__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Down on

APRIL A. MORRIS

E COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, September 18, 2015 • Vol.17, No.38

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GREENVILL

GREASY CORNER

The once-bustling downtown neighborhood may be gone, but memories of a ‘cool place to be’ remain See Community – Page 14

Top: One of the few buildings still standing from the Greasy Corner neighborhood, this shuttered brick building at the corner of Markley and Academy streets once housed a beauty parlor. At right, the City Homes at Markley development is under construction. Bottom: A 1939 photo shows the Dollar General service station located at Greasy Corner.

Win an Insider’s Tour of Bank of America Stadium!

No purchase is required. Contest is open to NC and SC residents who are 18 years of age or older at the time of entry. Guests must be age 5 or older. Limit one entry per person. Visit contest.allentate.com to see the complete rules.

contest.allentate.com


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | NEWS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PRESIDENT/CEO | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR | Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

We’ve lowered our mortgage rates to give you more options.

DIGITAL TEAM Emily Price | Danielle Car STAFF WRITERS Ashley Boncimino | aboncimino@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson | sjackson@communityjournals.com Benjamin Jeffers | bjeffers@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris | amorris@communityjournals.com ART DIRECTOR | Kristy M. Adair OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin

Lower rate. Lower down payment.

CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Kristi Jennings | Donna Johnston Annie Langston | Emily Yepes DESIGN & LAYOUT Kristy Adair | Whitney Fincannon Tammy Smith

We recently lowered our rates for new Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) applications. These new rates apply to

ADVERTISING DESIGN | Michael Allen EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY | Kate Madden EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner

Greenville

3375 Pelham Road Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

Greenville

1501 Wade Hampton Blvd. Greenville, SC 29609 864.235.6309

Greer

107 W. Church St. Greer, SC 29650 864.877.9089

Mauldin

publishers of

142 Tanner Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 864.676.9066

581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com

jumbo-type loans as well. That means the as-low-as ARM rates are the same for standard loan amounts and jumbo-type loans. Whether you are looking for an ARM or fixed rate mortgage, we can help you save money with a competitive rate and lower down payment. Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join. Contact us for details.

3.00% Two-year ARM

3.25% Five/One ARM

Fixed Rate Mortgage

3.98% APR.* Initial rate and

3.84% APR.** Initial rate and

Call us for rates on 15 and

payments fixed for two years.

payments fixed for the first five

30-year fixed rate mortgages.

The rate cannot change more

years. After five years, the rate

than 1% every two years.

cannot change more than 1% each year.

greenvillefcu.com 800.336.6309 Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

*Two-year ARM: APR quoted assumes our Two-year ARM of $100,000 without private mortgage insurance (PMI) for a term of 30 years. Initial interest rate of 3.00%. Initial monthly principal and interest of $421.60. 1% origination fee. 30 days interim interest prepaid. **Five/One ARM: APR quoted assumes our Five/One ARM of $100,000 without private mortgage insurance (PMI) for a term of 30 years. Initial interest rate of 3.25%. Initial monthly principal and interest of $435.21. 1% origination fee. 30 days interim interest prepaid. These limited-time rates apply to new loans and refinanced loan amounts not currently held by the credit union. Limited to borrower’s primary or secondary residence located in SC. Adjustable rates cannot change more than 8% over the life of the loan. Excludes attorney, title, tax, recording, survey, pest and other fees. $350 appraisal and $8 flood certification is required. Other closing costs may apply. Initial rate set independent of current index plus margin. Other property and underwriting restrictions apply. Mortgage loans are subject to credit approval. Member NCUA. © 2015 Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved.

The only thing worse than a bad business forecast is no business forecast. We can help. This is what we do. 864.908.3062 • atlocke.com

14ATL 7881C

© 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.


NEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

THEY SAID IT

page three

“Nobody realized we were poor. Everybody had what they needed and if they didn’t have it, they could get it from a neighbor.” Robbie Young Davis, on growing up in Greasy Corner, a once-bustling African-American neighborhood near A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School.

Specializing in Exterior, Landscape, and Interior Lighting. Whatever your needs, Harrison has the lighting solution for you!

“I never thought we would go from three to this.” Greenville Women Giving cofounder Sue Priester, at the 10th anniversary celebration of the philanthropic organization.

“You can’t just unilaterally vote to take something that’s public and make it private without the say-so of the people who originally created it.” S.C. Rep. Tommy Stringer, on last week’s vote by GHS trustees to create a process to shift GHS operations to a private entity.

NUMBERED

Lamps & Shades • Repair & Restoration • Custom Design Lighting • Consultation

“Who doesn’t love grandmas who can dance?”

3021 Augusta St., Greenville, SC 29605 harrisonlighting.com | 864.271.3922

Jakevis Thomason of Team SMASH, winner of “#DanceBattle America,” on a competing team of 60- and 70-year-olds.

“Greenville is definitely making tracks.” Restaurateur Carl Sobocinski, on the impact of Euphoria on Greenville’s accelerating reputation as a foodie town.

$3,600,000

Amount Greenville Women Giving has contributed to the community since its launch in 2006.

Our future together

A PREMIER SOURCE FOR UNIQUE LIGHTING

FALL TRUNK SHOW SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26; 11 AM - 5 PM

GARRISON OPTICIANS Fine European Eyewear

McDaniel Village • 1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109 • M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt.

864-271-1812 • garrisonopticians.com

Fine Jewelry Since 1946

Free onsite parking

123 College St., Greenville • 864-232-7385 jblacher.com


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | NEWS

DHEC suspends SC abortion clinics Gov. Haley ordered inspections in August APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) met with the representatives of the Greenville Women’s Clinic Wednesday to discuss an order of suspension issued to the clinic last week. Planned Parenthood of South Atlantic in Columbia was also issued an order of suspension and DHEC issued a Report of Visit to Charleston Women’s Medical Center after finding more than two dozen violations at the abortion clinics. The suspensions were issued Sept. 11 following an Aug. 18 order by Gov. Nikki Haley to conduct inspections of the three abortion clinics operating in the state, which DHEC completed in early September. The Greenville and Columbia clinics must submit a plan of correction by Sept. 28, according to DHEC. The agency issued a $2,750 fine to the Greenville clinic, citing violations of the Woman’s Right to Know Act, emergency drugs

matching a contents list, handling of bio hazardous waste, missing information in records and labeling of infectious waste. The Greenville clinic may not operate until the fine is paid, a plan of correction is submitted, records of training for employees in policies and procedures are submitted and files and records are maintained properly, DHEC officials said. Representatives from the Greenville clinic met with DHEC Wednesday to discuss coming into compliance, said DHEC spokesperson Robert Yanity. The Columbia clinic was issued a fine of $7,500. DHEC did not cite any violations

“We will take immediate action to make any necessary corrections and will provide DHEC with evidence to refute allegations we know are incorrect.” Jenny Black, CEO of Planned Parenthood South Atlantic

for the Charleston clinic, but noted documentation errors that must be corrected. DHEC also cited two companies that transport waste for the Columbia and Greenville clinics, Stericycle and MedSharps. Violations included “insufficient documentation of waste disposal practices, failure to follow disposal protocol and improper disposal of products of conception,” according to DHEC. The agency’s infectious waste management staff is scheduled to meet with Columbia clinic representatives on Sept. 28 and 29, said Yanity. Greenville Women’s Clinic officials did not respond to request for comment by press time. Jenny Black, CEO of Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, said in a statement that the health and safety of patients was of utmost importance. “Since receiving the report last week, we have focused our efforts on reviewing issues raised in DHEC’s findings and rigorously verifying compliance with all state laws and regulations. We will take immediate action to make any necessary corrections and will provide DHEC with evidence to refute allegations we know are incorrect,” wrote Black.

“We take the findings of this investigation very seriously and will work together with each of these facilities to help get them into compliance as quickly as possible.” DHEC Director Catherine Heigel

The clinics and companies are required to meet with DHEC staff within 15 days to discuss violations, corrective action and potential civil penalties. According to DHEC, all three clinics were due for inspection this fall. “DHEC remains committed to ensuring that all clinics operating in South Carolina are safe and in compliance with state and federal laws,” said DHEC Director Catherine Heigel in a release. “We take the findings of this investigation very seriously and will work together with each of these facilities to help get them into compliance as quickly as possible.”

EXTRAORDINARY ONLINE AUCTION Bidding starts online Friday, September 18 and ends Wednesday, September 23 Preview: September 18 from Noon until 7PM The entire contents of a beautiful lake home has been brought to WHAM’S SHOWROOM. Designer Furnishings and Decor – ALL LIKE NEW! Sofas, Tables, Beds, Linens, Bed Treatments, Armoire, French Buffet with Iron Plate Rack, Bombay Chests, Pearl Grandfather Clock, Desk, Vanity, Recliners, Mirrors, Prints, Oils, Art Glass, Decorative Pottery, Glassware, Pool Table, Pinball Machine, Penny Weight Machine, Emmett Kelly Porcelain Clown Figurines, Thomas Kinkade Prints on Canvas – signed and numbered, Rainbow Row, Charleston Sunset on Rainbow Row, New York Fifth Avenue and SO MUCH MORE!

Why buy retail when you can buy at AUCTION at YOUR price!!! For more details visit us online at

www.whamauctions.com 104 MIDDLETON WAY, GREER, SC 29650 • 864-801-9468

SCAF3988


NEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

PHOTO PROVIDED

After the Charleston church shooting and subsequent removal of the Confederate flag off the South Carolina Statehouse grounds, several Clemson Faculty Senate past presidents renewed the call to rename Tillman Hall.

Telling the complete story Clemson trustees’ task force seeks input on how better to tell school’s history CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Clemson University will launch a website next week to seek public input on how the school can best tell its complete history. Trustees formed a task force in July to develop recommendations on how to acknowledge the good and bad of the university’s history. The move came on the heels of the Mother Emanuel AME church massacre in Charleston and a student-led drive to remove the name of Benjamin Tillman, a founding trustee of the university and an unapologetic racist, from Clemson’s signature building on campus. A “Reclaim Old Main” march was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon from Howard’s Rock on the east side of the football stadium across campus to Tillman Hall, which was called Old Main until 1946. The task force’s recommendations will be made public and reported to the board by its February 2016 meeting. The task force was given five guiding principles: to explore multiple points of view inside and outside of the university; maintain a dialogue that is open, honest and respectful; acknowledge all aspects of history; create meaningful recommendations grounded in research and

evidence that result in actionable steps; and have a lasting impact. The task force will gather public input through a variety of meetings, listening sessions, conversations and written submissions. After the Charleston church shooting and subsequent removal of the Confederate flag off the South Carolina Statehouse grounds, several Faculty Senate past presidents renewed the call to rename Tillman Hall. As a lifetime trustee appointed in Thomas Green Clemson’s will and as an elected official – first as South Carolina governor and then as a U.S. senator – who funneled resources and revenue to the new school, Tillman played an instrumental role in the founding of Clemson University. But Tillman, who earned the nickname “Pitchfork Ben” for both his agricultural advocacy and for threatening to impale President Grover Cleveland on one, was a virulent white supremacist. He pushed Jim Crow laws and participated in the Hamburg Massacre, where six black men were killed by a white mob. While the task force completes its work, Clemson will push forward with several other diversity initiatives. The university has launched the second year of “Race and the University: A Continuing Conversation.” And on Saturday, the Clemson Brickmaking Project will be held beginning at 8 a.m. as a tribute to the predominantly African-American convict labor crew who made the bricks for the original campus buildings.

Health Events Girls on the Run Sept. 21-Dec. 8 • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Scholarships and payment plans available. Register at ghs.org/girlsontherun. Detect and Prevent Dry Eye Tues., Sept. 22 • Noon-1 p.m. • Greenville Marriott Learn the signs, symptoms and treatment of dry eye. Free; registration required. The Skinny on Belly Fat Mon., Sept. 28 • Noon • The Cottages at Brushy Creek Find out how losing a little around the middle can help you gain a lot. Free; registration required. Open House Sun., Oct. 4 • 2-5 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Meet the staff and tour the new Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center. No registration required. Free Screenings for Uninsured Women Wed., Oct. 7 • Times vary • Hillcrest Memorial Hospital Uninsured women ages 40-64 who meet certain income guidelines can receive free clinical breast exams, pelvic exams, Pap smears and mammograms. To register, call 656-3076. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 15-21501748GJ


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | VIEWS

OPINION VIEWS FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

GHS must change as health care changes IN MY OWN WORDS

by Bill McCrary

I’ve worked in our business my entire life and have seen firsthand how economic cycles can crush some businesses while wholly reshaping others. Textiles is virtually unrecognizable from where it was even just 15-20 years ago, with many companies perishing while others – due to foresight, planning and extraordinary adaptability – are prospering. That same wave of change is buffeting health care, causing rapid consolidations and even some hospital shutdowns across the nation. Our business is in Spartanburg, but I’m proud to call Greenville home. I’ve watched Greenville Health System grow into one of the Southeast’s leading health care systems with unparalleled patient care and leading-edge research.

“…innovative partnerships are the backbone of a successful company.”

What’s also continued to grow, however, is the extraordinary vision and quality of its board of trustees. The board’s guidance has ensured that GHS is not only a health leader but also a community leader, with a community commitment that’s among the top in the state. Not only does GHS offer a safety-net hospital but also community initiatives as diverse as free medical clinics and extensive community outreach programs to nationally-recognized workforce development programs, a growing biomedical cluster and even the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail. The question, however, is how to carry that success into the future. Faced with unprecedented cost pressures, many hospitals across the nation are in flux. Building a stronger bottom line frequently means combining resources with other hospitals, with mergers – regardless of state or county lines – increasingly seen as a smart solution that strengthens patient care while eliminating costly duplication. Simply put, the current health care climate requires unprecedented need for partnerships with both community and other health care systems. These

“Simply put, the current health care climate requires unprecedented need for partnerships with both community and other health care systems.” partners will be both public and private since – in today’s economy in particular – businesses cannot exist in a vacuum. As the president and CEO of Spartanburg-based William Barnet & Son LLC, I can tell you firsthand how innovative partnerships are the backbone of a successful company. We have many in our 170-year history, and these have allowed us to survive and prosper. But “private-public” partnerships can also be as small as how each person decides to invest their philanthropic dollars. I and my wife Esta are proud to say we donated the seed money that helped spark a community investment in an expanded blood and marrow transplant program at GHS. More news will be

coming out about this in the next few weeks, but, because of this expansion, patients who previously had to leave the area for care can now stay here. Health care decisions should stay local, and great health care absolutely needs to be available locally. The GHS Board of Trustees – led by visionaries who have served at the highest levels of some of the largest companies in the country – last Tuesday proposed exploring an option that would preserve GHS as a public, not-forprofit safety-net system while also creating an overarching innovative framework that will keep health care decisions local while giving GHS the flexibility to partner with other hospitals and health systems across multiple communities. With this innovative strategy, the GHS Board of Trustees is helping ensure that GHS can continue its commitment to the community and stay strong. I realize that this proposal still in the early phases, with many details still to be worked out and evaluated. But I applaud GHS trustees, past and present, for their forward thinking. Bill McCrary is a past chairman of the S.C. Manufacturers Alliance, current chairman of the American Fibers Manufacturers Association and a member of the Palmetto Business Forum. His company has operations in the U.S., Europe and Asia.

Zero waste is achievable goal IN MY OWN WORDS

by Marcia Papin

You’ve heard of “Farm to Table” – now Greenville County is preparing to complete the cycle by going “Table to Farm.” Food materials tossed out by large and small businesses and even your family homes actually have great value,

and have an opportunity to become a key element in the economic and environmental strength of the Upstate. On Tuesday, Oct. 6, the S.C. Department of Commerce is hosting an “Upstate Food Recovery Networking Event” in Suite 400 at Greenville

County Square. The event, which begins at 10 a.m., is open to the public and features experts from around the state. Registration is required and is simple. Go to: sccomposting.eventbrite. com. Businesses, organizations and individuals in the

Upstate have become increasingly environmentally aware, creating demand for innovative ways to reach “zero waste” – when no trash is sent to landfills. Zero waste is a goal that is economical and efficient, where all discarded materials become resources for others to use. Here at the county, we want to help businesses focus on this goal. By working together

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@communityjournals.com.

«


VIEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

«

with private and public partners, we can begin moving towards that lofty standard while also creating private sector jobs and boosting our economy. More than 20 percent of the waste in our local landfills comes from food residuals and yard trimmings. Instead of filling up space in landfills, these tossed-away materials, when used together, have the opportunity to play a vital role as feedstock in the evergrowing compost sector benefiting South Carolina’s many agriculture businesses. Targeting food waste is a priority for Greenville County. We have a Yard Waste Grinding facility at Twin Chimneys, and combining that asset with private sector food waste collectors and composters could dramatically increase recycling while also creating in-demand compost products. The county is working in collaboration with the state of South Carolina to foster its 40BY2020 Partnership Program, which has a goal of 40 percent recycling by 2020. To achieve this lofty goal we all need to work together. Private and public partnership can form the foundation, but much is left to do.

The first step is creating general awareness of what we call “food recovery.” Several prominent Upstate businesses are already aggressively and successfully executing food recovery programs. Michelin, Milliken and Greenville Health System are among those leaders, but many others may be unaware of how their goal of zero waste can also be an economic boon for the communities they serve. The county and state have valuable resources, both physical and educational, that we want to share. Greenville County is always interested in partnerships with businesses that foster expanded and improved services to the residential and business community. Together, we can do great things for our community. We can complete the cycle, creating an even more selfsufficient, sustainable and thriving Upstate. Marcia Papin, Greenville County solid waste manager, has been with the Solid Waste Division for more than 30 years. She has served on the International Board for the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) since 2000.

What’s Right in Health Care GHS Named Screening Center of Excellence The Center for Integrative Oncology and Survivorship at the Cancer Institute of Greenville Health System has been named a Screening Center of Excellence by the Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA) for its ongoing commitment to responsible lung cancer screening. GHS Radiology also was named a Screening Center of Excellence. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer carried out safely, efficiently and equitably saves many lives. To learn more about GHS’ Lung Cancer Screening Program, call 455-1346. Upstate Schools Achieve Safe Sport School Status Forty-three high schools and middle schools throughout the Upstate are recipients of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Safe Sports School award. The award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that provide safe environments for student athletes. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment. GHS athletic trainers meet the sports medicine needs of more than 15,000 student athletes across the Upstate and were instrumental in helping the schools achieve this award.

Happier, healthier, and at home.

Golf Ball Drop The Oconee Memorial Hospital Foundation will host its annual Golf Ball Drop on Sept. 30 to raise funds for Lila Doyle nursing and rehabilitation center, Safe Kids™ Upstate and Mountain Lakes AccessHealth Dental Clinic. To purchase a golf ball, contact 885-7562.

Comfort Keepers provides the kind of trusted, in-home care that helps people maintain full and independent lives, right in the comfort of their own home. We would be happy to arrange a free in-home visit to help you learn more.

SERVICES:

®

268-8993 www.comfortkeepers.com Over 550 independently owned and operated offices worldwide Caregivers are carefully screened, bonded and insured

• • • •

Companionship Cooking, Light Housekeeping Laundry Incidental Transportation (shopping, appointments) • Grooming & Dressing Guidance • Medication Reminders • Personal Care Services - Transfer & Positioning - Bathing, Hygiene - Incontinence Care - Feeding

ghs.org 15-21501748GJ


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | NEWS

Critical decisions on 9/11 Joe Dittmar shares lessons from surviving the south tower ASHLEY BONCIMINO | STAFF

aboncimino@communityjournals.com Eight minutes after Joe Dittmar walked out of the World Trade Center’s south tower, he heard the sound of twisting metal and crumbling concrete as it came tumbling down behind him. Fourteen years later, Dittmar said the experience reinforced his belief in good decision-making and positive energy. “Every decision is important, no matter how big or small one may seem,” said Dittmar, a 35-year veteran of the insurance in-

“To see furniture, paper, people being pulled out of the building against their will was a gruesome, terrible, awesome sight. … This wasn’t an Xbox game. This wasn’t a made-for-TV move. This was reality.”

THE BLOTTER

WITH BENJAMIN JEFFERS

Pickens football coach, friend shot and killed Former Pickens Blue Flame football coach Bill Isaacs and friend Dickie Stewart were shot and killed Monday while walking on North Homestead Road. Police arrested suspect Albert Leon Bowen of Pickens and charged him with two counts of murder and possession of a weapon during a violent crime. A bond hearing for Bowen was waived Tuesday at the request of the Public Defender’s Office. According to WYFF-TV, Pickens County Chief Deputy Creed Hashe said the shooting may have stemmed from an ongoing dispute between Bowen and one of the victims. The School District of Pickens County released a statement that said, “Bill Isaacs is fondly remembered in Pickens County as the winningest coach in the history of Blue Flame Football. His impact as a coach and as an educator cannot be overstated.” Isaacs served 27 years at Pickens High School. As football coach he had 181 wins and nine region championships. A memorial service for Isaacs will be Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. at Bruce Field in Pickens and is open to the community.

Joe Dittmar

dustry who was one of seven survivors from a meeting of 54 insurance executives on the 105th floor on Sept. 11, 2001. “Making the right decision is not easy, but if you trust yourself, if you trust your gut, if you trust your resources… you can make a critical decision that can have tremendous results.” For instance, a decision to begin a 100-story climb downstairs immediately after the lights flickered on the 105th floor, or the decision to ignore an announcement on the PA system telling employees and visitors to stay where they were in the building rather than exit. “Who would have thought that 18 minutes later… the same thing was going to happen to our building?” said Dittmar, who stopped briefly at the 90th floor with his colleagues, where they discovered what had happened to the north tower. “It was the worst 30 or 40 seconds of my life, to see great big holes on the side of that building, great billows of smoke... I remember immediately thinking, ‘How did the pilot not see the building?’” Or a decision, he says, to continue going down the concrete bunker of the stairs when they arrived at the sky lobby on the 78th floor, rather than opting for the elevators. One of his colleagues said she wouldn’t walk down 78

flights of stairs, and several of Dittmar’s colleagues followed suit. “I looked at her, gave the polite wave and made my way back to the stairs, which was arguably the best decision of what is still my life,” said Dittmar. “We learned later, anybody that stopped at the 78th floor didn’t make it out.” Dittmar credits those crucial decisions with his survival, in addition to what might be called karma. People immediately began helping each other, including a security guard who took it upon himself to raise spirits by singing “God Bless America” through a bullhorn. “What we saw that day was something we should see more of: human nature at its finest,” he said. “Everybody became teammates. We helped and coached each other.” Dittmar spoke at this month’s Greenville Spartanburg Anderson Technology Council luncheon in Greenville, where he recounted his experience and what he learned as a result. “First you have to trust what you know. Then you have to trust that you can make your own luck. Then you have to have faith in someone else,” he said. “People can create their own luck.”

Council approves inducement for new $100M manufacturing facility ‘Project Diamondback’ could preserve and create jobs APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Greenville County could soon see new jobs and $100 million in investment as a new manufacturer builds a facility in the area. Greenville County Council approved a resolution to offer an inducement agreement to the company, currently called Project Diamondback. In turn, the company commits to acquiring or purchasing buildings, machinery and equipment to establish a new manufacturing facility and agrees to invest no less than $100 million within five years. Council Chairman Bob Taylor said the targeted company has a presence in the Upstate and had looked at multiple other locations; however, Greenville County is poised to be the selection. The company is building a manufacturing facility and “replacing an existing line

with new technology,” he said. “It bodes well for additional future investment.” Council Vice Chairman H.G. “Butch” Kirven said the investment would keep the company’s sizable workforce in the area and the resulting new technology would prevent the area from losing jobs. The project would touch 500 new and existing jobs, he said. When the company will make an announcement is not known, Taylor said.

WOODRUFF ROAD REZONING MOVES FORWARD In other business, council approved at second reading a rezoning for an approximately 18-acre commercial development on Woodruff Road at Sunnydale Drive that would include a grocery store, retail and offices. Neighbors expressed opposition to the traffic the development would create, and the rezoning included conditions to help address concerns, including aligning a signal intersection on the south and ensuring connectivity with the nearby planned library branch. Council also approved second read-

ing of a rezoning on Fairview Road that would allow for the expansion of the Ballantyne Commons apartment complex by roughly 120 units. Second reading of a rezoning of a property on Chick Springs Road in Taylors was referred back to the council’s planning and development committee for additional discussion.

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION Council’s finance committee approved $146,200 in matching funds for a $1.46 million U.S. Department of Homeland Security grant to purchase new radios for fire department emergency vehicles. The funds will cover installing radios in 152 front-line emergency vehicles and three portable radios for each vehicle. “This will give us a tremendous amount of interoperability,” said Steve Graham, Boiling Springs fire chief. “This won’t be a total fix, but it’s a good start.” Emergency responders in the field had sometimes used their personal mobile phones to communicate because they did not have portable radios, Kernell said.


NEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

Worst in nation, again S.C. returns to No. 1 in the nation for rate of women killed by men BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com Once again South Carolina ranks first in the nation for the rate of women murdered by men, according to an annual report released by the Violence Policy Center. Based on the most recent data available from 2013, the report shows women were murdered by men at a rate of 2.32 per 100,000 females. South Carolina has ranked among the top 10 states in each of the 18 years Violence Policy Center has conducted the study. Last year’s report ranked the state as second. The study covers homicides involving one female murder victim and one male offender, and uses data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Report. Of the women murdered, about 94 percent were killed by someone they knew rather than a stranger, and women are more likely to be victimized at home than any other location, the report says. The rate of women murdered by men has fallen nationally from over 1.5 to 1.09 per 100,000 females since 1996. However, South Carolina remains at over twice the rate of

the national average. Because the numbers are based on 2013 data, the report doesn’t factor in any effects of legislation passed this year that levies harsher penalties for domestic violence offenders South Carolina. The new state law creates a system of punishments based on severity and frequency. The law also bans top-level offenders from owning guns for 10 years and requires prevention education for school students. Sara Barber, executive director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence, said, “With appropriate implementation… we hope that we will see significant changes.” The statewide Domestic Violence Task Force established by Gov. Nikki Haley would work with legislators to make sure organizations throughout the state followed the law’s provisions. Barber said the task force would monitor the effects of the law. “As we go forward we can look at changes and amendments that need to be made,” she said.

GHS Physician Update GHS welcomes these new doctors & offices! Dermatology Courtney McFaddin, MD Carolina Dermatology of Greenville Greenville, 233-6338

Internal Medicine Divya Rao, MD Cypress Internal Medicine–Greer Greer, 797-9550

Family Medicine Michael Peters, MD Keystone Family Medicine Greenville, 454-5000

Todd Albala, MD Cross Creek Internal Medicine Greenville, 797-7035

Tullious Stoudemayer Jr., MD Travelers Rest Family Medicine Travelers Rest, 834-3192

Rank

State

Homicide rate per 100,000 females

1

South Carolina

2.32

2

Alaska

2.29

3

New Mexico

2

4

Louisiana

1.99

5

Nevada

1.95

6 (tie)

Tennesee

1.65

6 (tie)

Oklahoma

1.65

8

Vermont

1.58

9

Maine

1.47

10

Michigan

1.45

Source: “When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2013 Homicide Data”

Gastroenterology Joshua Cohen, DO Gastroenterology Consultants of Internal Medicine Associates Greenville, 255-5609 Steve Clayton, MD GHS Gastroenterology & Liver Center Greenville, 455-2888

Margaret Sims, MD GHS Pediatrics & Internal Medicine– Wade Hampton Greenville, 522-5000 Pediatrics Leslie Gilbert, MD Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Greenville, 455-8898 GHS PHYSICIAN FINDER Call 1-844-GHS-DOCS (447-3627) weekdays 8 a.m.-8 p.m., and a trained operator will schedule a visit for you.

ghs.org 15-21501748GJ


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | NEWS

Health system heads to meet on EMS collaboration County Council called for connection APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The heads of two major Upstate health systems, Greenville Health System (GHS) and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, are scheduled to meet next Wednesday to discuss ways to collaborate on operating the county’s emergency medical services (EMS). Greenville County Council passed a resolution on Sept. 1 requesting the two health systems meet “and report as to how they can work together to develop a MIHP [mobile integrated health practice] to improve access, outcomes and value for the citizens of Greenville County.” Earlier this summer, county staff and

work together, “Greenville County will then look at alternatives to previous proposals and the current EMS operation.” At this week’s council meeting, St. Francis COO Dan Duggan said his system has always wanted collaboration with GHS, and “we are going to try again.” In past meetings, County Administrator Joe Kernell has said the county could easily partner with GHS because both were governmental entities, while St. Francis is not. Kernell said this week he is unsure whether the GHS’ board decision to investigate a private governance structure would affect a future partnership. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again at 6 p.m. on Oct. 6 at County Square.

GHS presented a proposal to give GHS operational authority over EMS. St Francis officials strongly objected, saying they were left out of the discussions and wanted a stronger role than the advisory committee membership currently proposed. St. Francis representatives presented their case at a special council meeting on Aug. 25. The joint staff-GHS proposal includes a 10-year contract and gives GHS operational control of EMS. The county would pay $1.5 million annually to GHS. The currently county-run EMS operates at a loss of roughly $3 million to $4 million annually and has an annual budget of $16 million. Council Chairman Bob Taylor said on Sept. 1 that council cannot force the two systems to collaborate and that different philosophies may prevent any sort of joint effort. According to the council resolution, if the two systems cannot devise a plan to

Read the full council resolution at bit.ly/ Greenville-EMS.

THE NEWS IN BRIEF USC CAPITAL CAMPAIGN TOPS $1 BILLION The University of South Carolina raised more than $1.04 billion in its eight-year Carolina’s Promise capital campaign, a record for any university in South Carolina. The campaign attracted more than 136,000 donors, 134 of which contributed $1 million or more. The university’s 89,417 in-state donors gave more than $604 million, while the roughly 47,300 out-of-state donors contributed more than $438 million. Nearly $181 million was raised in the campaign’s last year. USC President Harris Pastides announced in his State of Carolina speech that a new centralized university advising center designed to improve student retention and decrease the time needed to graduate will open this year. He also said more than 530,000 existing square feet on the USC campus will be repurposed to expand classroom and laboratory space.

CLEMSON TO HOST NCAA GOLF TOURNAMENT The Clemson University men’s and women’s golf teams will co-host the Clemson Invitational at Lake Keowee next spring. The tournament is scheduled for March 31-April 3, and will feature simultaneous tournaments: The men will play on The Cliffs at Keowee Falls’ Jack Nicklaus Signature Design Golf Course and the women on a neighboring Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course at The Reserve on Lake Keowee. Joining Clemson’s men’s golf team will be the men’s teams from Boston College, Georgia Tech, Michigan State, Notre Dame, University of Louisville, Furman University, University of North Carolina Greensboro, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Winthrop University and Elon University. Clemson’s women’s team will host Texas A&M University, Vanderbilt University, University of Tennessee, University of Florida, Michigan State University, Furman University, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Kennesaw State University,

University of Houston, Virginia Tech University, University of Oklahoma, Georgia Regents University Augusta and Boston College.

LOCAL CHEF TO COMPETE IN HOMETOWN BREAKFAST BATTLE Local chef Rodney Freidank is helping Thomas’ brand celebrate its 135th anniversary as one of the 135 chefs nationwide to participate in the Thomas’ Hometown Breakfast Battle. Freidank, Table 301 corporate chef, is representing the Upstate and will compete to create America’s best breakfast using a Thomas’ product.

Customers vote on their favorite recipe over a sixweek time period and the champion chef receives $25,000. Freidank created The South Carolina Sampler, which features cinnamon vanilla English muffins, eggs, fried chicken, shrimp and gravy. Other S.C. chefs competing include Kelly Franz of Magnolias in Charleston, Wesley Fulmer of Motor Supply Company Bistro in Columbia and Peter Haentjens of Dead Dog Saloon in Myrtle Beach. Voting takes place at thomasbreakfastbattle.com. The winner will be announced Oct. 28.

CHECK FURNACES BEFORE COLD WEATHER HITS Greer Commission of Public Works (CPW) is asking natural gas customers to test furnaces to ensure proper functionality – including pilot lights and system connections – before seasonably colder weather sets in.

«


NEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

«

Customers should call CPW to reconnect services or have pilot lights lit. To avoid delays, customers should call customer service during September and early October. CPW typically experiences significant service backlogs during the first cold snap, causing longer response times. “Calling us early will help avoid a chilly night without heat,” said Rob Rhodes, CPW’s Natural Gas Department manager. To schedule a re-connection, customers should call CPW’s customer service at 864-848-5500.

Great banking starts with great bankers.

SC DRIVERS: WATCH OUT FOR DEER South Carolina rose from 10th to ninth place this year for the odds of motorists hitting a deer, according to a study by State Farm Insurance. The likelihood of hitting a deer in the state is one in 95 drivers. “The facts are clear: South Carolina has a lot of deer and a lot of drivers,” State Farm spokesman Justin Tomczak said. “All too often these two are coming into contact with each other.” State Farm estimates state motorists filed over 37,000 claims due to deer collisions over the past year. The national cost per claim average is $4,135, up 6 percent from 2014 when the average was $3,888. The months of October through December have the highest risk for hitting a deer because of mating and hunting seasons, the company said. West Virginia topped the list of states where a collision is most likely with 1 in 44 odds. Hawaii rounds out the bottom of the list with 1 in 8,765 odds.

WAREHOUSE THEATER WINS NATIONAL AWARD The Warehouse Theatre has received national recognition for its presentations of the works of William Shakespeare through its educational outreach touring program. The theater received a $25,000 Shakespeare in American Communities grant by Arts Midwest, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The program awards grants to 40 nonprofit professional theater companies across 25 states plus the District of Columbia to perform Shakespeare’s works for students. The program includes accompanying educational activities. The Warehouse will present a touring version of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” at six venues in the Carolinas including the Peace Center, the Charleston Gaillard Center, the Newberry Opera House, the Sumter Opera House, the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg and the Diana Wortham Theatre in Asheville, N.C. More than 4,500 students are expected to attend.

At South State Bank, we know that every great relationship starts with a conversation. Whether we’re helping you open a new business checking account, choose better treasury management solutions, or to obtain credit to grow your business—we begin by getting to know you and your company first. Only then can we recommend the right products and services for you and your business. We want you to think of us as an extension of your team. Let us help you plan for tomorrow so you can focus on today. That’s relationship banking. That’s the South State Way.

USC BUSINESS SCHOOL WINS TOP RANKING The University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business’s undergraduate international business program is ranked at the top of the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges list for the 17th straight year. In March, the school’s MBA program was ranked tops in international business. USC also ranked No. 52 among all national public universities – up from No. 55 last year – and has 47 nationally ranked academic programs. USC Aiken was ranked the best regional college in the South, and USC Upstate was ranked No. 3 for regional colleges. Upstate also ranked as the third best regional college for veterans. USC Beaufort was ranked No. 6 among public colleges in the region.

Mike Spitzmiller | Commercial Banking Executive SouthStateBank.com | (864) 527-2909 | Member FDIC


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | NEWS

Legislators to GHS: Work with us or else APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com A vote last week by the Greenville Health System’s (GHS) board of trustees to explore the option of forming a private, nonprofit board to operate the health system is continuing to make waves. Greenville legislators expressed concern

“You can’t just unilaterally vote to take something that’s public and make it private without the say-so of the people who originally created it – the people of the county – and we are their representatives.” Rep. Tommy Stringer

this week over the vote, saying the new board would have no public oversight and the change would violate Act 432, which established the GHS board of trustees, defined the duties of the board and gave the Greenville County Legislative Delegation authority to appoint future board members. If the law needs to be changed, the trustees should work with the legislative delegation to make changes, they said. Under the current governance structure, the delegation approves nominees to the health system’s 14-member board of trustees. GHS officials said a revised structure would potentially keep the current board, which would then hold a contract or agreement with the new private nonprofit board to operate the health system, but not have direct control over its actions. The nonprofit board would be selfappointing and self-perpetuating. The private nonprofit board would be overseen by outside regulators, agencies and accreditors such as the IRS, Joint Commission, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Federal Drug Administration and others, said GHS vice president of strategic services Malcolm Isley. “There’s a lot of oversight and accountability for private, non-for-profit [entities],” he said. State Rep. Mike Burns said he and other lawmakers are seeking an opinion from the

ots r o R by p you p Sto ick u Y! p A d n a OD

L FALL F

A

IR T

state attorney general on the change. According to the attorney general’s office, such an opinion is not legally binding, but says the office’s attorneys believe a court would rule in a certain way, which is given weight and consideration by the courts. Burns said he is wary of the timing of last week’s GHS vote, because the Legislature is in recess until January. “They’re doing everything they can to ram this through,” he said, while legislators are willing to work with the board to change Act 432 if GHS trustees can make a persuasive case. GHS officials said the system is seeking the change because the health system’s status as a governmental entity has hampered its ability to partner with private entities like universities or other health providers. In order to compete in the changing healthcare setting, GHS must be able to act quickly in decision-making and “maximize system strategic and financial flexibility.” Rep. Tommy Stringer, who sponsored amendments to Act 432 in 2013 to change its name and enlarge the board in order to add two more hospitals to its system, said the delegation is willing to work with trustees and hear their concerns. Though GHS is concerned about partnering issues and no longer receives public

$2 million Value of Greenville General Hospital property deeded to a board of seven trustees by the City of Greenville in 1947. The city also contributed $375,000.

$1.5 million

Bond issued by Greenville County to assist in establishing the new hospital in 1947, passed by a special election

$3 million

Bond authorized by Greenville Legislative Delegation in 1966 to expand Greenville General Hospital Source – “The First 80 Years: Greenville Hospital System” and “Transformation: The Story of Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center, 1912-2012” by Dave Partridge and Fay Towell

m

Lawmakers say move to private nonprofit violates law that created GHS board

GHS’ beginnings

«

B

A

C

D

E

A.1

Bittersweet, Pumpkins, Mums and Gourds are here!

C.1

2249 Augusta Street, Greenville www.RootsofGreenville.com | 864-241-0100 C914R

Open 7 Days! Monday-Saturday 10am - 6pm & Sunday 1 - 5pm

E.1

B.1

D.1


NEWS | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

«

funding, “It does not change the fact that it’s still public. You can’t just unilaterally vote to take something that’s public and make it private without the say-so of the people who originally created it – the people of the county – and we are their representatives,” Stringer said. GHS board chairman Jim Morton has said that the health system has consulted multiple attorneys and is confident of its legal position to make the change. Morton said last week the board plans to communicate with those GHS serves and “generally listen.” Morton said the timetable on the change is flexible. Moving GHS from public to private governance could have broad implications across the state, not just in terms of health care, but in university governance and other areas, Stringer said. “My response to their legal opinion is, ‘Where’s the ethical opinion on all of this? Where is the idea that they are trustees and they have an ethical obligation to act like trustees?’” Legislators want to work with the

board to make the system stronger, Stringer said. “The last thing we want to do is damage the hospital system itself.” Burns agreed, saying he wanted to work with the GHS board to solve the issues raised. But if the board opts not to work with the delegation and proceeds to transfer its fiduciary responsibility to a private entity, “it is incumbent on us as legislators to pass legislation undoing what they did,” Stringer said. Greenville County Councilman Joe Dill said Tuesday, “I had to pinch myself” after attending the GHS board meeting on the governance change. “If it fails or goes bankrupt, the taxpayers of Greenville County are on the hook,” he said, referring to the county and city founding the system in 1947. Burns said the GHS leadership could potentially buy out the county’s investment of $2 million in 1947 dollars (approximately $21.3 million in 2015 dollars according to U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics) and operate the system as a private entity. “Anything’s possible if you amend the Act 432,” he said.

The SMART CHOICE for All of Your Home Security Needs

CORRECTION: A story in the Sept. 4, 2015 issue covering the Greenville Health System’s (GHS) board of trustees exploring a new governance structure incorrectly listed the accountability of the proposed boards. The current governmental board would not oversee a proposed private, nonprofit board (GHS Upstate). A private, nonprofit board would be accountable to the governmental board via a lease or contract, according to Malcolm Isley, vice president of strategic service for GHS.

Greenville’s Audiology Team

Having trouble listening in demanding environments?

Alisa S. McMahon MA, FAAA

Licensed Audiologist

Marcy W. Stowell MA, FAAA

Licensed Audiologist

Some companies promise lots of “free stuff” if you sign with them. We promise high quality, innovation and unwavering commitment.

Let us help you LISTEN to LIFE! Like us on

• Total Control App (remote access to your home) • Local Monitoring • Burglary & Fire • Video Surveillance • BlueVue24 (Video Alarm Verification) • Security Gates • Generators

We offer financing thru Healthiplan and are accepting TruHearing clients.

888-407-SAFE (7233) blueridgesecuritysolutions.com

12 Waite Street, Suite B-2, Greenville, SC 29607 • Phone 864-509-1152

864.509.1152 hearingsolutionsbymarcy.com HS-1-4p-ColorAd-Marcy/Alysa.indd 1

8/21/13 11:28 AM

A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

Memories of Greasy Corner Residents gather to remember and celebrate bustling downtown neighborhood APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

PHOTO BY APRIL A. MORRIS

y St

S Academ

St

St my de SA

ca

Kroc Center/ AJ Whittenberg Elementary

t

un S

alho

NC

son

t

tt St

Rhe

Perr y

y St

arkle

SEPT. 20 service featuring guest preacher Rev. Richard Curry, Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, 2 Jeff Circle

Ex

t

NM

SEPT. 19 banquet at Elks Lodge, Birnie St.

St

St

rS

ud

nie

we

rry

SEPT. 18 picnic outside Tabernacle Baptist Church and Israel Metropolitan CME Church

Bir Go

SH

The Legend of Greasy Corner reunion

be

Greasy Corner had all the services residents needed, according to Whiteside. Davis recalls shopping at the Rich Brothers grocery store and the Rabbit Trap convenience store in the neighborhood. Nightlife could be found at the Dog House club, she added. Ms. Ann sold hot dogs in a spot adjoining the Watkins Auto service station on Calhoun Street, she recalled. Fred Henson took over a service station named Dollar General and ran it for many years, Whiteside said. Two funeral homes, Watkins, Arnold and Sheppard and Joe Sullivan, operated in the neighborhood, he said. Sullivan’s was next door to Henson’s station. With no bank loans available, it was a struggle to establish a business and neighbors relied on each other for patronage, Davis said. Whiteside recalled his family would seldom venture further up Main Street than present-day Falls Street because “the cheaper stores were down there.” James Thompson, 64, who lived on Gower Street and later on nearby Howard Street, remembers the blackowned businesses that were for him examples of entrepreneurs, “even during the time of Jim Crow.” The building that housed a beauty shop at the corner of Markley and Academy streets is one of the few business structures still standing, Davis said. It will soon be nestled alongside the City Homes at Markley condo development. According to the city, the last of the six service stations was demolished in 2003.

Mayberry Park

ay

A CENTER OF COMMERCE

The reunion

M

At the convergence of Calhoun, Birnie and Hudson streets in Greenville, just behind where A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School now stands, was once a bustling African-American neighborhood and hub of commerce known as Greasy Corner. Greasy Corner had six gas stations at the same intersection, one dating back to 1913, according to the city of Greenville. Robbie Young Davis was born there. Davis, 71, lived on Birnie Street and recalls hurtling down the hill on roller skates as a girl. Many blackowned businesses operated in the area, including barbershops, cafes and stores, she said. Davis’ grandmother, Lizzie Carpenter, earned money by washing clothes or “chunkin’” – putting them in an outdoor pot and chunkin’ them to get the dirt off, she said. “She washed for those who lived on the mill hill.” Rev. John Whiteside was born on School Street and raised by his mother and grandmother there, he said. His mother worked as a presser at a dry cleaner, which was considered professional work because she also cleaned hats and more. Other Greasy Corner residents took the bus or walked along the railroad tracks to the homes of more affluent residents to cook and clean for them and “basically raise their children,” he said.

Falls Park

Ave

t

S

S Main

MORE INFO: 915-7606

Fluor Field

Photo: Rev. John Whiteside and Robbie Young Davis were both born in the Greasy Corner neighborhood at the convergence of Calhoun, Birnie and Hudson streets in downtown Greenville. The two are among the organizers for the Greasy Corner reunion happening this weekend. Photo by April A. Morris. Map: The Greasy Corner neighborhood was centered around the intersection of Calhoun, Birnie and Hudson streets, near where A.J. Whittenberg Elementary now stands.

PROFESSIONALS, RELIGION AND EDUCATION The neighborhood was full of professionals like Professor J.E. Beck, principal of Sterling High School, and teachers Fannie Martin and Annie Brock, said Davis. Greasy Corner was also home to Dr. McLaurin and Dr. E.L. McPherson, who would make house calls. The neighborhood had four churches, including Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, Tabernacle Baptist Church and Israel Metropolitan CME Church, said Davis. Children attended what was called the Old Union School and nearby Sterling High School. While some

residents owned businesses, others worked in concrete finishing, bricklaying and plastering, said Whiteside. Students learned these trades at what was called the “negro training school,” formerly the Union Negro Elementary School, he said. Because of segregation, “we weren’t allowed to work in the mills or allowed to rent houses on the mill hill,” he said.

A ‘COOL PLACE TO BE’ Thompson remembers the area was permeated with a village mentality; “everyone looked after each other.” There was a comfort in “interacting with people who genuinely cared about you,” he said. Greasy Corner was “a cool place to be,” said Thompson,

«


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

«

and shaped the lives of its residents, molding their behavior and instilling respect. It was the kind of place where, “if you were caught doing something you weren’t supposed to, your parents would know about it before you got home because someone would pick up the phone,” he said. Children spent time playing outdoors on the nearby fields and at Mayberry Park, Thompson said. If he was not supposed to be out “and Coach saw you hanging out on a corner, he’d give you some extra laps,” he said. Word traveled from person to person because phones were few – however, “if something happened, everyone rallied around. It was word of mouth,” Whiteside said. “If someone died, people would just start showing up with food.” “Nobody realized we were poor,” Davis said. “Everybody had what they needed and if they didn’t have it, they could get it from a neighbor.”

TOGETHER AGAIN This weekend, former and current residents will gather for a reunion and to record their stories. The celebration will feature a picnic, banquet and special church service. Organizers will block off between Calhoun and McCall streets to hold the picnic, Whiteside said. The banquet will honor 20 “super seniors,” some of whom are more than 100 years old, he said. Thompson, who worked for Milliken and for Sara Lee in North Carolina and South Carolina, returned to the Upstate in 2004 and is looking forward to reconnecting with former neighbors. “I haven’t seen some in 40 years. It will be great to see them in a different setting than a church for a funeral.”

‘‘ If it wasn’t for givers, I wouldn’t be a mother. I wouldn’t be a wife. I wouldn’t have life.

‘‘

Hear my story at: thebloodconnection.org -- Brianne, Pelzer, SC --

BEHIND THE NAME: The story behind

Greasy Corner’s name comes from what residents say was an accident between a train and a truck carrying a load of pigs, said Rev. John Whiteside. “There were pigs everywhere and people began calling it Greasy Corner,” he said.


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

Festival means Euphoria for foodies Understanding Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Dr. Alan Wolfelt

Helping Children and Teens Cope with Grief A free seminar for educators September 22, 2015 3:00pm to 5:00pm

Healing Your Grieving Heart: Exploring Practical Touchstones for Caring for Yourself A FREE seminar for anyone experiencing grief or loss September 22, 2015 6:45pm to 9:00pm

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Euphoria, the Upstate’s food, drink and music festival going on this weekend, has grown beyond the expectations of its founders, restaurateur Carl Sobocinski and singer-songwriter Edwin McCain. But neither wants it to grow past the intimacy it has now. “I’ve had people tell me they’ve eaten in Frank Stitt’s restaurants in Birmingham for 20 years, but Euphoria was the first time they were able to have a conversation with him,” Sobocinski said. “At Euphoria, you can see Edwin McCain walking down the street with his guitar and actually stop him and have a conversation. We want to make sure Euphoria maintains the highest quality and remains intimate. That’s really what makes Euphoria special.” The weekend-long event features tasting events, cooking demonstrations and wine seminars, multi-course dinners by guest chefs and live musical performances. This year’s event has no shortage of chefs with national reputations. David Guas hosts the Travel Channel’s

PHOTOS PROVIDED

“American Grilled.” The owner of Bayou Bakery, Coffee Bar & Eatery in Arlington, Va., Guas’ cookbook, “DamGoodSweet: Desserts to Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth, New Orleans Style,” was a James Beard Award finalist in the Baking and Dessert Cookbook category.

Art Smith, chef at Table Fifty-Two in Chicago, was once the day-to-day chef for Oprah Winfrey. John Currence, owner of City Grocery Restaurant Group from Oxford, Miss., competed on season three of “Top Chef Masters.” Adam Hayes, chef at

«

Enhancing your Understanding

of the Depression of Grief A half day workshop for professional caregivers

$25.00 Registration Fee for Professionals seeking CEU Credit

September 23, 2015 8:45am - 12:00pm All seminars are located at the TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC For more information or to make a reservation, call (864) 235-8330 or register online at www.thomasmcafee.com. Presented as a public service by:

CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

BACK-TO-SCHOOL BACK-TO-SCHOOL

2.00

% APY*

FOR 5 YEARS

MEANS TO DANCE DANCE MEANS BACK BACK TO THE SOCK BASKET GREENVILLE 2433 LAURENS ROAD

GREENVILLE, SC 29607 864.676.0635

THESOCKBASKET.COM CAPEZIO MERCHANDISE 15% OFF CAPEZIO DAYS - SEPT 21 - 26 POINTE SHOE FITTINGS WITH ANITRA - SEPT 23 *POINTE SHOE FITTING BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

855-CRESCOM (273-7266) haveanicebank.com 3695 E. North Street, Greenville, SC 29615 *The annual percentage yield (APY) assumes that interest remains on deposit until maturity. APY accurate as of today and is subject to change at any time and without notice. Personal accounts only. Deposit limited to $230,000. Penalty for early withdrawal. $5,000 minimum balance to open. This is a limited time offer. Effective Date: Sept. 14, 2015

Member FDIC


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

Wear them. Love them. Forget them.

«

Sapphire, N.C.’s Canyon Kitchen, won television’s “Cutthroat Kitchen.” Friday’s Taste of the South highlights local restaurants. McCain, who stepped away from Euphoria in 2013, returns to headline the event. Cooking demonstrations, a beer garden, a tasting showcase and wine seminars on Saturday will give attendees a chance to learn from local and guest chefs as well as master sommeliers. On Saturday evening, guest chefs will prepare multi-course dinners at various restaurants. Sunday’s lineup will include a New Orleans-style Jazz Brunch and the Culinary Cook-off. Four Greenville County students will compete Sunday in the Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown, and the winner’s dish will become part of Greenville County Schools’ lunch menu. For those who are worried about their caloric intake during the festival, Euphoria will offer sports events and free exercise classes, said Brianna Shaw, the festival’s executive director. “We’re calling it calories in, calories out,” she said. Tickets range from $35 to $995 for a VIP Star pass. Tickets are all-inclusive and include food, drink and music.

Better hearing no matter where you are.With family and friends. Out and about. At home. At work.

Better Hearing Experience Event Call today to schedule your better hearing experience today!

Wireless Accessories for your everyday needs. Phone

864-655-8300 • • • •

Details

• • • •

Communicate easily, anywhere, with everyone Phonak Audéo V hearing devices are tailored to give you the listening experiences you desire. Focus on speech understanding Comfort and ease-of use Automatic capabilities During your appointment, you’ll receive: Personal Demonstration of the new Phonak Audeo Venture FREE Accessory with Advanced level Devices Free Batteries with Davis Audiology Lifetime Service Plan Phonak's Rep, Stacy Marlowe, Au.D., will be on-site to answer your questions as well

While some of the dinners with guest chefs are sold out, tickets are still available for many of the Friday, Saturday and Sunday events. For information, go to euphoriagreenville.com. For schedule, see “What’s Happening” on page 51.

Davis

ComPilot Air II DECT II

ComPilot II

Conversation

RemoteMic Roger Pen

Roger Clip-On Mic

Control

PilotOne II

RemoteControl App

TV and Music TVLink II

4318 East North Street Greenville, SC 29615 Kristin Davis, Au.D.

Alexandra Tarvin, Au.D.

Proud Provider of Phonak Hearing Instruments

NEWAV110

Pansies & Violas …plant them now!

947 ANDERSON RIDGE ROAD Beside the MeSA Soccer Complex

864-458-9864

Mon.-Fri. 8 to 5, Sat. 9 to 4


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

Collective impact Greenville Women Giving celebrates 10 years APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com “I never thought we would go from three to this,” said Greenville Women Giving cofounder Sue Priester to a gathering last week kicking off the 10th anniversary celebration of the philanthropic organization. “The crowd is amazing,” she said at the event that featured speaker and business leader Darla Moore. Launched in 2006, the collective-giving organization asks women to individually give a set amount, pooling their resources and distributing grants that impact

Upcoming community events

the community. Since G re e nv i l l e Women Giving became a special initiative of the Community Foundation of Greenville in 2006, it has contribPHOTO PROVIDED uted $3.6 The Greenville Women Giving Fall Kickoff featured Darla Moore (center). million as of May 2015 and has nearly 500 members, a all members for selecting recipients. Gilreath, who has served on the grants goal for May 2016. Perry Gilreath, who joined the first committee, said at one time she used to year, said she was recruited by cofounder know all the Greenville Women Giving Harriet Goldsmith. “It’s been amazing,” members. Happily there are so many Gilreath said at the celebration. She re- now she does not know all the faces, she counted how the Community Founda- said. The collective-giving model is bention challenged the group to recruit a certain number of members the first year eficial for all levels of participation, she to gain a $50,000 grant and how they said. “If you want to be involved, you can be, or you can just give money.” surpassed the goal. Madeline Freeman, who joined in Greenville Women Giving awards grants ranging from $40,000 to $100,000, 2008, was recruited by Gilreath and after a grants committee reviews the ap- said growing the membership often inplications and then distributes a ballot to volves friends inviting friends. Freeman

MIDDLE SCHOOL MATTERS – KEEPING STUDENTS “ON TRACK” Oct. 21 Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St., Greenville

MANEUVERING THE MENTAL HEALTH MAZE Nov. 12 Greenville Mental Health Center, 129 Mallard St., Greenville

THE NEW WORLD OF AGING ADULTS Dec. 8 Herring Center, Furman University INFO AND RSVP: 361-1393 or greenvillewomengiving.org.

is pleased to see a focus on five different areas for the grant-making process, including education, social services, environmental, arts and health. Freeman said she likes the way the organization truly studies the nonprofit applicants before distributing the grant funds and that the funds create a direct impact.

Savor the Flavor October 9-11

Downtown Greenville

Taste tickets now available for purchase online & beginning September 21 at Michelin on Main in downtown Greenville! A portion of the Fall for Greenville proceeds will benefit eleven local nonprofits.

www.fallforgreenville.net

Fine home furnishings. Exceptional prices. TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER 1914 E Main St., Spartanburg • 864-342-6951 • M-F 10-5; Sat 10-3 875 NE Main St., Simpsonville • 864-228-1619 • M-F 9-5; Sat 9-3 See more of our inventory at www.CarolinaConsignmentLLC.com

A portion of the Fall for Greenville proceeds will benefit eight local nonprofits.


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC NG LISTI RACT NEW R CONT

TING S I L NEW

E UND

202 Farrar Lane Greer • $169,650

CT NTRA O C ER UND

1 Club Drive GCC Area • To Be Built

ON CALL

116 West Mountain Creek Church Rd. Pebble Creek • $221,609

864-297-3450 RACT T N O ER C UND

RACT T N O ER C UND

404 McIver Street Alta Vista • $899,601

4 Asbury Ave • Hampton Pinckney Area/Downtown • $319,601

OT CRE L A 0 5 . ON 1

89 Woodvale Avenue GCC Area • $1,199,605

304 Pine Forest Extension Alta Vista • $1,199,601

SE COUR F L O ON G

! VILLA N A TUSC

329 Pine Forest Drive Ext. Alta Vista • $769,601

11 Hobcaw Lane. Thornblade Area • $749,650

104 Brookview Circle Augusta Circle • $589,605

Poinsett Penthouse Downtown • $999,601

108 Lowood Chanticleer • $587,605

7 Chinquapin Lane Botany Woods • $995,615

OT! RE L C A 5 1/2

14 East Montclair Avenue North Main • $749,609

204 Bruce Meadow • Bruce Farm/Simpsonville • $729,681

9 Sunrise Drive Caesar’s Head • $574,635

7 Hindman Drive North Main Area • $699,609

N VATIO O N E ER R UND

AD S HE ’ R A CAES

SUIT O T D BUIL

114 Melville Ave. Augusta Circle Area • $699,605

REALTOR

CT NTRA O C ER UND

3 Ivy Trail 29 Shadowrock Court • Five Botany Woods Area • $214,615 Forks/Simpsonville • $207,681

1 Finnish Court Stonebrook Farm • $799,615

4 PM N. 2U S OPEN

Jackson Herlong

AGENT

122 Kellet Park Drive Kellet Park • $539,605

11 Ottoway Augusta Circle Area • $539,605

OL D PO N U O R IN-G

120 E Augusta Place Augusta Road Area • $449,605

LOTS OF LOTS!!!

713 Wembley Road Gower Estates • $439,607

3 Club Drive • GCC Area To be built - $399,605

8 Cureton Street Cureton Corners • $369,605

Lot 91 - Limestone Trail - 6 acres - Cliffs of Glassy - $29,356 Lot 26 - Melville Ave - Augusta Circle Area - $239,605 Lot 27 - Melville Avenue - Augusta Circle Area - $209,605 Lot 291/Pt Lot 29 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $349,605 Lot 311 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $329,605

6 Asbury Ave • Hampton Pinckney 441 Longview Terrace Area/Downtown • $319,601 Augusta Road Area • $349,605

2 Asbury Ave • Hampton Pinckney Area/Downtown • $315,601

607 Tanacross Way Oak Knoll • $174,605

Joan Herlong* Owner, BIC • 864-325-2112 • Joan@AugustaRoad.com *She’s the real Number One, has sold more real estate than ANY single Realtor in Greenville. Source: MLS stats 2012, 2013, and 2014.


ening muscles in your legs? 20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

f peripheral neuropathy

your hopes of leading

. Let us help. Realief®

pain CentersBurning has pioneered a

in your feet?

ment for your symptoms

Tingling numbness in your hands?

, pain and weakness —

Weakening and proprietary therapymuscles

in your legs?

comfortable and nonSymptoms of peripheral pain-free, drug-free careneuropathy

can shatter your hopes of leading ow in your area. an active life. Let us help. Realief®

Neuropathy Centers has pioneered a

proven treatment for your symptoms dule your symptom — numbness, pain and weakness —

nd treatment plan. using a new and proprietary therapy

n and discomfort that is safe, comfortable and non-

invasive. Our pain-free, drug-free care efine your life. is available now in your area.

enters.com

Call to schedule your symptom evaluation and treatment plan. Because pain and discomfort should not define your life.

et relief from your symptoms. Visit: realiefcenters.com all Realief today.

Get relief from your symptoms. -888-966-7971 Call Realief today.

1-888-966-7971

it isn't Realief, it isn't real relief.

If it isn't Realief, it isn't real relief. 0% Average Symptom Reduction. 80% Average Symptom Reduction.

sted Evidence-Based Procedure. Tested Evidence-Based Procedure.

Proprietary Patent-Pending oprietary Patent-Pending Protocol.Protocol.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ABC AND KELSEY MCNEAL

Team SMASH competes on ABC’s dance special “#DanceBattle America.”

Local teens win national televised dance competition BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com Three teenagers from Greenville and Easley won a national dance competition, “#DanceBattle America,” which aired on ABC Monday night. Brothers Jordan and Conner Chastain and their friend Jakevis Thomason competed as Team SMASH against seven other teams before a studio audience that voted them the winners. Jordan Chastain said he heard about the competition through a casting agent who encouraged him to submit a video,

so he got his brother and Thomason together to form a team. The brothers and Thomason knew each other from previous dance competitions, but had never danced together. They only had a week and a half to work together before the show. The team’s name is an acronym. It came about when Jordan and Conner Chastain were arguing with each other and their mom yelled out “SMASH.” The boys asked her what she was saying, and she replied, “So much attitude standing here.” Jordan Chastain said he likes the double meaning of also “smashing the

«


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

«

competition.” Team SMASH first battled head to head against a group of 60- and 70-year-old women with big personalities from Atlanta called the Silver Classix. The two teams had bonded during the 10 days of rehearsals and filming, so the boys said the competition was very friendly. “Who doesn’t love grandmas who can dance?” Thomason said. The choreographer who worked with the boys said he was impressed by their Southern gentlemanly charm, and incorporated their personalities into the choreography and costuming. Conner Chastain said working with the choreographer was difficult at first because he didn’t know their styles, but the choreographer helped them and they adapted. At one point in the show, Thomason did a split in the air while jumping over Conner Chastain, who was doing a move on the ground. “At first when [the choreographer] asked me to do it,” Thomason said, “I was a little like ‘I don’t know about that. Maybe try something else.’” The audience liked the routine and voted them the winners of the head-tohead battle. The team then had to wait until the end of the show to find out the final results, when the audience voted them the best overall. The grand prize was a trip to the Atlantis Paradise Island Resort in the Bahamas. Although the competition is over, Jordan said he and the others still communicate daily with the other contestants. The boys are also adjusting back to life after the competition. Jordan Chastain is a sports communications student at Clemson University and a hip-hop dance instructor at Shock Dance Center in Mauldin. Conner Chastain is a sophomore at Easley High School, and Thomason is a senior at Wade Hampton High School. Jordan Chastain said, “Right now, what’s next is catching up on schoolwork.”

Team SMASH with “#DanceBattle America” host Julianne Hough (second from left).


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

PICKENS 403 Hidden Valley Road • MLS 1303994 4BR/2.5BA • 25.59 Acres • $374,900

TAYLORS 1903 Dunlin Court • MLS 1298348 4BR/3.5BA • Inground Pool • $399,000

GREENVILLE 117 Applewood Drive • MLS 1297108 3BR/2.5BA • Tuscan Woods • $350,000

The host of “My Greenville Home” Listen to Dan Hamilton on Saturdays at 11:00am, ® station WGTK 94.5 FM

kw

KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY LT LTY

®

Dan Hamilton

864-527-7685

MyGreenvilleHome.com Each Keller Williams Realty Office is Independently Owned and Operated

Greenville Tech Charter High School is a 2015 bronze medal recipient of U.S. News and World Report’s America’s Top High Schools Award, which marks the fourth year for GTCHS receiving this award. The U.S. News rankings include data on more than 21,000 public high schools in 50 states and the District of Columbia. Schools were awarded gold, silver or bronze medals based GTCHS Teacher of the Year Valerie Dix. on their performance on state assessments and how well they prepare students for college. St. Mary’s Middle School students ended their first week of school with their annual “Meeting in the Middle” Party, where students draw different colors to be placed in teams with mixed grade levels. Throughout the year, the Meeting in the Middle teams perform community service, assist with younger school students, and build communication and team building skills with their peers. Greenville Tech Charter High School senior Julia Petersen has been selected as a PSAT/NMSQT National Hispanic Scholar. Julia scored in the top 2.5 percent of Hispanic and Latino testtakers in the region on the PSAT/NMSQT administered October 2014. The College Board’s National Hispanic Recognition Program (NHRP) identifies academically outstanding Hispanic/ Latino high school students. Each year, the NHRP honors about 5,000 of the highest-scoring students from over 250,000 Hispanic/Latino juniors who take the PSAT/NMSQT. Shannon Forest Christian School (SFCS) has chosen members of the school’s new Chamber Choir. The group will represent Shannon Forest at several festivals and clinics this year and will concentrate on a cappella repertoire for concerts and special events. Members are Caroline Baughman, Megan Harrison, Theresa Peter, Cassidy Van Houten, Liddy Agbomi, Landon Best, Conner Breazeale, Sawyer Norman and Ladson Ellis. The Chandler School lower school students are starting out the year practicing their writing skills as they play “I Spy Science” around their classroom.

Parents of prospective Langston Charter Middle

School students must attend one of three Application Orientation Meetings, as part of the lottery application process. The meetings will be on Saturday, Sept. 26 at 4:00 p.m.; Thursday, Oct. 8 at 7:00 p.m.; and Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 7:00 p.m. All meetings will be held at Woodruff Road Christian Church (20 Bell Road, Greenville, 29607). In addition to attending a meeting, parents must submit a lottery application, which will be available on the school Angie Carroll’s first-grade students website (langstoncharter. Ja’Lyrica Jones and Madison Castillo org) at the conclusion of the are learning about Reading Workshop first meeting on Sept. 26. at Ellen Woodside Elementary. They work together during workshop to The deadline for all lottery become better readers. applications is Friday, Oct. 23 at 3 p.m. A lottery of all complete applications will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 5 p.m. at the school. Parents of former or current students with a sibling planning to enroll for next year must attend a meeting and submit the lottery application by the deadline of Oct. 23. Call Celanie Martin, registrar, at 864286-9700 with any questions. Clemson University was named one of the healthiest colleges in the U.S. by The Greatist health and fitness website. The website acknowledged the diverse offerings of Fike Recreation Center and the increase in mental health services offered by the university in the last few years. In addition, Clemson’s Eat Well with Clemson Home program, the dining halls’ vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free offerings and campus sexual health services were considered.

Westcliffe Elementary received a grant from Ronald McDonald House Charities. A Friendship Adventure will promote character education through quality children’s literature. The guidance counselor will visit classrooms and introduce the character trait focus of the month and then share a book that represents that trait. She will then present the class with a copy of the book. At the end of each month, the teacher will choose one student who best represents that character trait to be recognized. The selected students will receive a McDonald’s Happy Meal.

«


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

«

Tami Blumenfield, an assistant professor of Asian studies at Furman University, has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the rapid expansion of material wealth in rural China and Bangladesh. For the proposal, “Collaborative Research: A multidimensional investigation of the dynamics of market Christ Church Episcopal School Upper School students sign the Honor transition and social Code pledging, “As a member of the Christ Church Episcopal School change in rural Chi- community, I will not lie, cheat or steal, and I will assume my obligation na and Bangladesh,” to encourage others to uphold this Honor Code.” the research team was awarded a total of more than $415,000 from the NSF.

Furman University English professor Margaret J. Oakes has received a major award from the Association for General and Liberal Studies (AGLS) in recognition of her teaching and innovative leadership at the university. The Jerry G. Gaff Award for Faculty Excellence in General and Liberal Education is given annually to those who have demonstrated leadership on their campuses in the area of general and liberal education; who have shown evidence of outstanding teaching in general and liberal education courses; and who have a record of achievement in curriculum development, innovation, or implementation in general and liberal education. Augusta Circle Elementary is embarking on a new approach to school fundraising that’s rooted in community service and acts of kindness. Raise Craze challenges students to complete at least five acts of service during the two-week campaign while reaching out to family and friends for contributions. It begins Sept. 28 and students may choose to complete service acts on their own, or to participate in several service events organized by the PTA. 

Kristi Ferguson’s advisory served as acolytes for the chapel service celebrating the new ministry of Kahu David Jackson, senior chaplain and reverend at Christ Church Episcopal School. Back row: Charlie Pruitt, Amani Richburg, Walker Leftwich, Zach Epting. Front row: McKoy Crawford, Courtney Lee, Laura Quarterman, Shayla Bennett.

Several Greenville County Schools’ seniors have been named National Merit Scholarship semifinalists. They are: Rowan Crowley, Sarai Dai, Victoria Glenn, Carol Lee, Karen Zhao, Jacob Haun, McKenzie Fletcher, William Gibson, Mitchell Saunders, Connor Clayton, Christian Hansen, Vaibhav, Kathleen Beaudoin, Nathaniel Boen, Ellen Chen, Emily Chen, Anna Hardison, Lillian Meng, Andrew Reeves, Virginia Britt, Thomas Elgin, John Huylu and William Wells.

We are now accepting school news through an easy-to-use online form at bit.ly/GJEducation. To be considered for publication, all information must be submitted via this form. Entries must be received by Friday at 5 p.m. to be considered for the next Friday’s publication.


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER The Cancer Society of Greenville County will hold a Say Whoa to Cancer luncheon on Sept. 22 at the Hilton Greenville featuring Dr. Ann Kulze, physician and speaker. Kulze will focus on good health habits and nutrition and how they relate to cancer prevention. The event is also a fundraiser to support the changing medical, financial, emotional and educational needs of cancer patients and their families in Greenville County. For more information, call 232-8439 or email lisa@cancersocietygc.org. DNA Creative Communications (DNA), in partnership with Community Foundation of Greenville, United Way of Greenville County and Hollingsworth Funds, will feature Susan Meier on “Leading with an Exceptional Board: Moving from Transactional to Transformational.” The Sept. 30 event at the Kroc Center is part of DNA’s annual Shine the Light Nonprofit Forums. The workshop will include a keynote address by Meier along with case studies and interactive roundtable discussions. For more information or to register, visit nonprofitforums.org or call 235-0959 ext. 101. In support of March of Dimes and more than 4,000 charities nationwide, Macy’s raised more than $3.5 million through its annual Shop For A Cause campaign. In addition to the March of Dimes, more than 4,000 local charities signed up to participate in the event this year. By giving $5 to their favorite local cause, customers were able to support a cause and receive a savings pass. Hilldrup moving and storage company and agent of United Van Lines has joined the national nonprofit Move For Hunger to fight hunger and provide food to food pantries. The Greenville Hilldrup location is participating to collect non-perishable food items from its customers and deliver to local food pantries. For more information, visit moveforhunger.org.

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation recently awarded nearly $7,500 to area schools, nonprofits and literacy organizations to enhance and support youth literacy and education programs. The grant awards are part of more than $4 million in grants awarded in 43 states. Local award recipients include: A.J. Whittenberg Elementary, $472.50; Wade Hampton High School, $3,960; and Youthbase, $3,000. A complete list of grant recipients is at dgliteracy.org. Grant applications for adult, family, summer and youth literacy grants will be available in January 2016. Urban League of the Upstate will honor John Miller, president and CEO of Denny’s Corporation, as the 2015 Whitney M. Young Jr. Humanitarian Award recipient on Oct 29 at the Marriott Hotel in Spartanburg. For more information about the event, visit urbanleagueupstate.org. Apple Gold Group, a franchisee of Applebee’s Bar and Grill, will host the 10th Annual Chip In For Wishes Golf Tournament benefiting Make-A-Wish South Carolina on Sept. 28 at The Preserve at Verdae. In 2014, Apple Gold Group raised over $25,000 with the annual golf tournament. For more information, visit sc.wish.org.

Beth Taylor, Make-A-Wish South Carolina board member and Upstate region volunteer lead; David Spracher (wish kd); William “Bill” Tiller, president and CEO of Make-A-Wish South Carolina; Blake Pittman (behind Tiller); Scott Harrison, regional vice president of Apple Gold Group; John Trone, area director; Chris Olson, area director; and Stephen Rickard, general manager, Easley.

AN EASIER, FASTER, MORE CONVENIENT

HOME EQUITY LINE OF CREDIT

FOR YOU & YOUR PLANS! LOW CLOSING COSTS1 QUICK APPROVAL EASY ACCESS TO FUNDS AFFORDABLE, UP TO 80% OF YOUR HOME’S VALUE MINIMAL PAPERWORK 1

Subject to credit approval. Contact a HomeTrust Bank Loan Officer today for pricing and program information.

APPLY ONLINE OR IN PERSON TODAY.

hometrustbanking.com/home-equity • 499 Woodruff Rd., Greenville, 864.335.2200 • 8599 Pelham Rd., Greenville, 864.605.6200


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

Shopoholic Secret No. 1 : During The Crawl, shop EVERYWHERE, but

put all your goodies in the biggest bag one bag, no questions...

Joan Herlong: clothing/ accessories, Prowse on Main Michelle Seaver: clothing/ accessories, TAZ Boutique Mary DuPree: clothing/accessories/ shoes, Monkee’s of the West End Hair & makeup, Capello Salon

THE ULTIMATE SHOPPING CRAWL 5th anniversary OCT. 22-23 5–8 PM Amy Emery Interior Design* Capello Salon Christ Church Episcopal School* cocobella boutique Copper Penny Custard Boutique

J. Britt Boutique Katie Poterala Distinctive Jewels* lansing alayne* Leandra Hill Metal Works* Lily Pottery Downtown Monkee’s of the Westend

MUSE Shoe Studio Prowse on Main Boutique* Savvy Sew Few Bags* Splash on Main Style Envy

TAZ Boutique Thorn Boutique* *Will be located as a pop-up shop within the Augusta Road branch of United Community Bank during The Crawl

For more Secrets of a Shopoholic, follow Fashion on the TOWN on Facebook

(Fashion on the TOWN), Instagram (fashiononthetown) and Twitter (TOWN fashion)


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF ANDERSON C.A. No: 2014-CP-04-02852 Michelle Kaarlie, Plaintiff vs. Christie Omdahl and Done with Dirt, LLC, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at this office at Post Office Box 35, Anderson, South Carolina, 29622, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff(s) in this action will apply to the Court for the said relief demanded in the Complaint. TO INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON): You are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO INFANT(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL OR TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM (S) HE/(THEY) RESIDE(S): You are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. J. David Standeffer, SC Bar # 5302 STANDEFFER LAW, LLC 2124 North Highway 81 (29621) P O Box 35 Anderson, SC 29622 (864) 964-0333 Anderson, South Carolina (864) 964-0930 (fax) Dated: 12-15-14 Attorney for the Plaintiff

NOTICE IN THE MATTER OF HARVEY BREECE BRELAND, PETITIONER Petitioner was definitely suspended from the practice of law for one year. In the Matter of Harvey Breece Breland, 405 S.C. 573, 749 S.E. 2d 299 (2013). Petitioner has now filed a petition seeking to be reinstated. Pursuant to Rule 33(e)(2) of the Rules for Lawyer Disciplinary Enforcement contained in Rule 413 of the South Carolina Appellate Court Rules, notice is hereby given that members of the bar and the public may file a notice of their opposition to, or concurrence with, the petition. Comments should be mailed to: Committee on Character and Fitness P.O. Box 11330 Columbia, South Carolina 29211 These comments should be received no later than November 8, 2015.

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CLOSE UNOPENED ROAD NOTICE is hereby given that the following party intends to file a petition pursuant to South Carolina Code § 57-9-10, et seq. for the abandonment and closure of one unopened road formerly identified as George Street. This road is located near the intersection of Easley Bridge Road and Mauldin Street in Greenville, SC. The road to be closed is shown particularly on plat by Thomas P. Dowling (2012) recorded in Plat Book 1136, Page 58 Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County, South Carolina. A copy of said plat is also available for inspection at the law offices of Wyche, P.A., 44 E. Camperdown Way, Greenville, South Carolina, 29601. The party intending to file this action is: Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, Inc. Questions or comments should be directed to attorney Amos A. Workman at Wyche, P.A., 44 E. Camperdown Way, Greenville, South Carolina 29601; Phone number (864) 242-8200.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Ernesto Corona/ DBA Taqueria y Pupuseria la Costena 3, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR, at 2801 Wade Hampton Blvd. Ste 7, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 4, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF ELECTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Notice is hereby given that the General Election for the City and Special Purpose District offices will be held at the voting precincts fixed by law in this County on Tuesday, November 3, 2015. If a runoff is necessary in a Municipal Election it will be held on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. City of Fountain Inn: Mayor, City Council Ward 2 and City Council Ward 4. City of Mauldin: Mayor, City Council Seat 2, City Council Seat 4, and City Council Seat 6. City of Simpsonville: City Council Ward 1, City Council Ward 3, and City Council Ward 5. City of Travelers Rest: Four City Council Seats. Public Service Districts: Belmont Fire and Sanitation District (three seats); Berea Public Service District (one seat); Brookfield Special Tax District (two seats); Canebrake Fire District (three seats); Clear Spring Fire-Rescue (three seats); Duncan Chapel Fire District (two seats); Foothills Fire Service District (two seats); Gantt Fire, Sewer and Police District (two seats); Glassy Mountain Fire Service Area (three seats); Gowensville Fire District (two seats); Lake Cunningham Fire District (two seats); Marietta Water, Fire, Sanitation and Sewer District (one seat); North Greenville Fire District (two seats); Parker Sewer and Fire Sub District (two seats); Piedmont Park Fire District (one seat); River Falls Fire District (two seats); Slater Marietta Fire & Police District (three seats); South Greenville Area Fire District (one seat); Taylors Fire and Sewer District (one seat); Tigerville Fire District (four seats); Wade Hampton Fire and Sewer District (one seat). Any person wishing to register to vote in this election must do so no later than October 3, 2015. The polls shall be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the locations designated below. The Managers of Election shall see that each person offering to vote takes the oath that he is qualified to vote at this election according to the Constitution of this State and that he has not voted before in this election. Voters who are blind, physically disabled, or unable to read or write are entitled to assistance in casting their ballot. This assistance may be given by anyone the voter chooses except his employer, an agent of his employer, or an officer or agent of his union. The Managers must be notified if assistance is needed. Voters who are unable to enter their polling place due to physical disability or age may vote in the vehicle in which they drove, or were driven, to the polls. When notified, the Managers will help voters using this curbside voting provision. In an effort to notify the voter who is physically disabled of inaccessibility to a polling place, an asterisk * is being placed after a polling place that is listed below. This asterisk indicates a polling place may be inaccessible to voters with a physical disability. Registered electors who cannot vote in person may be eligible to vote by absentee ballot. Persons wishing more information concerning absentee voting should contact their County Board of Voter Registration. At 2:00 p.m. on Election Day the County Election Commission will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601. On Friday, November 6, 2015 at 12 Noon, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in the Public Service District Elections. This hearing will be held at 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900 Greenville SC 29601. The following precincts and polling places will be involved in this election: Fountain Inn 1 Fountain Inn 2 Pineview Simpsonville Jones&Cooks

CITY OF FOUNTAIN INN Fountain Inn Civic Center Fountain Inn Activities Center Fountain Inn Activities Center Fountain Inn Activities Center Pine Grove Baptist Church

Conestee Greenbriar Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2

CITY OF MAULDIN Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S Main St Messiah Lutheran Church 1100 Log Shoals Rd Grace Covenant Pres Church 739 N Main St Forrester Woods Club House 424 Piney Grove Rd

315 N Main St 610 Fairview St 610 Fairview St 610 Fairview St 808 Gulliver St

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Gizmo Bar, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE, at 245 N. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 4, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Mauldin 3 Mauldin 4 Mauldin 5 Mauldin 6 Mauldin 7 Ranch Creek

Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S Main St Mauldin United Methodist Church 100 E Butler Rd Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 802 Miller Rd Ray Hopkins Senior Center Corn Rd@699 E Butler Rd Holland Park Church of Christ 1131Holland Rd Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S Main St

CITY OF SIMPSONVLLE Bridge Fork Kingdom Life Church 416 Holland Rd Hillcrest Kingdom Life Church 416 Holland Rd Moore Creek Westside Church 611 Richardson St Neely Farms Calvary Baptist Church 207 Davenport Rd Chapel Raintree Calvary Baptist Church 207 Davenport Rd Chapel Simpsonville 1 Simpsonville City Park Center 405 E Curtis St Simpsonville 2 Westside Church 611 Richardson St Simpsonville 3 Simpsonville United Meth Church 215 SE Main St Simpsonville 4 Westside Church 611 Richardson St Simpsonville 5 Center For Community Services 1102 Howard Dr Simpsonville 6 Calvary Baptist Church 207 Davenport Rd Chapel Standing Springs Westside Church 611 Richardson St Sycamore Simpsonville City Park Center 405 E Curtis St Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest 2

CITY OF TRAVELERS REST City Hall 6711 State Park Rd Renfrew Baptist Church 951 Geer Hwy

BELMONT FIRE & SANITATION DISTRICT Greenville 19 Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Greenville 23 Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Greenville 29 Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Belmont Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Conestee Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Donaldson Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Mauldin 1 Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Royal Oaks Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Mnt Pleasant Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd BEREA PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT Aiken Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Berea Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Enoree Berea fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Furman Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Lakeview Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Monaview Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Poinsett Saluda Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Sulphur Springs Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Westcliffe Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Westside Berea Fire Station 7401 White Horse Rd Dove Tree

BROOKFIELD SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT Dove Tree Club House 2 Sugarberry Dr

Dove Tree

BROOKFIELD SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT W/ WADE HAMPTON FIRE & SEWER Dove Tree Club House 2 Sugarberry Dr

Bells Crossing Circle Creek Holly Tree Kilgore Farms River Walk Sparrows Point Walnut Springs

CLEAR SPRING FIRE –RESCUE Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd Clear Spring Fire Station 3008 Woodruff Rd

DUNCAN CHAPEL FIRE DISTRICT Altamont Forest Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd Enoree Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd Furman Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd Paris Mtn Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd Poinsett Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd Travelers Rest 1 Duncan Chapel Fire Station 5111 Old Buncombe Rd GANTT FIRE SEWER & POLICE DISTRICT Greenville 16 Gantt Fire Station #1 1331 White Horse Rd Greenville 19 Gantt Fire Station #1 1331 White Horse Rd Belle Meade Gantt Fire Station #1 1331 White Horse Rd Belmont Gantt Fire Station #1 1331 White Horse Rd Carolina Gantt Fire Station #1 1331 White Horse Rd

Chestnut Hills Donaldson Grove Royal Oaks Southside Mnt Pleasant

Gantt Fire Station #1 Gantt Fire Station #1 Gantt Fire Station #1 Gantt Fire Station #1 Gantt Fire Station #1 Gantt Fire Station #1

1331 White Horse Rd 1331 White Horse Rd 1331 White Horse Rd 1331 White Horse Rd 1331 White Horse Rd 1331 White Horse Rd

GLASSY MOUNTAIN FIRE SERVICE AREA Gowensville Glassy Mountain Fire Station 2015 Hwy 11 Jennings Mill Glassy Mountain Fire Station 2015 Hwy 11 Maridell Glassy Mountain Fire Station 2015 Hwy 11 Tigerville Glassy Mountain Fire Station 2015 Hwy 11

Gowensville

FOOTHILLS FIRE SERVICE AREA with SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11

GLASSY MOUNTAIN FIRE SERVICE AREA with SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 GOWENSVILLE PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 Skyland Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 GOWENSVILLE PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT w/ SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11

Gowensville

Castle Rock Clear Creek Darby Ridge Fox Chase Frowhawk Gowensville Laurel Ridge Locust Hill Mountain View Oneal Sandy Flat Skyland Tigerville Tyger River

LAKE CUNNINGHAM FIRE DISTRICT Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station 2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station2802 N McElhaney Rd Lake Cunningham Fire Station2802 N McElahney Rd

NORTH GREENVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Altamont Forest North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Darby Ridge North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Maridell North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Mountain View North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Sandy Flat North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Travelers Rest 1 North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Travelers Rest 2 North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Tubbs Mountain North Greenville Fire Station #1 923 Tigerville Rd Ebenezer North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd Furman North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd Slater Marietta North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd Sulphur Springs North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd Travelers Rest 1 North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd Travelers Rest 2 North Greenville Fire Station #2 596 Hodgens Rd PARKER SEWER & FIRE SUB DISTRICT Aiken Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Carolina Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Chestnut Hills Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Greenville 06 Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Greenville 07 Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Greenville 08 Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Tanglewood Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Welcome Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Westcliffe Parker Fire Station #2 104 S Washington Ave Enoree Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Greenville 04 Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Lakeview Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Leawood Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Monaview Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd Paris Mountain Parker Fire Station #3 Poinsett Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Sevier Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd Westside Parker Fire Station #3 700 State Park Rd

PIEDMONT PARK FIRE DIDTRICT Altamont Forest Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Clear Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Darby Ridge Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Mountain Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Paris Mountain Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Pebble Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Sandy Flat Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd Sevier Piedmont Park Fire Station 2119 State Park Rd SLATER MARIETTA FIRE DISTRICT Ebenezer Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy Jennings Mill Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy Maridell Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy Slater Marietta Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy Tubbs Mountain Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy SLATER MARIETTA FIRE DISTRICT with MARIETTA WATER, FIRE, SANITATION & SEWER DISTRICT Ebenezer Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy Slater Marietta Slater Marietta Fire Station 3001 Geer Hwy SOUTH GREENVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Baker Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Conestee South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Donaldson South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Dunklin South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Fork Shoals South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Long Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Moore Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Neely Farms South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Ranch Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Reedy Fork South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Standing Springs South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Verdmont South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Ware Place South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer Woodmont South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer TAYLORS FIRE & SEWER DISTRICT Clear Creek Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Darby Creek Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Edwards Forest Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Locust Hill Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Laurel Ridge Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Mountain Creek Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Pebble Creek Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Stone Valley Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Wade Hampton Taylors Fire Station #1 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd Avon Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Brook Glen Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Del Norte Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Eastside Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Northwood Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Silverleaf Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd Suber Mill & Taylors Taylors Fire Station #2 405 Brushy Creek Rd TIGERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Maridell Tigerville Fire Station Mountain View Tigerville Fire Station Tigerville Tigerville Fire Station

2605 Hwy 414 2605 Hwy 414 2605 Hwy 414

WADE HAMPTON FIRE & SEWER DISTRICT Avon Wade Hampton Fire Station #1 2815 Wade Hampton Blvd Botany Woods Wade Hampton Fire Station #1 2815 Wade Hampton Blvd Brook Glenn Wade Hampton Fire Station #1 2815 Wade Hampton Blvd Timberlake Wade Hampton Fire Station #12815 Wade Hampton Blvd Wade Hampton Wade Hampton Fire Station #1 2815 Wade Hampton Blvd Devenger Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 1112 Pelham Rd Dove Tree Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 1112 Pelham Rd Greenville 24 Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 1112 Pelham Rd Mission Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 1112 Pelham Rd Palmetto Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 1112 Pelham Rd Del Norte Wade Hampton Fire Station #4 4211 E North St Northwood Wade Hampton Fire Station #4 4211 E North St Rock Hill Wade Hampton Fire Station #4 4211 E North St Spring Forest Wade Hampton Fire Station #4 4211 E North St Wellington Wade Hampton Fire Station #4 4211 E North St

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

OUR COMMUNITY COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA U.S. Sen. Tim Scott has announced that Greenville native Rachel Lewis is serving in his Greenville office internship program. Lewis, an upstate Special Olympian with Down syndrome, is mentioned frequently when Scott speaks about his opportunity agenda and his goal to help kids with special needs reach their educational goals. Rachel earned her high school diploma from Hidden Treasures Christian School in Taylors, and landed two jobs post-graduation.

NOTICE Powdersville Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact number 864295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in the Magistrates Office of Laurens County, SC. This mobile home is a 1969 Estate mobile home, Model MBH with serial number 24722854 and is located at 6025 Neely Ferry Road, Laurens, SC 29360. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is James M. Henderson, 810 Jenkins Bridge Rd., Simpsonville, SC 29680-7012.

The Center for Integrative Oncology and Survivorship at the Cancer Institute of Greenville Health System was recently named a Screening Center of Excellence by the Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA) for its commitment to responsible lung cancer screening. GHS Outpatient Radiology was also named a Screening Center of Excellence. Centers of Excellence comply with comprehensive standards based on best practices developed by professional bodies such as the American College of Radiology (ACR), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (I-ELCAP) in addition to providing clear information on who is a candidate for lung cancer screening. Local youth can demonstrate their football skills at the City of Greenville Parks & Recreation Department’s NFL Punt, Pass & Kick competition powered by USA Football on Sept. 20, beginning at 1:30 p.m. at the Greenville High School practice football field. The free competition is open to boys and girls ages 6-15. Participants can register and compete anytime within the 1:30-3 p.m. time slot or at nflppk.com. Visit the website for age divisions and requirements. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative Inc. helped celebrate its 75th anniversary by naming 75 members of the local community as “Bolts of Brightness.” The recipients were honored at the Madren Center in Clemson. Nominees who have volunteered their personal time to serve others in the community were selected and given $500 to be donated to the charitable organization of their choice. Better Business Bureau serving the Upstate recently named three new board members: James D. Jordon, president of Jordon Construction Company; Connie Caldwell, general manager at Carolina Heating Service of Greenville Inc.; and Jessica Sharp, diversity coordinator for Greenville Health System/University of SC School of Medicine Greenville. All three will serve a three-year term. Currently more than 25 Upstate business leaders serve on the BBB board. Victoria Valley Vineyards kicks off the celebration of its 10th anniversary with a daylong Vinestock 2015 Harvest Festival on Sept. 27 from noon to 8 p.m. The familyfriendly event will feature bands and local fare, including vineyard wines, The Bacon Bros. farm-to-table barbecue and Thomas Creek Brewery craft beer. Children’s events include games and a grape-stomping contest. Tickets for adults are $55, $20 for children and available at victoriavalleyvineyards.com through Sept. 24. The vineyard is located at 1360 S. Saluda Road, Cleveland, S.C.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

COMPLAINT NOTICES A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 200 Kondros Circle, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0253.00-01-001.17, Greenville County, SC. 114 Perry Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0170.00-04-007.00, Greenville County, SC. 6 F Street , Greenville County Tax Map Number 0530.02008.00, Greenville County, SC. 201 E Scenic Drive, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0492.00-01-022.00, Greenville County, SC. 205 E Scenic Drive A.K.A. Little Texas, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0492.00-01022.03, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before September 24, 2015. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2015, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time thereafter as other public hearings may be concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC REGARDING THE PROPOSED RELINQUISHMENT OF A RIGHTOF-WAY AT THE INTERSECTION OF NEELY FERRY ROAD (F0016) AND STENHOUSE ROAD; RIGHTOF-WAY TO BE CONVEYED TO THE ADJACENT PROPERTY OWNERS, BROTHERS FOUR. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2015, AT 6:00 p.m. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC REGARDING AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE GREENVILLE COUNTY STORMWATER ORDINANCE, AS AMENDED, RELATING TO NEW DEVELOPMENT AFTER THE COMPLETION OF A TIMBER HARVEST IN ACCORDNACE WITH STATE LAW. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE CIVIL CASE NUMBER: 2015CV2310701052 CIVIL CASE NUMBER IN THE MAGISTRATE’S COURT Washington Holdings, LLC/ Laura Wells 26 Draper St. Greenville, SC 29611 PLAINTIFF(S) vs. Unregistered in SC 1991 Horton Mobile Home VIN: H931846 DEFENDANT(S) The above captioned matter came before the Court by the filing of a Motion for Publication on September 4, 2015. This court makes the following findings of fact in this matter.  The plaintiff, Washington Holdings, LLC/Laura Wells, has provided sufficient evidence by way of sworn affidavit that he/ she has diligently attempted to serve a Defendant.  Pursuant to Rule of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure and SC Code 29-15-10, Plaintiff is entitled to an Order of Publication to achieve service of process on UNREGISTERED IN SC 1991 Horton Mobile Home, VIN: H931846.  Publication must be made in one newspaper of general circulation, to appear once a week for not less than three weeks.  Now, therefore, IT IS ORDERED, that the Plaintiff is granted the right to serve the Defendant, and all others by publication.  IT IS SO ORDERED.  Greenville, South Carolina Judge Jonathan D. Anders September 4, 2015

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT C.A. No.:2015-DR-23-3295 NOTICE OF PROCEEDINGS TO JUDD STEWART You have been notified pursuant to SC Code Ann Sec.15-9-710, that custody proceedings have been initiated under the abovereferenced case number by Aleyda Stewart. YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS: 1. That within thirty (30) days of receiving notice you shall respond in writing by filing with the Clerk of Court at 180 Magnolia Street, Spartanburg South Carolina 29306, notice and reasons to contest, intervene or otherwise respond; 2. That the Court must be informed of your current address and any change of address during the custody proceedings. 3. That failure to file a response within thirty (30) days of receiving notice will constitutes judgment by default rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile) Attorney for Plaintiff

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG CASE NO.: 2015-CP-42-1301 BESSIE SMITH, Plaintiff, v. JESSY LYNN APPEL AND SAMMY L SMITH, Defendant. IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, SC 29603

NOTICE Powdersville Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact number 864-295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in the Magistrates Office of Laurens County, SC. This mobile home is a 1993 Fleetwood mobile home, Model GALF with serial number GAFLP75A17981WE and is located at 6025 Neely Ferry Road, Laurens, SC 29360. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is Ricky Dale Pace, 6025 Neely Ferry Rd., Laurens, SC 29360.

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 10/3/15, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: B193, Angie F Chapman, Furniture, clothing, boxes misc. 2. Unit: A195, Angie F Chapman, Misc baby/child items 3. Unit: A020, Mark Bradberry, Misc. Golf and Misc. household 4. Unit: B253, Dannette H Greene, Misc. Household items 5. Unit: B317, Hernan Gomez, Misc. Sports items automotive 6. Unit: B167, Mary Wicker, Misc. Household 7. Unit: B312, Lashmeir Norman, Misc. boxes and bags 8. Unit: B319, Larry Cromer, Misc. tools and automotive items. 9. Unit: A016, Laura H Parker, Misc clothes and household 10. Unit: B315, Andre Tolbert, Misc household furniture 11. Unit: D010, Andy D Reeves, Misc. Household items 12. Unit: B288, Gene Dinkins, Boxes bags misc. 13. Unit: B110, Nartarsha L Miles, Misc. clothing

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Hollow Dive Bar Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR, at 3500 B Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 20, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Pivot Pizza Company, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE, at 99 Cleveland Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 20, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Circle K Stores, Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE, at the following locations. 485 HAYWOOD RD GREENVILLE 29607 429 WADE HAMPTON BLVD GREENVILLE 29609 3713 EAST NORTH ST GREENVILLE 29615 1001 WOODRUFF RD GREENVILLE 29607 7901 WHITE HORSE RD GREENVILLE 29617 820 CHURCH ST GREENVILLE 29601 906 HAYWOOD RD GREENVILLE 29615 5010 PELHAM RD GREENVILLE 29615 1814 WOODRUFF RD GREENVILLE 29607 1609 WEST BLUE RIDGE GREENVILLE 29611 To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 20, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line • ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 • email aharley@communityjournals.com


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

LOOK

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

ZACHARY HANBY / CONTRIBUTING

Clemson safety Jayron Kearse intercepts a pass in the first quarter. Clemson defeated Appalachian State 41-10 last Saturday at Memorial Stadium in Clemson.

Lady Antebellum entertains the crowd at Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

ZACHARY HANBY / CONTRIBUTING

Last Saturday, the waterpark went to the dogs. More than 230 dogs enjoyed a day of fun in the pools, celebrating Greenville County Rec’s “Waggin’ at the Waterpark.” Discovery Island hosted this event, which is the first of two this month. The next event is Saturday, Sept. 26 at Otter Creek. To register, visit greenvillesc.com.

Clemson players run down the hill.

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Tailgaters enjoy the atmosphere at Clemson.

Leadership Pendleton P $14,000 plu build a deck as purchase furniture for


COMMUNITY | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

PHOTOS PROVIDED

PHOTOS PROVIDED

Palmetto Elementary School celebrated International Literacy Day this year by having a Character Day. Students and teachers dressed up as beloved storybook characters, paraded throughout the school, and celebrated their love of literacy and learning. Assistant principal John Economou with first-graders.

Greenville Class 41’s Place Project Team raised us in-kind donations to k and a patio, as well e a grill and outdoor r playing and relaxing.

PROVIDED

Charlotte Conklin’s kindergarten class.

Former President Bill Clinton arrived at the Greenville Downtown Airport on Monday to attend the funeral of Helen Burns, mother of civil rights leader Jesse Jackson.

PROVIDED

USC PHOTOS BY LINDSAY HICKMAN / CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOS PROVIDED

Coaches Steven Spurrier and Mark Stoops have a talk during pregame warmups. Kentucky defeated South Carolina 26-22 last Saturday at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia.

Gamecock wide receiver Jarell Adams marches into the end zone for a fourth-quarter touchdown to cut the Kentucky lead down to two points.

To celebrate the season finale of TV’s “American Ninja Warrior,” 429 children, including many Shriners Hospitals for Children patients, took part in an all-abilities obstacle course this week. In addition, they had the chance to meet four contestants: Chris Moore, Sean Clayton, Matt Jordan and Miles Avery. The Ninja Warriors signed autographs and cheered on the course participants. Pictured from L to R are American Ninja Warrior contestants Sean Clayton, Miles Avery and Matt Jordan with Shriners patient Wyatt Banks.


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | COMMUNITY

Tailgating grilling tips that help fight cancer CRYSTAL LANGLOIS | CONTRIBUTOR

One of the keys to maintaining a healthy diet is by consuming a mix of nutrients from both meat and plant sources. While preparing certain meats properly on the grill while tailgating can provide for a tasty meal, the availability of more plantbased foods offers additional opportunities to cook healthy, unique dishes. Although convenient, you must also remember that grilling has its risks. In addition to the well-known issue of food-borne illness from undercooked meats, increasing evidence suggests over-cooked foods can contain carcinogens – especially food items that are charred, burned or blackened. As you are planning your football tailgate, here are some sensible tips for eating and cooking healthy. • Aim to keep portions of red meat (beef, pork or lamb) to three ounces or less, no more than five times per week. Choose lean cuts and trim the fat. Avoid processed meats such as ham, bacon, hot dogs, sausages and deli meats. When you do purchase them, try to find the nitrate/nitrite free versions. • Although red meats are a good source of protein, they are also high in calories,

cholesterol and saturated fat. Red meats also contain compounds that can be related to cellular damage and can form carcinogens when preserved by smoking, curing, salting or adding preservatives. • Cooking “muscle meats” (including beef, pork, fish or poultry) at high temperatures can also produce carcinogens, especially in areas where meat may become charred or blackened; the risk of carcinogens forming is higher for processed and red meats. • Marinade meat for at least 30 minutes to help protect against the formation of carcinogens and improve flavor. A mixture of vinegar, juices, spices and herbs (such as pineapple juice, brown sugar, garlic, apple cider vinegar, ginger, red pepper flakes) makes a nice marinade. • Pre-cook meats in the oven to reduce the time spent on the grill. When grilling, flip meats frequently to avoid charring, and be sure to cut off any charred areas before eating. • To reduce the risk of food-borne infection, ensure meats are fully cooked with no pink inside; juices should be clear. • Clean the grill after each use to pre-

SCORE BIG!

Susan McMillen

672B Fairview Road, Simpsonville, SC W NE ING! T S I L

FAIRVIEW LAKE 3BR/2BA RANCH, LAKESIDE, 3-SEASON ROOM, SWEET! #1308466 • $156,900*

• Tofu, tempeh and plant-based burgers are not only lower in calories and fat than meat, but are also good sources of protein and other important nutrients. • Fruits and vegetables can be grilled to add a new twist to your tailgate favorites. • Other plant-based grilled meals include bean burgers, stuffed Portobello mushrooms and flatbread with grilled vegetables. • Add a salad with leafy greens or a dessert of berries or melon. When it comes to cooking, take advantage of all this season has to offer. With a little imagination, your tailgate can be healthy, balanced and delicious. Crystal Langlois, RD, CSO, LD, is a registered dietitian and board-certified specialist in oncology nutrition with Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Newnan, Ga.

vent harmful chemicals from building up and transferring to your next meal. • Place punctured aluminum foil over the grill to prevent flare ups. But as much as you might like grilling meat, numerous studies show that increasing your intake of plant-based foods (fruits and vegetables) is a great way to improve health and maintain a healthy weight. In fact, the American Cancer Society reports that excess body weight contributes to as many as 1 in 5 cancer-related deaths. So eating more plant-based foods can not only help you maintain a healthy weight, but by doing so can also reduce your risk of cancer. Eating more plant-based foods doesn’t have to be difficult – and you can prepare many of them on the grill too. Some good examples include:

REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

W NE ING! T S I L

SADDLERS RIDGE 3(4)BR/2BA W/UPDATED KIT! FENCED BACK! NICE! #1299370 • $157,900*

LONG CREEK PLNTN 3(4)BR/2.5BA W/EXTRAS, NEW HVAC, SS APPL & MORE!, #1307499 • $196,900*

AUTUMN TRACE 3BR/2.5BA W/OFFICE, UNBELIEVABLE UPGRADES. #1305080 • $224,900

W NE ING! T S I L

W NE ING! T S I L

HERITAGE POINT 4BR/3.5BA PLUS LOFT, SUPER SPACIOUS, MOVE-IN NOW #1304381 • $259,900

SHENANDOAH FARMS 4BR/3BA, ONE BR ON MAIN, 2-STORY GREAT RM PLUS FRMLS! #1302391 • $264,900

*INDICATES PROPERTY IS ELIGIBLE FOR 100% USDA FINANCING

HOLLY TRACE 3(4)BR/2.5BA, LARGE CDS LOT, SCRN PORCH, READY NOW! #1306150 • $274,900

FOWLER FIELDS 3(OR 4)BR/3BA, LARGE LOT, GREAT LOCATION! #1301242 • $234,900

HIDDEN ACRES 4BR/3BA, MASTER+1 ON MAIN! 6 ACRES! #1295192 • $299,900*

LIST YOUR HOME HERE!

CALL SUSAN NOW!

864-238-5498


HOME

On The Market • Open Houses • Design • Trends

FEATURED HOME

1 Cromwell Avenue, Judges Alley

HOME INFO

Judge’s Alley sets the new standard for elegance and location. Nestled among the mature oaks of Alta Vista neighborhood, these high-end homes lie between Crescent Avenue and Augusta Road. Homes offer convenient access to museums, art galleries, recreation, boutiques and fine restaurants. This newly constructed home offers families a floorplan that maximizes living space and unique needs. This spacious home features a large Master Bedroom on Main Level with large walk-in closet and Master Bath. Upstairs you will find 3 large bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms and a bonus room. Other amenities include a office, 2-car garage, and large screened in porch. Don’t miss this amazing opportunity to be part of Judge’s Alley, best in location and style!

Price: $825,000 Sq. Ft.: 3492 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary, Hughes Middle, Greenville High Patrick Franzen | 864.250.1234 Highland Homes | highlandhomessc.com

The only real estate website you’ll need, no matter what you’re searching on!

Search by School or Subdivision Advanced Criteria Search Sort by Newest Listings First

GREENVILLEMOVES.COM


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

OPEN SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 FROM 2–4PM

FIVE FORKS AREA

WESTCHESTER

1021 BENNETT’S BRIDGE ROAD . $795,000 . MLS#1300026

147 BRIGHTON CIRCLE . $365,500 . MLS#1303499

132 HAMMETT POND CT . $349,900 . MLS#1296571

10 LOOKOUT LANE . $349,000 . MLS#1307766

5BR/4B 10+ acre private estate with stock pond, IG pool and full seven seat theater. Minutes from 85. Huge Price Reduction! Batesville L AndersonRidge, L south bennett’s bridge, l bennett’s bridge

3BR/3.5B Gorgeous brick/stacked stone home. Large & inviting family room. From Hwy 153, take Powdersville Rd. Turn left onto Wexford and 1st left onto Brighton Circle. Home on left.

4BR/3.5B Proven floor plan for entertainment coupled with decorator paint colors, updated lighting and culde-sac ideal for recreation! Old Spartanburg Road to Hammett Road; LT in Hammett Pond.

4BR/3.5B Classic PebbleCreek living. Traditional, custom built, 2-story full brick home. Rutherford Road to Stallings Road.Right on MountainCreek Church Road. Fairway View is third subdivision on Right. Lookout Lane on Left.

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Contact: Cate Thompson 567-9744 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Stephanie Miller 915-6076 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Carlyle Gillis 915-7288 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

CROFTSTONE

SILVERLEAF

TOWNES @ HIGHGROVE

VERDMONT

111 BROUGHTON DR . $319,999 . MLS#1306289

108 FIRETHORNE CT . $309,900 . MLS#1307894

30 DILLWORTH CT . $293,000 . MLS#1305147

208 CLAIRHILL COURT . $269,900 . MLS#1307018

3BR/2B Charming, cottage style, all on one floor. North Main Area. From Downtown Greenville, N. Main, right on Rutherford, left on Broughton.

6BR/3B Amazing cul-de-sac home has so much to offer. Riverside District! Silverleaf subdivision on the east side of Greenville!

3BR/3.5B Desirable end unit with extra parking pad next to unit. Woodruff Road south, Left on Batesville at FiveForks right into SD. Right into condos- Right then first right on Dillworth.

4BR/2.5B Hard to find backyard in this charming, pedestrian friendly community. Open floor plan, tons of storage and sprawling backyard! Turn right into Verdmont from Neely Ferry. Home on Right.

Contact: Annie Adams 341-9677 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Taylor Garrett 363-3705 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Tammy Copeland 404-0013 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Melissa Morrell 918-1734 Berkshire Hathway HomeServices

CHANTICLEER

WADE HAMPTON AREA

c r e a t o r s

athome

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES FOR SALE communityjournals.com High A JAPANESE-STYLE SPA AWAITS IN ASHEVILLE, NC

Georgia Belle INDULGE IN SAVANNAH’S MAJESTIC GARDENS, ARCHITECTURE & FOOD

PEBBLE CREEK

ON THE MARKET

o f

G 2015 SPRING SPRIN

Zen Treasure

HAMMETT POND

112 HIDDEN HILLS DR. . $748,500 . MLS#1306736

104 OAKWOOD AVE. . $149,900 . MLS#1305573

5BR/4.5B Beautiful golf course home. Updated w/up and down masters. Gorgeous granite, commercial grade stainless appliances. Abundant living spaces. Inviting outdoor living spaces. Two-car garage.

4BR/2.5B Adorable traditional brick home with a large beautiful yard. Screened-in porch & deck off the kitchen, fireplace in family room, some hardwood floors, tile bath and storage building in back.

Contact: Tom Marchant 449-1658 The Marchant Company

Contact: Gordon D. Seay 444-4359 The Marchant Company

Retreat FIND YOUR PERFECT STAY IN NATURE’S BEST SCENERY

50thIssue

CELEBRATING OUR

JUNE 2 015 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

PE OPLE , AWA R D S , HONOR S

TOWN_JUNE_Cover.indd 1 5/18/15 7:09 PM

Great Southern Homes CEO Mike Satterfield Returns to the Upstate and Partners with Coldwell Banker Caine Hometown businessman and Great Southern Homes CEO, Mike Satterfield, recently expanded the company’s home building organization to the Upstate. Great Southern Home partnered with Coldwell Banker Caine to market their homes throughout the Upstate. As a Greenville native who grew up in the Sans Souci area, Satterfield has over 35 years of experience in the construction industry.

He brings with him a wealth of knowledge on all aspects of home building, from land development to exceeding customer expectations in the quality homes he builds. In 1999 and 2003, the Columbia Sales and Marketing Council names Satterfield “Builder Executive of the Year”. He was honored by the March of Dimes as the recipient of the 2004 Columbia Real Estate Award, which is earned

by those individuals and companies whose real estate activities have significantly enhanced the local community. In 2003 and 2005 he received the prestigious designation “Certified New Home Builder”, from J.D. Power and Associates for achieving and maintaining high levels of customer satisfaction, providing an “outstanding home ownership experience” in the Greenville and Columbia markets.

“We are pleased to welcome back Mike to his hometown and are thrilled to partner with Great Southern Homes,” said Brad Halter, Chairman of Coldwell Banker Caine. “The company’s commitment to building quality homes that exceed customer expectations paired with our dedication to provide superior service will make for a successful partnership in the Upstate market.”


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

CONTACT INFO Contact: Cothran Homes | 864.214.3024 CothranHomes.com

Neighborhood Address: 201 Elmshorn Rd., Greer, SC 29650 To submit your Neighborhood Profile: homes@greenvillejournal.com

The Townes at Thornblade, Greer, SC Enjoy the freedom of home ownership at The Townes at Thornblade, a gated, maintenance-free townhome community located just off I-85 in Greer. There are three unique two story floorplans to choose from, ranging in size from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each Townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an Owner’s Suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2 1/2 baths. The floorplans are designed to maximize usable space and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, fourth bedroom and third full bath.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Community Size: Approx. 60 homes Amenities: Private Gated Access, Landscapes & Irrigated Grounds, Street Lights, & Community Pool. Schools: Buena Vista Elementary Norhtwood Middle Riverside High School Available Homeplans: The Primrose – 2,449 sq. ft. 3 Beds / 2.5 Bath Starting at $266,900 The Barberry – 2,742 sq. ft. 3 Beds / 2.5 Baths Starting at $284,900 The Heather – 2,672 sq. ft. 4 Beds / 3.5 Baths Starting at $298,900


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

This Weeks Listings! 218 Rice Street An Augusta Road Charmer!

218 Rice Street, Greenville, SC 29605 $499,000 - MLS# 1307597 - 3 Beds / 3½ Bath / Bonus Rm / Fenced Yard Agent: Debra Owensby / 864.608.4608

G

TIN

LIS

F

NEW CONSTRUCTION SOON, ON HOMESITE #9!

36 Windfare Pass, Greenville, SC 29609 | $769,000 Currently Customizable / Approx. 3000 sq-ft Home / 4 Beds / 4 Bath Luxurious master on main level / Full basement / Stunning mountain views Agent: Stan Tzouvelekas / 864.630.5252 - Only a few homesites left!!

Buyers of New Construction Still Need Services of a Realtor Consumers pay the same price if they “go direct” with a builder As the real estate market has rebounded, consumers have demanded new construction. In fact, about 30 percent of the home-buying public, at any given time, wants to purchase new construction if it’s available. One the most common misconceptions about buying new construction is that you don’t need the services of a Realtor. “If you ever need the representation of a Realtor, it is before, during and after the construction of a new home,” said Pat Riley, CEO and president, Allen Tate Companies, in the September-October edition of Carolinas Market Update, a bi-monthly real estate video series. Many new construction buyers are surprised to learn that the cost of the home is the same, whether they use a Realtor or “go direct” with a builder. A builder’s marketing fee is built into the price of the home. And while a builder’s representative is often helpful and knowledgeable, they are loyal to the builder’s interests – not the buyer’s. A Realtor will serve as a trusted advocate for the buyer, in matters from lot selection, plans and change orders, to financing options and coordinating a home’s completion with the sale of the buyer’s existing home. “The representation of a Realtor when you are buying new construction costs you no more than if you go it alone and assume all the risk,” said Riley. Carolinas Market Update is targeted to consumers in the Charlotte, Triad, Research Triangle and Upstate S.C. regions. It is produced every other month by the Allen Tate Companies and features information, statistics, trends and predictions about the real estate market in North and South Carolina. To access the latest Carolinas Market Update, go to the Allen Tate YouTube channel (www. youtube.com/theallentatecompany) or contact any Allen Tate Realtor®.

Protect your world Auto • Home • Life • Retirement

OPEN HOUSE: SUNDAYS, 2-4PM

7 Jenkinson Court, Greenville, SC 29605 $549,900 MLS#: 1288754 - 4 Beds / 3½ Bath / 2600 sq-ft / 0.14 Acres Agent: Tracy Harris / 864.423.1200

Call me today to discuss your options. Some people think Allstate only protects your car. Truth is, Allstate can also protect your home or apartment, your boat, motorcycle - even your retirement and your life. And the more of your world you put in Good Hands®, the more you can save.

ANDREA BOLGER 864-241-1221

1948 AUGUSTA STREET GREENVILLE, SC 29605 andrea.bolger@allstate.com

16 North Main Street, Greenville SC ConservusRealty.com | 864.608.4608

Insurance subject to terms, qualifications and availability. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Co., Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co., Allstate Indemnity Co., Allstate Vehicle and Property Insurance Co., Northbrook Indemnity Co. Life insurance and annuities issued by Lincoln Benefit Life Company, Lincoln, NE, Allstate Life Insurance Company, Northbrook, IL. In New York, Allstate Life Insurance Company of New York, Hauppauge, NY. Northbrook, IL. © 2010 Allstate Insurance Co.

143370

D

RE

TU EA

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION!

PE OPLE, AWARDS , HONORS


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Mary Praytor (864) 593-0366 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com (864) 527-4505 la nsu eni res p ate ac Privw/55

Ne wL ist ing

s ou rgeme o G Ho

Ne wL ist ing

w/ ck ies i r B t All meni A

Sig na tur e

100 Woodbine Rd. • Lake Greenwood

112 Hidden Hills • Chanticleer

205 River Walk Blvd. - River Walk

$1,225,000 • 1304750 • 4 BR 4.5 Ba

$748,500 • 1306736 • 4.5 BA

$395,000 • 1308350 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

ed ish Fin Bath & / nus r w +Bo d Floo r 3

Ne wL ist ing

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

t en en on i v i n Co ocat L

Sig na tur e

Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com

ge ara s G ar nu 3-Cw/Bo

Ne wL ist ing

le Tab s k oo erl ock Ov R

Sig na tur e

8255 Geer Highway - Caesars Head $393,900 • 1302748 • 3BR/2BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

pen t O lan a e p Gr loor F

Ne wL ist ing

102 Four Lakes Dr. - Middle Creek

436 S. Lakeview Dr. - Silver Lake

9 Redfree Dr. - Gilder Creek Farm

118 Garfield Ln. - Bryson Meadows

$387,500 • 1300079 • 4BR/3BA/2Hf BA

$300,000 • 1306999 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$259,000 • 1307896 • 4BR/3BA

$216,900 • 1307648 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com

! on ati ols! c o L at cho Grereat S G

Ne wL ist ing

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

, on ati 0k c o 1 L at ed $ Greeduc R

405 Woolridge Way - Hammett Crossing 925 Cleveland St. #152 - Riverbend Condos $175,900 • 1308102 • 3BR/2BA

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com Chuck Miller • (864) 293-4778 • cmillergsp@aol.com

Rs 3 B BAs 2.5

$165,000 • 1306176 • 3BR/2BA

Nellie Wagoner • (864) 423-3939 • nellie@marchantco.com

n tio en tors! t t A ves In

Mikel-Ann Scott • (864) 630-2474 • mikelann@marchantco.com Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com

use ho n Tow at e r G

Ne wL ist ing

Ne wL ist ing

119 Franklin Dr. - Central

$112,900 • 1308341 • 2BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$99,900 • 1307695 • 3BR/2BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly • (864) 414-1688 • jolenewim@aol.com

ly, On per h s p Ca er U Fix

Ne wL ist ing

53 E. Castle Dr. - Pine Hill Village

219 Pleasant Ridge Ave. - Pleasant Ridge

155 Dogwood Dr. - Dogwood Acres

$79,888 • 1307374 • 4BR/2BA

44,900 • 1307995 • 3BR/1BA/1Hf BA

John Stanislawski • (864) 660-9118 • johnstan@marchantco.com

t en tud ntial S on te ms ng Po e l C usi Ho

302 Cumulus Ct. - Reserve at Riverside

$92,500 • 1305778 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Mary Praytor • (864) 593-0366 • marypraytor@gmail.com

James Akers, Jr. • (864) 325-8413 • james@jamesakersjr.com

Kathy Slayter • (864) 982-7772 • kslayter@charter.net Fannie Mae Owned

James Akers, Jr. • (864) 325-8413 • james@jamesakersjr.com

om dro tial e 3 B oten P

Ne wL ist ing

402 Pendleton Rd. - Greenville $33,900 • 1307972 • 1BR/1BA

Kathy Slayter • (864) 982-7772 • kslayter@charter.net Fannie Mae Owned

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

and healthy I’ve Moved! Homegrown A former chef turns his mobile market on food deserts I’d Love to Help You Move Too.

only that which is in highFall is in the air. What a Guest columnist est peak and of that pargreat time to be out and ticular season. The day about enjoying all that the I found Adam, he was fall season and the garden selling butternut squash harvest have to offer. just picked the day beI was out trolling around fore. He also had eggplant, recently and found myself late-season tomatoes, a up in Travelers Rest on a with Kathy Slayter variety of peppers and gorgeous weekday mornsummer squash. He also ing. I happened upon a supplies local honey, freeMobile Market, “Connectrange eggs, locally made ing Farms to Families” hot sauce and BBQ sauce splashed on the side of the as well as freshly stonetruck, the latest in a wave of ground cornmeal and alternative shopping expebaking mixes, and highriences popping up all over quality salt from Charlesour county. The owner of ton’s salty waters. Wow. this mobile market is Adam Experts have long sugSturm, and here is his story. gested that eating what is Adam was a chef at a in season, the freshest we popular local restaurant and was stirred in 2014 to change his can find, is our healthiest alternative. livelihood by investing in this mobile After the truck is all stocked up, it travmarket. He told me he goes weekly to six els to various inner-city neighborhoods locally owned organic farms that offer that are considered “food deserts,” where him their highest-quality produce and Adam sells his wares and shares his knowledge. The circle of life from farm to have the best “sustainable” practices. Sustainable agriculture can be defined As soon as Labor Day as the production of passes, sedum flowers food, fiber or other burst into glorious color. plant or animal products using farming techniques that protect the environment, public health, human communities and animal welfare. These farms are all within a 30-mile radius of downtown Greenville. Adam goes to the farms to pick up his produce, selecting

SEE YOU IN THE GARDEN

Cynthia Serra, Realtor© (864) 304-3372 cserra@cbcaine.com

“It’s not about the transaction, it’s about the relationship.”

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com

Seasons Change. (Your decor should too!) New Fall & Seasonal Items Arriving Daily

www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960

table is complete. If you want more information, look up Connecting Farms to Families Mobile Market by going to adamsmobilemarket.com. Meanwhile, your fall garden seedlings should be up and getting established. Mine are. A good friend reminds me that per Clemson Extension, you should have all your fall veggies planted by Sept. 15 so they have time to establish themselves before the expected first frost date of Oct. 15. You can push this date a little, but not by much. Readily available now in the big box stores, feed and seed stores, and local nurseries are plant sets of broccoli, cabbage, collards, cauliflower, lettuces, spinach, onion sets and Brussels sprouts to fill up the empty spaces in your garden beds. Ornamental kales and mums look pretty too. If you have a patio garden, try lettuce in pots. Also, planting garlic is a must in the fall, and simple to do. Just go buy some garlic bulbs (yes, at your local grocery store), break the heads up into cloves and stick them in rows in the garden. Garlic needs 40 or more cold days below 40 degrees in order for the clove you put in the ground to split into a bulb. Garlic requires a well-balanced soil that is loose enough for the bulb to grow. Plant the cloves 4 inches deep and about 6 inches apart. If this sparks your interest, read all about it online. The garlic will be ready to harvest next summer. Growing your own garlic is sure to make you feel like a successful gardener. I encourage you to plant some in your own garden. Some pests don’t like the smell of garlic, so I always plant mine on the perimeter of the beds. As I wander through the garden, I am beginning to notice the subtle changes in color of the foliage. The sedum is especially spectacular; it hangs around all summer rather boring, but as soon as Labor Day passes, its flower heads burst into glorious color. I believe we too are like the plants in the garden. Our spirit stirs as we sense a change coming. As the days shorten and darkness descends be aware of the subtle shifts in nature and in yourself. See you in the garden. Kathy Slayter is a Greenville Realtor and third-generation gardener who became a Clemson-certified Master Gardener in 2007. She is passionate about growing, cooking and eating her homegrown food.


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO 31 Homesites Amenities: Gated Community Sq. Ft.: 2070, 2588, 2705

It’s here! Cottages at Riverbirch

Schools: Keowee Elementary Walhalla Middle and Walhalla High School Contact Information: Lake Keowee Real Estate | 864.886.0098 LakeKeoweeRealEstate.com LakeKeoweeOffice@gmail.com

Buyers from all over the country have been asking for it, so Crescent Communities and Lake Keowee Real Estate are here to deliver! We are introducing a new cottage concept for Lake Keowee Living called The Cottages at Directions: Take Hwy 123 towards Clemson, Turn Right on Riverbirch. This gated, planned community consists of 31 wooded, waterfront home sites in a low-maintenance Hwy 28, Turn Right on Hwy 188 (Keowee School Road), community. Craftsman-style cottages with exposed beams and stone entry are now being offered in three attractive Sharp Right on Knox Road, then Left onto Elderberry Way. models, all with open floor plans and beautiful outdoor living spaces. Buyers have recently been saying that “less is more” and so this community will offer floor plans of 2070, 2588 and 2705 finished square feet, rather than the traditional larger home sizes found in our lakefront communities. In order to make it easy for our buyers, lot surveys are already done, dock permit applications have already been made for all lots, septic permits are on file with SC DHEC, and financial institutions are prepared to start lending money for this construction project. And if you aren’t ready to build yet, you can buy the lot now and build at a later date.

AVAILABLE HOMEPLANS:

Trillium - 2070 sf 3 BR / 4 BA Starting at $310,000*

Sassafras - 2588 sf 3 BR / 4 BA Starting at $385,000*

Mulberry - 2705 sf 3 BR / 4 BA Starting at $399,000* *Lot prices not included

Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner,

REALTORS

®

LISA ROURK 561-1884 PELHAM ROAD

JANIE GIBBS 901-3403 GARLINGTON ROAD

DONNA STEGALL 414-1212 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

LINDA BROWN 884-0966 SIMPSONVILLE

AMY RAY 678-5265 AUGUSTA ROAD

ROBBIE HANEY 270-4192 N. PLEASANTBURG DR.

MIKE GREENE 879-4239 GREER

CHRIS RODRIGUEZ 908-9531 DOWNTOWN

KELLY MUELLER 402-9695 PROP. MGMT.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T I O N S

FO R T H E W E E K O F AUGUST 1 7  2 1 , 2 0 1 5 TOP TRANSFERS OF THE WEEK

ALTA VISTA - $740,000 600 Crescent Ave, Greenville

SPAULDING FARMS - $682,000 234 Northbrook Way, Greenville

WATSON ORCHARD - $660,000 6 Darien Way, Greenville

GRIFFITH FARM - $625,000 136 Griffith Hill Way, Greer

NORTH PARK - $585,000 13 Gallivan St, Greenville

HAMMETT CREEK - $580,000 6 Claymore Ct, Greer

GLEN ABBEY - $570,000 106 Glen Abbey Way, Greer

ALLEGHENY - $515,000 304 Allegheny Run, Simpsonville

BELLAGIO - $490,000 14 Bellagio Way, Greer

SCHWIERS GARDENS - $480,000 840 Cleveland St, Greenville

FIVE FORKS PLANTATION - $425,000 10 Chicora Wood Ln, Simpsonville

TERRACE ACRES - $419,000 104 Lyons Ct, Simpsonville

SUBD.

PRICE

SUBER RD & HAMMETT BRIDGE RD $3,120,000 $2,819,167 $1,175,000 $803,000 CAPER’S PLACE $750,000 ALTA VISTA $740,000 STONE HOLLOW $714,900 $700,000 SPAULDING FARMS $682,000 $660,000 WATSON ORCHARD $660,000 GRIFFITH FARM $625,000 $600,000 NORTH PARK $585,000 HAMMETT CREEK $580,000 $575,000 GLEN ABBEY $570,000 ALLEGHENY $515,000 BELLAGIO $490,000 SCHWIERS GARDENS $480,000 $430,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $425,000 TERRACE ACRES $419,000 PRESERVE AT PARKINS MILL $418,500 $417,000 PARIS GLEN $410,000 $400,000 LAUREL GROVE $393,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $388,000 ASHETON LAKES $375,000 KILGORE FARMS $372,000 CARISBROOKE $369,000 CARISBROOKE $369,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $360,000 STRATTON PLACE $343,000 SUNSET HILLS $325,000 HARRISON HILLS $325,000 HARTS COVE $323,890 COACHWOOD FOREST $305,000 WOODLAND RIDGE $303,869 TUSCAN WOODS $301,000 SILVER RIDGE $292,000 BELSHIRE $287,585 COACHMAN PLANTATION $287,000 HOLLY TRACE $285,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $285,000 HIGHLAND CREEK $284,000 $276,867 $270,000 TUSCANY FALLS $269,390 DOVE TREE $269,000 $265,000 $260,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $260,000 BRUSHY MEADOWS $257,000 $255,500 OAK GLEN $254,150 CARRINGTON GREEN $251,500 WADE HAMPTON TERRACE $250,000 KELSEY GLEN $249,900 AMBER OAKS FARM $244,734 SILVER RIDGE $243,000 OAKS@GILDER CREEK FARM $240,000 BRUSHY MEADOWS $240,000 MORNING MIST $240,000 SHADY FORD $239,170 OAK MONT $237,500 CREEKWOOD $235,000 ORCHARD FARMS $233,000 $232,500 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $230,000 DEVENGER PLACE $230,000 ENOREE TRACE $225,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $222,583 FOX TRACE $220,713 $220,000 HERITAGE CREEK $220,000 SQUIRES CREEK $217,000 SUGAR CREEK $216,500 RABON CHASE $215,000 FORRESTER COVE $215,000 WATSON CROSSING $215,000 PARKSIDE AT LISMORE $212,000 DEVENGER PLACE $210,000 HAMMETT CROSSING $210,000 MORNING MIST FARM $205,201 PLANTERS ROW $203,000 RICHGLEN $202,000 AUTUMN TRACE $200,000 GOWER ESTATES $199,500 ISAQUEENA PARK $197,200

SELLER RYLAND PROPERTIES LLC CHI-CONGAREE GREENVILLE HT USA INC A DELAWARE CO CONNECTOR HOLDINGS LLC CARRIE’S PLACE LLC WINBURN CATHERINE M (JTW BEASLEY ROGER W KASTLER LESA A KELLY JANET JOHNSON DE FAMILY LLC CLOVER CARYL L REV LIVIN HIGHFILL MONICA L JS ACQUISITIONS LLC MASSEY EDWARD KUKURA JOHN A FENNELL PATRICIA A VON WALDNER KAREN BRIDWELL AMY L (JTWROS) BEERMAN CURT R MCCOY CHARLES R JR SIMPSONVILLE MEDICAL OFF KRZYWOZYCKI CHERI J (JTW SIZEMORE JEFFREY D COOPER KENNETH L (JTWROS COX RONALD C JR KILPATRICK CATHERINE C HYDI DEVELOPERS LLC RAMSEY DAVID W NESEMEIER BRIAN J BURKS DAWN W SCHMIDT ERIC C ROSINSKI MARY D (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WYMAN BRANT E JOHNSON DOROTHY GOODEN ANNE M WIELOCH JOHN RELIANT SC LLC HOLBROOK MARK L D R HORTON INC THOMPSON KYLE WILLIAMS REBECCA H NVR INC MORZILLO JOANNE (JTWROS) BREWER WALTER L TULL STANLEY DONNER JUNE M UPI INVESTMENTS LLC R S H INVESTMENTS LLC D R HORTON - CROWN LLC HUTCHISON ANITA R JORDAN CHADWICK C SALYER ROBERT LEE II NOWACKI KIRSTEN L RYAN CATHERINE LEIGH MCSWAIN BRIAN L KING STEWART REID GRIFFIN DALLAS W JR HARRIS BRETT A NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC MCCAULEY CAROLINE H DUNLOP JEFFREY S DAVIDSON NICKI A D R HORTON - CROWN LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC FINCHER DEBRA E CANTRELL JERRY ROBERT JR ROBARGE RICHARD B COOK FAMILY LIVING TRUST S TEAM PROPERTIES LLC MCNEES JAMES TAYLOR ECKSTEIN BRUCE C (SURV) MUNGO HOMES INC D R HORTON - CROWN LLC FARMER ALISON W HAULOTTE DOREEN A BENTLEY BRADFORD T NEWTON PAUL HENRY RIDDLE DUSTIN L FAVORS BRUCE D GALLOWAY C F YILDIRIM ABDULKADIR (SUR KEEL TAMI B GRINDLE CHERYL L SPRUILL ANTHONY J MOODY SAMMY W JR KOONTS JEROME S FREDERICKSON DARREN (JTW WHITESIDE JONATHAN E REINGARDT CHAD W

BUYER

ADDRESS

EA RIVERSIDE LLC 16740 BIRKDALE COMMONS PKWY S3 H&H PROPERTIES II LLC 2701 COLTSGATE RD STE 300 CAMBIER JUDY (JTWROS) 30 WALL ST 12TH FL ACADIA LLC PO BOX 8580 BLUE MOON OF GREENVILLE 8 CALISTON CT YORK JOHN W (JTWROS) 600 CRESCENT AVE FARRIS RYAN (JTWROS) 8 STONE HOLW DUNN DENNIS P (JTWROS) 38 COUNTRY CLUB DR STONER JENNIFER S (JTWRO 234 NORTHBROOK WAY MJ3 LLC 201 GREER DR NELSON MARSHELLE L (JTWR 6 DARIEN WAY ZITZMAN DAVID P (JTWROS) 136 GRIFFITH HILL WAY TEAMACK LLC 929 CHICK SPRINGS RD CANTRELL JERRY R JR 13 GALLIVAN ST HOLBROOK MARK L (JTWROS) 6 CLAYMORE CT HERSHBERGER DANIEL ELROY 460 CHANDLER RD HUGHES MELISSA (JTWROS) 106 GLEN ABBEY WAY VALERIO CHARLES R (JTWRO 304 ALLEGHENY RUN ROMEO PATRICIA ANN 14 BELLAGIO WAY KORN LARY 840 CLEVELAND ST BUCKLEY ENTERPRISES LLC 213 BERWICK CT KUKURA JOHN A (JTWROS) 10 CHICORA WOOD LN MEDLIN BRANDI HALL (JTWR 104 LYONS CT CARDELL MICHELLE G 6 SLEEPY ORANGE CIR GIBBONS CANDY 135 BROWN LN KAPLAN MARGARET I (JTWRO 104 PARIS GLEN WAY HUSKEY CONSTRUCTION COMP 103 RIVOLI LN SIMS AMANDA D (JTWROS) 24 SUNNY MEADOW LN HOLMES JOSHUA (JTWROS) 405 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD HALL BEVERLY A (JTWROS) 714 MOSSY LEDGE LN BRIDWELL AMY L (JTWROS) 204 FIRESTONE WAY NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO 8701 W DODGE RD NIEMIEC JOHN D 706 LADYKIRK LN ABRAMS JOAN (SURV) 206 EASTCREST DR SLAY ANGELA M 122 WHITTINGTON DR KING KENDALL MCCREIGHT 6 SEMINOLE DR JACOBS DELWIN S 625 JENKINS BRIDGE RD PRICE JUDY R 18 LAURELHART LN BOYES JAMES A (JTWROS) 33 PRINCE WILLIAMS CT CUERVO WILLIAM (JTWROS) 54 WOOD HOLLOW CIR CULBERTSON MARTIN B (JTW 119 APPLEWOOD DR FRALEY AARON (JTWROS) 14 SILVER KNOLL CT ARE NARENDRA (JTWROS) 27 DAUPHINE WAY ADAMS KRISTEN (JTWROS) 49 SCOTTS BLUFF DR ELKINS BRIAN (JTWROS) 304 CIRCLE SLOPE DR BROOKS DEBRA (JTWROS) 20 CALMAR CT WHITE JACKIE (SURV) 205 CARRICK DR WYATT KRISTEN LAMB (JTWR 3182 E GAP CREEK RD GATEWAY 25 GREENWOOD LLC PO BOX 8624 BELTZ BRENT A (JTWROS) 205 DANTE LN WAYLAND DANIEL KENT 207 ROSEBAY DR GREENVILLE ACLM LLC 18 EDGE CT UNIT B RUMTHAOAS SOCHAN (JTWROS 4000 E NORTH ST ROLLISON ELIZABETH A (JT 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 214 THOMPKINS JAMIE SLIGH (S 210 MEADOW LAKE TRL PRESS MARY JO 200 HOLLAND FORD RD SWAGER MARGARET J (JTWRO 24 N WINDWARD CT SCHERRER KATHRYN (JTWROS 310 CHENOWETH DR BREARLEY HANNAH L 10 HUMMINGBIRD CIR HAH LLC 312 LYONS DR FARMER ALLISON (JTWROS) 1 CREEKWATER WAY TRAVIS CLYDE D 322 N RUTHERFORD RD DENSCH CARL O 107 HONEY CRISP WAY HOLLAND-MENNENGA CLARA A 209 MEADOW LAKE TRL HANSHAW DEBORAH L (JTWRO 605 TULIP TREE LN GRICE MARCUS D 10 WILDBRIAR CT CHERRY RANDY G (JTWROS) 121 KARLA CT SKELTON BRYAN DUNCAN 225 MEADOW BLOSSOM WAY SEEDLOCK LEISA (JTWROS) 426 S ORCHARD FARMS AVE POWELL ERIN FRANCES (JTW 123 STEPHENS LN CARDEN NICHOLAS C 314 WILLOW SPRINGS DR HORNE JASON MANNING (JTW 328 LONGSTREET DR ANDERSON BEAU C 100 SAFFRON WAY ROBERTS LOWELL A (JTWROS 30 REMUS WAY RIVERA LUIS GONZALEZ 113 BORDER AVE KUTZNER JARROD A 1374 CAMP CREEK RD TREECE JOSHUA D 6 KINDRED DR MOORE GEOFFREY C (JTWROS 3 ARMOR CT HAYNES ASHLEY K (JTWROS) 107 SANDY CREEK CT WALLACE CHARLES R DECLAR 1 STONE CHASE CT PIEROTTI JO H (JTWROS) 208 PLUM CREEK LN KRANSTEUBER JAKE (JTWROS 205 KILBURN LN YUCEL OZGUR 508 MILLERVALE RD MCGUIRE WILL HARLAN 113 HARTSDALE CT SEXTON CAITLIN T 6 AGER CT ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC PO BOX 4068ALE RD TUSSEY COLEMAN 10 TRAILSTREAM DR ELKINS-TURGEON LORI K 106 RICHGLEN WAY JOHNSON DOUGLAS H (JTWRO 40 FARM BROOK WAY ARRINGTON KAREN B (JTWRO PO BOX 10753 ANDERSON MARY CAROL 35 BLACKBURN ST


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

We’ll get you moving! Woodruff Road Office

864-516-7465

4 y 2–Y 2-4 a d un DA

Woodruff Road, Magnolia Park Town Center, Greenville Extraordinary in every detail! Enormous lower level with Media Room. All Bedrooms 2nd Level. Master suite is Magical with Private porch – overlooks Beautiful lawn, Koi Pond and more Master bath Carrara Marble floors/Marble counters – Incredible!! Hardwood floors, Marble foyer, Hand hewn travertine floor in totally enlarged and moved kitchen. Hand tooled copper sinks, granite. Too much to share!

Why build when you can buy this PRISTINE MOVE IN READY home?

n S UN OpeEN S

OP

7 Flat Shoals Court • River Shoals • $261,900 MLS #1308065 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 2900+ Sq. Ft.

Do Not Miss this Dream Home!

336 Parkside Drive • Simpsonville • $598,500 4 BR/4.5 BA • Appraisal $610,000

Joyce Barber

Megan Moe megan.moe@allentate.com

864-477-0121 AllenTate.com/MeganMoe

joyce.barber@allentate.com

864-414-6133

“Lori has been an amazing realtor. She wanted the best for us and pursued trying to find everything on our “wish list”. She was very approachable and thoughtful when we had concerns about finding a home. We believe she works incredibly hard at what she does. She is polished and professional yet approachable. She has been so friendly and real from the start and that is not something you find just anywhere. We were very thankful for all that she did to help us and will continue to recommend her highly to anyone!” I LOVE what I do and I am glad it shows! If you are looking for these qualities in an agent, I am looking forward to meeting you soon!

Putting the REAL in Real Estate Lori.Bayne@AllenTate.com | 864-884-3336 | AllenTate.com/LoriBayne


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

Harts Cove

18 homesites. 3 remain at intro pricing!

Details: An intimate, new neighborhood of half-acre and larger homesites near Five Forks, from the $300’s

OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1-4 PM

Schools: Bells Crossing Elementary Hillcrest Middle | Hillcrest High School

Contact Information:

With only 18 half-acre and larger homesites, Harts Cove is an intimate new neighborhood of upscale homes in the Linda Horner, Realtor Five Forks area. Tall hardwoods provide a leafy, green backdrop, and mountain laurel and other native plants border South Carolina Home Corporation a creek at the back of the community. Traditional and Craftsman-style homes are under construction, with several 864-505-7710 | lindahorner99@gmail.com ranch and master-on-main plans to choose from. Elegant interior finishes are included - hand-scraped hardwoods, granite counters, elegant moldings, upscale appliances, Directions: From Woodruff Road, turn onto Scuffletown iron rail on stairs, and stone fireplaces. Brick, stone, shake and shingle accent these Road, then right on Jonesville Road. Right on Harts Lane, Hardi-Plank homes, and side-entry garages and covered porches are standard. The and neighborhood is on left. From Hwy. 14 in Simpsonville, very first residents are moving in now, so only 15 opportunities remain, priced from turn on Harts Lane, go about a mile and a half, and the low $300’s. Introductory pricing is available for only the next three homes, so call neighborhood is on right. today to lock in your savings!

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Why Use a REALTOR®?

All real estate licensees are not the same. Only real estate licensees who are members of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® are properly called REALTORS®. They proudly display the REALTOR® logo on the business card or other marketing and sales literature. REALTORS® are committed to treat all parties to a transaction honestly. REALTORS® subscribe to a strict code of ethics and are expected to maintain a higher level of knowledge of the process of buying and selling real estate. An independent survey reports that 84% of home buyers would use the same REALTOR® again. Real estate transactions involve one of the biggest financial investments most people experience in their

lifetime. Transactions today usually exceed $100,000. If you had a $100,000 income tax problem, would you attempt to deal with it without the help of a CPA? If you had a $100,000 legal question, would you deal with it without the help of an attorney? Considering the small upside cost and the large downside risk, it would be foolish to consider a deal in real estate without the professional assistance of a REALTOR®. But if you’re still not convinced of the value of a REALTOR®, here are a dozen more reasons to use one: 1. Your REALTOR® can help you determine your buying power -- that is, your financial reserves plus your borrowing capacity. If you give a REALTOR® some basic information about your available savings, income and current debt, he or she can refer you to lenders best qualified to help you. Most lenders

-- banks and mortgage companies -- offer limited choices. 2. Your REALTOR® has many resources to assist you in your home search. Sometimes the property you are seeking is available but not actively advertised in the market, and it will take some investigation by your agent to find all available properties. 3. Your REALTOR® can assist you in the selection process by providing objective information about each property. Agents who are REALTORS® have access to a variety of informational resources. REALTORS® can provide local community information on utilities, zoning. schools, etc. There are two things you’ll want to know. First, will the property provide the environment I want for a home or investment? Second, will the property have resale value when I am ready to sell?

4. Your REALTOR® can help you negotiate. There are myriad negotiating factors, including but not limited to price, financing, terms, date of possession and often the inclusion or exclusion of repairs and furnishings or equipment. The purchase agreement should provide a period of time for you to complete appropriate inspections and investigations of the property before you are bound to complete the purchase. Your agent can advise you as to which investigations and inspections are recommended or required. 5. Your REALTOR® provides due diligence during the evaluation of the property. Depending on the area and property, this could include inspections for termites, dry rot, asbestos, faulty structure, roof condition, septic tank and well tests, just to name


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41 a few. Your REALTOR® can assist you in �inding quali�ied responsible professionals to do most of these investigations and provide you with written reports. You will also want to see a preliminary report on the title of the property. Title indicates ownership of property and can be mired in confusing status of past owners or rights of access. The title to most properties will have some limitations; for example, easements (access rights) for utilities. Your REALTOR®, title company or attorney can help you resolve issues that might cause problems at a later date. 6. Your REALTOR® can help you in understanding different �inancing options and in identifying quali�ied lenders. 7. Your REALTOR® can guide you through the closing process and make sure everything �lows together smoothly. 8. When selling your home, your REALTOR® can give you up-to-date information on what is happening in the marketplace and the price, �inancing, terms and condition of competing properties. These are key factors in getting your property sold at the best price, quickly and with minimum hassle. 9. Your REALTOR® markets your property to other real estate agents and the public. Often, your REALTOR® can recommend repairs or cosmetic work that will signi�icantly enhance the salability of your property. Your REALTOR® markets your property to other real estate agents and the public. In many markets across the country, over 50% of real estate sales are cooperative sales; that is, a real estate agent other than yours brings in the buyer. Your REALTOR® acts as the marketing coordinator, disbursing information about your property to other real estate agents through a Multiple Listing Service or other cooperative marketing networks, open houses for agents, etc. The REALTOR® Code of Ethics requires REALTORS® to utilize these cooperative relationships when they bene�it their clients.

10. Your REALTOR® will know when, where and how to advertise your property. There is a misconception that advertising sells real estate. The NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® studies show that 82% of real estate sales are the result of agent contacts through previous clients, referrals, friends, family and personal contacts. When a property is marketed with the help of your REALTOR®, you do not have to allow strangers into your home. Your REALTOR® will generally prescreen and accompany quali�ied prospects through your property. 11. Your REALTOR® can help you objectively evaluate every buyer’s proposal without compromising your marketing position. This initial agreement is only the beginning of a process of appraisals, inspections and �inancing -- a lot of possible pitfalls. Your REALTOR® can help you write a legally binding, win-win agreement that will be more likely to make it through the process. 12. Your REALTOR® can help close the sale of your home. Between the initial sales agreement and closing (or settlement), questions may arise. For example, unexpected repairs are required to obtain �inancing or a cloud in the title is discovered. The required paperwork alone is overwhelming for most sellers. Your REALTOR® is the best person to objectively help you resolve these issues and move the transaction to closing (or settlement). The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 2,200 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

4 SANTA MARIA COURT, GREENVILLE

116 PENN STREET, GREENVILLE

MONTEBELLO Quiet cul-de-sac, all bedrooms on main, beautiful stone entry welcomes you with old world charm to open floor plan 4 Bedrooms/3 Baths. MLS 1308340. $739,900

AUGUSTA RD Charming traditional home, walk to shopping and Downtown, 9+ ceilings, hardwoods on main, spa-like master retreat, fenced/gated back yard 4 Bedrooms/3.5 Baths. MLS 1306057. $549,900

Welcome Home! Call Today!

864.678.8208

JNorman@CDanJoyner.com

Crossword puzzle: page 54

Sudoku puzzle: page 54


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | HOME

FEATURED BUILDER

City Homes @Markley

artfully designed, sustainably built

TREY COLE 864-303-7249

OPEN HOUSE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 2-4PM HOME INFO The Carolina Price: $574,900 • MLS: 1300289 • Bedrooms: 4, Baths: 3.5 • Designed for the urban environment just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail with walls of glass overlooking downtown • Guaranteed gas/electric bill of less than $150/month for first year (spray-foam insulation, efficient systems) • Three stories include home office/guest suite with optional elevator

433 North Markley, Greenville, Above the Kroc Center in Downtown Greenville City homes inspired by the urban architecture of the 1920s, built for the modern urban lifestyle. Each level of this city home features 9 foot ceilings with walls of windows. Level 1 has an extra-deep 2-car garage plus 2 additional connected dedicated parking spots for guests and a full guest suite/home office with bathroom. Level 2: open kitchen/dining/great room space with outdoor entertaining porch and sunny back deck for continuous living space. Level 3: master suite with walk-in closet, plus two bedrooms with shared bathroom and laundry room. This City Home features stained concrete floor (level 1) and white oak hardwood floors (levels 2&3) with light-filled staircase that highlight Trey Cole’s popular Craftsman interior design package. The Carolina home has custom kitchen and master bathroom cabinets, granite countertops and a Bosch stainless steel appliance package. Unique to this lot is an additional 3000 square foot private backyard accessible by a walk-out back deck on the second level! Each City Home is sold as a single-family home with standard lot ownership and a simple HOA. To meet our sustainable standards, these homes feature spray foam insulation, tankless water heater, energy-efficient windows, LED lighting and high-efficiency HVAC systems.

A celebration of all things outdoors in Greenville County

October 3, 2015 10 am - 3 pm

Food Music Kids’ Activities and More!

at Conestee Park More info at

www.GreenvilleRec.com

PE OPLE, AWARDS , HONORS The Marchant Company Welcomes Two New Agents The Marchant Company is pleased to announce that REALTORS® Bo Matheny and Bobby Barreto have recently joined the firm. Bo comes to the Marchant Company with over 30 years of experience in the local real estate market. Throughout Bo’s career he has closed over $90 million of local real estate

transactions. A graduate of Wade Hampton High and Clemson University, Bo is a lifelong Greenville native and enjoys the Upstate grow and prosper. After several years of working in local government Matheny administrative and management positions, Bo pursued a career in Real Estate where he could work for

«


HOME | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

4 RESIDENC

PEOPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S

«

himself and connect others with the community he cares for so deeply. Bo is a compassionate “people person” who enjoys counseling sellers and buyers in order to match the right properties to the right people. Bobby Barreto, like Bo, is a Greenville native and Clemson graduate. While earning his BS and MBA at Clemson, Bobby founded Asterisk Development, Barreto LLC, a firm specializing in high-end residential and commercial real estate. Since the company’s founding 6 years ago, Bobby has planned and executed multiple single-family and multi-family real estate developments, most notably, 99 Wyatt Apartments in Clemson and Park Place on Hudson in Greenville. As a young entrepreneur, Bobby is motivated to try new things and develop new business strategies

that in turn facilitate growth. The Marchant Company looks forward to adding Bo and Bobby’s expertise to their team of 30 agents. Agents at The Marchant Company are dedicated to providing unsurpassed service and are committed to meeting clients’ needs. With over 350 years of combined real estate experience, The Marchant Company prides itself on their knowledge of the Greenville area real estate markets and their commitment to excellence. The Marchant Company services the greater Greenville, SC area including Easley, Fountain Inn, Taylors, Mauldin, Travelers Rest, Greer and Simpsonville. The Marchant Company is dedicated to serving Greenville and Upstate South Carolina with “Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future.” For more information on buying, selling or renting a home, please call 864.467.0085 or visit us at www.marchantco.com.

There’s never been a better time to make Downtown Greenville your home. MAIN ST HOMES SOLD OUT! ACT NOW FOR PHASE TWO

Phase II

Fluor Field Baseball Stadium

LEARN MORE AT OUR DOWNTOWN SALES OFFICE, 101 FALLS PARK DRIVE, #105

Advertise your home with us Contact: Annie Langston | 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com

WELCOME! IVEY JACOPS, MBA

Joining our Greenville Team of Real Estate Professionals

Proud supporters of the American dream. www.cbcaine.com

Downtown Greenville’s West End 2 and 3 Bedroom Homes Two-car Garages | Rooftop Terraces Priced from $499,000 mwestgreenville.com

Open by appointment, please call:

(864) 326-5047 parkergroupservices.com


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

Off to see the Wizard Exhibit based on book that became one of America’s best-known fairy tales CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A Kansas tornado more than a century ago had a profound effect on the life of children’s book author L. Frank Baum, who penned “The Wonderful World of Oz” in 1900 – and on American culture. Generations of Americans have enjoyed the story of Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Lion and the yellow brick road. It all started with a book, which is the subject of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” exhibit that opens at the Upcountry History Museum on Saturday. The exhibit, produced and developed by Great Explorations Children’s Museum of St. Petersburg, Fla., with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, is making its first appearance in South Carolina and Georgia. The exhibit is designed as a giant popup book to allow visitors to immerse

themselves in the Magical Land of Oz as well as science, history and the arts. When Baum wrote “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” he didn’t plan to write a sequel. But he acquiesced after thousands of children who read the book wrote letters asking him to write another story about Oz. He wrote and published the first sequel in 1904 and wrote sequels in 1907, 1908 and 1909. When he wrote “The Emerald City of Oz” in 1911, he wrote he could not continue writing sequels because Ozland had lost contact with the

Wanna go?

The book vs. the movie

“The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”

BOOK: Oz is a real place.

WHERE: Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St., Greenville

MOVIE: Oz is imaginary and Dorothy’s journey is a dream.

WHEN: Sept. 19-Jan. 18 (Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day); Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. COST: $6 adults, $5 seniors and college students, $4 children and students ages 4 to 18, free for children 3 and Under and museum members. INFORMATION: 467-3100 or upcountryhistory.org

rest of the world. But his readers didn’t accept that, and Baum wrote another sequel in 1913 and every year after until his death in 1919. After Baum’s death, his publishers got Ruth Plumly Thompson to continue to write sequels. An original Oz book was published every Christmas between 1913 and 1942. Baum also wrote a 1902 Broadway musical that he adapted from the original story. The original book has been in the public domain since 1956.

BOOK: Dorothy throws water on the Wicked Witch because the witch took one of her shoes. MOVIE: She was trying to put out the fire on the Scarecrow. BOOK: Dorothy has additional adventures after the Wizard departs before the good witch Glinda tells her to go home. MOVIE: Glinda shows up right after the Wizard’s balloon takes off without Dorothy. BOOK: The Cowardly Lion drinks a draught of liquid “courage.” MOVIE: He gets a medal for bravery. BOOK: The Wizard stuffs the Scarecrow’s head with bran, pins and needles to symbolize the intelligence he already has. MOVIE: He gets a diploma.

Did you know? • Dorothy’s slippers were silver in the book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum. They were made ruby red in the movie to show up better on the yellow brick road. • Baum was a former chicken rancher, traveling salesman and theater manager. • The name “Oz” came from one of the cabinet drawers in Baum’s study that was labeled O-Z. • Dorothy was named after Dorothy Gage, the infant niece of Baum’s wife, Maud. Dorothy died right as Baum started writing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” • In the film, a female dog named Terry played Toto. • “Over the Rainbow” was almost cut from the film for length reasons. • Buddy Ebsen was supposed to play the film’s Tin Man but had to bow out after he developed a severe allergic reaction to his silver paint. • The Smithsonian exhibit housing Dorothy’s slippers is so popular that the carpet in front of the slippers has been replaced numerous times due to wear and tear. PHOTOS PROVIDED


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

1

2

4

3

5

6

Hometown Teams Traveling Smithsonian exhibition explores how sports shape America

PHOTOS PROVIDED

1. The Bates College team (rear) competes in the NCAA Women’s Rowing Championships, 2012. 2. A young woman competes in a high school rodeo, 2011. 3. Althea Gibson shattered racial barriers in both tennis and golf. 4. Women’s field hockey, about 1919. 5. Competitors in a high school 5K Nordic ski event, 2010. 6. Claremont High School boys’ water polo team, Claremont, Calif., 2011.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Baseball. Soccer. Hockey. Bowling. Kickball. America loves sports, and that love starts in hometowns – on sandlots and in empty lots, in local gymnasiums and on Little League fields, in schools and on the streets. From pickup games to high school football games, we learn about winning and losing, sportsmanship and perseverance through sports. If we’re not participating ourselves, we’re watching somebody else, from the youngest children trying to hit a baseball off of a tee to professionals who play a game for a living. “Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America,” a Smithsonian Museum on Main Street traveling exhibit, is at Slater Hall through Oct. 25. The Slater Hall Citizens’ Committee and the Travelers Rest Historical Society are hosts. “Hometown Teams” captures the stories that unfold on neighborhood fields and courts and the underdog heroics, larger-than-life legends, fierce rivalries and gut-wrenching defeats.

Gilbert High School volleyball players compete at Highland High School, Mesa, Ariz., 2011.

The Smithsonian’s Museum on Main Street program is designed to give residents of small towns and rural areas access to cultural experiences to which they may otherwise have no access. One-fifth of Americans live in rural areas and about 43 percent of American museums are located in small, ru-

ral towns, the exhibit notes. But those museums – and historical associations and libraries that often are the cultural centers for rural America – often have smaller budgets and staffs and fewer opportunities to bring in traveling exhibitions than museums in bigger towns and more urban areas. The Museum on Main Street program targets small towns with populations of between 500 and 20,000 people. Since 1991, Museum on Main has traveled to more than 900 communities in 46 states and Guam, the Smithsonian says. Museum on Main Street invites the public to share their local sports stories through the “Stories from Main Street” website at storiesfrommainstreet.org or through the free mobile app available from the Mac App Store or the Google Play Store. Both platforms record and map the location reflected in the submission and will accept written and audio stories as well as videos and photos. The archived stories will serve as a searchable re-

cord of the unique experiences of life in American small towns. On Sept. 26, a cycling event will be held on the Swamp Rabbit Trail from Travelers Rest History Museum to Slater Hall. The ride starts at 8 a.m. Oct. 10 is Outdoor Movie Night. “McFarland USA” will be shown beginning at 7 p.m. The exhibit will be open before and after the movie. On Oct. 24, a vintage baseball game will be held at Shoeless Joe Jackson Park in Greenville at 10 a.m.

So you know “Hometown Teams” WHO: A Smithsonian traveling exhibition WHEN: now through Oct. 25 – Tuesdays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursdays, noon to 8 p.m.; Sundays, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. WHERE: Slater Hall, 5 Whitney St., Slater ADMISSION: Free INFORMATION: slaterhallsc.org


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

What day is it?

International Eat an Apple Day – SEPTEMBER 19

4 – major varieties grown in North Carolina: red delicious, golden delicious, Rome Beauty and Gala 7 – North Carolina’s rank among apple-producing states (Washington is first) 18.5 – Pounds of apples the average American eats annually. In some European countries, that number is 46 pounds 20 – number of bushel boxes a fully producing apple tree can grow 32:10 – biblical verse in Deuteronomy that uses the phrase “apple of his eye” 67 – percentage of U.S. apple crop grown for fresh consumption 248.6 MILLION – Bushels of apples grown in the U.S. in 2013, the 10th-largest apple crop since the U.S. Department of Agriculture began keeping statistics on commercial apple production 2.7 BILLION – wholesale value of the apple crop each year

The

Couple s eSerie Fring ombed

ht We B ING The Nig TOW

OLN, 16, 22, 23 LINSC ept. 15

Must-See Movies

By Eric Rogers

Citizen Trump Censorship fails in the age of the Internet Throughout the first part of the 20th century, filmmakers were at the mercy of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America trade association. Before their movies could be distributed, they had to get past the gatekeeper, Will H. Hays. Hays, the president of the Republican National Committee and a player in the Teapot Dome scandal, was appointed to clean up Hollywood in 1922. His puritanical standards for the film industry became known as the Hays Code. In the 1960s, the MPPDA changed its name to the Motion Picture Association of America and the organization developed the rating system we have today. But the Hays Office and the MPAA have not been the only impediments to free expression in the movie industry. In 1940, Orson Welles went to Hollywood as a novice filmmaker. He had gained fame two years earlier by scaring the nation half to death with his radio version of “War of the Worlds.” As a result, he was given a contract by RKO Pictures to produce his first film, “Citizen Kane.” It is ranked as the No. 1 film of all time by the American Film Institute. “Kane” is the story of Charles Foster Kane, a newspaper publisher who is more interested in creating news than reporting it. Kane is a fictional character, but he was largely based on real-life publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst, and Welles did not paint a flattering portrait. As a result, Hearst made several attempts to suppress the film. He offered to buy it so he could burn the negative. He threatened FBI investigations and he intimidated theater owners into giving it only a limited release. But to this day, it survives and thrives and is available on Netflix DVD, Amazon, YouTube and at the Greenville County Library. In the ’90s, Donald Trump was more successful at censorship by suppressing a film called “Trump: What’s the Deal?” The film exposes many of Trump’s shady dealings, contempt for others and inherent narcissism. Ironically, it includes a segment about a group of 200 undocumented immigrants who worked on a crew demolishing a building to make room for the Trump Tower. According to the film’s official website, Trump was so unhappy about the film that he threatened to sue anyone who screened it – but in this brave new world of Internet distribution, the film is now available for free. Given his recent rise in the polls, the film should be required viewing for all voters. Just go to TrumpTheMovie.com. Eric Rogers has been teaching filmmaking at The Greenville Fine Arts Center since 1994.


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

Reedy Reels Film Festival selections announced Inaugural festival is Oct. 16-17

Champion.” Chosen in the animation category were “Sky High,” “Candelaria Hot Dog,” “A Very Ordinary Person,” “The Punishment,” “Koyaa – Flower,” “Give and Break” and “Paths of Light.” Student films are “Nino,” “The Yellow Wallpaper” and “I Have Something to Tell You.” Documentaries are “From the Mouth of the Mariner,” “Brew Love, “Whiteout,” “Project Senium” and “Naleena.”

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Traysie Amick and Chris White on the set of Cinema Purgatorio.

for single day admission. Tickets may be purchased at reedyreels.com. The Upstate Film Society is collaborating with the film festival. The organization was started in 1998 by a small band of film lovers anxious to see quality and diversified films in the Upstate. The Film House is a 2015 benefactor of the film festival. The Film House was founded by Daryn Zongrone and provides the Upstate will opportunities to see independent films, foreign films, repertory classics and cult favorites. Films selected for the SC Short Film Showcase are “Last Night at the Ellington,” “Tree Hugger,” “Smoke Like Echo,” “Shelter County” and “High Heels & Hoodoo.” Feature films selected are “Present,” “Dar He: The Lynching of Emmett Till” and “Cinema Purgatorio.” Short films are “Relentless,” “Mother & Brother,” “Dead Hearts,” “Game of Life,” “Auguste & Louis,” “Elite,” “Marthe,” “AMAS (Inflammation),” “I Will Show My Breasts,” “To The Top,” “The Trouble with Lucie,” “Between Walls,” “The Other Night Factory,” “Dead End,” “Opening Doors,” “doopleganger,” “Nameless,” “Damnation,” “Franklin” and “Les Freres

GET READY,

‘CAUSE HERE WE COME.

NOVEMBER 24-29 TICKETS ON SALE AT 10AM Still from feature film selection “Dar He: The Lynching of Emmett Till”

PEACE CENTER | PEACECENTER.ORG | 864.467.3000

®

MOTOWN IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF UMG RECORDINGS, INC

RAYMOND LUKE, JR. AND BRYAN TERRELL CLARK PHOTOS BY JOAN MARCUS. ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY ANDREW ECCLES.

Thirty-six films will be screened at the inaugural Reedy Reels Film Festival next month. More than 700 entries were submitted for the two-day festival that will be held Oct. 16 and 17 at CU-ICAR in Greenville. The winning films were announced Thursday. “The mission of Reedy Reels Film Festival is to showcase talented and independent filmmakers while diversifying Greenville’s cultural community through the art of film and independent filmmaking,” said Matt Foster, organizer of the festival. The festival will feature short films, feature films, animation, student films and documentaries. The two-day film fest will feature eight blocks of films. Viewers will have a chance to meet the filmmakers during the festival. Prize money will be awarded. Tickets are $55 for both days and $30


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Atlas Road Crew keeps it raw

Come Help Us Celebrate

When the Charleston quintet Atlas Road Crew went into the studio last year to record their debut full-length album, they knew what they were aiming for, musically. The band, which formed in 2011 while all five members were students at USC, loved the old-school rock ’n’ roll of the Rolling Stones, the Hammondorgan-drenched Southern grit of the Allman Brothers and the upfront, strutting attitude of the Black Crowes, and they Details wanted to combine their own hard-driving style, honed from Atlas Road Crew w/Dave Britt playing 200 shows a year, into WHEN: Friday, Sept. 18, 8 p.m. the mix. They probably didn’t expect WHERE: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive, to come up with “Halfway to Greenville Hopkins,” which is the best TICKETS: $5 straight-ahead rock album I’ve INFO: 864-235-5519; gottrocksgreenville.com heard in years. Together with producers Rick Beato, Cory Plaugh and Jay Clifford, ARC (singer/guitarist Taylor Nicholson, guitarist Dave Beddingfield, pianist Bryce James, bassist Max Becker and drummer Patrick Drohan) has created a work of throwback genius, mixing anthemic choruses, unforgettable riffs, down-and-dirty grooves and boundless energy. It’s as if the rock-clock stopped in 1972, and no one minded at all. Special Guests: The reaction to “Halfway to Hopkins” has been near-universally positive, to the extent that the band has essentially been working nonstop since it came out in February. “I’ve definitely been surprised by the response to the record,” Nicholson says. “People really seem to be digging it. We’re getting feedback from Germany and places all over Europe where we never would’ve expected people to buy our album.” Perhaps part of the reason for the buzz around Atlas Road Crew, who will play at Gottrocks in Greenville Friday night, is that there seems to be a real lack of simple, and straightforward rock in the modern musical marketplace. “I think that has a lot to do with it,” Nicholson says. “There aren’t too many bands nowadays that are doing this. There are bands going the electronic route, but for us, keeping it raw with the guitars and piano makes our music stand out a little bit.” The Crew’s live show, honed over four years, has been a calling card for the band, as well. With only the 11 songs from “Halfway to Hopkins” to pull from, they often throw in some classic rock and blues favorites that influenced them. “As a whole, it’s bands like Zeppelin, the Rolling Stones, the Southern rock bands, all of that hits home for us,” Nicholson says. “I think it’s refreshing for people who are a little bit older to see these young guys playing songs by the artists they grew up listening to.” More than 200 shows a year is a lot of time to be crammed together into a van, so it’s come in handy for the band that they started as friends before forming the group. “We all used to be just some guys at college playing instruments,” Nicholson says, “and now over the last few years it’s just developed more and more. We have a European tour coming up in February. It’ll be our first time over there, and it’s pretty cool to O.K. WITH CORRECTIONS BY:_________________________________________ think that we’re going to go see the world just for doing something that we love to do.”

GRAND OPENING MAIN STREET FOUNTAIN INN September 24th 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Concert presented by “The Flashbacks”

The Honorable Henry McMaster Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina Miss South Carolina Daja Dial

*Free refreshments will be located in participating Merchant shops.

GN-0100780120

O.K. BY: __________________________________________________

AD CAREFULLY • SUBMIT CORRECTIONS ONLINE

R: FTN INN CIVIC CNTR ON: Angie Taylor ON: GN-GREENVILLE NEWS

PROOF CREATED AT: 9/4/2015 7:59 AM PROOF DUE: NEXT RUN DATE: 09/20/15 SIZE: 6 col X 21 in

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR | vharris@communityjournals.com

GN-0100780120.INDD


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 49

OCTOBER 16,17 & 18 Friday Saturday Sunday

10 am – 6 pm 10 am – 6 pm 1 pm – 5 pm

$5 General Admission, good for all three days!

For more information,

gcma.org /antiques or 864.546.4061 Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street, Greenville, SC 29601

Sponsored by

GCMA Journal AFAD 2015.indd 1

9/11/15 5:33 PM


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

Page turners

Escape to another world Teen reads offer alternative to high school stress and drama

Back-to-school can be an avalanche of activity, deadlines and hallway drama for any teen. These great books for young adults can provide an intriguing escape from the everyday hustle with their dose of altered realities. “The Glass Sentence” by S. E. Grove is a unique mix of mystery, science fiction and adventure. Sophia Tims lives in a fractured world – 100 years ago, the earth changed irrevocably and without explanation. Time itself shattered, dividing the continents into different ages. In Boston, Sophia’s home, the year is 1891, but Canada to the north has been lost to the advancing glaciers of an ice age. Exploration and trade with different ages has led to a melding of past and future technologies. Sophia’s uncle is a cartologer, one of the few scholars able to create maps of this new world that go far beyond the bounds of simple paper. When Sophia returns to find their house in shambles and her uncle missing, she must use the skills she has learned as her uncle’s apprentice to map the clues and find him. Catherine Fisher’s “Incarceron” is a meditation on utopian sentiments gone awry. After a war that destroyed most of the moon over 100 years ago, the poor and the malcontents of the world were all locked away in a self-contained living prison in a bid to bring peace and prosperity to what was left of the world. Only one person is rumored to have ever escaped from Incarceron. Finn has no memories before he woke up deep in the machinations of the prison. Claudia, daughter of Incarceron’s warden, lives in a world grown stagnant by Protocol, a policy that enforces the technologies and trends of the 18th century. Together they seek to unlock the mysteries around Incarceron.

SAVE THE DATES

PEACE CENTER | PEACECENTER.ORG | 864.467.3000

The world of “Fever Crumb” by Phillip Reeve is set in an even more distant future. London is a ruin still recovering from a war that overthrew the Scriven, a race of humanoid aliens that had conquered the earth. Fever Crumb is an orphan who spends her days tinkering in the workshop of her adopted father’s lab at the headquarters of the Order of Engineers, a group dedicated to invention and reinvention of lost technology. When Fever is sent to assist an archaeologist at a nearby dig, she stumbles across a find that could change the course of her life and the world. Reviewed by Jessica Zavasnik, teen librarian, Greenville County Library System, greenvillelibrary.org.


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

WHAT’S HAPPENING Euphoria Friday, Sept. 18 through Sunday, Sept. 20 • various locations and prices • euphoriagreenville.com FRIDAY • Sports Series: Golf at the Cliffs 8:30 a.m.; $150 The Cliffs at Mountain Park

• Sports Series: Cycling with George Hincapie 8:30 a.m.; $150 The Cliffs at Mountain Park, Hotel Domestique

• Zumba Class 8:30 a.m.; free The Village Green at the Courtyard Marriott, Main Street • Taste of the South 6 to 10 p.m.; $125 Peace Center’s TD Amphitheatre

• Wine seminar: All the Single Varietals 1 p.m.; $35 The Westin Poinsett • Wine seminar: Tour de France 3:30 p.m.; $35 The Westin Poinsett

• Traffic Jam 5 to 8:30 p.m.; $75 Music by Outshyne, craft beer & spirits, food trucks Fluor Field • Swanky and Sweet 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; $45 Clemson space at Greenville ONE building, 1 N. Main St. Desserts, cocktails and DJs

• Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown 11 a.m.; included in Jazz Brunch ticket and free to public Winner of student cooking competition’s dish will be added to Greenville County Schools’ menu Corner of Main and Broad streets

• Sunday Supper 5 to 8 p.m.; $150 farm to table experience

SATURDAY • Zumba Class 8:30 a.m.; free Peace Center TD Amphitheatre • Tasting Showcase noon to 4 p.m.; $75 Corner of Main and Broad streets • Wine tasting, craft beer garden, gourmet food and spirit sampling

SUNDAY • Jazz Brunch 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; $45 jazz music, brunch Corner of Main and Broad streets

Sept. 18

948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

Sept. 19

CONCERT

CONCERT

BOOK SIGNING

Unearthly, w/ Mysteriarch & Nihilistinen Barbaarisuus Ground Zero Tickets: $10 Death-metal outfit from Rio De Janeiro headlines triple bill.

Dave Britt Gottrocks Anthemic alternative pop-rock. 235-5519 | gottrocksgreenville.com

Fall Break Camp MAKER INSPIRED DAY CAMPS

October 15 & 16 • Visit TCMUpstate.org for more info Ages 4-5 Pre-K • 9am-12pm K5-3rd grade • 9am-5pm

Book signing with Cindy Landrum for Legenday Locals of Greenville the Pickwick 3219 Augusta Street noon-2 p.m. FREE

Meet author Cindy Landrum and pick up a signed copy of her book, “Legendary Locals of Greenville.” A new local history book reveals the intriguing characters and everyday

«

® 300 COLLEGE ST DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE TCMUpstate.org | 864.233.7755


52 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

«

citizens who have made Greenville’s history legendary. The book shares the stories of unique individuals and groups, past and present, who have had a lasting impact on the community throughout its history. Stay for lunch. 277-4180 thepickwick.net info@thepickwick.net FAMILY

Touch-A-Truck Westside Park 2700 West Blue Ridge Drive 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE Kids love trucks. Join us at Westside Park for this free event. Tow trucks, dump trucks, fire trucks, and more will be on hand for the kids to climb on and explore. greenvillerec.com/event/touch-a-truck RIDE

Upstate Forever’s Fourth Annual Preservation Ride Strawberry Hill USA | 3097 Hwy 11, Chesnee 8 a.m.-1 p.m. | Registration $40 Join us for our 4th annual event and enjoy one of three beautiful courses, a fully catered lunch, free prizes, and a ride t-shirt. Ride at your pace on the most scenic routes in the Upstate selected especially for you. Choose the 25-, 40- or 79-mile route. The Preservation Ride is a great way for you to show your support for one of the Upstate’s most respected and effective conservation organizations. 327-0090 upstateforever.org/2015-preservation-ride/ bmckee@upstateforever.org CONCERT

The Travelin’ Kine Independent Public Ale House Charleston quintet incorporates acoustic bluegrass into straight-ahead country. 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com CONCERT

Sam Bush Band Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium $30 in advance/$35 day of show Legendary mandolin master. 582-8107 crowdpleaser.com

Sept. 20 HEALTH/FITNESS

Hearts for the Homeless 5k Walk Barnet Park and downtown Spartanburg, 248 East Saint John St., Spartanburg 2-4:30 p.m.

$20 registration fee/10% discount for teams Miracle Hill Ministries invites you to participate in the Hearts for the Homeless 5k Walk in downtown Spartanburg. Walk the roads the homeless walk every day. See where they live and access services. After the walk, enjoy a family-friendly celebration complete with food, activities and fun for all as well as an award ceremony for top fundraisers. Make a difference for homeless children and adults. Register at www.miraclehill.org 631-0137 | miraclehill.org sfurnell@miraclehill.org

focus on hunger and homeless prevention. Over 200 individuals are expected to gather at the Cannon Centre to learn about opportunities within Greer Relief and what it offers to the community. Breakfast is available at 7:30 a.m. and the program starts at 8 a.m. 848-5356 greerrelief.org info@greerrelief.org CONCERT

Sept. 21 BOOK SIGNING

Capturing Your Family History

FUNDRAISER

Red Ribbon Golf Classic Green Valley Country Club 8:30 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. tee times $1,000 per 4-golfer team Greenville Family Partnership and the Chris and Kelly HOPE Foundation are joining forces to create a golf tournament that will benefit both organizations. Also on Sunday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at the Green Valley Country Club players and Sponsors can enjoy hors d’oeuvres and an open bar along with a silent and live auction. Coach Bobby Johnson will be joining us as our special guest speaker.Please RSVP. 467-4099 rrclassic.wix.com/red-ribbon-classic Terry@gfpdrugfree.org

Sept. 22 COMMUNITY MEETING

Greer Relief Neighborhood Breakfast The City of Greer, Cannon Centre 204 Cannon St. 7:30-9 a.m. FREE Greer Relief & Resources Agency will host a Neighborhood Breakfast. The purpose of the event is to educate the community on the mission of Greer Relief and their

Helping Children and Teens Cope with Grief TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 3-5 p.m. FREE Dr. Alan Wolfelt, a noted author, educator and grief counselor, will be presenting a seminar on Helping Children and Teens Cope with Grief. This program is geared for educators or anyone who works with children or teens. A variety of important sub-topics will explore how to artfully “companion” children and teens impacted by death. 235-8330 thomasmcafee.com/contact-us/grief-seminarregistration

thru Sept. 23

Hughes Main Library, Heritage Green 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. FREE Author Lisa Wingate talks about the importance of preserving family history, the Federal Writers’ Project and her new novel, “The Sea Keeper’s Daughter.” 527-9258 greenvillelibrary.org explore@greenvillelibrary.org

EDUCATION

THEATER PRODUCTION

The Night We Bombed Lincoln Towing Centre Stage, 501 River Street, 7-9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Wednesdays | $15

Willie Nelson Peace Center 7:30 p.m. | $55-$85 With a six-decade career and 200 plus albums, this iconic Texan is the creative genius behind the historic recordings of Crazy, Red Headed Stranger and Stardust. Willie Nelson has earned every conceivable award as a musician and amassed reputable credentials as an author, actor and activist. His album, “To All The Girls,” features 18 duets with music’s top female singers including Dolly Parton, Sheryl Crow, Rosanne Cash, Miranda Lambert, Carrie Underwood, and Shelby Lynne. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org EDUCATION

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes Grief Seminar: Healing Your Grieving Heart TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive 6:40-9 p.m. FREE Dr. Alan Wolfelt, a noted author, educator and grief counselor, will be presenting a seminar on Healing Your Grieving Heart: Exploring Practical Touchstones for Caring for Yourself. This program will be helpful to anyone who is experiencing grief in their lives. We look forward to having you join us for this evening of hope and healing. 235-8330 thomasmcafee.com

Trapped in the most horrendous rainstorm in Chicago history, six characters of diverse backgrounds are thrust together, sharing one thing in common: all have had their car towed that night by the notorious and corrupt Lincoln Towing. 233-6733 | centrestage.org info@centrestage.org

Sept. 23 EDUCATION

Enhancing Your Understanding of the Depression of Grief TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 8:40 a.m.-noon $25 Registration fee for professionals seeking CEU credit FREE Dr. Alan Wolfelt, a noted author, educator and grief counselor, will be presenting a seminar on Enhancing Your Understanding of the Depression of Grief. This workshop is for professional caregivers interested in furthering their knowledge of the process of dying, grief and healing. 235-8330 thomasmcafee.com/contact-us/grief-seminarregistration MEETING

Women Mean Business Charleston Cooks | 200 N. Main St. #101 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 4th Wednesday of every month FREE Women Mean Business, started in

«


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 53

«

2012 by local business woman Lauren Skelton Siddens, meets monthly, and businesswomen are invited to attend. Women Mean Business is casual, comfortable conversation with the goal of meeting other businesswomen to make new connections and foster their success in the business world. Women Mean Business is hosted at a variety of businesses/locations around Greenville from 5:307:30. To register, email Lauren Skelton Siddens at lauren@riverfallsspa.com. Lauren@riverfallsspa.com

FOOD TRUCKS

Who’s coming to the Lunchtime Pile-Up this week? WHO: Highway 301, Table 301 cuisine Automatic Taco, mobile taqueria The Nomadik Few, gourmet shaved ice WHEN: 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday WHERE: Corner of Broad and Falls streets (lot leased by Table 301 Restaurant Group) SPONSOR: Euphoria

FAMILY

Greenbrier Farms Porch Series Greenbrier Farms 766 Hester Shore Rd., Easley 5-8 p.m. | Wednesdays $10 per person / free children under 5 Join us for festive farm-to-table snacks along with live music each week. It’s the perfect way to unwind, take in the farm’s beauty, catch up with friends and see exactly where your food is coming from. 855-9782 | greenbrierfarms.com amy@greenbrierfarms.com

Sept. 24 CONCERT

Redleg Husky Live at Moe Joe Coffee Moe Joe Coffee 20 S Main St, 8-9 p.m. FREE Acoustic roots trio Redleg Husky (Asheville, NC) brings their unique blend of boot-stompin’ folk to Moe Joe Coffee and Music House. redleghusky.com redleghusky@gmail.com DINNER

Terrapin Beer and Bacon Brothers Farm to Table Dinner

(The PIT), Carly Ann Filbin (UCB), and Bobby Hankinson (Towleroad). 263-7868 | wpbrradioroom.com

Sept. 24-26 COMMUNITY

Blood Drives 9/24 - Bradshaw Acura, 2448 Laurens Rd. from 9 a.m.-noon 9/24 - Rosenfeld Einstein, 870 S. Pleasantburg Dr., 2-5 p.m. 9/25 - Bells Crossing Elementary School, 804 Scuffletown Rd, Simpsonville, 4-8 p.m. 9/26 - First Responders Day Event, 301 University Ridge, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 9/26 - Safety Day Event, Lowe’s, 3958 Grandview Dr, Simpsonville, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 9/26 - Mauldin BBQ Festival - 101 East Butler Rd, Mauldin, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 9/26 - Word of Life Ministries, 1023 West Georgia Rd, Simpsonville, 4-7 p.m. Blood donors save lives. dehrlich@thebloodconnection.org

thru Sept. 26 THEATER PRODUCTION

Greenbrier Farms 766 Hester Shore Rd., Easley 6-9 p.m. $65/person plus tax CONCERT

Bacon Brothers Public House and Terrapin Beer Co. collaborate at the farm for a nod to the great state of Georgia. Enjoy Greenbrier Farms fare paired with Athens, Georgia brews from Terrapin prepared by Georgia native chef Anthony Grey and his counterparts at Bacon Brothers Public House. 855-9782 greenbrierfarms.com amy@greenbrierfarms.com COMEDY TROUPE

Awkward Sex... and the City at The Radio Room Bent Frequency Duo Furman University, Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Hwy 8-9:30 p.m. FREE Bent Frequency Duo will perform as guest artists at Furman. The duo features Stuart Gerber (percussion) and Jan Berry Baker (saxophone). 294-2086 | FurmanMusic@furman.edu furman.edu/academics/music/Pages/default.aspx

The Radio Room 2845 N. Pleasantburg Dr. 9 p.m. $6 over 21, $8 under 21 at the door Raunchy storytelling show Awkward Sex... and the City comes to the Radio Room in Greenville for a night of uncomfortable laughs. Come watch NYC’s finest comedians relive their most awkward sex/ dating/relationship moments for your viewing pleasure. Featuring Creator/ producer Natalie Wall, Meghan O’Malley

TICKET OFFICE – GOING ON SALE – PEPPA PIG LIVE! PEPPA PIG’S BIG SPLASH

Jan. 30, 2016, 5 p.m. Peace Center Cost: $29-$39. VIP packages are available. On sale: Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 467-3000; Peace Center Box Office; peacecenter.org Additional info: Peppa Pig, star of the top-rated TV series airing daily on Nick Jr., is hitting the road. Peppa Pig’s Big Splash! promises to be the perfect theater show for all pre-schoolers.

COMPETITION DINING SERIES BATTLE OF CHAMPIONS

Oct. 28-Oct. 31 at 6 p.m. Renaissance North Hills Raleigh, 4100 Main at North Hills St., Raleigh, NC Cost: Tickets to attend the first three battles are $129 each excluding beverage, tax and service fee. Tickets for the final championship battle are $149 each excluding beverage, tax and service fee. On sale: Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. To purchase tickets: competitiondining.com Additional info: Chefs from the Carolinas compete in the Battle of Champions. Greenville series winner Chef Todd Warden of The Cliffs Valley will battle Chef Brent Martin of The Summit Room in Charlotte Oct. 30, to determine if he moves on to the championship battle Oct. 31.

COODER-WHITE-SKAGGS

Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. Peace Center Cost: $30-$60 On Sale: Sept. 18 at 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 467-3000; Peace Center Box Office; peacecenter.org Additional info: If you’re a fan of the blues, bluegrass or gospel, then you already know how exciting it is that these three musicians have come together. Ry Cooder, Sharon White and Ricky Skaggs - separate, they’ve made names for themselves with illustrious musical careers, and together... Together they are an unstoppable, musical tour-de-force.

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

The Odd Couple by Neil Simon Centre Stage | 501 River St. 8-10:20 p.m. | Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays Sundays at 3 p.m. $20, $25, $30 Neil Simon’s masterpiece comedy about a pair of mismatched roommates. One Apartment, Two Bachelors = A Great Evening of Fun. 233-6733 | centrestage.org information@centrestage.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Complete our easy-to-use online form at www.bit.ly/GJCalendar by Monday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in that week’s Journal.

Nov. 22 at 3 and 7:30 p.m. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Cost: $70, $60, $50, $39.50 On sale: Sept. 18 at 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 800-745-3000; GSP Box Office at The Bon Secours Wellness Arena; ticketmaster.com

MOTOWN THE MUSICAL

Nov. 24-29 Peace Center Cost: $25-$85 On sale: Sept. 18 at 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 467-3000; Peace Center Box Office; peacecenter.org Additional info: It began as one man’s story - became everyone’s music - and is now Broadway’s musical. “Motown The Musical” is the true American dream story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul.

Submit your Last Minute Ticket Sales for Upstate Events at bit.ly/LastTicketsGville For Upcoming Ticket Sales, enter them at bit.ly/UpcomingTicketsGJ


54 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.18.2015 | CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. PREFIXES SUFFIXED ACROSS

1 Thick-skinned river critters 7 Women’s soft hats of old 14 Crouches, as a catcher 20 Dream up 21 Turkey’s landmass 22 Career-track type 23 British hero sandwich? 25 Cut in half 26 Aunts, e.g. 27 Maglie of the old Giants 28 Be sickly 29 Give off 31 Certain tennis edge 33 “America” contraction 35 Person born to be an apartment manager? 42 Car made in an Alabama port? 45 Schoolyard rejoinder 46 Gap 47 Small brawl 48 “Drop — line” 49 Place for petri dishes 51 Hold tightly 54 Syringe causing a bad skin reaction? 58 Gmail rival 59 World finance org. 62 Holiday quaff 63 Thin, white mushroom 64 CBS drama 65 Advil rival 67 “Yipes!” 69 Printer resolution stat

70 Kids’ author Silverstein 71 Very busy checkout area? 75 “— to You” (2009 Lady Antebellum hit) 77 Lamprey lookalike 78 Pepsi or RC 79 Easily duped sort 82 Body filled with eau 83 Old TV’s Desi 85 The, to Jules 86 Pitchfork-shaped letter 87 Trim grass 88 Put-down during a visit with the doc? 92 John of plows 94 Takes as one’s own 95 Tar’s “Help!” 96 Doofus 99 Any of three English rivers 100 Pets that purr 102 Gregarious protester? 106 Beloved big rig? 110 Pal, to Jules 111 Big name in faucets 112 Process part 113 “As I see it,” online 115 Ending for percent 117 Harass 118 Like rabbis and shuls 122 PC shortcut used by inflation calculators? 127 Broad road 128 Celestial body circlers 129 Let the wind freshen 130 Not as bold

SEPTEMBER 26. 2015

By Frank Longo 131 Deluge 132 Vagabonds DOWN

1 “October Sky” memoirist Homer 2 Eager volunteer’s repetitive response 3 Ballpoint tip 4 Butter unit 5 Big name in elevators 6 State political bodies 7 GQ target 8 Take — loan 9 Brief mental glitch 10 Arum lily 11 Equine beast 12 More, to a maestro 13 Duel tools 14 1976 Sally Field title role 15 Packs it in 16 FedEx rival 17 Kong, e.g. 18 Small jerk 19 TV unit 24 Koteas of “Crash” 30 China’s — Zedong 32 Future lice 34 1973 novel by Toni Morrison 36 Theater level 37 Data plan datum 38 “Whoops!” 39 Multicolored 40 Tick by 41 Bring past a simmer again

43 Ida of old films 44 Early online protocol 48 Units of a million watts per ampere 49 Skimpy swimsuits 50 Here, to Jules 51 Gun, in slang 52 Senator Blunt

SUDOKU

53 Very versatile 55 Rationale 56 Inner: Prefix 57 Like bit-free orange juice 60 Folks not living in the past 61 Spoken with ease 66 Suffix with northeast 68 Struck out in editing

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

SPONSORED BY:

Medium

Sudoku answers: page 41

70 Realize 72 Quahog or geoduck 73 Spot for slots 74 Big small-screen star 75 Sgt. Friday catchphrase 76 Get from a pitcher anew 80 —’easter 81 She-sheep 83 British islet 84 Gives relish 89 Big oil gp. 90 Muzzle part 91 “The Bicycle Thief” director Vittorio De — 93 Dutch cheese 97 Act like 98 Denounces 100 Stage signal 101 Angle 102 Playwright de Beauvoir 103 PFC, e.g. 104 Rip to shreds 105 Bullion bars 107 Time release 108 Alternate 109 Underage 114 Arab country 116 Arab bigwig 118 Gridlock 119 Day before 120 Really little 121 Sign 123 Cote sound 124 Rink great Bobby 125 Banjo finale? 126 Coaching great Parseghian Crossword answers: page 41


CULTURE | 09.18.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 55

COMMUNITY VOICES THE SYMPTOMS WITH ASHLEY HOLT

The accidental purist Gnat showed up in a van he said he’d been driving for two weeks, but it looked like he’d owned it for 20 years. The outside was covered with dents, dirt and debris, and the interior contained fossil layers of convenience store and Burger King refuse, covering the once-pristine upholstery. He’d driven this monstrosity to visit me while I was pretending to get a college education in Savannah. In a weak moment of nostalgia for our hobo high school years, I had invited this dumpster diver to spend a few days with me in my new apartment. I was taken aback by his malodorous condition. Gnat brought the smell inside with him. He was wearing surgeon’s scrubs, making him look like the escaped mental patient he essentially was, and it became clear that this was his only set of clothes. Within an hour of his unpacking his belongings, every room in my apartment resembled his unfortunate vehicle. Gnat was, to put it kindly, untidy. Like Pigpen in “Peanuts,” he seemed capable of actually multiplying the filth around him. I’m generally okay with this. Since I engage socially with starving artists and streetwise hooligans, I know a lot of seriously filthy people. They avoid cleaning the toilet, the toaster oven or their own torsos, and being their pal means coming into contact with the toxic and potentially infectious environments in which they dwell. Within reason, this doesn’t bother me. Unlike so many germ-crazed citizens, I don’t feel the need to slather myself in sanitizer just because the lawn chair wasn’t hosed down with antibiotics. In fact, I think I share with most Americans a respect for good, honest filth. In spite of our germ phobia and constant showering, in spite of our cat-like vigilance against “the dirt we don’t see,” Americans worship mythic heroes who are filthy. Unwashed cowboys, greasy mechanics and factory workers, dusty ground troops, soot-smudged firemen, Tom Waits – we idealize them as the unshowered backbone of the country, and like them, we long to get sweaty, grimy and gross in the pursuit of personal accomplishment (provided we can scrub down with body wash afterward). Midwestern tourists may flock to Giuliani’s squeaky-clean, Disney-brand

SEPT. ��-��, ����

WE ARE New York, but they always lament that the grime and contamination of the old New York is gone. Maybe that’s why I had a soft spot for the Gnat. He was like that old New York – Kojak’s New York – that wonderland of crack houses and raw sewage, before the hipsters moved in with their graphic design and artisanal cheeses. The beautiful thing about damaged, unvarnished scuzzbags like Gnat is that they have no choice but to be their honest, gunk-encrusted selves. No attempt at gentrification, no pressurewashing or resurfacing, could alter his true, unfiltered, horrendously wretched self. Gnat and I had a long history of bohemian misadventures: ingesting unclean, non-FDA-approved substances in moldy basements, swigging beers with Black Sabbath in garbage-strewn cul-de-sacs, sleeping off weekend binges in bug-infested garages. We had been comrades in corruption. The trouble was that, in the intervening years, Gnat had enhanced his lifestyle of unwashed hooliganism and intoxication, while I had been tidying up. No longer did I leave dishes in the sink until they sprouted plant life. No longer did my refrigerator look like a laboratory experiment. I was embracing the clean life, Cloroxing the tank and tile, PineSoling the hardwood, Cascading the breakfast bowls. While I wasn’t exactly compulsive about my bathtub scrubbings, I was not, as Gnat preferred, using said tub as a toilet. And now, here he was, bringing to my lemon-fresh world

his filth and foul odor, soiling my sanitized adulthood with the putrescence of the past. I was resisting the urge to delouse him in a cloud of disinfectant. With bleach. He had to go. After a week of wallowing in this horror, I finally convinced Gnat it was time to pollute other regions. I helped him pack up his clutter and watched him drive away into a future of intermittent homelessness and jail time, then started dousing the apartment in cleanser immediately. I didn’t see Gnat again for another 12 years. He was living in a rented house – more of a shed – in North Charleston, and I invited myself over out of morbid curiosity. He wouldn’t let me inside. He said the place was a mess. Gnat, who I’d once seen blow his nose in his own bed linens, who allowed a pet ferret to use his car as a litter box, who had slept under bridges with no hope of a morning shower – that Gnat was now ashamed of his living conditions. We hung out at Hardee’s instead, where I watched him distribute ham and cheese particles all over his shirt and the floor, trying to imagine what “Grey Gardens” nightmare was inside that house. I never found out how bad the filth had gotten. I doubt he had any artisanal cheese in there. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at ashleyholt.com.

JUST GETTING STARTED, JOIN US AT THE TABLE. TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE euphoriagreenville.com

SUPPORTED BY

Greenville Journal


Beautifully crafted for life and living. The most beautiful sofas and chairs in the world didn’t get that way by accident. From the extraordinarily detailed tailoring to the handcrafted solid maple frames, when you buy a piece at Old Colony, you know you’re buying more than just a piece of furniture. You’re buying a lifetime of passion for quality and workmanship that you can feel every single time you sit down.

But don’t take our word for it, come sit for yourself.

50% Off

All Leather and Upholstery In-stock or custom order. Now through September 30th, 2015 only. Excludes Decorative Pillows.

3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330 | oldcolonyfurniture.com

A breathtaking blend of now and forever.

Profile for Community Journals

September 18, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

September 18, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

Profile for cjdesigns

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded