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SP first. al Cars.

GSP is closer, faster and less crowded2000 than Atlanta or Charlotte Airports. Think GSP first. GSP Drive, Suite 1, Greer SC 29651 | 864.877.7426 www.gspairport.com www.elevatingtheupstate.com gspairport.com : Book Flights, Hotel Rooms and Rental Cars.

2000 GSP Drive, Suite 1, Greer SC 29651 | 864.877.7426 www.gspairport.com

www.elevatingtheupstate.com

A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH A Brief History of the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport

The next milestone in GSP’s celebrated history Over the next four years, GSP visitors will witness the second and most substantial wave of renovations in the airport’s history with the Terminal Improvement Program, WINGSPAN. From initial planning and design to final completion, WINGSPAN has you, the passenger, in mind. GSP has been, and will always be, the Upstate’s hometown airport, and the things you know and love about the airport won’t change. Convenience. Community. Comfort. WINGSPAN signifies the next milestone in GSP’s celebrated history. Through year 2016 WINGSPAN will support a total of 1,397 local jobs, increase local income by $59.6 million, raise local output by $164.1 million, and boost tax revenues by $16 million. For more information about the WINGSPAN Program visit www.elevatingtheupstate.com and the WINGSPAN blog at www.blog.gsptip.com. GSP will maintain this website and blog with real-time WINGSPAN updates and program information. — GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG AIRPORT COMMISSION —

Photo provided by Mr. Francis Earle Hendrix Bill Barnet

Leland Burch

Valerie Miller

Hank Ramella Vice-Chair

Minor Shaw Chair

Doug Smith

‘‘

The crowd roared as the ball cracked off the bat and shot toward the shortstop.

Thinking he had hit a line drive to the outfield, the batter raced toward first. But Witty Davis leaped high, snagged the ball and fired it to first baseman F. E. Hendrix, who scooped up the low throw and doubled the runner off first base. Game over. The big crowd cheered wildly.

The Flatwood Peaches had won another game.

’’


Home Field ADVANTAGE Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport (GSP) has welcomed over 1.8 million passengers a year, is serviced by six major airlines and is still growing. GSP is home to over 1000 full-time and part-time employees who help man the Upstate’s travel gateway to the world. Conveniently located between Greenville and Spartanburg, the airport serves as the Upstate’s very own hometown airport. This month marks 50 years of GSP aviation excellence, and the airport has no plan of slowing down. In the midst of celebration, GSP is in the early stages of WINGSPAN, a four-year terminal improvement program designed to modernize the terminal building, improve passenger flow and upgrade the facility.

Where the Runway Stands On any given Saturday afternoon, the runway greets over 4,500 travelers from the U.S. and around the world. What travelers may not know is that where the airport stands today was once a thriving farming community. Even in the 1950’s, Saturday was a day to welcome incoming travelers from the region for some healthy competition on the baseball field. The Spartanburg County Twilight League was a baseball league manned by local farmers and mill workers. Local peach farmer, Paul Wood, was the manager of the area’s home team, the Flatwood Peaches. His farm was a 2,800-tree peach orchard, and he and his family lived in a house that stood where the GSP runway is today.

GSP International Airport

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Home Field TRADITIONS The airport was built with tradition and the people of Flatwood in mind. Local history is cherished and very much engrained in all facets of the airport. This emphasis was a major part of Roger Milliken’s vision, and continues to be a driving force today.

The Lucky Horseshoe During the initial construction of the airport, workers unearthed a horseshoe that has become a unique part of airport history. The horseshoe was later embedded in the runway as both a reminder of the Flatwood farmland history and as a token of luck and prosperity.

Paul Wood (standing second from right) and his family in front of their Flatwood community home in 1919. The large home stood in the middle of what is now the GSP runway. (Courtesy of Kathy Woodedge)

The airport expansion and 50 years of flight are a testament to the foundation and vision supporting our hometown airport.

2

In the 1950s, Saturday was game day, and the Peaches reigned supreme over the local baseball league. Over the years, the games slowed and the small community between Greenville and Spartanburg started to change as the area welcomed in the new travel port that also signified regional growth.

gspairport.com

Manning the Bases Before GSP was constructed, Greenville and Spartanburg were home to smaller airports that were able to accommodate small planes. In 1945, World War I hero and president of Eastern Airlines, Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, visited Greenville and urged local leaders to expand regional air travel capabilities and consider a regional airport. These words of wisdom did not go unnoticed. With the collaboration of a few Upstate leaders, the vision took shape and turned into a reality. Roger Milliken and Charlie Daniel were two of the local leaders who made this airport possible. While their backgrounds were diverse, they both loved to take a challenge head on. The duo understood the importance of building a regional airport in the Upstate, and worked together to build a team of leaders to make it possible.

In January 1985, Delta and American Airlines announced plans to service GSP. This addition prompted GSP to undergo its first-ever expansion in 1987. The renovations included expanding the concourses, building a parking garage, improving the emergency access roads, constructing more security fences and making general terminal improvements. The horseshoe was not forgotten during these renovations and still rests in the runway as a reminder of the airport’s heritage.


The Boy Aviator The “Boy Aviator” statue that stands in the terminal’s atrium pool was created by noted Utah sculptor, Dennis Smith. It was unveiled in 2004 in honor of Roger Milliken’s longtime service as GSP International Airport Commission Chairman. A little known fact about the statue is that the face of the boy aviator was sculpted to mirror the face of a young Roger Milliken. The statue is and will remain a cherished monument at the airport.

“An area like this will grow not just because you have provided such facilities like an airport. It will grow only because of the kind of business climate you have maintained here.” – Roger Milliken, July 25, 1961

In the Outfield When Roger Milliken envisioned the regional airport, he did so with his passion for natural beauty and trees. His vision laid the foundation for the airport’s dedication to green practices and a devotion to showcasing the natural scenery of the area. The airport has received the Spartanburg Men’s Garden Club Special Achievement Award six consecutive years for their landscaping efforts. The gardens and fountains of GSP will forever be a part of the airport, remaining paramount with WINGSPAN renovations to come.

GSP is also a certified tree farm, and has a responsibility to trim, prune and harvest acreage in order to maintain compliance with the South Carolina Forestry Commission Best Management Practices. In some years GSP has planted as many as 25,000 saplings. While the land has changed to make room for the airport, it is not far from its roots as a peach tree farm.

The Players “What I believe in so desperately is that making projects successful is a team sport and not an individual sport.” — Roger Milliken ROGER MILLIKEN

Leader of Milliken & Company for 71 years

ALEX CROUCH - Engineer and pilot, Alex Crouch of Piedmont Engineering played an instrumental role in selecting the site where the airport stands today. Crouch saw the potential in the small area between Greenville and Spartanburg known as Flatwood. The area was easy to locate, at the proper elevation and spacious enough to accommodate the needs of the growing aviation industry. Crouch understood that location was everything.

ROGER MILLIKEN - Leader of Milliken & Company for 71 years, Roger Milliken was known for his integrity, strong work ethic and commitment to the future. Milliken’s dedication to the community and economic growth was a driving force in making the airport possible. As the initial chairman of the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport Commission, he incorporated his passion for showcasing the natural beauty of the area in the landscaping and original design of the airport.

CHARLIE DANIEL

Founder of Daniel Construction Company

CHARLIE DANIEL - Founder of Daniel Construction Company, Charlie Daniel was dedicated to bringing industry and business to South Carolina. Daniel Construction Company helped build World War II industrial plants and higher education facilities in the Upstate. He was known for his ability to sell business and industry in South Carolina. Selling the airport came naturally to this savvy developer.

www.ElevatingTheUpstate.com

3


GRAND SLAM! GSP International Airport has a tremendous effect on the upstate economy. Below is a comparison of the economic impact it has had on the Upstate in 2009 and 2012. In 2009, the Total Economic Impact (Output) was $377,525,328. By 2012 that impact had more than doubled to $817,119,411 signaling an increase of $439,594,083. ANNUAL GSP ECONOMIC IMPACT 2009

2012

Percent Increase

Jobs

3,692

9,528

158.07%

Income

$112,014,138

$170,491,491

52.21%

Output

$377,525,328

$817,119,411

116.44%

*Chart updated as of September 2012

TIMELINE OF EVENTS

1961

The airport’s groundbreaking ceremony was held on July 7, 1961.

1962

After fifteen months of construction, the airport officially opened the runway for take-off on October 15, 1962.

1970

Air freight building constructed, providing facilities for air cargo and cargo brokers. United States Customs Office established.

1989

An expansion project was completed, increasing the airport terminal and passenger waiting areas by 140,000 square feet. Boarding bridges were also added for passenger access. New lounge and dining facilities were added as well as a travel agency located inside the terminal building. It was a privilege, in 2007, to write the story of GSP’s first 45 years, relating Charlie Daniel’s and Roger Milliken’s vision in establishing the airport. But that era is now history, updated by today’s generation of leaders as they plan to meet the needs of GSP’s 2nd half-century. By its 55th anniversary in 2017, the airport will little resemble its 1962 appearance; but, I’m sure its leaders and airlines, staff and facilities will reflect the founders’ determination to maintain GSP’s mission as Upstate South Carolina’s Gateway to the World. — Dave Partridge, author

4

GSP International Airport

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gspairport.com

1995

The runway was extended from 7,600 feet to 9,000 feet. The airport’s name was changed to Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, achieving international status because it houses two Federal Inspection Stations (FIS) consisting of Customs, Immigration and Agriculture. Per hour, 250 international passengers could be cleared through Customs at GSP.

IN A NUTSHELL

THE ULTIMATE FAN

1999

The second runway expansion project was completed, increasing the runway to 11,001 feet.

2001

Over 13,000 square feet of new terminal space was opened, increasing the available number of boarding gates to 13. FedEx opened a facility on the GSP campus having the ability to handle 3,000 packages an hour.

2004

The airfield was renamed after founder Mr. Roger Milliken, the only Chairman of the Airport Commission until his passing on December 30, 2010.

2005

The airport entrance road was widened to accommodate additional vehicle traffic. This project was advanced several years in order to take advantage of the South Carolina Department of Transportation’s decision to close and improve the airport interchange from Interstate 85.

2011

Southwest Airlines arrived at GSP. Passenger traffic increased more than 38% in 2011 to 1,755,509 customers, compared to 1,268,202 customers in 2010.

2012

Phase One of WINGSPAN began in June with the Rental Car Customer Center enabling project

A career takes off by Leigh Savage

For Herb Howell, GSP meant a world of opportunity Herb Howell When Greenville-Spartanburg International US Airways Station Manager Airport opened in October of 1962, Asheville, NC Herb Howell was an eight-year-old who lived just down the road off Highway 101, near where the BMW plant sits today. He didn’t know it at the time, but his involvement with GSP was just beginning, as was his passion for the aviation industry. Herb has nothing but fond memories of driving out through the rural farmland to watch construction on Sunday afternoons. “They were moving dirt and doing a lot of heavy lifting,” he says. “It was amazing to see that much going on at the time.” Fifty years later, he can still feel the excitement that swept over the crowd of thousands who had gathered to watch the Blue Angels on the airport’s opening day. As the years flew by, he would stop by the airport on occasion to watch the staff of Southern Airways or Eastern Airlines, taking note of the various jobs required before an airplane could take off. When it was time to get an after-school and summer job, GSP was the perfect fit. “I would do anything and everything,” he says, “Cutting grass, painting, changing light bulbs.” It was just five minutes from his home, but the real reason he kept working there - including a few summers while a college student at USC - was that he found the airport endlessly interesting. And that has never changed. After earning his degree in government and international studies in 1976, Howell decided to try out aviation as a career. After a few years with Southern Airways, working at the GSP airport he was so familiar with, he moved around the country - Memphis, Baltimore, Louisville, Knoxville - as a general manager with Northwest Airlines. He took an early retirement in 2009 but soon decided he was too young to miss out on the excitement of the airport, and, though he lives in Greer, he drives 55 minutes each day to work as station manager for US Airways in Asheville. As station manager, Howell does a little bit of everything - customer service, grounds operations, managing the ticket counter, overseeing the check-in process. After all of these years, “it still fascinates me to watch an airplane take off,” he says. “It’s been a passion and a calling.” The other perk of his career has been living in so many places and meeting so many interesting people along the way, including Dave Edwards, GSP President and CEO. “You really build relationships, and you interact with people from all over,” he says. But he’ll never forget his introduction to the career path, when he was just a young boy watching construction, or a teenager cutting the airport grass, or taking a job there fresh out of college. Now he’s a part of the airport’s history, with his picture among those in the massive mural that decorates the terminal. “I had no idea what was going to happen,” he says. “Looking back, it was a good thing and it was the right thing.”

www.ElevatingTheUpstate.com

5


GRAND SLAM! GSP International Airport has a tremendous effect on the upstate economy. Below is a comparison of the economic impact it has had on the Upstate in 2009 and 2012. In 2009, the Total Economic Impact (Output) was $377,525,328. By 2012 that impact had more than doubled to $817,119,411 signaling an increase of $439,594,083. ANNUAL GSP ECONOMIC IMPACT 2009

2012

Percent Increase

Jobs

3,692

9,528

158.07%

Income

$112,014,138

$170,491,491

52.21%

Output

$377,525,328

$817,119,411

116.44%

*Chart updated as of September 2012

TIMELINE OF EVENTS

1961

The airport’s groundbreaking ceremony was held on July 7, 1961.

1962

After fifteen months of construction, the airport officially opened the runway for take-off on October 15, 1962.

1970

Air freight building constructed, providing facilities for air cargo and cargo brokers. United States Customs Office established.

1989

An expansion project was completed, increasing the airport terminal and passenger waiting areas by 140,000 square feet. Boarding bridges were also added for passenger access. New lounge and dining facilities were added as well as a travel agency located inside the terminal building. It was a privilege, in 2007, to write the story of GSP’s first 45 years, relating Charlie Daniel’s and Roger Milliken’s vision in establishing the airport. But that era is now history, updated by today’s generation of leaders as they plan to meet the needs of GSP’s 2nd half-century. By its 55th anniversary in 2017, the airport will little resemble its 1962 appearance; but, I’m sure its leaders and airlines, staff and facilities will reflect the founders’ determination to maintain GSP’s mission as Upstate South Carolina’s Gateway to the World. — Dave Partridge, author

4

GSP International Airport

|

gspairport.com

1995

The runway was extended from 7,600 feet to 9,000 feet. The airport’s name was changed to Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, achieving international status because it houses two Federal Inspection Stations (FIS) consisting of Customs, Immigration and Agriculture. Per hour, 250 international passengers could be cleared through Customs at GSP.

IN A NUTSHELL

THE ULTIMATE FAN

1999

The second runway expansion project was completed, increasing the runway to 11,001 feet.

2001

Over 13,000 square feet of new terminal space was opened, increasing the available number of boarding gates to 13. FedEx opened a facility on the GSP campus having the ability to handle 3,000 packages an hour.

2004

The airfield was renamed after founder Mr. Roger Milliken, the only Chairman of the Airport Commission until his passing on December 30, 2010.

2005

The airport entrance road was widened to accommodate additional vehicle traffic. This project was advanced several years in order to take advantage of the South Carolina Department of Transportation’s decision to close and improve the airport interchange from Interstate 85.

2011

Southwest Airlines arrived at GSP. Passenger traffic increased more than 38% in 2011 to 1,755,509 customers, compared to 1,268,202 customers in 2010.

2012

Phase One of WINGSPAN began in June with the Rental Car Customer Center enabling project

A career takes off by Leigh Savage

For Herb Howell, GSP meant a world of opportunity Herb Howell When Greenville-Spartanburg International US Airways Station Manager Airport opened in October of 1962, Asheville, NC Herb Howell was an eight-year-old who lived just down the road off Highway 101, near where the BMW plant sits today. He didn’t know it at the time, but his involvement with GSP was just beginning, as was his passion for the aviation industry. Herb has nothing but fond memories of driving out through the rural farmland to watch construction on Sunday afternoons. “They were moving dirt and doing a lot of heavy lifting,” he says. “It was amazing to see that much going on at the time.” Fifty years later, he can still feel the excitement that swept over the crowd of thousands who had gathered to watch the Blue Angels on the airport’s opening day. As the years flew by, he would stop by the airport on occasion to watch the staff of Southern Airways or Eastern Airlines, taking note of the various jobs required before an airplane could take off. When it was time to get an after-school and summer job, GSP was the perfect fit. “I would do anything and everything,” he says, “Cutting grass, painting, changing light bulbs.” It was just five minutes from his home, but the real reason he kept working there - including a few summers while a college student at USC - was that he found the airport endlessly interesting. And that has never changed. After earning his degree in government and international studies in 1976, Howell decided to try out aviation as a career. After a few years with Southern Airways, working at the GSP airport he was so familiar with, he moved around the country - Memphis, Baltimore, Louisville, Knoxville - as a general manager with Northwest Airlines. He took an early retirement in 2009 but soon decided he was too young to miss out on the excitement of the airport, and, though he lives in Greer, he drives 55 minutes each day to work as station manager for US Airways in Asheville. As station manager, Howell does a little bit of everything - customer service, grounds operations, managing the ticket counter, overseeing the check-in process. After all of these years, “it still fascinates me to watch an airplane take off,” he says. “It’s been a passion and a calling.” The other perk of his career has been living in so many places and meeting so many interesting people along the way, including Dave Edwards, GSP President and CEO. “You really build relationships, and you interact with people from all over,” he says. But he’ll never forget his introduction to the career path, when he was just a young boy watching construction, or a teenager cutting the airport grass, or taking a job there fresh out of college. Now he’s a part of the airport’s history, with his picture among those in the massive mural that decorates the terminal. “I had no idea what was going to happen,” he says. “Looking back, it was a good thing and it was the right thing.”

www.ElevatingTheUpstate.com

5


LOOKING FORWARD The airport is moving forward and expanding as the Upstate continues to grow. WINGSPAN is designed to elevate the Upstate while remaining true to the heritage of the airport and Flatwood legacy.

About WINGSPAN PROGRAM View it as yours.

1B: Baggage Claim Renovations • New baggage claim carousels • Construct canopy on curbside for loading/unloading in front of baggage claim • Covered walkway to Garage A • New glass front on the Terminal in front of baggage claim

PHASE 2: BUILDING CORE GSP visitors will witness the second and most substantial A new garden will be incorporated at the front of the airport, complete with seating areas. CONSTRUCTION wave of renovations in the • Grand Hall Development Bases Loaded airport’s history with the Terminal including new food, beverage, and Improvement Program, WINGSPAN. WINGSPAN is designed to elevate the retail concessions area From initial planning and design to final Upstate without compromising the heritage • Renovation of the existing ticketing lobby completion, WINGSPAN has the passenger and integrity of GSP. in mind. GSP has been, and will always be, • New Customer Service booths DEVELOPMENT See it as improvement. the Upstate’s hometown airport, and the • Complete new canopies on curbside When WINGSPAN is complete, GSP will things that people know and love about the for loading/unloading become one of the most operationally airport won’t change. capable and efficient airports of its size. • New Landside Garden WINGSPAN is a $115 million program. WINGSPAN will include three primary phases. • New baggage screening equipment Airport funds will cover 80 percent of the PHASE 1: ENABLING WORK and facilities program, and the remaining 20 percent of Mechanical and electrical systems overhaul funding will come from a combination of • Security Checkpoint Consolidation will be completed throughout each phase of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) and Relocation the program. Airport Improvement Program Fund and • Concourse A and B Renovation the Transportation Security Administration 1A: Enabling Projects • Complete new glass front on the Terminal (TSA). No local taxpayer dollars will be used • Rental Car Customer Center relocation to fund any portion of the program, and the PHASE 3: PROJECT WRAP UP • Concourse A & B expansion for restrooms terminal will remain operational throughout and food, beverage and retail concessions • Construction of the new the duration of the program. Some historical Administrative Office for GSP elements, including the airside garden and • Construction of the North Wing for all water features, will be preserved and temporary airline facilities • Conference Center construction integrated into the new architectural design. • Utility/infrastructure relocations

SEE IT AS IMPROVEMENT. LOOK AT IT AS GROWTH. THINK OF IT AS PROGRESS.

Renovations will incorporate more concessions for travelers and airport visitors inside and outside the terminal and add a third carousel in the baggage claim.

6

GSP International Airport

|

gspairport.com

The ticketing area will be widened to accommodate for traveler traffic flow.


IMPACT Look at it as growth.

HISTORY Remember it as historical.

The new GSP will be an impelling force in Upstate S.C., positively impacting the economic landscape. The GSP International Airport has always had a major economic impact on the Upstate of South Carolina. WINGSPAN will further enhance economic growth at the airport and throughout the region. Many local contractors and vendors are participating in this program, thereby ensuring the circulation of local dollars within the community. GSP has set the bar high, aiming to utilize at least 70 percent of subcontractors and materials from the Upstate. During Phase One renovations in the Rental Car Customer Center, WINGSPAN has surpassed the 70 percent commitment, reporting current project local participation at 80 percent. SUSTAINABILITY Think of it as progress. WINGSPAN incorporates smart resources and solutions in renovations. GSP will be renovated with long-term sustainability in mind. Some specific ways that WINGSPAN will incorporate long-term sustainability into the renovations include: • Solar-Heated Water: Renovations will enable GSP to use energy from the sun to heat water for hand washing and concessions.

WINGSPAN renovations will be the dividing line, a pivotal point in connecting GSP’s history to its future. The WINGSPAN Program does not compromise the rich airport history; it actively works to highlight the small touches that make GSP stand out. After passing through security, passengers will enter the Grand Hall area where various concession options will be available.

• Rain Water Harvesting: To help decrease the use of city water in the airport, renovations include an on-campus rainwater harvesting system to collect water for non-potable use. • Regional Materials: GSP will source products and materials found within the region throughout WINGSPAN. WINGSPAN also sources from local vendors and contractors to complete the renovations.

WINGSPAN will uphold the historical marks of the airport like the airside garden and lucky horseshoe, while actively working to start new traditions through renovation details. One example is the repurposing of trees harvested during renovations into the final WINGSPAN design. WINGSPAN holds true to Roger Milliken’s original vision and embraces local tradition.

Hitting a Homerun With the bases loaded and WINGSPAN up to the plate, GSP’s future will be nothing less than a grand slam.

• Day Lighting System: The terminal is designed to allow more natural lighting in the terminal, resulting in a reduction in electrical requirements. • Automation System: Proximity detection systems will be incorporated in the airport design to automatically shut off lights if no movement is detected.

REMEMBER IT AS HISTORICAL. VIEW IT AS YOURS.

Outside, WINGSPAN will provide those picking up and dropping off at GSP shelter from the elements.

WINGSPAN will maintain the tradition and beauty of the airport architecture while meeting the growing needs of air travel today.

www.ElevatingTheUpstate.com

7


SP first. al Cars.

GSP is closer, faster and less crowded2000 than Atlanta or Charlotte Airports. Think GSP first. GSP Drive, Suite 1, Greer SC 29651 | 864.877.7426 www.gspairport.com www.elevatingtheupstate.com gspairport.com : Book Flights, Hotel Rooms and Rental Cars.

2000 GSP Drive, Suite 1, Greer SC 29651 | 864.877.7426 www.gspairport.com

www.elevatingtheupstate.com

A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH A Brief History of the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport

The next milestone in GSP’s celebrated history Over the next four years, GSP visitors will witness the second and most substantial wave of renovations in the airport’s history with the Terminal Improvement Program, WINGSPAN. From initial planning and design to final completion, WINGSPAN has you, the passenger, in mind. GSP has been, and will always be, the Upstate’s hometown airport, and the things you know and love about the airport won’t change. Convenience. Community. Comfort. WINGSPAN signifies the next milestone in GSP’s celebrated history. Through year 2016 WINGSPAN will support a total of 1,397 local jobs, increase local income by $59.6 million, raise local output by $164.1 million, and boost tax revenues by $16 million. For more information about the WINGSPAN Program visit www.elevatingtheupstate.com and the WINGSPAN blog at www.blog.gsptip.com. GSP will maintain this website and blog with real-time WINGSPAN updates and program information. — GREENVILLE-SPARTANBURG AIRPORT COMMISSION —

Photo provided by Mr. Francis Earle Hendrix Bill Barnet

Leland Burch

Valerie Miller

Hank Ramella Vice-Chair

Minor Shaw Chair

Doug Smith

‘‘

The crowd roared as the ball cracked off the bat and shot toward the shortstop.

Thinking he had hit a line drive to the outfield, the batter raced toward first. But Witty Davis leaped high, snagged the ball and fired it to first baseman F. E. Hendrix, who scooped up the low throw and doubled the runner off first base. Game over. The big crowd cheered wildly.

The Flatwood Peaches had won another game.

’’


GSP - Brief History