STYLE CENTRAL

Barb Blair’s furniture makeovers, contemporary realism at T.L. Norris Gallery, and the perfect picnic picks.

64 MAN ABOUT TOWN

The Man About TOWN kindles a new love for outdoor cooking.

79 EAT & DRINK

Feed your bacon addiction, sample fresh okra and exotic loose-leaf teas, and discover Greenville’s best fried chicken.

88 DINING GUIDE 90 TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

96 SECOND GLANCE

Judy Verhoeven turns cast-off scraps into beautiful art.

COVER: Artwork by Joseph Bradley (page 44–45); photograph by Eli Warren THIS PAGE: Table by Mobili Farm Tables, location: Taylors Mill (page 40); photograph by Patrick Cox

July 10 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Protective in nature. And wherever you drive it. — 2013 IIHS TOP SAFETY PICK

2013 GLK350 SUV starting at

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CARLTON MOTORCARS

www.CarltonMotorcars.com | 864-213-8000 | 800-801-3131 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607 * Excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, $905 transportation charge, and dealer prep fee.


EDITOR’S

Letter Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER mark@towncarolina.com Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR SENIOR EDITOR Jac Chebatoris

Cool Deal

ASSISTANT EDITOR Andrew Huang

F

or the first time in the history of TOWN, we present The Cool Issue. Part nod to July’s wicked heat. Part defiance of it. Full attention to our area’s cool factor. (After all, cool is what’s hot.) Thinking about the ideas, people, and experiences that make this place cool is an easy task. What’s not so simple is packaging it—selecting, cutting out. Cool is exclusive. It is a spotlight, a ray of light. Cool is ephemeral, but its effects can be lasting. For this inaugural Cool Issue, we focus on a major trend that is still paradoxically catching on: eco-living. With its name and geography, surely Greenville was destined to shine in its Earth-minded, green-bending, Swamp Rabbit Trail–blazing way. But why is eco-living cool? Who says Falls Park isn’t cool? In “Eco Loco” (page 68), we offer a primer of the many ways that this area, especially Greenville, harnesses the benefits of living green—through urban planning, transportation, and style. The Swamp Rabbit Trail and Falls Park are more obvious examples, but initiatives such as Greenville’s focus on public transportation and its new bike-sharing program; organic household products and salvaged parts from old homes; and an ever-growing focus on urban gardens and eco-construction are perhaps lesser-known ways. We are more consistently focused on local and less, which naturally leads to healthier lifestyles and a healthier planet. Cool is a surprise, a discovery. It goes beyond the surface. Taylors Mill was once integral to our economic livelihood. After decades of neglect, it has been revived to a different commercial glory—housing businesses and artisans (many using repurposed goods to craft their wares). Poinsett Highway is at the start of a similar revival. The Poinsett District Revitalization Project aims to clean up, green up, and build up another bustling district of Greenville, beyond downtown and along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. The Cool Issue presents these, and more places, businesses, and people that thrive on the challenge of thinking beyond the norm. Cool stuff, indeed—though our hope is that what we consider cool will finally be common.

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox Laura Linen Kathleen Nalley CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Chelsey Ashford Patrick Cox J. Aaron Greene Gabrielle Grace Smith Eli Warren Jay Vaughan GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN Kate Guptill Holly Hardin PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen Whitney Fincannon Caroline Reinhardt MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Lori Burney Mary Beth Culbertson Kristi Jennings Donna Johnston Pam Putman Katherine Elrod SALES ADMINISTRATION MANAGER katherine@towncarolina.com Kate Banner COMMUNIT Y SPONSORSHIPS & EVENTS MANAGER kate@towncarolina.com Alan Martin SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Ryan Johnston MARKETING MANAGER David Robinson CIRCUL ATION MANAGER

Follow us on Facebook & Twitter Be in-the-know online! Find the best of TOWN Magazine— events, stories, dining, & more!

12 TOWN / towncarolina.com

COOL IS A SPOTLIGHT, A RAY OF LIGHT. COOL IS EPHEMERAL, BUT ITS EFFECTS CAN BE LASTING.

Sue Priester PHIL ANTHROPIC ADVISOR TOWN Magazine (Vol. 3, No. 7) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 148 River Street, Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601, (864) 679-1200. TOWN Magazine is a free publication. However, if you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $45. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina. com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 148 River Street, Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.


Shutter stop.

Featuring a selection of 20 photographs by American masters Ansel Adams and Edward Weston, this stunning exhibition of breathtaking paintings offers a spectacular view of the American landscape from sea to shining sea.

Ansel Adams (1902 – 1984) Mount Williamson from Manzanar, Sierra Nevada, California, 1944

Masterpieces of American Landscape from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

On view through September 15

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org admission free

GCMA 1374 TOWN MFAAdams.indd 2

6/6/13 2:46 PM


Greg and Christine Sloan

made the decision to exit the rat-race and reclaim a simpler life for their family in spring 2012. Finding a charming neighborhood with Charleston-styled appeal, they decided to sell their large house across town and move to a cozier home that’s central to school and work, and offers a more relaxed routine. - Read more of their story at verdae.com Hollingsworth Park offers a diversity of housing options priced from the $200s. The residential mix includes custom and estate homes to more modest single-family dwellings, townhomes and luxury apartments. Residents enjoy a 20-acre central park, pedestrian-friendly streetscapes, a neighborhood business district and being close to everything. Verdae Development, Inc.

Greg, Christine, Claire and Grayson Sloan

“Our move to Hollingsworth Park has been more than a change in location. It’s been a change in our lifestyle. Here, the ‘Less is More’ philosophy has become reality for us.” - Christine Sloan, resident

Sales Office Open Daily in Legacy Square • 3 Legacy Park Road, Suite A • Greenville, SC 29607 • (864) 329-8383 • verdae.com


List z

THE

THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

July 2013

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TOP OF THE

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JERSEY BOYS Before Justin Bieber, NSYNC, and even the Beatles, there was Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Born from a group of rough-and-tumble, blue-collar boys, the group went on to become one of the best-selling musical groups in the world. This show tells the story of just how they did it, with hits like “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Oh, What a Night” taking center stage.

Photograph by Joan Marcus

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. July 10–21. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $55, $65, $85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 1 5


List z

WORLD OF CARL SANDBURG

What’s the Fourth of July without fireworks? Luckily, you won’t have to find out. Just venture into downtown Greenville for a celebration befitting Independence Day. Starting at 5:30 p.m., there will be live music by country band Outshyne and the Jazz Guardians from the Army Ground Forces Band. Fireworks will commence at 9:45 p.m. Make sure you arrive early for prime viewing real estate (and to enjoy the music and food)! Downtown Greenville. Thurs, July 4, 5–10:30pm. Free. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov

HARRY CONNICK, JR. New Orleans native, philanthropist, and all-round performer Harry Connick, Jr. is used to wearing many hats. For this evening concert, he will be taking the stage as a crooner extraordinaire performing songs from his newest album, Every Man Should Know. The collection of original songs reflects his perspectives on life and love, which are delivered in heartfelt fashion true to the singer’s roots. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, July 6, 8pm. $55, $65, $75, $85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

Apprentice actors from the Flat Rock Playhouse dig into Sandburg’s Pulitzer Prize–winning collection of poetry for a zany 30-minute romp. It’s storytime for the little ones, but don’t be shy—there’s no age limit when it comes to appreciating this American poet. Sandburg Home Amphitheatre, Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, 1800 Little River Rd, Flat Rock, NC. Wed & Fri, 10:15am. Thru Aug 10. Free. (828) 6934178, nps.gov/carl

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / RED, WHITE, AND BLUE FESTIVAL

Photograph by James Minchin III; courtesy of The Peace Center

THE

Because Everything Matters... Expertise matters. But price does, too. So Mackey combines equal measures of compassion and professionalism with a cost-sensitive philosophy that ensures we’re accessible to families of all faiths, all incomes. You need never overspend to get the service you deserve. A funeral or cremation doesn’t have to be expensive to be done right – and that’s been our philosophy for more than 140 years.

Offering affordable, compassionate care to the Upstate since 1872. © 2013 STEI 1 6 Mackey T O WhlfH N TownJuly13 / t o w n crev.indd a r o l i n1 a . c o m

311 Century Dr., 291 Bypass at I-385, Greenville | 864-232-6706 | MackeyMortuary.com 6/13/13 10:49 AM


REEDY RIVER CONCERT SERIES Pack a picnic dinner along with your dancing shoes. This summer concert series continues with the 246th SC National Guard Army Band, Most Wanted Bluegrass, Southern Crescent, Sean and the Boogie Children, and Chasing the Blues. This midweek treat is perfect for families wanting to relax in the summer evening. TD Stage, The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed throughout July, 7–9pm. Free. (864) 467-5741, greenvillesc.gov

TRAVELERS REST COMMUNITY FARMERS’ MARKET It doesn’t make sense to travel long distances just to get local produce. For those who live a bit further north than Greenville, the Travelers Rest Farmers’ Market is the solution to that conundrum. Produce varies from week to week, but there are always fresh-baked goods, goat milk and goat cheese, jams, and jellies. 115 Wilhelm Winter St, Travelers Rest. Sat, July 6, 13, 20 & 27, 9am–noon. Free admission. travelersrestfarmersmarket.com

Photograph by Hugh Cureton

Photograph courtesy of the City of Greenville

CAMP BROADWAY Have you got the sneaking suspicion that your son or daughter might be the next big Broadway star? Help them develop their talents at the nationally-acclaimed Camp Broadway when it comes to the Peace Center. The 5-day program is for children ages 10–17 and features dedicated rehearsal and master classes with Broadway professionals. At the end of the week, watch your kids put the fruits of their labor to work at a special on-stage performance. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon–Fri, July 22-26, 9am. $550. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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Our Clients Say It Best…

Tom Hazelton Director, Corporate Security / Services Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated

“Blue Ridge Security has provided top quality service for over ten years to our company and corporate executives. We have five manufacturing plants, fifty distribution centers, and our corporate headquarters located in the Southeast. The partnership and relationships built over the years with Blue Ridge Security have played a significant role in helping us to accomplish many of our company-wide goals. Their entire staff, from monitoring to sales and service, are committed to excellence and are diligent in ensuring that all of our employees are secure and safe in a variety of work environments.”

Serious Security A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

1-888-407-7233 • blueridgesecuritysystems.com J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 1 7


List z

THE

Quick HITS UPSTATE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL: THE COMEDY OF ERRORS zA midsummer night’s dream in Falls Park? Well, it’s not that Shakespearean play, but it is midsummer. Grab a seat on the grassy hills of Falls Park and enjoy one of The Bard’s earlier plays, a farcical comedy rife with slapstick, mistaken identities, and puns. Falls Park, Greenville. July 11–Aug 4, Thurs–Sun, 7pm. Free. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com/upstateshakespeare-festival

SLOW FOOD EARTH MARKET zWhat could be fresher than food produced just miles from where you live? Slow Food Upstate’s Earth Market brings quality food at fair prices from local farmers directly to downtown Greenville. None of the products sold here are produced using pesticides, herbicides, hormones, or other chemicals, so you can rest assured that only the healthiest, freshest food is going into your meals.

Photograph by Danny Clinch

NoMa Square at the Hyatt Regency, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Wed, July 17, 3–7pm. Free. slowfoodupstate.com

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN RIBFEST zLet’s be honest: the biggest winners at a barbecue competition are the spectators, especially when you’ve got a lineup that includes the 2012 Ribfest champions and worthy challengers from Texas, Ohio, Arkansas, and North Carolina. It’s not all about meat, though. There’s a carnival filled with games and rides, classic and custom car shows, and an arts and crafts fair. WNC Agricultural Center Fairgrounds, 1301 Fanning Bridge Rd, Fletcher, NC. Fri, July 12, 4–11pm; Sat, July 13, 11am– 11pm; Sun, July 14, 11am–7pm. Adults, $7. (828) 894-8847, wcpshows.com/ribfest.html

WILDERNESS SELF-RELIANCE SKILLS WORKSHOP zArmy veteran and wilderness survival specialist Alex Garcia teaches students the basics of finding food and water while in the outdoors. Build traps and fishing tackle from nature, identify edible plants, and learn how to find and purify water. Students should wear appropriate clothing and footwear for a day in the woods and bring a sharp knife, notebook, and bagged lunch. For adults only. Hagood Mill, 138 Hagood Mill Rd, Pickens. Sat, July 27, 9:30am–4:30pm. Pickens County Museum of Art and History members, $45; non-members, $55. (864) 898-5963

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com

The Black Keys The Black Keys have been honing their raw, blues-rock sound for more than a decade, but they’re just now headlining their own arena tour. The tour, in support of their Grammy Award–winning album El Camino, drops Patrick Carney’s stripped down drumming and Dan Auerbach’s crunchy guitars into the Charter Amphitheatre along with special guests The Flaming Lips. Charter Amphitheatre, Heritage Park, 681 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Fri, July 12, 7:30pm; doors open at 6pm. $40, $50. (864) 241-3800, charteramphitheatre.com

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Downtown Greenville . 123 College Street . JBLacher.com . 864.232.7385 . Since 1946


Town

ON THE

Artisphere Opening Gala May 9, 2013

Amanda Rock with Lee, Jerry & Tammy Barber Lanny & Sherry McAlister

Elizabeth Drewry & Art Farwell

Nancy Garrett, Mary Catherine Robbins, Cindy Huffman & Felicia Robbins

Greenville’s premier outdoor arts festival kicked off in style with more than 650 attending the opening gala. Artists, sponsors, and community members mingled under the gaze of a 40-foot wall of LED screens featuring the festival’s artworks. The evening included food by Rick Erwin’s Nantucket Seafood Restaurant and a signature “#7” cocktail, named in honor of Artisphere’s national ranking among fine-art shows. Photography by Jay Vaughan

Kevin Mertens, Walter Gayle & Jeff Mazzola

Hank & Marietta McCullough

Linda McDougald & Paul David Ringenberg

Lori & Charlie Thompson

Brady Smith, Tim Coyle & Robert Gagnon

Maria Dunn-Blough & Paton Blough

Bonnie Pittman, Brian O’Rourke, Ray Bryant & Jimmy Pittman

Rafael & Kimberly Williamson

Norman Malo, Catherine & Kurt Schumacher & Peter Helwing J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 2 1


BMW On the Lawn Party May 16, 2013 Friends of SmoakPR and the Upstate Business Journal gathered at the 17th fairway of Greenville Country Club’s Chanticleer golf course to enjoy cocktails and watch the BMW Pro-Am. Guests were treated to a kick-off party at the home of Mark and Donna Johnston that included treats from Saffron’s Catering and Thomas Creek Brewery. Photography by Jay Vaughan

Lorraine Goldstein & Hal Weiss

Kate Banner & Laura Linen

Don’t buy cheap clothes Buy good clothes, cheap. 1922 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 | labelsgreenville.com | 864.631.1919

Labels JR Jul13 Town.indd 1

Lauren Harper, Lindsay Powers & Jennifer Hoover 22 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Drew Torres with Chelsea, Diane & Chris Elbert

6/12/13 1:16 PM

Claire Rozeman & Claire Richards

Joe Hindman, Alissa Ricci Alissa Ricci & Ian Thompson & Ian Thompson


ON THE

Town

BMW Wine Down Party May 16, 2013 A starry night complemented the starstudded TD Stage at the BMW Wine Down Party. Against a backdrop of live music by Edwin McCain, cocktails, and hors d’oeuvres, about 650 guests and sponsors mingled with the celebrities from the BMW Pro-Am, including Kurt Russell. Lear Corporation and BMW executives were among the other distinguished guests who made an appearance. Photography by Gabrielle Grace Smith

Elaine & Dan Buckley

Michelle & Colby Griffin Jeff & Amy Russo with Lisa & Kevin Caldwell

Chris & Heather Lunsford

David Barton, Derek Coleman, Fran Coughlin & Michael Delaney J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 2 3


and

ON THE

Town Monte Chasteen & Jamy Ridge

eu p h o ri a2 0 13

and

zine town maga

Dr. Arthur & Edith Smith

The Loft at Soby’s Thursday, July 18th 6:00pm-10:00pm

TICKETS $35 ALL INCLUSIVE FOOD, DRINK AND MUSIC

Door prizes, live music from Wine Down and a taste of euphoria2013, featuring Performance Foodservice Corporate Executive Chef Derin Moore and Soby’s New South Cuisine. T I C KETS O N S A L E N OW AT WWW. E U PH O R I AGR E E N V I L L E . COM LI M I T E D AVA I L A B I L I T Y ! Palmer Dill & Bill Mitchell

Jessica & Scott Eiselt, Addie Bradshaw & Rick Finch

24 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Morgan Alford, Ashley Geary, Shannon Waters & Tara MaCalf

Brianne Cummings, Jake Dunaway, Josie Fulbright, Leanne Garrett & Jennifer Tolbert


State of Fashion May 9, 2013 Lung disease certainly isn’t sexy, but fashion is. What better way to fight it than to go to a catwalk extravaganza? The Upstate branch of the American Lung Association filled the Hilton Greenville with a host of South Carolina designers including Charme Silkiner, Gregory Ellenburg, and Colibri Collection, as well as flavorful eats and drinks. The evening raised more than $10,000 in support of the ALA’s mission to improve lung health and prevent lung disease. Photography by Chelsey Ashford Nikki Zurenko, Andrea Edenfield & Karen Bacot

Making Dreams Come True For Over 67 Years Chad Lott & Tim Matyaszek

F U R N I T U R E

Since 1946

864-277-5330 | www.oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Rd (Exit 46 off I-85) Greenville, SC

OldCol fp Jul13 Town.indd 1

Ally Barbato, Lara Farnsworth & Suzanne Lazerus

George & Barbara Corell

6/10/13 5:01 PM

Norm & Allison Price with Mo & Charlie Lewis

Jennifer Lance & Lauren Biediger

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 2 5


ON THE

Town

Euphoria: One Night Only May 5, 2013

Euphoria helped local foodies kick off their Cinco de Mayo with the official availability of tickets for the fall festival. About 400 guests attended the celebration, which featured live music from The Blue Dogs and Rachel Farley. Local restaurants Roost, The Lazy Goat, Devereaux’s, Passerelle Bistro, The Green Room, and Bacon Bros. Public House were represented. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Ali Nagle & Angela Halpin

GR EEN V IL L E ’ S mane e v en t

Friday, august 2, 2013 | 6:00-9:00pm Zoo-B-Que: The first-ever barbeque tasting at the Greenville Zoo. With local vendors, live music and of course, all your favorite zoo animals, Zoo-B-Que is sure to become Greenville’s “mane” event! Proceeds will benefit the construction and implementation of the Lion’s Den—something to “roar” about.

Today’s Lite Rock

Michael Harp & Antonio Goss 26 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Carmen Fennell, Leslie Fuller, Taryn Scher & Kristin Munafo

Claude & Nicole Robinson with Chris & Donna Rauch


{ { OUR DOCTORS

CREATE BEAUTIFUL

One-Stop Open Studios

SMILES

May 11, 2013 In anticipation of the 2013 edition of Greenville’s Open Studios, the Metropolitan Arts Council hosted the 8th annual retrospective exhibit of 85 previous Open Studios artists. The opening reception saw about 200 artists, sponsors, donors, and local-art enthusiasts gathered for conversation, wine, and, of course, great art. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Dr. Kyle Greer

Dr. Robbie Keels

Modern State of the Art Facilities ___

When you visit our dental offices, your smile and comfort is our top priority. Our entire team is dedicated to providing you with the personalized, gentle care that you deserve. Our talented dentists and staff are proud to serve the Greenville, Spartanburg and Simpsonville areas.

Oral and ___ I.V. Sedation Dental___ Implants Cosmetic ___Crowns

Veneers ___ Wisdom Tooth ___ Extraction “Spa Like” atmosphere with TV and Movies

Wilson Tillotson & Ken Betsch Anna Barton Ingram & Cary SavageIngram

PLinks-1002-Doctor Ad-TOWN_6.75x9.25_6.1.indd 1 PelhamLinks_JrPg_TownJune13.indd 1

Victoria Elgin, Sherry Elgin, Margaret Garrett & Kay Betsch

Debbie & Turner Nelson

Dr. Shannon Hudson Greenville 864.297.6365 Duncan 864.661.6365 Simpsonville 864.757.1500 www.PelhamLinks.com

PelhamLinks Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Our Doctors Create Beautiful Smiles

5/7/13 10:26 5:05 PM 5/9/13 AM

Katie Hughes & Charlotte Hunt

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 2 7


Greenville Women Giving Annual Meeting

We’re just like a controller, except we do all the work ourselves.

May 8, 2013 Guests began Greenville Women Giving’s 7th annual celebration with wine and cheese at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre before proceeding inside for the main event. The philanthropic organization presented grants totaling $470,576, including a $100,000 grant presented to the Food and Nutrition Services of the Greenville County School District. Other recipients included the Greenville Literacy Association, the Julie Valentine Center, and Mental Health America. Afterward, guests were treated to dinner at the Westin Poinsett.

Before you hire full-time accountants, consider A.T. LOCKE. Our team of experts can tackle your budget preparation, financial reporting and CFO-level management for a fraction of the cost. We’re thorough. We’re timely. And we’re not above making our own pot of coffee. Accounting | Controller/CFO | Reporting

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Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Suzy & Steve Townes Shauna Galloway-Williams, Dr. Nancy Henderson, Dr. Mary Fran Crosswell, Kaci Kackley & Robin Longino

Mary Sargent, Lynn Brown, Susan Wilkins & Fran Lilly 28 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ON THE

Make an Impression

Town

Linda Merriam & Emmy Holt

Sue Priester with Doug Dorman & Dottie Schipper Nancy Sanders, L’Tanga Johnson & Jane Thomas

weddings

receptions

rehearsal dinners

Cindy & Harold Jackson

Come see Greenville from our newly renovated Pearis Ballroom 864.232.5600 | commerce-club.com Commerce Mary Corner-Stanth, Marie Woolf,jr pg 0614.indd Brian Woolf & Janie Harris

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Planning your future. Building ours. At Nachman Norwood & Parrott, our team of wealth management consultants is here for you now and for your future. We are actively building an enduring company committed to serving you for generations with uninterrupted service, dedicated vision, critical knowledge and deep experience. Let us help you meet your long-term financial goals, today and tomorrow.

ON THE

Town

Drive Business Downtown April 23, 2013 Business, baseball, and an afternoon out of the office—what could be better? The Greenville Drive, Elliot Davis, and Upstate Business Journal teamed up for the third edition of this annual networking event. Nearly 40 Upstate businesses participated, highlighting downtown merchants that have been key in driving economic development in the region. Along with networking opportunities, local professionals and business leaders came down to the field as honorary team captains and scorekeepers. Photography by Jay Vaughan Mike deMaine & Kim Eades

1116 South Main Street | 864.467.9800 | NNPWEALTH.COM Nachman Norwood & Parrott is a local wealth management consultancy for top-tier individuals and qualified retirement plan sponsors. Investment products and services are offered through Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC (WFAFN), Member FINRA/SIPC. Nachman Norwood & Parrott is a separate entity from WFAFN.

Rick Davis & Donnell Drummond Craig Brown, owner of the Greenville Drive

Jim Bourey, George Maynard & Bob Morris 30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Dan Einstein, David Barnett, Nate Einstein & Earle Furman


LashBar Downtown Opening May 1, 2013 Owner Crystal Boyd welcomed more than 75 clients, friends, and neighbors in the West Greenville Village for the grand opening of her new studio, Lashbar Downtown. Guests mingled, nibbled, and sipped while getting a peek at the newly renovated space on Pendleton Street. Boyd also took the chance to introduce her staff and her signature eyelash extension service.

12 E Montclair Avenue

Stunning home in popular North Main area! This 5 bedroom 3 bath home has fantastic features. Spacious formal living room flows nicely into the formal dining room. Large eat-in kitchen with breakfast bar, & granite countertops. Master suite on main with his/hers vanities, separate shower and jetted tub. Huge family room with wood burning fireplace and wiring for surround sound. 2 additional bedrooms as well as a bonus room upstairs. Oversized patio with a custom outdoor fireplace and pool with waterfall feature. Truly a great find!

MLS# 1245829

$599,000

Photography by Chelsey Ashford 225 W. Mountainview Avenue 12 E Montclair Avenue

Fantastic 3 bedroom, 3 bath home in N. Main with all the extras on a double lot. Dramatic entry. Large living area which opens onto a side porch and sun room. Large dining room right off the custom kitchen with center island, custom cabinets and breakfast room. Huge pantry as well as a large 1st floor bathroom and laundry/mud room. First floor library. Master bedroom boasts a steam shower and is pre-plumbed for a stand alone tub. Second floor balcony. Large outdoor space includes flagstone patio with reflecting pond.

MLS# 1260453

$587,000

107 S Warwick Road It doesn’t get any better than this! 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath custom home with perfect open floor plan. Huge kitchen with granite countertops, custom cabinets, stainless appliances, and pantry opens onto the dining and large living space. Master suite with walk-in closet, his/hers vanities, jetted tub, and water closet. Bonus room with custom built-in cabinets and walk in storage. Downstairs, a cool living space with a bedroom and massive flex space. Wrap-around porch with outdoor fireplace. Beautiful new home in a beautiful setting!

Crystal Boyd

MLS# 1258409

Aaron Greene, Joshua & Mandy Blankenship & Lily Wikoff

Susan Honeycutt with Chloe & Tara Richter

The Best Move You’ll Ever Make!

17 Arcadia Drive

3 Beds, 1 Fullbath, 1 Halfbath 1600+SqFt

MLS# 1255001

$255,000

520 Carilion Lane

6 Bedroom, 4.5 Bath EarthCraft, Energy Star Certified Home in the Carilion Subdivison. Formal Dining Room with Butler’s Pantry, Large Living Area with Stacked Stone Fireplace, Beautiful Hardwood Floors. Great Kitchen with Custom Cabinetry, Granite Countertops, and Updated Appliances. Large Master Suite with Sitting Area, Jetted Tub, Separate Shower, and Double Vanities that Opens onto a Large Deck. Downstairs with second living space pre-wired for Surround Sound,opens to a Downstairs Patio. Quality Home with Wonderful Community Amenities Makes the Home Better than Perfect!

MLS#1261323

28 Townes Square Lane 3 Beds, 2 Fullbaths 1400+SqFt

MLS# 1257779

$510,000

$238,000

$429,900

313 Wild Geese Way 5 Beds, 2 Fullbaths, 1 Halfbath 2800+SqFt

MLS# 1259861

$219,000

Nick Carlson

111 Williams Street • Greenville, SC 29601 Mobile 864.386.7704 • Office 864.250.2850

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Weddings / by Andrew Huang

Marion Smith & Zack Oliver May 4, 2013 Love is patient, love is kind, and love is sweet, especially when an engagement ring comes with a side of cannoli. Marion and Zack, who met through Teach for America in Nashville, had been dating for three years when Zack took Marion for a picnic at a rose garden. He offered to pick up dessert and returned with a brown box. When Marion finally noticed the extra box alongside the pastry, Zack got down on one knee and proposed. The couple was married in Spartanburg, Marion’s hometown, at First Presbyterian Church. They now live in Raleigh, NC, where Marion is a graduate student at UNCChapel Hill and Zack works as an economist with the NC Department of Commerce. PHOTOGRAPHY BY OLIVIA GRIFFIN / OLIVIA GRIFFIN PHOTOGRAPHY

Gypsy Saifi & Taylor Fisher May 11, 2013

It took Gypsy some time to convince Taylor to go skydiving with her, but the end result was worth it. See, it wasn’t that Taylor was afraid— the former Special Forces soldier had jumped out of plenty of perfectly good airplanes through the course of his military career. He just had to arrange a few things, like making sure he jumped first so he could be waiting by a huge banner on the ground that asked, “Gypsy, will you marry me?” The couple was married at the Saifi family home and held their reception on the Greenville Country Club driving range.

Sara Derucki & Justin Truax May 4, 2013 Great things can happen even when you don’t follow directions, as Sara found out on a dark, gravel mountain road. Justin and Sara had planned to spend a weekend in the mountains near Asheville, but Justin had overlooked the directions to get to their secluded cabin. Despite getting lost in the dark, the two managed to arrive at the cabin. Inside, Sara found two-dozen roses waiting on the counter and turned around to see Justin waiting on one knee. She said yes before he could even finish asking. The two were married at Glassy Mountain Chapel and now live in Charlotte where the groom is a software developer and the bride is an engineer. PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEITH CARSON & CRYSTAL HEART / RED APPLE TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LINDSEY & CRAIG MAHAFFEY / SPOSA BELLA PHOTOGRAPHY

Taite Quinn & Richard Sasnett May 4, 2013 Love is a journey. For Taite and Richard, the saying is both literal and figurative. Though the two worked for the same company, they didn’t meet until a coffee shop interview in Greenville. After all, Taite was living in Greenville and Richard was a Savannah resident. A year into their relationship, the couple vacationed in Spain. On the Fourth of July, Richard managed to squeeze in one more treasured memory after a full day of traveling and sightseeing in Tangiers: a waterfront proposal in Marbella. The couple was married in Savannah’s Independent Presbyterian Church and held their reception at the Savannah Yacht Club. PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS CAMPBELL / GIVING WEDDINGS

HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the area and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Andrew Huang, 148 River Street, Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601, or e-mail ahuang@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 32 TOWN / towncarolina.com


Fabulous Fashions. Fashionably Priced.

Save the date as L’s goes all out for Summer on Augusta, July 25 through July 27. Enjoy instore daily specials and treats. Bring a chair Saturday, July 27 for our Beach Blast starting at 6pm and learn to shag to the great sounds from The Royal Scotsmen Band live under the tent! Enjoy refreshments and more!

Your pets will thank you! Posh Paws is a professional, full service grooming salon and upscale spa located in downtown Greenville. We provide the following specialized services to your furry family member: . Mud baths, sugar or salt scrubs · Premium grooming products · Luxurious and pristine facility · Aromatherapy and soothing music

234 Westfield St. | Greenville | 864.271.4377 | poshpawsgreenville.com

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C43R

· Canine and feline grooming · Canine massage · One-on-one appointments · Stress-free grooming environment · Skin and coat evaluations

3/5/13 Ls 4thS 11:31 TownJuly13.indd AM 1

6/10/13 5:48 PMB


Short Drive.

L

inville Golf Club isn’t far, but when it comes to the summer heat, we’re worlds away from the lowlands.

Bike the Rabbit GREENVILLE BICYCLE RENTALS

Call Today for Reservations: 800-742-6717

Free delivery and pick up – 7 days a week – at downtown locations and The Swamp Rabbit Trail

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at Linville Golf Club

175 Linville Avenue Linville, North Carolina 28646 www.Eseeola.com

M23A

864.990.5446 | www.BikeTheRabbit.com

Approximate Drive Time From Greenville/Spartanburg 2.5 hours

The Eseeola Lodge

1/29/13 10:01 AM

Creating Healthy Beautiful Smiles

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Professional Cleanings, Whitening, Veneers/Cosmetics, Fillings, Crowns, Bridges, Partials, Dentures, Implant Prosthetics, Extractions, Root Canal Treatment, and More! Ask about our custom sports guards in your child’s school colors and our NEW Teeth Whitening System!

Ryan M. Cook DMD

Greenville | 864.232.5289 16 Mills Ave. Ste. 5

Piedmont | 864.845.3402 110 Blossom Branch Rd. J33

FAMILY & COSMETIC DENTISTRY

www.mygreenvillescdentist.com

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FemCity Connection Luncheon Pure Barre started out of a basement in 2001. Since then the company has become a franchise and grown to have multiple studios across 34 states. Lauren Wilson opened Pure Barre Greenville in 2012 and has grown the studio rapidly- so fast in fact, that she is opening a second studio this summer. Lauren will share how to start a business, grow it and ultimately expand in this market.

Wednesday July 10, 2013 11:45 am - 1:15 pm at Ruth’s Chris Steak House 851 Congaree Road

Pilates Moves now offering Barre Classes Our class size is small so each participant has plenty of space and to ensure proper form. All levels welcome, package of 10 for $120. First class is free-call to schedule or sign up online using promo code “barremoves”. Come try our Barre Moves Class!

$30/member includes lunch | $45/non member includes lunch

Registration:

PilatesMoves 4th TOWNJuly13.indd 1

K713S

http://www.femfessionals.com/FemCities/Greenville W513F

1941 Woodruff Road, Suite C 864.631.5568 www.pilatesmovesonline.com

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6/10/13 4:30 PMS

Runway Everyday and

Badgley Mischka exclusively at

119 Cleveland Street | Greenville, SC 29601 864.298.0072 | www.gregoryellenburg.com

3 6GregE TOW N Jul13 / t Town.indd o w n c a r 1o l i n a . c o m hlfH

6/11/13 4:17 PM


B everly

salon

Visit the original

B low Out B ar $30 Shampoo and

B lowdry

with complimentary glass of wine (packages 4 or more $25 ea)

Also now offering

Air

Brush Spray Tan

Call today for appointment 864-879-9696 or book online at SalonBeverly.com or on Facebook. 1803 B Augusta Street, Greenville at Caper’s Place Hours: Tues-Thurs 9-7, Fri & Sat 9-5, closed Sun & Mon

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6/12/13 1:24 PM

Shoes Handbags Accessories Fresh Designs Friendly Service Fabulous Shopping!

864 271 9750 | www.museshoestudio.com | 2222 Augusta Road, Greenville Muse_hlfH_TownJuly13.indd 1

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Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future.

Valerie Miller, Award Winning REALTOR®, and expert in making dreams come true

Making Wishes Come True

www.MarchantCo.com 864.467.0085

Valerie knows that sometimes finding the perfect home seems impossible. But working as a realtor, motivational speaker and author, she has learned the art of making people’s wishes come true. The Marchant Company prides itself on giving every customer a tailored home buying experience, and Valerie is no exception. She passionately believes that anyone looking for a home deserves personal service and attention, not sales. And just how Cinderella’s glass slipper was a perfect fit, Valerie wants to help Greenville Member FDIC homebuyers find their perfect home.


TOWN

Buzz

COOL HOOD / OUTSIDE THE BOX / PROFILE

Window Shop

Photograph by Patrick Cox

A new generation of artists and businesses moves into Taylors Mill

Wood Work: The massive Taylors Mill will see its spaces filled with studios, workshops, and event spaces. Jaryd Walley, whose studio is located in the mill, crafts farm-style dining tables. J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 3 9


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Taylors Made

Table Tops: Jaryd Walley crafts custom farm tables in his studio at Taylors Mill Properties, nearly a square mile of workshops and offices.

A new crop of tenants reinvigorates historic Taylors Mill / by Andrew Huang / photograph by Patrick Cox

K

enneth Walker’s drawling words hang in the muggy morning air, in no particular hurry to get anywhere. Taylors Mill, the 91-year-old brick and glass building he owns, is similarly imperturbable. It wears the grit and wear of its history with implacable persistence, like it has sloughed off the urgency and decay of passing time. But neither Walker nor Taylors Mill is as placid as they appear. Behind the brick façade, the 814,000-square-foot space is a hub of activity. More than 50 businesses, ranging from art studios to plastic recyclers, call the mill home. It’s just a start, too. Since purchasing the mill in 2006, Walker has been busy plotting out a phased redevelopment of the property that will see the mill’s open spaces partitioned into workshops and offices. It’s a move that has already proven popular with artists and craftsmen. Jaryd Walley, owner of Mobili Farm Tables, was one of the first to move into his space at Taylors Mill.The former Hollywood prop maker, who salvaged much of his building material from Camp Sevier’s former barracks, finds that the mill adds to the rich backstory of his labors.“It’s poetic to think there is so much history in this wood, and that it’s getting put together in a space with so much history,”Walley says. The mill’s century-old patina isn’t the only attraction for tenants.The Taylors Art Group, a collective of working artists, and a forklift informally shared between tenants (useful for moving everything from CNC machines to pallets of reclaimed wood) are already evidence of a fledgling community built around respect and cooperation. A space as expansive as Taylors Mill is just begging to be filled, and if Walker has his way, it will be this community’s creative energies doing just that. Taylors Mill Properties. 228 Mill St, Taylors. (864) 244-9968, taylorsmillproperties.com

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. d n e k e e w a t s IItt’s’s nnoott jjuust a weekend. y e k e h t n i e f i IItt’s’s llife in the key ooff eeuupphhoorriiaa.. A L FAAVVOORRITITEESS 2013 F EFSE ST IV T IVA L F 2013 Friday, September 27th Friday, September 27th

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Table Tops: Jaryd Walley crafts custom farm tables in his studio at Taylors Mill Properties, nearly a square mile of studios, workshops, and offices.


COOL

Hood

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Urban Renaissance The Village of West Greenville comes alive again / by Jac Chebatoris // photograph by J. Aaron Greene

W

Night Light: Art enthusiasts take to the streets on First Friday to visit the art studios that call the Village home.

hen Greenville artist Susan Young Evans got married last year, it wasn’t at a swank country club, sprawling plantation home, or immense event hall, but it was a destination wedding—the destination was the garden behind the ArtBomb artist studio building in West Greenville, the area which is now rebranding itself as the Village of West Greenville. The ArtBomb, founded by artist Diane Kilgore Condon in 2001, was the first of the studios to take up real estate there and is what Evans, who appreciates the 1950s aesthetic distinct to this section of town, says, “started this revolution or ‘urban pioneering’ that is occurring in neighborhoods all over Greenville.” The stretch of Pendleton Street, which was the home to the Westside and Brandon textile mills (thus the name the “Village” from the mill villages), was an untapped and fitting industrial backdrop for artists to settle in. Lily Pottery, Knack Studio, and Village Studios are just a few of the nearly 50 artists and shops who have seen the Village evolve. Now, the City of Greenville along with the West Greenville Business Association are fostering this natural progression and furthering its residential, retail, and business growth. Naked Pasta, which recently opened at 1286 Pendleton Street, is the first restaurant (aside from Coffee to a Tea which moved from Lois Avenue to the West End) in this food desert, as such areas are called, and the ASADA food truck circulates through often, adding some serious metro-cred to this little-enginethat-could part of town. Bluesman Mac Arnold has a September opening date for his new, 4,400-squarefoot, Southern-fusion food and live-music restaurant, Mac Arnold’s Plate Full O’ Blues at 1237 Pendleton Street. His neighbor at the corner of Lois Avenue and Pendleton is the building designated for Clemson University—which will be a keystone presence in the Village, spearheaded by investor Richard Heusel. There is a palpable electricity of potential coursing through this area, one that is shared by its older siblings, the West End and the stretch of North Main Street running up to the area in front of the Hyatt, which now has a Manhattan-style abbreviation, NoMa Square. All have arisen from their grittier, adolescent pasts, searching for identity to become the happy, shiny versions of themselves now. (It’s all so very Gatsby.) Get down to First Friday when the studios open their doors, eat tacos from a truck, soak in the artfully applied vibrancy of what is still to come, and be prepared to answer emphatically when your out-oftown friends ask—“yes, it is THAT Greenville.”

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Natural Tendencies

Greenville artist Joseph Bradley is off and running / by Laura Linen / photography by Eli Warren

J

oseph Bradley loads his van with paintings to head to one of the top art fairs in the United States, the Old Town Art Fair in Chicago. For this annual art mecca, celebrating its 64th year, the stage is set for 250 hand-picked, nationally-acclaimed artists and an estimated 50,000 art lovers. Joseph Bradley will be among them, and his van will most certainly be empty for the drive home. As the Bob Jones University alum puts it, “Southern Art is hot.” Or maybe it’s the South in general that has sparked the country’s interest. Big-city chefs look to boiled peanuts and pimiento cheese for inspiration; meanwhile, Bradley looks to nature. Bradley’s fascination with animals at play and how much they remind us of, well, us, manifests itself in multilayered, mixed-media works, in various sizes. Whether a bull with birds joyfully alighting on its antlers, or colorful koi that seem alive against a metallic backdrop, Bradley captures the motion, humor, imperfection, and beauty of nature all without doing the first sketch. He never sketches. It’s all about experimentation and intuition. Let it happen, he says, when the brush, or metallic leaf, hits the custommade panel.

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Bradley’s use of silver leaf—small squares of metal pounded to the thinnest possible degree—imbues his work with a “cool factor,” not to mention a sense of wonder. Handling the delicate squares is like manipulating air—it nearly tears at the look of it. The artist intends to launch a new round of panels, along with a new Web site and digital, multi-media series of 20 birds. No doubt Bradley has taken flight—but he’ll come home again.

Free Hand: Artist Joseph Bradley doesn’t sketch. He pours inspiration straight from mind to medium. For more of his woodland-inspired work, check out josephbradleystudio.com


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fternoon tea, debutante parties, special-event dinners. A typical week for Emile Labrousse, executive chef at Greenville’s venerable Poinsett Club, can entail planning and preparing literally thousands of meals. So how’s a guy to relax? When this chef has a day off, he heads for the Green River near Saluda to indulge his other passion: fly fishing. A day spent fly fishing is, he says, “a Zen moment that lasts seven days.” Labrousse started to fish—and to cook—as a young boy in Périgueux, in southwestern France. “Growing up, my living room was the outdoors,” recalls the chef. “I would forage for mushrooms in the woods and ride 30 miles outside town on my little red bike to fish in the Dordogne River.” After high school, Labrousse attended culinary school


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Ride High Amp up your routine with Trek Travel’s Greenville Ride Camp / by Andrew Huang

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he Upcountry has never needed validation as premier cycling territory. Not when Greenville has played host and home, respectively, to the USA Cycling Professional Road & Time Trial National Championships and retired professional cyclist George Hincapie. But an extra accolade never hurt. Greenville joins exotic and storied locations like California’s Mount Figueroa, the Spanish island of Mallorca, and the red rock canyons of Moab, Utah, as a location for Trek Travel’s Ride Camps.

The mix of guided and self-guided rides features scenic overlooks of the Blue Ridge, but make no mistake: these routes are designed for serious riders in search of a challenge. The views are secondary to physical conditioning. Luckily, in addition to meals, accommodations, and a support vehicle, ride-camp participants have access to top-of-the-line Trek road bikes and local expertise. It’s time put your head down and get to work. Hot Pursuit: Greenville Ride Camp, Trek Travel. From $899. (866) 464-8735, trektravel.com

Photograph courtesy of Trek Travel

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WHERE WE LIVE IS BECOMING THE ENVY OF AMERICA. A LOT LIKE OUR HEALTH SYSTEM.

And it’s no wonder people are envious. The doctors at Greenville Health System (GHS) are providing tomorrow’s cancer therapies today, right here in the Upstate. Just ask Dr. Joe Stephenson—medical director of the GHS Institute for Translational Oncology Research and one of 60 cancer specialists—whose commitment to research is helping to bring breakthrough treatments and comprehensive care to families throughout the region. Learn more at ghs.org/modelofchange.

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Up the Street The Poinsett District is getting a facelift to become a destination / by Jac Chebatoris // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

J

ust hearing the word “revitalization” brings to mind a deep breath of fresh air. For a downtrodden area of Greenville that’s been waiting to exhale for a while, that time has arrived. The Poinsett District Revitalization Project is giving new life to the rather ramshackle corridor of Highway 276. In the place where the (now demolished) Piedmont Shirt Factory once stood as a token of a long-ago thriving textile community, there are now plumes of tractor-trailer exhaust that choke the thoroughfare that holds Duke’s Sandwich Shop and really not much else—it’s been a thru-way, not so much a destination. The Poinsett District Revitalization Coalition, made up of a multitude of public and private partners (Furman University, Greenville County, City of Greenville, Greenville Rec, SCDOT, GCRA, TreesGreenville, Arbor Engineering, Chick-fil-A/Cherrydale, Duke Energy, McCall Capital, M.S. Shore Company, Stone and Associates, and iOutside) is changing that. Not just cosmetically by planting trees and landscaping, says Shannon Herman, the project manager with Greenville County, but by bringing about economic and community development— reviving the four bordering neighborhoods, bringing in light manufacturing jobs, creating places of recreation, and even a “linear park.” “Linear in terms of how Falls Park or Swamp Rabbit works,” explains Herman, “which will connect Washington Center High School, sold by the school district to the recreation district, all the way up through the corridor to Poinsett Highway, making an on-street connection through Poe Mill to Swamp Rabbit.” The plans to breathe new life into the corridor— distinguished as the quarter-mile stretch of Poinsett Highway between Hammett Road and Gantt Street—started percolating two years ago. With a comprehensive and collaborative effort, the dilapidated, kudzu-covered, long-forgotten buildings and abandoned mill-village homes will give rise instead to shiny, standard-issue community spots such as coffee shops, doctor’s offices, and grocery stores. There are even plans for an outdoor climbing wall. “We want this to be its own place, the Poinsett District,” says Herman. “You have a reason to come there, a reason to be there, a reason to stay there.” The District’s metamorphosis won’t happen overnight—it’s going to be a couple years at least for this to come to full fruition. But at least we have a gleaming example of what patience and a sense of purpose can do for a place left to wither and fade— it’s called Downtown Greenville.

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Bloc Party: Private and public organizations are partnering to rebuild the economic and recreational vitality of this stretch of Poinsett Highway.


Photographs by Matthew DeLorme / courtesy of Doug Shaw

WITH A COMPREHENSIVE AND COLLABORATIVE EFFORT, THE DILAPIDATED, KUDZU-COVERED, LONG-FORGOTTEN BUILDINGS WILL GIVE RISE INSTEAD TO SHINY, STANDARDISSUE COMMUNITY SPOTS SUCH AS COFFEE SHOPS, DOCTOR’S OFFICES, AND GROCERY STORES. THERE ARE EVEN PLANS FOR AN OUTDOOR CLIMBING WALL.

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Sun damage iS never in Style.

9.20.13 Save the Date The 22 nd Rose Ball

is Greenville’s oldest charitable ball which has raised more than $2.6 million

Protect and Prevent. Greenville Dermatology is offering 25% off all sunscreens for the month of July.

864.242.5872

369 Woodruff Road greenvilledermatology.com

for local, nonprofit Greenville charities since its inception, including funding for Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.

Sponsored by the Charity Ball Board of Greenville, SC 7:30 in the Evening September 20, 2013 The Poinsett Club Greenville, SC Black Tie Access this link for reservations: www.theroseball.org/2013-roseballreserve

GARRISON OPTICIANS 1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109 | McDaniel Village | 271-1812 M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. | www.garrisonopticians.com

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

C73R

Locally Owned and Operated Since 1974


TOWN

Profile

Pacesetter: Eric Brown was attracted to interior design at an early age, captivated by the sets of old Hollywood films. Years later, a mentor recognized Brown’s talent, encouraging him to pursue the craft.

Talent by Design Eric Brown of Eric Brown Design has a natural eye for world-class interiors / by Jac Chebatoris / photographs by Paul Mehaf fey

S

ometimes you have to go back to the start. For Charleston-born, Spartanburgraised interior designer and decorator Eric Brown, it goes way back to when he pretended to be sick to be able to stay home from school and watch old movies. Even at the tender age of seven, he recalls, as he was watching that freaky-yet-fabulous black-and-white 1940 Hitchcock flick Rebecca, he was caught up not so much in the plot, but in the set design. He wasn’t just avoiding school, but actually laying the foundation for what would be his life’s passion and work—further spurred on by his beloved late grandmother, Wilma, who was the person who gave him his first “introduction to the trappings of the interior,” Brown says from his plush and (obviously) well-decorated loft office on East Washington Street in downtown Greenville (with paintings by artist Matt Baumgardner, now based in Travelers Rest, a one-of-a-kind coffee table by Rose Tarlow, and vintage leather villa chairs by John Saladino—two of his favorite designers). “She would go through and talk about antiques and art and take me to museums,” he says. Though she never told him outright that she thought he should pursue design. “I guess it’s because she was afraid my father would be furious with her that it was interfering with his plans that I was going to be a star quarterback,” Brown says with a bemused laugh, suggesting that that was the last thing that would ever have happened. He may have dropped the ball with his dad, but it only took a summer job during high school at a posh antique store, Chestnut Galleries in Spartanburg, to get another one rolling.

When Brown went in to the gallery to sell a yearbook ad, the owner asked him if he could polish brass. Well, yeah, can’t everybody, he thought. So he sold the ad and secured a summer job polishing brass. But Mr. Dunbar saw something else in his young charge and soon promoted Brown to create renderings. Now, years later, Brown still credits Dunbar with being the one who recognized something in him that he could then, as he describes, take ownership of. “He told me at a very early age that I had something special and unique, and instead of not believing him, I believed him and I felt it. It’s funny how someone can acknowledge something that they see that you may not be aware of,” he says, adding that “the key is when you take ownership of that and you realize, ‘You know, he’s right.’” J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 5 1


TOWN

Profile

“What’s unique about me is that I don’t really have a style. It’s not ‘a’ style; it is style.”—Eric Brown

Brown is self-taught and believes in that classic adage: you either have it or you don’t. If his client list is any indication— CEOs and presidents of global companies from up and down the Eastern seaboard—Brown definitely “has it.” But what he doesn’t have, interestingly enough, is one particular design style. “What’s unique about me is that I don’t really have a style. It’s not ‘a’ style; it is style,” he says. “We’ve done things across the board: super modern, very traditional, almost museum-ey to Italian. I don’t like things that are too much one thing.” “We” includes his partner Jim Boyd, with whom he has worked for nearly 20 years; he created Eric Brown Design about 25 years ago. Early on there was a seven-year stretch in New York City, which is a resumé builder for sure, and also the stuff of a fledging designer’s dreams. Brown was only 28-years-old when he worked on his first 10,000-square-foot penthouse. His projects since have included yachts, planes, corporate offices, and townhouses. Brown is an avid art collector and his eyes light when he talks about creating collections for many of his clients. “I look at art like a scholarly element. I’ve formed a lot of really impressive collections for clients who let me create their collection and then they get bitten by the art bug and excited,” he says. 52 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Natural Selection: Brown started Eric Brown Design about 25 years ago; he worked for years in New York City before coming back to his native South Carolina.

His historical interest lends itself to a sweeping style of what might first appear as disparate elements, but come together to create an environment—not just, here’s some chintz, stripes, and flowers, have a seat (quelle horreur!). “History is at the core of everything I do,” says Brown, who can reflect his own personal history as one by design, as well: the influences, the turns in the road (devastatingly, he lost his mother, father, and sister in the decade of 30- to 40-years old), and especially the people—even if it’s not until looking at the past that one can see the future that was waiting. It’s all worked out in other words? “I think it’s working, he says.” It’s never ‘worked’ out,” he clarifies. “It’s a workin-progress.”


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In cooperation with Greenville Health System

presents

Yikes! Call Ike’s!

Music by Tom Kitt Book and Lyrics by Brian Yorkey

A FEEL-EVERYTHING MUSICAL CARPET, RUG & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING, INC. IKE’S 128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC • 864-232-9015 • www.ikescarpet.com

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JULY 11- 27 THU-SUN

Centre Stage is partnering with the Greenville Health System in presenting two panel discussions after the 3pm matinee on Sunday, July 14 and a 12pm Lunch & Learn on Friday, July 19. “Let’s Talk About Mental Illness” and will include local doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, clinicians and guests from NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). The Sunday panel will be open seating and will begin around 5:15-5:30pm. The Friday “Lunch & Learn” session will require free registration and can be completed at ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636). Both discussions are free and open to the public. NEXT TO NORMAL is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

For tickets 233-6733 or www.centrestage.org 54 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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This versatile building can be used as 2300 sq. ft. of office space on 2 floors, or renovated by Greenville’s own talented Trey Cole. He can transform it into your residence, with potentially 3 floors of living space, including roof top deck, large balcony, two car garage, basement for storage or your own private wine cellar. There are no regime fees and no parking fees and it is only one block from Greenville’s amazing Downtown—located between McBee and Washington —and around the corner from the new One Building. Call today for more incredible details!

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Piece Maker

Photograph by J. Aaron Greene, from the book Fur nitur e Makeovers by Barb Blair

Greenville artist Barb Blair of Knack Studio has a penchant for giving new life to old furniture

Blair calls this piece “Abelia,” describing it as “a gentle giant; it just needed a little color to bring it back to life.” J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 5 7


HAND

Made Interior Perspective: Blair names each of her pieces. “Emmaline” (left and below, with art by Joseph Bradley, pp 44–45) was falling apart when Blair procured it for free—her dad got it from a garage sale in upstate New York; (bottom) a detail of “Abelia” from the previous page; Blair’s book Furniture Makeovers, published by Chronicle Books, has been featured in the New York Times and elsewhere.

Knack on This Barb Blair takes furniture to a new glory—and shows you how

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ave you ever cried at one of those fashion makeover shows? Well, I have. Somehow, it just gets to you. The forlorn and poorly dressed suddenly emerge polished and bright, full of new life and hope (sob). Barb Blair, a California native now Greenville resident, does this very thing for hopeless furniture. At her studio/showroom called Knack, she brings out the “lovely in the unlovely,” and has bought truckloads of cast-off pieces headed for the trash heap. Then the magic occurs. Blair exhibits a combination of instinctive creativity and skill, elevating old furniture to new heights. Watching her work is like watching an angel breathe new life into something broken. Her patience, fine touch, attention to detail (even the backs are painted to perfection, and drawers are lined with beautiful paper) transform the functional to fine, each with personality. In fact, Blair names each piece: Eudora, Perpetua, Selma, and Tullia are a few examples.

58 TOWN / towncarolina.com

The artist’s book Furniture Makeovers is a hit on Amazon and was recently promoted by the New York Times. She offers hints, tips, resources, and “before” and “after” pictures to make you—not cry, silly—rejoice to have found inspiration to do something with that table in the giveaway pile.

BLAIR’S ATTENTION TO DETAIL (EVEN THE BACKS ARE PAINTED TO PERFECTION, AND DRAWERS ARE LINED WITH BEAUTIFUL PAPER) TRANSFORMS THE FUNCTIONAL TO FINE, EACH WITH PERSONALITY.

Photographs by J. Aaron Greene, from the book Fur nitur e Makeovers by Barb Blair

/ by Laura Linen


10 years in the making. The Upstate’s Premier Home and Design Magazine Looking forward to looking back‌ coming Fall/Winter 2013. Call 864.679.1235 for details.


GOOD

Eye

Frame Work

Ring Leader: Terry Norris’s interest in contemporary realism, such as Drew Fagan’s circusinspired figures above, dictates what he showcases on his gallery walls.

T.L. Norris Gallery delivers contemporary art in a modern setting

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

“Sometimes people who walk into a gallery act like they don’t know if they should be there. But going to a gallery is supposed to be fun,” Norris says. To that end, he doesn’t neglect the social aspect of viewing art: the gallery is equipped with a wine bar and full kitchen—perfect for lubricating the senses.—Andrew Huang From July 6–Aug 3, T.L. Norris Gallery will be partnering with Renato Moncini, profiled in TOWN’s October 2012 issue, for an exhibit of his work as a NASA illustrator. The gallery is located at 1 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. Gallery hours are Tues–Fri, 1–6pm, and Sat, 9:30am–5pm. (864) 991-8645, tlnorrisgallery.com

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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othing escapes the eye of an artist. And so it follows that the space where it’s displayed should exhibit a similar attention to design and detail. Away from the bustle of downtown foot traffic, one can find that attention at T.L. Norris Gallery on Wade Hampton. Terry Norris, investment banker by day and owner and director of the gallery, chose the gallery’s building for its Mid-Century Modern aesthetic—a subtle complement to the contemporary realism that he highlights. Norris recognizes the crucial role of flow in his gallery. A welcoming foyer space, home to brand-new exhibits, compresses and expands, gently funneling patrons to a larger central space. Speckled white Terrazzo floors, white-painted brick, and leather-strap Wassily chairs serve as accents.


Making your house a home with beautiful art.

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CELEBRATING 54 YEARS! THE MELEHES FAMILY THANKS YOU FOR YOUR PATRONAGE. OpenHearth hlfH Town July13 v2.indd 1

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FOUND

Objects

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Picnic Pleasure Don’t leave home without these al fresco essentials / by Laura Linen

1 BOTTLE SERVICE Picnic Plus wine tote, $16. From The Cook’s Station, 659 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com

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2 SUN SPELL Charles Viancin silicone lid cover, $18. Stainless steel mixing bowl, $34. Both from The Cook’s Station.

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3 BOARDING PARTY Round cheeseboard with sliding storage, $24. Cheese knives included. From Charleston Cooks!, 200 N Main St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 335-2000, mavericksouthernkitchens.com

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4 CHECK MATE Gingham check tablecloth, $59. From Pottery Barn, 700 Haywood Rd, Greenville. (864) 329-0227, potterybarn.com

6 PACK IT UP Rattan picnic basket for 2, $89. From Pottery Barn.

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen—and savor your own fresh-air dining experience.

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Pho tog r aph s by Pau l M eh a f fe y

5 BUBBLE BATH Govino plastic champagne flutes, $13 for a set of 4. From Kitchen Arts & Pottery, 400 E McBee Ave, Ste 112, Greenville. (864) 271-2171, facebook.com/ kitchenartspottery


It's About Home.

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Pure Barre is coming to Pelham Road this Summer!

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

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Fire Starter The Man faces his fear of outdoor grilling, just in time for the Fourth

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fter enjoying a recent backyard cookout, the beautiful blonde who inexplicably enjoys my company suggested I invest in an outdoor grill. It did seem to be the one gaping hole in my culinary arsenal, which includes almost every other accoutrement from food mill to chicken-shaped egg topper. But despite being a self-proclaimed gourmand, for me the outdoor grill never held much cachet. One reason is that armed with a little skill, a hot stove, and a set of well-seasoned cast-iron skillets, one can pull off some amazing gastronomic feats. Another is my innate fear of being slightly intoxicated near open flames and pressurized fuel. But knowing this beautiful blonde’s suggestions are really thinly veiled decrees, I grabbed my wallet and set out to do some shopping. The first stop was Charleston Cooks on North Main Street for accessories. Store manager and chef Mark Pollard proudly directed me past displays of gadgets that made my well-stocked kitchen feel sparse by comparison. There were graters and peelers and juicers and scalers and even little rubber pods to gently cradle poaching eggs. My credit cards began to tremble as we approached the grilling section, but Mark suggested starting out simply with only a few “must have” accessories. While debating the virtues of tongs versus forks, Mark informed me he is a former martial arts champion. At that point, the debating abruptly ended and I enthusiastically agreed with all of his recommendations: long locking tongs and an instant-read thermometer, both by Rösle, an Outset brand grilling basket, silicone sauce mop, a soaker box for chips (Mark likes to soak his in bourbon and apple juice), and a Pitt Mitt glove. 64 TOWN / towncarolina.com

For the grill itself I headed south to see my friend John Colacioppo who, along with his wife Kelly, owns The Cook’s Station at the corner of Main and Augusta. Although Kelly bears no resemblance to Wilma, John is a dead ringer for Fred Flintstone and has a working beer tap just feet from his desk, a perk miles beyond the standard office water cooler. John led me on a tour of grills with prices ranging from a few hundred dollars to more than $8,000. Knowing my weak spot, and budget (under a grand), he guided me toward the Primo brand, Kamado-style ceramic grill, hinting that it could double as a backyard pizza oven. The Primo uses natural hardwood lump charcoal and is versatile enough to grill, smoke, roast, or bake. Imagining myself impressing the beautiful blonde with wood-baked pizzas, grilled steaks, roasted chops, and sautéed seafood, all without having to conquer my fear of propane, was enough to sell me on the spot. While discussing the versatility of the Primo grill and the abundance of accessories available to the backyard chef, I asked John his favorite methods of grilling. He talked about Boston butts and flank steaks and even French-bread pizzas he’d grilled for his kids. But then he told me some of his best times behind a grill were the simplest. Just he, Kelly, and a couple of their friends down at Cleveland Park, grilling hot dogs on one of the beat-up, park-issued hibachis while the kids played nearby. It seems grilling, like most activities, is not about the stuff but about the people you’re with. So whether you’re searing scallops in a full outdoor kitchen or grilling burgers on a hibachi down at the park, enjoy it with the people you love. That’s my plan this summer. Yabadabadoo! The Cook’s Station 659 S Main St Greenville. (864) 250-0091, thecooksstation.com Charleston Cooks 200 N Main St Greenville. (864) 335-2000, mavericksouthernkitchens.com


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downtown greenville now has access to boardcertified family Medicine physicians 12-hours a day, as well as on the weekend. no appointment necessary. Simply walk-in or use our call-ahead service to reserve your appointment with one of our Bon Secours Medical group physicians who will assess your needs and conduct tests if needed. Important: Bon Secours Express Care provides treatment to injuries or conditions that are non-life-threatening. If you have an emergency, call 911 or proceed directly to the emergency room.

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66 TOWN / towncarolina.com


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68 TOWN / towncarolina.com


ECO LOCO

THERE ARE 50 GREENVILLES IN THE UNITED STATES, ONE (OR MORE!) FOR ALMOST EVERY STATE. BUT IT IS OUR GREENVILLE THAT TRULY LIVES UP TO ITS NAME. AND NOT JUST FOR ITS LUSH LANDSCAPES OR VERDANT PARKS OR LEAFY, SHADED STREETS. THE UPCOUNTRY IS A GREEN REGION, A TIGHTKNIT COMMUNITY SHAPED BY INDIVIDUALS WORKING TO LIVE AND PROFIT SUSTAINABLY. WITH VARYING BACKGROUNDS, PASSIONS, AND EXPRESSIONS, PEOPLE FROM ACROSS OUR REGION HAVE STEPPED FORWARD TO LEAD MORE SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES— AND, IN THE PROCESS, LEAD US.

By Kathryn Davé, Kathleen Nalley, and Steven Tingle

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by Steven Tingle

[TRANSPORTATION]

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TO THE BEFUDDLEMENT OF MANY ONLOOKERS,

Mayor Knox White recently walked down the middle of Main Street wearing a kayak. The bottom had been cut open to allow for his legs, and with paddle in hand he mimed riding the rapids as volunteers handed out flyers. The stunt was to raise awareness that Greenville has become one of ten finalists for Outside Magazine’s Best Active Town, a contest that includes cities such as Boston, San Diego, and Honolulu. There is no question Greenville is full of runners, bikers, walkers, and a few kayakers, but a major reason for this fact is not just the active nature of the town’s residents but the sustainable transportation infrastructure that is in place to promote these activities.

THE “ENJOYMENT” FACTOR IS ONE OF THE MAIN KEYS IN BRINGING THE PUBLIC INTO THE SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FOLD. “SIXTY-SIX PERCENT OF EVERYONE’S DAILY TRIPS ARE WITHIN A FIVE-MILE RADIUS OF THEIR HOME,” SAYS TY HOUCK, DIRECTOR OF GREENWAYS, NATURAL AND HISTORIC RESOURCES AT GREENVILLE COUNTY RECREATION DISTRICT.

According to experts, to have any meaningful impact, a community’s alternative or sustainable transportation initiatives need to go far beyond bus routes and greenways. “One of the things we are recognizing here in Greenville,” says David Baxter, project coordinator for Greenlink, “is the fact that if we are going to truly provide a legitimate alternative to the personal automobile, as well as continue to enhance our offerings for those folks who need public transit, it’s got to be a multiple-mode approach.” For Baxter, this means a complete alternate transportation network including walkable sidewalks, greenways, bus shelters, bike lanes, lockers, carriers, and sharing programs along with the backbone of a strong bus system. Greenlink has recently expanded its service to Simpsonville and Mauldin and this fall will begin offering a commuter service to Clemson along with a connector route that will travel to the other Clemson campuses: CU-ICAR, Clemson at the Falls, Project One, and the University Center. Greenlink is also taking over operation of the Downtown trolley with plans to add two new trolleys as well as extend operation hours and routes. This expanded service follows Greenlink’s installation of bike carriers on the front of all of its buses as well as the recent addition of four bike lockers, two at the Spring Street garage and two adjacent to the downtown transit center. “It’s representative of Greenlink’s commitment to a multi-modal approach to public transportation,” says Baxter. “Many folks who are active in the bicycling community are very open minded about different forms of transportation and actually enjoy using the buses as an alternative means to get around.” The “enjoyment” factor is one of the main keys in bringing the public into the sustainable transportation fold. “Sixty-six percent of everyone’s daily trips are within a five-mile radius of their home,” says Ty Houck, Director of Greenways, Natural and Historic Resources at Greenville County Recreation District. “If you can ride a bike at ten miles an hour, that’s obviously a very short bike ride. But it’s not a lot of fun if that bike ride is on Woodruff Road.” On the other hand, according to Houck, if that bike ride is on the Greenville Health System’s Swamp Rabbit Trail or a well-marked bike lane that leads to shops, offices, and services, then the ride becomes enjoyable and healthy. “Transportation is the necessity,” says Houck. “Exercise is the added luxury.”

“TRANSPORTATION IS THE NECESSITY,” SAYS HOUCK. “EXERCISE IS THE ADDED LUXURY.”

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Drive Bye: With six stations in downtown Greenville, the B-Cycle bikeshare program has become a viable alternative to driving.

Photog r aph by Pau l Meh a f fey

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he Swamp Rabbit Trail is just one part of Greenville’s network that leads from one sustainable transportation option to another. “Look at it like a road network,” says Houck. “You have Interstate roads, primary roads, and residential roads. Sidewalk walkability to a greenway system or to a transit system is the same idea in the community realm of sustainable transportation.” But despite being an alternative transportation option, the real draw of the trail is that it is fun. “We see the excitement,” says Houck.

“We see people out on the Swamp Rabbit who have probably never gotten on a bike before because there was nowhere exciting, enjoyable, and easy to go.” One of the newest and most-talkedabout pieces of the multiple-mode sustainable transportation equation is Greenville’s B-Cycle bike-share program, a partnership between Upstate Forever and the Greenville Health System. The program launched at the end of March with six stations located throughout downtown. Users purchase a daily, weekly, or annual membership, and for

a small fee “borrow” a bike that can be returned to any station. “According to the system and standard calculations, riders have burned a total of 341,360 calories,” says Van Whitehead, deputy director of Upstate Forever. Whitehead notes the program is not just meant for fun and exercise but to also serve a real need for transportation. “Eighteen percent of the trips are less than a mile, and interestingly enough 64 percent of the trips are more than five miles,” he says. “People are really getting out there and going places.”

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Pho tog r aph by Pau l M eh a f fe y

“MANY FOLKS WHO ARE ACTIVE IN THE BICYCLING COMMUNITY ARE VERY OPENMINDED ABOUT DIFFERENT FORMS OF TRANSPORTATION AND ACTUALLY ENJOY USING THE BUSES AS AN ALTERNATIVE MEANS TO GET AROUND.” —DAVID BAXTER, PROJECT COORDINATOR FOR GREENLINK


Park-n-Ride: A cyclist attaches his bike to one of Greenlink’s accommodating buses.

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MERCY VERITY CANDLES ARE NON-TOXIC, MADE FROM 100-PERCENT SOY WAX WITH NO CHEMICAL ADDITIVES AND A LEADFREE COTTON WICK.

AGING WELL: OLD HOUSE SALVAGE SUSTAINABLY REPURPOSES PIECES OF HISTORY

SPIN CYCLE: EARTHSPUN APPAREL TURNS RECYCLED BOTTLES INTO ON-TREND TEES

GREEN LIGHT: ALL-NATURAL, HAND-CRAFTED SOY CANDLES OUTSHINE TRADITIONAL FLAMES

For Joe Stevens, going backward is the way to move forward. His company Old House Salvage has specialized in historic preservation for more than 50 years. Joe and his crew take down old buildings, rescuing vintage materials along the way. His Piedmont shop is a treasure trove of antique doors, porcelain doorknobs, Heart of Pine flooring, claw-foot tubs, mantles, brick, and far more. These beauties are repurposed in new home construction, craft furniture-making, and handmade art—preserving both virgin materials and local heritage. “If I weren’t around,” Joe sighs, “it would just all be crushed and taken to the landfill.” theoldhousesalvage.com

The plastic bottle of pop in your hand could someday be the next t-shirt in your drawer. It may sound like magic, but turning old, plastic bottles into weavable, wearable yarn is recycling’s most stylish trend. The process of shredding and spinning recycled plastic from bottles and X-ray film into high-quality yarn is not unique to Earthspun Apparel. However, in 2010, Greenville native Jack Miller and his business partners recognized that this innovative apparel technology could be a sustainable, profitable tool to revive the textile industry in the Carolinas. Today, Earthspun Apparel’s distribution center is located in Greenville, where they process, package, and ship the soft, stylish, and sustainable tees that have made it all the way to multiple celebrities, including Ellen DeGeneres. Each tee is dye-free and super soft, thanks to its blend of recycled polyester and recycled Carolina cotton. It’s a style choice that’s as refreshing as the first biting sip from a bottle of soda—but it lasts far longer. earthspunapparel.com

Mercy Verity candles are made with love. That much is obvious from looking at Lisa Summer’s hand-poured, small-batch soy candles, presented sweetly in vintage mason jars with twine. Lisa’s passion for natural candles has grown over the years; when she started, she knew next to nothing about candle-making. Each vegan candle is packaged in a reusable container—a jar, a coffee mug— designed to encourage customers to reuse their containers. A candle that looks good, smells good, and does the environment good? It’s love at first light. mercyveritycandles.com

74 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Photog r aph ( lef t) by Pau l Meh a f fey Photog r aph (r ig ht) cou r tes y of Lu l laby Pai nt s

by Kathryn Davé

[STYLE] [LIFESTYLE]

EACH VEGAN CANDLE IS PACKAGED IN A REUSABLE CONTAINER—A JAR, A COFFEE MUG—DESIGNED TO ENCOURAGE CUSTOMERS TO REUSE THEIR CONTAINERS.


DIFFERENT STROKES: ORGANIC, VOC-FREE, BABY-SAFE PAINT GIVES NURSERIES A HEALTHY LOOK

Roll Play: Already VOC- and toxin-free, Lullaby Paints goes the extra mile with lightweight eco-pouches that reduce the material, shipping, and environmental costs of their paint.

Just what are asthmagens, allergens, neurotoxicants, and carcinogens doing in the paint you apply to your baby’s nursery walls? Nothing good, that’s for sure. Lullaby Paints, a new VOC- and toxin-free line of paints, proves that lovely paint can be made for babies (and grown-ups) without any of the bad guys mucking it up. Although Lullaby Paints is just a year old, the revolutionary Spartanburg-based paint company has already won numerous awards and features in high-end stores like Dwell Studio. The paint promises zero VOCs and no toxins—big news in a world where indoor air quality is five times worse than outdoor, and the EPA deems VOCs the nation’s second largest pollutant. Lullaby’s solution is an environmentally friendly formula that provides sophisticated color, quality coverage, and safety for mom and baby. Lullaby takes the innovation one step further by packaging the paint in an eco-pouch, designed to reduce the company’s footprint and preserve the life of the paint. Oh, baby. lullabypaints.com

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that an old rail line would one day be home to thousands of cyclists, runners, and walkers, and connect two cities without the use of gasguzzling cars? That a river teeming with textile pollution could become the iconic image of a thriving urban destination? That community gardens would dot mill-village landscapes, and residents would take as much pride in the food they grow as they do their bond? That recycling would no longer just be perceived as personal responsibility, but adopted by companies as normal operating procedure? Greenvillians, that’s who. In recent years, a plethora of LEED–certified buildings (new and historic), green spaces, recycling bins, bicycle paths, recharging stations, and edible community gardens have cropped up all over the city. But Greenville’s move toward sustainability didn’t just happen overnight. Perhaps its momentum began when a group decided to take action to clean up one of the city’s most valuable treasures—the Reedy River—and turn it into a hallmark destination for locals and tourists alike. For decades, residents had turned their backs on the Reedy River, as it became primarily a dumping ground for textile mills’ discharged waste and little more than an eyesore. But, in 1993, a dedicated group, Friends of the Reedy, saw the potential to turn this ecological problem into an opportunity. They helped transition the Reedy into a major attraction for the city, and in the process, spawned a renewed focus on sustainability. “Greenville’s birthplace is the Reedy River and Reedy River Falls,” says Brad Wyche, member of the Friends group and founder of Upstate Forever, whose primary mission is to promote responsible growth, mitigate urban sprawl,

76 TOWN / towncarolina.com

and conserve rural and natural environments. “After years of neglect, the Reedy River has become one of the focal points of the city. One might say we’ve come full circle.” ccording to Wyche, most successful sustainability projects, like the Reedy River, have been dependent upon collaboration between individuals, non-profit groups, government agencies, and private entities all coming together to create change. But most of this change has not been without controversy.

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Main Street transform into a pedestrian-focused destination. By eliminating two lanes of traffic, sidewalks were widened and beautification projects began. “That project shifted our focus away from cars and back onto people,” says Wyche. Along with Huffman, Wyche is a proponent of infill development, which involves renovating and developing in city centers where utilities and services support a denser population. Infill development can help reduce traffic congestion, create more

“GREENVILLE’S BIRTHPLACE IS THE REEDY RIVER AND REEDY RIVER FALLS,” SAYS BRAD WYCHE, FOUNDER OF UPSTATE FOREVER “Human nature is to fight change,” claims Rick Huffman, founder of Earth Design in Pickens. “But it’s also human nature to innovate and to seek a better quality of life.” Take, for instance, Greenville’s Main Street. Visionaries wanted to decrease its four lanes down to its current two and were met with dissent. The visionaries trudged on, however, and saw

livable communities, and preserve rural lands. “If we can direct more growth to the urban center, we’re not taking up rural land, which is important in reducing the rate of sprawl and not looking like Atlanta or Houston in 20 years,” claims Wyche.

UPSTATE FOREVER’S “GREATEST HITS” IF YOU WANT TO GET AN IDEA OF JUST HOW MUCH LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS ARE INVESTING IN THE FUTURE OF THE AREA, CHECK OUT A FEW OF THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF UPSTATE FOREVER:

Co-implementation of the bike-share program—B-Cycle— that allows and encourages the rental of bicycles at any one of several highprofile bike stations throughout the city. Becoming the first land-trust organization in South Carolina to receive national accreditation.ill Completing the LEED Platinum–certified renovation of the Upstate Forever Greenville office.l Releasing an eyeopening growthprojection study for the Upstate that shows what our region will look like in 2030 if current development patterns and policies remain unchanged.ll Playing a key role in securing and opening the Swamp Rabbit Trail that connects downtown Greenville to Furman University and Travelers Rest.

Ph o t o g r aph cou r t e s y o f t h e G r e e nv i l l e C o nve nt i o n & V i s it o r s B u r e au

by Kathleen Nalley

[URBAN]

WHO COULD HAVE IMAGINED

“HUMAN NATURE IS TO FIGHT CHANGE,” CLAIMS RICK HUFFMAN, FOUNDER OF EARTH DESIGN IN PICKENS. “BUT IT’S ALSO HUMAN NATURE TO INNOVATE AND TO SEEK A BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE.”


U

pstate Forever’s own office space is an example of what Wyche’s group strives to achieve. Built in 1916 in the historic Pettigru district, “This place sat empty for over 20 years,” explains Wyche. “We bought it, rehabbed it, and now it is LEED Platinum–certified, as well as a model for environmental-efficient technology, such as solar panels, green roof, rainwater collection, etc. It’s an example of not giving up on a structure, but instead, revitalizing it into a sustainable model for the future.” Swamp Rabbit Trail was the very first project Upstate Forever tackled. To get the project done, Wyche sought people with an ability to visualize what such a trail could mean for residents and the future of both Greenville and Traveler’s Rest. “Just the other day, I passed a sign that said ‘TR means Trail,’” says Wyche. “When you see that kind of progress, when something like a bike trail has the power to transform a place, that’s when you know you’ve accomplished something.” People are at the forefront of another innovative program, Gardening for Good, a Greenville Forward initiative, which serves as a network and resource center for community gardens throughout the county. “Ultimately, gardens are not just a source of food; they act as a collecting space that allows people to come together,” says Reece Lyerly, Gardening for Good director and sustainability director for Greenville Forward. “What keeps people coming back to a community garden is the community,” says Lyerly. He expects

LAST YEAR, GREENVILLIANS POSTED A 42-PERCENT RECYCLING RATE, BEATING OUT THE STATEWIDE RATE OF 37 PERCENT.

River Run: Once a dumping ground for textile-mill waste, Reedy River Falls and Falls Park now stand as examples of what responsible and visionary urban planning can accomplish.

a significant increase in urban gardening as more Greenvillians move city-center. “As more apartment buildings and developments take shape downtown, the greater the need for individual garden plots to supply those residents,” says Lyerly. Urban gardening is only one of the green efforts that seems to be growing on residents. Last year, Greenvillians posted a 42-percent recycling rate, beating out the statewide rate of 37 percent. Elizabeth Garrison, founder of EverGreen Recycling and member of the city’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, believes this says a lot about the character of our people. “Everywhere I go, people want to tell me what good recyclers they are,” says Garrison. “Greenvillians are forward-thinking. Our town fosters a sense of progression. Ours is a culture that wants to do the right thing.” Through her company, Garrison meets the recycling needs of businesses in Anderson, Greenville, Laurens, and Spartanburg counties. Her efforts, combined with those of the city, help to create a greener Greenville. “The City of Greenville does an excellent job of recycling residential materials,” admits Garrison. “But they don’t deal with that of businesses. In essence, we pick up where the city leaves off.” Such cooperation is the lynchpin of our vibrant community.

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For more info please visit www.ecospaints.net or call 1-866-587-3586. 78 TOWN / towncarolina.com


EAT&

Drink

SIDE DISH / CITY DISH / QUICK BITE

Hog Wild

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Bacon Bros. Public House takes cured meat to new heights

Nest Egg: Deviled Dust Eggs with coppa ham and mustard seed J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 7 9


SIDE

Dish

/ by M. Linda Lee

CHEF GRAY RECOMMENDS ANYTHING FROM THE CURING CHAMBER: That includes coppa ham, bastardo salami, bresaola, and more—all butchered and cured in-house. BLT: A trifecta of pork—peachwoodsmoked bacon, belly, and jowl— served on house-made Sally Lunn bread, spread with greenpeppercorn mayo.

Chef Anthony Gray brings on the Bacon Bros. Public House / by M. Linda Lee

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sk Chef Anthony Gray why he wanted to open a restaurant that sizzles around bacon, and he’ll tell you he’s been fascinated with cured meats for as long as he can remember. That fascination spawned Bacon Bros. Public House, where house-cured charcuterie runs the gamut from the signature thick-cut bacon—smoked on-site using peachwood from a South Carolina farm—to country ham, turkey salami, and lamb prosciutto. Gray, who came to Greenville to open High Cotton years ago, and more recently honed his charcuterie skills at Bacon Bar in Atlanta, now divides his time between the stoves at Bacon Brothers and Coal Fired Bistro (Pelham Road and Highway 14). “You can’t keep me out of the kitchen,” he admits. “I love the intensity of the line.” At his new place, Gray goes whole-hog, buying entire animals, butchering them in-house, and smoking them in the restaurant’s own smokehouse out back. Aside from charcuterie, his menu targets 80 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Southern comfort food—fried pickles, pimiento cheese, chicken and White Lily dumplings—“the kinds of things I grew up eating,” says the Georgiaborn chef. “We offer food that’s local, fresh, and sustainable, but still affordable,” Gray explains. (The most expensive thing on the menu is $15). The staff makes everything from hot sauce to salad dressing from scratch, and much of the produce comes from Coal Fired Farm in Woodruff. Tables fashioned from recycled pallet wood and sections from an old fence mounted on the ceiling set off the pub’s neutral color scheme. A counter divides the dining room from the long bar, which is faced with more pallet wood in a 3-D effect, and topped with a thick slab of poured concrete. Everything says rustic, relaxed, comfortable. Near the bar, the glass-front curing chamber is more than the showpiece of the dining room. The country ham, bacon, sausage, and other housemade charcuterie displayed inside not only drive Bacon Bros.’ menu, but they fit in perfectly with what Gray calls “the restaurant’s celebration of Southern heritage.”

Photog r aph s by Paul Meha f fey

Meat & Greet

BUTTERSCOTCH STICKY BUN: An “in-your-face” brioche sticky bun, sprinkled with peachwoodsmoked bacon and bourbonbarrel salt.


High on the Hog: (this page) Potater Tots with pit-cooked pork shoulder, American cheese, buffalo pig ears, and sorghum vinegar; (opposite, clockwise from top-left) kale salad with Goat Lady’s applewoodsmoked goat cheese and Merlot vinaigrette; the curing chamber; charcuterie board with housemade meats and accoutrements

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 8 1


CITY

Dish

Take Your Leaf Zen ambience soothes visitors at Tealoha Tea & Eats

/ by Ruta Fox

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ealoha (pronounced tee-loha) is a word coined by proprietress Jun Li to mean “Welcome, please come in and have some tea.” The tea drinks at Tealoha are not tradition’s Southern sweet, so get ready to enjoy some liquid treats unlike any you’ve tasted before. Li, 27, immigrated to America from China when she was 20 years old. She graduated New York University with a degree in mechanical engineering, but had a burning desire to start a business. Since tea has held an esteemed position in Chinese culture for thousands of years, she went all-in after two years of research. She’s created a Zen-like environment with a luxurious natural bent: recycled barn-wood panels on the walls and bamboo-patterned comfy chairs in a conversation pit. Check out the bar, a felled tree courtesy of the Biltmore forest in Asheville. Soothing earthy browns and greens impart a supercalm vibe as relaxing music surrounds you. It’s a cool hang for a morning meeting (they are open early) or a relaxing way to cap off a busy evening (they are open late). A variety of hot and cold tea drinks are on the menu, including exotics like Osmanthus Dragon Pearl and Silver Needle. Enjoy the SmooTEAS, a tea-infused version of a smoothie topped with whipped cream, or an iced fruit tea like Pom Love. The “eats” part of “tea and eats” means top-quality premium ingredients for all the food and pastries. Organic salads, gourmet panini, and sweet treats like a Salted Caramel Crème Puff will tempt you. “My husband’s job took us here four years ago,” says Li, “but the business-friendly environment here sealed the deal to open this concept.” A welcome change, for sure.

J

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

Tealoha Tea & Eats 131 East McBee Ave, Greenville (864) 509-1899, tealoha.com

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com


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QUICK

Bite

Fried & True

Leave the bucket behind— these local spots serve up crispy, juicy bliss / by Andrew Huang

Iron Chef Going the homemade route? Nothing beats a cast-iron skillet for holding an even heat. It’s just the thing you need when toeing the line between burnt crisp and fried to perfection.

Whether between biscuits or with soulful sides, fried chicken shines at a picnic or summer supper.

84 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Diner Delirium Sit down. It’s the only way to enjoy fried chicken that, on a bad day, is as good as your mother’s. You’ll need the support afterwards, too— satisfaction this good will knock you off your feet. OJ’s Diner, 907 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com On Your Mark As bacon-infused chocolate (or really, bacon-infused anything) proves, savory and sweet is gustatory bliss. Get to that level of nirvana with a soul-food staple: fried chicken wings and a Belgian waffle smothered in syrup. Marquette Meat Market & Café, 720 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 232-9763, themarquettemeatmarketcafe.com Strips Search People usually get treated to warmed-over coffee and stale donuts in auto-service waiting rooms, but Toyota of Greenville has an ace up its sleeve: possibly the best chicken fingers in the Upstate. The Pit Stop at Toyota of Greenville, 2660 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 288-3535 x2160 See Biscuit There’s only one reason people swear by Chick-fil-A’s chicken biscuits: they haven’t yet been to Tommy’s. Think a quarter-pound of delicately fried chicken between buttery homemade biscuits. Tommy’s Country Ham House, 214 Rutherford St, Greenville. (864) 2426099, tommyscountryhamhouse.com

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

T

here’s a reason you can build an entire restaurant franchise around Southern-fried chicken: nothing else in the world is as mouthwatering or as soulful. Buttermilk-brined, dry-rubbed, juicy, golden, crispy, bite-sized, man-sized, on a gingham tablecloth—however you take it, take it from one of these local spots.


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IN

Season Simmer Down: Embrace okra’s gumbo goodness or snack on crispy, fried handfuls. Either way, start with fresh-picked pods sold at the TD Saturday Market in downtown Greenville.

Podcast

Okra offers a taste of the South / by M. Linda Lee

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dips the okra in an egg wash, then in a oneto-one mixture of flour and cornmeal. Then he places the okra on an oiled baking sheet and bakes it at 375ºF for about 30 minutes, or until the coating is browned and crispy. “My latest favorite way to make okra is to sauté it in olive oil with Indian spices like garam masala and cayenne pepper,” Chris says. When okra is in season locally from June to October, you can find varieties such as Clemson Spineless and Red Burgundy (named for its distinctive color) at Greenville’s TD Saturday Market. BioWay Farm, Greenbrier Farms, Parson Produce, and Spurgeon Farms are a few local producers who sell the vegetable that the Cotton Planter dubbed the “manna of the South” in its August 1857 issue.

))) FOR A MOUTHWATERING GUMBO RECIPE COURTESY OF STELLA’S SOUTHERN BISTRO, CHECK OUT TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Photog r aph by Paul Meha f fey

S

lender and ribbed, the tapering green (usually) pods we know as okra (Hibiscus esculentus) originated in West Africa. Slaves brought okra seeds with them to America, where this relative of cotton took to the dense clay soil of the South. While some folks dislike okra for its slimy insides, cook it long enough—as in a gumbo—and the sticky juice proves an excellent thickener. Besides being stewed in gumbos and soups, okra can also be sautéed or steamed. In the South, however, fried and pickled are the preparations of choice. Chris Sermons, of Bio-Way Farm in Ware Shoals, prefers to bake okra. The end result, he says, is similarly crispy, but avoids the large quantities of oil required for frying. He


FOOD. DRINK. FUN.

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Full Bar and WIne List Available for Private Lunches Nightly Chef’s Specials Open for Dinner at 5 pm Monday - Saturday

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2660 Poinsett Highway Greenville, SC 29609 Between Furman University and Cherrydale

864.271.7877 J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 8 7


DINING

Guide Taco Takedown A venerable Mexican street food gets a makeover Tacos. They’re warm and delicious. They’re budgetfriendly. They have an ethnic pedigree, making them automatically interesting. They’re great for eating with friends. They’re best consumed using your hands. But most important, tacos are impossible to screw up. Even when they’re bad, they’re good. If this humble street food is satisfying when sloppily assembled from generic ingredients, imagine the difference if given a little extra love—in the style of The Local Taco, where manager Kristopher McGowan and his kitchen staff craft superior tacos. The restaurant is part of a small chain headquartered in Nashville, and the name might as well be a mission statement. The “Taco” obviously refers to the menu: Tex-Mex in origin, but gussied up with international flair. On the other hand, “Local” refers to the restaurant’s neighborhood-centric approach to service. Situated in the former Campbell’s Pharmacy, the location has existed as an Augusta Road gathering spot for decades. With roll-up garage doors (installed when The Local Taco took over the property), the dining room opens to the outdoor patio, allowing laughter and conversation to mingle as freely as families and friends do. “Local” is also a good description for the way McGowan prefers his restaurant’s produce. In addition to frequenting the TD Saturday Market, the restaurant gets farm-fresh produce delivered right to the back door: “seriously farm-to-table,” as McGowan puts it. The extra thought put into each taco isn’t limited to just the quality of ingredients, either. There’s a myriad of atypical taco fillings, from marinated Korean short ribs served with Asian slaw to alder-smoked salmon with horseradish crema. The top sellers, however, are the fish (lightly fried haddock with jalapeño tartar sauce) and spicy shrimp (soaked in buttermilk, then fried). These are tacos with a really delicious twist. —Andrew Huang

THE LOCAL TACO Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

LOCAL / ORGANIC IN THE UPCOUNTRY AMERICAN GROCERY

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine (and a frequently changing menu) that emphasizes the highest-quality ingredients from local, regional, and national produce. The smoked beef tongue tacos make a decadent starter. For an entrée, the grouper or the salt-crusted ribeye are standout options. Finish with the Mexican coffee pudding. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed

$, L, D. 15 Conestee Ave, Greenville. (864) 509-1081, thelocaltaco.com

Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com

Rd, Greenville. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

BREW AND EWE

Gas-powered, steam-powered, perhaps even Coal Fired. But bacon-powered? That’s the claim for this new restaurant, brought to you by the team at Coal Fired Bistro. They’re backing it up with a cure chamber, too—cured, stuffed, and dried meats galore, all made in-house. As a bonus, nearly everything on the menu is sourced from pasture-raised products from South Carolina farms. $$, L, D.

One side of this café/boutique serves up a variety of coffee drinks from Counter Culture Coffee. Pair a drink with a bagel with lox and set off to the other side of the shop: a boutique specializing in woolens and home goods. $, L, D (Mon–Sun),

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham

B (Mon–Sat). 108 W Broad St. (864) 370-2739, brewandewe.com

THE CAFÉ AT WILLIAMS HARDWARE

When the McCarrell sisters—Joyce and Nancy—moved back to Travelers

Rest, they were interested in bringing back a sense of community to the town. With family recipes and local produce at the center of their efforts, they’ve managed to slow things down so that neighbors and friends can savor meals and enjoy each others’ company at this hometown café. $$, B (Sat), L (daily), D (Fri–Sat).

13 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 8347888, cafeatwilliamshardware.com COAL FIRED BISTRO

High Cotton alumnus Anthony Gray has brought his kitchen expertise to Coal Fired Bistro. The menu is chock full of Italian cuisine prepared from

KEY : Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sunday Brunch = SBR 88 TOWN / towncarolina.com


BARS, CAFÉS, & RESTAURANTS fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. Start with a raw kale salad before moving onto the veal osso buco. The restaurant also has a treat in store for oenophiles: 32 automatically dispensed bottles of wine that ensure each glass gets the perfect pour. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat). 8595 Pelham Rd. (864) 329-0400, coalfiredbistro.com

COFFEE TO A TEA

Mornings and afternoons are made better at this quaint spot with a focus on local products and healthy options. Start your day with a signature breakfast sandwich or fresh-baked cinnamon roll. Lunch shines with a chicken or tuna salad sandwich on house-baked bread. For dessert, try a slice of cake from the rotating counter selection. Gluten-free options abound. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1 Augusta St, Ste 101. (864) 373-9836, coffeetoatea.com EVERYDAY ORGANIC

From salad greens to potato chips, including beer and wine, Everyday Organic guarantees that every ingredient here is free from chemicals, hormones, and preservatives. It may be a no-frills place, but the food is tasty, fresh, and inexpensive. Salads and sandwiches make up the main dishes, which have an international flair in the likes of a croque monsieur and a Cuban panino. Vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free items are available, too. Try their housemade desserts. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3225 N Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville. (864) 498-9194, eorestaurants.com THE FARMER’S TABLE

If breakfast isn’t your favorite meal of the day, prepare to change your mind. All day long, The Farmer’s Table serves delicious combinations: made-from-scratch Happy Cow buttermilk biscuits and house-made sausage gravy, French toast made from Bavarian Pretzel Factory brioche, and omelets galore. But if lunch is more your scene, make sure you try the lamb burger, a pita stuffed with Native Meats ground lamb and served with fresh, hand-cut sweet potato fries. $-$$, B, L. Closed Saturday. 401 E Kennedy St, Spartanburg. (864) 582-6554, thefarmerstablesc.com THE FOREST COFFEEHOUSE

Originally synonymous with the Leopard Forest Coffee Company, the coffee-roasting company has since spun off. Fortunately, The Forest Coffeehouse serves the same sustainable, high-quality coffee and everything you could want to pair with it: biscuits, muffins, scones, sandwiches, salads, and even a flatbread pizza. $, B, L. 27 S Main

St, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-5500, theforestcoffee.com

HIGH COTTON MAVERICK BAR & GRILL

Floor-to-ceiling windows overlook picturesque Falls Park for an airy and relaxed dining room. The menu, steeped in locally-sourced ingredients, features fish, game, and steaks prepared with a Southern flair. Menu staples include the Eden Farms pork chop (paired with jalapeño cheddar grits, buttermilk-fried okra, and bourbon-bacon sauce) and the Wild American Shrimp & Grits (featuring house-made Andouille sausage, braised leeks, and roasted tomatoes). The bar also features the restaurant’s own private-label spirits. $$$-$$$$. L

(Mon–Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, highcottongreenville.com LIFEIT CAFÉ

Being green with envy generally isn’t a healthy state of being, but being chock full of dark leafy greens is another story. Raw and living foods are the focus of Chef Latrice Folkes café. The menu is the epitome of fresh: kale, broccoli, avocado, sprouts, and cucumbers star in sandwiches, salads, and wraps. There’s also the option to drink your veggies and fruits in the form of organic smoothies. Regardless, nothing is prepared above 118ºF to preserve the nutrients and enzymes in every bite. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 730

S Pleasantburg Dr, #L, Greenville. (864) 271-4334, lifeitcafe.com NAKED PASTA

There’s nothing scandalous about being naked: It’s just transparency to the core, and this family-owned and operated pasta kitchen has nothing to hide. Using local produce and fresh cheeses (Spurgeon Farms, Crescent Moon Farms, and Happy Cow Creamery are just a few), the chefs here whip up quinoa salads, olive tapenade, and artichoke spreads—not to mention a multitude of artisanal pasta. A location in the Pendleton Arts District is just icing on the cake. After all, even starving artists have to eat.

$, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 1286 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 5096008, getnakedpasta.com ROOST

This latest nod to the enterprising farmto-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. Executive Chef Trevor Higgins brings old-fashioned Southern favorites into the twentyfirst century. $-$$$, B, L, D, SBR. 220 N

Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com STOMPING GROUNDS

Lisa Suber’s café has intimacy and warmth. Sure, the bare-brick walls and local artwork help liven up the former furniture consignment shop, and the food (organic apple pie from Spurgeon Farms, coffee by West End

Coffee Company, and Danishes from Greer’s Flour Haven) have their roots in the community, but when the staff greets you by name, it’s clear that this kind of neighborhood vibe can’t be impersonated. $, B, L, D. Closed

Sunday. 208 Trade St, Greer. (864) 8011555, stompinggroundsgreer.com STONE SOUP

Inspired by the communityoriented folk tale Stone Soup, owner and equine enthusiast Suzanne Strickland has created a one-of-akind dining experience in Landrum. She introduces diners to produce from local farmers, such as with the panko-breaded NC trout served with gingered sweet potatoes and sautéed Brussels sprouts. The community also makes a contribution to the décor, with artwork and photographs of locals with their horses. But regardless of your community affiliation or equine affinity, flavor makes this a spot a dining destination. $$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 1522 E Rutherford St, Landrum. (864) 4575255, stonesoupoflandrum.com

SUMMAJOE’S SEARING PANS

Local, farm-fresh ingredients take the limelight at SummaJoe’s. The Greek salad with Split Creek Farm feta is a standout, but the pizzas are no standins. A long list includes specialty pies like the Capital Punishment (fired up with Joe’s hot sauce, made from Polecat Farm’s peppers) and the Cheech and Chong, which piles on a little bit of everything. Diner-style tables, yellow-vinyl aluminum chairs, and blue-vinyl booths create a retro feel. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 127 N

Main St, Anderson. (864) 965-9030, summajoes.com SWAMP RABBIT CAFÉ

Downtown Greenville, Swamp Rabbit Trail. Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. Biking to work? Stop by for breakfast and enjoy fresh-baked scones and muffins (made with King Arthur Artisan flour), or a pogacha (a Turkish pastry stuffed with beef, spinach, and feta) for lunch. And while you’re here, peruse the grocery’s inventory to continue the local trend at home. $, B, L. 205 Cedar

Ste A, Greenville. (864) 234-0916, tablefields.com TORTILLA MARIA

Local, organic, and gluten-free—while a growing number of restaurants check off those boxes, it is still a rarity to find Mexican food that satisfies those requirements. Enter Tortilla Maria. In addition to the innovative takes on enchiladas and tacos, the restaurant offers a colorful selection of healthy smoothies and juices. The Mean Green Juice blends apples, celery, cucumber, ginger, lemon, and spinach together for a refreshing, cleansing beverage. $, B (Sat), L, D. Closed Sunday. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0742, tortillamaria.com UPCOUNTRY PROVISIONS

Local produce, hormone-free meats, and fresh-baked bread marry to produce delicious sandwiches in a renovated red barn just off the Travelers Rest Main Street. The food is simple, satisfying, wholesome, and undeniably fresh—much of the produce and many of the herbs come straight from a garden out in front. With all the attention Upcountry Provisions pays to crafting your food, it’s only polite to return the favor and devote yourself to a healthy sampling of fresh-baked muffins, cakes, and cookies. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday

& Monday. 102 S Poinsett Highway, Travelers Rest. (864) 834-8433, upcountryprovisions.com THE VILLAGE BAKER

Bordering Pendleton’s square across from Farmers Hall, the family-owned Village Baker devotes itself to creating artisan breads without additives and preservatives. No bleached flour, trans-fats, or artificial flavors go into the breads and pastries created here by members of the Rizzo family. At the Village Baker, the day starts with omelets, pastries, and French toast, and progresses to quiche, salads, and sandwiches—on fresh-baked bread, of course. If you have a sweet tooth, you’ll find it difficult to pass up the tempting pastries and homemade cakes. $, B, L. Closed Sun–Tues. 108 E

Main St, Pendleton. (864) 646-5800, myvillagebaker.com

Lane Rd, Greenville. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com TABLEFIELD’S

Eating healthy on the go just got easier. This fast-casual restaurant has all the benefits of farm-to-table without the pretentiousness or the price tag. Pert leafy greens, crispy pecan-smoked bacon, and creamy goat cheese highlight the selection of salads, while a tomato-onion jam adds a dab of sweetness to savory Angus burgers. $, B, L, D. 1117 Woodruff Rd,

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 8 9


TOWN

Scene Wed–Sat, 8pm. Adults, $35; seniors, $33. (866) 732-8008, flatrockplayhouse.org

Thru July 19

EXPOSED

JULY

Thru July 14 THE BIG BANG

What could be more catastrophically hilarious than a 12-hour musical with 318 cast members, 6,428 costumes, and 1,400 wigs? How about two producers trying to raise the $83.5 million necessary to put on such a show? Chronicling some of history’s most famous figures, from Big Bang to present, the producers attempt to give investors a taste of what their money’s worth with creative retellings of the lives of Adam and Eve, Caesar, Eva Braun, and Napoleon. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Thurs, Sat–Sun, 2pm;

This exhibit features photographers Crystal Vinson and Ginia Worrell as they confront the vulnerabilities of the self. Their approaches are different but collectively paint the individual as a site of competing anxieties. Vinson’s stylized fashion imagery presents individuality lurking beneath glamorous façades, while Worrell’s intimate selfportraits reveal conflict within the self. Ultimately, these artists lay themselves bare and exposed. Riverworks Gallery, 300 River St, Ste 202, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 271-0679, gvltec.edu/ riverworks

Thru August 10 WORLD OF CARL SANDBURG

Apprentice actors from the Flat Rock Playhouse dig into Sandburg’s Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of poetry for a zany 30-minute romp. It’s storytime

GREEN LETTUCE Restaurant 19 Augusta St. in the westend

for the little ones, but don’t be shy— there’s no age limit when it comes to appreciating this American poet. Sandburg Home Amphitheatre, Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, 1800 Little River Rd, Flat Rock, NC. Wed & Fri, 10:15am. Free. (828) 693-4178, nps.gov/carl

Thru Sept 15 MASTERPIECES OF AMERICAN LANDSCAPE

Masterpieces of American landscape—60 in total—arrive in Greenville courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The dazzling array features works by Thomas Cole and his 19th century Hudson River School compatriots as well as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and other modern photographers. The century-spanning exhibit can’t begin to capture the natural beauty of the United States— but it’s a great start. Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St, Greenville. Wed–Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 271-7570, gcma.org

2, 9, 16, 23, 30 TUESDAYS ON TRADE

If you’re not familiar with Greer’s downtown charms, these themed Tuesday nights are a good place to start. Join other area denizens for girls’ night out, or show off your ride and meet other gearheads at the Mustang–, Harley–, and BMW– themed nights. Downtown Greer. Tues, 5–8pm. Free. (864) 416-0125, greerstation.com

3–4

CELEBRATE AMERICA

Sometimes you need to take two days when you’re celebrating a country as great as the United States. This street festival in downtown Easley will have plenty of food, drinks, carnival rides, and live entertainment to properly ring in Independence Day. And of course, it wouldn’t be a proper Fourth of July celebration without fantastic fireworks. Old Market Square, downtown Easley. Wed, 2–10pm; Thurs, 2–11pm, fireworks show begins at 9:45pm. Prices vary. (864) 4234344, easleyevents.com

Successful Public Relations: Telling and Selling Your Story

AUGUST 7, 2013 at the Kroc Center An integral part of successful Public Relations is telling your story well. This workshop will address leveraging Public Relations to support fundraising and communication goals. Attendees will learn how to craft their story in order to develop effective Public Relations strategies and compelling donor relations campaigns.

Register at dnacc.com or call 864-235-0959 ext. 4

90 TOWN / towncarolina.com


CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS

3, 10, 17, 24, 31 REEDY RIVER CONCERT SERIES

Pack a picnic dinner along with your dancing shoes. This summer concert series continues with the 246th SC National Guard Army Band, Most Wanted Bluegrass, Southern Crescent, Sean and the Boogie Children, and Chasing the Blues. A midweek treat is perfect for families wanting to relax in the summer evening. TD Stage, Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7–9pm. Free. (864) 467-5741, greenvillesc.gov Photograph by Crystal Vinson; courtesy of Riverworks Gallery

3, 10, 17, 24, 31 SMILEY’S BLUES NIGHT

Smiley’s Acoustic Café has long been a stop for Upstate natives who treasure live music, tasty fare, and a free-spirited vibe more reminiscent of Asheville or Berkeley. Join local musicians on Wednesday nights for Blues Night, presented in association with the Palmetto Drum Company. Smiley’s Acoustic Café, 111 Augusta St, Greenville. Wed, 10pm. Free. (864) 282-8988, smileysacousticcafe.com

GRANTS FOR SECURING A BRIGHTER FUTURE

LIBERTY TAP ROOM & GRILL Liberty Tap Room & Grill provides patrons with simple and eclectic fare, served alongside unique draft beer and craft brews. Well-known for its tasty and satisfying food, Liberty is an easy

A Community Foundation Enrichment Grant helped the Jones Gap Expansion Project secure additional funding to realize a long-standing vision of conservation.

place to relax with friends and let the friendly, attentive service take over. Located directly beside the Greenville Drive in the West End, Liberty Tap Room is also a great place to stop before or after a game, to enjoy traditional American cuisine in a fun, modern atmosphere.

www.cfgreenville.org

941 S. Main Street, Downtown Greenville 864.770.7777 | libertytaproom.com

We make it easy to give back to the place we all love to call home.

Open daily 11am - Until | Sunday Brunch 11am - 2pm Happy Hour Daily 4 - 7pm J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 9 1


REPUTABLE

TOWN

Scene

4–7, 17–23 GREENVILLE DRIVE

Stars in the making, the crack of a bat, a group of friends, and a cold beer in hand—all the ingredients for an entertaining summer evening at Fluor Field. Make your way to the West End stadium and support your hometown Drive during its July home stands. Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Times vary. $7-$10. (864) 240-4528, greenvilledrive.com

4

by DESIGN

INDEPENDENCE DAY AT HERITAGE PARK

Get in the patriotic mood with a stirring pops concert courtesy of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. Bring the whole family out for a lawn-sprawling celebration at the Charter Amphitheatre. There will be a children’s activity center as well as a furious, sky-shattering fireworks display to cap off the evening. Charter Amphitheatre, Heritage Park, 681 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Thurs, 5:30pm; concert begins at 8pm. Ticket prices vary. (864) 2413800, charteramphitheatre.com

5

FIRST FRIDAYS

Visit downtown Greenville for an eyeful. More than 25 local art galleries and venues will be open. Works by emerging and established artists will be on display. Visitors can expect a diverse range of media: oils, watercolors, pottery, jewelry, woodworks, and photography, among others. Locations vary, Greenville. Fri, 6–9pm. Free. (864) 325-4445, firstfridaysonline.com

6, 13, 20, 27 TD SATURDAY MARKET

It’s market season again! Grab some fresh, local produce, baked goods, meats, and cheeses at this weekly market. With peaches from Monetta and tomatoes from Central, you can rest assured that you are supporting local farmers and sustainable practices with each item you purchase. Chef demonstrations are also great for getting some kitchen inspiration for what you take home. Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8am– noon. Free. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

PelhamArchitects.com

4

RED, WHITE, AND BLUE FESTIVAL

What’s the Fourth of July without fireworks? Luckily, you won’t have to find out. Just venture into downtown Greenville for a celebration befitting Independence Day. Starting at 5:30pm, there will be live music by country band Outshyne and the Jazz Guardians from the Army Ground Forces Band. Fireworks will commence at 9:45pm. Make sure you arrive early for prime viewing real estate (and to enjoy the music and food)! Downtown Greenville. Thurs, 5–10:30pm. Free. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov 92 TOWN / towncarolina.com

6, 13, 20, 27 TRAVELERS REST COMMUNITY FARMERS’ MARKET It doesn’t make sense to travel long distances just to get local produce. For those who live a bit further north than Greenville, the Travelers Rest Farmers’ Market is the solution to that conundrum. Produce varies from week to week, but there are always fresh-baked goods, goat milk and goat cheese, jams, and jellies. 115 Wilhelm Winter St, Travelers Rest. Sat, 9am–Noon. Free. travelersrestfarmersmarket.com


Photograph by James W. Johnson; courtesy of Flat Rock Playhouse

6

HARRY CONNICK, JR.

New Orleans native, philanthropist, and all-round performer Harry Connick, Jr. is used to wearing many hats. For this evening concert, he will be taking the stage as a crooner extraordinaire performing songs from his newest album, Every Man Should Know. The collection of original songs reflects his perspectives on life and love, which are delivered in heartfelt fashion true to the singer’s roots. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $55, $65, $75, $85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

10–21

JERSEY BOYS

Before Justin Bieber, NSYNC, and even the Beatles, there was Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Born from a group of rough-and-tumble, blue-collar boys, the group went on to become one of the best-selling musical groups in the world. This show tells the story of just how they did it, with hits like “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Oh, What a Night” taking center stage. The show contains mature themes and is not recommended for children under 12. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $55, $65, $85. (864) 4673000, peacecenter.org

10–Aug 18

LES MISÉRABLES

An all-star cast might’ve brought this popular musical to the movie-going masses, but there’s still no substitute for the emotion, the tension, and the timbre of a live performance. Join Jean Valjean as he seeks redemption amid the chaos of revolutionary France. The brand-new production features a cast of 30 performers and a new production design to bring this epic story to life. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, Sat–Sun, 2pm; Wed– Sat, 8pm. $40. (866) 732-8008, flatrockplayhouse.org

11, 18, 25

MUSIC BY THE LAKE

Join Dr. Leslie Hicken and the Lakeside Concert Band for its annual summer concerts. The varied programs will feature a huge variety, from “The Kings of Swing” with clarinet soloist Bob Chesebro, to The Andy Carlson Band on Bluegrass Night, to The Matt Olson Jazz Quartet. Lakeside Amphitheater, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. 7:30pm. Free. (864) 2942086, furman.edu

11–27

NEXT TO NORMAL

TRANQUIL

Feel everything instead of just feeling good at this rock musical. The story isn’t afraid to confront the suffering and pain that come with life’s triumphs. A mother struggles with bipolar disorder and its effects on her family. Loss, suicide, drug abuse, and modern psychiatry come into focus against the backdrop of suburban life. It’s a story that perhaps hits a little too close to home for some—but for this musical, confronting the reality of pain provides with the courage to endure. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun 3pm. Adults, $30; juniors, $25. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

11–Aug 4

UPSTATE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL: THE COMEDY OF ERRORS

A midsummer night’s dream in Falls Park? Well, it’s not that Shakespearean play, but it is midsummer. Grab a seat on the park’s grassy hills and enjoy one of The Bard’s earlier plays, a farcical comedy rife with slapstick, mistaken identities, and puns. Falls Park, Greenville. Thurs– Sun, 7pm. Free. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com/upstateshakespeare-festival

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 9 3


Scene

12–14

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN RIBFEST Let’s be honest: the biggest winners at a barbecue competition are the spectators, especially when you’ve got a lineup that includes the 2012 Ribfest champions and worthy challengers from Texas, Ohio, Arkansas, and North Carolina. It’s not all about meat, though. There’s a carnival filled with games and rides, classic and custom car shows, and an arts and crafts fair. WNC Agricultural Center Fairgrounds, 1301 Fanning Bridge Rd, Fletcher, NC. Fri, 4–11pm; Sat, 11am–11pm; Sun, 11am–7pm. Adults, $7. (828) 894-8847, wcpshows.com/ribfest.html

12

THE BLACK KEYS

The Black Keys have been honing their signature raw, bluesrock sound for more than a decade, but they’re just now headlining their own arena tour. The tour, in support of their Grammy Award–winning album El Camino, drops Patrick Carney’s stripped-down drumming and Dan Auerbach’s crunchy guitars into the Charter Amphitheatre along with special guests The Flaming Lips. Charter Amphitheatre, Heritage Park, 681 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Fri, 7:30pm. $40, $50. (864) 2413800, charteramphitheatre.com

94 TOWN / towncarolina.com

13

THE GREENVILLE GAMES

Go hard or go home. Curls for the girls. Eat clean, train dirty. Whatever your fitness mantra, just be prepared to bring your best for the 2013 Greenville Games. This Upstate Crossfit competition will feature individual competition and two-person same-sex teams for both Rx and scaled workouts. All you’ll need for this competition is everything you have. Piedmont Athletic Complex, 150 Woodmont School Rd, Piedmont. Sat, 8am. $59. thegreenvillegames.com

17

SLOW FOOD EARTH MARKET

What could be fresher than food produced just miles from where you live? Slow Food Upstate’s Earth Market brings quality food at fair prices from local farmers directly to downtown Greenville. None of the products sold here are produced using pesticides, herbicides, hormones, or other chemicals, so you can rest assured that only the healthiest, freshest food is going into your meals. NoMa Square at the Hyatt Regency, 220 N Main St, Greenville. Wed, 3–7pm. Free. slowfoodupstate.com

Photograph courtesy of Carolina Mountain Ribfest

TOWN


22–26

CAMP BROADWAY

Have you got the sneaking suspicion that your son or daughter might be the next big Broadway star? Help them develop their talents at the nationally acclaimed Camp Broadway when it comes to the Peace Center. The 5-day program is for children ages 10–17 and features dedicated rehearsal and master classes with Broadway professionals. At the end of the week, watch your kids put the fruits of their labor to work at a special on-stage performance. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon–Fri, 9am. $550. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

24–31

BIG LEAGUE BASEBALL WORLD SERIES

A host of big bats and nifty curveballs descend on Easley as talented baseball players arrive for this international tournament. Teams of 16–18 year olds from Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Mexico, Canada, and the United States will compete for a spot in the tournament championship game, broadcast live on ESPN. J.B. “Red” Owens Recreation Complex, 111 Walkers Way,

Easley. Wed–Wed, times vary. Adult week pass, $30; daily, $5. bigleagueworldseries.com

TD Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Fri–Sun, 8am–6pm. Free. (864) 233-2562, greenvillekc.org

27

26–28

CAROLINA FOOTHILLS DOG SHOW CLUSTER

WILDERNESS SELF-RELIANCE SKILLS WORKSHOP

The Greenville, Spartanburg, and Hendersonville Kennel Clubs will be hosting their July shows at the TD Convention Center. There will be 3 all-breed dog shows, 3 obedience trials, and 3 rally trials. Judging for the Hendersonville KC will take place on the 26th, Greenville on the 27th, and Spartanburg on the 28th.

Army veteran and wilderness survival specialist Alex Garcia teaches students the basics of finding food and water while in the outdoors. Go hands-on and build traps and fishing tackle from nature, identify edible plants, and learn how to find and purify water. Students should wear appropriate clothing and footwear

for a day in the woods and bring a sharp knife, notebook, and bagged lunch. For adults only. Hagood Mill, 138 Hagood Mill Rd, Pickens. Sat, 9:30am–4:30pm. Pickens County Museum of Art and History members, $45; nonmembers, $55. (864) 898-5963

Sept 20

THE ROSE BALL

The longest-running charitable ball in Greenville will be lending its 2013 support to 14 local charities, including A Child’s Haven, Triune Mercy Center, and the Bon Secours St. Francis Health System. Themed as the “Art of the Rose,” this year’s ball will feature 25 artists and their work. A portion of the proceeds from the art auction will be donated to the Rose Ball’s beneficiaries. Live entertainment will be provided by the band Right to Party. There will also be an art reception held prior to the ball at The Lazy Goat. The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $400 per couple; additional sponsorship opportunities available. theroseball.org

AvAilAble on ThursdAys!

J U LY 2 0 1 3 / 9 5


SECOND

Glance

Happy Trails

When faced with a pile of trash—objects used, neglected, and abandoned—most of us react with disgust or at best indifference. Not Judy Verhoeven: “It bothers me that we often devalue the old, broken, ‘unattractive,’ and worn things and want them out of our sight . . . I think about those things and feel sad that so much of our planet’s precious resources are spent to make beautifully-designed, useful things that are soon trashed.” From the things that most of us would call trash—the spine of a worn-out book, an empty printer-ink cartridge, SOLO cups—Verhoeven assembles a rich landscape centered on a dilapidated trailer. An homage to “trash,” perhaps, but indisputably a reminder that beauty remains even in what is thrown away. —Andrew Huang “Trailer Trash” is on display at ArtBomb Studios, 1320 Pendleton St, Greenville. See more of Verhoeven’s work at judyverhoeven.com

96 TOWN / towncarolina.com

Judy Verhoeven, Trailer Trash, 2013; image courtesy of the artist

Collage artist Judy Verhoeven assembles refuse with a fresh eye


528 Haywood Road

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TOWN July 2013  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals.

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