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AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC

…where listings actually SELL, too.

! ! BLE ORY IDA E HIST V I D L SUB VIL S – GREEN E R 3 AC ECE OF I AP WN

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100 Chapman Place $7,500,605

2513 Augusta St $2,999,605

5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathroom

5 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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112 Putney Bridge Ln $1,750,681 5 Bedrooms, 6 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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111 Rockingham Rd $1,700,607

114 Woodland Way $924,601

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4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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14 Parkins Glen Ct $819,607 5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 2 Powders

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4 Cromwell Ave $679,605

1225 Parkins Mill Rd $624,607

219 Boxwood Ln $567,601

5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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5 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

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The Word on the Street…

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AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong Owner, Broker in Charge 864-325-2112 Joan@AugustaRoad.com *Greenville’s Number One Realtor, for the past FOUR years. Source: MLS Sales Volume, 2015, 2014, 2013 & 2012

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Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690, Harry V. Roser, Broker-in-Charge and Cliffs Realty Sales, SC, LLC, 341 Keowee Baptist Church Road, Six Mile, SC 29682, Ivy Nabors, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Walnut Cove Realty, 158 Walnut Valley Parkway, Arden, NC 28704, Dotti Smith, Broker-in-Charge. *Subject to availability. Discovery Visit offer valid for first-time visitors only.

Imagine a place where families create friendships, make indelible memories and enjoy a lifestyle as active as it is diverse. Here, at The Cliffs, you’ll delight in a collection of seven nationally-acclaimed clubs in the lake and mountain regions of the Western Carolina mountains — all just minutes to Asheville and Greenville. Whether your choice is real estate or club membership, from the moment you choose to call The Cliffs home, you’ll enjoy the amenities of all seven Cliffs communities.

Arrange a Visit to Discover The Cliffs Today 866.411.5771 | go.cliffsliving.com/town Custom Homes • Expansive Estate Lots • Club Memberships GLASSY

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M O U N TA I N PA R K

WA L N U T C O V E

K E O W E E V I N E YA R D S

VA L L E Y

K E O W E E FA L L S

K EOWE E S PRI N GS

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We bring the world to your doorstep. LUXURY LISTING

120 E Round Hill Rd., Green Valley $2,495,000 | MLS#1335830 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345 LUXURY LISTING

29 Falling Star Way, Cliffs at Glassy $1,895,000 | MLS#1346224 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

LUXURY LISTING

1209 Mountain Summit Rd., Cliffs Valley $2,100,000 | MLS#1345505 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345 LUXURY LISTING

119 Snap Dragon Way, Cliffs at Glassy $1,595,500 | MLS#1346051 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

UNDER CONTRACT

400 E McBee Ave., Cityhomes at McBee $759,900 | MLS#1349406 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

LUXURY LISTING

LUXURY LISTING

8 Moss Falls Ln., Cliffs at Glassy $1,945,000 | MLS#1346522 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

570 Lawson Fork, Inman $1,895,500 | MLS#1346112 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

LUXURY LISTING

136 High Rock Ridge Dr., Cliffs at Glassy $1,495,000 | MLS#1346118 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

HISTORIC HOME

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $719,900 | MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

1551 Highway 56, Spartanburg $675,000 | MLS#1347108 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

LUXURY LISTING

605 Raven Rd., Cliffs at Glassy $1,100,000 | MLS#1345766 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

UNDER CONTRACT

921 High Knoll Way, Cliffs Valley $649,500 | MLS#1346119 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 UNDER CONTRACT

111 Foggy Cut Ln., Cliffs at Glassy $645,500 | MLS#1346049 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

240 Grandmont Ct., Charleston Walk $475,000 | MLS#1341159 Holly May 864-640-1959

30 Vaughn’s Mill Ct., Hamptons Grant $429,900 | MLS#1343442 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

316 Laguna Ln., The Courtyards on West Georgia $405,889 | MLS#1345193 Holly May 864-640-1959

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ia

Introducing our Newest Agents…

DEBRA OWENSBY

TIM HEATLEY

Sales Executive | 864-404-8295

Sales Executive | 864-561-1489

UNDER CONTRACT

1 Shinleaf Dr., Dove Tree $324,500 | MLS#1349486 Helen Sherman 864-593-7222

LOT

UNDER CONTRACT

51 Meadow Rose Dr., Woodland Creek $299,000 | MLS#1337960 Joseph Gobbett 864-553-1998

305 Shoally Ln., Shoally Ridge $269,900 | MLS#1348201 Joseph Gobbett 864-553-1998

LOT

519 Ivy Spring Ct., Stone Pond $236,900 | MLS#20188687 Nancy King 864-414-8701

6 Tropicana Ct., City Lights $239,900 | MLS#1347805 Holly May 864-640-1959

210 Lobelia Way, Cliffs at Glassy $249,900 | MLS#1343556 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580 SOLD

25 Brookdale Ave., Fair Heights $199,900 | MLS#1349764 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

325 Stillwater Ct., Windsor Forest $189,900 | MLS#1347811 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

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FIRST

Glance

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Recognized by Baby-Friendly USA for gold standards in mother/baby care practices. stfrancisbaby.org

Take a Seat: Who: Carl Sobocinski, owner of Table 301 restaurant group, celebrates the 20th anniversary of Main Street staple Soby’s this fall. Carl was a significant player in transforming Greenville’s downtown scene. For more, see “The Serial Restaurateur,” page 94. Where: The dining area of Italian restaurant and oysteria Jianna, Sobocinski’s latest endeavor located across from Falls Park at 600 S Main St, Greenville. Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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6 8

Contents 12 19

EDITOR’S LETTER THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

4 9

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

WEDDINGS TOWNBUZZ

Grab a book (and some Bordeaux) at Joe’s Place in the Pettigru Historic District; discover our cover artist Sunny Mullarkey McGowan’s bold prints with delicate details; enjoy an elegant escape at Charlotte’s Dunhill Hotel; The Warehouse Theatre’s Forum Series embraces tough topics; Shira Forge rebrands an age-old trade; and more.

59 PROFILE

Juan Gonzalez might be a businessman, but he’s inspiring a community of creatives with the group Spanish Writers.

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TOWN SPORT

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STYLE CENTRAL

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A trio of designers, protectors, and producers, Darren Meyer, Andrea Cooper, and Mike McGirr are an active force committed to sustaining the Upstate’s natural assets. / by John Jeter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

25 ON THE TOWN 38 43

HITTING THE DIRT

THIS PAGE: Blacksmith Matthew Shirey forges his iron creations with tools familiar to metal crafters of the past. For more see “Living History,” page 52.

THE SERIAL RESTAURATEUR

As Main Street staple Soby’s turns the big 2-0, Table 301 creator and overall Greenville champion Carl Sobocinski reflects on life and the legacy he hopes to leave behind. / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Paul Mehaffey

COVER: Local printmaker Sunny Mullarkey McGowan designed and pressed the original artwork for this month’s cover. For more, see “Block Party,” page 46.

Scope out the Carolina hunting season with our go-to guide. Slide into the season with school spirit (and a new outfit); local indie jewelers craft some killer trinkets.

MAN ABOUT TOWN

The Man realizes donning a sports cap comes with more commitment than he’s comfortable with.

83 MS. BEA WRIGHT

A wise Southern sage with a depth of insight, you never know what advice might come from the desk of Ms. Wright.

& DRINK 103 EAT Find scenic views and decadent foods

at Cashier’s Canyon Kitchen; slice into pork heaven with a plum chutney-glazed roast; follow the caffeine craze and take a coffee break (or two) at these local joints.

111 DINING GUIDE 118 TOWNSCENE Got plans? You do now. 128

SECOND GLANCE

Greenville Technical College’s RIVERWORKS gallery presents the colorful work of Paul Yanko.

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Live for the moment.

The 2018 E 300 Sedan has a mode for every mood. CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

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EDITOR’S

Letter September Highlights New Chapter

Joe’s Place relocates to Williams Street with a smattering of books, brews, and quality wines: page 43

Bridging Cultures

Juan Gonzalez unites culture and community with Greenville-based creative hub Spanish Writers: page 59

Northern Exposure

Writer Mary Cathryn Armstrong braves the Jackson County, North Carolina, hills for an adrenaline-packed adventure: page 63

Do As I Say Photograph by Eli Warren

Welcome Ms. Bea Wright as she wields a wealth of Southern wisdom: page 83

That’s an Idea

Hitting the Dirt

In their respective roles, a trio of land-lovers is championing the Upstate’s assets: page 86

Grand Canyon

Cashier’s Canyon Kitchen combines good views with superb food from Cutthroat Kitchen’s Chef Adam Hayes: page 104

O

n November 7, 1997, Carl Sobocinski hit gold. That day, his eponymous restaurant Soby’s opened in a former shoe store on Main Street. At the time, the Westin Poinsett Hotel was dilapidated and boarded up, and walking in that area of downtown was a questionable prospect at best. There was no trolley, no bookstore, no tables for shooting the breeze. But Sobocinski loved the building and the art of hospitality and knew he wanted a restaurant—right there. Today, nearly 20 years after its opening, Soby’s is the flagship of Sobocinski’s restaurant empire Table 301. It is arguably Greenville’s most known restaurant, turning out fried green tomatoes, crab cakes, and fried chicken in a classic brick building that feels both warm and refined, approachable yet upscale. Carl himself could be described this way, one of the most charming and down-to-earth CEOs you’ll ever meet—easy with a smile and intentional gaze. What unifies people who make things, change things, shift things for the better? It isn’t only insight. It isn’t just creativity. Sure, these are necessary and present in varying degrees. But the thing that unites such change-makers is defiance. A willingness to pursue goals, to push in a new direction despite obstacles. Why take a chance on a building in an area rife with crime and virtually no foot traffic? Because Carl Sobocinski understands that risk is the rub, and the edge offers the best view. Sometimes, an idea nags until we can no longer ignore it. Change begins within us, as it began in Carl and the other visionaries presented in our annual People Issue. They could’ve smothered the drive, the desire to shift. Instead, they nurtured their ideas with care, shelter, and sustenance. Our city, like all cities, is organic, in motion, shifting and pulsing and morphing each day. It is alive because we are alive. Change literally happens overnight, if we wish to acknowledge it. These individuals, and the people before them, have made Greenville what it is. What will it be tomorrow?

Artist Sunny Mullarkey McGowan rolls the ink onto her block for this issue’s cover. For more on Sunny and her work, turn to page 46.

@towncarolina

@towncarolina

facebook.com/towncarolina

bit.ly // towniemail

Photograph by Caroline Reaves

Blair Knobel, Editor-in-Chief blair@towncarolina.com

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OCTOBER 13, 14 & 15 Featuring special guest James Farmer, designer and author of A Place to Call Home

sponsored by For more information and tickets, call 864.546.4065 or visit gcma.org/antiques Presented by

GCMA TOWN AFAD Ad pg 1.indd 1

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RUN, DON’T WALK! LAST DAY TO SEE WYETH DYNASTY IS SEPTEMBER 10

Wyeth Dynasty In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N.C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 70 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. Join us for a FREE tour of Wyeth Dynasty before the exhibition closes. Thursday, September 7 11 am Sunday, September 10 2 pm

Special Thanks to

Exhibition Sponsor

CONTINUING ON VIEW THROUGH OCTOBER 22

Victoria Wyeth: My Andy This exhibition offers an intimate look into the life of Andrew Wyeth and his family, as photographed by his only grandchild, Victoria Wyeth. The exhibition features black-and-white photographs taken from 1993 to 2013 at the Wyeth homes in Maine and Pennsylvania.

Greenville County Museum of Art Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) Barefoot, 1992 ©Andrew Wyeth Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

admission free

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HOME IS WHERE YOUR STORY BEGINS... “I am a native of Greer and I love helping people find their first home, forever home or retirement home! Giving each client one-on-one customer service is something I strive to do. Buying or selling a home, The Grace Girls will take great care of you throughout the entire transaction. Let us help you with all your Real Estate needs!”

Paige Burkhalter REALTOR/BIC 864.444.6259

Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

WHAT DO YOU APPRECIATE ABOUT LIVING IN GREENVILLE AND THE UPSTATE?

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR

“The temperate and consistent weather. Oh wait, nevermind.”

Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR ABBY MOORE KEITH ASSISTANT EDITOR

“Born and raised in Greenville, I have a great sense of pride for the Upstate. It is my goal to go above and beyond for all my clients. The heart of real estate is relationships. Whether you are buying or selling, I can help you through the process.”

Meredith Shannon AGENT 864.616.4331

“I am a life-long native of Greenville County. I’ve been successfully licensed in Real Estate since 1993. Whether it be your Home Sweet Home, land or new construction, I have a vast knowledge of this business and the area. If you’re thinking of buying or selling real estate I would love to help you!”

Renee’ Stovall AGENT 864.420.7448

Bringing Real Estate back to the basics and adding a personal touch.

“Small town vibe with some big city advantages.”

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS RUTA FOX M. Linda Lee Steven Tingle Jac Valitchka

“Day-tripping to all the small towns surrounding us.”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mary Cathryn Armstrong, STEPHANIE BURNETTE, Kathryn Davé, Ron Friis, JOHN JETER & Stephanie Trotter CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & DESIGNERS Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David “That my wife Bonner, Jivan Davé, Whitney Fincannon, and most of Alexander Harrison, Jake Knight, REBECCA my family live LEHDE, Gabrielle Grace Miller, Sunny here, too.” Mullarkey McGowan, Eli Warren & Bethany Williams

“I love that there’s a lot of growth and energy in Greenville, but it’s still small enough that you feel you can make an impact as an individual.”

ANDREW HAUNG EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Zoe Nicholson EDITORIAL INTERN Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER

“The thing I most appreciate is, especially coming from the north, the Southern hospitality. People are always just waiting to smile.”

“The seasons (born in Florida, so that’s a big deal to me)! And the fact that people in Greenville love Greenville!”

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen David Rich VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

“The fact that Greenville is always evolving, always wanting to be even better.”

ACCOUNT MANAGERS Donna Johnston, Stephanie King, Rosie Peck, Caroline Spivey & EMILY YEPES TORI LANT DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER NATALIE WONG DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

“Having the mountains right in my backyard. It’s a wonderful escape each chance I get to road-trip through them.”

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

864-444-6259 • 103 LAKEFOREST DRIVE, GREER, SC 29651

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 7, No. 9) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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Now you don’t have to choose between looking good and feeling good! You can have it all at downtown Greenville’s first medical wellness and aesthetics concept Services include: • SculpSure • Botox • Juvederm • Cosmetic Surgery • Functional Medicine • Advanced IV Therapy • Health Restoration • Nutritional Programs Learn more at our Launch Events September 9th and 16th Two locations: Downtown Greenville & Greer, SC

864·214·5232 OptimalSelfMD.com

Shawn Birchenough, MD Plastic Surgery

Katherine Birchenough, MD Functional Medicine

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A growing neighborhood town center that welcomes everyone. Whether you visit, work or live here, Legacy Square is blossoming into a shining centerpiece filled with a thoughtful collection of local shops and services for all. Located at the heart of Verdae’s high-growth area, this multi-phase town center surrounds the northeast end of Legacy Park and will ultimately include 13 acres of quality commercial development that provides accessibility and convenience to area residents and more.

Join the Expanding List of Businesses Stella’s Southern Brasserie Carolinas Center for Oral & Facial Surgery Wagner Wealth Management NHE Property Management KDS Commercial Properties Dwayne Wood Architects Kathy Lenser Interiors

Legacy Square Phase 2 design by DP3 Architects

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Holliday Dental YMCA at Verdae Majik Touch Lockers Park View at Verdae SCBIO Headquarters Verdae Development Caldwell Constructors

Rocky Slope Road at Legacy Park New storefronts are taking shape & Phase 2 development is underway. For sales and leasing info, call (864) 329-9292 • verdae.com

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List z

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THE MONTH’S MUST- DOS

TIM MCGRAW AND FAITH HILL Antony and Cleopatra. Romeo and Juliet. Bella and Edward. Then Jacob. Then Edward again. There’s no question that country superstars Tim McGraw and Faith Hill are a power couple; between the two of them, the pair share countless awards bestowed by the Academy of Country Music, the Recording Academy, Billboard, and the Country Music Association—just imagine how many trophy cases they had to build. Now, the “This Kiss” singer and the man behind the hit single “Live Like You Were Dying” are combining forces again for the Soul2Soul World Tour. Whether they’re rocking solo or on stage belting it out together, these country crooners are simply legendary.

Photograph courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, Sept 15, 7:30pm. $80-$120. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

September 2017 SEPTEMBER 2017 / 19

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FIDELITY INVESTMENTS MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES Paying homage to the drive-in days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks outdoors in scenic Falls Park. More social than Netflix and less irritating than the sticky floors of the movie theater, it’s the best way to settle under the stars and welcome autumn. Falls Park on the Reedy, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Sept 6–27. Wed, 8pm. Free. (864) 467-4485, greenvillesc.gov/1324/ FidelityMoonlightMovies

THE BODYGUARD

You’ve been trying to hit Whitney’s high notes a la “I Will Always Love You” for years, so why not let some people with actual vocal chops give it a shot? The Bodyguard musical premiered 20 years after the film’s release and stays loyal to what made the original such an icon—action, intrigue, romance, and, of course, a killer songbook that pays tribute to one of music’s most influential artists. R&B singer Deborah Cox takes on the role of Rachel Marron, a pop diva who hires bodyguard Frank Farmer when she finds herself in the crosshairs of a killer. The pair grows closer as the case gets hotter and . . . well, you know the rest.

Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sept 11–17. Mon–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm. $35+. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

COUTURE FOR A CAUSE Recyclers rejoice—all those plastic grocery bags you’ve been hoarding have finally found their calling. Join the hubbub of artists, designers, and fashion fans for Greenville’s Couture for a Cause, a recycled runway competition benefiting the local chapter of the American Cancer Society. All outfits are crafted with repurposed goods and modeled by cancer survivors; don’t throw away your chance to experience the style, all for a great cause. West Village Lofts at Brandon Mill, 25 Draper St, Greenville. Thurs, Sept 7, 7–9pm. $75-$125. coutureforacausesc.org

Architects of Fine Custom Homes Custom Home Design — New Homes · Renovations · Additions · Restorations www.NealPrinceStudio.com · 864.235.0405 · Greenville, South Carolina 20 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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zWhat-Not-To-Miss /

INDIE CRAFT PARADE Much more exciting than sitting at home and trying to painstakingly stay inside the lines of your adult coloring book, the Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the South, with wares ranging from paper goods to prints to unique wearables. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so drop that needlepoint you’ll never finish and join the Parade. Huguenot Mill at the Peace Center, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Sept 16–17. Sat, 9–6pm; Sun, 11–5pm. $5 admission. makerscollective.org

AGATHA CHRISTIE’S THE MOUSETRAP

Novelist Agatha Christie is known for spinning a bloody yarn, blending together murder, revenge, mystery, and plenty of didn’t-see-that-coming moments. The Mousetrap is arguably the cream of the crime crop, pitting five strangers against one another—in a snowbound mansion, no less— to fight for their lives. Sergeant Trotter is on the scene when a young woman is murdered, and his investigation leads him to Monkswell Manor, where he’ll have nothing more than a nursery rhyme to help him crack this whodunnit before it’s too late.

SYMPHONY TOUR OF HOMES Normally if you want to get inside some of Greenville’s most exquisite homes, there’s a little bit of breaking and entering involved. Not okay. This year’s tour will showcase the Crescent Avenue area, highlighting the diversity of designs within this ever-evolving, upscale neighborhood community. A kickoff cocktail party at the home of Ellis and Mary Burnett Johnston will precede the tour on Tuesday, September 26. Crescent Ave, McDaniel Ave, Greenville. Sept 29–Oct 1. Fri–Sat, 10am–4pm; Sun, 1–4pm. $20-$25. (864) 370-0965, guildGSO.org

Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Sept 8–Oct 1. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

September 2017 Photograph courtesy of Makers Collective

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FEATURED HOMES

150 MOUNT VISTA AVENUE

$549,900

tract n o der C n U 28 CLUB FOREST LN ✦ $589,900

454 LONGVIEW TER ✦ $524,900

As Greenville grows and changes, choose a Realtor® you can trust – one who has lived and worked here for more than 20 years. Specializing in the Augusta Road area, Virginia is continually one of this town’s most award-winning agents for sellers and buyers alike, earning top honors through exceptional client service and market expertise.

221 CAMMER AVE ✦ $339,900

864.313.2986 VirginiaHayes.com SEPTEMBER 2017 / 21

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Quick HITS EUPHORIA

z There are some things that go hand-in-hand: rich wines seem to taste their best when complemented by some of downtown Greenville’s most appetizing and delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef dinners, cooking panels, and tastings, the festival has plenty of gustatory experiences to offer. Downtown Greenville. Sept 21–24. Times, prices vary. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

SIPPIN’ SAFARI

z Having more than a few cocktails on a Friday night may leave you feeling like an animal, but how about actually getting to partake in a party with the animals? This annual event supports the Friends of the Greenville Zoo program, mixing cocktails with cockatoos to fund our beloved hometown creatures. There will be zoo tours for visitors, musical acts, and a silent auction loaded with plenty of must-have items. Baboon imitations are strongly discouraged. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Fri, Sept 8, 6:30–9:30pm. $45. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

A MAN AND HIS PROSTATE

Photograph by Will Crooks

z No need to sugarcoat this one. The one-man show starring silver screen legend Ed Asner is all about, um, self-discovery. While on holiday in Italy, Asner’s character falls prey to prostate problems, landing him in a foreign hospital where (surprise!) no one speaks English. The sequence of events that follow— all of which is based on a true story crafted by comedy writer Ed Weinberger—is equal parts raunchy and hysterical, each priceless one-liner delivered with the grouse only an 87-year-old man in a backless hospital gown could deliver. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Mon, Sept 18, 3pm & 7pm. $34-$54. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

DREW HOLCOMB AND THE NEIGHBORS

z With the March release of their eighth studio album, Souvenir, Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors have proven they have the stuff to stick it in the music industry. Their gritty cocktail of Southernstyle music has landed them on numerous festival stages and supporting slots for some of the genre’s most prominent names including The Avett Brothers and Robert Earl Keen. The rootsy Tennessee natives are famous for their dynamic live shows, and they’re sure to bring it all out front and center for a rip-roaring night of rock and roll. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Sept 21, 7:30pm. $25-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

CLYBOURNE PARK

z The passage of time can heal many things. Unfortunately, deep-seated racial tensions and baseless discrimination aren’t among them. The Bruce Norris piece picks up where Lorraine Hansberry’s Broadway classic A Raisin in the Sun left off, with the Younger family attempting to move into the predominantly white neighborhood of Clybourne Park. The move is condemned by the white community, setting the wheels in motion for a tumultuous future. Roles are reversed when in 2009, a young white couple with dreams of razing the house and gentrifying the now all-black neighborhood face the same obstacles that affected the Youngers all those years ago. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Sept 22–Oct 8. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

Victoria Wyeth: My Andy When born into the artistic lineage of the Wyeth family, it’s expected that one shall follow the footsteps of creative nobility—no pressure. As the lone grandchild of the late Americana painter Andrew Wyeth, Victoria Wyeth does justice to her artistic legacy by documenting his last years in a collection of intimate shots, exposing the natural world Wyeth not only inhabited but so deftly captured in his paintings. Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. Thru Oct 22. Wed–Sun, times vary. Free. (864) 271-7570, gcma.org

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GREENVILLE

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Town

ON THE Joyce & Mark Kleinke

Euphoria’s Tapas & Tinis

David & Brenda Rich

July 14, 2017

Lacey & Gray Morgan

David Kent & Katelyn Goretzke James & Nicole McAden

Mona Thind, Krishna Patel, Anika Patel & Jitan Patel

Partygoers at Euphoria’s Tapas & Tinis at The Rutherford donned their summer cocktail best while enjoying small bites and strong beverages. Avocado toast, Key lime shooters, and four selections of Blue Point beer were just a few of the offerings at the foodie fest. Live music from Java accented the night of friends, food, drink, and plenty of dancing to kick off ticket sales for the festival, happening this month. Photography by Jake Knight

Heather Meadors, Nicole Zimmerman & Amy Springett

Ashley & Clay Brown

Amy & Mark Jew

Brian & Heather Barker with Kurt & Catherine Schumacher Chris & Susan Hare

Emily Neal & Kristen Hegel

Michael & Megan Thacker Sima & Neetu Patel

Erich Poley, Jenean Poley, Andy Turner & Carl Sobocinski

Karen Potter, Emily Ledbetter & Carley Draddy Jarrod Wiggins, Scott King & Johnathan Bragg

Bob White & Elizabeth Roller

Bryan & Annette Sanders

Brianna Shaw, Robin Stelling & Reagan Stelling SEPTEMBER 2017 / 25

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Virginia & Chris Hayes

Summer on Augusta VIP Kickoff Party June 13, 2017

Rhonda Rhodes-Stephenson, Kenny Rhodes & Amy Rhodes

One hundred members of the Augusta Road Business Association and guests started Summer on Augusta’s festival in a cheerful and casual setting at The 05, where they enjoyed an evening filled with food and beverages along with music from Louie Sagedy. Sponsors of the annual festival were treated to a night of fellowship and a preview of the shag dance contest and tomato pie competition. Guests learned of the Summer on Augusta events happening throughout the weekend and left with a homemade party favor—a hand-painted canvas from Hughes Middle School students. Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Chandler Parham, Savannah Gardner, Elizabeth Hunter & Sam Murry

Vicky McDonald & Sarah Lucas Cissy Nix & Caroline Brackett

“It’s attention to detail that makes the difference between average and stunning.” — Francis Atterbury

Clair Ray & Blake Brookshire

GREENVILLE 535 Woodruff Road 864.288.6290

ANDERSON 1718 Pearman Dairy Road 864.225.0884

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SPARTANBURG 530 S. Blackstock Road 864.587.9732

ClaytonTileCo.com

Scott & Caroline Dover

Chip Hunt, Lauren Hunt, Will Feemster, Carmen Feemster, Campbell Lewis, Annie Adams, John Greene & Kate Wright

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ON THE

Town

The Upstate’s BEST Rehabilitation!

Community Foundation Donor Event at Fluor Field June 13, 2017 The newly opened Champions Club at Fluor Field was bustling with 150 Community Foundation supporters this summer. While no peanuts or crackerjacks were found, catering from the Greenville Drive fed the crowd as they watched the Drive beat the Columbia Fireflies—and Tim Tebow—on Fluor Field. Donors, board members, and other friends of CF Greenville were treated to the funfilled evening for their continued support of the Community Foundation and Greenville as a whole.

Sue Priester & Magaly Penn

Lori & Larry Stuart

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

• 24 Hour Skilled Nursing Care • Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy • Rehabilitative & Restorative Programs • Accelerated Care Plus Therapy • Registered Dieticians • Vital Stem Therapy • Respiratory Therapy • Wound Therapy • Pain Management • Social Services • Admissions 7 days a week • Medicare & Medicaid Certified • Long-term caring staff • Recreation Therapy • Salon & Barber Shop services • Wireless internet available

Georgia Haas, Graham Paylor & John Paylor Marie Monroe & Jeff Dunlaevy

Frank & Patricia Backus, with Susan & Michael Cinquemani

Jenny Brazil & Emily Edwards

Bern & Candis McPheely

Dave & Frances Ellison

Beverly & Marvin Ward

NHC HealthCare Greenville 1305 Boiling Springs Road Greer, SC 29650

Matt & Jill Edwards

Cathy Grant, Bob Morris, & Susan Lady

(864)458-7566 SEPTEMBER 2017 / 27

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ON THE

Town

Flat Out Under Pressure at MAC Gallery June 24, 2017 Garland Mattox & Jacki Newell

Faith Chase & Sarah Farrar

Sammy Pangle & Michelle Jerdines

Kate Furman & Rakan Draz Gayla Day & Phillip Day

Kacce Lominack, Anne Woods & Sue Priester

Victoria Fitton & Steven Rogers

While the artists might have been under some stress, the Flat Out Under Pressure Awards at MAC Gallery was a laidback affair. Around 250 patrons of the arts dined on food from Reeves Catering and perused the 24-hour creations by Upstate artists for the annual FOUP contest. MAC director Alan Ethridge presented the awards, with first place going to Starr Haney. Greenville Health System, TD Bank, Duke Energy, and many other businesses sponsored the annual art competition, which is in cooperation with the City of Greenville. Photography by Jake Knight

Henk Vandyk & Lynn Greer

Shari Grace & Keith Grace Kristin Wence, Matt Wence & Bess Field Glory Day Loflin & Katie Fenske

Steve Calder, Caroline Calder, Kathy Schmedding, Eric Schmedding, Erika DeRoberts & Jan Davis Ann Hicks & Anne Woods

Landon Clark, Ashley Clark & Oivia Perreault

Edward Kinney & Elizabeth Kinney

Scott & Amanda Bradley

Reg Batson & Rebecca Batson

Jennifer Hagans & Lisa Bell

28 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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THE GMT-MASTER II Designed for airline pilots in 1955 to read the time in two time zones simultaneously, perfect for navigating a connected world in style. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL GMT-MASTER II IN 18 KT WHITE G OLD

rolex

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Pam Hall, Cary Hall & Judy Cromwell

Givens Parr: Narrative Objects Gallery Opening August 10, 2017 Purveyors and patrons of fine art gathered for Greenville painter Givens Parr’s latest exhibition opening at Hampton III Gallery. The artist’s lush still life paintings featuring everyday objects were the talk of the evening. On Saturday, August 12, Parr went in depth about her work at the gallery’s Coffee and Conversation series. The exhibition will be on display at Hampton III Gallery through September 16.

Evan Slavitt & Clark Jernigan

Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Xiao Yu, Givens Parr & Xiaoboo Hu

211 E. Park Avenue

Sally Kendrick & Mary Stark Kendrick

Joan Potter & Mary Lawson

$865,000

East Park Historic District! Fabulous 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath home steps away from Downtown. Over 5,000 square feet of living space. Originally constructed in 1910, this home was completely renovated in 2005 keeping with the Arts and Crafts details and all the modern conveniences one would expect. No expense was spared. Easy Swamp Rabbit Trail access and a new trolley route at your front door!

Tim & Ashley Parr John & Amelie Weems

We’re Everywhere

Nick Carlson Mobile: (864) 386-7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net

Emelia Stephenson & Jeanet Dreskin

30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Sandy Rupp & Givens Parr

Connor Brunson & Hallie Weems Bev Howard & Eleanor Welling

Tommy & Donna Dowling

Jim Tipton & Mary Louise Mims Henry Parr, Lily Parr, Roy Fluhrer & Elizabeth Barwick

9 Sherwood Street

$1,925,000

Over 5,300 sq. ft., 10 ft. ceilings on all levels, elevator, wide plank hickory floors, outdoor dining with fireplace, grill and phantom screens. The ultimate kitchen with top of the line appliances. Master suite fills the entire second level with sitting area, luxurious bath, two walk-in closets and his and her offices. Separate Casita, guest suite, enclosed crab orchard stone courtyard with fountain, three car garage and four porches with views of park and waterfall.

Paige & Lakin Parr

Alexis Furman & Haley Berthold

Brandon Cox & James Krenisky Jim & Peggy Parham

We’re Everywhere

Sharon Wilson Mercedes Bartow & Yuri Tsuzuki

Mobile: (864) 918-1140 sharon@wilsonassociates.net SEPTEMBER 2017 / 31

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Caledonia Elegance USC School of Medicine at the Metropolitan Arts Council July 18, 2017

Krupa Merchant & Francesca Tocci

CALEDONIA

Quinten Meadors & Jennifer Vassy

Science and art mixed for a casual evening at MAC’s downtown gallery. The annual event invited the incoming freshman class of Greenville’s medical school to mix and mingle with fellow classmates, MAC members, and other Greenville residents. Over light appetizers and drinks from Reeves catering, the future doctors and surgeons learned about Greenville’s thriving arts scene as well as MAC’s busy schedule of events from director Alan Ethridge. The reception was the perfect way to welcome the new batch of Greenville transplants to the city. Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Weddings & Events Carved among century’s old Live Oak Trees draped with Spanish moss, Caledonia is a unique setting built on the site of a 1700’s rice plantation. Steeped in history, the property’s founders trace back to Pawleys Island’s namesake – Elizabeth Pawley, who

Caroline Faircloth & Bekah Bowie Thomas Berault & Jon Vandenberg

was married to Caledonia’s original founder Dr. Robert Nesbit a Scotsman.

John Naselli & Susan Cordero

Whether it is for a wedding, part of a corporate retreat, a truly special place awaits your special event. And don’t forget world class golf while you’re here – our course was built by “The Maverick” Architect Mike Strantz. Arielle Houston, Michael O’Brien, Mikaela Conley & Jessica Accardi

CaledoniaGolfAndFishClub.com | 843-222-9249

PHOTOS BY: PASHA BELMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Julie Barton, Emily Schumann & Lauren Jones

Samuel Shelhos & Samantha Cuff

32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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ON THE

Town

Run on Clouds.®

Chris Doran & Addison Brandt Abigail Laughter, Michala Tesne & Claiborne Lucas

Victoria Dillard, Danielle Godfrey & Kellie Shell

Susan Ward & Alex Howard

Sam McCoy & Tyler Seckel

Sarah Thibaudeau & Connor Evins

Shauna Owen & Megan Lee

Suzanne Purvis & Catilin Purvis

Brent Sinopoli & Viloa Mueller

“On combines the best of a traditional and minimalist running shoe while staying exceptionally light.” — THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Meghan Willard & William Weibley James King & Jessica Bigner Matthew Kavolus & Paula Kavolus

SHOES • HANDBAGS • ACCESSORIES 864.271.9750 | MUSESHOESTUDIO.COM 2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE SEPTEMBER 2017 / 33

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ON THE

Town

Matthew Smith & Hillary Smith

Deshaun Watson at Maserati of Greenville July 22, 2017 Mia Pressley & Hassan Pressley

Kristi Dickinson, Greg Dickinson, Rachel Dickinson & Gary Dickinson

Marshall Skoloff, Eric Skoloff & Sam Skoloff

Linda & Skip Wilson

Eric & Katie Skoloff

Cathy Frasher & Xavier Dye Paige Baker & Hillary Baker

Diehard Tiger fans were treated to the chance of a lifetime at Maserati of Greenville. The invite-only event provided Clemson supporters the chance to meet and mingle with The Rook himself, Deshaun Watson. Watson signed memorabilia for a few children (who were decked out in their orange-and-purple best, of course) and chatted with the small crowd about his rise to greatness. Glenn Sawicki from Saffron’s provided a medley of cheeses and prosciutto for guests to dine on. The event marked one of the last for Watson before he took off for NFL training camp in Texas. Photography by Bonfire Visuals

Michael Eaton, Christie Draddy, Ricardo Carrasco & Tori Frasher

Bryan Sloan, Karen Sloan & Megan Powers Bard Parks & Paul Nipper

Abi & Grant Dickinson Cathy Frasher, Jack Frasher & Deshaun Watson

Michael Foster & Walker Miller

Melanie Maloney & Chrisi Frasher

Steven Tolleson, Brian Boughner & Anthony Mahfood

Rachel & Gary Dickinson

Rob Frasher, Joe Frasher, Michelle Frasher & Marc Balsa Derek & Dee Bowen

Kian Razzaghy, Janette Sparano, Michael O’Shea & Judy O’Shea

Steve & Sheryl Knupp

Billy Powers, Kathy Powers, Blair Haag & Randal Haag

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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101 Hemingford Circle

101 McAlister Lake Drive

MCALISTER ACRES

KINGSBRIDGE

7 Oakview Drive

AUGUSTA ROAD

26 Wilmont Lane

AUGUSTA ROAD

We’re Everywhere

Blair Miller

blair@wilsonassociates.net, Mobile: (864) 430-7708

104 Brookview Circle AUGUSTA ROAD

17 Ben Street

ALTA VISTA

00 Biltmore Drive (Lot)

7A Meyers Drive

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AUGUSTA ROAD

445 Longview Terrace

ALTA VISTA

AUGUSTA ROAD

8/16/17 9:30 PM


GREENVILLE’S

REALTOR *

MELISSA MORRELL - 2017 Year To Date

Beautiful Music for Beautiful Minds

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August 4, 2017

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Guests at the annual Beautiful Music for Beautiful Minds event spent an evening tapping their toes at The Old Cigar Warehouse downtown. The VIP reception benefitted the Gateway Clubhouse and its mission to support and help bolster the confidence of adults living with mental illness in the Greenville community. A live and silent auction, open bar, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and music from Steel Toe Stiletto helped Gateway to raise money and change lives.

Lauren Dean, Morgan Cook & Coleen Buckley

Photography by Jake Knight Sue McConnell, Randy Redlinger & Annette Sanders

Richard & Susan Strauss

Pam & Mike May

Rose & Kevin Mihaly Lizz Walker & Donna Gottschall

INVENTORY IS LIMITED. BUYER DEMAND IS HIGH. INTEREST RATES ARE LOW. THE TIME IS NOW TO SELL YOUR HOME!

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John Amstrong & Rebecca Swanson

Rachael & Steven Baldassarra with Kristine & David Berger

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ON THE

Home Backup Power…

Town

Edward & Barb Turner

Erik Personius & Stephanie Famelis

Kenya & Chuck Ford

Bobby Barreto, Sullivan Short & Bob Barretto

Caroline Krcelic & Paul Ogletree

Lamont & Shonette Sullivan

Katie Burras, Ron Harmon & Haley Wortkoetter

Susan & Gerald Schultheis

Financing Available!

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Moira Gillespie & Sarah & Pace Amanda Owens Beattie

Ulrike Bonn, Christina Koelz-Likidis, Lukas Bonn, Thomas Bonn & Christian Voelk

A Service of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

For information or a free estimate, call 1-800-240-3400 SEPTEMBER 2017 / 37

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TOWN

Weddings

/ by Zoe Nicholson

Anna Kunst & Christopher Deschenes April 25, 2017

O

n Christopher Deschenes’s 25th birthday, he had little clue a serendipitous meeting would result in a life-altering gift— a reunion with his biological family, whom he had never met before. But this newly discovered familial connection would also lead Christopher to the best present of all, his future bride, Anna Kunst. Christopher was introduced to Anna through his half-sister, and the very night they met, he leaned over to his sister and whispered, “I’m going to marry that girl one day.” Anna and Christopher spent the next

38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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four years falling deeply in love, and since Christopher knew for a fact he would marry Anna, it was only natural to take the next step to making this dream a reality. In the midst of Hurricane Joaquin at a Clemson football game, Christopher transformed his college gameday sign into a proposal, kneeling down in the rain and mud to ask Anna to be his. The wedding took place on a 300-year-old estate in Ireland, the couple’s ancestral home. The ceremony

Irish Ayes: Anna and Christopher’s nuptials reflected their ancestral roots with a beautiful ceremony at Glouster House and Gardens, a 300-year-old estate in Brosna, Birr, County Offaly, Ireland.

featured ancient Celtic wedding traditions, including a handfasting ceremony and plenty of Irish whiskey. Anna wore an elegant gown from The Poinsett Bride. The couple resides in Greenville, where Anna is a staff coordinator at New Horizon Family Health Services and Christopher owns a flooring business. HALEY OZIER PHOTOGRAPHY

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TOWN

Weddings Elizabeth “Lizz” Gerrity & Robert Pingry June 10, 2017 Lizz Gerrity’s and Robert Pingry’s romance is the classic tale of cheerleader falls for boy-next-door. Their meet-cute happened at a Purdue University football game, where Rob snagged Lizz’s number when she came to his section in the stands to encourage them to cheer. Fast forward five years, and Rob was ready to make his all-American sweetheart his wife. Pretending to have arranged a private dinner to get Lizz to the terrace, Rob eagerly dropped to one knee and asked her to be his forever. Lizz just as eagerly accepted. The ceremony and reception were held at Wyche Pavilion, the ideal setting to show-off to guests their beautiful new home city of Greenville. Lizz is a marketing supervisor at National Land Realty while pursuing her master’s at Clemson University, and Rob is an engineer at Koyo Bearings. ANGELA COX ZION // ANGELA ZION PHOTOGRAPHY

Katelyn Elizabeth Horn & Nicholas Williams May 6, 2017 Some say love is a race to the finish line, but Katelyn “Katie” Horn and Nick Williams skipped the race altogether. The fun-loving couple met in Charleston two years ago, where they both decided to forgo the annual Cooper River Bridge Run and head straight to the festivities. Their instant connection prompted a few months of long-distance dating, but Columbia-resident Katie made the move to Greenville once she knew Nick was The One. In Greenville, the two bought a house together, and it was after a stressful week of moving that Nick offered Katie the key to his heart, with a diamond ring attached. The ceremony took place at Nick’s home church, Mauldin United Methodist, and the reception was held at the Westin Poinsett. Now settled in Greenville, Katie is a wedding planner at Katie Williams Events and an office assistant at Eller Tonnsen Bach Attorneys at Law, and Nick is a buyer at ZF Transmissions. JENNIFER STUART PHOTOGRAPHY

Elizabeth Bomar & Wes Paul May 13, 2017 College sweethearts Elizabeth Bomar and Wes Paul began dating their senior year at Presbyterian College, but chose to focus on careers before cementing their love in marriage. After eight years together, which included master’s degrees and house renovations, Wes was ready to pop the question, and knew just the place to propose. The couple had planned a vacation to Great Exumas, Bahamas, and it was in that exotic oasis Wes asked Elizabeth to be his forever. The ceremony and reception took place eight months later at the Bahama Beach Club on Treasure Cay, where 38 of their closest friends and family joined to celebrate. The intimate tropical setting was the ideal spot for the couple to begin their new life together. They now reside in Greenville, where Elizabeth is an adoption supervisor at Region 1 Adoptions, and Wes is a CPA at PricewaterhouseCoopers. GABRIELLE MANNI SAWYER // ABACO WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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INSPIRATION AWAITS

2017- 2018

SEASON

LISTEN/ESCUCHA: CELEBRATING HISPANIC HERITAGE Free Peace Voices Event SEPTEMBER 7 THE BODYGUARD SEPTEMBER 11-17

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW

SCHOOL OF ROCK

PERFORMING BLONDE ON BLONDE

OCTOBER 21

THE AMERICAN CHAMBER PLAYERS Peace Chamber Concert Series OCTOBER 26

OCTOBER 29

FUN HOME SEPTEMBER 26 - OCTOBER 1

LES MISÉRABLES OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 5

THE SIMON & GARFUNKEL STORY OCTOBER 3

STRAIGHT NO CHASER NOVEMBER 14

TAJMO: THE TAJ MAHAL & KEB’ MO’ BAND OCTOBER 5 TREVOR NOAH OCTOBER 8 THE JAMES HUNTER SIX Rock the River Concert Series OCTOBER 11 SWEET PLANTAIN Peace Chamber Concert Series OCTOBER 12 EDDIE PALMIERI LATIN JAZZ ORCHESTRA: EDDIE AT 80 OCTOBER 19

ON YOUR FEET!

PICTURES & WORDS: MOTIONPOEMS HIGHLIGHTS BLACK POETRY Free Peace Voices Event FEBRUARY 22

DECEMBER 26–31

THE COLOR PURPLE

(ON SALE SEPTEMBER 8)

DREW HOLCOMB AND THE NEIGHBORS Rock the River Concert Series SEPTEMBER 21

DEANA CARTER

SPECIAL GUEST SWEET TEA TRIO

DECEMBER 5–10

(ON SALE SEPTEMBER 22)

TARA ERRAUGHT: IN RECITAL Peace Chamber Concert Series JANUARY 12 PALMETTO POETS: SPEAKING OF THE SOUTH Free Peace Voices Event JANUARY 18 NEW YORK POLYPHONY Peace Chamber Concert Series JANUARY 20

CIRQUE MECHANICS: PEDAL PUNK NOVEMBER 16 MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER CHRISTMAS NOVEMBER 20 WILL DOWNING’S SOULFUL SOUNDS OF CHRISTMAS FEATURING AVERY SUNSHINE NOVEMBER 24 ROBERT EARL KEEN’S MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM THE FAM-O-LEE NOVEMBER 28

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

(ON SALE OCTOBER 6)

JANUARY 31 - FEBRUARY 11 BROOKLYN RIDER Peace Chamber Concert Series FEBRUARY 15 LES BALLETS TROCKADERO DE MONTE CARLO FEBRUARY 16 RAIN - A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES FEBRUARY 20 MAVIS STAPLES FEBRUARY 21

@peacecenter TOWN_blank page.indd 6

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

(ON SALE NOVEMBER 10)

MARCH 13-18

WOMEN WITNESSING THE WORLD THROUGH WORDS Free Peace Voices Event MARCH 29 THE UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN APRIL 17 FOR POETRY’S SAKE: CELEBRATING NATIONAL POETRY MONTH Peace Voices Event APRIL 26 WAITRESS

(ON SALE NOVEMBER 10)

MAY 8-13

THE HOT SARDINES MAY 17 LOVE NEVER DIES

(ON SALE NOVEMBER 10)

JUNE 12-17

POETRY WITH PRIDE: CELEBRATING PRIDE MONTH Peace Voices Event JUNE 28

GROUPS 8/16/17 9:31 PM


TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Photograph by Rebecca Lehde

The Inside Story Joe’s Place offers a fine collection of reads, coffee, and wine in a quaint new space

SEPTEMBER 2017 / 43

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TOWN

Buzz

Feeling Bookish: Enjoy your read with a sparkling white or a full-bodied red— the bookstore’s wine options are available by the glass or in a wine flight. The coffee bar (above right) features a variety of brews crafted from Due South Coffee Roasters’ beans, as well as nibbles from Upcountry Provisions.

New Chapter Family-owned Joe’s Place brings books and more to historic Williams Street / by Abby Moore Keith // photography by Rebecca Lehde

T

he best bookstores are a cocktail of three essential ingredients: book-lined shelves for getting sufficiently lost; a quiet spot to sink into the magic of a well-told story; and an overall aura of comfy, neighborly charm. Of course it doesn’t hurt if a toasty mug is involved, and if you’re at Joe’s Place, there might even be a glass of wine. If this sounds like print paradise to you, a few hours spent perusing the pages of this delightful family-run shop is well worth an outing. Owned by Alix and Mary Bernard, Joe’s Place is a used bookstore three years in the making, named for Mary’s late brother Joe, a lover of a good read. Formerly of the West End, the shop now operates (as of July) in an early twentieth-century home on the corner of Williams and Washington streets. “We decided we loved what we were doing and wanted to invest in ourselves,” Mary explains of the recent move—in other words exit the renting world and purchase a place that was all their own. The challenge was finding where to go. After scouring the West End for the ideal venue, Mary and Alix turned to the area around the Pettigru District, and found their dream spot right across the street from the Poinsett Club. “As soon as we walked into this one,” Mary says, “it was like, oh my gosh, this is a great bookstore.” A great bookstore perhaps, but one in need of some significant renovations. Utilized as commercial office space for decades, the building was not only dirty and dusty but, according to Alix, even “the kitchen was missing the floor.” Capital Construction of the Carolinas came in and, among many improvements, added a staircase, an electric lift to the second floor, and spiffied up the side porch—one of the shop’s countless spots to sip wine and settle into a good read.

A tour of the new space reveals periwinkle-gray walls and white bookcases. A downstairs wine bar boasts a repurposed wood ceiling, and just past the plump red armchairs—previously of the Grove Park Inn—there’s an espresso bar where the building’s old, unused doors are incorporated into its structure. Here you’ll find brews from Due South Coffee Roasters, complete with an exclusive “Joe’s Place” espresso blend. A variety of comestibles from Upcountry Provisions is available, along with Lowcountry Ladle and LaRue Fine Chocolates. Alix’s artwork—he’s a painter and illustrator—lines the walls, including a delicate watercolor of their new building, which was Mary’s Christmas present. Upstairs is where the remaining books live. The rooms, which can be reserved for meetings, are themed according to genre, and offer a mix of window seats, benches, and even a table from the Blue Ridge Dining Room at the Grove Park. There are hundreds of books ranging from biographies to local mysteries to fantasies, and though most are used, a portion of their inventory is new. “Used doesn’t necessarily mean old,” Mary explains. “Although, we do have vintage books here, which is one of my husband’s passions.” If Alix’s passion is vintage books, Mary’s is vintage wines. Or just wine in general. Joe’s Place hosts regular wine classes, featuring eclectic bottles and progressive food pairings. Wines available for tasting are often from small, family-owned vineyards, continuing a community-centric theme that’s woven into the entire store. From the monthly trivia nights to live music to the welcome messages sketched onto the foyer’s chalkboard wall, Joe’s Place is the definition of a neighborhood bookstore. Joe’s Place, 2 Williams St, Greenville. Mon–Thurs, 8am–7pm, Fri, 8am– Until, Sat, 10am–Until. Closed Sundays. (864) 558-0828, joesplacellc.com

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OUTSIDE THE

Box

Block Party Sunny Mullarkey McGowan crafts bold cuts inspired by nature’s details / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Eli Warren

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imple and bold. That’s how artist Sunny Mullarkey McGowan interprets the natural world in her black-and-white linocut prints, mimicking her feelings about nature in her artwork. Simple, in that her inspiration may be sparked by a plant or a bird she spies during a walk in the woods with her husband and three children; bold, in the silhouette of mountain peaks inked in stark black-and-white relief; and delicate in the details, depicting the tiny scales on a moth’s wing or the feathers of a bird. “I’ve done many prints with scenes inside the wings of moths or beetles,” says Sunny. “That was an exploration of my appreciation for the grandeur of nature, recognizing and honoring the tiny details that are often overlooked.” Carving her designs into blocks of linoleum and inking them with black oil-based ink, Sunny creates graphic black-and-white prints on fibrous Japanese Unryu paper, which she hand-pulls with the help of a disk-like tool called a baren. “I love the physical act of carving and the fact that I have to think in reverse,” she claims. “Every mark I make with my carving tool leaves a little bit of texture behind and creates an un-inked surface.”

Print Quality: (Clockwise from left) Our cover artist Sunny Mullarkey McGowan in her home studio; Gingko; A World Within a World; and The Western Wind. The above pieces are linocuts, or prints created from designs on linoleum blocks. Sunny utilizes Japanese Unryu paper for her print designs, as well as oilbased ink.

The printmaker and painter comes by her artistic talent naturally. Her mother is a quilter, so Sunny grew up helping choose colors and fabrics for her mother’s quilts. In high school in Beaufort, South Carolina, the budding artist took every art class offered. Luckily, one of her teachers, Melba Cooper, recognized the teen’s talent and encouraged her to apply for the Governor’s School— then just a summer intensive course held at Furman University. After high school, Sunny studied visual and media arts at Anderson College and the University of South Carolina respectively before taking a break from school as a fifthyear senior. “And I’m still on that break,” she declares, laughing. Sunny finds her most rewarding artistic moment when she takes an idea from a drawing to a carved block to a final print, and then sees the design is exactly what she envisioned. Just as satisfying is sharing that joy with others, especially her children, all of whom are interested in art. Case in point: during the last week of school this year Sunny’s youngest child came running out holding a piece of matte board on which she had painted a bright, beautiful explosion of color. She handed it to her mother and exclaimed: “Mom, it’s my passion!” as if she had actually brushed her passion onto the canvas. The artist was struck by her daughter’s ardor for art: “To be able to create something, and play, and express yourself in a way that words can’t is a wonderful gift to have as a family.” You can see Sunny’s art at her new studio at 547 Perry Avenue in the Village of West Greenville on First Fridays and by appointment. If you’re driving past the Hammack Law Firm at 223 W Stone Avenue, look for the black-and-white mural Sunny designed and painted with the help of Furman students this summer. For more of Sunny’s work, visit sunnymullarkey.com.

46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Towner

UP

Made for T.V. Altanta fashion designer and Project Runway runner-up Edmond Newton comes to Greenville / by Jac Valitchka

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enacity plus personality makes for good reality television, and for clothing designer and Union County native Edmond Newton, both of those attributes landed him a spot (after 10 seasons of trying) on the hit show Project Runway in 2015. He’s based in Atlanta where he creates his eponymous line of men’s and women’s clothing. Catch him in Greenville as a celebrity judge for the charity runway competition “Couture for a Cause” on September 7. OK, so let’s just get to this right away: what is the most “notreal” part of reality TV? >> Wow! OK, I am not able to speak out on other reality shows, only the ones that I have been a part of. I would say the most “not-real part” would be the part that we—meaning the competitors—do not see when you are actually being filmed. Everyone always asks if we had more time to create our looks. I can say that those deadlines are real. When Tim Gunn enters the room and announces, ‘It’s time to go to the runway,’ there is no more time. The deadlines that you watched at home on your television and intense pressure that we were under are real.

Hats Off: South Carolina–born fashion designer Edmond Newton lives and works in Atlanta, where he creates his eponymous line of women’s and men’s clothing. The Project Runway 2015 runnerup will be a celebrity judge at Couture for a Cause, September 7, 7–9 p.m., at the Lofts at Brandon Mill.

Why was it so important to you to keep applying and trying for 10 seasons to get on Project Runway? >> When I first heard about the show, I did not know what to expect, because the show had never aired before. I felt in my heart that this show had been created especially for me. From there I was determined to get on it. I wanted to use it as platform to showcase to the world my design abilities; I wanted to win the prizes to expand and grow my fashion house; and I wanted to prove to everyone out there that if you have a dream and you stick to it, it can come true. How profoundly did being on the show—especially as a runner-up—affect your career and your life? >> Being on Project Runway instantly elevated my career to a whole new level. Runway gave me the exposure that I needed to make the EDMOND NEWTON brand become global. My entire life was already full of experiences that influence a lot of the creative visions that I use today. Since the exposure from being on the show, I’ve been able to gain so many more life experiences: traveling to exotic locations, meeting fans, celebrities, new clients, and individuals from all walks of life. Describe what your signature style element is. >> I am all about balance when designing. I always incorporate sexiness into anything that I design, whether it be women’s wear or menswear. I would say that my signature style element is sexiness. As a success-driven man, what do you think is the recipe for success? >> You have to be so focused and driven that people think that you are crazy. As an artist, everyone may not understand your vision, but do not change or give up on it. The vision was given to you, and your challenge is to bring that vision to reality for the world to see.

))) FOR MORE INTERVIEWS, GO TO TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Photograph by Carlos Jones; courtesy of Edmond Newton

What do you see happening for your career from here on out? >> I see the EDMOND NEWTON brand continuing to build and grow, providing many different elements of luxury fashion, goods, and services. I am also currently working on my book, which tells the struggle of my journey of getting to Project Runway. The book will be available in 2018 and will be available for pre-order on my site: edmondnewton.com.

48 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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TOWN

Buzz

Pass the Mic

The Warehouse Theatre’s Forum Series fosters meaningful conversations / by Zoe Nicholson // illustration by Alexander Harrison

T

he theatre is in a unique position to enact social change through artistic expression, and Greenville’s Warehouse Theatre is taking the task to heart. From the Main Stage to Main Street: the simple mission of the Warehouse’s forum series is to delve into the drama on stage to help stimulate thoughtful discussion on social experience. “Theatre is one of the oral histories,” Warehouse producing artistic director Mike Sablone says. “So examining the history of the community is extremely important.” Drawing from whatever is on stage, the series “focuses a lens,” as Sablone puts it, and zeroes in on a relevant theme to the community. “It really allows us to get into the more vibrant and alive topics worth examining,” Sablone says. Panelists are drawn from all sides: the privilege panel held last spring featured wealthy businessmen, minorities, and stay-at-home moms. The March discussion, titled “Of All My Sons, Who Is Really Privileged?,” offered six completely different viewpoints on life in America, which created an open conversation that examined privilege from the perspective of race, sexuality, gender, and religion. The panel was Sablone’s first introduction to the forums. “It was spectacular. Watching this community talk about things that aren’t comfortable to talk about but doing so with grace, humility, and respect was really moving,” he says. The sensitive topics can be difficult to navigate, but longtime moderator Jonathan Parker conducts the discourse with mindfulness. “You’re going to want to run out of the room, but we don’t want you to because this conversation is too important,” Parker says of the honest dialogue, where touchy words like racism and white privilege aren’t shied away from. But the conflict is vital; fires of change

can’t burn without friction. “A pooling of agreement is not helpful,” Parker says. “If all our panelists agree, we have failed.” This month’s show, Clybourne Park, tackles changing communities throughout two time periods: the 1950s and now. The play by Bruce Norris, which bookends the events that occur in Lorraine Hansberry’s play A Raisin in the Sun, focuses on an issue Greenville is grappling with: gentrification. “Even after only living here for six months, I can tell how much gentrification is a part of Greenville. The growth is spectacular. At the same point, you want to examine the cost of that growth,” Sablone says. The hefty subject warrants two forums, which will look at Greenville’s growth during two time periods: pre–Main Street revitalization and now (post-hashtag). The Warehouse wants to give a platform for both sides to come together and air out the problem. “It doesn’t matter if you’re right, wrong, indifferent,” Parker says, “what matters is that we’re talking about it.” The talk will include developers like early Main Street advocate Merl Code and people who have been affected by rising rents. No matter what perspective or argument is brought to the theatre, Parker ensures that all voices will be heard with three simple rules: disagree with dignity, listen with intentionality, and respond with sensitivity. While the forums seek to change minds and open eyes, you might get dirty and you might sweat. And that’s okay. “This is a safe place to have unsafe conversations,” Parker says. It’s a place to be heard, to be challenged, and to be changed.

Real Talk: The Warehouse Theatre’s forums on its upcoming show Clybourne Park will be held on Wednesday, September 20 (part one) and October 4 (part two) at 6:30 p.m. at the Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Showings of Clybourne Park will play immediately after the forums. Tickets can be purchased at warehousetheatre. com/tickets.

50 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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BY

Design

Shape Shifter: Sylva, North Carolina, blacksmith Matthew Shirey has always been drawn to ways of the past. At 19, he discovered his passion for crafting functional, one-of-a-kind work in the forge; (left) a custommade ax by Shirey

Living History Blacksmith Matthew Shirey forges timeless metal tools that honor old ways / by Kathryn DavĂŠ

// photography by Paul Mehaf fey

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M

ost 19-year-olds don’t set out to become a blacksmith—at least not today. But 200 years ago, such a career choice was as common as going to medical school or majoring in business. Matthew Shirey was not most 19-year-olds. A history buff since a young age, he felt compelled by an old skill that was once a community fixture, now just a rare craft. Blacksmithing almost disappeared, for a time. It is artisans like Shirey who give it breath today. His path to the small Shira Forge workshop in Sylva, North Carolina, is simple, though certainly one less traveled. Shirey grew up fascinated by frontier life, famous wilderness men like Daniel Boone, and the “old ways of doing things.” He discovered living history reenactments in high school, where he was first introduced to blacksmithing. At 19, he decided to take a weekend blacksmithing workshop at a local state park in his home state of Pennsylvania. Two days with the forge and the anvil had him transfixed. “I knew immediately this is what I wanted to do,” he says.

He went on to become a welder and carpenter, but poured his free time into learning the art of blacksmithing. “I bought a hand-crank forge for 50 dollars, borrowed an anvil, and just started hammering away,” he explains. His whole-hearted pursuit paid off when he moved to Waynesville, North Carolina, to work at a Boy Scouts camp. He found a community that celebrates craft and decided to stay, teaching carpentry, taking on metalworking commissions, and refining his distinct style. Shirey’s work is a visual and tactile nod to time past. Across his knives, cookware, axes, and bottle openers, the mark of the forge is clear. His tools don’t hide the maker’s hand; they glow, almost, with warmth, authenticity, and soul long after the forge has gone cold. Other contemporary metalworkers are turning out sleek, modern pieces, but Shirey is quick to admit that he’s not after knives with a shiny, mirror finish. “My process is very forge-intensive,” Shirey says. “I try to do as much of the work in the forge as I can. I’ll hammer out 90 percent of the shape right there in the forge.” SEPTEMBER 2017 / 53

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BY

Design

Into the Fire:

Shirey’s Appalachianinspired pans, knives, and tools are forged from carbon steel and hand-rubbed for a dark patina that will become more pronounced over time. He works mostly in the forge, shaping about 90 percent of the piece there. The result is a timeless and highperforming functional work of art.

Function is a core value for him: after all, function is the reason blacksmithing came to be thousands of years ago. Mankind needed stronger, cheaper tools, so we figured out how to create fires hot enough to forge them. “Blacksmithing is considered the root craft,” Shirey points out. “The ability to work iron really changed the face of human evolution.” Although Shirey has some modern equipment, the heart of the process is much the same as it was centuries ago. Iron is heated until it becomes malleable, and then hammered into something new. The moment when metal surrenders to the fire’s incredible heat is mesmerizing to watch—and to control. “I find it amazing to take this super hard surface that comes from the earth and mold it into anything I want. To shape it into something very functional, like a tool, is a powerful process for me,” Shirey says. For a modern blacksmith who grew up idolizing frontier men, there’s something special about forging the same tools they used to carve out an existence in America’s untamed wilderness. Perhaps that’s why Shira Forge tools look as if they’d be right at home in the hands of Daniel Boone. Each piece is forged and refined for flawless performance, but Shirey stops shy of polishing

away the warm, rough texture of the forge. The result is an aesthetic that pays homage to the plucky, self-reliant Appalachian culture he admires so much. He’s not the only one who appreciates the aesthetic. At craft fairs and galleries (Shirey is a new vendor for this year’s upcoming Indie Craft Parade in Greenville), people catch sight of his cookware, in particular, and beeline for a closer look. Forged from carbon steel, Shira Forge pans have an organic shape and are hand-rubbed for a warm, dark patina that will continue to develop over years of use. Shirey is not afraid to pit his forged fry pans against that holy grail of Southern cooking, the cast-iron skillet. “Cast iron is brittle, but you could throw my pan against a brick wall and it won’t break,” he laughs. But before the craft fairs and the art galleries and the online shop, before the business plan and the Shira Forge branding, there’s just a craftsman playing with fire, making something powerful and beautiful from the earth. This is what blacksmiths did two centuries ago, the music of the anvil ringing through their village. And this is what Matthew Shirey does today in his small shop in the woods: “My favorite place to be, other than with my family, is in my shop playing with metal. I enjoy making simple, useful things.” View Matthew Shirey’s work at shiraforge.com; he will be at the Indie Craft Parade, September 16–17, at the Huguenot Mill at The Peace Center in Greenville.

54 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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8/18/17 5:01 PM


TOP

Bunk

Royal Treatment: Enjoy the boutique charm of the historic Dunhill Hotel, which houses The Asbury restaurant helmed by celebrated chef Matthew Krenz. The hotel is located center city at 237 North Tryon Street, Charlotte, North Carolina. For more information about rates, call (704) 332-4141 or visit dunhillhotel.com.

Captionhead: text here

Uptown Girl Escape to the Queen City for classic elegance at The Dunhill Hotel / by Ruta Fox // photography by Rebecca Lehde

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short hour and a half up I-85, the Charlotte city skyline gleams with possibility. With a plethora of professional sports teams, the U.S. National Whitewater Center, and diverse neighborhoods, the Queen City is well worth a day trip. But while the daytime amusements pay tribute to the city’s royal charm, the evening opportunities are its crown jewels. To stay, skip the unknown of Airbnb or the predictability of a corporate chain and check into the elegance of The Dunhill. A boutique hotel offering a modicum of history, a bit of bar alchemy, and an abundance of superbly crafted cuisine at The Asbury restaurant, The Dunhill is located center city—an ideal spot for weekend getaways. It resides on the Historic Hotels of America roster in conjunction with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which recognizes the finest historic hotels in the country. Opened at the tail end of the Roaring Twenties as the Mayfair Manor, The Dunhill has reimagined itself many times over since 1929, all while retaining a dignified, charming sense of British and Old World style. The hotel’s architect, Louis H. Asbury Sr., bicycled through Europe garnering inspiration and influences; Italian cathedrals and the Gothic churches of England and France had a lasting impact on him. Mr. Asbury also held the distinction as the first professionally trained, full-time architect in North Carolina. Once on site, sink into a sumptuous leather wingback chair under the framed Union Jack to check your email—there’s complimentary high speed Wi-Fi throughout the hotel—before heading to your room. There you’ll find a blend of traditional and modern; armoires and iPod docks, deluxe Beekman 1802 amenities, ultra-plush bathrobes, and gleaming marble bathrooms. Even Sir Paul McCartney slept here. The Lobby Bar is a favorite for hotel patrons, and locals keep it buzzing. Intimate,

with a huge carved mirrored dark wood bar, the watering hole offers Old World and New World wine flights or inventive cocktails like the Nutty Old Fashioned (Cathead pecan vodka, black walnut bitters, orange, cherry) and Ghost Cider (The Dalmore 12 Year, spiced syrup, orange, lemon). The Dunhill’s true treasure lies downstairs in The Asbury restaurant. There, Executive Chef Matthew Krenz assembles humble, often local ingredients and elevates them to the stratosphere. Krenz is a tenth generation rancher, and the Krenz Ranch provides all the beef served at the restaurant. His Southern, yet modern, menu inventions could include pan-fried lamb sweetbreads with carrot barbecue sauce, fermented chili-glazed pork belly with cornbread purée, or shrimp with coconut and green curry rice grits. Duck hearts, pork cheeks, and bison tongue may also grace the menu. Lunch offers casual fare—like a fried chicken sandwich layered with green tomato chowchow and caramelized onion aioli. Bar bites and in-room dining also feature Krenz’s deft touch. The restaurant is open seven days a week for lunch and dinner with brunch on Saturday and Sunday. Each season, the menu transforms in conjunction with the artwork rotation at the Sozo Art Gallery, located just across the street in Hearst Tower. A smattering of theatres and museums also await within a few blocks, cementing The Dunhill as an Uptown stay of regal proportions.

56 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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The Highlands Food & Wine Festival isn’t your usual, run-of-the-mill food and wine event. No, the air is a little more rarefied, given that we’re 4118 feet above sea level in the beautiful southern Appalachian Mountains. And the food, the wine and the music are all at a higher level, too. This is truly a festival that marches to it’s own beat.

The Highlands Food & Wine Festival. Nov. 9-12. FOOD. WINE. MUSIC. MOUNTAINS.

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TOWN

Profile

Bridging Cultures Local businessman Juan Gonzalez encourages community-driven creativity / by Ron Friis

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// photography by Eli Warren

t’s a sunny Saturday evening in Greenville and a group of 20 people sit around a portable projector screen in the Community Room of M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers. Presbyterian College professor Clinia Saffi stands before them, discussing poems and poets from Latin America while the audience nods, smiles, and answers her frequent questions. In the background, Javier Durán plays light flamenco arpeggios on his guitar, and when she wants to move to the next slide of her PowerPoint, Dr. Saffi signals the tall man in the blue blazer sitting with her laptop. “Por favor, Juan . . .” This is what a meeting of Greenville’s Spanish Writers looks and sounds like, and the man at the laptop is the group’s founder, architect, and driving force, Juan Gonzalez. From conversations that began in 2014 at The Write Place on Pendleton Street (a creative salon run by local writers Lucy Beam Hoffman and John Jeter), Juan built this community of culturally concerned readers and writers who share Latino roots. In a few short years, Spanish Writers has grown into an important facet of Greenville’s vibrant cultural scene. When you speak with Juan, he looks you right in the eye. His perfect English is soft-spoken, and he’s a thoughtful, active listener who is uncommonly modest and generous. Lucy Beam Hoffman says, “Juan is a passionate advocate for the arts. Whatever he does, he uses his heart.” When Juan tells you that “Spanish Writers wants to give more than it receives,” you believe him.

Growing up in the small city of Ojuelos de Jalisco, Mexico, Juan loved math and chess, and competed in contests for both. “At first I saw chess as just a game,” he says. “Later I understood there is much more to it.” He tells a story about winning a regional chess tournament at age 13 against a much older man when his opponent swapped a valuable bishop for a simple pawn, just because the placement of Juan’s piece bugged him. His takeaway? “We can be a pawn and still win,” he says, “as long as we are strategically located.” Juan first came to the Upstate some 25 years ago on a Fulbright-García Robles scholarship to pursue a graduate degree at Clemson. There he got a master’s in mathematics and met his future wife, Mayra, from California, a graduate student of international trade. They soon married, decided to settle permanently in the area, and bought a home. Since then, the couple started a family and Juan built two successful companies:

Spanish Class: Juan Gonzalez hails from Mexico but has lived in the Upstate for 25 years. To encourage cultural understanding and to celebrate diversity, he started the group Spanish Writers, which meets at M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers. More than just a writing club, the group includes a musician, flamenco dancer, spoken word poet, and other creatives mostly of Hispanic origin.

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“Juan is one of those rare people that’s totally inclusive. He embraces everyone.”—John Jeter

Juan for All: Gonzalez is a humble man with significant determination. After settling in the Upstate with his wife, Mayra, he started two successful businesses and the Spanish Writers, which now has about 40 members and a growing Facebook following of more than 500.

Optimum Professional Services and the real estate development firm Innovation Builders. Tonight’s event, however, is not about business, even if Juan treats it just as seriously. A meeting of the Spanish Writers is about building community, exploring culture, and encouraging participants to embrace their creative side. The 40 or so members of the group range in age from young writers-inprocess to published authors in their seventies. Some have graduate degrees, while others have not finished high school. One is an advocate for abused children. One dances flamenco. One is just fifteen years old. While not all the Writers are writers, they all share an intense appreciation for creativity in English and Spanish. Local author John Jeter says, “Juan is one of those rare people that’s totally inclusive. He embraces everyone.” Although they are a bilingual group, Juan stresses that all are welcome in Spanish Writers and he uses social media daily to expand their membership and audience. The group’s Facebook page publishes members’ original work and its number of followers increases daily—every morning more than five hundred people wake up to the same notification: “Juan Gonzalez has posted in Spanish Writers.” Member Vera Gómez had been writing and performing her poems in Greenville for more than twenty years when she met Juan, but joining the group changed things for her. She says, “I finally felt connected to a group of writers that share my culture and upbringing and understand from where I come. It’s a nice change in helping better integrate Greenville.” Juan stresses the importance of the community aspect of the group: “People have found meaning and fought loneliness through Spanish Writers and feel the group belongs to them,” he says. “In it, they find a reflection of themselves.” Spanish Writers has been especially active in local schools and universities. Working with Furman intern Alana Parish this past spring, the group presented “Hispánica,” a showcase of narratives, poems, paintings, songs, and dance, to Furman students, faculty, and the public at large. At a

recent event at Greenville’s Next High School, the Writers ran a workshop for some 200 teenagers. The students began by answering a questionnaire about their likes and dislikes, their future plans, and fears. These answers sparked discussion of how simple statements of personal opinion can launch new stories or poems. “Creative writing can be a valuable tool to navigate the turbulence of adolescence,” Juan says. This is the kind of community engagement he is most proud of. In the future, Juan would like to expand the group’s access to publication venues (both individually, as well as collectively), and to export the Spanish Writers’ model to other cities and even countries. Despite his outwardly gentle nature, Juan pursues his goals with great determination and drive, that same entrepreneurial spirit that supports him as a businessman. Back at M. Judson, it comes time for Juan to speak. His stories—which he amazingly recites in his second language with no notes—explore the different elements of identity we all think about: family, work, sacrifice, hard times, loyalty, love, friendship. Through his narrators, Juan gives voice to people who often have no voice. Even if they are set in another country or another language, Juan’s stories, like the bonds between the Spanish Writers, build bridges to something universal, something we can all relate to.

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On September 8, we are partnering with Greenville Animal Care to host an adoption and food drive event at their facility on Furman Hall Road. Join us from 3 - 5 PM, enjoy a snow cone from Nomadik Few, tour the facility, and meet all the furry friends available for adoption. Coldwell Banker Caine is proud to support the national Homes for Dogs Project, a partnership that has helped more than 20,000 dogs find homes nationwide. #cainecares

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Simpsonville’s Newest Custom Home Community Now taking initial lot reservations. Home/Lot Packages starting in the 400s For more information call: Brianna McCluskey • 864-655-7702

ARHUpstateSC.com American Eagle Builders, Inc., an Independent Franchise

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GET

Away Fresh Catch: While Jackson County’s rivers might be hotspots for fly-fishing enthusiasts, the area, which includes parts of the Nantahala National Forest, offers a wide range of recreational activities.

Northern Exposure September is a beautiful month to have grand adventures in Jackson County, North Carolina / by Mary Cathryn Armstrong

D

riving in the mountains has never been my forte, I think, as I snake my car through the narrow arteries of the Western Carolinas’ highway system. I wonder aloud more than once how the locals must abhor drivers like me; I imagine them shaking their fists in my rearview mirror, silently griping at this obvious amateur who won’t dare drive over 10 mph around the mountain’s jagged curves. As I continue the climb toward Jackson County, North Carolina, my cellphone reception starts to snag, the little bars dropping down further and further until they’re eventually replaced by a very stern-looking “X.” No matter. It’s an even trade-off to be surrounded by the divine scenery of one of North Carolina’s most playful mountain getaways.

Photog r aph (Pant her tow n Val ley) by Nick Breed love ; Fly-f i sh i ng t r ai l cour tes y of Brook i ngs A ng lers

BY LAND I once read somewhere that snakes are more afraid of us than we are of them. I don’t know how true that is, but I like to think it’s why I didn’t see a single one on my first hike in Panthertown Valley. I simply scared them all away. Just east from Cashiers, Panthertown Valley is a stunning slice of the Nantahala National Forest with a breadth of scenic waterfalls, manmade hiking trails, lazy streams, dipping valleys, and picturesque overlooks begging to be explored. And explore we did, looping over two miles to and from Schoolhouse Falls—a drop in the bucket for the Valley’s 6,700acre tract of raw, unrefined land. Perhaps the most iconic of the area’s many waterfalls, Schoolhouse Falls cascades over the mossy rock face in thick sheets, pooling at the bottom in a sort of makeshift swimming hole. Our trail guide tells us that if we cut to either side, (and if we’re careful) we can actually cross behind the falls. It’s an exercise in tactile maneuvering across the slippery boulders and snarled tree roots. One hand goes here, foot goes there, step up, slide down, do the hokey pokey and turn yourself around. The outer view from between

the streaks of glassy, rushing water, however, is worth any minor cuts and scrapes. We passed other groups of like-minded travelers along the hike: young couples casually strolling hand-in-hand; weekend campers loaded down with bulky backpacks; knots of sleepyheaded Cub Scouts looking only slightly worse for the wear. Panthertown Valley’s diverse trail system is also an ideal challenge for mountain bikers, and they navigate the sloping hillsides and rough patches of rugged terrain with reckless confidence. Of course, these woods are also a playground for a plethora of non-human species that reside here, including black bears, deer, birds, and other wildlife. I jerk my head to the right when I hear a strange rustling coming from a bush nearby. “Wild turkey,” the guide states matter-offactly, no pause in her stride. Oh, good. As long as it’s not a snake.

BY AIR “What do you mean you’ve never been to Cashiers?” The zip line instructor is looking at me as if I’ve just instantaneously sprouted a pair of fluffy white bunny ears. “You live in Greenville and you’ve never come up here?”

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“I’ve visited Asheville a few times,” I offer halfheartedly, pretending to adjust the chinstrap of my helmet. It’s comfortable already, but I need something to do with my hands as I inch closer to the edge of the solid wooden platform. Ah, too late—they’re sweating already. “Well, yeah,” he snorts, clipping my harness into the thick cable stretched taut between two magnificent trees. “Everyone goes to Asheville.” Then he pushes me off the ledge. Relax. This is just all part of the experience on the Vordach Zip Line, an exhilarating adventure on high in the Sapphire Valley Resort. Named after the German word for “canopy,” the Vordach consists of 13 steel wires threaded across the lush forest of pines, oaks, and other indigenous fauna, lending a rare bird’s-eye view of the property’s sweeping natural beauty while your heart takes the old one-two adrenaline punch. After a quick crash course in zip safety—whatever you do, don’t grab the line—we advance through a series of ascending lines of various lengths that peak at around 70 feet above the ground. Some slides are quick, barely allowing two lungfuls of crisp air before it’s time to hit the brake. Others move more moderately, during which time I muse on what life might be like if I got stuck up here and was forced to live among the squirrels. If those lofty heights make you feel squeamish, there is the option to head back on foot. But, come on—do you really want to be that guy?

BY WATER The Tuckasegee River—fondly referred to as the “Tuck” by area residents—is a 60-mile swath of freshwater that flows northwest from Jackson County and on up into the Little Tennessee River. It’s also apparently a pretty popular place to be in the wee hours of a Saturday morning; many of the fishermen are already packing up their gear when we arrive around 8:30 a.m., their faces a clear indicator of whether or not the early venture was a successful one. I may look the part in my waterproof bib and wading boots, but I couldn’t tell a woolly bugger from a clinch knot. (Yes, those are real fly-fishing terms.) So when you’re a newbie to the sport, it helps to have a guide that knows what he’s doing. And carries a flask of bourbon.

EAT /// Library Kitchen & Bar Near the entrance of the Sapphire Valley Country Club, Library Kitchen & Bar pairs chef/owner Johannes Klapdohr’s global menu with co-owner Marvin Gralnick’s spunky artwork—a match made in heaven.

184 Cherokee Trail, Sapphire, NC. (828) 743-5512, librarykitchenandbar.com

STAY /// Old Edwards Inn & Spa An award-winning, Europeanstyle retreat in the heart of downtown Highlands, the Old Edwards Inn & Spa offers an elegant escape complete with golf course, pool, spa treatments, and fine dining.

445 Main St, Highlands, NC. (866) 526-8008, oldedwardsinn.com

PLAY /// Vordach Zip Line The 10-element canopy tour provides excellent valley views as riders zip above the Blue Ridge Mountains. Come winter, the Sapphire Valley Resort transforms into a ski retreat.

Sapphire Valley Highway 64, Sapphire, NC. (828) 743-7663, sapphirevalley.com

“I have zero patience,” I warn our instructor Alex Bell as we pick over the slick rock bottom toward one of his tried-and-true “honey holes.” The Tuck is a prime location on the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail, a collection of some 15 rivers, creeks, and streams in Jackson County that are known for their yearlong abundance of trout. Bell helped found the trail, the only of its kind in the United States. He also operates AB’s Fly Fishing Guide Service, which is how he got stuck with me. “See? You’re a natural,” Bell says once we are situated somewhere downstream (or maybe it was upstream) on the river. It’s taken a few tries, but I’ve gotten the hang of casting the line back and forth smoothly, watching the colorful fly bob with the water’s tempo once it lands. I admit, I can see how people find this relaxing. As the sun continues to rise, so does the hazy layer of fog that had settled on the Tuck overnight, and the sky blazes with the rich auburns, ambers, and golds reflected by the surrounding trees. A recent drought has left the water level slightly lower than average for this time of year, but it rushes forth at a steady pace and creates an organic kind of music. For a moment, I forget that I’m standing waist-deep in chilly river water. I just listen. The tug on my line draws me back. Though Bell had advised not to yank the rod upward if I feel a bite, it’s my first knee-jerk reaction. And the small rainbow trout might have escaped if not for Bell’s agile net skills. It’s catch-and-release season, so the lucky fish is dropped back into the Tuck after posing for a picture or two—otherwise, not one of my friends would believe that I actually caught a trout. We celebrate with a nip from that flask I mentioned earlier. Naturally, it’s in the shape of a fish.

Photog r aph (Tuck asegee R iver) cour tes y of JC T DA ; School house Fal ls by Nick Breed love

Splash Guard: Fly-fishing and zip-lining are popular activities in Jackson County, North Carolina; Schoolhouse Falls (above right) is one of countless hidden havens in Jackson County to catch a water spill. Other spots include Cashiers Sliding Rock, which sports a natural slide and swimming holes above and below the falls.

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Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

Pictured from left to right: Susan Savage and Realtor Patty Cunningham in the White Rabbit Fine Art Gallery in Travelers Rest

“Earlier this year I was presented with a dilemma. I was notified the house my husband and I had leased for many years was being sold. It could not have come at a worse time as my husband was undergoing treatment for cancer and a move was out of the question. We decided to buy the home and Patty was there to navigate the paperwork, required signatures, and assure that we were being represented. I was able to concentrate on my husband’s health. I could not have done this without her professional and caring help. I truly appreciate her friendship.” – Susan Savage, Founding Member of White Rabbit Fine Art Gallery in Travelers Rest and Chairman of the Travelers Rest Artists Alliance

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

www.MarchantCo.com | 864.467.0085 Patty Cunningham 610.659.4669 TOWN_blank page.indd 7

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2017

OCTOBER 14+15

Most people don’t plan to fail, they fail to plan. – John L. Beckley

We offer our clients concierge quality advisory and planning services customized for their individual needs and goals. Our approach is to centralize our clients’ diverse financial strategies and life-plans to provide a coordinated, efficient and effective roadmap for financial security.

Bavarian Costume Contest 800-Sugar-MT skisugar.com/oktoberfest

Sugar Mountain Resort Sugar Mountain, North Carolina

10 South Academy Street, Suite 250, Greenville, SC 29601

864.720.2000 | FosterVictorWA.com 66 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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SPORT THE BEST RECREATION ON LAND & WATER

Dog Days

Take on open season with our guide to the field this fall

Born to Hunt: English pointers (pictured) are popular bird dogs. Turn the page for more best hunting mates.

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Game On

Join the chase with our go-to guide for South Carolina’s hunting season / by Stephanie Trotter

S

eptember opens the door to man’s intimate commune with nature—not as mere observer, but as active participant. When a hunter stalks an animal, it reestablishes an innate connection to the wild and our ability to fend and feed ourselves. Early man hunted to live; modern man hunts to feel alive. Nothing is as primal as man versus animal. Senses heighten as one adjusts to the wind, teams with the land, tracks the target, and waits for the perfect shot. A natural state ensues as the scope spies the

prey. Adrenaline surges, and all else slips away, save a growing heartbeat. The index finger flexes and smoothly squeezes the trigger. Hunters covet one day above all others: opening day. That day differs for every man and woman, depending upon their mark and weapon of choice. Traditionally, the Saturday before Labor Day sets the pace as dove season opens across the state, with all others following through next summer. Here is a rundown of opening days and other targeted information, by the numbers.

When a hunter stalks an animal, it reestablishes an innate connection to the wild and our ability to fend and feed ourselves. Early man hunted to live; modern man hunts to feel alive.

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Top Dog: The pointer, also called an English pointer, is known for its intensity in the field and likability in the home. A bird dog that can cover big ground, pointers are also affectionate household pets.

ON THE HUNT (2017–2018) South Carolina hunting is divided into four zones, and season dates sometimes vary depending on location. While private land is ideal if available, the Department of Natural Resources allows hunting on designated wildlife management areas (WMAs). For more information on bagging, tags and licensing, and specific hunting limits, visit dnr.sc.gov. DOVE: Private Lands & WMAs, All Zones Select days, September 2, 2017–January 15, 2018 DEER: Private Lands & WMAs, Zones 1–2 October 11, 2017–January 1, 2018 QUAIL: Private Lands & WMAs, All Zones November 20, 2017–March 1, 2018 DUCK: Private Lands & WMAs, All Zones November 18–25, 2017, and December 9, 2017–January 28, 2018 TURKEY: Private Lands, All Zones, March 20–May 5, 2018 WMAs, All Zones, April 2–May 5, 2018

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Hunters can practice at designated shooting tables and firing lines at the following U.S. Forest Service Shooting Ranges: Cedar Creek Shooting Range – Oconee County Beaverdam Shooting Range – Edgefield County Fairforest Shooting Range – Union County Crossroads Shooting Range – Laurens County

GEAR UP Get technical at these local outfitters: Cabela’s 1025 Woodruff Road, #H101, Greenville. (864) 516-8100, cabelas.com Grady’s Great Outdoors 3440 Clemson Blvd, Anderson. (864) 226-5283, gradysoutdoors.com Luthi’s Outfitters 1418 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 233-0551, facebook.com/ LuthisOutfitters Orvis 1 N Main St O, Greenville. (864) 240-4284, orvis.com

FIELD COMPANIONS These breeds are top bird dogs: Brittany Boykin Spaniel English Pointer English Springer Spaniel German Shorthaired Pointer Golden Retriever Labrador Retriever Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Vizsla

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Follow our progress and be among the first to know all of our opening details. www.LimoncelloGVL.com

@LimoncelloGVL 70 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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Spark a lifelong passion for curiosity and learning through play. ®

BRING ON THE BENEFITS! Why membership? - Pay once, play all year - Discounts on birthday parties,camps, events, & shopping - Exhibit sneak peeks and members-only preview parties - Early registration for camps & events - Multiple family options

BECOME A MEMBER WITH THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE UPSTATE TODAY. From $150 TCMUPSTATE.ORG/MEMBERSHIP

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SHOP small, DREAM big.

1922 Aug usta S t. G r e e nv ille , S C 2 960 | la b le s g r e e nv ille . c o m | 8 6 4 . 6 3 1 . 1 9 1 9

From pencil to paper, to your front door, Lenzi and Emily at Designed for Downtown are creatively transforming homes in some of Greenville’s best neighborhoods. Working as designers in the nation’s 4th fastest growing city is a challenge, but these Clemson graduates are nothing but excited to put old school techniques to work to bring new life to classic streets. Every design is hand-drawn — including construction drawings — so no detail is left behind. Lenzi and Emily specialize in custom home design, whole house renovations, restoration of historic homes and even offer interior design services to accompany. 72 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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DO

DESIGNED for DOWNTOWN, LLC • designedfordowntown.com • 803.351.1385

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STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY / EDITED BY LAURA LINEN

Model Equation

Special thanks to model Reagan Stelling; hair & make-up by Isabelle Schreier/Belle Maquillage

Solve your fall fashion problems with bold and bright trends

ON REAGAN: Shoshana orange tassel dress, $418. From Monkee’s of the West End; circle earrings, $10; gold cuff, $39. All from Labels Designer Consignments.

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THE LOOK

School Belle Ace fall fashion with flying colors / styled by Laura Linen

// photography by Paul Mehaffey

STAR STUDENT:

Yellow blouse, $24; 1970s wrap denim skirt, $45. All from Kate DiNatale Vintage; Tri-tassel earrings, price on request; Sam Edelman Mara black velvet platforms, $130; Emily zip pouch, $25. All from Muse Shoe Studio.

Special thanks to model Reagan Stelling; hair & make-up by Isabelle Schreier/Belle Maquillage

Model Reagan Stelling is a kindergarten teacher at First Presbyterian Academy.

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Red gingham dress, $40. From Kate DiNatale Vintage; topknot tassel earrings, $55. From Muse Shoe Studio; J. Crew heels, price on request. From Labels Designer Consignments; Equipment grey pullover, $298. From Twill; Boston antique desk and chair, $125. From Rock House Antiques.

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THE GOODS

Craft Couture Don delicate designs from local indie jewelers

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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HOOP DREAMS: (clockwise from top left) 1. OM circle earrings, $62. From BLUEskyBLACKbird; 2. Gold necklace, $ 88. From Eleven and Jane; 3. Sterling silver bracelet, $172; 4. Sterling silver ring, $96. All from Leandra Hill Metal Works; 5. Leo zodiac constellation oval bracelet, $ 50. From Julie Nolan; 6. Lapis pendant necklace, $30 0. From Kate Furman.

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Breaking Ground This Fall:

DOUBLETOP VILLAGE

ARNOLD PALMER SIGNATURE GOLF

The excitement is building on Balsam Mountain Preserve as the new Doubletop Village is coming soon! The Village will combine 23 turnkey cottages, a Members’ Grille and Tavern, General Store, Organic Community Garden, activity lawns, and extraordinary views — in short, all the elements that make Balsam unique. Located less than 40 minutes west of Asheville, Balsam Mountain Preserve isn’t your typical private mountain community. It’s something different. And with fewer than 400 homesteads spread across 4,400-forested acres, owners truly live within nature.

BOARDING HOUSE LODGE AND RESTAURANT

Come experience life at Balsam Mountain Preserve, and learn about the community’s newest commitment to life here, Doubletop Village.

To arrange a visit, call 828.202.9182 or visit BalsamMountain.com MORE THAN 34 MILES OF TRAILS

This is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation to buy to residents in jurisdictions in which registration requirements have not been fulfilled, and eligibility for purchase will depend upon the state of residency of the purchaser. There is no guarantee that facilities, features, or amenities depicted or otherwise described will be built or, if built, will be of the same type, size, or nature as depicted or described.

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SUNDAY // October 1, 2017 // 1:00 – 6:00 PM Birds Fly South Ale Project // 1320 Hampton Ave Ext // Downtown Greenville

the Young Benefactors 2nd annual Bocce Social a fun and casual event featuring live music, yard games, delicious craft beer, and, of course – bocce! free to the public // Suggested donation of $3 benefits the students at the Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities // available on eventbrite or GSAFOUNDATION.NET

The Governor’s School for the Arts Foundation’s Young Benefactors are a group of dynamic young professionals in Greenville who support the Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities by raising awareness for the school and funding for the visiting guest artists program.

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QUIET CONFIDENCE. HOW YOU FEEL KNOWING EVERYTHING YOU’VE WORKED FOR IS TAKEN CARE OF.

1116 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.467.9800 | NNPwealth.com

Investment products and services are offered through Wells Fargo Advisors Financial Network, LLC (WFAFN), Member SIPC, a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. Nachman Norwood & Parrott is a separate entity from WFAFN.

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MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Curve Ball

The Man is unprepared for the requirements of team representation / illustration by Timothy Banks

L

ast fall, I was leaving Mike & Jeff’s BBQ with a to-go bag full of more food than one person should eat at a single time when a man I’d never seen before looked at me and said, “Tough loss last night.” I glanced around thinking he must be speaking to someone else, but we were alone in the parking lot. “They need more hitters,” he continued as he got into his car. “Sanchez can’t carry the whole team.” As he drove away I kept thinking, “What the hell was he talking about?” This was the first time I had worn my New York Yankees baseball cap. I’d purchased the hat during a trip to Manhattan that summer. I didn’t buy it because I was a fan of the team. I bought it because I like the iconic logo and thought the hat would make me look cool. Which is does. But when I wear it people assume I follow the team and know the language of the game. Which I don’t. Even when I’m not wearing the hat, many people, especially men, seem to expect, because I am a man myself, that I know about sports. Countless times have I been stuck at a cocktail party listening to someone talk about a recent sporting event as if my knowledge of it were a given. What baffles me even more is they often use the pronoun “we” to describe the team they are discussing. “We really need a better passing game,” they’ll say. Or, “We’ve got some strong rushers this

year.” When these interactions occur, I’ve learned to just grin and nod, which is quite similar to the way I converse with my mother. At a recent dinner party in Los Angeles, I sat next to two baseball fans who were rattling off batting averages and something called RBIs. I’d just met these men, but they assumed I knew what they were discussing. When they began arguing about baseball MVPs they looked to me to settle the debate. “Do you remember who was MVP in 2013?” one of the men said to me. “No,” I responded. “But I do know Kinky Boots won the Tony for best musical that year.” He would not have looked more surprised if I had stood up and peed in my glass of rosé. While in L.A., I purchased an all black Dodgers cap from a shop near Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. Later that same day I told my friend Angela, an L.A. native and huge sports fan, that I was probably going to be asked about the team when I wore the hat. “Just say, ‘We’re hitting good right now,’” Angela told me. “And then say, ‘When Kershaw gets back from his injury we’ll be in a good position to make a run.’” She may as well have been speaking Swahili, but I memorized the lines and now have the vernacular to wear my L.A. cap with confidence. Still, if someone asks me my prediction for next season’s winner, I will have to go with what I know. My Fair Lady for Best Revival. We’re unbeatable.

80 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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8/19/17 12:20 PM


Buy-One-Get One-Free Tickets

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MS. BEA

Wright If you ever hear a Southern lady utter the phrase “have you considered,” prepare yourself to receive a tender correction on some behavior or thinking that is contrary to common sense or decency.

Southern Sage: Ms. Bea Wright will join us each month with her quips, concerns, and cups full of common sense. Send your questions to mswright@ towncarolina.com.

Do As I Say Presenting Ms. Bea Wright, offering pertinent solutions to life’s little quandaries

Illustration by Bethany Williams

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adore strong, Southern women. Undoubtedly, I am biased since I was raised by one of the strongest and smartest women I know. Beyond teaching me manners and how to hem a skirt, I witnessed my mother overcome obstacles with grace, determination, and joy. This is her greatest legacy to me. Passing on what we learned from our mothers and our own experiences is the way of the South. Sharing wisdom is what we do. Sometimes counsel is offered gently, so as not to offend. For instance, if you ever hear a Southern lady utter the phrase “have you considered,” prepare yourself to receive a tender correction on some behavior or thinking that is contrary to common sense or decency. Other times wisdom is offered with a lightning bolt of frankness. When we do it well, the beneficiary never sees it coming. Perhaps it’s the kid leather glove that softens the blow. Let’s face it. Sometimes in life, we all could use some words of wisdom— whether just a bit of encouragement or perhaps a slap-in-the-face reality check. However, seeking advice from a family member or friend runs the unwelcome risk of their probing curiosity and intrusive follow-up. All you really want is a considered opinion, with no strings attached!

That’s where I come in. You ask, and I offer a frank, reasoned, and (hopefully) wise solution to your current challenge from a fresh, uninvolved perspective. Here’s a for-instance. Just the other day a coworker expressed apprehension about her husband’s impending retirement. “What is he going to do with himself? He has no hobbies or interests outside his work!” she exclaimed. Well, you and I both know that her question revealed a lot more about her concerns and trepidation than it did her husband’s anticipation about his approaching, never-ending vacation. With that in mind, I offered this bit of wisdom. First, have you considered that your husband is not looking for a new boss? This may be the first time that he will be in the position to cast his own vision for success. Let him experience, own, and enjoy the opportunity. Second, encourage your spouse to dream and be sure he has something he looks forward to. Ambition and hope motivated your husband to be successful in his career. His aspirations about this next chapter of his life will sustain and inspire him to be a successful and happy retiree. Last, be patient. No doubt there will be hiccups along the way. Time and freedom to figure things out on his own (and with your support) will surely lead to a happy retirement for you both. Now, take heart, dear readers—life is complex, but it doesn’t have to be complicated. Call on me to help. Until next time, y’all behave. Send Ms.Wright your questions regarding relationships, personal concerns, and etiquette at mswright@ towncarolina.com. Inclusion is anonymous and based on editorial discretion.

SEPTEMBER 2017 / 83

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HITTING

THE D

GRASS ROOTS:

Andrea Cooper, the executive director of Upstate Forever, poses at Greenbrier Farms in Easley, one of many tracts that receives protection from the organization. 86 TOWN / towncarolina.com

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DIRT

Picture Greenville, a beautiful canvas, a place so alluring it’s now the fourth fastest-growing city in America. Trouble is, how to balance the beauty and the bounty? Meet City Park project manager Darren Meyer, Upstate Forever’s Andrea Cooper, and Feed & Seed director Mike McGirr—the new vanguard championing Upstate sustainability, one tract at a time.

by JOHN JETER ph o t o g r a ph y by PAUL MEHAFFEY

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THE CREATOR // D A R R E N M E Y E R 1

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DARREN MEYER’S CANVAS IS LAND. “AT ITS ROOT, WHAT WE DO IS WE SHAPE ENVIRONMENTS IN PLACES FOR DAILY LIFE,” SAYS MEYER, 41, A PRINCIPAL AT MKSK STUDIOS.

He joined the landscape architecture, urban design, and planning firm after graduating from Ball State University in Indiana. Meyer opened MKSK’s first office outside of the Midwest last year when the City of Greenville awarded the Columbus, Ohio– based company a $574,000 contract for City Park—the green space development planned for West Greenville. With an estimated price tag of about $19 million, the park is expected to be a showpiece when ground’s broken in 2020. “The project itself is really a forward-thinking approach by the City to say, one, we want to make a great investment in the community with this public park space, and, two, we know from our experience with Falls Park, and in other cities, when you create great public space, it does have an impact on the neighborhood around it.” Asked about his major influences, Meyer names his parents. His father, Ramon, and mother, Betty, were classical musicians. Ramon was a conductor and percussionist who performed with, among others, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Betty was an organist and pianist. “I look at how they went about the mechanics of working with other creative people, how they collaborate,” he says. “How did they engage with others in terms of their art, bringing a lot of personalities together to create something beautiful?” Landscape architecture attracted him because of its dynamism. “The building materials that architects use are fairly static. You look at a building like this,” he says, sitting in The Village Grind’s renovated space in the Village of West Greenville. “The brick here may be a century old, and it has all sorts of charm and ambiance,

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but when you work with landscape materials, they’re constantly changing. They’re constantly growing. You can’t sculpt that perfect piece on the canvas and have it stay that way. It always changes.” Circumstances shift, too. Poorer neighborhoods face gentrification. Environmentalists are concerned about impact. Policymakers and bureaucrats regulate. “I think the challenge that most cities are facing now is, how do you make equitable decisions for everyone in the community to make sure everyone has access to public greenspace, affordable housing options, quality of life?” he questions. He’s keen on green’s multilayered benefits. “There’s a tremendous amount of peer-reviewed evidence that supports the notion that everything from lowering stress to more physical health is all positively impacted by exposure to or access to greenspace,” he says.

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MAN WITH A PLAN:

Darren Meyer of the landscape architecture, urban design, and planning firm MKSK Studios, is the project manager of the proposed City Park, set to break ground in 2020 in West Greenville. Meyer moved his family from Columbus, Ohio, to helm the project.

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I think the challenge that most cities a r e f a c i n g n o w i s, h o w d o y o U m a k e e q U i t a b l e decisions for everyone in the commUnity to make s U r e e v e r y o n e h a s q U a l i t y o f l i f e?

—DARREN MEYER

oreover, companies looking to move or expand to the Upstate need talent. Talent wants a great place to live. That’s partly why he and his wife of 15 years, Katie, relocated to Greenville with their four sons—all under 10. “The public parks system and the trail system, like the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail, are just such a huge part of the quality of life here.” As City Park’s project manager, Meyer demurred at calling himself a game-changer, saying his project is bigger than he is. “We were talking about how much I love seeing how people use parks when they’re done. The benefit of having four boys is I get to see how kids will use parks in ways I would’ve never imagined,” he says. Mari Steinbach, director of the Greenville’s Parks & Recreation Department, appreciates what Meyer brings to Greenville. “He is organized and focused on the fine details that others might brush aside or miss altogether,” she says. “He is sharp and catches the suggestions that are even often unspoken.”

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THE PROTECTOR // A N D R E A C O O P E R LAY OF THE LAND:

As the executive director of Upstate Forever, Andrea Cooper works to protect critical Upstate lands and waters for future generations. Mike McGirr, executive director of Feed & Seed, seeks to bring farmers and consumers together to encourage the use of local produce.

Andrea is a game–changer “ U beca se she finds in–the–box’ t h i n k i n g i n c r e d i b l y U n s a t i s f y i n g .”

—BRICE HIPP

ANDREA COOPER’S A CONVEN ER. AS THE N EW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE N EARLY 20-YEAR-OLD UPSTATE FOREVER CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATION, Cooper balances disparate constituencies: residents, government types, developers, and farmers. “We must have a shared vision, and we have to be willing to sit down and figure out where our interests overlap, and how we can look at our municipalities and what makes sense. It’s creative, and that’s what it has to be because we’re looking for creative solutions.”

Cooper obtained an art history degree from the University of Colorado and attended Parsons School of Design in Paris. She actually started off as a volunteer in Sierra Leone in West Africa. A civil war cut that short. She eventually wound up in Charleston, where she helped with her family’s real estate business. long the way, she met her husband, Edwin, an attorney. While they were considering a move to Greenville, they ran across Brice Hipp during a July Fourth week visit to Brevard in 2015. Brice, Upstate Forever’s board chair and Mary Hipp’s sister-in-law, knew Cooper from her Liberty Fellowship, an intensive leadership program. At the time, Upstate Forever’s founding director, Brad Wyche, was stepping down. Brice immediately hooked Cooper up with the search committee. Cooper stepped up the following October. “Andrea is a game-changer because she finds in-the-box thinking incredibly unsatisfying,” Brice says. “She’s a searcher and a truthseeker. She is not afraid to ask questions, even if it means being uncomfortable.” Now, Cooper’s 11 full-time and six part-time staff members are working to redefine an uncomfortable message into one that more easily explains just how high the stakes are.

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F r o m h i s c h i l d h o o d i n n e a r- a b j e c t poverty to bright–lights jobs in Manhattan a n d S a n F r a n c i s c o t o p r i v a t e- c h e f g i g s f o r big–name celebrities,,McGirr's now here to c h a n g e h o w w e f a r m a n d f e e d o U r s e l v e s .”

“We have 300,000 people moving to the Upstate in the next 25 years,” she says. “Our prospective land use is expected to double. So we are going to pave over twice as much as what we’ve paved over already. We’re on this crash course to becoming Anywhere USA.” Like Meyer, Andrea cringes at the label game-changer; she cringes at labels, in general—don’t say tree-hugger around her. “If there was a game-changing aspect to it, it’s figuring out how to resonate with the broader community, like why should Joe Schmoe care? He should, because his commute time will increase and greenspaces and quality of life will decrease if we continue to grow in this sprawling, unfettered way. There’s nothing wrong with development, it just needs to occur in the right places.” Her concerns hit home. “I’ve lived in South Carolina more than I’ve lived anywhere my entire life, and I’ve raised my two boys here. I don’t want to have happen here what happened where I grew up.” She’s referring to Westport, Connecticut, near New York City. “That’s where the farms got gobbled up by McMansions and subdivisions. I came back from college, and it was a different place, and it was really sad. The soul was gone.” THE PRODUCER // M I K E M C G I R R

Exuberant, outspoken, funny, Mike McGirr—the 49-year-old executive director of Feed & Seed billed as the Upstate’s first food hub—tells a story with the same flair a celebrity chef uses when serving up a flamboyant and unexpected dish. He describes his arrival in Greenville as “enormously circuitous,” an atypical understatement. From his childhood in near-abject poverty to brightlights jobs in Manhattan and San Francisco to private-chef gigs for big-name celebrities, McGirr’s now here to change how we farm 4 and feed ourselves. “I work with the peeps,” he says, sitting at a table at Reedy River Farms, just across the river from Feed & Seed’s building at 159 Welborn Street. “So I work with farmers, poor people, and then I mix with the rich people, because I come from poor people, and I worked with rich people.” Sounds like fresh corn. It’s not. “My dad was the child of a third-shift lineman at an automotive factory,” he says, referring to Stark County, Ohio, where the annual $24,015 per capita income is $10,000 a year less than Greenville County’s and just at the federal poverty threshold. “My grandpa’s name was Junior. It was his given name, and it’s on his gravestone,” he says. “The story in the family is that the family was so poor they couldn’t even afford to give him a name.” Like Cooper, McGirr pursued artistic studies, earning a degree in graphic design and print management from the Rochester Institute of Technology in upstate New York. Ultimately, he became bicoastal, bopping between New York and Bay Area advertising and branding gigs. Then came what he calls, “The Great Unpleasantness of the Financial Adjustment”—otherwise known as the Great Recession. He left for Europe, where he pursued another passion. “I was staying on farms and learning, refining my cooking talents,” McGirr says. Next came Atlanta, where a friend from his advertising days asked him to cook for celebrities; he signed non-disclosure agreements. The work took off. “Cooking for these families of significant and opulent means, and for these celebs and all of that, provided me a platform for spending the majority of my time basically going around the region, working with the farmers that were very similar to the subsistence farmers that my parents introduced me to as a child,” he says.

After four years, McGirr tired of Atlanta’s congestion. He chose Greenville. Here, he found his future husband, Travers Scott, director of Graduate Studies at Clemson. Here, too, he found a run-down building on Laurens Road. He took the building’s name, Feed & Seed, but didn’t get the property. Then he found The Commons, a stretch of buildings in the planned 22-acre City Park, and future home to Feed & Seed. he non-profit, now three years old, is designed to be an all-encompassing hub, to include a Bacon Bros. café; a demonstration farm and community garden; wholesale and retail to neighborhoods, schools, and restaurants; educational programs; and consultation for farmers, consumers, and industry. “I’m a pretty darn good facilitator,” he says without a hint of arrogance. “I’m a producer. What I used to do is exactly what I’m doing now, whether it was a $21 million budget to sell people sweater sets for Ann Taylor or whether it is to introduce squash blossoms to people in the Upstate as a delicious summer treat.” Mary Hipp, chair of Feed & Seed’s six-member board, says: “Have you met Mike? How could he not be a game-changer? Mike’s ability to get the right people to the table to have the right conversations happen is impressive. Simply, he is a powerful convener.” And like Meyer and Cooper, McGirr understands that the future of Greenville rests in ground.

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T H E S E R I A L R E S TAU R AT E U R C A R L S O B O C I N S K I L O O K S BAC K AT N E A R LY 2 0 Y E A R S O F U P S , D OW N S , A N D R E I N V E N T I O N S AS GREENVILLE’S BEST HOST AND OWNER OF TABLE 301.

BY

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Head of the Table: Carl Sobocinski is the creator of Main Street staple Soby’s, the flagship of his restaurant group Table 301. The restaurant has served more than 2.5 million guests since opening 20 years ago, and has sold nearly 420,000 crab cakes..

by STEPHANIE TROTTER photography by PAUL MEHAFFEY

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arly morning is the perfect time to walk Main Street. Temperatures are low and the pace a bit slower. About 7:30 a.m., Carl Sobocinski strolls from Starbucks to Soby’s on the Side or Southern Pressed Juicery, and eventually to Table 301, his downtown restaurant group that sits atop Soby’s restaurant—a Main Street draw for nearly two decades. “I’ve sort of had that routine the last couple of years,” shares the friendly restaurateur. “Most of it is for personal health, just starting the day in a calm manner, enjoying the walk downtown. I always run into somebody, and can strike up a conversation about something going on in Greenville.”

And there’s a lot to talk about. Options are limitless these days, thanks in part to Carl’s professional and philanthropic efforts. Yet as he faces the half-century mark this December, his priorities are shifting. The bold 25-year-old who fronted Funky Fridays above his first restaurant 858 has grown into a reflective, forward-thinking ambassador of Greenville. Like the menu to a Michelin 3-star restaurant, Carl is continually injecting new additions, and is poised to serve his most succulent offerings yet. A P É R I T I F If it’s hot in the kitchen, the Table 301 offices are even hotter. Running eight restaurants with more than 500 employees, a food truck, and a catering business is trickier than mastering a classic boeuf bourguignon. Yet Carl is cool and calm. “It’s big. It’s a lot,” he reveals. “As I hit

50, I’m reevaluating how much longer I can do this and do I want to? I don’t think it’s a mid-life crisis, it’s just a time to reevaluate.” The intuitive mathematician is calculating the pull of his restaurants against that of his two daughters. “Time is precious and family is important. These girls are at impressionable ages, and the years are going by too fast,” explains the single father of Bella (12) and Lexie (9). “There’s nothing better than being a dad. Bella’s got six more years of school before college and I want to be able to spend as much time with her and Lexie as I can. That’s where that thought process comes from.” So what will the king of cuisine do with his first babies . . . his restaurants? The word legacy flows from Carl’s mouth totally unprompted . . . reinforcing the observation that he’s not rushing into this new stage of life without contemplation. “I think one of the greatest legacies for me would

be to have started something, and help five, six, seven young entrepreneurs get started, and turn some of these restaurants over to them. I want to see them take over and keep doing good things in the community. That’s sort of where I’m looking at the legacy being.” That direction would bring his operation full-circle, back to when a New England teen decided to tackle the South. A P P E T I Z E R An hour north of Boston, just over the state line, sits Durham, New Hampshire. It’s where Carl grew up between two dairy farms. “I started working on a dairy farm at age 12,” he recalls. “We had a decent-size garden and grew our own tomatoes, peppers, squash, and corn. You name it, we had it in the garden. We probably ate at home five to six nights a week.” Mom was a teacher, dad was in sales, Carl an only child.

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Table Manners: Carl has a knack for pairing excellent cuisine with the perfect setting, like at Jianna in downtown Greenville across from Falls Park, his latest venture with famed chef Michael Kramer at the helm.

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n Saturdays, he’d visit his grandfather’s Polish market and butcher shop in Salem. “I’d stand behind the counter and watch them work and see how they talked to people and how everybody knew my grandfather.” Carl and his mom shared the same spring breaks, and would head to the beach. Wrightsville. Myrtle Beach. Hilton Head. Amelia Island. “I sorta loved the Southeast,” he says smiling. When looking at colleges in the mid-80s, three things dominated his thoughts: studying architecture, playing baseball, and Clemson University’s football team winning the National Championship. “When we drove onto Clemson’s campus, it reminded me of the town where I grew up. I knew that’s where I needed to be.” Four and a half years later, he left Clemson with a design degree and a passion for the food service industry, after starting work at Keowee Key Country Club his junior year. “I really loved being around people, and there’s always a curve ball. I love that aspect of the business, that no two days are alike.” Working at a drafting desk? Or making friends over food? The graduate chose the latter. S A L A D With more than 120-plus restaurants in downtown Greenville, it’s hard to recall the slim pickings of past times. In 1993, Carl and a few friends saw an opening, borrowed money, and opened 858. “I was fired up to do it,” he says. “I put in ridiculous hours. I would be there from nine in the morning until midnight, six days a

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week, sometimes seven.” Today, he laughs at the gumption of his younger self. “I wasn’t scared. Literally, I remember telling friends, if it doesn’t work out, I’m 25 years old. I’ll go get a couple of jobs and pay it back. I’m more scared today, more nervous, about all of the financial burdens, and labor. All the people we’re responsible for. Back then, I was young, dumb, and naïve.” He was smart enough to know when to leave 858. “There were three of us, and we were on three different pages. I thought it best for me to go search for something else.” That something else was bold and birthed his true, entrepreneurial spirit. In November of ’97, he turned an empty shoe store on Main Street into Soby’s, introducing “New South Cuisine” to a meat-and-three town. This fall, Soby’s will celebrate 20 years. In an industry where roughly half of restaurants fail the first year, and only 10 percent make it past five, surviving and thriving double decades is huge. Carl admits a special fondness for his namesake establishment, as it formed the foundation for all others: Soby’s on the Side, The Lazy Goat, Nose Dive, Passerelle Bistro, Papi’s Tacos, Southern Pressed Juicery, and Jianna. Restaurant O and Devereaux’s experienced solid runs, but closed with lessons learned. Number 1: don’t spend beyond industry ratios on aesthetics. Number 2: recessions hurt. Number 3: leasing rates can increase monumentally with a town’s growth. “I definitely have that sense of failure, that sadness that it didn’t work,” he says reflectively. “You’re like, we went after this thing. We ran it very well for however many years, but at the end of the day, it wasn’t good enough, or we weren’t good enough.” He doesn’t want to feel that failure again. Carl’s teamed together with other restaurateurs to support each other and Greenville. “I know from other cities there’s a lot of dog-eat-dog out there. But we have a great restaurant community. We work together. Most of us feel like all boats rise with the rising tide.” One such initiative to buoy downtown is making national 5 headlines, enriching the county’s entire landscape. M A I N C O U R S E Not having studied business, Carl has joined as many groups as possible to learn the ins and outs of running one. While on the board of the Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, he and his colleagues petitioned City Council for $300,000 in hospitality tax money to explore marketing the city. He’ll never forget hearing “Yeah THAT Greenville” for the first time at Brains on Fire. “I had a big smile on my face! I think everybody’s face in the room just lit up, and we were like, this is the ticket. This is gonna work!”

with a bunch of different farmers. Some looked at us sideways, others said they’d do it.” This coming weekend, as many as 100 tents will arise to sell produce on Main Street at the TD Saturday Market. But Carl’s most entertaining concept was born out of necessity with good friend Edwin McCain. D E S S E R T Back in the mid-2000s, both Carl and platinumselling artist Edwin McCain were hitting their stride. With success came requests, and friends were making a lot of them. The two buddies hit upon an idea. They could better help the community with one big event, rather than dozens of individual donations. That conversation led to one of the most innovative festivals in America: Euphoria. “His vision was a lot better than mine,” McCain says with a big laugh. “If it had been up to me, we’d have met for hot dogs and boiled peanuts, and used a tractor-trailer for a stage. All the credit goes to him.” leven years later, the four-day event the two founded combines the nation’s top chefs and master sommeliers with award-winning singers and songwriters. Charities like LiveWell Greenville, A Child’s Haven, and the South Carolina Children’s Theatre have benefited from more than $250,000 in grants since 2006. “If I could say anything notable, it would be just how solid Carl is,” confesses Edwin. “He’s a foxhole friend, and there are very few of those. I can count on him to be the same person he’s always been. He’s always set the level, and that’s why so many people are in his corner and support him unconditionally.”

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C O R D I A L S The man who so eloquently promotes Greenville starts to stutter when credited with molding Main Street in so many different ways. “It’s very flattering, but, but, but . . . I don’t know. I’m just one guy. It took a whole lot of people around me, supporting me.” He’s now focused on helping others as he steps back from day-to-day operations at Table 301. “I’m able to look at the 10-thousand-foot view, but 6 it’s not giving me a lot of time to do the things I want to do,” he spills in a rush. He’s working with a child through Mentor Greenville, giving back to the Liberty Fellowship (one of the “best experiences” of his life), and teaching folks to eat healthier through a hands-on cooking program at Mill Village Farms. “I believe we’re all led to give back. It feels great to know things we’ve done have made a difference, but it also doesn’t feel like it’s enough,” he ponders. “I’ve been very blessed and very fortunate. Since so many people helped me, I want to be sure to return that favor and help others reach their goals.”

“THE IMPORTANCE OF RELATIONSHIPS, THE IMPORTANCE OF GIVING BACK, THOSE THINGS WILL HOLD TRUE FOR GENERATIONS. ALL I’VE E V E R WA N T E D TO D O I S M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E A N D B E I M PAC T F U L .” — C A R L S O B O C I N S K I Tourism numbers and dining dollars show the slogan’s certainly worked. “Our city is a brand. It’s like a business and we need to treat it that way. So, I think we did a good job on selling them [City Council] on that.” He’s devoted significant time to selling other ideas as well, lobbying lawmakers to allow Sunday alcohol sales and implementing a no-smoking ban before any others. In a nod to the homegrown food of his childhood, he facilitated a rebirth of the downtown farmer’s market. “Susan Reynolds and I literally drove around. We went out to Travelers Rest, and up and down 25, and met

Jorge “Papi” Baralles, Sr., is living proof Carl is doing just that. Papi is originally from Mexico, and joined Table 301 as a dishwasher at Soby’s when it opened 20 years ago. In the days to come, Carl will be handing his long-time employee ownership of Papi’s Tacos, which they founded together. “The importance of relationships, the importance of giving back, those things will hold true for generations. All I’ve ever wanted to do is make a difference and be impactful.” A dish that will sustain him deep into this next stage in life. SEPTEMBER 2017 / 97

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2017 F E S T I V A L S C H E D U L E H I G H L I G H T S | September 21-24, 2017 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER ��

Songwriters Recipe

Supported by Discover South Carolina, Performance Food Service, Revel and TALK

An intimate “behind the scenes” event featuring legendary and Grammy-award winning songwriters, with bites from the SC Chef Ambassadors. Hear the stories behind the songs you’ve been singing along to, straight from the mouths of the songwriters themselves! price: $100 venue: Revel time: 7-10:30pm

Greenville Kick-Off Party Presented by GSP International Airport Supported by Merline & Meacham

What better way to kick off the festival weekend than with a taste of our hometown? From Chefs and restaurants, to craft brews, wine and spirits, even the music you’ll be dancing along to will be shining a spotlight on this amazing city we call home. price: $75 venue: Old Cigar Warehouse time: 8–11pm

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Taste of the South

Presented by The Local Palate and The Greenville News Supported by Performance Food Service and Peace Center

From Virginia to Florida, and everywhere in between, we’re bringing you a TRUE Taste of the South with 19 Chefs showing off what Southern cooking means to them. It wouldn’t be euphoria without live music to keep you movin’ featuring Edwin McCain…so throw on some seersucker and join us for a Southern celebration y’all won’t want to miss. price: $125 venue: Peace Center Amphitheatre time: 6:30-10:00pm

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Feast by the Field

Presented by GVLtoday Supported by Discover SC, Greenville Health System, Gordon Food Service and Yard House

Beer snobs, wine-o’s, and foodies unite for this amazing opportunity to learn, taste and imbibe with the experts themselves. With chef demonstrations, over 60 restaurant and beverage tastings, and music from the Brooks Dixon Band there is truly something for everyone. price: $75 venue: The West End time: 12-4:00pm

Big Easy Bash

Presented by TOWN & Supported by City of Travelers Rest

Take a sprawling park in Travelers Rest, mix in 10 talented chefs from Greenville, New Orleans and beyond, two food trucks and a dessert cart, add the txotx, craft beer, wine and NOLA-inspired cocktails, and you’ve got a surefire recipe for fun. price: $85 venue: Trailblazer Park in Travelers Rest time: 7-10:00pm

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Back by popular demand: brunch becomes BBQ for the 2nd year in a row! With 8 unbelievable pit masters all gathering together in the West End, there is absolutely NO better way to spend your Sunday Funday than with us! And it wouldn’t truly be brunch without Bloody Marys and mimosas, along with delicious accompaniments and traditional Brunch items from over 15 local and regional restaurants, and music from Crooked Pine! price: $55 venue: The West End time: 11am-2:00pm

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Get ready to take notes - or just bites and sips - and learn from the best! With wine seminars featuring a sense of humor, an opportunity to study with the biscuit king himself or everything you wanted to know about ‘cue, pre-prohibition cocktails, or chocolate and liqueur pairings - it’s sure to be a class you don’t want to skip!

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EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Got the Chops: Canyon Kitchen’s menu changes frequently based on the seasons (and what is growing in the on-site garden). Expect dishes like the Wam Bam Lamb, with tomato braised carrots, toasted cumin, and green coriander pesto.

Canyon Fire Chef Adam Hayes crafts fine Southern Appalachian cuisine at Lonesome Valley’s Canyon Kitchen

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PIT

Stop

Grand Canyon A secluded North Carolina valley serves up stellar scenes and serious cuisine at Chef Adam Hayes’s Canyon Kitchen / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

T

hey call it Lonesome Valley. You know why when you set your eyes on the stunningly beautiful and remote canyon in Cashiers, North Carolina, where Richard Jennings Jr. settled in 1947. In the 1950s, Jennings began mink farming and raising trout to feed the small mammals on his family’s 800-acre property. When mink fell out of favor with consumers, he turned to trout farming as his livelihood. Today, the trout farm operates in Canton, North Carolina, and the mountain valley enfolds a residential agrarian community developed by the Jennings family a decade ago, now complete with a restaurant, a spa, and rental cabins tucked into the woods. Housed in a barnlike building at the community’s heart, Canyon Kitchen shows off post-and-beam construction, with massive oak ceiling beams and two wood-burning stacked-stone fireplaces. The restaurant opened on Memorial Day weekend 2009 with celebrated chef John Fleer at the helm. In 2015, Fleer left to concentrate on his new Asheville restaurant, Rhubarb, and passed the reins to Adam Hayes, former executive chef at the Grand Bohemian Hotel, also in Asheville.

For someone who grew up in a small North Carolina town on steaks and barbecue, Hayes has stepped away from his meat-and-potatoes box with riffs on traditional Southern Appalachian fare. As a boy, he worked alongside his grandmother in her bakery in Asheboro, North Carolina. Consequently, his approach to food is driven by the question: “What would Grandma do?” While Grandma would certainly have pickled watermelon rind and fried shrimp, would she have thought to pair them with corn soubise and strawberry sofrito? Hayes would. He whimsically deconstructs a Caprese salad into its taste elements: heirloom tomatoes, mozzarella panna cotta, and a basil macaron. On any given night, he may tickle succulent sous-vide lamb ribs with a Kentucky soy miso glaze, or fire up a Gulf snowy grouper with a Fresno chile beurre blanc. The inviting garden right behind the restaurant defines

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Captionhead: text here text here

Country Boy: The chef’s Southern roots are reflected in the homey prose describing his courses on the ever-changing menu: Pull Up a Chair introduces a small salad, like the watermelon basil (above right); starters fall under Now Yer Just Pidlin’; and Dinner Bell limns the entrées, like the pork belly (opposite left). Supper Ain’t Supper Without Dessert features decadent sweets like the dacquoise, with dark chocolate ganache and praline crunch (above far right). Chef Adam Hayes (above) was a winner of Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen in 2014.

ey

Hayes’s culinary focus. Here lettuces sprout from metal troughs, tomatoes redden on the vines, and the stalks of a Cherokee corn varietal train up a wire fence on the plot’s perimeter. Hayes prides himself on crafting dishes from locally grown and foraged ingredients, and describes his improvisational cuisine as “a hodge-podge of styles,” ranging from Appalachian to Asian. “It’s not just me,” he claims. “I have a solid team behind me. I create the inspirational channel we all get behind.” As arresting as Canyon Kitchen’s food is, the restaurant’s view of the rolling shamrock-green Great Meadow framed by the towering granite face of Cow Rock rivals it. On warm summer nights, accordion doors across the front and back of the dining room open to welcome in the mountain breezes. Canyon Kitchen closes for the winter months, giving the chef license to hunt quail in Texas, help a friend vint wine in Napa Valley, and take tasting trips across the country. The seasonal closing also allows Hayes more time to spend with his wife and their two young children. As he puts it, “I’m living the chef’s dream!” Canyon Kitchen, 94 Lonesome Valley Rd, Sapphire, NC. (828) 743-7967, lonesomevalley.com; open for dinner only, May–Oct, Wed–Sun, 5–9pm SEPTEMBER 2017 / 105

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KITCHEN

Aid

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PANCETTA ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN WITH PLUM CHUTNEY Serves 6

INGREDIENTS:

T

he first time I tied a roast I learned by watching a French cook demonstrate the process in heavily accented English—on YouTube. This is our world now: lessons on anything, available anywhere at almost anytime. School, should we choose to embrace it, never ends. I am long past the days of school supply lists and syllabi, but the gravitational pull of school starting still tugs me every year. I drive through quiet September mornings, the light golden and the sky wide, a cathedral—and imagine I can’t be the only one ready to start anew. So I find myself in my kitchen, ready to tackle the kind of recipe we have no time or need for during summer’s whirlwind romance. September is a bridge month, a time when late summer fruits still linger, but our palates crave a change. A pork roast—in this case, a pancetta-wrapped pork tenderloin roast with plum chutney—can squire us elegantly from one season to the next. It requires just enough time and technique to feel that you’ve earned it when you slice the fragrant, golden roast the next day. Tying the tenderloin, rubbing it with herbs, simmering late-season plums with warming spices for a ruby-colored chutney . . . this is the kind of homework that feeds body and mind.

Plum Assignment

Plum Chutney: 5 black plums, sliced in ½-inch wedges 1 Tbs. olive oil 1 large shallot, sliced lengthwise 1/2 c. light brown sugar 1/4 c. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbs. chopped garlic 1 tsp. mustard powder 2 tsp. grated, peeled ginger 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1 bay leaf Kosher salt to taste Pork Tenderloins: 5 tsp. herbes de Provence 5 tsp. olive oil 2 pork tenderloins (about 2 pounds) Kosher salt and black pepper to taste 4 oz. pancetta slices 2 tsp. grated, peeled ginger 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1 bay leaf Kosher salt to taste

September is a bridge month, a time when latesummer fruits still linger, but our palates crave a change.

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Tie each tenderloin with kitchen twine to hold its shape. Stir together herbes de Provence and olive oil in a small bowl; then rub generously over the tied tenderloins. Season well with salt and pepper. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight. 2. Heat olive oil over medium heat in a saucepan. Add shallot and sauté until golden and soft, about 2 minutes. Add brown sugar, vinegar, garlic, mustard, ginger, bay leaf, and salt to taste. Stir until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add plums, place the lid on, and cook covered for 8 minutes. Remove lid, reduce heat to very low, and continue to simmer for another 15 minutes until thickened, stirring occasionally. (Can be prepared ahead and rewarmed over low heat before serving.) 3. Preheat oven to 400°F. Drape pancetta slices over the tied tenderloins, overlapping slightly. Roast for about 30 minutes or until a meat thermometer registers 145°F in the thickest part of the tenderloin. 4. Transfer to serving plate or cutting board and let pork rest for at least 10 minutes. Remove string, slice, and serve with the warm chutney. Adapted from recipes by Susan Spungen and Tyler Florence.

Pancetta and late-season plums turn pork tenderloin into the perfect back-to-school project / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

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CITY

Dish

Common Grounds These Upstate cafés serve more than a great cup / by Stephanie Burnet te

// illustrations by Alexander Harrison

M E T H O D I CA L C O F F E E ONE CITY PLAZA, GREENVILLE

A

cup named Joe has captured our palate’s imagination (not to mention our flextime) with delicious sips in reimagined spaces. An increasingly independent workforce coupled with purveyors—in old and developing neighborhoods alike—has immersed the Upstate in a coffee culture that feels newly notable. From ground-up roasters to independent coffeehouses, we offer this round-up of the coffee you’ll crave this season, in its many quaffable variations.

C O F F E E U N D E R G RO U N D C O F F E E S T R E E T, G R E E N V I L L E

The godmother of Greenville’s coffee scene, Coffee Underground has been perking us up since 1995 in the basement of the Cauble Building on Coffee Street. Fair trade remains front and center at CU, who roasts their own beans. ORDER THIS: The CU Cortadito will have you firing on all cylinders with its four shots of espresso and four raw sugars blended with half-and-half. WHAT’S NEW: A second location opening early next year on West Stone Avenue with not one, but two connected restaurant concepts.

T H E F O R E ST C O F F E E H O U S E M A I N S T R E E T, T R AV E L E R S R E S T

Farm-to-table coffee is a reality at The Forest Coffeehouse in the heart of downtown TR. Beans are grown at Leopard Forest’s own farm in Zimbabwe, though they also source from single-origin farms in South America. ORDER THIS: The Snow Leopard is a luscious latte with caramel and white chocolate syrups, both made in house. WHAT’S NEW: Expanded interiors to hang out (and spread out) with lots of sunlight spilling through plate-glass windows.

The Vagabond Barista Will Shurtz took Greenville by storm when he opened a brick and mortar coffeehouse along with David Baker and Marco Suarez, with floorto-ceiling windows and industrial accents in the newly minted ONE City Plaza. Apronclad baristas deliver deftly crafted drinks in blue and white china, set atop cloth napkins. ORDER THIS: A single-origin pour over or the sweet milky Tres Leches. WHAT’S NEW: Evening hours with select wines by the glass and small tapas.

D U E S O U T H C O F F E E ROAST E RS TAY L O R S M I L L , TAY L O R S , S C

The acclaimed roasting house was the first tenant in Bay 3 at the redeveloping Taylors Mill. Authenticity is the word at Due South— even their sipping chocolate is made from scratch. Drink coffee from just-roasted beans and make a stop into 13 Stripes Brewery now open next door. ORDER THIS: The best Caffé Mocha you’ve guzzled (maybe ever). WHAT’S NEW: A second location next year at the Feed & Seed development adjacent to the Swamp Rabbit Trail.

L I T T L E R I V E R ROAST I N G C O . D O W N T O W N S PA RTA N B U R G , S C

The epicenter of Spartanburg’s coffee culture is Little River Roasting Co. in the historic Masonic Temple Building. LRR— as locals refer to it—shares space with Cakehead Bake Shop and Hub City Bookshop, creating one trifecta of a destination. ORDER THIS: A French Toast Latte shaped with maple syrup and brown sugar cinnamon (it’s not pumpkin spice). WHAT’S NEW: A new second roaster means more than double the production of finished beans, so bring a bag home.

T H E V I L L AG E G R I N D V I L L AG E O F W E S T G R E E N V I L L E

Before agencies and restaurants peopled the Village of West Greenville, this pert coffee shop opened with friendly service, delicious sips, and wow-worthy baked goods. A shared space with Golden Brown & Delicious (GB&D) offers lots of room for your morning meet-ups. ORDER THIS: The Rose Cardamom Latte for a thoughtful fall sip. WHAT’S NEW: GB&D is now open for dinner with beer and wine service.

G R AT E F U L B R E W P L E A SA N T B U R G / G R E E N V I L L E T E C H

Gratefully serving Counter Culture coffee by only certified baristas, Grateful Brew is your coffee/beer bar oasis near Pita House. The vintage light fixtures alone will make you smile, and the mid-mod upfit feels right at home. ORDER THIS: A perfect Lavender Latte utilizing local lavender-infused honey. WHAT’S NEW: More food trucks, more takehome beer offerings, and more tables with the ubiquitous yellow chairs.

B E X CA F É A N D J U I C E BA R W E S T E N D, G R E E N V I L L E

Organic beans are the name of the game at this smart coffee bar in the West End of Greenville. Don’t miss the stellar fresh juice blends like the Glowing Garden, a pineapple-mint-cucumber dream. ORDER THIS: An extra-dry almond milk cappuccino. WHAT’S NEW: The neighborhood is growing up around the ballpark district with Otto Izakaya and HUSK opening soon.

ESPRESSO 101 WA D E H A M P T O N B O U L E VA R D, G R E E N V I L L E

The indie newbie of our list is Espresso 101, perking up the redeveloping corridor of Stone Avenue/Wade Hampton Boulevard. The tiny flatiron building—built in the 1950s as a liquor store—is today the muse of proprietors Patrick Franzen and his sister Kimberly Petromichelis. ORDER THIS: Espresso (of course) brewed into double-wall glass cups. WHAT’S NEW: A Greek frappe and expanded take-away items.

Home Brew: Methodical, The Forest, Little River Roasting Co., and Due South offer custom roasts to take home so that you can extend your java time in the comfort of your own space.

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“WHERE ENTERTAINMENT NEVER STOPS”

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Tuesday- Saturday 11-9 • Sunday 11-4 • Monday closed

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OCT 31, NOV 1, 7, 8

JAN 23, 24, 30, 31, FEB 6, 7

501 River Street, Greenville SC 29601 information@centrestage.org

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TICKETS 864.233.6733 centrestage.org

Big City Excitement Meets Outdoor Adventure

VisitSandySprings.org When you stay in Sandy Springs, you’re just 15 miles from downtown Atlanta and next to more than 950 acres of natural areas. There’s no need to choose between a day in the city and a hike in the woods. From one location, you can have it all. © 2017 Sandy Springs Hospitality and Tourism. All Rights Reserved.

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DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation? Woodfired pizza, of course. Sourcing every ingredient from local vendors, the everchanging toppings feature local cheeses and freshfrom-the-farm produce. Dig into mainstays like the margherita or tomato pesto, or try a seasonal pie, like the Okra Winfrey below. Loaded with Parmesan sauce, gouda, red onion, roasted okra, string beans, poblano, bell pepper, cherry tomatoes, ricotta, and balsamic vinegar, this pie will have you reaching for another slice . . . okay, whole pie.

$, B, L, D. Swamp Pizza: Thurs–Sun, hours vary. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 255-3385, swamprabbitcafe.com

AMERICAN THE ANCHORAGE

Chef McPhee’s blue-bedecked restaurant is causing quite the splash. With a menu focused on hyper-local produce, it changes almost weekly. Sample dishes include Charred South Carolina Mackerel with watermelon, ginger, jalapeño, dark soy, lime, and cilantro, and Timberock Farms Muscovy Duck. The “For the Table” option offers housemade charcuterie, Blue Ridge Creamery cheese, and Bake Room bread. Don’t miss the outstanding cocktail program at the gorgeous bar upstairs, or brunch! Now being served. $-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com AUGUSTA GRILL

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesame-encrusted tuna seared to perfection—along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers. $$, L, D. 631 S Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com BRICK STREET CAFÉ

You’ll likely have to loosen your belt after chowing down at this Augusta Street mainstay that serves all the comforts of home. Try Mom’s Spaghetti, Miss Sara’s Crab Cakes, or the signature fried shrimp with sweet potato fries. But do save room for made-from-scratch sweets like the sweet potato cake, peanut butter cake, and apple pie (available for special-order, too). $$-$$$, L, D. 315 Augusta St. (864) 421-0111, brickstreetcafe.com GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites, such as well-crafted salads and sandwiches—like the killer burger on a housemade brioche bun—as well as seasonal specials fill the menu. Don’t miss Noodle Nights on Thursdays, complete with housemade ramen. $$, L, D, SBR. Closed

Photograph by Andrew Huang

Monday & Tuesday.1269 Pendleton St. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR S E P TM EM AR BC EH R 2017 / 11 01 5

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DINING

Guide

HALLS CHOPHOUSE

FREE ICE CREAM ! Purchase any 14” pizza and receive 2 FREE ice creams.

Coupon must be present at time of order. Dine-in only and valid at all locations. Expires 9/30/2017

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. Don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven.

OJ’S DINER

A PREMIER SOURCE FOR UNIQUE LIGHTING

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and God intended.

$$, L, D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 21 E Coffee St. (864) 438-4698, greenville.inkanivy.com

$, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com

JIANNA

RESTAURANT 17

KITCHEN SYNC

Visit our Showroom: 3021 Augusta St., Greenville harrisonlighting.com | 864.271.3922

Smoked, hand-pulled BBQ is a glowing centerpiece of this local eatery. Serving plenty of homestyle dishes, like the Tabasco-breaded hot chicken sandwich and pimento cheese appetizer, Oakblue also offers the Korean BBQ sandwich with hefty short rib, pickled Daikon radish, and spicy Gochujang aioli.

INK N IVY

$$-$$$, L, D. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, jiannagreenville.com

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OAKBLUE KITCHEN

$$, L (Tues–Sun), D (Tues–Sat). Closed Mondays. 109 N Main St, Ste A, Greenville. (864) 520-2579, oakbluekitchen.com

With stellar views of Falls Park from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine from the 40-foot bar, and nosh on potato gnocchi, radiatori, and ricotta with truffle honey.

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116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com

$, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com

Located in the space formerly occupied by Corner Pocket, Ink N Ivy boasts a menu of American fare with an emphasis on fresh seafood. Lunch features staples like the charred salmon salad, and the evening menu tacks on entrées like the grilled scallops, topped with lime cilantro butter, and served on wilted chives, baby spinach, and roasted peppers.

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bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food” from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR.

A straight farm-to-table concept and a certified-green restaurant, Kitchen Sync’s eco-focus extends to its menu, sourced by local farms. Start with the Gritz Fritz, with Hurricane Creek fried grits, collards, and pepper jam. The Banh Mi salad comes loaded with fresh veg and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu, or try the local rib pork chop. Don’t miss the pizza! $$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 5688115, kitchensyncgreenville.com LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

NORTHAMPTON WINES & WINE CAFÉ

Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar. Choose a bottle from the thousands for sale, open it for a corkage fee, and enjoy with a selection of cheese or small plate. Or, select the dining area for dinner from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a decidedly relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$. L, D. 211-A E Broad

St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwines.com

THE NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Nick Graves like smoked scallop crudo with creme fraiche, grapefruit, hot sauce pearls, and Meyer lemon oil, and pork belly agnolotti with chestnuts, rapini, and saffron cream. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere.

$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill.com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com ROOST

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables

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overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beer-butt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com

SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

BARS & BREWERIES 13 STRIPES BREWERY

Providing patrons and patriots alike with a wide porch area and spacious interior bar, 13 Stripes rotates a loaded arsenal of aptlytitled suds—including the Nathan Hale Pale Ale and Machias Liberty Nitro Milk Stout— and rolls out session beers, IPAs, porters, and other seasonal kegs that pair perfectly with one of 13 Stripes’ “ration plates,” laden with fresh-cut meats and cheeses. Taylors Mill, 250 Mill St, Ste PW 3101, Taylors. (864) 349-1430, 13stripesbrewery.com BIRDS FLY SOUTH ALE PROJECT

With a focus on farmhouse saisons and sour beers, Birds Fly South Ale Project has come home to roost in Hampton Station. Though closed for production Monday through Wednesday, the open-air taproom is the perfect mid-week place to drain a cold glass while noshing on local food truck fare. Expect to find flavor-filled concoctions, such as the Biggie Mango, Eldorado Saison, or the 2Hop Session IPA. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext. (864) 412-8825, bfsbeer.com BREWERY 85

Named for Greenville’s favorite freeway, this microbrew is attracting outsized attention with their eclectic collection of craft brews. From the crisp GVL IPA to the malty Howdy Dunkel, Brewery 85 combines Southern style with the best of German brew techniques. Trek to the taproom for their latest lagers; well-mannered kids and canines welcome. 6 Whitlee Ct. (864) 558-0104, brewery85.com THE COMMUNITY TAP

Convenience, expertise, and great atmosphere collide at The Community Tap, Greenville’s neighborhood craft beer and wine shop. Choose from their extensive selection—more than 180 local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of their ever-rotating beer and wine taps. 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525, thecommunitytap.com

QUEST BREWING CO.

Committed to producing premium brews while minimizing their environmental impact, Quest guarantees to satisfy your beer cravings and sustainability enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature brews; the West Coast–style Ellida IPA packs a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon brewery tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville. (864) 272- 6232, questbrewering.com

SIP WHISKEY & WINE

True to its namesake, this rooftop tasting room is all about liquid refreshment. While the full-service bar offers an array of fine wine and whiskey, there’s no better way to end your evening than with an easy-drinking glass of sangria (or a signature cocktail) in hand. SIP’s open-air patio complete with cushioned couches accentuates the laidback atmosphere, and a curated collection of small plates guarantees a quick answer to an alcohol-induced appetite.

Greenville’s finest grass fed burger.

$-$$, D. 103 N Main St #400, Greenville. (864) 552-1916, sipgvl.com SWAMP RABBIT BREWERY & TAPROOM

Located off of Main Street in Travelers Rest, this local brewhouse gives you one more reason to cruise (responsibly!) down the Swamp Rabbit. With a taproom offering classics (try the easy-drinking American pale ale) and fresh brews (the Belgian-style farm ale is a golden dream) as well as frequent food truck visits, this brewery is sure to become your favorite place to cap off a Saturday afternoon.

dine in or dine out

864.568.8676 3029 Augusta St. Greenville

26 S Main St, Travelers Rest. theswamprabbitbrewery.com THOMAS CREEK BREWERY

The Thomas Creek brand has been a familiar feature on the Greenville libation lineup for more than ten years, but a visit to the home of the River Falls Red Ale or Trifecta IPA is well worth the trip. Fill up on your favorite Thomas Creek brew in the tasting room, or soak up some sun (and hops!) on the brewery’s patio. Tours available by appointment. 2054 Piedmont Hwy. (864) 605-1166, thomascreekbeer.com UP ON THE ROOF

We all know a well-crafted cocktail can make your spirits soar, but a glass at this dignified drinkery will leave you nine stories high, literally. With it’s classic cocktails, local craft brews, and unique wine varieties, this rooftop bar brings a heightened experience to downtown’s Embassy Suites. Graze on small plates and soak in some of the Upstate’s most scenic vistas. $-$$, L, D. 250 RiverPlace. (864) 242-4000, eatupdrinkup.net UPSTATE CRAFT BEER CO.

LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 72 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the Greenville Drive crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St. (864) 239-0286 macspeedshop.com

Housed in the old Claussen Bakery off Augusta, Upstate Craft Beer Co. is hoppy hour heaven. Not only do they feature the best local and national brews on tap, this beer joint offers home brewsters all the gear and ’gredients needed to craft their own aleinspired inventions. Makes sure to try a naan pizza from the in-house kitchen. 400 Augusta St. (864) 609-4590, upstatecraftbeer.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is within walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com

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DINING

Guide

THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR.

1 Augusta St, Ste 126. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

BREAKFAST/LUNCH BISCUIT HEAD

The queen bee of all things fluffy, floury, and delicious, Asheville-based Biscuit Head has set up shop in Greenville with its wide array of home-cooked biscuits. Whether you like ’em slathered in gravy or smothered in sweetness—the jam bar is slammed with fruity preserves—you can’t go wrong with the Greenvillian topped with fried pork steak, jalapeño cream cheese, bacon gravy, a sunny side egg, and pickled jalapeños. $-$$. B, L. 823 S Church St, Greenville. (864) 248-0371, biscuitheads.com/menu-greenville THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St. (864) 232-4100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com HAPPY+HALE

Based out of Raleigh, the healthy eatery’s first SC location offers diners a diverse menu of made-to-order salads, bowls, smoothies, juices, and breakfast items crafted from wholesome, all-natural ingredients. Try the “Incredibowl” packed with pumpkin seeds, black beans, avocado, golden quinoa, dino kale, and lemon tahini dressing, paired with an Almond Brothers smoothie. $$, B, L, D. 600 S Main St.

happyandhale.com MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon.

$$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s

offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday. 615 S Main St. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon. $$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Ste T. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS BEX CAFÉ AND JUICE BAR

Healthy and hearty join forces at this West End juice bar. Find fresh fare in their organic salads, as well as their fruit and veggie-rich juice varieties; or sink your teeth into something a little more solid. Their sausage, egg, and cheese bagel will not disappoint, with gluten-free options available, of course.

$, B, L. 820 S Main St #104. (864) 552-1509, bex.cafe COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D. methodicalcoffee.com O-CHA TEA BAR

A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com SOUTHERN PRESSED JUICERY

A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try the power-packed energy bowl like the Dragon Blood. This hot-pink concoction is based with

a creamy mixture of dragon fruit, almond milk, and banana, then layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W. Washington St.

(864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the Mid-Century couch or solo at the palletinspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

DELIS & SANDWICHES CAVIAR & BANANAS

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourmet prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the Classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing, or the Rick’s Chopped Salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb-crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

$-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St. (864) 271-8431, sobysontheside.com

sautéed shrimp in creamy spicy ChipotleGuajillo suace); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw.

$-$$. Closed Sunday & Monday. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 605 Haywood Rd. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com BASIL THAI CUISINE

Elegant comfort is hard to come by, but the Eang brothers have created an empire out of the unconventional concept which Basil Thai adds in the Aloft building downtown. Try the Chicken Coconut Tureen to start: a simple dish of chicken, mushrooms, and galanga roots in coconut milk packed with herbaceous flavors. You’ll probably have enough for leftovers, but the best comfort meals usually do. $$-$$$, D. 9 N Laurens St. (864) 609-4120, eatatbasil.com/greenville HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. For dinner, try one of the thali specials. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. Soleil Moon Frye fans should give the Punky Brewster roll a try: tuna, mango, hot sauce, and Panko topped with spicy crab salad and unagi sauce. $$, L, D. 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai.com

SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh. $, B, L, D (closed Sunday

evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St. (864) 509-6061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS CAFÉ & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

ETHNIC

JI-ROZ

The delicacy of Mediterranean cuisine greets Greenville at Main + Stone’s latest food joint, Ji-roz (YEE-ros). With its abundance of natural light, ocean blue decor, and authentic Grecian pottery, this farm-to-table concept transports patrons straight to the Santorini seaside. Do dinner tapas-style with a variety of small plates, or go straight for the gyro, complete with a fluffy pita wrap, tzatziki, tomatoes, onions, fries and your meat of preference. $$, L, D, SBR. 644 N. Main St #100, Greenville. (864) 373-9445, jirozgreenvillesc.com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

ASADA

Vibrant Latin culture comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote rellenos de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy

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shallots, and sauce. Try the Vietnamese crepes or the Pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from their home grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Monday. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com MENKOI RAMEN HOUSE

Can you say umami? Located on Woodruff Road with a second shop now on North Main, this Japanese noodle house offers an exquisite ramen experience that will have you wondering why you ever settled for the dorm room packet version. Start with the rice balls or edamame, then dive into the Shoyu ramen—marinated pork, bean sprouts, spinach, green onions, nori, and a boiled egg bathe in a soy-based broth. $, L, D. 1860 Woodruff Rd, Ste C, and 243 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 288-5659 YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soulsatisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce then topped with a fried egg. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN ARYANA

The enticing aroma of Afghan cuisine delivers savory satisfaction at this local lunch spot. Chef Nelo Mayar brings her favorite fare from hometown Kabul to Greenville eaters—think succulent lamb kabobs and meat-filled steamed dumplings, sweet potato burhani and root-veggie rich soups. To spice things up, the menu changes daily, but expect to find two plates of rice, meat, and veggies offered. $, L. 210 E Coffee St. (864) 236-7410, aryanagreenville.com DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lthe arugula salad or bistro burger with caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com

PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration.

“NEVER” TOUR A LUXURY HOME WITHOUT “THE” EXPERT

$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday.

618 S Main St. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE

Boasting French flair and fare, this sister restaurant to Simpsonville-based Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second in Jason and Julia Scholz’s line of quality eateries. Situated in the burgeoning Hollingsworth Park area, Stella’s Southern Brasserie offers a local twist on French staples—such as blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen—served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday.

23 W Washington St. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

* Ty Savage represented the buyer or seller of each home shown

Ty Savage, Broker, CEO

864.444.7399

OVER 15 YEARS EXPERIENCE AND $350 MILLION PLUS IN SALES

• Professional Photography/Aerials • Staging Consultation • Buying & Selling Expert • Local Print Ad campaign • Zillow 5 Star Premier Agent / Featured listing on Zillow/Trulia

FOOD TRUCKS AUTOMATIC TACO

Since 2015, this taco truck has delivered new wonders and old favorites. Owner Nick Thomas treats the tortilla as a work of art, with the likes of Nashville Hot Chicken or Thai Shrimp with fried avocado stuffed into soft shells. Sides like the street corn are must adds. Don’t miss a chance to reinvent your taste buds—check the Automatic Taco’s Facebook page for their weekly schedule. $. Schedule varies.

(404) 372-2266, facebook.com/ automatictaco CHUCK TRUCK

Owner David Allen uses only local

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DINING

Guide

ingredients to make his burgers. Treat yourself to a pimento cheeseburger and fries, or salute our Cajun neighbors with the truck’s signature N’awlins burger—a fresh-ground beef patty served with andouille sausage, peppers, onions, and applewood-smoked white cheddar, topped with the Chuck Truck’s very own herb aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864)

STONE PIZZA

ELLADA KOUZINA

$$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave. (864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

884-3592, daveschucktruck.com

Greek cuisine hits the Greenville scene in this big blue traveling kitchen. Traditional treats are always available off the spit, the lamb and chicken gyros are Mediterranean heaven, and their special take on Greek fries are the ideal pre-meal snack. Check social media for weekly schedules and booking opportunities. $. Schedule varies. (864) 908-5698, facebook.com/elladakouzina2013 ROBINO’S

Chef Robin’s vision of freshly sourced fare with a home-cooked feel comes to fruition in Robino’s Food Truck. Though mainly featuring Italian food, this truck shucks out a wide variety of American classics, such as the chicken potpie with puff pastry or the garden burger. For those with dietary limitations, the vegan lasagna is a great go-to option. $, Schedule varies. (864) 621 3064,

robinosfoodtruck.com

THOROUGHFARE FOOD TRUCK

From culinary school to the streets of Greenville, Neil and Jessica Barley have made it their mission to bring people together through food. Not only has Thoroughfare proved that tater tots can be eaten with every meal (their disco tots are topped with white cheddar gravy), they’ve driven their way into our hearts. Don’t miss the mahi mahi tacos topped with kale slaw and chipotle aioli. $. Schedule varies. (864) 735-8413, thoroughfarefoodtruck.com

PIZZA BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes. $-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St. (864) 2323706, barleysgville.com COASTAL CRUST

This Charleston-based catering joint graces the Greenville scene with artisan, Neapolitan-style pizza pies. Served out of a turquoise ’55 Chevy tow truck, the pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River farms. Stick with the classic margarita pie, or branch out with the red Russian kale and Gorgonzola, sprinkled with almond pieces and drizzled in olive oil. Location information and renting opportunities are available on their website. $, L, D. Location varies. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street downtown, and now on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L,

D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 9918748, sidewallpizza.com

Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, the latest edition to the corner of Stone and Park avenues is no pie in the sky. Ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends (beer, sports, and pizza, amirite?), STONE and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with house-made mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked for a flat minute in their wood fire oven.

VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TACOS CANTINA 76

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76. Although ripe with golden-brown chimichangas and zesty enchiladas, the menu’s real star is the taco selection. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese, or turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli. $, L, D. 103 N Main St.

(864) 631-2914, cantina76.com FARMHOUSE TACOS

Hand-crafted and locally sourced, this TR taco joint is the love child of Mexican cuisine and Southern soul food. Start the meal with a few small plates—try the fried green tomatoes with pimento cheese or the pan-seared crab cakes—then dig into pure taco bliss with the Travelers Rest hot chicken or the fried catfish with tartar sauce. Go a little lighter with a farm-fresh salad, and end with a mouthful of campfire s’mores. $, L, D, SBR.

164 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-0586, farmhousetacos.com PAPI’S TACOS

Table 301 plankowner Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. Get in, get out, and enjoy Falls Park. $$, L, D. 300 River St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com WHITE DUCK TACO SHOP

The new kid on the taco block, White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok Shrimp taco or the Mushroom Potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or Birds Fly South’s crisp Bungalow Golden Ale for the complete taqueria experience. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext Suite 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com WILLY TACO

Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta! Housed in the former Feed & Seed, the animated atmosphere pairs perfectly with their festive food presentation. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the crispy avocado—topped off with one of their house-crafted margaritas. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 217 Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

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Now on Tap – Village of West Greenville POURING AT 12 LOIS AVENUE 44 Taps – Private Party Space – Small Bites, Burgers, Flatbreads, Sweets & More Spartanburg

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Life moments shouldn’t be interrupted for service calls. From covering our shoes to explaining everything in detail, we are committed to ensuring your home’s problems are fixed without any headaches.

Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

(864) 908.3362 W W W. CO R L E Y P R O. CO M “Each time we have had the occasion to request help from Corley, we have never been disappointed. All the specialists who have visited our house and helped us have been polite, professional and always willing to explain all our choices. Thanks again.” Jo Ann & David T., Greenville SEPTEMBER 2017 / 117

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Thru Sept 30 SEPTEMBER

Thru Sept 3

MUSIC OF THE NIGHT: THE SONGS OF ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER Even if you’re not a huge fan of musical theater, chances are you’ve heard a tune or two by Andrew Lloyd Webber. The composer extraordinaire has a hand in film scores, orchestrations, and has written unforgettable music for Broadway productions like Cats, Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, The Phantom of the Opera, and more. The Flat Rock Playhouse pays homage to this musical mastermind with a revue of his all-time greatest showstoppers. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$50. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

More than just your average, everyday farmers market, Travelers Rest’s version of the seasonal favorite incorporates lecture series, culinary demonstrations, fitness, music, and even crafts for the kids. You can find vendors like Blue Ridge Creamery, Southern Pressed Juicery, Circa Doughnut, and Greenbrier Farms any time you visit. Trailblazer Park, 235 Trailblazer Dr, Travelers Rest. Sat, 8:30am–12pm. Free. travelersrestfarmersmarket.com

Thru Oct 22

VICTORIA WYETH: MY ANDY When born into the artistic lineage of the Wyeth family, it’s expected that one shall follow the footsteps of creative nobility—no pressure. As the lone grandchild of the late Americana painter Andrew Wyeth, Victoria Wyeth does justice to her artistic legacy by documenting his last years in a collection of intimate shots, exposing the natural world Wyeth not only inhabited but so deftly captured in his paintings.

September 22 – October 8

by Bruce Norris Directed by Jay Briggs

sponsored by:

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warehousetheatre.com

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Photograph of Tye Tribbett, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

TRAVELERS REST FARMERS MARKET


CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS youth in need. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sun, 5pm. $42-$52. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, times vary. Free. (864) 271-7570, gcma.org

Thru Oct 28

6–27

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES

Photograph of Tye Tribbett, courtesy of Bon Secours Wellness Arena

TD SATURDAY MARKET

TD’s annual downtown market is the place to stock up on seasonal produce, plants, baked goods, meats, and cheeses—all while supporting regional farmers. There’s also fresh bread and pastries, handmade spreads, pottery, pickled treats, and more. The market is winds down next month, so get in while the gettin’s good. Downtown Greenville. Sat, 8am–Noon. Free. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

Paying homage to the drive-in days of the past, Moonlight Movies showcases some of the best vintage flicks outdoors in scenic Falls Park. More social than Netflix and less irritating than the sticky floors of the movie theater, it’s the best way to settle under the stars and welcome autumn. Falls Park on the Reedy, 601 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 8pm. Free. (864) 467-4485, greenvillesc.gov/1324/FidelityMoonlight-Movies

2017 3 SPIRITFEST A winning pair of uplifting

7

COUTURE FOR A CAUSE

Recyclers rejoice—all those plastic grocery bags you’ve been hoarding have finally found their calling. Join the hubbub of artists, designers, and fashion fans for Greenville’s Couture for a Cause, a recycled runway competition benefiting the local chapter of the American Cancer Society. All outfits are crafted with repurposed goods

gospel talent and spiritual discussion, SpiritFest emphasizes the power of strength through prayer and acceptance. This year’s edition features powerhouse vocalists Tamela Mann, Tye Tribbett, Travis Greene, The Rance Allen Group, and other artists lifting their voices in praise. The annual tradition will also present Spiritfest scholarship funds to local

Handbags are like friends...you can never have too many!

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH 6-9 PM

Huguenot Loft at the

PEACE CENTER Greenville, SC

Join us for our 11th annual silent and live auctions of over 100 handbags and valuable gift items. Enjoy great food and Folonari wines! Benefiting the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation Tickets are $40 and available at:

www.SCOvarianCancer.org email: info@scovariancancer.org

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Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

and modeled by cancer survivors; don’t throw away your chance to experience the style, all for a great cause. West Village Lofts at Brandon Mill, 25 Draper St, Greenville. Thurs, 7–9pm. $75-$125. coutureforacausesc.org

NAVY LEAGUE COUNCIL DINNER

A civilian group with a mission to support our country’s greatest and bravest, The Upper South Carolina Council of the Navy League will host an evening in honor of those serving at sea. Along with drinks and dinner, the night will include guest speaker Commander Porter Halyburton, a Vietnam War veteran held captive for seven years. Guests, including nonmembers, will hear Commander Halyburton’s inspiring story of courage in the face of extreme trial. Reservations required by September 3. The Poinsett Club, 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Thurs, 6pm. $33. (864) 438-4621

7–24

BROWN

8/15/17

You may be a good man, but for goodness’ sake, stop letting Lucy hold the football, Charlie Brown. Based on Charles M. Schulz’s lovable pint-sized characters, the musical trails our favorite zigzag-stripe-wearing protagonist as he tries to figure out what it means to be a “good man.” He’s joined by Lucy, Linus, Schroeder, Snoopy, and the rest of the Peanuts gallery in this heartwarming family 5:23 PM production that’s sure to shine a little light in all our souls. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $12.50-$25. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

8 RECYCLED RUNWAY COMPETITION

Presented by

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH, 2017

SIPPIN’ SAFARI

Having more than a few cocktails on a Friday night may leave you feeling like an animal, but how about actually getting to partake in a party with the animals? This annual event supports the Friends of the Greenville Zoo program, mixing cocktails with cockatoos to fund our beloved

Miss

WEST VILLAGE LOFTS AT BRANDON MILL

AGATHA CHRISTIE’S THE MOUSETRAP

Benefiting

Sept 8–Oct 1; Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. Greenville Little Theatre. Queen of mystery Agatha Christie weaves together a tale of murder and mayhem in this classic production.

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT COUTUREFORACAUSESC.ORG

8–Oct 1 AGATHA CHRISTIE’S THE MOUSETRAP

Novelist Agatha Christie is known for spinning a bloody yarn, blending together murder, revenge, mystery,

z ot Do N

RECEPTION 6:00PM RUNWAY COMPETITION BEGINS AT 7:30PM

25 DRAPER ST, GREENVILLE, SC 29611

hometown creatures. There will be zoo tours for visitors, musical acts, and a silent auction loaded with plenty of must-have items. Baboon imitations are strongly discouraged. The Greenville Zoo, 150 Cleveland Park Dr, Greenville. Fri, 6:30– 9:30pm. $45. (864) 467-4300, greenvillezoo.com

Photograph courtesy of Greenville Little Theatre

Untitled-1 1

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE

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Photograph by Joan Marcus, courtesy of the Peace Center

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THE BODYGUARD Sept 11–17; Mon–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm. $35+. The Peace Center. We will always love these songs. Relive the glory days of Whitney Houston’s cinematic turn as Rachel Marron in this production that pays homage to the 1992 film.

and plenty of didn’t-see-that-coming moments. The Mousetrap is arguably the cream of the crime crop, pitting five strangers against one another—in a snowbound mansion, no less—to fight for their lives. Sergeant Trotter is on the scene when a young woman is murdered, and his investigation leads him to Monkswell Manor, where he’ll have nothing more than a nursery rhyme to help him crack this whodunnit before it’s too late. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

9 & 23

WAGGIN’ AT THE WATERPARK

If heaven is a giant field full of dogs, this must be the next best thing. Bring your furry friend to get a little wet ’n wild at the waterpark, where they’ll have the run of the place for the entire day! Both dates will have separate times designated for small dogs, large dogs, and even senior canines. This summer has been a scorcher, and your pups deserve it. Otter Creek Waterpark, 101 W Darby Rd, Greenville. Sat, 9am– 3:30pm. $17-$30. (864) 288-6470, greenvillerec.com/event/wagginat-the-waterpark-otter-creek

BODYGUARD 11–17 THE You’ve been trying to

hit Whitney’s high notes a la “I Will Always Love You” for years, so why not let some people with actual vocal chops give it a shot? The Bodyguard musical premiered 20 years after the film’s release and stays loyal to what made the original such an icon— action, intrigue, romance, and, of course, a killer songbook that pays tribute to one of music’s most influential artists. R&B singer Deborah Cox takes on the role of Rachel Marron, a pop diva who hires bodyguard Frank Farmer when she finds herself in the crosshairs of a killer. The pair grows closer as the case gets hotter and . . . well, you know the rest. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Mon– Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm &

8pm; Sun, 1pm. $35+. (864) 4673000, peacecenter.org

OLD BROADS 12–23 FOUR Old age ain’t all Depends

and denture glue for Beatrice Shelton, a sassy retired burlesque performer with her mind on the Caribbean but her body in the nursing home. Along with her band of quirky comrades, Beatrice attempts to solve the dark mysteries occurring behind closed doors at Magnolia Place Assisted Living, going head-to-head with the nefarious Nurse Pat Jones and encountering an unexpected (yet hysterical) scenario at every turn. Directed by Ruth Wood, the Leslie Kimbell–penned comedy was the winner of Centre Stage’s 2016 New Play Festival. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $15-$30. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

15

THE ROSE BALL

Celebrate the elegance and versatility of the world’s favorite flower at Greenville’s 24th Rose Ball. Benefitting 14 local charities and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, the ball will transform the Poinsett Club into a haven of roses, Champagne, and dancing. Dubbed the “The Grandest Ball of Them All” since 1974, this year’s theme will be the Palette of the Rose, highlighting the multiplicity of the thorned flower with a cocktail hour and seated dinner, along with

Making Delivery Special A memorable birth experience. Let your special, brand-new baby start out life in a special, brand-new place: Starting in September, at The Family Birthplace at Patewood Memorial Hospital, our delivery suites will be ready for your sweet delivery! Here, our staff brings professional expertise, compassion and tenderness to provide the best experience possible for you and your precious baby. To learn more about deliveries at Patewood, please visit ghs.org/pmhbaby.

ghs.org

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Miss DREW HOLCOMB AND THE NEIGHBORS Sept 21; Thurs, 7:30pm. $25-$55. TD Stage at the Peace Center. Grab your neighbors for Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors’ rootsy, rip-roarin’ Southern sound.

music and dancing. Local vendors and gardeners will aid in creating a fantastical atmosphere featuring 4,000 donated roses. The Poinsett Club. 807 E Washington St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. Prices vary. theroseball.org

MCGRAW 15 TIM AND FAITH HILL

Alex Lilla

Caleb LeGrand

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 260137

Jordan Sherer

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 1470089

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 259691

Brad Rollison

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 1021998

David Zambelas

Loan Officer, NMLS#: 284229

864.527.9980

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15–30 AMADEUS True, the official portraits

CRAFT PARADE 16–17 INDIE Much more exciting

than sitting at home and trying to painstakingly stay inside the lines of your adult coloring book, the Indie Craft Parade exposes the creative expression of craft artists from around the South, with mediums ranging from paper goods to prints and unique wearables. You’ve never seen so much artistry under one roof, so drop that needlepoint you’ll never finish (even IF you had the time) and join the Parade. Huguenot Mill at the Peace Center, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Sat, 9–6pm; Sun, 11–5pm. $5 admission. makerscollective.org

GREENVILLE FAIR 16 SOUTH There’s so much more to fairs than deep-fried hamburgers and getting trapped in the Gravitron for 2–10 hours. The South Greenville Fair will showcase prize-winning chickens, horses, beef, and rabbits from around the Upstate, and select a special Fair Queen to reign over it all. There will also be competitions in artwork, engine-tractors, and a BBQ rib cookoff. What more could you ask for? Simpsonville City Park, 100 Park Dr, Simpsonville. Sat, 8:30am. Free. southgreenvillefair.com

of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart make the renowned composer look a little pompous. Then again, it’s kinda hard to look laid-back in a powdered wig. Playwright Peter Shaffer takes a few civil liberties in crafting the persona of one of history’s most important tunesmiths, branding him a bad boy with a vulgar streak and the mouth of a sailor. Recounted by an aging Antonio Salieri, Amadeus weaves a tale of heated rivalry between Mozart and the Italian composer. Even with Salieri’s many, many attempts to wreck his reputation, Mozart still manages to comes out on top—even in death. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, Sun, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm. $30-$50. (828) 693-0403, flatrockplayhouse.org

Photograph courtesy of the Warehouse Theatre

Thomas Ray, Branch Manager, NMLS#: 171228

Antony and Cleopatra. Romeo and Juliet. Bella and Edward. Then Jacob. Then Edward again. There’s no question that country superstars Tim McGraw and Faith Hill are a power couple; between the two of them, the pair share countless awards bestowed by the Academy of Country Music, the Recording Academy, Billboard, and Country Music Association—just imagine how many trophy cases they had to build. Now, the “This Kiss” singer and the man behind the hit single “Live Like You Were Dying” are combining forces again for the Soul2Soul World Tour. Whether they’re rocking solo or on stage belting it out together, these country crooners are simply legendary. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 7:30pm. $80-$120. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

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ARMS 5K 16 OPEN If your family is in the midst of a

medical crisis, worrying about where you’re going to lay your head down at night should be the least of your concerns. Thankfully, the Open Arms organization helps provide a home (away from home) for families in this exact situation, giving them one less thing to fret over when travelling for treatment. Funding for Open Arms is made possible through events like the 5k, which takes place throughout Mauldin’s scenic Conestee Park. Conestee Park, 840 Mauldin Rd, Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. $15-$25. (864) 675-1531, openarms5k.com

THE 16–24 PINKALICIOUS MUSICAL

Pinkalicious is a girl who, yep, you guessed it, loves all things pink. But when a few too many cupcakes turn our young heroine into a walking piece of Bubble Yum, Pinkalicious is forced to take off her rose-colored glasses and give greens a chance. Who knows—your little ones might ask you to stop for roasted Brussels sprouts instead of ice cream on the way home. But probably not. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 10am & 1:30pm; Sun, 1:30pm & 5:30pm. $18-$27. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

rip-roaring night of rock ’n’ roll. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $25-$55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

21–24 EUPHORIA There are some things

that go hand-in-hand: rich wines seem to taste their best when complemented by some of downtown Greenville’s most appetizing and delectable cuisine. Add a little live music to the cocktail, and there you have it: Euphoria. In addition to numerous guest chef dinners, cooking panels, and tastings, the festival has plenty of gustatory experiences to offer. Downtown Greenville. Times, prices vary. (864) 233-5663, euphoriagreenville.com

22–23 SOOIE And the last little pig cried . . . beef or pork? Mustard or vinegar? Whole hog or shoulder? Now, you have the chance to decide for yourself at this BBQ competition sponsored by the City of Mauldin. Enjoy plates heaped high with tantalizing cuts on Saturday, but be sure to stop by on Friday for the “Anything Butt” challenge, where rivals will plate to impress with a variety of homemade side dishes.

MAN AND HIS 18 APROSTATE

No need to sugarcoat this one. The oneman show starring silver screen legend Ed Asner is all about, um, self-discovery. While on holiday in Italy, Asner’s character falls prey to prostate problems, landing him in a foreign hospital where (surprise!) no one speaks English. The sequence of events that follow—all of which is based on a true story crafted by comedy writer Ed Weinberger—is equal parts raunchy and hysterical, each priceless one-liner delivered with the grouse only an 87-year-old man in a backless hospital gown could deliver. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Mon, 3pm & 7pm. $34$54. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Photograph courtesy of the Warehouse Theatre

HOLCOMB AND 21 DREW THE NEIGHBORS

With the March release of their eighth studio album, Souvenir, Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors have proven they have the stuff to stick it in the music industry. Their gritty cocktail of Southern-style music has landed them on numerous festival stages and supporting slots for some of the genre’s most prominent names including The Avett Brothers and Robert Earl Keen. The rootsy Tennessee natives are famous for their dynamic live shows, and they’re sure to bring it all out front and center for a

Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 11am–3pm. Free admission. mauldinbbq.com

22–Oct 8 CLYBOURNE PARK

The passage of time can heal many things. Unfortunately, deepseated racial tensions and baseless discrimination aren’t among them. The Bruce Norris piece picks up where Lorraine Hansberry’s Broadway classic A Raisin in the Sun left off, with the Younger family attempting to move into the predominantly white neighborhood of Clybourne Park. The move is condemned by the white community, setting the wheels in motion for a tumultuous future. Roles are reversed when in 2009, a young white couple with dreams of razing the house and gentrifying the now all-black neighborhood face the same obstacles that affected the Youngers all

MAKE YOUR N E XT EVENT GO DOWN IN H ISTORY

120 SOUTH MAIN STREET GREENVILLE, SC 29601 | 864.421.9700 WESTINPOINSETTGREENVILLE.COM

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Scene 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $25+. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

28 Shopping, dining, and a great HANDBAGS FOR HOPE

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$75. (864) 232-0344, greenvillesymphony.org those years ago. The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

THE 23–24 BEETHOVEN GREAT

It’s all Beethoven, all the time when the Greenville Symphony Orchestra premieres its landmark 70th season. The showstopper evening will feature select works from the famed composer, including the Piano Concerto No. 5, ‘Egmont’ Overture, and the master’s iconic 5th Symphony. Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel will lead the talented guild of musicians, including Dmitri Levkovich on piano.

HOME 26–Oct 1 FUN Don’t let the title

fool you—this musical adapted from cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s autobiographical graphic novel isn’t all sunshine and rainbows. The chronological story is told from Bechdel’s present-day perspective as she reflects on formative phases in her past: the rigid, deceptive relationship with her father during her childhood and the sexual awakening she experiences in college. As the story unfolds, Bechdel realizes that our singular experiences are often intertwined, and that it takes some growing up to understand who our parents are. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs,

cause? We’re there. The 11th annual Handbags for Hope event will benefit the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation, inviting guests for a fabulous evening of both silent and live auctions featuring dozens of musthave items. Capping off the night are plenty of flowing cocktails, delicious appetizers, and the opportunity to win big with gifts from local retailers. Huguenot Loft at the Peace Center, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Thurs, 6–9pm. $40. (864) 373-6306, scovariancancer.org/event/ handbags-for-hope-2017

Fri, 7–10pm. $27. (864) 232-3595, loavesandfishesgreenville.com

FISHING FILM TOUR 29 FLY Greenville is just one of more

than 150 stops on the 11th annual Fly Fishing Film Tour (hosted by Mountain Bridge Trout Unlimted), which unites anglers of all ages to mingle and share a few tales of the line. The fest’s cinema lineup presents stunning films from every corner of the Earth, giving you a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience some of the greatest fishing thrills with your own two eyes. Brewery 85, 6 Whitlee Ct, Greenville. Fri, 7pm. $15. (503) 349-7298, flyfilmtour.com

OUT HUNGER 28 ROCK Rock ’n’ roll and spirits go

together like . . . well, rock ’n’ roll and spirits. Join pop rockers Tommy Tutone—yes of “867-5309/Jenny” fame—while sampling wares from top South Carolina distilleries including Striped Pig Distillery, Sugar Tit Moonshine, Six & Twenty Distillery, and others. Proceeds from the evening will directly benefit the local Loaves and Fishes, a program that collects and distributes food items to local pantries in need. Revel, 304 E Stone Ave, Greenville.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

TOWN

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29–Oct 1SYMPHONY TOUR OF HOMES Normally if you want to get inside some of Greenville’s most exquisite homes, there’s a little bit of breaking and entering involved. Not okay. This year’s tour will showcase the Crescent Avenue area, highlighting the diversity of designs within this ever-evolving, upscale neighborhood community. A kickoff cocktail party at the home of Ellis and Mary Burnett Johnston will precede the tour on Tuesday, September 26. Crescent Ave, McDaniel Ave, Greenville. Fri–Sat, 10am–4pm; Sun, 1–4pm. $20-$25. (864) 370-0965, guildGSO.org

FUN HOME

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Sept 26–Oct 1; Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. $25+. The Peace Center. Based on Alison Bechdel’s 2006 graphic memoir, Fun Home is a winner of five Tony Awards, including Best Musical in 2015. It delves into Alison’s life at three different stages as she comes of age, taking in the full view of how her family and experiences have shaped her.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

FRIENDS 30 BETWEEN The Greenville Symphony

Orchestra’s popular Spotlight Series opens the year up with a showcase unlike any other, mixing together elements of the classics, romantic symphonies, and contemporary tunes to make for one unforgettable, intimate evening. Each of the orchestra’s uniquely brilliant woodwind, strings, brass, and percussion sections will have a chance to shine; the five performance pieces—including works by Alec Wilder, Svante Henryson, and Josef Fiala, among others—have been specially chosen for the occasion. The Fellowship Hall at First Baptist Greenville, 847 Cleveland St, Greenville. Sat, 2pm & 7pm. $15. (864) 232-0344, greenvillesymphony.org

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Estates Homes as distinguished as our readers.

Peaceful Mountaintop Retreat, TR

6BR, 7BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1349564 · $3,800,000

59 Grand Vista Dr., Greenville

4BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1330488 · $1,299,000

The Cliffs Valley Vince Roser (864) 411-5773 cliffsliving.com

Conservus Realty Kendall Bateman (864) 320-2414 theridgesatparismountain.com/real-estate/city-view-1/

Lake Keowee Custom Home, Salem

Maintenance Free Living, Lake Keowee

Turnkey Family Retreat, Lake Keowee

The Cliffs at Keowee Falls Ivy Neighbors (864) 411-5769 cliffsliving.com

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Libby Zorbas (864) 207-8711 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

Keller Williams Luxury Lake Living Libby Zorbas (864) 207-8711 luxurylakelivingrealty.com

5BR, 6BA · MLS#20188770 · $1,225,000

3BR, 3.5BA · MLS#20189311 · $999,999

101 Ramsford Ln., Simpsonville

36 Windfaire Pass Ct., Greenville

Wilson Associates Linda O’Brien (864) 325-0495 wilsonassociates.net

Conservus Realty Kendall Bateman (864) 320-2414 theridgesatparismountain.com/real-estate/park-view-9-799000/

124 Pheasant Way, Fountain Inn

206 Hidden Hills Dr., Greenville

Wilson Associates Angela Rodriguez (864) 609-7219 wilsonassociates.net

Wilson Associates Mary Allison Zimmerman (864) 979-5842 wilsonassociates.net

6BR, 5BA · MLS#1348744 · $874,900

5BR, 3.5BA · MLS#1350245 · $513,000

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4BR, 4BA · MLS#1313961 · $789,000

3BR, 3BA · MLS#1346335 · $510,000

6BR, 4BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#20184487 · $975,000

101 Hemingford Cir., Simpsonville 3BR, 2.5BA · MLS#1348515 · $599,000 Wilson Associates Blair Miller (864) 430-7708 wilsonassociates.net

1384 Millrock Church Rd., Simpsonville 3BR, 2.5BA · MLS#1342249 · $373,000 Allen Tate Janet Price (864) 414-2460 PriceMovesHomes.com

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Caroline Spivey at 864.679.1229 or cspivey@communityjournals.com 8/18/17 5:23 3:24 PM


September 28, 2017

101

6:30 PM @ ZEN

grants totaling

$4.8

million in 11 years

77 more than

organizations touched since 2006

550 members

$75 ticket includes

We invite you to join Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville.

silent auction of local art cocktails delicious eats live music by Kelly Jo

greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

Sponsored by 2017-2018 Partners

BMW Manufacturing

Town

Resurgent Capital Services

For ticket & art donation information visit meyercenter.org or call 864.250.0005 SEPTEMBER 2017 / 127 Untitled-1 1 TOWN_blank page.indd 3

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SECOND

Glance

Grand Design

P

aul Yanko creates colorful fluidity within rigid lines in his latest collection at Greenville Tech’s Riverworks Gallery, Snap to Grid. Migrate from Center. Deviate and Expand. The five-piece collection pops with horizontal grid lines that bear helter-skelter designs within the organization. Yet there’s more to Yanko’s work than meets the eye. The fractured panes hide clues to Yanko’s history: an intricate symbol harkens back to his experience with Egyptian hieroglyphs; details resemble his great-grandmother’s needlework; and isolated strokes of color honor his heroes Wayne Thiebaud and Paul Klee. The vignettes of Yanko’s life move out from the center of the grid, creating a pathway for the eye to wander and discover the secrets he’s buried within lines and color.—Zoe Nicholson Snap to Grid. Migrate from Center. Deviate and Expand. is on display through September 24 at Greenville Technical College’s RIVERWORKS Gallery, 300 River St #202, Greenville. Yanko will give an artist’s talk and reception on Fri, Sept 8, at 6pm. Gallery hours are 1–5pm, Thurs–Sun.

Paul Yanko, Built Stacked Framed—Botanical Version, 2017. Mixed media on watercolor paper; 30 in. x 22 in. Photogpraph of artwork by Eli Warren.

Painter Paul Yanko puts art into motion through colorful organization

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Retirement Perfected. 10 Fountainview Terrace • Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

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CREATING THE UNEXPECTED SINCE 1856 532 Haywood Road | Greenville, SC | 864.297.5600 | www.halesjewelers.com

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TOWN Sept. 2017  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...

TOWN Sept. 2017  

Each month, TOWN Magazine brings you compelling articles, stylish design, and captivating photography. TOWN engages the reader with illumina...