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GREENVILLE GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, November 30, 2012 • Vol.14, No.48

Safe on the

SWAMP RABBIT TRAIL

LIBERTY SQUARE GOES ON THE MARKET. PAGE 14

Despite thousands of users, crime on greenway is lower than average PAGE 8

City of Greenville police officer Jim Plonk patrols the Swamp Rabbit Trail in Cleveland Park. Police officers assigned to the central downtown business district are responsible for patrolling the trail, either on foot or using bicycles and motorized vehicles.

The 2012

Warehouse brings actor home for the holidays. PAGE 33

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2 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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Worth Repeating They Said It

“We’re very encouraged by investor activity.” Craig Stipes, vice president with CBRE Capital Markets Private Capital Group, on interest expressed in the two Liberty Square towers, which are now on the market.

30,000

Christmas trees harvested per year in South Carolina, as estimated by the National Christmas Tree Association.

Quote of the week

“The UFC is a worldwide thing, but for my first fight, FX’s best ratings weren’t some big city. The best ratings were in Greenville, S.C. It motivates me to train harder.”

63-1

Record of Simpsonville’s Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson, mixed martial artist and former kickboxer.

Simpsonville karate instructor Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson, an Ultimate Fighting Competition welterweight, on the community support he receives in the Upstate.

$17.6 million

“It felt like life was closing in on me.”

Economic impact of Spartanburg County’s Tyger River baseball and softball park, according to a Clemson University report.

Beverly Gilliland of Greenville, on the early-onset hearing loss that led to her cochlear implant.

“It’s largely a cash business, and the tax man is always listening.” A Christmas tree lot operator explaining why he won’t reveal how many trees he sells in a year.

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Helicopters (six Chinook dualrotor helicopters and four Lakota helicopters) to be housed at the S.C. National Guard Upstate Army Aviation Support Facility at SCTAC.

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JOURNAL NEWS

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4 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Community food drive idea spreading During the entire month of October, Augusta Court residents held their First Annual Food Drive to benefit food banks in the Greenville community. It was organized by a couple of neighborhood moms who not only spread the word, but also enlisted their young children to help collect the donated items. A letter was sent to each household on the street, giving details of the drive and asking for everyone’s involvement. With 62 homes on Augusta Court, 500 items was deemed an achievable goal. All types of canned food were requested, with an emphasis on collecting high-quality protein, such as tuna, peanut butter and canned meats. Residents were encouraged to place their food items on their porches each Saturday morning for neighborhood children to collect at noon. Additionally, one of the organizers placed a basket on her porch to serve as an “anytime during the week” drop-off receptacle. Small yard signs were displayed each weekend, reminding everyone of the Saturday collections and showing the running total of donated items. The grand total was announced at a block party on Halloween. Augusta Court residents had collected 576 canned food items in just one month. The idea was shared among friends on neighboring streets in the Augusta Road area. As a result, the Melville/Aberdeen/Brookwood Drive neighborhood is conducting their First Annual Food Drive during the month of November. During these economically challenging times, this is an inspirational example of how neighbors, working together, can make a difference in the lives of the less fortunate. If every community would do this, the food banks would be overflowing! – Bill Turner, Greenville

November 30

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GHS welcomes these new doctors and sites! Dermatology Ashley Mason, M.D. Carolina Dermatology 920 Woodruff Rd. Greenville, 233-6338

Family Medicine Adrienne Labotka, M.D. Mountain View FP–Memorial Dr. 406 Memorial Dr. Ext. Greer, 877-9066 Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Heritage Internal Medicine & Pediatrics–Wren

New Office Drew Goldsmith, M.D. Gregg Johnson, M.D. 1115 Wren School Rd. Piedmont, 859-0740

Midwifery Bethany Duncan Smith, CNM Greenville Midwifery Care 890 W. Faris Road, Ste. 470 Greenville, 455-1600

Ophthalmology Catherine Baston, M.D. Carolina’s Eye Care 51A W. Butler Rd. Mauldin, 236-9888

Pediatrics S. Douglas Egge, M.D. Pediatric Associates–Spartanburg 1686 Skylyn Dr., Ste. 201 Spartanburg, 582-8135 T. Matthew Eison, M.D. Pediatric Nephrology 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A115 Greenville, 454-5105

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Kasia Kocol, D.O. Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. C100 Greenville, 454-SHCC (7422)

Primary Care Sports Medicine Neha Chowdhary, M.D. Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. C100 Greenville, 454-SHCC (7422)

Office Sites on the Move General Surgery 890 W. Faris Road, Ste. 310 Greenville, 455-8300 Pediatric Neurosurgery 48 Cross Park Ct. Greenville, 797-7440 Pediatric Surgery 48 Cross Park Ct. Greenville, 797-7400

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Matthew Close, D.O. Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 727 S.E. Main St., Ste. 220 Simpsonville, 454-SHCC (7422)

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 5

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Kitchen table poker If there is one message the five justices of the state Supreme Court have delivered repeatedly in 2012, it’s that South Carolina legislators will have to clean up their own messes. With this spring’s two rulings on election filing laws and last week’s long-awaited decision on “kitchen table” poker, the high court has underscored that most basic tenet of Civics 101: the role of the judicial branch to review laws, not make them. However outdated the statute in question may be, the justices will not legislate from the bench to untangle it. This is the core message behind the court’s split decision last week to reinstate guilty verdicts against five poker players charged with illegal gambling after an April 2006 police raid on a private poker game in a Mount Pleasant home. The case centered on the state’s convoluted 1816 anti-gambling law, which essentially outlaws any betting games played with cards or dice. The five players appealed and had their convictions tossed by a circuit judge who declared the law “unconstitutionally overbroad” because it criminalized all card-and-dice games “regardless of whether the dominant factor in a particular game is skill or chance.” He declared Texas Hold ’em a game of skill, not chance, ruling “it is not unlawful to gamble on a game of skill in a residence.” The Supreme Court said skill or chance is not the issue; what matters is whether money is wagered on the outcome. State law allows a casual game of poker in a private residence, but not in “a house used as a place of gaming” – which the justices ruled the Mt. Pleasant residence in question to be. With good reason. Police said the 2006 raid uncovered two poker tables running a “for-profit gambling operation” with a $20 buy-in advertised on the Internet, the Charleston Post & Courier reported. The private home was used twice a week for such games and the host was pocketing some of the cash – making it organized gambling and therefore illegal, the justices ruled. The one clarifying takeaway from all this is that casual, kitchen table card games are no longer criminalized under South Carolina law. Poker players (as well as lovers of Monopoly and Crazy Eights) may enjoy an occasional, casual game around the kitchen table without fear of arrest. Make it a regular event with advertising and a cover charge, however, and you’ve broken the law – wherever you play. That said, the ruling offers little relief to law enforcement, which must still decide on a case-by-case basis if future kitchen table card games are legally casual or illegally organized. This is the very vagueness the circuit judge (and two dissenting justices) called unconstitutionally overbroad, as it gives police “too much discretion in every case,” wrote Justice Kay Hearn in dissent. The majority disagreed, noting police regularly “determine just where a statutory line is drawn.” The newly guilty defendants are outraged, one going so far as to accuse the justices of cowardice for lacking “the guts to bring the law into the 21st century.” He has chosen the wrong target. Cleaning up outdated laws is the job of the General Assembly, which has so far proved incapable of cleaning up this one. The challenge, as Chief Justice Jean Toal noted, is to modernize the overreaching portions without cracking the firewall that has kept professional gambling from slithering back into this state. The more complicated the law, the easier it is to sabotage, as past history well proves. Proceed by all means, legislators – but with caution.

Data breach shows need for consolidation If it can happen to computer systems maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense, it can happen to anyone’s computer system. That’s not an excuse. But it’s a disturbing fact in today’s increasingly networked cyber world as organizations constantly combat hackers determined to breach any safeguard to steal sensitive information. I’m not minimizing the seriousness of the recently announced S.C. Department of Revenue data breach, in which foreign hackers apparently got their hands on the tax records of 3.8 million South Carolinians and more than 650,000 businesses. However, the reality is that virtually no system is immune to this kind of threat. For example, hackers have broken into Pentagon computer systems on at least three occasions since 2008, according to published reports. Having said that, we as a state and as individual South Carolinians should do everything we can to protect ourselves against cybercrimes like identity theft. Thoughtful minds are asking what else state government should be doing to protect data. One answer is pretty clear, yet achieving it will be complicated if territorial concerns fight against what’s in the more pressing interests of taxpayers. We need to consolidate the stand-alone computer systems of all state entities so that our expertise, energies and resources are pooled rather than fragmented. The recent implementation of the S.C. Enterprise Information System (SCEIS) was a significant step toward this goal. It brought the core accounting, payroll, procurement and human resource operations of most state agencies into one system. But state-supported colleges and universities, and various programs at some state agencies, are not part of any unified system. It makes little sense for any state entity to proceed on its own rather than using all of the available resources of state government to protect against computer-savvy hackers. The S.C. Division of State Information Technology (DSIT) already manages and provides information technology services for a large swath of state government. Those services even include monitoring and test-

IN MY OWN WORDS by RICHARD ECKSTROM

ing for data breaches – at no charge. The Department of Revenue was not among the state agencies covered by DSIT prior to this data breach, although it is now. This is not to say that the breach absolutely would have been prevented if the Department of Revenue had been part of the state’s consolidated system. It certainly wouldn’t have hurt, though. Centralizing our computer systems wouldn’t just bolster security. It also would allow the state to weigh and prioritize its options for how to capture information needed for making better decisions and holding agencies more accountable for performance. Unfortunately, my office sees the shortcomings of the state’s fragmented, decentralized computing and accounting systems every year in gathering financial data to produce the state’s monthly and yearly financial reports. This fragmented structure is often inefficient. To put it bluntly, some state-supported colleges and other agencies operate like independent nations rather than as partners on a team, resulting in duplicative systems. Duplicative systems penalize taxpayers with inefficiency and with avoidable costs. In taking stock of this recent hacking case, it’s important that we don’t politicize it or use it to push other agendas. Instead, let’s use it as a learning experience to help state government better serve its ultimate constituents – the taxpayers. It would be a double loss, indeed, if government returned to business as usual by accepting the unnecessary costs and risks of allowing many state entities to operate their own computer systems rather than safely consolidating them under the watchful eyes of dedicated experts. Richard Eckstrom is S.C. Comptroller General.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

JOURNAL NEWS

Liberty Square towers go on the market By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

November 30

Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com. One and Two Liberty Square in downtown Greenville.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Nearly a year after taking over the Liberty Square buildings on Beattie Place in downtown Greenville in a foreclosure, Lehman Brothers Holdings have put the two towers up on the market. Lehman Brothers was previously the lender on One and Two Liberty Square and foreclosed in January 2012. Craig Stipes, vice president with CBRE Capital Markets Private Capital Group, which managed and leased the buildings after the foreclosure, said Lehman Brothers’ aim was to stabilize the asset. The company put in substantial capital investment, installing new elevator components and renovating the Commerce Club, located on the top floor of One Liberty Square. The two “Class A” office buildings total approximately 436,000 square feet with a parking garage between them. Stipes reports that there has been keen interest in the property that

was listed last week. “We’re very encouraged by investor activity,” he said. Stipes said he anticipates the sale of the buildings to happen within the next four months. Both buildings will be sold at the same time. In addition to the Commerce Club, tenants in the towers include Gallivan White & Boyd, Willis, Ernst & Young, Robert Half Technology, Azalea Capital and the Jackson Lewis law firm. In other activity at the site, the Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd law firm is moving out of Liberty Square, Stipes said. However, Resurgent Capital Services will be moving from Wells Fargo Center on South Main Street into 86,000 square feet of the space in early 2013. There are also additional parties interested in moving into the space vacated by the law firm, he said. The activity is a sign of the improving office market in Greenville, Stipes said.

N E W S T H AT Y O U C A N U S E

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New Impact is an eight-week comprehensive weight management program for children ages 6 to 21. Program includes a YMCA family membership, exercise and cooking classes, and more. To learn more, call 675-3488.

Join the GHS Life Center® or PATH (Life Center and five YMCA locations) in December and get a reduced initiation fee. Find out more at ghs.org/path.

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Save a place in line at any GHS MD360® or ER. Just register online at ghs.org/inquicker, wait in the comfort of your home (or wherever), arrive at your projected time and see a nurse within 15 minutes! This optional service is for non-life threatening and minor emergencies.

Purchase a gift certificate for a one-hour massage or nutrition consultation at the GHS Life Center and get $5 off. Three one-hour or five half-hour personal training sessions are just $99. Offer good Dec. 1-31.

Struggling With Infertility? Nearly 25% of couples struggling with infertility already are parents, so secondary infertility is not uncommon. For help, contact GHS Fertility Center of the Carolinas at 455-1600 or visit fertilitycenterofthecarolinas.org.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 7

journal news

Coffee With Artists… Every Thursday morning, Carolina Foothill Artisan Center in Chesnee hosts “Coffee with Artists,” a social networking opportunity to meet local artists. The public is invited for free coffee, to meet artists, and to tour the Center at 10 a.m. Call: 461-3050. Dioramas… Local historian James Buchanan created a series of dioramas—handmade miniature 3-D scenes—depicting the classic ’Twas the Night Before Christmas story. For decades, citizens enjoyed seeing them in downtown store windows. Through the efforts of Spartanburg Art Museum and Spartanburg Regional History Museum, you can once again see these enchanting scenes. Exhibited in the History Museum, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ends Jan. 5. Art Exhibit… Spartanburg Art Museum presents Tarleton Blackwell, a living South Carolina artist, known for his large and colorful collages of rural South images, especially pigs. Runs through Feb. 16, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Art Exhibit… Spartanburg Art Museum presents Jim Harrison, a living South Carolina artist, known for his nostalgic old-barn paintings and coastal Carolina landscapes. Runs through Dec. 29, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Live Theatre… Spartanburg Youth Theatre presents Madeline’s Christmas, a delightful musical based on the popular children’s book series about the adventurous French girl Madeline. Shows in the David W. Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center, Friday, Nov. 30, at 4:30 and 7 p.m.; and Saturday, Dec. 1, at 2 and 4:30 p.m. Audition Workshop… Spartanburg Youth Theatre will conduct a workshop to help students prepare for their auditions for Harold and the Purple Crayon. The workshop is open to students in grades 3-12. It will be held Saturday, Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-noon in the Black Box Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center. $25, and pre-registration is required by calling 585-8278. Christmas Concert… The First Presbyterian Chamber Singers present Tidings of Comfort and Joy, a Christmas concert benefiting Mobile Meals of Spartanburg. The singers are regionally well known for their exceptional quality, performing both well known songs such as Silent Night and classical pieces such as Wexford Carol No. 3. In the David W. Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center. Starts at 7 p.m. $15. Call 573-7684 or 583-4531. Auditions… Spartanburg Youth Theatre will hold auditions for Harold and the Purple Crayon on Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 3 and 4, 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Theatre Classroom at Chapman Cultural Center. It is open to students in grades 3-12. Bring a headshot photo, come 15 minutes early to complete paperwork, and be prepared to give a one-minute monologue. Xmas Shopping… Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg will host “Holiday Art Spree” Dec. 3-22, Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Sale items will all be made by local Guild members and will include paintings, note cards, jewelry, and ornaments. Music Sandwiched In… The Music Foundation of Spartanburg presents Arbor Wind Trio for a free mini-concert on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 12:15 p.m. at the main library downtown Spartanburg. Featuring clarinets and a bassoon, the musicians will play Christmas music. Bring your lunch or buy one there.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

8 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

City of Greenville police officer Jim Plonk goes through the first aid kit in his patrol vehicle while on patrol on the Swamp Rabbit Trail at Cleveland Park. Many of the calls officers get on the trail are medically related. The kit includes a portable defibrillator, which needs to be started periodically to be sure it is in working order.

Safe on the Swamp Rabbit Trail By april a. morris | staff

Since the Swamp Rabbit Trail opened in the spring of 2009, thousands of cyclists and walkers have taken advantage of the converted rail bed that stretches along the Reedy River nearly 18 miles from Conestee to North Greenville Hospital just beyond Travelers Rest. An estimated 359,000 people use the trail each year, according to the firstyear impact study conducted by Julian A. Reed, Furman University health sciences professor. So with thousands thronging to the trail on the weekends with their bicycles and walking gear, do users occasionally bring their less-than-desirable behavior? Earlier this month, business owner Dick Hills entreated Greenville County Council to help him address the issue of metal theft at his property near Blue Ridge Road and Pete Hollis Boulevard, which is intersected by the trail. He said the thieves were using the trail as a highway and had driven a truck along it, making off with fencing multiple times, in addition to wiring and lighting. Hills called for 24-hour law enforcement coverage of the trail to

prevent crime. Council requested additional attention from the sheriff ’s department, while Councilman Joe Dill said the Public Safety and Human Services Committee would address the issue. “We’ve got to stop them from getting in there,” Dill said. However, a Journal investigation indicates Hill’s experiences are the exception to the rule. Law enforcement jurisdiction along the Swamp Rabbit is shared between the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Department, the Greenville City Police and the Travelers Rest Police. Law enforcement officials told the Journal they see average to below average levels of criminal activity both along the trail and at addresses adjacent to it. In the city of Greenville, one of the officers assigned to the central business district is tapped each shift to patrol the trail on an ATV, said police spokesperson Johnathan Bragg. The downtown officers often ride bicycles on city streets, but use the motorized vehicle on the trail for a faster response time. Bragg said he knows of very little property crime in the area, primarily because few buildings are located along

the trail within the city limits. Master Deputy Laura Campbell of the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Department said crimes reported in those areas where the Swamp Rabbit Trail is listed as a cross street range from lower than average to average. She knew of one recent incidence of repeated break-ins at a nearby home that was not secure, but no property crime concentrated along the trail. Along the approximately 10-mile Greenville County portion of the trail, the sheriff ’s department has two deputies dedicated to patrolling on motorcycles. The deputies typically are on the trail seven days a week, Campbell said, sometimes several hours into the evening, though they see little trail activity after dark. According to the City of Greenville, the trail hours are dawn to dusk, as many areas are not lit, except near Riverwalk and the Liberty Bridge. Sheriff ’s department’s statistics reveal that the majority of calls coming from areas around the trail are citizens reporting suspicious people or vehicles. The trail does not have an address, so the department must reference it as a cross street.

JOURNAL NEWS Since 2010, the sheriff ’s office logged 56 reports of suspicious persons and 23 suspicious vehicles. Total calls to date listing the trail name are 165, according to the sheriff ’s department. Calls that referenced where the trail crossed Bleachery Road and Pinsley Circle since 2010 totaled 168. Campbell said that the number of suspicious-persons calls is an indication that the public is keeping watch. “We want them to be proactive,” she said. “The public is our best asset. If something doesn’t seem right, call us.” Johnathan Bain, who works at the Swamp Rabbit Cafe, said the cafe hasn’t experienced any safety issues, despite being a trail access, which requires them to leave their gate open. “It seems safe to us. I ride the trail every other day,” he said. The cafe staff knows the officers who patrol the trail and workers are there often well into the evenings, Bain said. “Because we have decent road access, we could be a target, but we haven’t had a problem.” Furman University experienced several incidents of vehicle breakins when the trail first opened, but there haven’t been any more since a suspect was apprehended, said Fur-

November 30

man spokesperson Vince within 24 hours. Moore. He added that For user safety along campus police do not the trail, community partpatrol on the trail itself, ners – often churches, gas but do watch over a busy stations and restaurants parking lot frequented by – offer parking lots and trail users. restroom stops. This colIn Travelers Rest, Police laboration allows users to Chief Lance Crowe said patronize local businesses there were a handful of car The letters and numbers painted on the Swamp Rabbit Trail at regular intervals and the businesses share break-ins when the trail should be used when calling for help to guide responders to the exact location their trail knowledge. first opened, but the latest of the caller. Houck said the district activity has been limited is working with Hills to to graffiti on signs – along with black foil metal thieves at his business, insaid that the Swamp Rabbit Trail has bear sightings. cluding reestablishing drainage ditches some built-in safety features like tenthBecause the trail runs parallel to that may hinder vehicles from using mile markers that can be referenced Travelers Rest’s Main Street, police the trail for access. Houck said to his to 911 in an emergency. Using these officers can see it from their vehicles knowledge, Hills is the only person to markers, emergency responders can while they are on patrol, Crowe said. date who has reported crime as a problocate callers quickly. In addition, Crowe has an officer lem because of a property’s proximity With a non-emergency 911 call, who regularly patrols on bicycle and to the Swamp Rabbit Trail. users can also report speeding cyclists, another who walks or cycles the trail. and officers will issue them a citation Fine-tuning trail operations as more “Chances of a person seeing an offifor exceeding the 20 mile-per-hour and more people take advantage of cer on the trail are pretty high,” he said. limit, Houck said. the Swamp Rabbit is a never-ending Travelers Rest officers, like those The recreation district also subprocess, he said. However, throughout who patrol in the city of Greenville, are scribes to crime prevention through nearly two decades of experience and deputized and can patrol and respond environmental design, such as thinresearch on trails and greenways, “I to calls the full length of the trail, ning vegetation so people cannot hide have yet to find statistics that trails have Crowe said. in it and installing see-through infora negative impact on the community.” Ty Houck, director of greenways, mation kiosks for the same reason, Contact April A. Morris at natural and historic resources for he said. Removable panels on kiosks amorris@communityjournals.com. Greenville County Recreation District, allow the staff to clear away any graffiti

360 º H e a lt H e d u c at i o n

Guyology: Just the Facts

Rheumatoid Arthritis Answers

Sun., Dec. 2 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 4th and 5th grade helps ease the transition into puberty through open discussion. Session fee: $50 for father/son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com.

Wed., Dec. 12 • 10:30-11:30 a.m. • GHS Life Center GHS rheumatologist Gulzar Merchant, M.D., will discuss symptoms and challenges of rheumatoid arthritis and what you can do about them. Lunch to follow. Free; registration required.

Lymphedema Information Session Thurs., Dec. 6 • 4:15-5 p.m. • GHS Life Center Cancer survivors and their caregivers are invited to a free information session on how to prevent and control lymphedema. For more information, call 455-6233.

Nutrition: Key to a Successful Workout Thurs., Dec. 6 • 6:30 p.m. • Burdette Library Branch/Taylors A GHS registered dietitian will discuss how nutrition can affect your workout. Free; registration required.

Look Good … Feel Better

Meet the Midwives Thurs., Dec. 13 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Light refreshments provided. A tour of The Family Birthplace will follow. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Mon., Dec. 10 • 1-3 p.m. • GHS Cancer Center Women with cancer are invited to learn how to look and feel better using a variety of beauty techniques. Free; registration required: Call 627-1903 or 1-866-227-4395.

120849

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 9

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The Tupelo Honey Cafe, an iconic restaurant in downtown Asheville, doesn’t change Southern cooking, it redefines it. And it will be redefining it in Greenville in early summer 2013 as part of the ONE project on Main and Laurens streets in downtown Greenville. The award-winning restaurant is the newest announced tenant of the $100 million mixed-use development and the nextdoor neighbor to Anthropologie, the national retailer that specializes in women’s clothing, accessories and home decor. “Downtown Greenville is vibrant, dynamic, beautiful and thriving,” said Steve Frabitore, owner of Tupelo Honey Cafe, “and when the Hughes project management team approached us about having a location at the ONE project, we knew the site would be ideal. We’re incredibly excited to be a part of downtown Greenville.” The original Tupelo Honey Cafe on College Street in Asheville opened in 2000. A second Asheville location opened in 2010. The chain’s third loca-

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tion opened in Knoxville, Tenn., in October and a restaurant is also planned for a historic train depot in downtown Johnson City, Tenn. “We are incredibly excited for Tupelo Honey to open its first South Carolina location at ONE. THC fits perfectly with our leasing strategy of finding high quality, game-changing tenants to supplement Greenville’s growing downtown,” said Bob Hughes, president of Hughes Development Corporation. The Greenville restaurant will have approximately 140 seats and will feature Tupelo Honey’s signature performance and display kitchen, a full bar and outdoor patio seating. A revamped Piazza Bergamo will flank the front of the restaurant and provide an idyllic setting for dining, officials said. Tupelo Honey Cafe serves scratch-made Southern fare with a creative interpretation. The restaurant’s menu features shrimp and grits, root beer molasses glazed pork tenderloin, “Not Your Mama’s Meatloaf,” sweet potato pancakes, a Southern fried chicken BLT and a gluten-free menu. The company’s annual payroll will be

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Steve Frabitore, proprietor of the Tupelo Honey Cafe, with an artist’s rendering of what the lobby of the restaurant’s new location in ONE in downtown Greenville will look like when completed. The restaurant will be located on the ground floor corner behind Frabitore.

$5 million by the end of 2013. Other tenants in ONE include the Clemson University Business School, CertusBank and Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd law firm. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Sgt. Bo Hicks died ‘doing what he loved’ Hundreds mourn the loss of fallen Greer soldier

Those who knew Bo Hicks best describe him as a happy little boy who grew up to become a man and soldier of distinction. They also say Hicks died doing what he loved. Hicks was buried this week at Wood Memorial Park in Duncan after being killed in combat in Afghanistan on Nov. 16 in a roadside bomb and rifle attack north of Kabul in Paktika province. Also killed in the attack was Spc. Joseph A. Richardson of Booneville, Ark., 23. Greer welcomed Hicks home with hundreds of residents lining the route through the city to Wood Mortuary. There were flags waving, and everyone from little girls to old men turned out to say goodbye to a favorite son. Another vehicle-mate of Hicks and Richardson was severely wounded in the

Gerry pate / contributing

By CHarles Sowell | staff

attack that killed Hicks, the family said. “We want to make sure that Bo’s fellow soldiers are all recognized, too,” said his aunt, Kellee Hicks. Hicks died just months shy of finishing his third tour in the region – two in Iraq and one in Afghanistan, his father, Chan Hicks, said. It would have been his last tour. Sgt. Channing “Bo” Hicks, 24, left behind a son, Wesley, 5, and daughter, Deliah, 7, as well as a family torn between their loss of a loveable son and their pride in the young man’s devotion to duty. He is divorced from his wife, Lisa Danielle Shelton, of Taylors. Over the holiday, the folks living in Hicks’ close-knit neighborhood of Apalache were out on the streets, talking about the handsome redhead who played football and graduated from Greer High School in 2006. Greer High School athletic director Travis Perry said Bo Hicks played for him at Greer. He also grew up with Hicks’ father, Chan Hicks Sr. “He was really a fine young man,” Perry said. “He was always, ‘Yes, sir. No, sir.’ He was a quiet kid and didn’t play a whole lot, but he played for our scout team and found

Members of Bo Hicks’ family (from left), uncle Dennis “Pepper” Hicks, aunt Kellee Hicks, grandmother Kaye “Memimi” Hicks and father Chan Hicks, talk about the person he was and how they were handling their grief.

a way to contribute. He was part of the foundation of our team, helping the other players prepare for the games each week.” Bo Hicks was the kind of kid who always had a grin lurking somewhere on his face, friends said. The Hicks family is working-class and Bo in many ways was a typical soldier, with the exception of his extraordinary will and devotion to what he saw as his duty, they said. “Back when he was in elementary school

he got a set of plastic toy soldiers and shortly after declared he wanted to grow up and be a soldier,” said Kaye “Memimi” Hicks, his paternal grandmother, who raised the young man from childhood. “He was just that kind of child, from early on in life.” Uncle Dennis “Pepper” Hicks said his nephew was affected tremendously by the attack on America on 9/11. As soon as Bo turned 17, he got permission from his dad to sign up, the elder Hicks said. “I urged him to take some time off before he went into basic,” he said. “His basic was Ft. Benning, Ga. It gets pretty hot down there. He wouldn’t delay and went in shortly after graduation.” Bo Hicks’ younger brother John also plays football at Greer and is considered a defensive standout, Perry said. Sitting outside on the neat suburban home’s carport, John is still working to come to terms with his brother’s death. He’s not sure if he’ll follow his brother’s footsteps and join the Army. “I’ve had some offers from some of the small colleges,” he said. John, at 17, is a rising senior and will have to make a decision sometime soon, his grandmother said. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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Woodside timeline 1902 In 13 days, John T. Woodside raised the $85,000 he needed to build Woodside Cotton Mill. The plant opened in the fall.

1904 Woodside Cotton Mill expanded to 33,000 spindles.

1906 Woodside bought Fountain Inn Manufacturing Co.

1908 Woodside built mill in Simpsonville.

1912 Last and largest addition to Woodside Cotton Mill built.

1925 Woodside Cotton Mill considered “undisputed flagship” of Greenville’s major cotton mills.

Reliance Housing Federation has announced a $55 million investment to develop the Woodside Mill area for residential and commercial use.

1931 John T. Woodside ousted from presidency of Woodside Cotton Mills.

Developer says Woodside Cotton Mill could be center of community once again

1950 Woodside Mill Village incorporates.

1956 Woodside became part of Dan River Mills.

Reliance Housing Foundation plans $55 million project

1984 Woodside ceases operation. mid-1980s Woodside Mill Village charter allowed to expire.

By Cindy Landrum | staff

1987 Woodside Cotton Mill and Woodside Mill Village put on the National Register of Historic Places.

Greg Beckner / Staff

14 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Woodside Cotton Mill, considered at one time to be the flagship of Greenville’s major cotton mills, was once the center of life in West Greenville. Reliance Housing Foundation, a nonprofit developer of affordable housing based in Asheville, believes the mill can be that once again. Reliance plans to invest $55 million in West Greenville to renovate, preserve and develop the abandoned mill, once the largest complete cotton mill in the United States. The mill and surrounding village are on the National Register of Historic Places. “Preserving and recycling this building to serve the current needs of the community is the epitome of sustainable development,” said Reliance CEO Bob Jackson in an email. Reliance was formed in 1997 with the

mission to develop sustainable and diverse communities by building high-quality, affordable housing, revitalizing neighborhoods and responding to community needs, according to the organization’s website. Reliance evaluated Woodside Mill using several criteria it has considered in past projects, including location, market demand, structural capacity, financial viability and community support, Jackson said. “This is a very feasible project. The market shows strong demand for these units and financing is available,” he said. “More importantly, we believe it will have a transformative impact on the community.” Reliance has developed more than 4,000 housing units and has a strong, successful track record, he said.

The historic Woodside cotton mill.

“Woodside Mill offers a great opportunity for the adaptive reuse of a significant historic building,” he said. Reliance’s development plan for the 14 acres at Woodside Avenue and West Main Street includes adapting the mill into 300 apartments and on-site amenities like a cybercafe, dog park, fitness center, playground, pond, walking trail and parking facilities. The plan also includes 45,000 square feet of space for commercial use such as artist studios, galleries and related uses. Funding for the project would be obtained through private investment and a series of tax incentives, including lowincome housing tax credits, federal and state historic tax credits, mill revitalization tax credits and other similar tax-

JOURNAL NEWS

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Woodside Mill ceased operation in 1984. Nonprofit developer Reliance Housing Federation plans to renovate, preserve and develop the abandoned mill.

exempt programs. Jackson said Woodside Mill is an opportunity for Reliance to revitalize a community while showcasing its ability to deliver high-quality housing. Jackson said the mill would offer high-quality affordable housing to working individuals and families. Rental rates for the majority of the units are expected to range from $570 to $700 per month. The units will range from 560 to 1,030 square feet. Jackson said it is important that Reliance preserve the mill and village’s legacy of industrial and architectural significance as an early 20th-century South Carolina textile mill village when restoring the buildings as a mixed-use development. “Not only is it environmentally and economically sound to preserve and re-use historic buildings, but buildings like the Woodside Mill also provide residents and the community with a sense of history and context,” he said. “In effect, they provide a historical backdrop and foundation upon which families can move forward to build stable and successful futures.” Jackson said in order to qualify for historic tax credits, the reconstruction of the mill must meet National Park Service standards for historic preservation. He said the project would provide affordable housing and jobs in the community and attract additional redevelopment capital to the area. “A project of this magnitude will be a major step in the revitalization of the entire neighborhood,” he said.

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Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 15

journal news spartanburgregional.com

News and information from Spartanburg Regional

healthmatters TIMOTHY YEATMAN TO LEAD THE GIBBS CANCER CENTER Timothy Yeatman, M.D., will serve as the new Gibbs Cancer Center director. Dr. Yeatman previously served as the executive vice president and founding chief scientific officer for M2Gen, a for-profit subsidiary of Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL and a professor of surgery and oncological sciences at the Moffitt Cancer Center. He has received numerous honors and awards including the James IV Association of Surgeons Traveling Fellowship Europe; the Center Director’s Award for Outstanding Research at Moffitt Cancer Center; the James Ewing Foundation Trainee Award; and the “Million Dollar Researcher” Award at the University of South Florida. Dr. Yeatman has been continuously funded over the course of the past 12 years through grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Cancer Society, including a prestigious Director’s Challenge Award for the global profiling of human colon cancer. He has published more than 150 articles in the top peer-reviewed journals in his field including the prestigious Science, Nature Genetics, Nature Medicine, Nature Reviews Cancer, as well as the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and Cancer Research. Dr. Yeatman received his undergraduate degree at Duke University and his medical degree from Emory University. He completed his surgical internship and residency at the University of Florida, and then a surgical oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center. For more information, visit gibbscancercenter.com.

SPARTANBURG REGIONAL’S CARDIOPULMONARY LABORATORY RECEIVES ACCREDITATION Spartanburg Regional’s Cardiopulmonary Laboratory has been granted a three-year term of accreditation in echocardiography in the area of adult transthoracic by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC). Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in the United States. On average, one American dies every 39 seconds of cardiovascular disease—disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The American Heart Association estimates that the direct and indirect cost for cardiovascular disease in the U.S. for 2010 was $503.2 billion. Early detection of life-threatening heart disorders and other diseases is possible through the use of echocardiography procedures performed within hospitals, outpatient centers and physicians’ offices. While these tests are helpful, there are many facets that contribute to an accurate diagnosis based on echocardiography testing. The skill of the person performing the examination, the type of equipment used, the background and knowledge of the interpreting physician and quality assurance measures are each critical to quality patient testing. IAC accreditation is a “seal of approval” that patients can rely on as an indication that the facility has been carefully critiqued in all aspects of its echocardiography operations.

CARDIOVASCULAR REHAB ANNOUNCES NAME CHANGE, CERTIFICATION Spartanburg Regional’s cardiovascular rehabilitation program recently was renamed as the Heart Wellness Program. Cardiac and pulmonary programs help people with heart and respiratory problems recover faster and improve their quality of life. The program was recently certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular

EXPERT CARE Gastroenterology Associates welcomes physician Andrew Taber, M.D. Dr. Taber is board certified in internal medicine and board eligible in gastroenterology. For an appointment, please call 573-7511. and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), recognizing Spartanburg Regional for its commitment to improving patient quality of life by enhancing standards of care. This is a first-time accreditation for the program. Certified AACVPR programs are recognized as leaders in the field of cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation because they offer the most advanced practices available. AACVPR program certification is valid for three years. The Heart Wellness Program offers a medical fitness-based model. Clients are assessed and given an individual exercise prescription. Education, counseling and support for patients are part of the wellness plan. It is a medically-supervised exercise program. The Heart Wellness program is available to members of the community for a $40 monthly fee, Monday-Thursday, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. and Friday, 6 a.m.-12 p.m. For more information, call 864-560-4250.

TUNE IN TO DISCOVER HEALTH on WYFF News 4 on Sundays to learn more about the latest advances in medical care at Spartanburg Regional.

16 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

journal news

Hyatt renovations should be complete in January City approves development agreement for project By Cindy Landrum | staff

A construction fence around the front of the Hyatt came down Tuesday, giving Greenville its first look at a renovated hotel and plaza that city officials say will be a key part of the reinvention of North Main Street. Renovation of the hotel’s lobby and ballroom are virtually complete, landscaping on Beattie and in NOMA Square at the Hyatt entrance on Main Street is underway, a new fountain has water in it and work is ongoing on the hotel’s new restaurant, Roost. The project is expected to be virtually complete in January, said Heather Meadors, director of community relations for JHM Hotels, the company that owns the Hyatt. The project will cost at least $15 million, according to a development agreement approved by the Greenville City Council at its meeting Monday night. The city has agreed to pay $900,000 for improvements to NOMA Square’s public easements, according to the document. When JHM Hotels President D.J. Rama revealed plans for the renovation last year, he called the wholesale renovation of the Hyatt a reinvention. The renovation project includes a new restaurant and bar concept unique to downtown, artsy conference space and a revamped square. The Hyatt was the cornerstone of Main Street’s redevelopment nearly three decades ago. Now, the city hopes the Hyatt rein-

UPCOMING EVENTS LIGHT UP A LIFE Tuesday, December 4 • 3 or 7 p.m. Spartanburg Regional Hospice Home For donations made to the Light up a Life campaign, Spartanburg Regional Hospice will place a light on our Tree of Memory. Two tree-lighting ceremonies will be held to honor or remember friends and family members. For more information, call the Spartanburg Regional Foundation at 864-560-6727.

vention – along with the $100 million ONE multi-use development under construction at the corner of Main and Washington streets – will put new life in that area of Main Street. The hotel’s lobby features wood veneers, glass rails, and a glass entry with lighting that can change colors based on the events happening on Main Street or within the hotel. A 40-foot sculpted chandelier crafted by an artist in Seattle will hang from the ceiling. A large meeting space located on the corner of Main and Beattie Streets – Studio 220 – features natural light, hardwood floors, floating ceiling panels, gallery lighting and a bank of multiple large screen televisions facing both inside and outside. In addition, the lobby will feature a “think tank” room for business meetings and Max’s Library, a reading room and technology station for guests, named after the late Greenville Mayor Max Heller, who was instrumental in bringing the Hyatt to downtown Greenville 30 years ago. The Roost Restaurant will feature a demonstration kitchen and bring a farm-to-table concept to downtown. It is expected to open in mid-January, Meadors said. NOMA Square will feature a water wall, fire pit, permanent stage and the Mice on Main. Outdoor dining will be offered. The reconfigured plaza will host public events such as Downtown Alive and Main Street Music. The project also included renovation of the office building formerly known as the Greenville Commons. Retailers will be located on the first floor.

MEDICAL WEIGHT LOSS INFORMATION SESSION Tuesday, December 4 • 4-5 p.m. Spartanburg Regional Cafeteria Conference Room This free class covers information about our medical weight loss programs: Rapid Weight Loss, Healthy Lifestyle and 9- or 18-week Optifast. These programs are designed for long-term, sustained weight loss and include vitamins, supplements and medications, if needed. For more information or to register, call 560-7070.

MOBILE MAMMOGRAPHY Spartanburg Regional’s mobile mammography unit performs screening mammograms across Spartanburg, Cherokee and Union counties. Call 560-7999 to schedule an appointment and bring your insurance card and identification. The mobile mammography unit will be at the following sites on the dates listed below: December 6: Family Physicians at 290 1575 E. Main Street, Duncan December 12: Family Practice of Woodruff 511 Cross Anchor Road, Woodruff

LAPBAND® INFORMATION SESSION Wednesday, December 12 • 6:30-9 p.m. Family Medicine Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center This free class covers detailed information about weight loss surgery. This class is led by Paul Ross, M.D., who has performed more than 1,300 weight loss surgeries in his career. For more information or to register, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070.

SURVIVING STROKE: A SUPPORT GROUP Monday, December 17 • 6-7 p.m. Regional Outpatient Center Family Medicine Conference Room-Fifth Floor This support group is for stroke survivors, their families or other support persons. It helps people learn more about stroke, share their experiences about stroke, and become inspired to move forward after their stroke. For more information call 560-2132.

Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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Wednesday, December 19 • 6:30-9 p.m. Family Medical Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center This free class covers detailed information about Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy weight loss surgeries. For more information or to register, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070.

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journal news

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journal news

$26 million SCTAC expansion planned National Guard, county and Greenville Tech project to house helicopters, ease aircraft technician shortage

TM

New maintenance and storage facilities in a partnership between the South Carolina National Guard, Greenville County, the SC Technology and Aviation Center (SCTAC) and Greenville Technical College could lead to even bigger projects over the next decade, National Guard Lt. Col. Larry Peebles told Greenville County Council. Construction is underway for an Upstate Army Aviation Support Facility, which is slated for completion in the fall of 2013, said SCTAC president and CEO Jody Bryson. As part of an agreement with the aviation center and the SC National Guard, the approximately 111,000-square-foot, $26 million facility will house six Chinook dual-rotor helicopters and four Lakota helicopters. It will also employ 75 people, Peebles said. The second phase of the project is set to break ground in January 2014, he said, and will include a field maintenance shop and joint-use readiness center. Both facilities will be used by the National Guard and Greenville Tech. The National Guard and Greenville Tech are contributing to fund the construction of the readiness center. The maintenance shop will be nearly 50,000 square feet and the readiness center roughly 94,000 square feet. The center will employ 15 full-time guardsmen and 151 traditional guardsmen, Peebles said. The economic impact of both phases of the project is estimated at $72.5 million, he said. Greenville Tech has an aircraft maintenance technology program located at SCTAC, but it is currently capped at 125 students. With additional space, the program could immediately grow up to 50 percent, said Greenville Tech’s vice president of finance, Jacqui DiMaggio. The college’s facility requirements are incorporated into the readiness center’s plans and the organizations will share portions of the building, including some classrooms

A view of the smaller of the two hangar bays for the Upstate Army Aviation Support Facility at SCTAC. The humansized doors and work crews stand in stark contrast to the large hangar doors.

ltc associates architects

By april a. morris | staff

and a meeting area. Other areas will be exclusively the National Guard’s or Greenville Tech’s, Peebles said, calling the arrangement “a very successful marriage of their requirements and our requirements.” The Guard is working to collaborate with the Greenville Tech truck and diesel mechanic training program to expand the training area to include an off-road training space. DiMaggio reported that the school is losing its offroad training space in January 2013. The readiness center collaboration would allow the National Guard to train aircraft mechanics and technicians on site and Greenville Tech to expand its program, Peebles said, adding that the purchase of additional aircraft by the National Guard will create the need for up to 450 aircraft mechanics nationwide. In the future, technicians for both Boeing and Honda could be trained at the facility, he said. More collaborations are possible in future months, Peebles said. The Guard is considering creating a Southeast Center for Excellence in Aviation, where it could train aviators from other states at the local facility. Partnerships for readiness centers already exist in Spartanburg and at The Citadel, Peebles said. With no new military construction anticipated until 2020, Peebles said the Upstate construction to be completed in 2015 will create a platform for expansion when the money is again available. For the support facility, the design work for the readiness facility and maintenance shop should be finished by June 2013 and ready for groundbreaking in early 2014.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | the Journal 19

journal news

Cohen’s

Candidates announce intentions in House District 17 race

CHILDREN’S JACKETS 15.00

Primary set for Jan. 22, election for March 12 By april a. morris | staff

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Following a successful bid for the District 5 S.C. Senate seat earlier this month, Republican Tom Corbin of Travelers Rest announced he will give up the District 17 House seat he held and won again. And though filing for the seat does not begin until Nov. 30, two candidates have already announced their intentions to compete for the seat vacated by Corbin. District 17 encompasses much of northern Greenville County, including Tigerville, Slater-Marietta and Travelers Rest. The primary election is scheduled for Jan. 22, 2013, and a runoff on Feb. 5, says Conway Belangia, director of elections and voter registration for Greenville County. The special election is

scheduled for March 12, 2013, and approximately 20,000 voters in more than a dozen precincts can cast their ballots, he says. Mike Burns, a Travelers Rest businessman, announced earlier this month that he would pursue Corbin’s seat. Burns, who owns Duke’s Doggs restaurant in Travelers Rest and the Janco real estate and construction company, says he is interested in promoting a small business focus in Columbia. “I also want to continue Corbin’s conservative-style leadership,” he adds. Burns, 60, says he is a proponent of common-sense government and has created multiple businesses since 1990. “I think I can represent how the people of the district think,” he says. Roy Harmon, also a resident of Travelers Rest, announced this week that he intends to run. Harmon is a third-year law student and says he has been interested in politics for a long time, working with the S.C. Policy Council and U.S.

Rep. Trey Gowdy’s campaign. The special election opened a door for him to seek office, he says. Harmon, 28, says he saw inefficiency in state government and wants to help implement accountability and transparency. He adds that, if elected, he will work to lower state taxes because “some taxes discourage people from moving here.” While the situation of a legislator winning two seats at once can happen and is legal, says Belangia, it is not common. A legislator cannot hold both seats, however. State law dictates that the primary election must happen on the eleventh Tuesday after the resignation or declination, he says, and the election on the eighteenth Tuesday after. Filing for the District 17 seat opens at noon on Nov. 30 and closes at noon on Dec. 10. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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SPARTANBURG COUNTY COUNCIL FROM THE NOVEMBER 26 MEETING

Spartanburg County’s investment in the huge Tyger River baseball and softball park netted the county $17.6 million in economic impact this year, according to a new report from Clemson University. Clemson reported to county council Monday that more than 100,000 people visited Tyger River Park this year, including about 60,000 from outside Greenville and Spartanburg counties. “You knocked this one out of the park by investing in Tyger River Park,” said Bob Brookover of Clemson’s International Institute for Tourism Research and Development. Bond payments for the park cost the county about $2.8 million each year, funded by hospitality tax money. In other action, county council’s support of the Clean Air Act grew heated when dissenters protested. The clean air resolution, passed 6-1, pledges Spartanburg County’s support for outreach, education and action to reduce air pollution and stay within federal regulations for air pollutant levels. Critics claimed some of those actions would require government spending and

would represent government overreach. County resident Doug Cobb read a letter from State Rep. Bill Chumley, R-Woodruff, who was at a Greenville County legislative delegation meeting and could not attend the Council meeting. The letter called global warming a “now-proven hoax” and called for a public hearing about the resolution. “I’m concerned that this resolution being considered about air quality is being passed without consideration of the taxpayers,” said Chumley’s letter. Term limits were imposed by council on members of boards and commissions after a 4-3 vote at third reading. The measure establishes a two-term limit for members of the boards the county appoints. After the second term, a board member may serve a third term if all seven county council members approve, but a board member cannot serve a fourth term. Council next meets on Dec. 17 at 5:30 p.m. in the County Administration Building at 366 N. Church St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ communityjournals.com.

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Greenville county council from the november 20 meeting

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Greenville County Council has decided to pursue an industrial zoning text amendment to restrict certain operations in mixed-use areas. When a new scrap metal recycling business moved into Fountain Inn in late 2011 and began operation earlier this year, little did neighbors know that the business would produce what they described as “booming” noises, Greenville County Council chairman H.G. “Butch” Kirven said at this week’s council meeting. After numerous complaints over the course of several months about the operation, Triple M Metal worked with Fountain Inn officials to limit the nighttime noise associated with depositing scrap metal onto the ground and waiting rail  $100 off aoff complete pair of • $100 a complete pairglasses of glasses cars, along with coupling rail cars, Kirven said.  $125 off each additional complete pair • $125 off each additional complete pair Though the industrial operation cannot be seen from the  10% off all sunglasses, readers, and accessories • 10% off sunglasses, readers, accessories residential properties and vice versa, the sound travels across (offer applies to stock on hand, no other discounts apply) the distance, said Fountain Inn city attorney David Holmes. Sale ends December 31, 2012! Offer applies to stock on hand, no other discounts apply. City officials are continuing to work with the company to reduce noise, he said. Sale ends December 31, 2012! In a move to prevent a similar situation in other areas GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE zoned for industrial use and adjacent to residential areas, Kirven said he introduced a zoning ordinance text GARRISON OPTICIANS amendment that could increase compatibility in these McDaniel Village 271-1812 mixed-use areas. 1922 Augusta Street To protect neighbors of future industrial operations, the M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. proposed amendment to the I-1 zoning designation would www.garrisonopticians.com

outline new restrictions for scrap metal processing, salvage yards and industrial waste recycling. These changes would include minimum site size, screening requirements and noise restrictions. “The more I looked into this situation, the more I became convinced that this is a real problem of compatibility unlike any we’ve faced previously,” Kirven said. “In economic development, the focus is on adding jobs and investments. No one thought about making sure this new company actually fit into the existing mixed-use neighborhood.” Councilman Sid Cates requested that the wording not limit the examples of the type of businesses included. Kirven said the ordinance change will not alleviate the current situation in Fountain Inn, but will prevent future compatibility issues. All properties currently zoned I-1 will not be subject to the new guidelines, said county spokesman Bob Mihalic. Council approved the text amendment initiation, which will be taken up by the council’s Planning and Development Committee, the county Planning Department and the county Planning Commission. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 6 p.m. at County Square, Greenville. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Wonderboy bounces back

FIELDS OF

GREEN

Thompson prepares for next UFC bout By LEIGH SAVAGE | contributor

Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson, a Simpsonville karate instructor and Ultimate Fighting Competition welterweight, had to pull out of a bout scheduled for Nov. 17 in Montreal, due to a torn meniscus. But Thompson didn’t achieve his 63-1 record by being easily deterred. “I look at it like, by the time I do step in there, I’ll be that much better,” Thompson said. After missing UFC 154, he’s hoping to be on the card at UFC 156 in February, with a chance to redeem the first and only loss he’s experienced in his 14-year competitive career. He’s up and walking pain-free after undergoing surgery on Oct. 29, and he’s already back to training under a modified plan developed by his father and coach, Ray Thompson. THOMPSON continued on PAGE 25 GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Trees for sale at Jim Smith’s Christmas Tree Corner on Haywood Road. Smith said he has been selling Christmas trees on the same corner lot since 1980.

SC Christmas tree growers smell profits in search for ‘the perfect tree’ By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

When you’re trying to get in touch with a Christmas tree farmer this time of year, it’s best to use a cell phone. The season between Thanksgiving and Christmas is when Wes Cooler puts thousands of miles on his heavyduty pickup truck, hauling trees from his farm to various markets and from

the major distribution centers in North Carolina to a tree lot near you. Cooler offers cut-your-own trees at his Oakatie Farm, located on the coast near Beaufort, but his main business is supplying the hundreds of lots that sell to tens of thousands of customers. He was raised in Pickens County, graduated from Clemson, and went on to a career as a U.S. Army officer. He retired a full colonel.

How the travel-weary Cooler came to be co-owner and chief tree trimmer at Oakatie is, perhaps, a longer story than how the family came to own about 90 acres on a high bluff overlooking the Oakatie River. The farm is believed to have been in the family before the start of the Civil War and began raising Christmas trees for commercial markets in the early 1980s. TREES continued on PAGE 24

PHOTO PROVIDED

STEPHEN “WONDERBOY” THOMPSON

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 23

journal community

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Kevin Cleaves waters Christmas trees at Jim Smith’s Christmas Tree Corner on Haywood Road. trees continued from page 23

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24 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Cooler may well be the last of his family to raise Christmas trees. He hopes to sell the property after this season. “I’ve only got a few hundred trees left on the property now,” Cooler said over the roar of his pickup’s diesel engine while motoring south on Interstate 95 from a trip to a major market in North Carolina. It takes a lot of folks like Cooler to keep the big tree lots like the ones on the western end of Haywood Road operating through the holiday crush. Then there are the small operators like Joel Ann Chandler, who owns the Mauldin Open Air Market. Chandler drives herself to the big fir farms in the high country near Boone, N.C., to get her trees. “The best trees are firs, and the best firs come from up there,” she said. Chandler won’t talk about how many trees she sells in a year. None of the tree lot operators would for this story. “It’s largely a cash business, and the tax man is always listening,” one said. However, officials at the state Christmas Tree Association have no such compunctions. South Carolina Christmas tree sales were up 15 percent in 2011, and growers are expecting another strong year this Christmas, Steve Penland, York County Christmas tree grower and executive secretary of the S.C. Christmas Tree Association, told Clemson University for their annual Christmas tree press release. “Last year’s excellent weather got people outdoors to go tree shopping,” Penland said. George Kessler was a Clemson University forestry professor for 32 years and has been growing Christmas trees in the Central area since 1971. He operates

Hilltop Christmas Trees and is chairman of the S.C. Tree Farm Committee. “The weather is certainly a factor. But I also think people are getting back to the traditions they remember from childhood. The experience of taking the family out to a tree farm and choosing the perfect tree harkens back to simpler times,” Kessler said.  Kessler also thinks more people are realizing that buying a fresh-cut locally grown tree is a smarter consumer choice and better for the environment than buying an artificial tree or a tree that was shipped to a big box store from a distance. “When you buy a local tree that’s standing on the stump, that’s as fresh as you can get. It’s full of water and it will look beautiful the entire Christmas season. And when you meet the grower eye-to-eye, you learn a little bit about how the tree was cared for,” Kessler said. Buying a fresh-cut or live tree is better for the environment, Clemson said. As renewable resources, they absorb carbon dioxide, emit oxygen and provide a wildlife habitat in the field. Christmas tree farms also stabilize soil, preserve water supplies and provide scenic green space, Clemson said. According to the most recent data collected by the National Christmas Tree Association, South Carolina has nearly 2,000 acres devoted to Christmas tree production and harvests approximately 30,000 trees per year. That’s no small contribution to the state’s $17 billion dollar forestry industry, the university said. For more information on local Christmas tree growers, go to www.sciway.net/ bus/sc-christmas-tree-farms.html.

Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@commnityjournals.com.

journal community THOMPSON continued from page 23

“I’ve got to keep my stamina and the strength in my legs,” said Stephen Thompson, who plans to work toward becoming UFC World Champion while maintaining another job he loves – working as head kids’ instructor at Upstate Karate, the facility his father opened in 1983. “A lot of champions, all they do is train,” Thompson said. “But I want to work. I love teaching those kids’ classes. To see them grow up and become different people ... I know what martial arts did for me, keeping me focused on my goals, teaching me respect and selfcontrol, and I want to give that back to them and have a blast doing it.” The meniscus tear is one of relatively few setbacks Thompson, 29, has experienced in his fighting career, which started with kickboxing when he was 15. Already a senior black belt in kempo karate, he was following in the footsteps of his father and older sister, who both competed in kickboxing. “I was thrown to the dogs on that one,” Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson teaching one of his karate classes. Thompson said of his first match, in which “A welterweight had gotten injured, the teenager faced a 28-year-old who 5-0 record. He joined Alchemist MMA was then undefeated. That didn’t last for Management and soon got the call from and they were looking for a filler,” he said. long, as Thompson earned his first of 57 the UFC, which he likens to the NFL of “When the UFC calls, you don’t turn it down – it’s the best of the best.” consecutive kickboxing victories, which all fight sports. After intense training, included several world titles. Thompson made his debut at “I had gone to the highUFC 143 on Feb. 4, 2012, and est point you can go” with immediately caused a stir with kickboxing, Thompson said, a jab-punch-roundhouse kick and so he started looking for a combination that sent opponew challenge. He found it in nent Dan Stittgen to the mat. Chuck Norris’ World Combat With “a combination we League, televised on Versus, teach all the time in class,” where he became the No. Thompson had not only won 1-ranked fighter in 2006. his first UFC fight, but had An injury to his left knee earned a $65,000 bonus for the caused him to consider his Knockout of the Night – an options again, and he realized honor not typically bestowed mixed martial arts was the way on first-time fighters. to go. Mixed martial arts, or He was so successful that he MMA, is a full-contact sport was asked to take part in UFC that allows striking and grap145, fighting UFC veteran Matt pling techniques, both standBrown. After 14 years and 63 ing and on the ground, from consecutive wins, Thompson other combat sports, including incurred his first loss. wrestling, Brazilian jiujitsu “I always thought, if I ever and kickboxing. lose, it will be a motivation “UFC was getting more boost for me,” Thompson said. popular,” Thompson said of “When you are winning, you the league that has a worldwide get in a rut a little bit. I wasn’t fanbase and is frequently shown wanting to lose, but to lose to internationally on channels someone like Matt Brown, it such as FX. “I had these skills wasn’t that bad.” I had been developing, so I But he can’t wait for the opdecided to put it all together.” Thompson made his debut at UFC 143 on Feb. 4, 2012, in Las Vegas, He started out at the lower where he not only won his fight with a first-round knockout, but he also portunity to fight Brown again. “I know I can beat him,” levels of MMA, earning a earned a $65,000 bonus for having the “Knockout of the Night.”

PHOTOS PROVIDED

“I love teaching those kids’ classes. To see them grow up and become different people ... I know what martial arts did for me, keeping me focused on my goals, teaching me respect and self-control, and I want to give that back to them and have a blast doing it.” Thompson said, adding that he overtrained before the match and lost too much weight too quickly to make the 170-pound weight requirement. “It’s definitely going to make me a better fighter because I learned a lot from that loss.” As he recovers from injury and gears up for a return to the UFC’s octagon, Thompson said Upstate support has been a huge boost. After spending so many years meeting parents and kids through karate class and programs with area schools, Thompson says he gets community support almost everywhere he goes. “The UFC is a worldwide thing, but for my first fight, FX’s best ratings weren’t some big city,” he says. “The best ratings were in Greenville, S.C. It motivates me to train harder.” Contact Leigh Savage at lsavage@communityjournals.com.

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 25

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Hear again Cochlear implant helps Upstate woman regain hearing By april a. morris | staff

Beverly Gilliland said she never imagined that she would have the same health problems as her parents. Gilliland, who grew up with a mother, father and grandmother who wore hearing aids for many years, began to have difficulty talking on the phone and communicating as a social worker for Greenville County Schools. “I got three different hearing aids over the course of four or five years,” she said. “At first they would help a bit, but then I would still have difficulty.” Over those few years, Gilliland, 64, said she almost completely lost her hearing. She was unable to talk on the phone, attend performances or movies, or hear during church services. “It felt like life was closing in on me. The opportunities for quality of life were

falling away,” she said. After learning that she might qualify for a cochlear implant, Gilliland said she was ready to try it. A cochlear implant works for some people who have less than 20 percent of their hearing or who are completely deaf. The device electronically produces a sense of sound rather than amplifying it like traditional hearing aids. Part of the implant is surgically placed under the skin and near the auditory nerve, while another part is worn over the ear, often magnetically attached to the part beneath the skin. A microphone picks up sounds and transmits them to a speech processor, and a receiver/stimulator sends electric impulses to an electrode that stimulates the auditory nerve. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, a cochlear implant does not restore hearing, but creates a “useful representation of sounds.” Gilliland said she got the implant in her right ear in 2008 and after the incision healed, it was activated. “Within minutes I was able to hear and understand speech from an ear that I haven’t heard from in years,” she said. Because the implant created a different sort of stimulation, Gilliland likens it to adjusting to a new pair of glasses. She

worked on speech exercises where she repeated what was said to her. In her experience, the performance of the implant improved over the course of the first year. Gilliland “In the first few days I would make mistakes, but you have to work at it. It’s like practicing the piano,” she said. She now gets checkups and an audiologist can fine-tune the program to allow her to get the best performance. Her current model has different settings for conversation, distance hearing and noisy environments, she said. Gilliland got her second implant in 2009 and calls the results “a miracle.” The technology allows her to continue to work, talking with parents, teachers and children. “If I didn’t have a cochlear implant, I would have had to retire before I wanted to because I just couldn’t function,” she said. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, patients experience varying degrees of success with a cochlear implant and also have to weigh the risks like potential facial nerve damage, infection or dizziness, to name a few. Users also have to consider whether the implanted technology will be compatible with later up-

grades to the external component. More than 90 percent of health plans cover the implants, according to the FDA. At a recent tuning appointment, Gilliland said an audiologist told her that she has experienced a high degree of success with her implant compared to other patients. Because it has been so transformative for her, said Gilliland, over the past 18 months she has volunteered to share her experience at health fairs in South Carolina and North Carolina. “I really want to help other people because I know what it’s like to struggle with hearing loss” and can speak with authority to those who have questions about cochlear implants, she said. “Your social contacts are lost – you sort of withdraw from people. I’ve met many people at these events who are depressed and despondent.” Gilliland wants to share her experience with people who may be curious or who may not know about the technology. She will be attending an upcoming Upstate event sponsored by one of the makers of cochlear implants on Dec. 4 at the Hilton Greenville. For more information, visit www.hearinghealthseminar.com. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Don’t Miss These Special Nights THROUGH DEC. 24 SANTA EVERY NIGHT FROM 69 PM

Santa will be in Winter Wonderland every night from Thanksgiving night through December 24 from 6:00 to 9:00 PM (unless there is an unexpected emergency at the North Pole that Santa has to tend to!). Optional photos with Santa taken by a professional photographer will be available each night for an additional cost. Visitors may choose to take their own pictures with Santa, or purchase the professionally-taken photos, on Monday, December 3.

Rotary Club of Greenville

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

We sincerely appreciate the support of the following Upstate businesses, organizations and individuals for their support. Their contributions help make Roper Mountain Holiday Lights become more brilliant each year, while ultimately benefiting Rotary Charities and the Roper Mountain Science Center Association with the proceeds raised from Holiday Lights.

MONDAY, DEC. 3 BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

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DON’ T MISS COCKY FROM 78:30 PM

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SILVER Community Journals ∙ Duke Energy ∙ Entercom Radio ∙ FLUOR ∙ TD Bank ∙ GE Power Systems

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Greenville Road Warriors ∙ Oxner Landscape Maintenance ∙ Piedmont Arthritis Clinic Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) ∙ TRS Staffing Solutions

THURSDAY, DEC. 6 GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHOIR FROM 6:307:30 PM

BRONZE Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, Inc ∙ Bradshaw, Gordon and Clinkscales, LLC ∙ Brown Mackie College Cleveland Park Animal Hospital ∙ Ever-Green Recycling ∙ Fairway Outdoor Advertising Golden Career Strategies, Inc. ∙ Harrison Lighting ∙ Impressions Media Services ∙ Jackson Lewis LLP JonScot General Contractors, LLC ∙ Judith Sosebee Prince ∙ Southwest Airlines ∙ The Spa At West End Wintergreen Management Company ∙ Young Office Supply

MONDAY, DEC. 10 SUE CLEVEL AND ELEMENTARY SINGERS FROM 6:30 TO 7:30 PM BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

FRIEND Anonymous ∙ Arthur State Bank ∙ Bank of Travelers Rest ∙ Kim L. Capehart, DDS, PA DNA Creative Communications ∙ Holder Electric Supply, Inc.∙ Independence National Bank ∙ Management Solutions LLC Melloul-Blamey Construction ∙ Northwestern Mutual Financial Network ∙ Sitton Buick GMC ∙ TD Convention Center Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes ∙ Trehel Corporation ∙ UBS The ALFA Group ∙ Charles Warne Terry Weaver ∙ Westin Poinsett Hotel

TUESDAY, DEC. 11 MEET REEDY RIP’IT FROM 79 PM

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12

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MEET ROWDY FROM 6:308 PM

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28 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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SUNDAY, DEC. 16 ROBERT E. C ASHION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHOIR FROM 6:307:30 PM

MONDAY, DEC. 17 BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

Scan for our complete digital guide to this year’s event and for more information about our Schedule of Events Stay connected through Facebook and our website, RoperMountainHolidayLights.com. NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 29

journal community

journal community

Don’t Miss These Special Nights THROUGH DEC. 24 SANTA EVERY NIGHT FROM 69 PM

Santa will be in Winter Wonderland every night from Thanksgiving night through December 24 from 6:00 to 9:00 PM (unless there is an unexpected emergency at the North Pole that Santa has to tend to!). Optional photos with Santa taken by a professional photographer will be available each night for an additional cost. Visitors may choose to take their own pictures with Santa, or purchase the professionally-taken photos, on Monday, December 3.

Rotary Club of Greenville

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

We sincerely appreciate the support of the following Upstate businesses, organizations and individuals for their support. Their contributions help make Roper Mountain Holiday Lights become more brilliant each year, while ultimately benefiting Rotary Charities and the Roper Mountain Science Center Association with the proceeds raised from Holiday Lights.

MONDAY, DEC. 3 BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

TUESDAY, DEC. 4

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GOLD Century BMW ∙ Jain Chem, Ltd ∙ SYNNEX Corporation

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 5

SILVER Community Journals ∙ Duke Energy ∙ Entercom Radio ∙ FLUOR ∙ TD Bank ∙ GE Power Systems

MEET THE TIGER FROM 78:30 PM

Greenville Road Warriors ∙ Oxner Landscape Maintenance ∙ Piedmont Arthritis Clinic Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) ∙ TRS Staffing Solutions

THURSDAY, DEC. 6 GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHOIR FROM 6:307:30 PM

BRONZE Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, Inc ∙ Bradshaw, Gordon and Clinkscales, LLC ∙ Brown Mackie College Cleveland Park Animal Hospital ∙ Ever-Green Recycling ∙ Fairway Outdoor Advertising Golden Career Strategies, Inc. ∙ Harrison Lighting ∙ Impressions Media Services ∙ Jackson Lewis LLP JonScot General Contractors, LLC ∙ Judith Sosebee Prince ∙ Southwest Airlines ∙ The Spa At West End Wintergreen Management Company ∙ Young Office Supply

MONDAY, DEC. 10 SUE CLEVEL AND ELEMENTARY SINGERS FROM 6:30 TO 7:30 PM BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

FRIEND Anonymous ∙ Arthur State Bank ∙ Bank of Travelers Rest ∙ Kim L. Capehart, DDS, PA DNA Creative Communications ∙ Holder Electric Supply, Inc.∙ Independence National Bank ∙ Management Solutions LLC Melloul-Blamey Construction ∙ Northwestern Mutual Financial Network ∙ Sitton Buick GMC ∙ TD Convention Center Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes ∙ Trehel Corporation ∙ UBS The ALFA Group ∙ Charles Warne Terry Weaver ∙ Westin Poinsett Hotel

TUESDAY, DEC. 11 MEET REEDY RIP’IT FROM 79 PM

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12

SNOWFLAKE In Memory of Mary “Mom Mom” Anstead ∙ William Dantin ∙ Fritz & Perrin ∙ George and Sarah Fletcher

MEET ROWDY FROM 6:308 PM

In Honor of Hannah & Finnegan Garity ∙ In Honor and Memory of the Gartner Family and Friends ∙ In Honor of the Staff of the Greenville County Library System ∙ Beth Padgett ∙ In Honor of Tom Sowden, Rotarian for 37 years ∙ Nancy B. Stanton ∙ Meg Terry In Honor of Brice & Barron Tiffany ∙ In Honor of Louise D. Whitmire

ROPER MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY LIGHTS

SOUTHWEST TICKET GIVEAWAY DETACH AND COMPLETE THIS FORM FOR A CHANCE TO WIN TWO TICKETS FROM SOUTHWEST AIRLINES! LOOK FOR OUR “REGISTER TO WIN” BOX INSIDE WINTER WONDERLAND

MAKE SURE TO VISIT

Winter Wonderland!

FIRST & LAST NAME: STREET ADDRESS:

Park / Stroll / Enjoy

CITY, STATE, ZIP:

You will find:

PHONE: EMAIL: YES

MAY WE EMAIL YOU IN THE FUTURE ABOUT ROPER MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY LIGHTS?

28 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

3

NO YES

NO

ONE ENTRY PER PERSON. MUST BE A LEGAL U.S. RESIDENT & OVER 18 YEARS OLD TO ENTER. ENTRIES ACCEPTED NOVEMBER 22–DECEMBER 30, 2012. WINNER WILL BE SELECTED ON OR AFTER DECEMBER 30, 2012. TICKETS EXPIRE DECEMBER 31, 2013

25 Giant Holiday Cards Created by local students 3 Concessions 0 Restrooms 3 Entr y Box for Southwest Airline Tickets 0 “Green Screen” for photos (For an additional fee) 3 Gift Shop

0 113012

ARE YOU 18 YEARS OR OLDER?

WINNER WILL BE NOTIFIED BY PHONE & LETTER AFTER DECEMBER 30, 2012

Santa (through Dec. 24) 3 The Balloon Elf 0 Performances Mailbox for letters to Santa 0 S ’mores Kits & Roasting Fire Pit 0

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13 JL MANN HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR FROM 6:30 TO 7:30 PM

SUNDAY, DEC. 16 ROBERT E. C ASHION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHOIR FROM 6:307:30 PM

MONDAY, DEC. 17 BRING YOUR DOG NIGHT

Scan for our complete digital guide to this year’s event and for more information about our Schedule of Events Stay connected through Facebook and our website, RoperMountainHolidayLights.com. NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 29

journal community

our community

our schools

community news, events and happenings

The Greenville Chamber of Commerce is hosting its Legislative Breakfast on Dec. 6 at the Westin Poinsett Hotel in Greenville. Members of the local legislative delegation will offer their perspectives on the upcoming session of the S.C. General Assembly. Attendees will also be able to ask questions. Cost is $25 for Chamber members. For more information and to register, call  864239-3748  or email  eedwards@greenvillechamber.org.  Southern Eye Associates will offer a seminar on dry eye syndrome on Dec. 6, 6-7:30 p.m. Dr. Kurt Heitman, ophthalmologist at Southern Eye, will cover the causes and symptoms of dry eyes along with recommended treatments. For more information and to register, email events@southern-eye.com or call 864-354-1364.  The S.C. Department of Revenue and the S.C. Department of Consumer Affairs have partnered with the S.C. State Library to offer educational webinars to inform the public on how to enroll in credit monitoring and learn more about how to minimize security breach effects.  The Protect Yourself Against Identity Theft program also allows the public to use a library computer to sign up for credit monitoring. Webinars are scheduled for Dec. 4, 11 a.m., in Simpsonville and Dec. 19, 3 p.m., in Mauldin. The identity theft programs are scheduled through Jan. 4, 2013. Visit www.greenvillelibrary.org or call 864-527-9258 for more information. A service of remembrance will be held on Dec. 4 at 6:30 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 200 West Washington St., led by Dr. Richard Gibbons. Families and friends who have lost loved ones are invited to remember and honor them. The service will include scripture readings, a time of reflection, Holy Communion, commemorative candle lighting and prayers for healing and well-being. The Greenville Council of Garden Clubs will hold a free Open House at the Kilgore-Lewis House (c. 1838), 560 North Academy St., Greenville, on Dec. 2, 2-4 p.m. The house is decorated

for the holidays and the theme is “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.” In addition, the house will be open 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesday through Friday, for the first two weeks in December. Call 864-2323020 or visit www.kilgore-lewis.org for more information. Visitors to Roper Mountain Holiday Lights can meet local mascots in Winter Wonderland on selected nights this month. On Dec. 4, USC’s Cocky will be on site from 7-8:30 p.m. and the Clemson Tiger will put in an appearance on Dec. 5, 7-8:30 p.m. Greenville Drive’s Reedy Rip’It will greet visitors on Dec. 11, 7-9 p.m. and the Greenville Road Warriors’ Rowdy will visit on Dec. 12, 6:30-8 p.m.  Roper Mountain Holiday Lights is open nightly, 6-10 p.m., through Dec. 30. For more information, visit www.ropermountainholidaylights.com. Greenville First Church of the Nazarene, 1201 Haywood Road, Greenville, will present “A Journey to Bethlehem… An Ancient Path to Christmas” on Dec. 1-2, 5:30-9 p.m. The event features a live marketplace with merchants, Roman soldiers and dancers along with Mary and Joseph. For more information, visit www.ajourneytobethlehem. com or call 864-233-4890. Walnut Grove Plantation will present “A Colonial Night Before Christmas” on Dec. 1, 5-9 p.m., at 1200 Otts Shoals Road, Roebuck. Tour the historic Moore family home by candlelight and see the wreaths, greenery, fruits and berries used to decorate for the season. Kids can create crafts and all can enjoy wassail and cookies around a fire. Reservations are required for guided tours. Admission is $6 for adults, $4 for ages 6-17 and free for ages five and under. For reservations, contact Zac Cunningham at 864-576-6546 or walnutgrove@ spartanburghistory.org. Bobby Blakely will present a Christmas with Elvis performance on Dec. 7, 7 p.m., at the Pelzer Masonic Lodge. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children. There will also be a hot dog plate sale at 5 p.m. by Piedmont Church of God of Prophecy. For more information,

call 864-230-9069 or 864-230-5102. Readers can join Book Your Lunch with debut Southern author Sharman Burson Ramsey on Dec. 11 at Twigs Tempietto, Greenville. Ramsey is the author of “Swimming With Serpents,” a novel of love, conflict and redemption during the Creek War. Ramsey’s story will be continued in the forthcoming sequel, “A Nest of Vipers.” Tickets are $25 and must be purchased in advance at www.bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. Greenville children’s author Melinda Long will be signing copies of her picture book, “The Twelve Days of Christmas in South Carolina,” at Fiction Addiction on Dec. 8, 1-3 p.m. The event is free and Christmas-themed refreshments will be served. Long is also the author of the bestselling picture books “How I Became a Pirate” and “Pirates Don’t Change Diapers.” In addition, the store will host a preschool story time on Dec. 13 at 10:30 a.m. featuring “Kel Gilligan’s Daredevil Stunt Show” by Michael Buckley. For additional information, call 864-675-0540 or visit www. fiction-addiction.com. To raise money for its new park, the Greenville Downtown Airport will hold a fundraising run on May 18, 2013. And now through Jan. 15, 2013, the airport is holding a naming and logo contest for the event. Submissions should be sent, along with contact information, to Lara Kaufmann at laralkaufmann@ gmail.com. The winner of the contest will receive a Discovery Flight donated by the Greenville Jet Center and free entrance to the race. For more information about the airport, visit www.greenvilledowntownairport.com or call Joe Frasher at 864-242-4777. Lake Keowee Marina and Hidden Cove at Lake Keowee will host a Lighted Christmas Boat Parade on Dec. 7 at Lake Keowee Marina. Participation is $20 per boat and includes entry to the parade and a goody bag. All participating boats must be illuminated and selfsufficient and all boat captains must attend a mandatory Captain’s Briefing. For more information, call 864-882-2047.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to email: community@communityjournals.com.

30 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

activities, awards and accomplishments

Mauldin High School is participating in an in-store book fair at Barnes & Noble at Shops at Greenridge or Haywood Road, Greenville, or www.barnesandnoble.com. Fifteen percent of purchases made Nov. 30-Dec. 2 will benefit the school. Christ Church Episcopal School sophomores Kendall Sieber and Madeline Ryan will present a fashion show in support of the Make A Wish Foundation. The show, produced as part of a sophomore project, will be held on Dec. 8 at 7 p.m. in the school’s auditorium. The Spartanburg Day School will host the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League on Dec. 8. During the competition, teams of 10 students from several Spartanburg schools will build autonomous robots, helping the students to learn skills that will prepare them for college and move them toward the possibility of obtaining jobs in science or technology. This year’s challenge is “Senior Solutions,” with a goal to improve the quality of life for seniors by helping them continue to be independent, engaged and connected in their communities. For more information, visit www.usfirst.org or www.spartanburgsciencecenter.org.

Chandler Creek fifth-graders went to Camp Greenville and hiked “The Moving Mountain” to the waterfall. Pictured are Coen Roberts, Wil Marler and Lovely Ladson. The Mt. Zion Christian School National Jr. Beta Club is sponsoring a toy drive in support of the Salvation Army. The toys will be delivered to children ages 3-10. New, unwrapped toys may be dropped off at MZCS through Dec. 11. The Carolina Farm Stewardship Association has named Clemson’s Institute for Economic and Community Development the institute of the year for its work in sustainable agriculture programs. Clemson’s Dave Lamie received the

journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Stone Academy recently honored its Reflections contest winners on the primary and intermediate levels. The theme of the contest was “Magic of a Moment.”

award on behalf of the institute for a program that helps new farmers grow successful businesses and for its work in local food system development.

CASE honor in recent years. Dr. Angela Shiflet, the Larry Hearn McCalla Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, received the honor in 2009.

Every year, Mitchell Road Christian Academy students make ornaments to decorate a Christmas tree for the Festival of Trees. This year, the school’s tree will be at the Hyatt Hotel. Art students in T1 through sixth grade, along with the Art Club, made all the ornaments from recycled materials.

Riverside High School students recently participated in the Youth in Government conference in Columbia. The Riverside team won the 2012-Premier Delegation as well a fourth consecutive gubernatorial victory. This year also marked the first time schools were allowed to run more than two candidates for the five elected offices. Riverside was the only school to run for all five. Four won their primaries and three of the five offices were won by Riverside students.

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education have named Wofford College’s Dr. Alliston K. Reid as the 2012 South Carolina Professor of the Year. He was selected from among nearly 300 top professors across the United States. Reid is the second Wofford professor to win the annual Carnegie/

Auditions for new choristers will be held in January!

Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

Blythe Academy of Languages has been awarded $8,000 in teacher mini grants. These awards were made possible by donations of Blythe Academy parents and business partners. Among the winners were Carrie Johnson and Debbie Carter on behalf of the fourth-grade team: “Think Small: Using Leveled Texts to Teach Small Reading Groups” and Monica Brackett, Wendy Garrison and Adrienne Whitner on behalf of the fifth-grade team: “We All Read!” For a complete list of winners, visit www.blythepta. Johnson and Carter org or the Blythe Academy Facebook page. Blythe Academy mini grant winners Carrie Johnson and Debbie Carter on behalf of the fourth-grade team: “Think Small: Using Leveled Texts to Teach Small Reading Groups” Blythe Academy mini grant winners Monica Brackett, Wendy Garrison and Adrienne Whitner on behalf of the fifth-grade team: “We All Read!”

Brackett, Garrison and Whitner

Tickets may be purchased at the door.

Happy FOG-lidays! This time of year is full of family and food...and fats, oils & grease (FOG). When cooking, pour all leftover FOG in a can and trash it.

Avoid the FOG Clog at www.PipePatrol.org NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 31

journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Trans-Siberian Orchestra will present the live debut of its rock opera, “The Lost Christmas Eve,” at the BI-LO Center on Nov. 30. The band is giving back $1 for every ticket sold to the 8 p.m. performance to SYNNEX Share the Magic. The beneficiaries are Make-A-Wish Foundation of South Carolina, A Child’s Haven, Clement’s Kindness and Pendleton Place for Children and Families. For more information, visitwww. synnexsharethemagic.com. Traveling Chic Boutique, a women’s boutique at 122 North Main St., Greenville, has donated $1,375 to local charities since opening in September. The store hosts monthly charity events with a percentage of sales benefitting a specific charity each month. TCB also hangs jars behind its counter to collect instore donations for Safe Harbor, Ronald McDonald House, Meals on Wheels, Loaves and Fishes, Cancer Society of Greenville County and the Greenville Humane Society.

toys and clothing to children who otherwise would receive few or no gifts at Christmas. Until Dec. 19, participating restaurants will display paper angel tags with the first name, age, gender and gift wishes. Contributors can take one or more tags, purchase gifts and return the gifts to one of the designated drop-off locations. Make-A-Wish South Carolina, in partnership with TD Bank, will grant the most unique wish in South Carolina history on Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. at the opening night performance of the Nutcracker at the Peace Center. The event is open to the public. Make-A-Wish South Carolina grants the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions and granted 142 wishes last year. Generations Group Homes recently achieved national accreditation for its Pathways Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility program through the New York-based Council on Accreditation. Pathways PRTF is designed to treat at-risk boys who struggle with sexual behavior problems and have a direct need for psychiatric services.

The Commerce Club will host its annual Toy Drive/Holiday Gala on Dec. 3, 6-8 p.m. The club will unveil its renovated bar and lounge area as club members and guests bring new, unwrapped toys that will be donated to Country Santa from Pickens. The Commerce Club is located at 55 Beattie Place on the 17th floor of the One Liberty Square building, downtown Greenville. For more information, call 864-232-5600 or email Dylan Petrick, general manager, at dylan.petrick@ourclub.com. The First Presbyterian Chamber Singers will present “Tidings of Comfort and Joy,” a benefit Christmas concert for Mobile Meals of Spartanburg, on Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center. The 28-voice choir will perform an eclectic mix of musical styles with baritone Paul MacPhail and violinist Mary Irwin. Tickets are $15 and are available at First Presbyterian Church (864-583-4531), Mobile Meals of Spartanburg (864-573-7684) or www.mobile-meals.org. On Dec. 1, seven Battle of the Bells teams will compete across Greenville County from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. to see who can collect the most money in their Red Kettle to support The Salvation Army. Team locations include: The Just Teasin’ Elves at Macys, Haywood Mall; The Greenville News at Wal-Mart, Simpsonville; The Kroc Pots at Wal-Mart, Woodruff Road; Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc at Sam’s Club, Woodruff Road; The Salvation Army Southpaws at Total Wine & More; the Area Command Commandeers at Wal-Mart, Wade Hampton; and, Carolina Heat Baseball at Belk, Haywood Mall. Subway restaurants will host Salvation Army Angel Trees in participating restaurants throughout the Upstate to give donors an easy way to provide new, unopened

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TD Bank and the Arbor Day Foundation recently launched TD Green Streets, a new grant program that will offer ten $20,000 grants in support of innovative urban forestry initiatives in underserved communities. Funding will support the purchase of trees, tree planting, maintenance and educational activities. The program is part of TD Forests, an initiative that protects forest habitats and plants trees equal to the amount of paper the bank uses each year. For information, visit www.tdgreenstreets. com. Winners will be announced in April 2013. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

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Approximately 70 students from the Junior Beta Club at Greenville Middle Academy recently traveled to New Jersey to assist with hurricane relief efforts as part of a school trip to New York City and Philadelphia. The group helped in Moonachie, N.J., by moving Red Cross cleaning supplies and distributing them to flood victims. The students also donated supplies, including water, blankets and food, to the Sayreville Storm Relief Donation Center.

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Journal culture Home for the

Holidays Warehouse Theatre using Kickstarter to bring actor home for Christmas play

KICKSTARTER continued on page 34

Photos provided

Everybody wants to be home for the holidays, and Ryan Bradburn is no exception. So the Warehouse Theatre is asking for help to bring him back to Greenville to perform in “Santaland Diaries,” a hilarious one-man, one-act play based on David Sedaris’ stint as a Christmas elf at Macy’s Department Store in New York. Before moving to Atlanta, Bradburn was known as one of Greenville community theater’s By Cindy Landrum | staff leading comic actors. The theater wants to raise $3,000 in its “Bring Ryan Home for the Holidays” campaign on Kickstarter, an online communityfunding platform for creative projects. It has until Dec. 6 to raise the money. As of midweek, $955 has been pledged. Kickstarter is an all-or-nothing deal, meaning if the theater doesn’t raise the entire amount, it gets nothing. Supporters can pledge as little as $10. They get rewards based on the amount of money pledged. A pledge of $10 or more gets a mention in the Kickstarter section of the production’s playbill. A pledge of $25 gets a holiday card signed by the cast; $50 will award an ornament from the set. A $100 pledge nets the supporter a ticket to the play and an invitation to the exclusive “Ugly Sweater After Party.” “Kickstarter is a fundraising tactic we’ve never used before,” said Paul Savas, the theater’s artistic and executive director. “Santaland Diaries” seemed like the perfect time to try. The theater will pair “Santaland Diaries” with another David Sedaris short, “Season’s Greetings,” for an irreverent, adult look at the Christmas holidays. It will also present a kid-friendly show, “The Christmas that Almost Wasn’t.”

BRINGING FAMILY AND FRIENDS TOGETHER FOR THE HOLIDAYS. AVOID THE HIGHWAY THIS YEAR. FLY HOME.

Search and Compare Fares. Book Flights, Hotel Rooms and Rental Cars gspairport.com NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 33

JOURNAL CULTURE KICKSTARTER continued from PAGE 33

So in addition to paying for the production costs of all three shows, the Warehouse must also pay the additional expense of bringing in Bradburn from Atlanta. “Our mainstream Main Stage shows are easily sponsorable,” Savas said of the decision to use Kickstarter for the coming-home project. “It’s a little harder to find sponsorship for our more David Sedaris- or more ‘November’-like shows.” According to the Kickstarter project page, 44 percent of the Warehouse’s revenue this season will come from charitable gifts. In a video promoting the Kickstarter project, Bradburn said he misses Greenville, especially the theater community.

“It’s where my heart is,” he said. “It’s where I grew up.” Bradburn is a designer who specializes in photo prop design, illustration, photo styling, scenic art, fabrication and graphic design. Savas called him “perfect” for the “Santaland Diaries,” which is the true and humorous account of David Sedaris’ stint as a Christmas elf at Macy’s

The Warehouse Theatre is turning to Kickstarter, a crowd-funding website for creative projects, to help pay for one of its Christmas shows, “The Santaland Diaries.” The campaign is titled “Bring Ryan Bradburn Home for the Holidays.”

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WHAT: “Santaland Diaries/Season’s Greetings” WHO: “Santaland Diaries”: Ryan Bradburn & “Season’s Greetings”: Kerrie Seymour WHERE: The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St., Greenville WHEN: Dec. 7-9, 13-16, 20-23, 28-29 Thursdays and Fridays, 8:30 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 8 p.m. TICKETS: $30 INFORMATION: 864-235-6948 * Note: This show is not appropriate for children.

him coal for Christmas if he doesn’t straighten up. “Santa no longer traffics in coal,” Sedaris wrote. “Instead, if you’re bad, he comes to the house and steals things. I told Riley if he didn’t behave himself, Santa was going to take away his TV and his electrical appliances and leave him in the dark.” And traditional Christmas theatrical fare doesn’t address the irritated adults who threaten to have the elf fired during their wait for their kid’s two-minute sit in the fat man’s lap. “Go ahead, be my guest,” Sedaris wrote. “I’m wearing a green velvet costume; it doesn’t get any worse than that.” Paired with “Santaland Diaries” is “Season’s Greetings,” Sedaris’ take on Christmas family newsletters. “Season’s Greetings” is not for the kids, either. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

ction a

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Department Store in New York. Sedaris made his comedic debut reading the essay on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition on Dec. 23, 1992. It was adapted into a one-man oneact play by Joe Mantello in 1996, and has become a popular adult Christmas production, the opposite of “It’s a Wonderful Life” and “A Christmas Carol.” After all, traditional Christmas theatrical fare doesn’t address the “Oh, My God Corner.” That’s the place, Sedaris wrote, were people arriving to see the long line say, “Oh, my God!” It is an elf ’s job to calm them down and explain that it will take no longer than an hour to see Santa. Neither does traditional Christmas theatrical fare address the tantrumthrowing child whose mother wants the elf to tell him Santa will bring

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Twiggs’ exhibit revisits ‘Messages from Home’ By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

South Carolina artist Leo Twiggs has painted the violence of a hurricane, the complexity of racial relations, the romance of Southern rivers and the bonds of family. Some would say his work represents the fabric of the South. And he uses fabric – literally – to do it. Twiggs uses the unique medium of batik, a fabric painting process that uses dyes and wax that provide nuanced colors and shapes. His work was the subject of a book, “Messages from Home: the Art of Leo Twiggs.” That book is the subject of an exhibition, “Messages From Home: Revisits,” at Hampton III Gallery on Wade Hampton Boulevard in Greenville through Dec. 31. Twiggs, who is one of the most recognized African-American artists in the Southeast, drew national attention in the early 1970s when he included images of the Confederate flag in his paintings. He was one of the first black artists to do so. In his series “East Wind Suite: The Hugo Series,” Twiggs chose not to focus on the destruction caused by winds of up to 179 mph and the highest tidal surge ever recorded along the country’s Atlantic coastline. Instead, the series of nine pieces – comprised of 11 paintings – focused on people’s resiliency and ability to overcome events that could easily overwhelm. In “Targeted Man,” Twiggs took a

G IF T CA R D

Leo Twiggs

look at how the World Trade Center attacks changed people. People suddenly didn’t know whom to trust, whether somebody on the street was an enemy or a friend, a situation he said reminded him of growing up in South Carolina’s Lowcountry with the threat of the Ku Klux Klan. In 1970, Twiggs was the first black student to earn a doctorate degree from the University of Georgia. He taught at South Carolina State University, where he chaired the art department until 1998. His work has won international recognition and he has had more than 75 one-man shows. In 2004, the Georgia Museum of Art organized a retrospective of his work. He was the first visual artist to win a Verner Award, one of South Carolina’s highest awards. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Messages from Home: Revisits” WHO: South Carolina artist Leo Twiggs WHERE: Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 10, Greenville WHEN: Through Dec. 31 EXTRA: Coffee and conversation with artist, Saturday, Dec. 1, from 11 a.m. until noon. INFORMATION: 864-268-2771 or www.hamptoniiigallery.com

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Playing past the fear Cellist Sara Clanton Schaffer finishes a ‘transformative year’

CHELSEY ASHFORD

Watching Sarah Clanton Schaffer perform, it’s difficult to imagine she’s ever had issues with confidence. Schaffer plays the cello, but her music is as far from a stuffy classical recital as you can get, as is her playing style. In between bouts of mid-song head-banging and hilarious storytelling, Schaffer layers classic pop songwriting, uniquely evocative lyrics and riveting vocals on top of the mournful-yet-melodic wail of her cello to create a sound that combines different genres into a fresh, exciting sound. But when Clanton auditioned for a scholarship to Furman University music program in 2001, she wasn’t nearly as self-assured. “My audition for Furman University felt like a disaster,” Schaffer says. “I was so nervous. I don’t know if it was stage fright or if I didn’t believe in myself. Looking back on it now, I feel like I could’ve handled it a lot better.” When I mention that it can’t have gone that badly since she was ultimately accepted into the program, Schaffer laughs and says, “I’m my own worst critic.” Schaffer said she’s known since she was five years old and climbed onstage during a concert by Christian artist Sandi Patti that being onstage was what she ultimately wanted to do. “I was dancing really crazy,” she said, “and I remember I was one of the last kids to walk off the stage, and all of a sudden, this arm grabs me. It was Sandi Patti, and she pulled me back up onstage and said, ‘You were the one who Sarah Clanton Schaffer was dancing the wildest, what’s your name?’ “I got to talk into the microphone, I got a T-shirt, and my mom still has the picture of me and Sandi Patti onstage. And that was the moment where I knew I wanted to become a performer.” Schaffer chose to double-major at Furman in both music and communications. After graduation, though she had been writing songs for years, she spent a lot of time playing sessions and shows for other artists, before joining the duo Adele Cotton (formerly O Mello Cello Tree), alongside singer/songwriter Darby Wilcox. After the duo parted ways in 2011, Schaffer made the decision to become a solo performer, but not without some trepidation. “It’s always felt like this is what I’m supposed to do, but this fear was really in the way. So I started out as a side player. I’d been writing songs for a long time, but getting the guts to get up there and perform them was really the biggest thing. And I’d say in the past year, I’ve learned what I have to offer, what my product is.” Part of that year of growth took place onstage with the David Mayfield Parade, a band led by Grammy-nominated multi-instrumentalist David Mayfield, who has worked with the Avett Bros. and Mumford & Sons, among many others. “I got hired in January to go on tour with the David Mayfield Parade, and I spent two months on the road with them,” Schaffer said. “I’ve learned so much about what it means to be a performer. It’s not just about going out there and playing your instrument and hoping people will like it. It’s really about engaging your audience and connecting with them.” Mayfield is producing Schaffer’s upcoming album, “Chasing the Feeling,” which is the culmination of her last year of songwriting and performing growth. “It’s very exciting. I’ve been working really hard the last year, focusing on writing and working with a lot of new people. It’s been such a transformative year for me. I’m really grateful for what’s been going on.” Visit www.cellotreearts.com for more info on Sarah, her upcoming tour dates and her Kickstarter project to raise the money to record “Chasing the Feeling.”

Carlos Agudelo, Artistic Director Guest Artist McGee Maddox from the National Ballet of Canada December 7, 2012 7 pm December 8, 2012 3 pm December 9, 2012 3 pm

www.converse.edu/arts/ twichell-auditorium

Scan Code To Buy Tickets using your phone!

36 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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For Tickets 864-596-9725 or 864-583-0339 online

Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 12/1, BI-LO CENTER

Young Jeezy Multi-platinum rapper kicks off December. Tickets $29-$89. Call 864-241-3800 or go to www.bilocenter.com.

12/1, THE HANDLEBAR

12/6, THE HANDLEBAR

12/8, THE HANDLEBAR

Horizon Records Presents Greenville Record Fair 2012 More than 45 tables of new, classic and collectible vinyl. Call 864-233-6173 or go to www.handlebar-online.com.

Keller Williams Multi-instrumental wizard builds songs onstage all by himself. Tickets: $18. Call 864-233-6173 or go to www.handlebar-online.com.

Larry Keel & Natural Bridge Lightning-fast acoustic picker fuses bluegrass, jam, jazz music. Tickets: $13. Call 864-233-6173 or go to www.handlebar-online.com.

12/7, THE BOHEMIAN CAFE 12/3, PEACE CENTER

Joe Bonamassa Next-generation blues guitarist moves the music forward. Tickets: $49-$69. Call 864-467-3000 or go to www.peacecenter.org.

12/1, GOTTROCKS

Murder The Day Georgia-based metal quartet. Call 864-235-5519.

Ten Foot Polecats Boston-based blues-roots trio. Admission is free. Call 864-235-7922 or go to http://blog.horizonrecords.net/.

12/12, THE HANDLEBAR

Tab Benoit Cajun axe-master returns to the Upstate. Tickets: $17. Call 864-233-6173 or go to www.handlebar-online.com.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 37

journal culture In cooperation with Morgan Stanley Wealth Management & Current Tools

‘Amberly’ is Greenville woman’s debut novel Christian fantasy is first of three-book series By Cindy Landrum | staff

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Mary Elizabeth Hall never intended to publish the story that had rolled around her mind for 30-something years. It was her private story, the one she played around with in her mind, mostly during bouts of insomnia. Then the Greenville woman realized she was starting to forget parts of the story she labels as fictional history and she began writing it down, turning a conversation in the familiar story into a scene, a scene into a chapter. “Then I bought books on how to write a novel,” she said. She realized then that she didn’t know even the basics of writing a book, that an author couldn’t jump from what one character was thinking to what another was thinking and back again. She didn’t realize that she couldn’t use more than one question mark and that exclamation points were widely frowned upon. And she didn’t realize that there wasn’t really a place in the Christian publishing world for the type of fiction she was writing. Editors urged her to write something more mainstream. “Amberly” is the first book in a threepart Crestmere Series, set in a nation whose past is rich in cultural lore and

touched by grief. Twin kings rule the Bretalian Isle together despite vehement objections from many around them. Recalling English lore, Hall’s Bretalia is said to have been founded by a legendary figure named Byrtus. Other nations have names similar to early names of their real-life counterparts, Hall said. The story behind the Crestmere Series was inspired by classic literature from Beowulf to Tolkien, she said. In the first book, coldblooded enemies snatch Eleanor Williamston as a declaration of war. Her heart is drawn to the handsome guardsman who rescues her. She’s drawn to him but then is torn when he challenges her political ideals. The guardsman then reveals something that makes her choice even more difficult. “In many ways, ‘Amberly’ is the story of Christians everywhere who strive to honor God but hold different convictions about how it should be done,” she said. Hall, who will be signing books at the Holiday Fair at the TD Convention Center on Saturday, wondered at first whether she could change history. Her daughter suggested she write scifi instead so she wouldn’t be bound by reality. But, Hall said, she decided the biblical references in “Amberly” limited her to Earth. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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journal culture

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the week in the local arts world

The Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts presents The Hen Party Comedy Show with Karen Mills and Leanne Morgan on Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15-$18. For more information, visit www.ftinnarts.org. Spartanburg High School Chorus presents its Christmas concert, “We Wish You a Merry Christmas,” Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. in the David W. Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center. This free concert will include an evening of seasonal music by the Viking Voices, Men’s Choir, Women’s Choir and the Corporation. For more information, call 864431-1205. First Baptist Church of Spartanburg invites the public to sing the wellknown parts of Handel’s “Messiah” at Chapman Cultural Center on Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. Admission is free and dress is casual. Participants should bring a copy of the words and music, available online. For more information, call Rev. Carey at 864-439-8721, ext. 104, or 205-534-9205. The Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble will present their annual “Holiday Music in the Galleries” at the Greenville County Museum of Art’s Sundays@2 on Dec. 2.  For more information, call 864-238-4639. The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg hosts a Holiday Art Shopping Spree, Dec. 3-21, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at Chapman Cultural Center. All merchandise is locally produced by guild members and includes ornaments, paintings, jewelry, books, pottery and notecards. For more information, call 864764-9568. The Spartanburg Regional History Museum presents “From Cultured to Capture,” a seminar and stage presentation about the dynamic life of a highly educated West African Muslim, Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m., in the David W. Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center. Aphmed Kenya will perform “The Life and Times of

Omar ibn Said” an 18th-century dramatic slave reenactment with the “Timbuktu African Artifacts.” Tickets are available at the Chapman Cultural Center box office, 200 East St. John St., Spartanburg, or by calling 864-596-3501.

seum present “James ‘Buck’ Buchanan: The Night Before Christmas & Other Gifts” at the History Museum, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. until Jan. 19. For more information, call 864596-3501.

ages 5 and older. For information, call 864-467-3000, 800-888-7768 or visit www.greenvillesymphony.org. The Spartanburg Art Museum and the Spartanburg Regional History Mu-

“General Cornwallis” (left) and “Alcolu II” by Tarleton Blackwell.

Ballet Spartanburg presents “The Nutcracker,” featuring McGee Maddox from the National Ballet of Canada, at Converse College’s Twichell Auditorium Dec. 7 at 7:00 p.m. and Dec. 8-9 at 3:00 p.m. Tickets are $32 for adults, $20 for students and $26 for seniors. The Children’s Nutcracker Sweets Party will be Dec. 8 at 1 p.m. The children’s ticket to the party is $40 and includes a ticket to the performance. Parents accompanying children do not need to purchase a party ticket. For more information or to make reservations, call 864-596-9725. The Making Words Move Teen Poetry Slam will be held at the Sterling Community Center at 113 Minus St. in Greenville on Dec. 15 at 2 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. All submissions must be original and participants must be between the ages of 13-19 to compete for the $100 prize. For more information, visit www.poetryslam.com or call Moody at 864-357-7148. The Greenville Symphony Orchestra will present its annual concert, “Holiday at Peace,” featuring vocalist Steve Lippa in The Peace Center Concert Hall on Dec. 21 and 22 at 7:30 p.m., and on Dec. 23 at 3 p.m. Also joining the orchestra is The International Ballet, as well as Santa and Mrs. Claus, who will greet the audience following the performance. Tickets are $15-$35 and the concert is most appropriate for

The Spartanburg Art Museum is hosting an exhibit of paintings by Tarleton Blackwell titled “The Hog Series” on display through Feb. 16. The exhibit features 20 paintings of hogs in unique settings. SAM, located in the Chapman Cultural Center at 200 E. St. John St. in Spartanburg, is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Sundays, 1-5 p.m. For more information, contact SAM at 864-582-7616, or contact the Chapman Cultural Center at 864-278-9698.

Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

The West End Winter Walk November 30th • 6-9pm South Main and Augusta Streets in Greenville’s West End

Come join us for great food, refreshing drinks, prize giveaways, and festive shopping! ❄ Amanda Henry’s Popcorn Parlor ❄ Augusta Twenty ❄ Cocobella Boutique ❄ Custard Boutique ❄ Diana Classic Children ❄ Go Fish ❄ Growler Station ❄ Kudzu ❄ Monkee’s of the West End ❄ Pedal Chic ❄ Pink Bee ❄ Postcard From Paris ❄ Samantha Grace Designs ❄ The Cook’s Station ❄ The Emporium ❄ The Greenville Drive Shop ❄ The Spa at West End

❄ M112A

The Greenville Tech Chorus will offer a free concert on Dec. 1 at 4 p.m. at Second Presbyterian Church, 105 River St. For more information, visit www.gvltec.edu.

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | The Journal 39

JOURNAL CULTURE

Arts Calendar Carolina Ballet Theatre The Nutcracker Nov. 30 – Dec. 2 ~ 467-3000 Fine Arts Center I Am Rachel Corrie Nov. 30 – Dec. 8 ~ 355-2550 SC Children’s Theatre Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells Nov. 30-Dec. 16 ~ 467-3000 Fountain Inn Arts Center The Hen Party Dec. 1 ~ 409-1050 Furman University Furman Jazz Combos Dec. 2 ~ 294-2086

DECEMBER 2 at 2:00PM The Carolina Bronze Handbell Choir will perform a selection of favorite carols in the galleries. The acoustics of the GCMA make it an ideal venue for this popular concert. The event is free, and guests are encouraged to wander throughout the Museum and view the exhibitions as they listen to familiar Christmas music arranged exquisitely for handbells.

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Absolutely FRee!

Peace Center Joe Bonamassa Dec. 3 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council Fair & Square: Selections from Open Studios 2012 Through Dec. 3 ~ 467-3132

Nov. 30 – Dec. 6, 2012 Centre Stage Miracle on 34th Street: A Live Radio Play Through Dec. 22 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Works by Stephen Scott Young & Works by Bryan Collier & David Drake: Potter and Poet of Edgefield Through Dec. 30 ~ 271-7570 Studio 220 at the Hyatt Regency Works by Carole Tinsley Through Dec. 30 ~ 248-1568 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Linda Q. Furman Through Jan. 13 ~ 233-6733 BJU Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green From Rublev to Faberge & Likely and Unlikely Pairings Ongoing ~ 770-1331

Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Judy Verhoeven Through Dec. 15 ~ 250-2800

7:00 p.m. • Tickets $7.00

40 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

journal homes F e at u r e d H o m e s & N e i g h b o r h o o d s | O p e n H o u s e s | P r o p e r t y T r a n s f e r s

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Open Sunday, dec. 2, 2-5 pm 1 4 J e n k i n s o n C t . , R o c k w o o d a t A u g u s t a , G re e n v i l l e Custom built by Dillard Jones - Southern Living Builder of the Year twice! This fabulous bungalow boasts a spacious open great room with a fireplace, a gourmet kitchen with everything on your wish list, a cozy screen porch and deck plus fun outdoor living space. Featuring a master on main, a large upstairs loft, two additional bedrooms with baths plus a fourth space - ideal for a study or bonus room. Tucked away in a quiet cul- de- sac just minutes for the heartbeat of sought after Augusta Rd. Check it out at www.rockwoodataugusta.com. More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

Price: $519,000 | MLS# 1243000 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 2800-2999 SF Contact: Helen Hagood 864.419.2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com www.caine.com/agents/ helenhagood Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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Beautiful immaculate craftsman-style home in Boxwood. Only 1-year old. Movein-ready. Secondary bedrooms & Bonus Room seldom used - just like new. Boxwood is a very popular quiet, peaceful & safe neighborhood in great location. Easy access to I-385, I-85, Woodruff Rd, GSP airport, etc. Excellent schools, including the brand new Monarch Elementary School. Open floor plan - great for entertaining or everyday living. Granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances, & recessed lighting in Kitchen. Hardwoods in Family Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, Breakfast Room & Foyer. Ceramic tile in both bathrooms. All carpeted bedrooms on main floor. Finished carpeted Bonus Room with 2 closets above garage. Screened porch. HOA fees are $110/month Feb-Dec for landscaping, & $325 annually due in Jan. Energy-efficient home. Formal Dining Room with chair-rail & wainscot, currently used as an office. Bonus Room has separate thermostat with HVAC system. Neighborhood has large green spaces in front & rear areas. Home warranty from First American available with acceptable offer.

Home Info Price: $249,500 | MLS#1250384 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, 2200-2399SF Monarch Elementary Hillcrest Middle Mauldin High Contact: Scott Holtzclaw 864.884.6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co.

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109 Rolleston Dr - $775,000 21 Rivoli Lane - $389,900 5BR/5.5BA. Energy Star home constructed by 3BR/3.5BA. Premier location w/absolutely Goodwin-Foust. Must see! From GVL 385 S incredible views of downtown and mountains. to Roper Mtn Exit & turn L, Go about 5 miles Charleston style townhome in gated commuto R into SD on Chamblee, 3rd L on Sable nity. Haywood Rd to Left on Pelham toward Glenn, R on Rolleston Margaret Marcum/ Downtown, immediate Left on Villa Road. Suzy Withington, 201-6001 Prudential C. Leigh Irwin,, 420-3125/380-7755 Prudential Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249356 C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1245950

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19 Weston Brook Way - $289,900 4BR/2.5BA. Located at end of culdesac. Loft, morning room, LR & more. Best price per foot in this gated community. Woodruff Rd to Miller Rd, Right into SD, Right on Weston Brook Way. Cameron Keegan, 238-7109 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1247995

201 Iron Bridge Way - $249,500 3BR/2BA. Gorgoeus home in great location. Move-in ready. Immaculate condition. Open floor plan. 385 S to Woodruff Rd toward Simpsonville, Right on Hwy 14, 1.5 miles to SD on Left. Scott Holtzclaw, 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250384

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2 Windchime - $179,999 4BR/2.5BA. Charming home on corner culdesac lot. Many updates. 385 to Exit 27 Fairview Rd, turn R on Fairview Rd, L on Harrison Bridge, L on Wild Horse Creek, L on Windchime, Home on Corner Linda Bobo, 982-8322 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248162

102 N. Chancelor Dr - $174,500 4BR/3BA. Updated home. Hardwoods, master on main, renovated master bath, outdoor pergola for outdoor living space, open concept. Located at the corner of Woodruff Rd & Hwy 14, across from McDonalds Dana Mathewes, 270-4722 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1243575

42 T h e J o u r n a l | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

105 Canebrake Dr - $165,900 4BR/2BA. Brick home w/newer roof, gutters, windows, heat pump, duck work,water heater. 2 car garage, big lot. S. Batesville directly across from Buena Vista Elem @ Traffic light. Turn on Canebrake Dr. Dana Mathewes, 270-4722 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248815

104 Saluda Ridge Dr - $119,900 3BR/2BA. One story split BR home. Large backyard w/above-ground pool & deck + strage bldg. Farris Bridge Rd North. Cross White Horse Rd, Pass Berea First Baptist, Left on Hope, Left on Saluda Ridge Jean Keenan, 380-2331 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248648

PRESTIGIOUS KELLETT PARK. Elegant, custom built, immaculately maintained home with pool, sunroom, and office/media room. Many luxurious upgrades. Shown by appointment only. Owner (864) 288-8463

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Flexible, bright and open floor plan in this like-new four bedroom home. Space allows for large living room with built-ins and smaller office or larger office and smaller living rm. Hardwoods throughout down, great open kitchen with solid surface counters, stainless appliances and tile back-splash. Bright 2-story great room with inviting gas fireplace. Private fenced backyard, perfect for children and pets with walk-to-park access at back gate. Large, luxurious master suite upstairs with his and hers closets, dual sinks, garden tub and separate shower. Sidewalk to clubhouse and pool area, playground and activity court...great walking community with room to roam in the next door recreation area. Call or email for further info 864-331-3107.

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Home@GreenvilleTeam.com NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | T h e J o u r n a l 43

R E A L

E S T A T E PEOPLE,

Coldwell Banker Caine Names Upstate’s Top Producers from September Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from each of its five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – for the month of September. The top producing agents from each office are ranked by the total volume of business closed last month and include: Easley: Susan McCoy, Heather Parlier, Lori Brock Greenville: Jacob Mann, Sharon Wilson, Susan Gallion Greer: Shelbie Dunn, Charlene Panek, Linda Wood Seneca: Pat Loftis, Jere duBois, Brett Smagala Spartanburg: Francie Little, Lori Thompson, Annette Starnes Top listing agents in each office are recognized for listing the highest total volume of residential properties last month and include: Easley: Carol Walsh, Heather Parlier, Melissa Hall Greenville: Jacob Mann, Sharon Wilson, Heidi Putnam Greer: Faith Ross, Linda Wood, Shelbie Dunn Seneca: Pat Loftis, Brett Smagala, Jere duBois Spartanburg: Beth Beach, Francie Little, Judy McCravy

AWARDS,

D I G E S T HONORS

and Accredited Relocation Specialist designations, is a Life member of the Atlanta Board of Realtors and is a recipient of the Crystal Phoenix Award. She was named Rookie of the Year while at Harry Norman Realtors and received numerous recognitions while at Dorsey Alston Realtors in Atlanta.

Johnson “We are thrilled to have Kim join C. Dan Joyner Company,” said David Crigler, Broker-in-Charge. “We welcome her to our family of Realtors.” Johnson is currently is building a home in Hollingsworth Park and resides in Greenville with her husband, Hank and children, Jessica and Hayes. Before leaving Atlanta, she was an active member of her church, singing in the choir and serving on the Board of Trustee. In her free time she likes to work out, practice yoga, read, travel, and meet new people. “I am excited to be back ‘home’,” said Kim. “There is no place in the world like Greenville!” Grube Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Kimberly Carter Johnson has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Augusta Road office.

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Olivia Grube has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pelham Road office.

An upstate native, Johnson graduated from J.L. Mann High School and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Special Education at Converse College. She has an extensive career in the real estate industry spanning 15 years. She earned the Accredited Seller Representative

An Ohio native, Grube graduated from Cadiz High School. She was self Grube employed for the past 10 years as a caterer and personal chef.

Johnson Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

We are thrilled to have Olivia join the Pam McCurry Team,” said John Moore, Broker-in-Charge of the Pelham Road Office. “She is a welcome addition to C. Dan Joyner Company.” Grube currently resides in Mauldin with her husband, Larry and two children. She has been an avid runner since age 10, and she also enjoys cooking, baking, gardening and entertaining. “I come from a big family of real estate professionals,” said Grube. “Personally, I love the excitement of buying and selling homes and am honored to help others find the joy in those experiences as well.” Sherman Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Ashley Dawes Sherman has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Augusta Road office. A Florida native, Sherman graduated from St Petersburg High School. He Sherman earned a BS.B.A. degree from University of Florida in Gainesville with a major in accounting. Sherman served as a CPA with Elliott Davis Company in Greenville; and most previously, was a principal and registered investment advisor with Greenwood Capital Associates. We are excited to have Ashley join C. Dan Joyner Company,” said David Crigler, Broker-in-Charge at the Augusta Road office. Sherman currently resides in Greenville with his wife, Ginger, who is also a C. Dan Joyner sales associate. In their free time, they enjoy golf, skiing and tennis.

Search. Map. Drive. Visit. Over 1,900 Neighborhoods Online. THE UPSTATE’S MOST COMPLETE NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE. 44 T H E J O U R N A L | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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Agents on call this weekend

PATRICK TOATES 360-0170 PELHAM RD.

ANGELIKA SCHMIDT KAAREN ANDERSON SHARON CALHOUN LOGAN COTTINGHAM MARY LOU BARNHARDT 630-2458 879-4239 979-9954 430-1671 293-4814 PLEASANTBURG GREER WOODRUFF RD. SIMPSONVILLE POWDERSVILLE

46 T H E J O U R N A L | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com.

CHERRY REYNOLDS 979-2633 AUGUSTA RD.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

N E I G H B O R H O O D

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99 Echo Drive

$1,750,000 • 4 BR/5 BA • MLS 1250219 Grand 7000+ sf estate on 14+ Acres

$750,000 • 3 BR/2.5 BA • MLS 1243569 Long Range Views, Caesars Head

Joey Beeson • 864.660.9689

Tom Marchant • 864.449.1658

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Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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3 Andy Court $425,000 • 3 BR/3 BA • MLS 1250243 Lake Robinson, 5 car garage, workshop, pool

Gordon D. Seay • 864.444.4359

Valerie Miller • 864.430.6602

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106 Wren Way

$284,900 • 4 BR/4.5 BA • MLS 1249408 Fannie Mae, 3300 sf/1. 40 ac, basement, granite

$299,000 • 2 BR/2BA • MLS 1250156 Great floor plan, hdwds, deck, amenities

Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

Tom Marchant • 864.449.1658 ettia

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$225,900 • 3 BR/2.5 BA • MLS 1248231 Conveniently located, hdwds, pvt yard, amenities Anne Marchant • 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly • 864.414.1688

204 Rainwood Drive $189,921 • 5 BR/3BA • MLS 1228853 Plank hdwds, screen porch, corner lot

Joan Rapp • 864.901.3839 ts

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105 Woodmere Dr. $221,615

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Bells Crossing Elementary Mauldin Middle School Mauldin High School

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$499,970 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • MLS 1243209 Morton Steel Building w/HVAC, W/D hookup & bath

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$240,475

New Homes from the $170s to $290s 12 Month Average Home Price: $230,000

115 Siena Drive

$749,000 • 4 BR/4.5 BA • MLS 1240775 1 sty w/lower walkout, 5000+ sf, lake front Nancy McCrory • 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin • 864.230.5176

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minutes to the Five Forks area’s many shops, restaurants, entertainment and medical facilities. New homes range from the $170s to $290s and are ENERGY STAR® Certified. The final phase has been released. Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in Gresham Park! The decorated model is at 2 Carter Run Ct. is open daily. For more information, call (864) 676-0158 or visit www.ryanhomes.com.

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$850,000 • 3 BR/3 BA • MLS 1250265 Includes guest house w/ 2BR & 2 BA

Gresham Park, Simpsonville, SC Enjoy a truly one level living with yard maintenance included at Gresham Park! This charming, peaceful neighborhood features lovely singlefamily homes with fully maintained yards, so you’re free to lounge by the community pool or gather with friends and neighbors at the community clubhouse. You’ll also appreciate being conveniently located just

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$174,921 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • MLS 1250743 Handicap accessible, in-law suite

Joan Rapp • 864.901.3839

601 Cleveland Street 8-F

$74,900 • 1 BR/1 BA • MLS 1247755 Open flr plan, hdwds, built-ins, terrace Anne Marchant • 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly • 864.414.1688

Agent on duty: Jean E. Bartlett • 864.506.4093

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | T H E J O U R N A L 47

S pa rta n b u rg T r a n sac t i o n s J u ly

1-7,

2012

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

CANYON CREEK CYPRESS CREEK SHORE HEIGHTS OAKS AT ROCK SPRINGS BRIDLE RIDGE HANGING ROCK WYNFIELD GABLES BENT CREEK PLANTATION SHAFTSBURY HEARTWOOD PLACE CAROLINA PLACE ROCK SPRINGS POWDER SPRINGS SUTTLES ESTATE HILLBROOK FOREST WATERVALE WINDERMERE CREEKSIDE AT ROCK SPRINGS RED OAK ESTATES SUNNY SLOPES WHISPERING PINES CROSS POINTE RIVER RUN WINDRIDGE WYNBROOK SHADY GROVE HILLS CANDLEWOOD BRIGHTON WOODS MELODY CREEK EDGEWOOD HEIGHTS TIMBERLAKE EVANWOOD PALMETTO TOWNES RIVER FOREST STONE STATION

$299,900 $267,500 $255,000 $246,554 $220,000 $198,000 $195,000 $193,000 $175,000 $175,000 $156,500 $151,300 $151,000 $150,000 $149,900 $145,000 $144,000 $135,000 $133,900 $130,000 $129,999 $129,900 $129,000 $124,400 $124,000 $122,000 $120,900 $120,000 $109,000 $103,500 $100,000 $100,000 $97,500 $92,000 $92,000 $90,000 $89,400 $88,700 $88,467 $85,000

BONGIOVI, ANDRE MCLESKEY, JASON L HENDERSON, DOUGLAS FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE REEVES, DAVID A MUNGO HOMES INC MCKINNEY, VIRGINIA P MOOLMAN, SHAUN WILSON, JONATHAN M MORROW, PATRICIA A KNOX, RICKY E PHILLIPS, JARED L WILKINS, TEDDY R NEAD, BRANDON P SMITH, STUART M ABBOTT, DANIEL L COOPER, LISA M SHELEST, SERGEY MCCULLOUGH, LARRY G STOKES, JOHN W TAYLOR JR, EDWARD A LITTLEJOHN, ANITA CRAWFORD, TODD A GILBERT, JOEY CHADE THRAILKILL, JOSHUA GLIDEWELL, JOSHUA AARON CUDA, RAELYN M MUTTERS, KEVIN C MAHAFFREY, MICHAEL L PERTELL JR, LEVERNE ARMSTRONG, BRIAN K FIRST PIEDMONT FEDERAL JONES, SANDRA L FIELDS, BYRON L BRENNER, ALLISON L HODGE, THOMAS R ROBINSON, TAQUANA S OWENS, JESSICA N MURDOCH JR, ROBERT W MCDOWELL, SUMMER C

216 ESCALANTE DR 15 KNEE RUN 171 SHORE HEIGHTS DR 369 MILHAVN DR 867 SHADOW CREEK DR LOT NUMBER: 116 102 GABLE CT 319 SUGAR TIME LN 488 ABBERLY LN 502 MARCH CT 2722 CAROLINA COUNTRY CLUB RD 748 LANYON LN 124 POWDER SPRINGS DR KINDER DR 100 HICKMAN CT 156 BELMONT DR 270 WATERVALE DR 308 JACOB CREEK DR 351 CAPSTONE LN 580 MEADOW RD 109 SUN VALLEY DR 240 SUNNYVIEW CIR 998 MIKE DR 127 CHANDLER DOWNS TRL 253 RIVERRUN DR 259 BETHANY CT 628 CLARION CT 172 ALBUS DR 8670 HIGHWAY 11 363 BRIGHT WICK CT 449 BRIGHTON WOODS DR 143 CAROWAY CT 342 EDGEWOOD CIR 814 ISLAND FORD RD 668 SHADOW DANCE LN 200 JOHNSON LAKE RD 715 W SAGO CT 121 FORESTVIEW DR 3418 STONE STATION RD 135 SUNNY RAY DR

LIBERTY RIDGE OAK FOREST OAKMONT ESTATES BERRY HENDLEY FARM WATTS FARM MINK CREEK ESTATES REIDVILLE CROSSING CARRIAGE GATE MILLS MILL DANCING WATER POINTE DANCING WATER DR CONGRESS BOULEVARD AUTUMN WOOD

$73,900 $70,000 $56,000 $55,000 $52,000 $50,000 $49,000 $43,000 $38,000 $32,000 $31,000 $27,500 $15,000 $13,011 $13,001 $10,000 $6,000 $6,000 $5,000

BEAN, ROBERT D DAVID, MATTHEW MICHAEL KELLY, MELVIN A WELLS FARGO BANK NA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC CROSSIN, JAMES H ARTHUR STATE BANK BRIDGES, WILSON WALL, AMAELIA EASLER COOPER, PATTY H ALLEY, JAMES R BRUNSON, WILLIAM A US DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING REYNOLDS JR, CHARLES E FANNIE MAE ROSBOROUGH, JONATHAN D VICKERY, MARY W SEWELL, STEVEN WAYNE HART, MARTHA RUTH SK BUILDERS INC CAMPSEN, FRANK A BISHOP HOMES LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC S C PILLON HOMES INC M&T PROPERTIES INC GARRISON, GREGORY METTS JR, ROBERT E BALLARD, VERNON LANFORD, TERRY G PADILLA, MARJORIE ARYAM TUCKER, SEAN J BANK OF AMERICA NA HENRY, AUCKIE CITIBANK NA CLARK, JEANNIE L BANK OF NEW YORK DANCING WATERS DEVELOPERS LLC

725 WASPNEST RD 4220 CHAFFEE RD 209 DEER RUN CT 314 COLE ST GRAND FIVE DR 2050 WASHINGTON ST 215 EMERALD WAY 240 TRIPLE H FARM RD 116 WATTS LN 54 WILD CHERRY CIR 8055 WHITE AVE 171 E FARRELL DR 448 CARRIAGE GATE DR 9051 FAIRFOREST RD 112 MILL ST 427 HAWES DR 311 MAIN ST 178 DICKSON COVE RD LISTSER, TONEY J 322

$2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500

SUDDUTH, DARRELL A MARTINETS, SHELLY DENISE FORD, CHRISTOPHER DEAN KAMRINE COMPANY LLC

CONGRESS BLVD 120 ROCK HILL CHURCH RD 120 ROCK HILL CHURCH RD 133 AUTUMNVALE DR

YADLOUSKIY, PAUL SMITH, ELAINE O GERALD R GLUR REAL ESTATE PARKER, CHRISTOPHER R MOORE, MARCUS MARK III PROPERTIES INC FRIEZE JR, HARRY LEE BROERMAN, STANLEY WILLIAM GM HOMES INC WORDEN, ROGER A PADGETT, GRAHAM E NGUYEN, HOANH V COOPER, MICHAEL A CMH HOMES INC SCHOSS, NORMAN G EASLER, DANNY ESTATE OF FRANKIE S BRANDT EMORY, KENNETH E PEGORARI, PAOLO ANDERSON, MARCINE BISE COGGINS, CHARLES BETA LLC PRUITT, SCOTT B HATFIELD, JASON P FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE CROWE, ROGER W ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BANK GRAY JR, WESLEY E WATT, NICHOLAS A WILLIAMS, CARL E P COLE, CHANDLER A LANFORD III, PAUL W GENTRY, DEBRA F HOUSING & UBAN DEVELOPMENT HODGE, THOMAS R THE VILLAS AT LAWSONS CREEK GRACE UNLMTD INTERNAT’L INC PITTS, JAMES P BURRUSS, KIMBERLY

BUYER

ATLAS SC 1 SPE LLC FORD, LUCILLE C FORD, LUCILLE C SYNOVUS BANK

ADDRESS

HOTTEST

neighborhoods and everything you want to know about them

Milestone showcases another top provider of the Inspiration Home Professional home builders and “do-ityourself” renovators alike will take notice of the surfaces supplied by Clayton Tile throughout the Inspiration Home’s various bathroom suites. Since 1961, Clayton Tile has provided ceramic tile and stone for Upstate contractors, builders, designers, and architects – even homeowners interested in remodeling their own homes. Family-owned and operated, the company maintains one of the largest in-stock inventories in the Carolinas. Lonnie Clayton, who co-owns the company with Lannie Clayton and Greg Manuel, said the 2012 Inspiration Home offers his company a wonderful opportunity to show designers, builders, and home owners just a few of the possibilities Clayton Tile can offer. “This is such a great project to highlight what builders and suppliers can do in our area and we’re so happy to be a part

48 T h e J o u r n a l | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

of it,” Clayton said. “We’re thrilled with our contribution and hope others will be as excited as we are with the end result.” The selections used in the Inspiration Home are both classic and contemporary – a blend of materials including crisp white subway tile, natural limestone, and porcelain, in addition to modern looks such as glass mosaics, crushed glass, and metal accents. The colors, too, are sophisticated – a palette of white, gray, and suede. Clayton Tile has three showrooms in the Upstate – a 4,800 square foot showroom at its primary location in Greenville, a 3,600 square foot facility in Spartanburg, and a 2,800 square foot showroom in Anderson. Each site contains not only a huge selection of products and designs but also Clayton Tile’s greatest asset – a knowledgeable staff of more than 30 employees. Among them are design consultants and sales representatives devoted to the company’s founding principles of supreme customer service. For more information about Clayton Tile, visit www.claytontileco.com.

The 2012 Inspiration Home is a grand 11,220 square feet residence constructed by Milestone Custom Homes of Greenville in an architectural style reminiscent of the late 1800s– but with the latest in modern conveniences and technology.

Tour the Home: November 29 - December 2 December 6 - December 9 To see this spectacular home within Verdae in Greenville, purchase tickets now. Visit www.ihomesc.com for details. 100% of ticket proceeds go to two deserving charities – the Greenville Humane Society and the S.C. Mountains to Midlands Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Special to the Journal

GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS NOVEMBER SUBD.

PRICE

$39,368,279 NORTH LAURENS STREET CONDOS $1,470,000 $1,400,000 $1,313,622 COBBLESTONE $1,052,500 CLIFFS AT GLASSY EAST $999,999 $950,000 $765,000 TERRACE AT RIVERPLACE $610,000 SUNSET HILLS $560,000 $545,000 STONEBROOK FARM $525,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $507,500 BARRINGTON PARK $495,000 $480,000 TUXEDO PARK $456,485 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $430,695 SPAULDING FARMS $428,000 CHANDLER LAKE $414,765 HAMPTON’S GRANT $389,500 CHANDLER LAKE $370,500 MCRAE PARK $367,870 $356,000 SILVER MEADOWS $350,000 HOLLY TRACE $349,500 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $338,000 HOLLINGTON $335,845 BRUSHY MEADOWS $333,000 CREEKWOOD $328,990 LINKSIDE $325,000 TUSCAN WOODS $320,000 BOTANY WOODS $320,000 GOWER ESTATES $312,500 WOODLANDS $308,654 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $287,830 COTTAGES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $285,000 ASCOT $282,000 HERITAGE POINT $268,500 SKYLAND SPRINGS $260,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $250,738 GOWER ESTATES $250,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $245,000 WARRENTON $239,000 RIVERPLACE $232,000 GOWER ESTATES $230,000 STONE CREEK $224,000 AVALON ESTATES $215,000 AVALON ESTATES $215,000 AUTUMN TRACE $212,500 MORNING MIST FARM $212,000 TREYBERN $205,000 ORCHARD FARMS ARBOR WALK $204,795 BROOKFIELD WEST $204,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $202,500 WOODGREEN $200,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $200,000 WATERMILL $199,008 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $192,850 BEAUMONT $188,783 SHOALLY RIDGE $188,484 ENOREE TRACE $187,000 COPPER CREEK $186,836 SHOALLY RIDGE $182,750 AVALON ESTATES $181,900 THE COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $179,285 STONELEDGES $172,846 TWIN CREEKS $170,000 DREXEL TERRACE $165,000 $160,000 SPRING HAVEN $160,000 COURTYARD AT ORCHARD FARMS $159,500 LINKSIDE GREEN $157,500 CHARTWELL ESTATES $155,245 TWIN CREEKS $153,105 PARKSIDE AT LISMORE $153,082 COACH HILLS $150,000 GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM $150,000 $150,000 BUTLER STATION $149,900 LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE $149,000 LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE $149,000 OAKLAND HEIGHTS $144,500 LOCKELAND PARK $139,000 THE HEIGHTS $136,555 COUNTRY CLUB CROSSING $133,900 $130,897 $129,900

3-9,

2012

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

VERANDAS AT THE POINT LL STRONG ALLYN S BRASHIER T WALTER TRUSTE 1550 WEST BLUERIDGE LLC LEE ANDY HALE RICHARD LONNIE (JTW BC&C OF GREENVILLE LLC FLOREZ PROPERTIES LLC NANTZ MARK S CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES LL MEAKIN DOROTHY M THORNBURG MORTG SECURITI ZITLAW BETHANY L ELIDEMIR OKAN STRONG PROPERTIES LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT NVR INC CORDAS DANIEL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RING PAUL D BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BERLIN SUSAN J WALTER CHRISTOPHER A (JT BENNETT JOHN C BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SELLARS ROBERT E BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WINCHESTER LINDA D VAN DYKE DONALD L TRUSTE LASOFF FAMILY TRUST TRUS BBTKAT INC REED CHRISTINE G BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HALL JOHNNIE A II PENMESTA RAVINDRANATH BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HILL STEVEN E ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC HOWIE THEODORE V KASER NATHAN D RIDDLE MELISSA D PACE BRANTLEY M NICHOLS MICHAEL SCOTT APPLE CHRISTOPHER M LUDLOW JASON D NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM NOLAN BRUCE MEADOR APRIL A BROWN WILLIAM M LILLIE JEFFREY J MISENCIK AMY M COX ELIZABETH S ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC TABONE JENNIFER J EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC SK BUILDERS INC STONEWOOD HOMES INC SK BUILDERS INC MUNGO HOMES INC STONEWOOD HOMES INC PARADA JESUS SALVADOR DU BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SK BUILDERS INC TILLERY SARAH C PHILLIPS GARY C TALMAR ASSOCIATES INC ENGLISH PAMELA K FOREMAN AMY P ZUBER WILLIAM F SK BUILDERS INC NVC INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL GALLAGHER MATTHEW A KLINE RACHAEL BROWNE FRANK MARK WORLEY JOHNETTE L KELLY SAMSON M CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA HARRISON RANDALL M SUNCREST HOMES LLC NVR INC OROZCO ARLOS ALBERTO SANDERS JOHN H GREEN DONALD R

GS VERANDAS AT THE POINT COLE CHARLES D III BLEVINS W BRADFORD EXCHANGERIGHT NET LEASED CINQUEMANI MICHAEL A LIV DOLIN LONNY H LPA RHETT LLC LPA RHETT LLC FINKELL DONALD RICHERSON ELLIS ALLISON B (JTWROS) CZARSTY APRIL D (JTWROS) WATROUS DAVID SCOTT JR ( PINE BRADLEY T (JTWROS) STEFANICH DAVID R (JTWRO COLE CHARLES D III SEGRAVE-DALY RICHARD M J BOYLAN MARIA HILL ERIN BUTLER TRASK KEONE RYAN BROGDEN GABRIEL B ROMAELLA DINAH H KARKI BIMAL K ROATCH FAMILY IRREVOC TR DIBENEDETTO HEATHER COX MEADOR APRIL A (JTWROS) RAY CHARLES R III (JTWRO MCARTHUR BRETT W DOWNIE KATHARINE E BROOKS HEATHER M REITHER KARIE LYNN (JTWR ZYCH JOHN R (JTWROS) GREEN KEVIN M T & C VENTURES PROPERTIE REEL PROPERTIES GROUP CO TILLERY SARAH C CRIBB ASHLEY P (SURV) RAJU V KRISHNAVENI (JTWR AIKEN ERICA E REEVES ETHEL M RAY SUSAN (JTWROS) RILEY CHRISTOPHER T BHIDE DIPTI (JTWROS) SHANNON BRADLEY MARSHALL CHIRMULAY NEERAJ ELLISON BEVERLY W (JTWRO FOWLER KRISTIN P (JTWROS NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM REARDON JEAN M HAUK DALE (JTWROS) FARRELL PATRICK (JTWROS) SCHULER JAMES (JTWROS) HUTCHINSON BRENT J (JTWR ELLIS ROSS F (JTWROS) VEE BETTY L FAMILY TRUST GOLDSMITH JENNIFER L (JT FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG LOWENSTEIN ADAM C BARNETTE FRANCES C PRESSLEY SYLVIE L HERD GLENDA R ALONZO JOEL SUTTLES CLINTON ROBERT ( FRANKLIN CHRISTIE A & KE HORTON SUSAN E YACINICH JUSTIN PATE JOY N (JTWROS) WALLANDER JAY ANDREW (JT KINGSMORE M BRUCE BYRD CYNTHIA (JTWROS) JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATI DAHMS EDWIN M LEVY LYNN B SMITH JASON BRADLEY (JTW ESPINOSA JOSE C MITCHELL MILES ETHRIDGE JESSICA CALDWEL FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SKINNER CASSANDRA LEIGH CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA PARKS BARBARA PIERCE GENESIS M C ANDERSON JANET S CHERY ELISABETH JACKSON DANIELA C (JTWRO MASTERS LARRY CORREA NATALIA

18 BROAD ST THIRD FL 119-BN MAIN ST PO BOX 17859 251 S LAKE AVE STE 520 19 GATWICK LN 77 EAGLE ROCK RD 4530 PARK RD STE 300 4530 PARK RD STE 300 201 RIVERPLACE UNIT 805 7 SEMINOLE DR 1315 PARKINS MILL RD 18 NORMAN PL 504 VILLAGGIO DR 6 CHILTON PL 119-B N MAIN ST 209 TUXEDO LN 626 PAWLEYS DR 909 SPAULDING FARM RD 15 RED TIP CT 226 ALENDER WAY 213 TEA OLIVE PL 23 MCRAE PL 301 W EARLE ST 301 BROWN FARM WAY 134 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 100 BEAUMARIS LN 256 ABBEY GARDENS LN 22 MEADOW MIST TRL 424 RIVER SUMMIT DR 109 RAES CREEK DR 117 APPLEWOOD DR 15 STONYBROOK DR 9065 PRESTON LN 107 EMERALD POINT DR 209 OYSTERCATCHER WAY 5 BOXFORD CT 3 ASCOT RIDGE LN 373 HERITAGE POINT DR 42 JUDE CT 222 ASHLER DR 14 PONDEROSA RD 505 RIVANNA LN 501 MORNING CREEK PL 155 RIVERPLACE UNIT 106 11 BUCKINGHAM RD 207 LEDGEWOOD WAY 5 BRADBERRY CIR 5 BRADBERRY CIR 10 SPRINGLEAF CT 500 TULIP TREE LN 251 HADDINGTON LN 12 REDGLOBE CT 2 COBBLESTONE CT 4625 JAMES RD 5 RED MAPLE CT 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 2857 WESTPORT RD 232 ASHLER DR 108 BEAUMONT CREEK LN PO BOX 1024 112 SAFFRON WAY 205 PILGER PL PO BOX 279156 302 COLLINGSWORTH LN 305 TICKFAW CT 117 STONELEDGES LN 16 MONTREAT LN 402 DELLROSE CIR 6565 AVALON BLVD 3415 VISION DR 6 SENTINEL CT 229 GREENVIEW CIR 633 CHARTWELL DR 66 YOUNG HARRIS DR 3 WHEAT CRESSING CT 4617 COACH HILL DR 950 E PACES FERRY RD NE 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 603 HYDE PARK LN 40 APPLE RIDGE RD 255 BONNIE WOODS DR 1300 RUTHERFORD RD 100 HERNDON CT 100 SHALE CT 102 JESSICA WAY PO BOX 1037 104 HILLCREST AVE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Here’s to gingerbread houses and all the things that make a house a home Buying or selling, renting or relocating, the real estate professionals at Coldwell Banker Caine are here to help.

Call us at 864.250.4601 or visit us online at cbcaine.com.

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | T H E J O U R N A L 49

journal culture

UpstateFoodie.com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

Shop local. It Matters. BehindTheCounterONLINE.com         

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

50 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

INVITATION TO BID Higher Source Aviation invites you to bid on a turn-key 60L x 15W x 15H downdraft heated paint booth to include all required permits and third party inspections. Email proof of insurance, 3 references and must be able to meet 10% up-front payment with draws upon percentage of completion. 50% to be paid upon satisfactory completion of project. If interested, request RFQ from: rserafini@ highersourceservices.com No phone calls please. EOE

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Recording Software for Register of Deeds, RFP# 13-01/08/13, January 8, 2013, 3:00 P.M. There will be a mandatory pre-proposal meeting held at 10:00 A.M., E.S.T., Wednesday, December 12, 2012 at the Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillevillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP # 16-12/19/12 Animal Care Building Gas Pack Replacement in Greenville County, December 19, 2012, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site visit will be held at 9:00 A.M., EST, DECEMBER 5, 2012 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillevillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Walmart Market #4145, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 805 W. Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite B, Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than December 16, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Yan Supply Corporation / DBA Motor Mile Exxon, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 2760 Laurens Road, Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than December 2, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that TSD Social Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 1117, 1119 & 1121 Cedar Lane, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than December 9, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that FCS Investments, LLC DBA / All American Liquor, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 3033-3039 Wade Hampton Blvd. #4, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than December 2, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line

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tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305     

email aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that R & M Social Club, Inc. DBA / Moe’s Place, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 3 Reid School Road, Taylors, SC 29687 . To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than December 2, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE Journal 51

JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

MARK STURGIS / CONTRIBUTING

Carolina’s Dylan Thompson looks to throw downfield.

Steve Spurrier discusses the next Gamecock play against Clemson with the coaches in the booth.

Dylan Thompson celebrates the touchdown that gave Carolina the lead over Clemson.

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Chancel Choir, Pipe Organ, Brass/Percussion Ensemble Sunday, December 9 – 9:00 & 11:00 AM (Traditional)

“The Sweetest Story Ever Told” Children’s Choirs Wednesday, December 12 – 6:00 PM

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Buncombe Street United Methodist Church In Downtown Greenville www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341 52 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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the week in photos

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Mike Cole / contributing

Over 1,200 bikes and approximately 2,800-3,000 toys were collected for children in the Upstate during the Toys for Tots Toy Run, sponsored by the United States Marine Corps. The toys are distributed through the Salvation Army and Redemption World Outreach Church. This year was the 10th annual motorcycle toy run. Harley-Davidson of Greenville started the toy run with Captain Anthony Liller in 2002 and has collected around 20,000 toys over the past ten years.

Santa is coming to Pickwick This Saturday!

3219 Augusta St., Greenville • M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3 • 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net

Time for the Holidays You can’t put it in a box and wrap it with a bow, but the gift of TIME for yourself or a special caregiver in your life, is precious during the Holidays. This time of year can become overwhelming with the added activities and “to-do’s” of the season. For over 30 years Interim HealthCare has been making the holidays a little less stressful for families across the Upstate. Allow us the honor of bringing a bit more joy to you or a loved one by giving the gift of TIME.

Participants in the 2012 Trees Greenville Turkey Day 8K 1/4-mile Toddler Trot take off from the starting line. The Toddler Trot was the first of four events held on the course on Millennium Boulevard. The event, presented by the Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center, was for the benefit of Trees Greenville.

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Crossword puzzle: page 54

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

1-800-439-4590 www.interimcares.com NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE Journal 53

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54 THE Journal | NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Across 1 Not as risky 6 Influential collegian, briefly 10 Mus. direction in a dramatic passage 15 Dalmatian, e.g. 19 Where surfers shop 20 Sphere opening 21 Romney foe 22 __ colada 23 Arranged pickling solutions on the shelf? 26 Breakfast fare 27 Name on sweet pieces 28 Deceptive handle 29 Memorable Shakespearean trio 31 Solstice mo. 32 “Ghostbusters” goo 34 Like blue cheese 37 Cosa __ 38 Virginie, e.g. 40 Funhouse admission fee? 43 Syst. with gestures 44 Furrowed 46 Patriotic chant 47 Island S. of 10-Down 49 Program writer 50 Pre-coll. exams 53 Place setting items 55 __ flakes 58 ACLU concerns 60 Like leaves 63 Drug in Shatner novels 64 Roller coaster, e.g.

65 Tough call 68 Firenze’s land 70 Verb in the classic “Mission: Impossible” opening scene 72 One in a military march? 73 “Your shingle work stinks!” e.g.? 76 Litigator’s org. 77 Outfit for an outfit 79 Official commands 80 Biceps band 82 13th-century date 83 President pro __ 85 Uppity sort 86 Beach shirt 87 “Fawlty Towers” producer, with “the” 88 Old dagger 90 Cognac grade, initially 92 Reuben need 96 Spanish she-bear 98 Not really, with “only” 101 Quiet 103 Goal for a H.S. dropout 105 “Don’t take candy from strangers,” say? 109 Urgent 110 Beefeater product 112 Algerian port 113 Oct. 24, 1947 declaration 115 __ school 116 Abby and Martha’s poison of choice, in a 1939 play

118 Types 120 Asian wraps 122 Democratic donkey designer 123 Empty church basket? 128 Wineglass feature 129 Water from France 130 City west of Caen 131 Reverberations in une grotte 132 Mitty portrayer 133 Data update mechanisms 134 Partings 135 Venezia casino winner Down 1 Sun. speech 2 Disaronno Originale product 3 King or queen 4 Sommer of film 5 Like May through August, in a way 6 Book flap feature 7 My friend abroad 8 Long John Silver feature 9 “__ fan tutte”: Mozart opera 10 Napoleon I’s birthplace 11 Sac fly result 12 Suffix with Jacob 13 Diving duck 14 Sausage skin 15 Short details? 16 Landing with just a

toothbrush? 17 Infuriates 18 Feudal servant 24 Dutch pottery city 25 St. __: Caribbean island 30 Little piggies 31 Invoice column hdg.

Hard

33 Infuriates 35 Pal 36 Goes after 39 Theater sections 41 Conserves 42 Like “Mary Poppins” 45 Maestro Toscanini 48 Magician’s opening

51 Arabic alphabet opener 52 Funny Fields 54 Topper seen on a mogul 56 Hacienda brick 57 A beginner in 59 Man cave topic 61 Onetime Rolex rival 62 Find 65 Opposable digit 66 Prevention measure? 67 Indian chef’s series of adventures? 69 Choir section 71 Put in bold type, say 74 Subtitle of the sequel “Damien” 75 Analogy words 78 Trivial lies 81 Spoke Siamese? 84 __ Park: Edison lab site 89 Nuke-testing dept. 91 Remain undecided 93 “Allow me ...” 94 Deadeye 95 Arctic carrier 97 Rube’s “anti” 99 Opens one’s eyes 100 Crazed 102 Audibly awed 103 Southern Baltic Sea port 104 List of typos and such 106 Worldwide relief org. 107 It’s common in some camps 108 Boot part 111 “Capisce?” 114 Many pin tumbler locks 117 Shelter from a storm, perhaps 119 Airline investigative org. 121 Fried __ 124 Golfer’s concern 125 Chap 126 Stats, e.g. 127 “Cats” poet’s monogram

Crossword answers: page 53

Sudoku answers: page 53

JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN WITH BILL KOON

Footprints in the wine “Handmade” things are important to me. I like the idea that furniture, quilts, ceramics, etc. have been invested with talent, maybe even affection, by an artistic person. “Handmade” beats “machine-made” almost every time. I’m worse than Linus van Pelt about my blanket, an old quilt stitched by my grandmother – by candlelight, I imagine. In the warm weather, I keep it in a cedar chest that my grandfather crafted; he made one for each of his children, and I have the one he did for my father. And I’d fight you over my crooked coffee cup, which was thrown by one of my kids in a kindergarten art class. Still, I’m a little nervous about handcrafted food. What are we to make of “hand-patted hamburgers,” for example? I guess that if you cook them long enough, germs are harmless. Still, I don’t see the benefit of having someone actually shape my burger. I believe I’d just as soon have a machine, a clean one, do the job. Same goes for “hand-tossed pizza.” Maybe it’s fun to imagine some happy, mustachioed Italian in a big hat throwing a wad of dough into the heavens to become a round crust ready for sauce and pepperoni and sausage and bacon. But I always hope that the tosser washed his hands well, with soap. Actually, I’d be happy if the ads skipped the “hand-tossed” bit altogether. I wouldn’t even care if some inventor came up with a gadget that would throw the dough to the skies. Now, to shift appendages for a minute, I like my wine and have accepted the possibility that somewhere along the way someone stepped on it – with clean feet, I trust. But vintners are sensible people in my book, and I think they have pretty much squelched those labels depicting men, women, and children crushing my pinot with their toes. I’m happy when I see those big stainless tanks in warehouses instead of the wooden tubs full of extended families up to their knees in grapes behind some Italian villa. I still have to struggle a bit with the concept of “handcrafted” cheese. I’m not sure what the term means and can’t find an answer online. Maybe the cheese makers don’t want us to know. But the image I get is that of a pudgy farmer, in a barn, with his hands in a tub of curdling milk (at least it is not his feet). “Handcrafted” has bothered me particularly with moldy cheeses like gorgonzola and Stilton. I have always wondered whether the mold came from the cheese or the cheese maker. It bothered me particularly when I learned that Clemson aged my favorite blue cheese in the Stumphouse Mountain tunnel above Walhalla. Nice to think of the stuff crusting up in natural circumstances, but just how sanitary can “handmade” cheese in an old mountain tunnel be? I’m proud to say that I put aside my fears and eat plenty of the stuff – with a little wine. But I started eating a lot more of it when, a few years back, I learned that Clemson had come up with a nice, clean, climate-controlled, hands-off lab that could whip up the cheese and age it just as well as Stumphouse Mountain. Does “handcrafted chocolate” explain how Whitman can get all those different morsels into little paper cups according to the map on the inside of the box top? The guys who do that must have a short working life. Is it possible that a machine can wrap a chocolate “Kiss” or a peppermint? I hope so. Besides, I’d like a fingerprint on my mint no more than I want a footprint in my wine. I never thought I’d come out for the machine age. But I’m all for it in the case of edibles and potables. Stamp my hamburgers with a mold, please. Press the grapes with something hydraulic. Don’t forget the hoop when you make my hoop cheese. Meanwhile, I’ll drag my handmade quilt along over my shoulder and have my coffee out of my crooked little cup. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012 | THE JOURNAL 55

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Nov. 30, 2012 Greenville Journal