Page 1

IN THIS ISSUE

NEW CITY BUDGET // GREENVILLE HOUSING FUND // A KICKSTARTER FOR MAULDIN COFFEE CO.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, April 13, 2018 • Vol.20, No.15

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED RESILIENT • GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT GREEN • ACTIVE • WALKABLE • CONNECTED • HUMAN SCALED • RESILIENT • GREEN

E H T F O S T U O D N A S N I THE

N G I S E D R A D O B W E I V E R FOR K O O L Y E H T AT H W D AN E R A HEY T O H W


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com ADMINISTRATIVE EDITOR | Heidi Coryell Williams hwilliams@communityjournals.com

You profit because we don’t.

STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester SALES MANAGER Emily Yepes MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES John Clark | Donna Johnston | Jonathan Maney Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew DIGITAL SALES ASSISTANT Amber Knox VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks

Greenville

LAYOUT Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith

3375 Pelham Road Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen

Greenville

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner

1501 Wade Hampton Blvd. Greenville, SC 29609 864.235.6309

CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

Greer

107 W. Church St. Greer, SC 29650 864.877.9089

Mauldin

142 Tanner Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 864.676.9066

publishers of

581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com

800.336.6309 greenvillefcu.com

© 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

As your not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers a host of money-saving services that help maximize your finances. Only your credit union can offer truly FREE interest-bearing checking:

For borrowing or saving, your credit union delivers value that most banks can’t match:

• No minimum balance to earn interest

• Lower loan rates

• No monthly service charges

• Lower fees

• No withdrawal fees

• Higher deposit rates

• No per-check fees

• Free direct deposit

• 30,000+ surcharge-free ATM locations

• Free online banking and bill-pay

• Free ATM or Visa Debit* Card

• Free remote deposit

Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

© 2018, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Specific services, rates, and fees may vary. Member NCUA. Checking accounts and Visa debit cards are subject to credit approval.

Look for the Spring issue of atHome available today INSIDE // BOWLING IN SPARTANBURG • KEOWEE BREWS • FINDING A BIZ COACH A magazine for Upstate living

BABY LEOPARD NURSERY THE IMPACT OF TREES //

// MEET THE COOKING DOC // MAC ANNUAL AWARDS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

IN THIS ISSUE

GREENVILLE

March 30, JOURNAL.CO M • Friday,

Spring 2018

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200

MARCH 30, 2018 | VOL. 8 ISSUE 13

READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.CO M

$1.00

2018 • Vol.20, No.13

THE PLAN LLE GRE E NVI

WHAT

HA S

WHAT

SH OU LD

DO N E?

LLE GRE E NVI

DO?

SCORE!

ew Neew N

gs ngs nninining g iinnn egi Beg Be B

SOCCER SOARS IN THE UPSTATE, AND THE ARRIVAL OF NEW PRO AND SEMI-PRO TEAMS IS JUST THE BEGINNING

Michaela Andress of Spartanburg-based youth soccer club Carolina FC Will Crooks / Upstate Business Journal

Aerial shot by Pro Bros

Productions

GREENVILLE Barnes & Noble – 735 Haywood Road – 1125 Woodruff Road Community Journals – 581 Perry Avenue

FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS & ADVERTISING, CALL 679-1200 L LO W U S O N S O C I A L M E D I A : communityjournals.com – atHome in the Upstate – athome.magazine FO

GROWING GREENVILLE

THE MOST RECOGN IZED, NATIONA LLY AWARD-W INNING, LOCALLY FOCUSED , HOME MAGAZIN E IN THE UPSTATE.


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

PAGE 3

101

grants totaling

$4.8

million in 11 years

76 Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

THEY SAID IT

more than

organizations touched since 2006

550 members

“I definitely wasn’t expecting it to get that much exposure. ‘SportsCenter’ got a hold of it. It kind of went a little viral.” Brooks Brackett, lead graphic designer at Redhype, on the response to a promotional piece he created for the Carolina Panthers that coincided with the release of the “Black Panther” film

$2.M

HOUSING NEEDS

The amount of initial funding the City of Greenville has provided for the newly launched Greenville Housing Fund, which will help address the city’s shortage of more than 2,500 affordable housing units.

We invite you to join

Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville. greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

GROWING GREENVILLE

In coming months, city and county officials will announce several new projects that are poised to change the way Greenville looks forever. The Greenville Journal’s occasional series “Growing Greenville” will provide an inside look at the work being done – in public and behind the scenes – to move our community into the future.

2017-2018 Partners


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

Preserve GHS as a strong, local health-care system By William F. Schmidt III, MD, PhD

We are fortunate to live in the Upstate. We live in a thriving, growing community where we look out for each other. One of the many benefits of living here is access to outstanding health care from our nonprofit, first-class health-care systems. At Greenville Health System (GHS), we are here for the community. As the safety-net hospital for the Upstate, we treat everyone regardless of their ability to pay, supported by the amazingly generous donors who live in our region. Many people are unaware that not one penny of their tax money goes to support GHS, unlike most other places in the country where uncompensated care is provided by a tax-supported public hospital.

We are grateful to all of you who have been there for GHS over the years. GHS exists because of YOU. We exist because you have supported the organization since its founding in 1912 with your financial gifts, your talents, your enthusiasm, and your vision.

We are grateful to all of you who have been there for GHS over the years. GHS exists because of YOU. We exist because you have supported the organization since its founding in 1912 with your financial gifts, your talents, your enthusiasm, and your vision. You are always inspiring us to aim higher and constantly improve our care. Because of you, GHS offers everything from groundbreaking, nationally acclaimed cancer treatments unavailable at other hospitals to bone marrow transplants, a renowned Children’s Hospital, and medical and nursing schools to develop our future

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

workforce. GHS provides high-quality specialty care so patients with complex medical problems can stay here with their families and friends instead of being forced to travel for treatments. Being a safety-net hospital means more than not turning away our less fortunate neighbors. Yes, we provide health care for low-income individuals regardless of their insurance status and ability to pay. In 2017, the value to our community of this uncompensated care was $98.7 million in charity care and $96 million more in bad debt. Because we’re a nonprofit organization, we also develop and provide clinical services based upon the needs of the community, not upon their ability to generate shareholder profits required by for-profit hospitals. For example, GHS is not reimbursed for the cost of care provided to thousands of uninsured, indigent, and Medicaid patients each year. These patients receive care across all areas of GHS, from inpatient specialty units to emergency trauma services to ambulatory geriatric services — yet GHS receives no tax dollars to offset those unreimbursed costs. I am asking for your support in keeping GHS as our local health system. As you may know, certain legislators within our state government previously introduced a bill proposing the sale of GHS to the highest bidder, with use of the proceeds to fund a variety of nonmedical public projects. If that were to happen, it is highly likely the purchasing corporation would be an out-of-state, for-profit organization without strong local relationships or commitment to the Upstate and the members of our community. Such organizations limit their uncompensated care to governmentmandated evaluation, stabilization, and transfer; prioritize clinical services based upon return on investment; and pass profits to shareholders rather than reinvesting in the community to meet local needs. It now appears priorities have been reconsidered and passage of a compromise bill is possible. I ask you to join me in encouraging our legislators to pass the current legislation and our governor to sign it into law, preserving GHS as one of our strong Upstate health-care systems. GHS is able to offer incredible health care to our local community because our community believes in us and supports us. We are community members caring for each other. Don’t let YOUR health-care system be sold off to serve the political motivations of others. Please call or email your legislators and tell them you strongly encourage permanent resolution of this issue in a way that allows GHS to successfully evolve in a rapidly changing national health-care landscape.

William F. Schmidt helped found GHS’ nationally recognized Children’s Hospital almost 30 years ago, fundamentally changing health care for children and families in the Upstate. He’s now vice president of development for the GHS Health Sciences Center and is physician leader for GHS’ Office of Philanthropy and Partnership.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Managing Editor Emily Pietras at epietras@communityjournals.com.


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

OPINION

What is the definition of safe, stable shelter? By Susan McLarty

Recent lively debates during County Council meetings have sparked conversations about adequate outdoor shelter for dogs in Greenville County. Hundreds of dogrescue advocates described harsh conditions with lean-to shelters that led to frostbite and even death. The discussion identified a dual-reality for Greenville. In one reality, Greenville is an award-winning tourist destination. In another reality, Greenville is a place where it is legal and acceptable for a dog to suffer. The question of how to define adequate shelter resulted in a unanimous decision by County Council to pass the ordinance that provides reasonable protection from weather exposure. The unresolved question is: Who else is lacking adequate shelter, in addition to our four-legged friends? Pulitzer Prize-winning author Matthew Desmond of “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” visited Greenville in April 2017 and said, “Without stable shelter, everything falls apart.” Desmond was speaking at the United Ministries’ Uniting for Change Luncheon on behalf of the growing majority in our country who live below the poverty line and receive no housing assistance. Since receiving the Key to the City from Mayor Knox White, Desmond has transitioned to co-teach with this year’s

Uniting for Change Luncheon speaker Kathryn Edin. As one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, Edin unveiled in 2011 that in any given month there were 1.5 million families, with about 3 million children, with cash incomes below the extreme threshold of $2 per person per day. Take a moment and consider what you might spend on a cup of coffee per day and contrast this with purchasing necessities like food for less than the cup of coffee. The rise in extreme poverty has increased by 4 percent since 1996 when welfare was reformed. In Greenville County, there has been a 62 percent rise in the poverty rate since 2000 with the number of children experiencing homelessness in Greenville County Schools increasing from 582 in 2011 to 942 in 2017. Edin documents that homelessness is rising across the country, which leaves families with little to no options. The loss of a job was the primary precursor to a spell of $2-a-day poverty coupled with the cost of rental housing increasing 6 percent and wages declining by 12 percent over the past two decades. Yet the stories shared in Edin’s book, “$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America,” co-written with H. Luke Shaefer, exemplify families who are workers: All had worked or were working, but the loss of job caused a downward spiral. In Greenville, the Miracle Hill Rescue

Mission has 130 emergency shelter beds for men who are rebuilding their lives. On average, there are 40 men working full time in service jobs downtown, while living in emergency shelter, who are not able to access safe affordable homes. According to a report released in March by the National Low-Income Housing Coalition, the U.S. has a shortage of more than 7.2 million rental homes affordable and available to extremely low-income renter households. Only 35 affordable and available rental homes exist for every 100 extremely low-income renter households. The challenge of addressing the loss of the social safety net since welfare reform, housing instability, and lowwage labor is at the heart of why Edin calls for a new conversation, as well as to finish the job started in 1996 to transform the social safety net. The expertise Edin will share on April 19 will provide our community the ability to dig deeper in our understanding of not only our deficit of homes affordable to incomes but also our dependence on low-wage labor in the midst of our high-powered economy. Susan McLarty will begin her tenure as Greenville’s first homeless coordinator on May 1.

The YMCA of Greenville is made up of people of all ages and from every walk of life working side by side to strengthen communities. Together we work to ensure everyone – regardless of gender, income, faith, sexual orientation or cultural background – has the opportunity to live life to its fullest. We share the values of caring, honesty, respect and responsibility – everything we do stems from it.

Get involved for a better us.

ymcagreenville.org


Serving the Greater Greenville Area with Local Expertise, Global Reach

NEW

ING LIST

187 Fisher Knob Road Lake Jocassee • $2,100,676 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

ON

RES C A SIX

100 Chapman Place On Chanticleer Golf Course • $7,500,605

NEW D N BRA

4 Cromwell Avenue Alta Vista • $649,605

E LIN E R O . SH T F 108

Lot 81 Peninsula Pointe South Lake Keowee • $244,696 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

NG ISTIAY 2-4 L NEWSUND N OPE

NG ISTIAY 2-4 L NEWSUND N OPE

304 Stewart Street Augusta Road Area • $460,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

K DOC R E WAT P E DE

Y EAD R N VE I MO

114 Keowee Club Road Lake Hartwell • $2,950,689

502 Crescent Avenue Alta Vista • $1,049,601

E ELIN R O H T. S F 9 30

EN ITCH K NER G I S DE

403 Watts Avenue Alta Vista • $599,601 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

RACT T N O YC GENC N I T CON

220 Deep Cove Point Reserve at Lake Keowee • $549,685 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

ER UND

239 Winding Oaks Drive Waterford Pointe • $1,374,672 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

864.297.3450

5 Cammer Avenue Augusta Road • $425,605 Alex Boyd 706.825.8975

T RAC T N CO

200 Waccamaw Avenue Augusta Circle Area • $679,605

www.jha-SothebysRealty.com

NG ISTI L NEW

NEW N OPE

11 Sir Abbott Trail Sherwood Forest • $200,607 Jackson Herlong 864.313.2520

22..4

LLOOTT E E R R AC

ATE THE

5 Brick House Court Kilgore Plantation • $930,681 Patrick Furman 864.283.4560

SUB

T E LO L B IDA -DIV

37 Rock Creek Drive GCC • $549,605 Katherine Hall 864.678.0820

T RAC T N O RC E D UN

306 Wembley Road Gower • $519,607

O ICE F F O


Serving the Greater Greenville Area with Local Expertise, Global Reach N CTIO U D E ER PRIC 0 0 0 $35,

NG ISTIAY 2-4 L NEWSUND N OPE

1688 Bethel Road Simpsonville • $174,681 Patrick Furman 864.283.4560

710 Brown Avenue Historic Belton • $489,627

105 Putney Bridge Lane Cobblestone • $799,681 Patrick Furman 864.283.4560

217 Aberdeen Drive Augusta Circle • $449,605 Grace Loveless 864.238.5114

403 McDaniel Avenue Alta Vista • $699,601

500 Watts Avenue Alta Vista • $474,601 Alexis Furman 864.630.3952

DAYS! 2 N I ACT CONTR R E D UN

32 Fernwood Lane Cleveland Forest • $299,607 Liz Henry 571.228.8649

205 Woodvine Way Mauldin • $249,662 Jackson Herlong 864.313.2520

864.297.3450

ED PAIR E R &

6 Meyers Drive Augusta Circle • $679,605 Ragan Smith 843.437.6262

! LAN P R O FLO S U CIO SPA

5 Griffin Street Downtown • $414,601 Reid Hipp 864.449.1779

Y! 1ST DA T C A CONTR UNDER

28 Douglas Drive GCC/Augusta Road • $359,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

D ECTE P S N I

! MER IELD! M U S F THIS FLUOR Y D REA K TO L WA

N TOW N W O OD T K WAL

1421 Augusta Street Augusta Road • $539,605 Zoned OD/Residential, Augusta Rd Frontage

DER UN

15 Isbell Lane Parkins Mill • $589,607 Jackson Herlong 864.313.2520

108 Augusta Court Augusta Circle • $729,605 Ragan Smith 843.437.6262

E OM H OR ICE F F O

-4 AY 2 D N N SU OPE

PARK D N A EL CLEV O T WALK

N PLA R O FLO N E OP

! OOM R R ATE E H T

CT TRA N O C

2-4 DAY N U NS OPE

205 Robin Lane Swansgate • $359,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

NEW SUBDIVISION IN NORTH MAIN! Henigan Lane Lots • Located off W. Mountainview Avenue • Lot 1 Henigan Lane – $246,609 • Lot 2 Henigan Lane – $285,609 • Lot 3 Henigan Lane – $155,609 • Lot 4 Henigan Lane – $145,609 • Lots 3 & 4 Combined – $299,609 • Lot 5 Henigan Lane – $232,609

www.jha-SothebysRealty.com

EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

BY THE NUMBERS Proposed city budget adds downtown police officers WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Sonny

How many lives will you save May 12th?

We’re only one month away from the funnest day of the year, when I get to walk the trails with all my friends and save lives doing it. In case you haven’t heard, the 4th Annual Tails & Trails 5K Run/Walk is happening on May 12th at Conestee Park. There’s a chance for you to fundraise just by sending a link to your friends and family where they can donate towards your goal. Animal Care’s mission is to build a NO KILL community in Greenville County, and dollars add up to lives saved. Will you join our cause and register to be a life saver? You can even get a discount by signing up before April 30. Just go to GreenvillePets.org to learn all about our biggest fundraiser of the year and how you can help homeless pets like me.

GreenvillePets.org

More police officers would patrol Greenville’s downtown under the city’s proposed 2018-19 operating budget. Police Chief Ken Miller had proposed in January the city create a special downtown “entertainment district unit,” which would patrol from Markley Street near Fluor Field in the West End to Beattie Street near the Hyatt from 3 p.m.-3 a.m. to coincide with downtown’s peak hours. The proposed budget, unveiled by City Manager John Castile and members of the city’s Office of Budget and Management at the City Council’s committee of the whole meeting Tuesday, April 3, adds eight officers and two sergeants, half of Miller’s request. The new police officers were one of the few new initiatives included in the proposed budget. There were $7.3 million in new requests; less than $1 million could be funded, Castile said. “Many are worthy projects,” he said. “We’ll keep them on the list.” Among the new items that got in were extra money for employee tuition reimbursement, replacement protective equipment for the fire department, more police body cameras, internally illuminated street signs, rubber speed humps, two new positions in the parking department, downtown restroom repairs, a new point-of-sale system for the zoo, an automated side-loader garbage truck, and money to pay for the city’s new comprehensive and downtown plans. Left out were new public safety administrative space, additional funding for affordable housing initiatives, a new Stone Avenue Fire Station, implementation of the Cleveland Park master plan, renovation of the West End Plaza, streetscaping for Augusta and Laurens roads, new parking in the West End and the Village of West Greenville, and expansion of the Spring Street parking garage. The budget includes a 3 percent increase in employee compensation, a 1 percent increase in employer contribution to the state pension fund, and a 7.5 percent increase in health insurance. Greenville residents wouldn’t pay higher property taxes under the proposed budget, but they would pay more for wastewater and stormwater collection. Parking and zoo admission and memberships rates would stay the same. Miller has said the new entertainment district unit is needed to keep up with downtown’s growing popularity with residents, visitors, and protestors. The city’s downtown residential population is increasing — it is estimated that about 7,000 people now live there. There are

GREENVILLE BUDGET BASICS What’s the bottom line?

$200.5 million WHAT’S IN?

• Money for the city’s new downtown plan • New downtown holiday decorations • Additional money for employee tuition reimbursement • Automated side loader garbage truck • Fire department administrative assistant • Two new parking department employees • Internally illuminated street signs • Rubber speed humps • Downtown restroom repairs • Zoo point-of-sale system

WHAT’S NOT? • Additional funding for affordable housing • Stone Avenue Fire Station replacement • Cleveland Park master plan implementation • West End Market renovation • Cultural Corridor Urban Trail • Rhett Street streetscape and road alignment • West End parking • Village of West Greenville parking • Public safety radio replacement

WHAT’S IT GOING TO COST? Property taxes stay the same 5 percent wastewater fee increase 2.2 percent stormwater fee increase Parking rates stay the same Zoo admission and memberships stay the same

1,484 residential units under construction and another 142 in the planning stages. About 28,800 people work downtown during the day. One hundred and twenty-five restaurants and 25 bars operate in the central business district from Beattie Place to Markley Street. Ten hotels are operating now, and four are under construction. Two more are planned. In addition, the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail attracts more than a half million visitors per year; the Cancer Survivors Park is nearing completion; and plans for City Park, the city’s new signature park on the western edge of downtown, are being developed. There were 445 special events held in Greenville last year, and 99 percent of them occurred in the central business district. In addition, downtown has become a popular place for political protests and demonstrations. Currently, six officers assigned to a larger zone cover downtown. A public hearing and first reading of the budget is scheduled for April 23. Second reading of the budget and the city’s capital improvement plan is set for May 14.


2018 Featuring

THE SPINNERS “Rubberband Man” “I’ll Be Around” “It’s A Shame” “I’ll Always Love You”

“Working My Way Back To You” “Games People Play” “I’m Coming Home”

Also

And

Jim Quick & Coastline

MAGIC An Upstate Premier Variety Band

May 4, 2018 5:30 pm -10 pm at Blue Ridge Electric Co-op, 734 W. Main St., Pickens, SC ADULTS $25 • CHILDREN $15 Discounted tickets purchased in advance: Adults $20 • Children $12 Come in a classic car (1989 or older) and $30 admits a carload of up to four! Line-up begins at 2 pm. Gates open at 3 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars. Proceeds benefit Upstate charitable organizations. For more information, call 800-240-3400 or visit online at blueridgefest.com.

“Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate”


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Newly launched Greenville Housing Fund seeks affordable housing project proposals until April 13 CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

The newly launched Greenville Housing Fund will accept letters of intent until April 13 from developers of affordable and workforce housing for its first round of loans. The Greenville City Council established the independent nonprofit fund to help address the city’s shortage of more than 2,500 affordable housing units. The fund, which was launched as part of the community development financial institution CommunityWorks, will provide equity funding for the development and preservation of affordable housing for households with annual incomes between $15,000 and $55,000. The city provided $2 million as initial funding. Eligible borrowers include nonprofit and for-profit organizations, government enti-

ties, builders, developers, or a combined partnership of, committed to the production and preservation of affordable and workforce housing. Borrowers must have experience developing and managing qualified units. After the letter of intent submission period closes, Greenville Housing Fund will evaluate the applications based on readiness and overall project impact. The projects deemed most ready will be invited to complete a full application for funding. Initially, the fund will target projects in the city limits. Examples of projects that could qualify are the first phase of the Greenville Housing Authority’s redevelopment of the former Scott Towers site, which includes renovating 80 units at the Garden Apartments and constructing a 114-unit building for seniors, and a planned renovation of the 88-unit Stratham Place Apartments, said

GET YOUR SKIN IN THE GAME When was your last skin check? Dr. John Korman,

South Carolina native, founder and Harvard-trained dermatologist, is now accepting new patients.

420 The Parkway, Suite M, Greer upstatedermatology.com | 864-877-0776

Ginny Stroud, the city’s community development coordinator. Greenville Housing Fund expects to award the money by the end of May, she said. Maximum loan is $500,000. “We felt an urgency to get the money working to increase the affordable housing supply,” Stroud said. After the initial loans are awarded, the fund board will look at hiring an executive director, work on affordable housing education and advocacy programs, begin developing new partnerships, and work with partners to develop projects.

Fundraising will be a top priority, Stroud said. Future funding could go toward affordable housing projects outside of the Greenville city limits. The proposed city budget for 2018-2019 does not include any money for the Greenville Housing Fund. The Hollingsworth and Graham foundations have pledged money to cover operating expenses. Westminster Presbyterian Church has also pledged $100,000.

Greenville’s first homeless coordinator outlines short-term goals CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

It will take more than one person to end homelessness in Greenville, but there’s now one person coordinating the effort. Susan McLarty, who has served as Westminster Presbyterian Church’s mission outreach coordinator since 2003, has been hired by the Greenville Homeless Alliance as Greenville’s first homeless coordinator. She will start May 1. As homeless coordinator, McLarty will help organize the efforts of dozens of groups in Greenville that are addressing the problem. McLarty, who served on the steering committee for Greenville’s affordable housing study that showed the city has a shortage of 2,500 affordable housing units and that it would cost $250 million to build its way out of it, said there used to be a surplus of homes that lowwage earners could afford. With Greenville’s growth, those have been lost, she said. “We need to build up the housing ladder,” she said. “That’s what we’ve really lost.” The condemnation of the Economy Inn on Augusta Road in January illustrates the problem. One hundred and fifty people were displaced. It was at least the third time since 2014 that hotel condemnations displaced residents in Greenville.

McLarty said her most immediate goal is to finalize an emergency housing crisis response plan in case another large residential property or motel is condemned and those who live there are displaced. McLarty said there are other motels in Greenville that could be condemned in the future. McLarty said another priority will be to get more permanent supportive housing, an intervention that combines non-time-limited affordable housing assistance with support services. McLarty said permanent supportive housing is the most effective way to address chronic homelessness, which is defined as being on the streets for a year or more. Greenville has one such housing complex, Reedy Place, and residents had a 90 percent decrease in emergency room visits, an 87 percent decrease in inpatient behavior health rehab stays, an 89 percent decrease in EMS transports, and a 92 percent decrease in days and charges at detention centers. McLarty said they are pursuing a piece of land that would be a good site for a 20-unit permanent supportive housing complex. Twenty units would not solve the problem. In the latest homeless survey, 131 people were identified as chronically homeless in Greenville County, she said. But the facility could be used as a model and replicated throughout Greenville County, she said.


Retirement perfected. 10 Fountainview Terrace • Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community


MAC invites you to

GET CARDED

for buy-one-get-one-free tickets to the best shows in town.

South Carolina Children’s Theatre

With a donation of $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard entitling you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets for one show at each of the following venues. Valid for one full year!

*select shows only

Get your ArtCard today:

16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com/donate @MACartscouncil | #GVLarts


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Greenville’s Tip Price Wins Drive, Chip & Putt Championship at Augusta National Local Greenville junior golf player Tip Price won first place in his division at the fifth annual Drive, Chip, & Putt National Finals in Augusta, Ga., last weekend. Eighty players from across the four age divisions who won qualifying matches earned a trip to Augusta National Golf Club to participate in the event on the eve of the 2018 Masters Tournament. Price, who participated in the Boys 10-11 division, placed first in the drive portion of the match, winning with a 239-yard drive, more than 5 yards ahead of his closest competitor. Price came in second in chipping and won first place in putting, ahead of a two-way tie between Sam Udovich of Inver Grove Heights, Minn., and Patmon Malcom of Alpharetta, Ga. Price hit both putts within 3’3” of the hole to earn enough points to clinch the Boys 10-11 division title.

Price said he thought everyone had an equal chance of winning, but he was glad he came out on top. “It feels great, honestly,” Price said. “It’s not easy to even get here, and to win it is a bonus.” Price’s parents were just as glad that he won. Tip’s father, Brian, said they are proud that their son’s hard work has paid off. “Tip works real hard, but more importantly, he loves it,” Brian Price said. Brian introduced the game of golf to Tip when he was 4 years old. Tip trains about five times a week and has been to many tournaments, such as the Grant Bennett Florence Junior Invitational and the PGA Iowa Pee-Wee Tour. -Robert Hull

2018

SUMMER C A MP AT FURM AN SCOPES! summer enrichment camps are founded upon the belief that children will thrive in an environment in which they are challenged to think and question and can be playful and imaginative. Visit us on the web at furman.edu/scopes to see some of the activities.

DATES June 18–22, 25–29 | July 9–13, 16–20 COST $289 per week

Microscope

(grades 1–2 in fall 2018) With a science and nature focus, children will participate in classroom activities, reading, art, music, outdoor sports and swimming.

Kaleidoscope

(grades 3–5 in fall 2018) Children will take nature walks, play outdoor games and swim. In the same day, they may build a tower or identify and classify rocks.

Telescope

(grades 6–8 in fall 2018) Focused on teamwork and creativity, the sessions feature elements of drama and design. In addition to instruction, the days include art, outdoor games and swimming.

For camp details and to register, visit furman.edu/scopes

New lounge. New bistro. Same comfortable feeling. There’s a big, beautiful expansion about to take shape. With more independent living options, more dining, more lounges, more activity rooms, and more ways to enjoy life than ever before.

I n d e p e n d e n t L i v i n g | A s s i s t e d L i v i n g | M e m o r y C a re | R e h a b i l i t a t i o n | S k i l l e d N u r s i n g

Groundbreaking Fall 2018. To learn more, call 864.991.3100. One Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville, SC 29615 | RollingGreenVillage.com Part of Greenville. Part of your family.

Rolling Green Village is a not-for-profit community.

.


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GROWING GREENVILLE

“Some people are only into looks and don’t notice so much how things actually function in the city.”

GREENVILLE’S GATEKEEPERS How the Design Review Board Urban Panel has shaped downtown Words by Ariel Turner

T

he aesthetic of Greenville’s celebrated downtown is no accident. The massing of buildings, block patterns, pedestrian-only streets, green areas, the materials and colors used on new construction and renovations — each element since the 2000 Design Guidelines for the C-4 Central Business District were created has been approved by the City of Greenville Design Review Board Urban Panel before it existed outside of a rendering or architectural drawing. The exterior designs of residential and commercial projects in the C-4 district (CBD) and the West End Preservation Overlay District, from drive-thru ATM awnings to 800-unit apartment buildings, must be approved by the five-member, volunteer panel before the projects get underway. And for the DRB panelists, the responsibility of approving, recommending changes, or denying the applications is not taken lightly. In essence, they are the gatekeepers for what Greenville will look like in the future.

“My first priority is to assure that the project abides by the design guidelines, first and foremost,” says DRB Urban Panel chairwoman Carmella Cioffi, a licensed architect with 25 years of experience. “Secondly, as a design professional and a resident of the city, to evaluate what I see and give my opinion, based on my professional training and experience, as to how a design can respect Greenville’s rich architectural history, while, at the same time, looking forward to the future of Greenville. We are very lucky to have a wide range of expertise on the board, architects, artists, developers, and preservationists. With this mix of experience, I feel that we have a great chance of doing our part to help the city continue to move forward while respecting and preserving our past.” The visual appearance of the Link Apartments at the corner of River and Rhett streets as they were proposed in August 2014 motivated West End resident Danielle Fontaine to speak at the monthly public hearing of the DRB. As a result of her input and many others’, changes to the project were made specifically on the Rhett Street side, opening the street-level units up to the sidewalk and adjusting some of the step-backs

in the balconies to create more visual interest than a solid wall. And Fontaine continued to attend meetings, giving her opinion on the applications presented from the standpoint of a visual artist and one who’d previously lived in various cities around the world and studied architecture in Montreal. She eventually was invited to join the panel. “I knew what I was getting into,” she says. Fontaine says she remembers early on in her tenure of almost three years on the panel that many of the multifamily projects that have now been built around Academy Street were presented for initial approval but looked more suburban, like something that might be built on Pelham Road. “They didn’t have the city feel, and that was one of the things early on that we had to remind people of,” she says. “This is the city. We’re trying to get an urban feel to Greenville, and our architecture needs to reflect that.” Of course, there are exceptions to every rule, she says. The Grand Bohemian Hotel project, for instance, was first presented to the panel with a design inspired entirely by national park architecture. And while the hotel,


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM rounding buildings, the walkable areas nearby, and the practicality of the proposed materials, for instance. Often the panel will request to see physical samples of the construction materials WALKABLE The “spaces” between buildings before approving their usage. should be designed and built to provide a “As someone once said, the devil is walking experience as desirable as the intended in the details,” Cioffi says. “One of the destination, as well as to accommodate people things that makes Greenville’s archifrom a range of ages and physical abilities. tectural fabric so special is the detail. The depth of window jambs create a CONNECTED The convenience of pedestrians shadow line, the brickwork details creshould take precedence over the needs of the ate visual interest, the proper proportion and transition from one material infrastructure and building systems they use to another enhances overall and inhabit. composition. These things HUMAN SCALED Buildings should incorporate are what create a rich tapestry, and to not encourage architectural features along sidewalks and other this type of design would be a primary public rights-of-way that add visual detriment to what the City of interest and provide visual cues for pedestrians Greenville has worked so hard and cyclists relating to access and use. to restore and protect.” Fontaine further explains RESILIENT Building and site designs should the attention to detail. consider a project’s full life-cycle to ensure “At the Design Review that the private realm is both adaptable to Board we are not supposed to changes in market needs and aligned with the be really concerned with particular architecture styles, but functionality of the public realm. how well does it work for a city,” FonGREEN Public realm designs should prioritize taine says. “There are many possible looks to urban. We try not to dictate pedestrian comfort through an acknowledgment styles but dictate aspects. How will it of local climate and environmental factors. work with the pedestrians in the city is ACTIVE Improving the well-being and quality always what feels the most important to me, and how does it relate to the of life of people requires that public realm and surrounding buildings also.” building designs encourage pedestrians to be Most of the local architects submitactive participants in the day-to-day experience ting designs to the city are well versed of the City. in the guidelines, but occasionally they’ll push the envelope, Fontaine (source: Greenville Downtown Design Guidelines) says, which leads to lively discussion during meetings. One of the several local architecture firms who has helped shape downtown Greenville through its projects, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture planned to break ground this spring, sits on Falls Park (MPS), has invested in the city’s overall efforts to create on the Reedy, it is also situated in the middle of the city. a sense of place through thoughtfully designed mixedThe compromise, which has been a process over the use developments that contribute to the overall appeal past two years, was to allow the architect to keep the roof the CBD. mantic, rustic feel that would contrast with many of the A key example is McBee Station, for which MPS conother nearby modern hotel projects while streamlining sidered the historic character of the downtown architecthe shapes and changing the materials to give it a more ture and used a warehouse and historic mill approach to modern appeal. break up the overall mass of the building and maintain a “You know that there’s a demand for that kind of pedestrian scale along the McBee Avenue facade. more romantic architecture, but you know that it has to “As architects, our legacy outlives us, so we must be fit in town also,” Fontaine says. good stewards of the influence we have on our city,” says Which brings up one of the more complicated aspects Joe Pazdan, principal in charge of MPS. “The guidelines of sitting on the DRB and trying to assess whether projcontinue to evolve, but they give us all broad boundaries ects meet the written guidelines: to work within as we design enduring projects that will “You can have all the guidelines in the world,” Fonimpact generations of Greenville residents.” taine says, “but every site is different, and you have to MPS leadership is also regularly involved in advising take into consideration unique aspects of the site also.” on the design guidelines and other city organizations. Determining the appropriateness of a design for each “When we started our firm decades ago, we made a unique location requires the panelists to compare the point of locating our office downtown in order to have a project with the guidelines, and then look at the sur-

DESIGN PRINCIPLES

04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15 role in the growth and health of our city,” Pazdan says. “Since then, we’ve consistently invested in our people, spending time serving on planning and zoning boards, the DRB, and the GLDC [Greenville Local Development Corp.].” More often than not, however, it’s architects from out of town, like for Link and the Grand Bohemian, who don’t always adhere to the guidelines for various reasons. Sometimes those projects are so far removed from Greenville’s design culture that they will result in a unanimous denial from the panel, but other times, the architects are bringing in designs that would complement surrounding buildings and introduce new ideas to the city.

“We are not supposed to be really concerned with particular architecture styles, but how well does it work for a city.”

–Danielle Fontaine

“We need to be trying different things,” Fontaine says. “We need to modernize ourselves in various ways, so getting ideas from outside our own local architects is good, too.” The guidelines for the CBD also include areas of special conditions, such as the West End Historic District and Court Square District, because they have unique historical or cultural significance. Guidelines for those areas are different. A recent example that sparked public discussion was the proposed Diner 24 sign for the former Charlie’s Steakhouse location on Coffee Street. The proposed sign featured exposed light bulbs similar to the Warehouse Theatre sign that had been installed in the West End within the previous year. The DRB denied Diner 24’s application for the “Route 66-style” sign, citing the different guidelines for Main Street verses the West End. When the panel makes a decision that people don’t like, its members hear about it. And they welcome feedback, especially during the public hearings when residents have a platform to impact the decision. Fontaine says that sometimes people will comment and have a clear understanding of the whole process and all of the determining factors, but not always. “Some people are only into looks and don’t notice so much how things actually function in the city,” she says. “And we learn from what people tell us, because every once in a while they look at it from a perspective that we hadn’t considered.” The City of Greenville Design Review Board Urban Panel meets for its public hearing at 4 p.m. every first Thursday of the month on the 10th floor of City Hall. In addition to Cioffi and Fontaine, current members are Robert Benedict, Mitchell “Mitch” Lehde, and Bogue Wallin.


Walk

5K

Run

SATURDAY, MAY 12 at Conestee Park

REGISTER AT GREENVILLEPETS.ORG $25 entry $30 after April 30 $20 per person for teams of 6+ All proceeds go directly toward building a NO KILL community in Greenville County.

For more information contact Paula Church at pchurch@greenvillecounty.org.

Thank you to our 2018 Sponsors:

GREENVILLE COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY

‘A GREAT TRADITION’ Federal judge who presided over Dylann Roof trial: South Carolina has history of tolerance CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

During his eight years as a federal judge, Richard Gergel has overturned the South Carolina Constitution’s ban on same-sex marriage, overturned a death sentence because the prosecutor compared a black defendant to King Kong, and presided over the trial of Dylann Roof, the white supremacist who killed nine AfricanAmericans during a church Bible study. It would appear to some that South Carolina is not a tolerant place. But that’s far from the truth, said Gergel, a U.S. District Court judge in Charleston. “I’ll simply say tolerance and respect for the diverse views of others is part of our state’s history,” said Gergel, who wouldn’t talk about specific cases over which he has presided.

“We haven’t always been perfect. But it’s been a major thread in our history.” Gergel, a historian who has studied civil rights and religious tolerance in South Carolina, will be the keynote speaker Sunday, April 15, at ShalomFest ‘18. He is presenting “From Francis Salvador to Max Heller: Jewish Public Service in South Carolina” at 1:30 p.m. Gergel said South Carolina’s religious tolerance dates back to when noblemen were trying to induce settlers to the Province of Carolina, which included most of the land between what is now Virginia and Florida. The Fundamental Constitution of Carolina, written by the British philosopher John Locke, provided that any seven or more people agreeing in any religion could form their own church.

“There’s a history of Jewish public servants in the state. It’s a tradition that goes on from the inception of the state to the present.” Richard Gergel

Richard Gergel will be the keynote speaker at ShalomFest ’18.

“It was the first constitution in history to outline religious freedom,” Gergel said. By 1700, more than half of the white settlers in Carolina were religious dissenters. A century later, South Carolina had the largest Jewish population of any of the United States. “You don’t think of our state as a particularly tolerant place, but it was a model of tolerance,” Gergel said. “It’s a great tradition of which we all need to remind ourselves.” The first Jew to be elected to public office was Francis Salvador, a young English plantation owner in the Ninety Six district near Greenwood. There have been plenty of Jewish officeholders since. Jews were elected mayor in Columbia, Camden, Georgetown, and, of course, in Greenville, where Max Heller was credited with downtown’s renaissance. They have served in the state House and Senate. Gergel was the first Jewish federal judge in South Carolina. “There’s a history of Jewish public servants in the state. It’s a tradition that goes on from the inception of the state to the present,” Gergel said. “Jews are called to service. They are deeply grateful communities have allowed them to thrive and prosper.” Years ago, Gergel appeared on historian Walter Edgar’s program on public radio. He was talking about Jews that settled in

South Carolina’s small towns from 1880 through 1930 and opened stores. All the phones lit up, prompting Edgar to think that they were having technical problems, Gergel said. When he answered the first call, the person on the line told him they had grown up in Saluda and knew the Greenbergs, the judge said. Call after call, listeners were saying the same thing, the difference being the name of the towns and the names of the Jewish families that operated the stores there. “Jews were so accepted in small towns,” Gergel said. That doesn’t mean anti-Semitism or discrimination doesn’t exist, and Gergel said some religions are tolerated more than others. “But the larger story is how our state is widely accepting of diverse populations,” he said. This year is the 10th ShalomFest, which was started as a way to introduce the Upstate to Jewish traditions, culture, and food. Sisters-in-law Angi and Liz Einstein are co-chairing this year’s festival. They are both Christians who married Jews more than 25 years ago but did not convert. “In all this time, we are still learning this beautiful faith,” Angi Einstein said. “Since it is our families’ faith and the faith that Jesus was raised in, it’s important for us to understand as much as we can.” The festival, which runs from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Temple of Israel in Greenville, will feature Zev Rogalin, a Lithuanian who survived three concentration camps, including Dachau. He will present “When They Came for the Neighbors: Bearing Witness” at noon April 15. The presentation will detail Rogalin’s experience during the Holocaust and his life in Israel in the 1940s and 1950s. In addition, there will be performances by an interfaith choir, a 42-minute film from the National Holocaust Museum, a rabbi lecture on bar and bat mitzvahs, recreations of a Jewish wedding and Passover Seder, food, and children’s activities.

SHALOMFEST ‘18 WHEN Sunday, April 15, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. WHERE Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road TICKETS Free admission INFO www.templeofisrael.org/shalomfest


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

ANIMAL WELFARE

Greenville County Animal Care announces progress since January

stone of a 90 percent no-kill save rate. Seven hundred and fifty large dogs have entered the shelter since Jan. 1, and 500 of those have been adopted, while 250 are still in need of a home. Five hundred and fifty small dogs and puppies have also entered the shelter, as well as 100 cats and 48 kittens. In total, 980 animals have been adopted into loving homes. Lost pets have made up 68 percent of GCAC’s intake since Jan. 1 for pets in Greenville and Spartanburg County, making it a great place to check first when a pet goes missing. Two hundred and fifteen lost pets were returned to their owners. There have been 915 free spays and neuters provided to high-risk pet populations through the donations of the community. One hundred and fifty heartworm-positive dogs entered the shelter that required treatment totaling about $100,000. MUSEUM

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate receives grant for financial literacy programs

Greenville County Animal Care is currently at an 87 percent save rate, which is incredibly close to the next mile-

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate (TCMU) has been granted $10,000 from the Piedmont Chapter of the South Carolina Association of Certified Public Accountants (SCACPA), which represents more than 4,000 CPAs and accounting professionals throughout the state. The funds will go toward the museum’s Finances for the Family program, which is a family-based financial literary series built to

educate parents and children. SCACPA has shown its support for TCMU since 2013, where it helped maintain the Money Works bank exhibit. This partnership helps families to learn to make better choices about their finances while also educating future generations. PHILANTHROPY

Peace of Triune Art Auction to be held April 19 The Upstate Women’s Club of Simpsonville will host the Peace of Triune Art Auction for the 6th time. The event will benefit the Triune Mercy Center and its program that help Greenville’s homeless. The event will be held on Thursday, April 19, at Studio 220 at the Hyatt Regency Greenville on North Main Street. Admission for the event will be free. The event is presented by Southern First Bank and will begin at 6:30 p.m. with a silent auction featuring contributed art and other items. A live auction will follow with a performance by Joe Everson. The auction will feature works by professional artists throughout the Upstate that have been donated, as well as artists in the Triune Art Room. Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.

Our Schools BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

University to launch new and updated academic programs Bob Jones University has announced that its Division of Music will launch four new degrees including a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in music and church ministries, Bachelor of Music Education, and a Bachelor of Music in Composition. The new degrees will be available in fall 2018. The ex-

isting musical programs are expecting updates as well to include additional credits in applied music study, new experiential learning internships in the community, and a seminar focused on developing entrepreneurial skills and mindset for the 21stcentury musician. Dr. Michael Moore, who is the current head of the Department of Music Education, will become chair of the Division of Music this summer. Moore and

the rest of Bob Jones University are anticipating the degree will be appealing to students who are strong in music, but also interested in business, communications, arts administration, health sciences, or ministry careers.

Greenville County Schools

Celebrates CLASS ACTS Each year, hundreds of Greenville County Schools students, teams, and staff use their skills and talents to achieve state and national recognition. Class Acts shares many of these exciting accomplishments with the greater community.

Check out the CLASS ACTS on GreenvilleJournal.com/greenville-county-schools

Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.


WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Billy Lewis Ramsey

DEATH NOTICES FOR APRIL 13 Lisa Davis, 51, passed away on April 9, 2018. Mackey Mortuary is assisting the family.

Howze Mortuary is assisting the family.

Mr. James Lee Buckley, 64, passed away Sunday, April 8, Robinson Funeral Home-Downtown is assisting the family.

Doris Ogle Jones, 85, widow of Carl S. Jones, passed away Thursday, April 5, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE, is assisting the family.

Alphonse George Kelada, 84, passed away on Saturday, April 7, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE, is assisting the family.

Edward C. Kelly, 70, of Travelers Rest, passed away on Thursday, April 5, 2018. Howze Mortuary is assisting the family.

Clay Cook, 72, of Taylors, passed away on Saturday, April 7, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown, is assisting the family.

Billy Lewis Ramsey, 82, passed away on Tuesday, April 3, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE, is assisting the family.

Beverly Histon, 84, passed away on April 6, 2018. Mackey Mortuary is assisting the family.

Zachary “Zach” Thomas Holcombe, 23, of Greer, died Tuesday, April 3, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE, is assisting the family.

Alvin Kelley, 95, of Marietta, passed away on Thursday, April 5, 2018.

GREENVILLE – Billy Lewis Ramsey, 82, husband of the late Thella Seagraves Ramsey, passed away peacefully in his daughter’s home on Tuesday, April 3, 2018.

He is survived by one daughter, Susan Thoss and husband, Stephan; three sons, Tony Ramsey and wife, Anita; Roger Ramsey and wife, Joan; and Billy Ramsey and wife, Sharon; five grandchildren, Elizabeth Ramsey, Josh Thoss, Jessica Wangler, Emily Ramsey, and Jacob Ramsey; and four greatgrandchildren, Carly and Ethan Gilbert, and Michael and Brayden Wangler.

Born in Logan, WV, he was the son of the late Walter and Elizabeth Ramsey. Mr. Ramsey was a true Patriot and was deeply devoted to his family, his country, and his Lord and Savior. He retired from the Marine Corps as a Staff Sergeant having served in Vietnam and during Cuban Missile Crisis. While in service, he earned a Good Conduct Medal with five stars, a Vietnamese Service Medal with three stars, a Combat Aircrew Insignia with three stars, Vietnamese Campaign Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, an Air Medal with two stars, and the Cross of Gallantry with palm.

He was preceded in death by his son, Michael “Mike” Ramsey. We celebrated his incredible life on Monday, April 9, 2018 with a visitation at Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Southeast and the funeral service in the Chapel. Burial took place in Greenville Memorial Gardens. Memorials may be made to DAV – Disabled American Veterans, P.O. Box 14301, Cincinnati, OH 45250-0301.

Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Email or visit for information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

Alphonse George Kelada SIMPSONVILLE – Alphonse George Kelada, 84, passed away on April 7, 2018 at the McCall Hospice House of Simpsonville, S.C. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on August 15, 1933, to the late George David and Marie Shehata Kelada. He is survived by his wife, Nabila Rafla Kelada, whom he married on August 6, 1972 in Montreal, Canada; his son, George Kelada, and his wife, Julie Wyatt Kelada; his daughter, Dahlia Kelada Kerr, and her husband Christopher Alan Kerr; his grandchildren, Wyatt Gabriel Kelada, Elle Alexandria Kelada, Lucas Alan Kerr, and Maggie Evan Kerr; and his sisters, Nadia Kelada Naguib, and Isis Kelada Magadan and her husband, Edito. Alphonse was preceded in death by his dear friend and brother-in-law, Dr. Selim Naguib. Mr. Kelada held a Master’s Degree in Chemistry. His lifelong career in package (yarn) dyeing included training in Germany and Switzerland before immigrating to Montreal, Canada in 1964. During the 1970’s, he served as General Manager of the Dominion Textiles Mount Royal Dyehouse in Montreal. After the company acquired Linn-Corriher in Landis, N.C., he moved his family to Salisbury, N.C. in 1980

to serve as manager of the Corlin Dyehouse. In 1985, he joined U.S. Finishing in Greenville, S.C. as General Manager. In February of 1988, Mr. Kelada, with the help of his unwavering wife, founded Spartan Dyers in Spartanburg, S.C. His son, George, joined the business full-time in 1996 followed by his daughter, Dahlia, in 1997. In November of 1997, Spartan Dyers acquired the Pharr Yarns Sterling Plant in Belmont, N.C. He would regularly mention that owning a facility like the Sterling Plant exceeded his wildest dreams. Sharing his passion for dyeing yarn with his family and team of loyal associates brought him great joy. So much so that he had no interest in retiring. Mr. Kelada was also passionate about supporting the Christians of Egypt. He was a founding member of the Copts Association in both Canada and the United States. Locally, he served the

Lord through his efforts at St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church located in Mauldin, S.C. The church started in Greenville in the early 1980’s when the first families gathered together in their homes to pray. Mr. Kelada was instrumental in making the construction of their church a reality in 2001. The church is built in the Coptic tradition and now serves as a place of worship for approximately 200 families. Mr. Kelada regularly reminded those around him of the reality that, “We are in the hands of the Lord.” We take comfort in knowing that he is now at home with the Lord. The family will receive friends from 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. on Friday, April 13th, at Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, 1604 NE Main Street, Simpsonville, S.C. 29681. The funeral service will begin at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 14th, at St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church, 507 South Main Street, Mauldin, S.C. 29662. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church Youth Fund, P.O. Box 26195, Greenville, S.C. 29616-1195.

Plan for “someday” today.

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes can help you plan ahead, allowing you to design personalized arrangements that are a reflection of you. Contact us to receive complimentary information about the following: Funeral Planning Guides Cost Estimates & Payment Plans Cremation Services

Downtown Chapel | 232-6733

Northwest Chapel & Cremation Center | 294-6415

ThomasMcAfee.com Southeast Chapel | 688-1600


Luxury Service at Every Price Point UNDER CONTRACT

8 Moss Falls Lane, Cliffs at Glassy $1,945,000 MLS#1346522 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

120 E Round Hill Road, Green Valley $1,460,000 MLS#1360958 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

SOLD SOLD

30 Tilley Road, Cleveland $730,000 MLS#1355490 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

DOWNTOWN CONDO

35 Wild Turkey Court, Cliffs Valley $1,175,000 MLS#1364444 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

HISTORIC HOME

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $699,000 MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

120 Plantation Drive, Woodruff $674,900 MLS#1362902 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

3,600+ SQ FT

457 Pimlico Road, Gower Estates $549,900 MLS#1361791 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

121 Rhett Street, Unit 305, Rhett Street $798,500 MLS#1361175 Cheyenne Kozaily 864-999-1959

1 Little Boulder Drive, Cliffs at Glassy $579,900 MLS#1363885 Andy Overgaard 828-808-8305

UNDER CONTRACT

311 Meyers Drive, Augusta Road $499,900 MLS#1363354 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580

236 Grandmont Court, Charleston Walk $469,000 MLS#1361519 Holly May 864-640-1959

8 Peters Brook Court, Kilgore Farms $364,900 MLS#1364107 Lisa Briganti 864-616-1499

105 Shefford Court, Silverleaf $292,000 MLS#1356748 Erin Colman 864-940-9709

301 Briarwood Drive, Holly Tree $272,500 MLS#1364824 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

18 Slow Creek Drive, Allisons Meadow $249,900 MLS#1364050 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

UNDER CONTRACT

231 Franklin Oaks Lane, Franklin Meadow $329,900 MLS#1364391 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303


This Week

Purple Hearts

Seasonal artichokes invite a new hue

Photo by Chelsey Ashford


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Color of the Year Ultra Violet shares the spectrum with springtime’s purple artichoke, blending beauty and bounty in the home. by Stephanie Burnette | photography by Chelsey Ashford

P

ANTONE’s Color of the Year Ultra Violet caught us a bit by surprise with its celestial hues and lofty epitomes. And though it may feel premature to paint the town purple, nature offers us an organic application with a rush of artichokes speeding to spring markets. The purple variety is almost a dead ringer at its elbows for the Ultra Violet chip #18-3838. Artichokes look pert simply grouped on a table, in a bowl or as part of an arrangement, adding significant architecture to a container. PANTONE tells us Ultra Violet is forward thinking with energy that communicates ingenuity and calls it an “enigmatic purple, nuanced and full of emotion.” What we’re certain of is that the aubergine globes feel fresh in the home, a symbol of Ultra Violet’s undeniable aplomb. We asked Suzie Bunn of STATICE to create an array in an Ultra Violet mood and the result is unpredictably warm and earthy, demonstrating the Color of the Year’s natural élan. Bunn captured early spring with elements that run the gamut of purple components; the bouquet feels harmonious in shades of violet, lilac and fuchsia, blue-leaning pinks, mossy greens and take note of the artichoke’s citron interior, naturally tipped in bronze. We created our own palate from this bouquet with an app called PANTONE Studio. In our estimation, it’s a game changer for identifying paint formulations. Simply snap a photo of an object or scene, indoors or out, and watch a palate manifest. With the tap of finger, your table or décor can be inspired directly from real life.

ER

D UN

CT

RA

T ON

C

Metallics are a luxe complement to PANTONE’s 2018 Color of the Year Ultra Violet. Hotels have embraced the color purely on its own, featuring its pop and saturated energy in lobbies and common spaces.

13 Waccamaw Ave., Augusta Rd. area $435,000

112 Longview Terrace., Cleveland Park $1,075,000

229 Watkins Farm Dr., Greer $425,000

25 Highland Dr., Augusta Rd. $699,000

219 Lake Cirle Dr., Paris Mountain $650,000

bit.ly/JacobMann 864.325.6266


OPEN SUNDAY, APRIL 15 from 2-4PM SPAULDING FARM

AUGUSTA ROAD

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/67Z8ZQ/9-Block-House-Road-Greenville-SC-1357730

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/Z8BVM5/18-Ottaway-Drive-Greenville-SC-1361176

9 Block House Rd • 4BR/3.5BA

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

18 Ottaway Dr • 3BR/2BA

$595,000 · MLS# 1357730 Barry Cain · 421-2166 CODE 4760829

$305,000 · MLS# 1361176 Tyler Nasim · 313-4088 CODE 4850507

M E G A OPEN HOUSE EVENT SUNDAY, APRIL 22

2 - 4pm

WIN AN ALEXA PRIZE PACKAGE

Including an Echo Show, Echo Spot and Smart Outlets Product images provided by Amazon. All rights reserved. Contest details available at www.cdanjoyner.com

Agents on call this weekend

Brian Norman 979-4874 Augusta Road

Tony Rebucci 201-9455 N. Pleasantburg

Jonathan Bachman 879-4239 Greer

Clair Carson 915-7510 Prop. Mgmt.

Vicki Galloway Roark 979-8425 Main Street

Gia Townsley 934-3191 Anderson

Kristy Tarallo 483-2669 Pelham Road

Katrina Campbell 567-5188 Garlington Road

Linda Ballard 449-6302 Easley

Dina Lopez 884-5560 Simpsonville

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Chelsea Woods • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Highgrove Estates • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

032/Clear Springs • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Asheton Springs • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

207 Chelsea Lane · $729,000 · MLS# 1362973

4 Glengrove Drive · $536,900 · MLS# 1362073

108 Angel Falls Drive · $449,900 · MLS# 1364203

6 Venetian Court · $415,000 · MLS# 1361454

5BR/4.5BA Beautiful home with high quality construction, close to all Greenville and Spartanburg Amenities with two masters and in-law suit. Pelham to Parkway to S. Batesville to Enoree rd.

5BR/4.5BA Freshly painted home with many builder upgrades! Master Bedroom with separate sitting area. Spacious, covered tiled patio, perfect for entertaining. Right on Batesville Rd. Left Highgrove Ct. Right on Glengrove

5BR/4f2hBA FIVE FORKS AREA, ~5800SF OF AMAZING HOME! BONUS ROOM & MEDIA ROOM! 3-CAR GARAGE, .57 ACRE, ALL BELLS&WHISTLES! COME SEE! East on Woodruff Road to R@ Scuffletown Road, ~3.5mi on Right

4BR/3BA Polished, classic, Asheton Springs! FF hardwood floors, guest BR & full bath, upstairs MBR w/FP, screened porch, cul-de-sac location! From HWY 14, Asheton Way, L @ Ashbury, left, left

Contact: Laura McDonald 640-1929 Wilson Associates

Contact: Susan McMillen 238-5498 Allen Tate

Contact: Mary Jo Ochylski 483-8484 Coldwell Bankere Caine

Contact: Harpreet Chahal 646-462-1925 Keller Williams Greenville Upstate

Collinsbrooke Mill

Augusta Road Hills

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey | 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com 41 Collinsbrooke Court · $450,000 · MLS# 1364793

101 Low Hill Street · $260,000 · MLS# 1364737

5BR/3BA Brick 5BR + bonus w/3 full baths 3 car garage. Master & 2nd BR on main. Master-dual vanities/garden tub/tile shower. Kitchen-granite countertops/stainless steel appliances/2 pantries. Upstairs-3 large BRs + bonus.

2BR/1BA Beautifully renovated home off Augusta Road. Open floor plan. Spacious kit w/marble c’tops, stainless steel apps. Beautiful hdwds. Freshly painted throughout. Newer HVAC/architectural roof/electrical/plumbing/windows/cabinets. Fenced yd /deck.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Live your life, Love your home.

1stchoicecustomhomes.com 864.505.2252 19 Charleston Oak Lane Greenville


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Home

Mahaffey Plantation

59 Griffith Creek Drive, Greer, SC 29651

Home Info Price: $539,900 MLS: 1364814 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 3.5 Built: 2005 Schools: Oakview Elementary, Riverside Middle, and JL Mann High Agent: Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 mmorrell@cdanjoyner.com

One Owner, Fully Finished Basement Home with Breathtaking Grounds! This stunning basement home boasts an awesome floor plan and all that nature has to offer. The main level provides an unforgettable Great Room with stacked stone gas fireplace and views of the home’s large screen porch. The kitchen and breakfast area also share in the home’s Keeping Room that showcases the home’s second gas log fireplace. New appliances can also be found in the kitchen as well as a walk-in laundry room with sink, wrap around bar, and granite countertops. The front dining room is elegant and has tall windows taking in views of the manicured grounds. The owner’s retreat is on the main level

with hardwoods and an upgraded bathroom with a fully tiled walk-in shower and a large walk-in closet. The upstairs has three bedrooms, walk-in closets and and a Jack and Jill style bathroom. The basement is truly lower level luxury with a guest bedroom, full bathroom, huge center bonus room with nearby sink for beverages and serving, exercise room (among other options), workshop area and boundless walk-in storage space. There’s over 600 Sf of unfinished space! The basement level has a graciously sized deck with hot tub and access to the backyard that has mature trees and the sights and sounds of the Enoree River, Griffith Creek and koi pond.

Real Estate News

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in 2017 As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 35 agents that is conRiggs Valerie Miller Properties sistently a top per- T. Marchant broker-in-charge, agents honored included: former in GreenTom Marchant – Unit Listing Agent ville. The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTORS® for of the Year, Volume Listing Agent of the Year, Volume Sales Agent of the Year, outstanding performance in 2017: Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, Highest Average Listing Price Agent of

Purdie B. Marchant Maisenhelder A. Marchant & B. Marchant the Year, Highest Average Sales Price Runner Up, Average Listing Price Runner Agent of the Year, and 2017 “Signature” Up, Average Sales Price Runner Up Agent of the Year Valerie Miller Properties (Clint Miller, Barb Riggs – Unit Sales Agent of the Year, Valerie Miller, Chuck Miller) –Unit ListVolume Sales Runner Up, Unit Listings continued on PAGE 29


Swing for a Million Dollars! April 27 – April 28 Eagle Zone Golf

Improvement Center Pelham Road, Greenville

Take your shot at making a hole in one in the finals and win $1,000,000! $500 prize each day for being closest to the pin and a chance to win a million dollars.

Friday, APRIL 27, 9 AM - 9 PM Saturday, APRIL 28, 9 AM - 5 PM FINALS, APRIL 28, 6 PM - 7 PM

MARK YOUR CALENDARS!

PROCEEDS G O TO WA R D S T H E

G R A N T P RO G R A M

H e l p i n g To F u n d Community Projects

w ww ww w.. ll aa uu rr ee nn ss ee ll ee cc tt rr ii cc .. cc oo m m 886644..668833..11666677 DETACH AND REDEEM

Million Dollar hole-in-one

shootout

Laurens Electric Cooperative, Inc.

Buy One Bag, Get One FREE! That’s 24 balls for only $10. To redeem this coupon, present it at the event site. C O N T E S TA N T L I M I T E D T O O N E C O U P O N P E R D AY C O U P O N H A S N O C A S H VA L U E

Use this coupon during early bird hours, Friday 9-11 and Saturday 9-10 and receive two bags free with one bag purchase. SC Living


LEC 18 MHIO Advertorial.qxp_Layout 1 3/28/18 11:14 PM Page 1

Laurens Electric offers golfers a sh t at $1 million Come to the Eagle Zone Golf Improvement Center on Pelham Road in Greenville, Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 for a chance to win $1 million in Laurens Electric Cooperative’s and Touchstone Energy’s 16th Annual Hole-In-One Shootout. All proceeds from the event will benefit the LEC Community Impact Initiative. ®

10 players will qualify each day by being closest to the pin to compete in the finals, when participants have a chance of winning one million dollars by shooting a hole-in-one. Qualifying times are Friday, April 27 from 9 a.m.–9 p.m. and Saturday, April 28 from 9 a.m.–5 p.m. The finals will follow on Saturday at 6 p.m.

Million Dollar hole-in-one

shootout

Laurens Electric Cooperative, Inc.

the LEC Community Impact Initiative, a program that provides grants, not to exceed $2,000, to local charities for purposes that enrich the quality of life of the citizens in the communities LEC serves. Recipients will be chosen by their respective chambers and will be based on their projects that include innovative, creative, and practical solutions to current community needs.

Every dollar spent at the hole-in-one event is a dollar that will go to support the LEC Community Impact Initiative; it’s a fantastic way to contribute to the community and have a great time in the process.

Event proceeds to benefit the LEC Community Impact Initiative For more information about the Hole-In-One Shootout, visit the co-op’s web site at laurenselectric.com.

Other prizes include $500 each day to golfers with shots closest to the pin, and during the finals, $1000 to the golfer closest to the pin, $500 for the second closest, and $250 to third. G R A N T P RO G R A M

Laurens Electric is dedicated to improving the quality of life of the citizens in the upstate and in the communities the cooperative serves. All proceeds from the Hole-In-One Shootout will benefit

H e l p i n g To F u n d Community Projects

Laurens Electric Cooperative a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, serves 54,000 member-owners in Laurens, Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Newberry, Union and Abbeville counties.Since 1939, the co-op has been dedicated to being the provider of choice for energy and relateds services in the Upstate.

Giving back to the community we serve is one of our core values.

D

Laurens Electric Cooperative, Inc. (l-r) Last year, Kendall Samero of Taylors won $1,000 for the closest-to-the-$1 million-hole shot. Aaron Thomas (pictured with son Peter) placed 2nd and won $500, followed by Jamin Drake, who took home $250.

Laurens Electric’s employees, pictured here with WSSL's Bill Ellis, top-center, volunteer their time to staff the event.

Blake, 5, enjoys free pizza and a day on the range with his family.


www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Justin Ruzicka (864) 775-0119 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • MarchantPm.com (864) 527-4505 me Ho s! n i ta e un Acr Mo on 5

d& uil iews! B V m sto ing Cu thtak a Bre

! lue t! Va tmen t a r Gre t Apa s e Gu

n tio ! oca l lot L b fu per ti Su beau on

126 Caesars Pointe - Caesar’s Head

59 Grand Vista Dr. - The Ridges at Paris Mountain

119 Riverlook Lane - Acadia

15 Jervey Road - Greenville

$1,700,000 • 1346370 • 6BR/6BA/1Hf BA

$1,271,000 • 1357141 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

$899,500 • 1361560 • 4BR/4BA/2Hf BA

$799,000 • 1353214 • 4BR/3BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

tyle n S rse! o t u es arl Co Ch Golf on

Kendall Bateman • (864) 320-2414 • kendall@marchantco.com

hes inis eal! F r p erio Ap Sup Curb &

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

t! ly 2 Lef On mes o nh Tow

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com

g itin lla! Inv an Vi c Tus

204 Hidden Hills Dr. - Chanticleer Towns

716 Villaggio Drive - Montebello

100 S Hudson Street - Park Place on Hudson

19 Arezzo Drive - Montebello

$579,900 • 1362287 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$579,900 • 1363342 • 3BR/3BA/1Hf BA

$499,500 • 1355290 • 2BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$494,900 • 1355432 • 3BR/2BA/2Hf BA

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

y eadde! R i n s i ve- ast Mo the E on

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com

yer Bu e! 0 00 tiv $7, ncen I

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

k & es! ric eatur B All ible F red c In

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com

ne & O g! k n c Bri Livi All evel L

213 Steadman Way - Brighton/Carisbrooke 104 Pleasant Meadow Ct. - Pleasant Meadows 105 Pleasant Meadow Ct. - Pleasant Meadows 101 Pleasant Meadow Ct. - Pleasant Meadows $484,900 • 1363033 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Mikel-Ann Scott • (864) 630-2474 • mikelann@marchantco.com Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com

in me ! Ho tting t a e Greuiet S Q

$309,500 • 1360177 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Shannon Cone • (864) 908-6426 • Shannon@MarchantCo.com

& ed y! vat Read o n Re e-in v o M

$286,400 • 1360176 • 3BR/2BA

Shannon Cone • (864) 908-6426 • Shannon@MarchantCo.com

/ ot wws! L n e ai Vi unt ive Mo ress p Im

371 Hickory Hollow Rd. - Inman

15 Swenson Court - Blue Ridge Plantation

17 Bear Cove Trail - Cedar Rock Colony

$269,620 • 1364461 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$214,900 • 1364286 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$99,500 • 1357740 • Lot

Kay Ramsey • (864) 905-2845 • kay@marchantco.com

Kathy Slayter • (864) 982-7772 • kslayter@charter.net

Charlotte Faulk • (864) 270-4341 • charlotte@marchantco.com

$280,441 • 1360174 • 3BR/2BA

Shannon Cone • (864) 908-6426 • Shannon@MarchantCo.com

! res ! Ac Barn + 25 and ol Po

5050 Rainbow Lake Rd. - Campobello $629,000 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


cd

cd cd

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

cd

Real Estate News cont. ing Team of the Year, Volume Listing Team of the Year, Unit Sales Team of the Year, Volume Sales Team of the Year, Highest Average Listing Price Team of the Year, Highest Average Sales Price Team of the Year, and 2017 “Signature” Team of the Year Anne Marchant & Brian Marchant – Unit Listings Runner Up, Volume Listings Runner Up, Unit Sales Runner Up, Volume Sales Runner Up Celeste Purdie – 2017 Rookie of the Year Brian Marchant – 2017 Marchant Company “Hall of Fame” Linda Maisenhelder – Special Recognition

vast array of life experiences coupled with their love of people and real estate are the perfect ingredients for a great REALTOR.”

cd cd

All All About About FLOORING FLOORING of SC of SC

All AboutFLOORING FLOORING of SCof SC cdAll About cd

• Experienced staff • New larger showroom• New larger showroom

cd

• Experienced staff

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for • FREE • Excellent 100’s of the latest styles • 100’s of the latest stylesestimates Performance in February 2018

• FREE estimates

• Financing • 1000’s of beautiful colors • 1000’s of beautiful colors available • Financing availab

Johnson

• New larger showroom

• Experienced staff

• 100’s of the latest styles

• FREE estimates

• 1000’s of beautiful colors

• Financing available

Newlarger larger showroom • New • •New larger showroom showroom

Riggs

• FREE estimates

• 1000’s of beautiful colors

• Financing available

• 1000’s • 1000’s of beautiful of beautiful colors colors

Martin

NEW LOCATION 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr Greenville, The Cone Team SC 29609 864-241-3636

••Experienced staffstaffstaff Experienced • Experienced

• 100’s of the latest styles

• 100’s • 100’s of the oflatest the latest styles styles

The Anderson Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Two New Associates Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce the addition of Jennifer Elgin and Paige Quattlebaum. They have Elgin joined the company’s Anderson office as sales associates. Jennifer Elgin has been a resident of Anderson her entire life. She is a graduate of Crescent High school and holds an associate’s degree in computer science. Elgin’s attention to detail and strong communication skills have yielded a successful career in sales and management spanning 20+ years. She became a licensed realtor in 2007. Paige Quattlebaum was born and raised in Columbia, SC but has lived in the Upstate since 1986. A graduate of Clemson University with a degree in MarQuattlebaum keting, her professional career started at Michelin in customer service. Quattlebaum has also worked in healthcare marketing for 10+ years before obtaining her real estate license two years ago. Her love for helping people and providing excellent service are driving forces in her goal to help you find your dream home. “We are elated to have both Jennifer and Paige join our team of professional REALTORS here at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS,” said  Rusty Garrett, Broker-InCharge of the Anderson office. “Their

All About FLOORING SC cd 04.13.2018 |of GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

• FREE • FREE estimates estimates • Financing • Financing available available

NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST TRAVELERS REST LOCATION NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS LOCATION 2111k North Pleasantburg 3245C Wade Hampton Dr Blvd 3245C Wade11Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy 11 (just 3598 Hwy (just offREST Hwy 25) 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr Wade Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) Greenville, Taylors,SC SC29609 29687 3245C Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Greenville, SC 29609 Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-241-3636 864-292-8207 864-292-8207 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 864-292-8207864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 (for

• New larger showroom

• Experienced staff

• 100’s of the latest styles

• FREE estimates

Remember

LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION • Financing available • 1000’s 2111k ofNEW beautiful North Pleasantburg Dr colors 3245C Wade HamptonDeserve Blvd 3598 HwyOur 11 (just off Hwy 25) Your Feet Floors

Remember Remember Your Feet Deserve Your Feet OurDeserve Floors Our Greenville, SC 29609 864-241-3636

NEW LOCATION NEW LOCATION 2111k North 2111k Pleasantburg North Pleasantburg Dr Dr Greenville, Greenville, SC 29609 SC 29609 864-241-3636 864-241-3636

Taylors, SC 29687 864-292-8207

TAYLORS TAYLORS LOCATION LOCATION 3245C 3245C Wade Hampton Wade Hampton Blvd Blvd Taylors, Taylors, SC 29687 SC 29687 864-292-8207 864-292-8207

Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-241-3636 (for appointment)

TRAVELERS TRAVELERS REST LOCATION REST LOCATION 3598 Hwy 359811Hwy (just11off(just Hwy off25) Hwy 25) Travelers Travelers Rest, SC Rest, 29690 SC 29690 864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) (for appointment)

R

Remember Your Feet Deserve Our Floors

A. Marchant & B. Marchant

Remember RememberYour Your Feet Feet Deserve Deserve Our Our Floors Floors McCrory & Turpin NEW LOCATION As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr Agency,” The Marchant Company is a Greenville, SC 29609 small boutique business of just 35 agents 864-241-3636 that is consistently a top performer in Greenville. The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTORS® for outstanding performance in February 2018: Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Lydia Johnson –Top Unit Listing Leader of the Month & Top Volume Listing Leader of the Month Barb Riggs –Top Unit Sales Leader of the Month Mark Martin –Top Volume Sales Leader of the Month The Cone Team (Shannon Cone & Travis Cone) –Unit Listing Team of the

TAYLORS LOCATION 3245C Wade Hampton Blvd Taylors, SC 29687 864-292-8207

TRAVELERS REST LOCATION 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-241-3636 (for appointment)

Remember Your Feet Deserve Our Floor

continued on PAGE 31

Wendi Ruth | 864-979-3046 | wruth@cbcaine.com


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of March 12 – 16 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,337,500 $1,941,550 $1,449,195 $1,312,697 RIVERBANKS ENERGY CENTER $1,140,000 BLACKSTONE $790,000 KELLETT PARK $630,000 BARKSDALE $550,000 PLEASANT VALLEY $535,000 $535,000 COURT VIEW TOWNHOUSES $516,000 $490,000 CLEVELAND PLACE $470,000 $470,000 GRANDVIEW TOWNES $434,500 STONEHAVEN $420,000 CONNOR’S CREEK $419,900 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $412,470 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $400,000 FIRETHORNE $385,000 WATERS RUN $379,905 CARLTON PARK $375,000 $375,000 SUGAR MILL $375,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $369,900 CLIFFS VALLEY $355,000 CAROLINA SPRINGS $355,000 $350,000 BRAEMOR $345,000 COPPER CREEK $340,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $337,670 $335,000 THORNBROOKE $333,000 LOST RIVER $328,308 GOWER ESTATES $325,000 RICHLAND CREEK@NORTH MAIN $324,000 CAROLINA OAKS $318,900 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $316,515 KILGORE FARMS $297,370 $295,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $292,450 $290,000 LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK $290,000 ABBEYHILL PARK $290,000 $287,500 BRIAR OAKS $284,648 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $283,030 ARBOR WOODS $280,452 RUNION ESTATES $280,000 ISAQUEENA PARK $280,000 $280,000 CAMDEN COURT $280,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $277,300 RICHGLEN $275,000 $275,000 BOULDER CREEK $274,000 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $272,551 CEDAR COVE $268,200 RUNION ESTATES $265,197 WARRENTON $265,000 PELHAM SPRINGS $265,000 HERITAGE POINT $263,000 AUTUMN TRACE $262,900 $260,000

PACOLET MILLIKEN ENTERPR 1260 E BUTLER ROAD SELF- 3050 S HIGHWAY 14 LLC MANCUSO HOLDINGS LLC RUSHING-MARLOWE PROPERTI NICHOLS KELLY R (JTWROS) CONNER KENNETH E TILL MICHAEL STEVEN TESNER DONALD R (JTWROS) LOWE CRAIG COURT VIEW DEVELOPMENT L JOHNSON LISA D MCGEE JOAN S CARLTON JAMES E MARK III PROPERTIES INC RICH BRANDON (JTWROS) DESTEFANO KIMBERLY NVR INC PACK LISA C NEELY FERRY VENTURE LLC NVR INC VINE GRACE KATHERINE (JT GROSS KARLA H MATTHEWS RACHEL MCCULLOU GIBSON AMY P MYER STEVEN WASCOM PATRICIA A REX DEVELOPMENT LLC RUTHERFORD PAUL H (SURV) MUNGO HOMES INC NVR INC PROBOTANOJO NICOLE BOHMAN ROBERT H MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN MADDOX BRAXTON T (JTWROS SIMS CARA P (JTWROS) 116 CREST HILL PROPERTY NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH GABRIEL & LILY LLC SAJNOG ADAM G (JTWROS) GENDLIN HOMES LLC WOLF EDYTHE G (JTWROS) NOVELLA CHRISTEL M WICKLINE CORY R (JTWROS) NVR INC D R HORTON INC CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BRUNIES CRAIG ALLEN SURVIVOR’S TRUST THE CHAN SIU SIN BLUE JOHN BAKER CLINE BRIAN K BOSWELL ALISSA WILKLOW ( HOYT DAVID W D R HORTON INC ELLYS CONSTRUCTION LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH TAYLOR CHRISTINE B SOLOMON LAURA S FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG ACKERMAN MARSHA L HEALEY DANIEL P

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

NATURALAND TRUST PRIME STORAGE GREENVILLE PELHAM-BATESVILLE FIRE D KHIONE 1616 LLC SECOND HALF PROPERTIES L BUITER BARBARA JEAN WOFFORD PENNY CHILDS BRADLEY DORN (JTW BROWN KATHERINE G (JTWRO SMITH EDWARD M SEXTON ANDREA (JTWROS) SLATER MONICA (JTWROS) JOHNSON STEPHANIE D (JTW PATTERSON COLLEEN MICHEL ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN BILOTT BRANDEN J (JTWROS LOONEY TAMA PAIGE (JTWRO MILIN JEAN-CHRISTOPHE (J DUNNE VINCENT DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL KAUR BHAJANPREET (JTWROS BROMELING ERICA L (JTWRO LAVEN MICHAEL A (JTWROS) BAGLEY KATHRYN (JTWROS) HENRY ADAM (JTWROS) SKIVER FAMILY TRUST LUHRS DONNA AUDREY (JTWR PEACHTREE DEVELOPMENT LL NYE CHAD J (JTWROS) TRIMMER AMY D (JTWROS) GAFFNEY RHONDA L THORNAL CARRIE (JTWROS) WHITEHEAD DAVID ERNEST ( FRANKLIN LANDON D BEATY COURTNEY LYNN (JTW CONKLIN SCOTT M (JTWROS) HARRIS SANDY (JTWROS) GLEASON GRETCHEN C HAN MINHUI EISELE JENNIFER BRIGITTE BEAUCHAMP CECLIA WITT (J CLARY CAROLINE REBECCA AHMAD JOANNA P (JTWROS) HACKSHAW BENDY (JTWROS) PALTROW TAMAR E HUZ ELLEN (JTWROS) CAWTHON AMY E (JTWROS) JOHNSON BRIAN P MILLER DONNA M (JTWROS) AGNEW AMANDA M CORNETT MARY K (JTWROS) PONOMAREV PAVEL (JTWROS) SHONKWILER CHARLIE M (JT BISHOP SHANNON LEE GREENE HANNAH ALLOWAY BEVERLY ANN (JTW CLICK DENISE J ROS ROMAN MENDEZ CRAMER LAUREN N (JTWROS) BOWER LAURIE E (JTWROS) FANTOZZI ANGELA REVOCABL PALLACK GLENN MESSINA ANDREW (JTWROS) SPENCER JACLYN E

PO BOX 728 83-85 RAILROAD PL 2761 S HIGHWAY 14 4939 W RAY RD # 4-507 122 GLENBRIAR CT 104 BAMBER GREEN CT 6 CHIPPING CT 6 BARKSDALE RD 53 PLEASANT VALLEY TRL 42 LAURENVILLE LN 214 GIBBS ST 28 DUSTY OAK LN 14 LANDSDOWN AVE 279 MUSH CREEK RD 120 CROMER RD 110 MILLSTONE WAY 5 CONNORS CREEK CT 114 ALISTER DR 12 AREZZO DR 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 108 WATERS RUN LN 2640 AUGUSTA ST 2349 STANFORD RD 703 SUGAR MILL RD 7 SUNDEW CT 204 PATHFINDER CT 174 PHEASANT WAY PO BOX 2585 2 LATHERTON CT 304 GOSFORD RD 260 ROCKY SLOPE RD 23 EDISTO ST 20 SPRINGHEAD WAY 401 WINDWOOD ST 313 DON DR 1 MAJESTIC OAK CT 116 CREST HILL DR 258 ROCKY SLOPE RD .147 FORT DR 2120 E COLEMAN RD 14 BRADSTOCK DR 122 OAKLAND DR 201 LANSFAIR WAY 608 HEATHERCREST CT 12345 OLD WHITE HORSE RD 504 BRIAR OAKS LN 220 TALON CT 307 TIMBERLAND WAY 604 SUNHEN CT 108 OXFORD ST 420 HOLLAND RD 305 N ALMOND DR 608 NEELY FARM DR 6 COVEY CT 3 WHITEHALL ST 509 MELLOW WAY 103 COMMON OAKS CT 110 BANBURY CIR 601 SUNHEN CT 202 ACKERMAN CT 5 PELHAM SPRINGS PL 775 DOWNING ST 10 FARM BROOK WAY 121 S MEMMINGER ST

COLONY SUBDIVISION $259,900 $259,850 ORCHARD CREST $256,470 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $255,000 BURGISS HILL $252,900 SUMMERSIDE@ROLLING GREEN $252,200 MOORCROFT $252,000 $251,250 $250,000 FAIR HEIGHTS $250,000 PARK RIDGE $249,900 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $249,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $245,000 COLLEGE HEIGHTS $242,000 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $240,000 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $240,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II $239,345 LOWNDES HILL ORCHARD $235,000 HARTWOOD LAKE $229,990 $227,000 BRYSON CROSSING $226,000 HUNTERS WOODS $225,000 ROPER PROFESSIONAL PARK $220,000 THE BRIO $218,000 POWDERHORN $216,500 HUNTERS WOODS $215,000 SUMMER WOOD $214,800 ROSEMONT $213,500 PINE BROOK FOREST $212,000 PLANTERS ROW $207,500 DEVENGER PLACE $205,500 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $205,022 NELSON’S CREEK $205,000 WILLOW GROVE $204,000 THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS $204,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $204,000 PINEHURST $202,900 COLONIAL HILLS $200,000 FOWLER CHASE $199,300 ALLEN WEST $193,786 TIMBER RIDGE $193,000 PLANTERS ROW $193,000 CASTLEBROOK $192,985 RIVERSIDE CHASE $192,500 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $191,000 DUNEAN MILLS $191,000 ASHLEY OAKS $190,000 MONTROYAL HILLS $189,500 THE TOWNES AT EASTSIDE $187,355 LOCKELAND PARK $186,000 HUNTERS WOODS $185,000 AVALON ESTATES $184,000 IVYBROOKE $183,500 LOCKELAND PARK $181,000 ANNACEY PARK $180,000 PHEASANT RIDGE $180,000 CARRINGTON $179,900 FAIRVIEW LAKE $178,900 $175,000 PEBBLECREEK $175,000 WHISPERING OAKS $175,000 $175,000 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $172,190 ST MARKS POINTE $170,000

PRICE SELLER BUCHANAN CYNTHIA GILLESPIE KRISTI REID MARK III PROPERTIES INC PORRELLO COURTNEY (JTWRO POWELL CHARLES DAVID TOBINO FAMILY TRUST ROBERTS JANE WINN DONNA ANNETTE WILLIAMS MARGARET C M NETTLES HOLDINGS INC REMBREY CONSTRUCTION AND HANCE KIVILCIM O DEVEIX-FORRESTER HEIGHTS SAVAGE ENTERPRISES LLC BUMP JUDITH K BAREFOOT DEBBIE B BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC GARRISON J HENRY III D R HORTON-CROWN LLC RIVER STREET MANAGEMENT CONNER BRYAN K MEEKER ERNEST E & MEEKER ROPER PROFESSIONAL PARK RICE FRANK T LINDELL JERALD C TUGGLE CHRISTY H BURRELL KRISTIN (JTWROS) ANGELL PAMELA BULLARD JIMI L (JTWROS) IVEY MAURICE R POTE JUDITH E MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN SANGRET BRIAN J (JTWROS) MARK III PROPERTIES INC FANCHER JAMES W (JTWROS) KREZDORN ERICA R GENDLIN HOMES LLC VAUGHAN BRIAN SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC GEDIKOGLU YAMAN ARNOLD DEIDRE K NVR INC PLEASANTBURG LLC TROTTER LYNZIE B KINDER REALTY LLC HEER GEORGE ZELENY VIVIAN R 401 BRUSHY CREEK LLC SUNCREST HOMES LLC PICHARDO SACHENKA O ROS-PERALES PEDRO FRASER ROBERT B (IND & L SUNCREST HOMES LLC PETER AARON (JTWROS) FORD JOSHUA A GENTHNER HOWARD R QUIROZ MIGUEL ANGEL LITTLE JOSEPH E ANDERSON STEPHANIE & BYR CAROLINA CAPITAL DEVELOP CELIA SEAN NVR INC HINES TERI MORGAN

BUYER

ADDRESS

HANSEN JOY VIRGINIA (JTW DONALD JESSE ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L PURRY CHARLES E JR ROOZEN KAYE L (JTWROS) HANSEN PETER N (SURV) TANDOC EDUARDO CASUPANAN THREE BENT WHEELS LLC VOLWILER LOIS REVOCABLE MITCHELL PONTHETTA OCTAV COLE RYAN DAVID DEPAOLI JOHN A AND DEPAO JAMES SHANNON CAMPBELL CAMERON JANE CALDERBANK CHARLES (JTWR POE PATRICIA H DAWS JEFFREY ALLEN CAPITAL REAL ESTATE SOUT LUDWIG ALLISON JONES MARION MICHELLE THOMPSON APRIL (JTWROS) HAMES KAREN C (JTWROS) ROBINSON INVESTMENT GROU KAZURA ANDREW GUERRERO GILBERTO A (JTW SAWYER MICHAEL (JTWROS) REINER DEENA R (JTWROS) HILLMAN JANICE COLON DAWN M (JTWROS) POSTON JAMES TYLER WOOD ANGELA MEDINA-OLIVERA JEANETTE GREJDA KEVIN PATRICK (JT D R HORTON INC TUCKER CHARLES N MATHIS RYAN SEARS JULIA (JTWROS) MILLER LAUREN A (JTWROS) CURTIS JEFFREY P (JTWROS WILLIAMS AVERY D PAGLIUCA CHELSEA NICOLE VILLAVERDE ALEXANDRIA KE SIMS TINNETTA ZABIELA MINDAUGAS TEDESCHI MICHAEL A SASSER STEVEN (JTWROS) PASEK LARRY GRANT (JTWRO MCQUEEN STEPHANIE CREECH AUBREY H EGMOND DARLA (JTWROS) GORENZ MARY F SNM BUILDERS LLC SULLIVAN JOHN P EMERY MARTHA A (JTWROS) CMG REAL ESTATE INVESTME OZKAPTAN KENNETH H DAWSON ROBLYN J DAVIS JOSHUA D (JTWROS) BRYANT JAMES W (JTWROS) LATIF AARON J (JTWROS) CHILDS CAROLYN A (JTWROS HEINZ BRENNEN MOORE MAGGIE COPELAND KEVIN S D (JTWR

2706 LOCUST HILL RD 501 OVERBROOK RD 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 424 203 BLUE RIDGE DR 100 FAIROAKS DR 110 MOORCROFT WAY PO BOX 12037 101 W COURT ST UNIT 414 123 CUMBERLAND AVE 310 BRENLEIGH CT 52 REDDINGTON DR 27 DECKERS WAY 17 PRINCETON AVE 106 BLUE SAGE PL 403 CLARE BANK DR UNIT 12B 768 ELMBROOK DR 84 VILLA RD STE 200 474 GRAYPOINTE DR 202 PARIS MOUNTAIN AVE 15 FOX DEN LN 203 FOXWORTH LN 507 N MAPLE ST 1001 S CHURCH ST UNIT 201 206 HARRISBURG DR 4 FOXWORTH CT 31 RUSTCRAFT DR 316 TEAROSE LN 290 FURNACE RD 11 TRAILSTREAM DR 102 HEDGEWOOD TER 419 JONES PEAK DR 207 BARNYARD WAY 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 2 CAMPBELLS FARM DR 202 WILD HORSE CREEK DR 304 NEW PERRY RD 2 AMY LN 300 REDSTEM DR 124 HUFF DR 207 CHARMAR WAY 21 GROVEVIEW TRL 301 SKIPTON ST 140 FAWNBROOK DR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 107 35 DUKE ST 111 LEGRAE LN 106 PEMBERTON DR 9 HARVEST BELL LN 442 PEAKSVIEW DR 501 FOXHOUND RD 153 CREEK SHOALS DR 694 IVYBROOKE AVE 446 PEAKSVIEW DR PO BOX 765 PO BOX 1323 4 RIVERCHASE CT 608 FAIRVIEW LAKE WAY 2610 STANDING SPRINGS RD 8 HONEYBEE LN 12 MOSSY BROOK TRL 22 HILLSIDE CIR 16 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 1 CALALLA CT

Not all agents are created equal.

GO BEYOND THE EXPECTED.

Tim Keagy 864-905-3304

Ted Green 864-684-8789

Ray Bergey 757-409-4900

864.295.2846 | www.CTKteam.com

Angela Harmon 864-508-4462

Sean Keagy (USMC Vet) 864-230-1348

Tim Werdein 864-992-2041


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Real Estate News cont. Month & Volume Listing Team of the Month Anne Marchant & Brian Marchant – Unit Sales Team of the Month Nancy McCrory & Karen Turpin –Volume Sales Team of the Month

Sally Ballentine Joins Coldwell Banker Caine Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Sally Ballentine as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. From running the Ballentine household as a busy mom to years of working as a legal assistant, Sally has a broad range of experience in serving people. Most recently, she spent over ten years employed as a real estate agent with local builders. Sally is thrilled to bring her talent to her position as a REALTORÒ with Coldwell Banker Caine. Sally is grateful for the opportunities real estate has given her to meet new people. She enjoys coaching her clients through their transactions as she works to make the process stressfree. In her spare time, Sally volunteers in local schools in Greenville County. “We are extremely thankful Sally has joined our team,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her years of experience and passion for the industry are a wonderful addition to the office.”

Patrick Furman Joins Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty is pleased to announce the addition of Realtor Patrick Furman to the company. Furman Owner and CEO Joan Herlong said, “Patrick’s years of experience in the title sector of the Real Estate industry has given him a unique perspective on the marketplace. Patrick has owned and managed his own company for the past 8 years, and his expertise will be a wonderful asset for our clients.” Patrick Furman was born and raised

in Upstate New York. He chose to relocate to Greenville after falling in love with the area after visiting with his wife. Patrick has been in the title sector of real estate for 15 years, operating his own regional title search and property research company for the past 8 years. When he chose to move to Greenville, he felt becoming a Real Estate agent would be a perfect next step in his career. Says Furman, “I believe wholeheartedly that the more informed you are, the better decisions you will make. I look forward to drawing on my experience in title services to guide clients through each aspect of the real estate process, arming them with the knowledge they need to make a sound decision. I am honored to be a part of Joan Herlong’s company.”

Nicole Tucker Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Nicole Tucker as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. In her previous career as a leasing proTucker fessional, Nicole realized her love for managing details and helping people find a place to call home. She is ready to take the next step in real estate by putting her skills to use as a REALTOR. A born and raised Upstate native, Nicole has loved watching the area change and grow. For fun, Nicole spends time with her family and stays active by riding bikes and hiking. She gives back to the community by actively participating as a member of the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution). “It is a pleasure to have Nicole join our Greenville office,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her attention to detail and passion for real estate will benefit our team greatly.”

the nation’s leading residential real estate companies. According to a research report produced by REAL Trends, the 500 largest residential real estate brokerage firms in the nation closed over 3.2 million residential sales transactions in 2017. These transactions represent approximately one-third of all new and resale transactions completed by brokers during the year, yet the  REAL Trends 500represented less than one-half of one percent of all brokerage firms. The 500-ranked brokers closed 3.2 million home transactions with a value of over $1.1 trillion during 2017, up from $1.0 trillion in the calendar year 2016. Included in The 500 is Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS headquartered in Greenville, SC. C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS closed 4,473 transactions for a combined sales volume of over $1 billion in 2017, ranking it as the top firm in the Upstate of South Carolina. This year’s survey represents the most comprehensive collection of data assembled on the leaders of the residential brokerage industry. Numbers are documented by outside accounting firms. “Housing sales in the nation were up 1.1 percent in 2017 from 2016. REAL Trends 500 firms were up 3.3 percent in the same period,” said Steve Murray, president of REAL Trends. “For the fourth year in a row, the nation’s largest brokerage firms gained market share.” It took 1,899 transactions to be included in this year’s  REAL Trends 500, up from a minimum of 1,843 transactions a year ago. In 2016, there were 235 firms recording over $1 billion in residential sales while there were 274 firms that accomplished this in 2017. To view the rankings, go to  https:// www.realtrends.com/rankings/rt500.

Coldwell Banker Caine Spartanburg Celebrates Grand Opening

Coldwell Banker Caine will hosted a grand opening of its new headquarters at 151 S. Daniel Morgan Avenue and artist REAL Trends 500 Ranks Nation’s reception recently. The party featured Largest Real Estate Firms the artwork of featured artist, Page Jones Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Davis, a ribbon cutting, live music, and a REALTORS Ranks #1 for Upstate South Carolina celebration of the company’s 85th year of REAL Trends, the trusted source for business in the Upstate. news and research about the real estate brokerage industry, announced the results of the 2018 REAL Trends 500, an independently verified compilation of

Crossword puzzle: page 50

Sudoku puzzle: page 50

 WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@ communityjournals.com


APRIL 21 & 22 Welcome spring with the perfect pairing of fresh flowers and fine art at the GCMA. Twenty local floral designers and garden enthusiasts will interpret works of art, creating imaginative displays that celebrate the GCMA permanent collection! Fine Art + Flora Weekend is free and open to the public on Saturday and Sunday. In addition to admiring the art and arrangements throughout the weekend, guests can enjoy an Ikebana demonstration on Saturday afternoon, and, for a small charge, take part in Saturday’s “Bouquet to Go” workshop, using fresh flowers. The weekend begins Friday, April 20, with a Preview Party ($50 per person) showcasing the flowers at their peak of freshness. To learn more or to purchase Preview Party tickets, visit gcma.org/flora

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal FA+F Print.indd 2

admission free

3/6/18 11:51 AM


ARTS & CULTURE

BROOKS BRACKETT’S POP CULTURE-INSPIRED ART page

INTERNATIONAL BALLET’S TWIN DANCERS page COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

37

35

A NOT-SO ‘PERFECT WEDDING’ page

38

Art by Brooks Brackett

04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOKING BACK Laurie Anderson reflects on her enduring 50-yearcareer in new book

mental as you were in the days when you had almost nothing, the days when you were physically cutting tape or looping tape around the room. Now that everyone uses the same digital tools in sound and image, it’s harder to make something new.

VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

Again, I’m not someone who regrets. I like to use what I’ve got and use it as well as I can, but I’m not someone who goes, “Boy, the old days were a lot more interesting.” It’s hard to make work with pencils; it’s hard to make work with computers. It’s hard to make something that’s beautiful and meaningful no matter what the material is.

So, do you miss those limitations?

vharris@communityjournals.com

To try to sum up the career of the avantgarde artist, composer, musician, and film director Laurie Anderson in the space we have is an impossible task. Suffice it to say that, over a nearly 50-year career, Anderson has created multimedia art installations; collaborated with, among many others, the Kronos Quartet, Peter Gabriel, Jean-Michel Jarre, and William Burroughs; directed multiple short and full-length films; and created a massive conceptual piece called “United States,” a combination of musical numbers, spoken word pieces, and animated vignettes about America that ran nearly eight hours. Anderson took some time recently to look back at her various projects, including

What’s your plan for your reading at the Governor’s School?

Laurie Anderson. Photo by Ebru Yildiz

some that were never finished or released, with “All the Things I Lost in the Flood: Essays on Pictures, Language, and Code,” a comprehensive and idiosyncratic look back at her career. As part of the Governor’s School for the Arts & Humanities’ Presidential Guest Artist Series (sponsored by The Graham Foundation and First Citizens Bank), Anderson will bring her typical ex-

HUMANS AND ANIMALS

perimental spirit to Greenville on Friday, creating a multimedia presentation based on the book and meeting with students from the Governor’s School and the Fine Arts Center. We spoke with Anderson recently about the book, her career, and her plans for her time at the Governor’s School.

What was it like looking back at your career with this book? I learned that I’ve been building on some of the same ideas in ways that I hadn’t been aware of, themes that were a little more buried than I thought. I thought, “Wow, I haven’t had a new idea in 40 years!” I tried to include things that didn’t work out, because I find that so-called failures are in many ways just as interesting as the things that are successes. So I included a lot of those. I also wanted to make the point that sometimes when I was making one thing, it easily turned into another. If it was a failure as a string quartet, it might have ended up being a great installation.

Are there any projects that you regret not finishing?

April 20 & 21 at 8pm and April 22 at 3pm / Gunter Theatre Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor / Lisa Kiser, Piano / David Gross, Piano / Hugh Floyd, Narrator

No, I don’t evaluate myself like that. I try to go forward and learn what I can from things, and I like that when something doesn’t work as one thing, they’re really interesting as others.

Did anything from the past inspire whatever your next project might be? Definitely. I’m glad you mentioned that, because I found a lot of things that were like, “Wow, this is especially interesting,” particularly some of the sound work. Electronic instruments are very fussy about the way they direct the shape of music, and sometimes you’re not able to be as experi-

For tickets or more information call (864) 467-3000 www.greenvillesymphony.org Journal Print 1/4 pg Humans/Animals.indd 2

4/9/18 2:48 PM

It’s almost like bringing the book back to life because it started as performances and then it got written down, and that’s one way to preserve things but not the ideal way. Instead of standing there and reading the book, I’m going to retell it, let’s put it that way. You can tell when someone’s reading as opposed to speaking. When someone’s reading, you can hear the punctuation. But when they’re speaking, you can hear all the natural hesitations and pauses and things that happen while you’re thinking. Like this conversation right now; I’m not just reading something; I’m trying to think of what the next word will be. And that’s the kind of rhythm that’s usually in my work, so the presentation of the book will be more like that than the reading.

And what about your conversations with the students? I’m very curious about what they’re thinking these days. I want to throw it over to them. I am very sure it’s challenging to be a student these days because they’re being asked to participate in some of our bigger cultural dilemmas. Since they’ve been thrown into this gun crisis, they’re required to have an opinion about it. They have a much bigger stake in it now that students have become targets of gun violence. Art and culture and politics are all connected, and my work naturally falls within those boundaries.

LAURIE ANDERSON WHEN Friday, April 13, 7:30 p.m. WHERE Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, 15 University St. TICKETS Event is free, but tickets are required INFO https://bit.ly/2FH9ZUv


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE For graphic designer Brooks Brackett, great projects come from small ideas SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

Brooks Brackett, lead graphic designer at Redhype, believes that simple, thoughtful ideas from everyday inspirations can be the most rewarding. This proves true from two of his most recent projects, a piece inspired by the Academy Award-winning movie “Get Out,” and a commissioned piece inspired by the blockbuster hit “Black Panther.” Brackett is a Greenville native who has spent most of his life here, other than attending the Art Institute in Charlotte, N.C., for graphic design. “I have always been interested in art since I was a kid, probably the age of 3,” Brackett says. “I made my first logo, even though at the time I thought it was just a symbol, at age 10 for my skateboarding team.” Brackett has always been inspired by skateboarding culture and says that it was his first glimpse into art. Brackett says, “That’s where it first started was skateboarding with friends and emulating the artwork.” Brackett has grown vastly as an artist and designer, but still finds inspiration in the simple things in life — conversations with friends, movies, musicians he likes, and nature. Brackett has long been a fan of “Get Out” writer and director Jordan Peele. “Ever since his early ‘Mad TV’ days, and it was his first film so I had to go see it. It was a great film,” Brackett says. He was inspired by the popular horror movie and noticed that Peele had

posted some fan art on his Instagram page. Brackett created a few pieces and then shared them, in hopes that Peele would see. Peele not only saw the art but reposted it to his own Instagram page, and went on to publish it in a book, which was a compilation of about 30 pieces of art by fans (out of more than 100 that he posted on his page) inspired by the film. “I definitely wasn’t expecting that to come out of my sketches,” Brackett says. “He sent me a book, and I’ve been trying to keep it away from things to keep it nice and clean.” Brackett was also recently commissioned by the Carolina Panthers to create a promotional piece based on the team’s logo to coincide with the release of “Black Panther,” Marvel’s latest blockbuster hit. “It actually took place in like two days, so the deadline was very tight. I definitely wasn’t expecting it to get that much exposure. ‘SportsCenter’ got a hold of it. It kind of went a little viral. So, I wasn’t expecting that either,” Brackett says. “The Panthers are probably my new favorite client. It was challenging; it was unexpected; it was everything that you would want in dealing with a client. Even though it was just a quick commission, it was very rewarding,” he says. Brackett puts emphasis on how small projects or simple inspirations can reap the most rewards. “Great rewards come from pretty small ideas, even just simple conversations. It’s just a matter of writing it down and revisiting it, exploring it and hashing it out, seeing what it can grow into,” Brackett says. “A lot of my favorite ideas have started out that way. That can apply with business, art, music. It can really apply to any creative avenue.” Brackett is quietly incredibly driven.

He does not boast over the time spent on any project and is constantly working to improve his craft. “I like to draw, which is surprisingly something that not every designer does, but it can really enhance your work if done correctly,” Brackett says. “I’m trying to figure out how to paint, which is surprisingly harder than I thought it would be. I like to do things with my hands.”

He believes in following your passion in order to find success. Brackett explains, “I think the bigger message is just to do what you love to do, have fun with whatever it is that you want to pursue in life. It might not be that fun at the start, but it can be very rewarding if you stick with it. That’s one thing that art has taught me, because when I first started I had no idea I could make a career out of it.” Brackett’s next move it to continue to try new things and move outside of his comfort zone. “I like to challenge myself. I painted this and then I want to see if I can make something better next month,” he says. “It’s almost like a process of never really being satisfied, but being satisfied enough that you appreciate yourself. You always want to be a little uncomfortable.” Brackett is constantly looking for new media to master, as he dabbles in creating music on his computer and hopes to explore motion design in the future. “I want my pictures to start moving,” he says. “I want them to start interacting and talking, and I think that’s the next big step going forward. If you really enjoy something, just do it.”

Greenville graphic artist Brooks Brackett (right) was commissioned by the Carolina Panthers to create a promotional piece based on the team’s logo, coinciding with the release of “Black Panther” (above).

To see more of Brackett’s work, check out www.brooksbrackett.com, or his Instagram page.


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CHORD CHANGES Finding Freedom’s slow-build, cross-genre EP reflects its multifaceted lineup WORDS BY VINCENT HARRIS

Finding Freedom. Photo provided

Cure your Spring Fever with Colorful Accents from 4Rooms

20% OFF

any 1 item of your choice Excludes local art. Can’t be combined with any other offer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Expires 4/18/18.

GIFTS • HOME DECOR • OCCASIONAL PIECES • ACCENTS 864-241-0100 2222 augusta street, unit 1 4roomsgreenville.com mon-sat 10am-6pm; sun 1-5pm

The title of the new EP by the Upstate band Finding Freedom is “Genre Is a Social Construct,” and it’s a concept the band spends the five songs on the EP espousing. While there are certainly familiar elements in play, like big, warmly strummed electric guitar chords, moments of crunching hard rock, and even a touch of progressive rhythms and song structures, every song on the EP sounds entirely different from the one before it. That’s not to say it doesn’t hang together. In fact, thanks to the production efforts of Andrew Oliver (from another Upstate band, Brother Oliver) and the mixing skills of Marshall Hewett of Charlotte, N.C.’s Transit Recording Studio, the sound is seamless and crisp, sounding for all the world like it was recorded, mixed, and mastered on a six-figure budget over several months rather than on a shoestring in a few weeks. “Genre Is a Social Construct” was very carefully created by the band — singer/guitarist Robert Lindblad, lead guitarist Josh Hutson, and bassist Dan Johnson — to be the best possible introduction to a multifaceted group. “Rob writes most of the music, and he’ll bring us a song that’s totally different from the last one he wrote,” Johnson says. “And we wanted to have a song selection on this EP that was very varied.” In order to make sure the EP had an impact, Finding Freedom, who will play an EP release show Friday at The Spinning Jenny

in Greer, doesn’t open the proceedings with “God of Your Own World” or “Wasted,” the two heaviest songs; instead, it slowly builds from the more subdued, almost countrytinged ballad “Nowhere I Belong,” creating a path for the listener. “We didn’t want too much shock factor where you have a song that’s really super chill, then something heavy, then something chill again,” Johnson says, “so we made sure it was a progression.” Lindblad adds that the way the band approached the EP is the same way it typically approaches its live shows. “We try to structure setlists for the shows, and definitely songs from the album, so that they flow,” he says. “Music is all about a journey I think, and that’s what we keep in mind.” There’s an intricacy to the band’s songs that comes out with repeated listens, particularly with Hutson and Lindblad’s guitars. The two weave chords and solos so effectively that it often sounds like three or four guitars playing instead of two. And because Finding Freedom started as a trio with no drummer (and, in fact, the band still doesn’t have a full-time percussionist), the band’s arrangements have more breathing room than most traditional four-piece groups. “We didn’t have a drummer for the first four or five months,” Hutson says. “We just practiced with the three of us, so we groove off of each other more than the drums.” “A lot of people start with drums when they write a song, and I’m the opposite,” Lindblad says. “That’s actually what I struggle with the most.” None of the songs’ various attributes would have come through as well if not for the firstrate production and mixing, which is interesting because the people responsible for those tasks worked completely separately. “We originally went into the studio with Andrew Oliver and he did all the basic tracking,” Johnson says. “But while he was mixing, we ran into a time issue because Brother Oliver was about to go on tour. And then when we started getting short on time, Andrew actually looked at us and said, ‘You should have one person mix and master this.’” That’s where Marshall Hewett came in. “He had the stems of the songs, and he was able to do it in three or four weeks,” Hutson says. “I loved working with both of them.”

FINDING FREEDOM

W/ ESTUARIE, THE APARTMENT CLUB, AND THE SOULFEATHERS WHEN Friday, April 13, 7 p.m. WHERE The Spinning Jenny 107 Cannon St., Greer TICKETS $9 adv, $13 door INFO 864-469-6416, www.thespinningjennygreer.com/


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

DANCE, DANCE Twins share lead role in International Ballet’s ‘Coppélia’

with IB before heading off to college because it is a full 90-minute ballet, and not a series of excerpts, and its comedic storyline requires as much acting as dancing. Set to the music of Léo Delibes, “Coppélia” follows an eccentric toymaker, Dr. Coppelius, who is determined to bring his most recent life-sized doll, Coppélia, to life. Meanwhile, a friendly village girl, Swanhilda, and her fiancé, Franz, become curious about the mysterious girl that they see in Dr. Coppelius’ shop, not realizing she’s only a doll. When Swanhilda and Franz try to sneak into Dr. Coppelius’ shop and are discovered, a chaotic chain reaction, comic impersonations, and a dramatic — but happy — conclusion follow.

ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

Identical twins Lydia and Logan Acker, 18, are anything but in personality. Lydia is the more outgoing of the two — laughing and bubbly — and possibly less disciplined, while Logan, the shy one, keeps Lydia in check. They both agree on these assessments, offering various anecdotal examples as proof. The most obvious is that they often hate each other’s favorite music. But the one thing they do nearly identically, and have done since they were 4 years old, is ballet. And as supportive as they are of each other, they are also fiercely competitive and drive each other to work harder. “There were definitely times when I wanted to quit ballet, and Logan was like ‘No, I want to keep doing it,’ so I was like, ‘Yeah, because Logan’s doing it, I’ll do it too,’” Lydia says. “I think being able to do it together really helped us stick with it.”

“COPPÉLIA,” PRESENTED BY INTERNATIONAL BALLET Lydia and Logan Acker. Photos provided

role and bring — although we’re doing the same acting, the same steps — like, to bring something different in our own individual personalities to the role,” Logan says. And since they are equally as accomplished ballerinas, it will be difficult even if the audience attends both performances, to tell the difference. But there

“There were definitely times when I wanted to quit ballet, and Logan was like ‘No, I want to keep doing it,’ so I was like, ‘Yeah, because Logan’s doing it, I’ll do it too.’” Lydia Acker Lydia and Logan Acker began their dance instruction at 4 years old at International Ballet Academy. Photo provided

Now as high school seniors who have danced together or shared roles in every performance to date, they will close out this stage of their young careers on April 14 and 15, performing as Swanhilda, the lead role in the classical ballet “Coppélia,” with International Ballet. They won’t actually be dancing together, though, this time. To give them both the chance to play the lead in “Coppélia,” Logan will dance Saturday night, and Lydia will dance the Sunday matinee. “It’s been interesting to share the same

are nuances to their partnering and arm movements, for instance, to which their partner, Gabriel Paluszak, who plays the male lead, will adjust. Lydia tends to have a more assertive style and Logan is more controlled in her movements, the Ackers say. The “Coppélia” performances have even more significance for the Ackers since they began their instruction at the company’s affiliate, International Ballet Academy, almost 14 years ago. As IB’s founder and the Ackers’ first teacher, Lena Forster,

WHEN April 14, 7:30 p.m.; April 15, 3 p.m.

points out, they are the only two students in the studio’s history to have begun and completed their instruction there. The twins say they are thrilled to dance in this particular production as their last

WHERE Peace Center Gunter Theatre, 300 S. Main St. TICKETS $35 INFO www.peacecenter.org

FREE PIZZA!

Sidewall Pizza Is Offering This “Buy 1 Pizza, Get 1 Free” Voucher For All Hungry Greenville Journal ! Readers. ! This is a Time Sensitive Offer and Expires at 9PM on Saturday, April 21st 2018.!

Available at all 3 Sidewall locations. Please ! present this voucher at time of ordering. ! Dine-In only. Not valid with any other offers. Warning: the ice cream is delicious.


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

A R T S C A LE N DA R APR. 13 -19

Main Street Friday

Conspiracy Band Apr. 13~ 232-2273 Peace Center

Billy Currington Apr. 13 ~ 467-3000 SC Children’s Theatre

Dragons Love Tacos Apr. 13-14 ~ 235-2885 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Frank McGrath Through Apr. 13 ~ 467-3132 Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra

One Voice: Daybreak Freedom

Photo by Escobar Photography

Apr. 14 ~ 409-1050 International Ballet

Coppelia Apr. 14-15 ~ 467-3000 North Greenville University

Beauty and the Beast Through Apr. 14 ~ 977-7085 Peace Center

Brian Regan Apr. 15 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain Apr. 17 ~ 467-3000 SC Children’s Theatre

Once Upon an Orchestra Apr. 17 ~ 235-2885 Downtown Alive

The Eric Weiler Group Apr. 19 ~ 232-2273 Fine Arts Center

Spring Dance Concert Apr. 19-20 ~ 355-2550 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Nadia Barbotin & Harlan Lovestone Through Apr. 20 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Works by Nathan Bertling Through Apr. 29 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art

Carl Blair: GCMA Collection Through May 20 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Material Transformation Through May 23 ~ 735-3948 WXYZ @ Aloft Hotel

Works by Marian and Melanie Pouch Through May 31 ~ 313-5708

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT GLT’s ‘Perfect Wedding’ is a finely tuned farce NEIL SHURLEY | CONTRIBUTOR

“Perfect Wedding,” opening this weekend at Greenville Little Theatre, contains all the elements you’d expect from a classic farce: slamming doors, mistaken identities, comedic chaos, and a flying toilet brush. Wait. A toilet brush? “Oh, yeah,” says actor Graham Shaffer. “We’ve got toilet brushes flying across the stage.” “That’s actually the seventh character in the play,” actor Jenell Kosmicki says. “The toilet brush.” Shaffer and Kosmicki play a bride and groom getting ready for their noon wedding. Shaffer begins explaining the plot. “Bill, the groom, wakes up on the morning of his wedding with someone in his bed —” “Who isn’t his fiancée,” Kosmicki chimes in. “And his fiancée is on her way to the hotel.” “We’ve booked the suite for today so she can get ready for the noon wedding, and I wake up with a mystery woman beside me,” Shaffer continues. “My best man, who is supposed to be arranging everything, comes in and finds me disheveled.” “And they’re trying to keep it from the bride,” Kosmicki says, “and trying to fix it.” “And it just snowballs into more and more lies as the play progresses,” Shaffer says. “The best man’s girlfriend and the maid get involved, and then the bride’s mother comes in just when everything is

coming to a head.” “And that,” Kosmicki says, “just creates more chaos.” “Perfect Wedding” is Kosmicki’s first show since high school. “I went to a college that wasn’t really centered around the arts, and after that, I had night jobs and children, and they can cramp your style,” she says, laughing. “But in the last few years, as my kids have gotten older, I’ve just felt this desire to try to do it again.” After “bombing” an audition for another GLT show, she told her husband she was done — but he encouraged her not to quit. “He told me I need to go try, that even if it’s terrible, I just need to go get the experience, and get more confidence and do it. So I did. And I’m here! And I’m really excited to be here!” By contrast, Shaffer is a local theater veteran and works as GLT’s technical director. So not only does he have to worry about his performance, he has to make sure all the doors slam correctly. “There are a lot of slamming doors,” Kosmicki says. “It’s been hectic but a lot of fun,” Shaffer says. “It’s a great cast; we all gel really well with each other. But it’s tough because this farce is so particular with the way things are worded, and everything has to be exactly right.” “It takes a lot of practice,” Kosmicki says. “A lot of fine-tuning.” “Having Allen McCalla as director is great because he knows how to tell you what you’re doing wrong and how to fix it,” Shaffer says. “He knows exactly what he wants and he gets you to do that. And

I love that.” “And he’s always right,” Kosmicki adds. “He gives you the freedom to try something different, but in the end, he’s right because he’s got such a great vision for it.” “We’re at that point now where we’ve learned the lines, we know our blocking, now we’ve got to find the fun and the juice,” Shaffer says. “We have to find out which moments we can really squeeze and get that comedy out of it. And we’re discovering that every day more and more. Like having the doors changed everything — they become characters in the play, and the timing of slamming two of them at once when you can’t see that person on the other side of the stage, and knowing there’s a door slam between these two lines, and just little things like that. There’s so much detail that we have to practice over and over again so that the audience doesn’t think we practiced so much.” Shaffer and Kosmicki call the show a roller coaster. “It’s so quick moving,” Kosmicki says. “It’s probably going to be about an hour and 45 minutes,” Shaffer says, “but it feels like 15 minutes.” “It does!” Kosmicki adds. “It really does! And we’re cracking ourselves up. It really is fun.”

“PERFECT WEDDING” WHEN April 13-29; times vary WHERE Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. TICKETS $28 INFO greenvillelittletheatre.org


COFFEE COMMUNITY

feast

Josh Williams, founder of Mauldin Coffee Co. Photo provided

Be a Part of the Mauldin Coffee Co. movement at https://kck.st/2HlU8fI

Mauldin Coffee Co. launches Kickstarter to open permanent location this year ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

C

ollaboration over competition is more than just a trendy phrase for Josh Williams, founder of Mauldin Coffee Co. It’s a key idea informing his business decisions for his newly launched venture to bring a coffee shop to his hometown of Mauldin. It’s so central to his business model that in order for Mauldin Coffee Co. to have a permanent location within the year, Williams is asking the community to pitch in via a Kickstarter that runs through April 28. He needs to reach $30,000, which will help secure the 1,200-square-foot building he has his eye on, the location of which he will disclose after he’s signed the lease. Having already invested a significant amount of personal funds and lined up committed baristas, Williams is prepared to continue fundraising if the Kickstarter isn’t fulfilled. But, he’s hopeful his particular skills with people and desire to launch a business he thinks Mauldin is lacking will resonate with others who want the same thing. To communicate his vision, Williams has developed core values for Mauldin Coffee Co.: Everybody has a seat at the table; Kindness is cool; Every drink is a work of art; We don’t have customers — we have family. All of this was borne out of wishful thinking he rouCOMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

tinely expressed while driving past Eddie’s Corner Market on the corner of East Butler Road and Bon Air Street, which was the first location Williams looked at but did not choose. “I started telling my wife, ‘Wouldn’t it be awesome if a coffee shop was there?’” Williams says. “That slowly turned into, ‘Wouldn’t it be awesome if I opened up a coffee shop there?’” After a couple months of discussion and spending time around other entrepreneurs while working for Showcase Marketing, Williams, who has worked as a church worship leader in human resources and marketing, began to think his crazy idea wasn’t so far-fetched. He tabled the idea after a couple job changes that helped add more management skills to his resume, but it kept creeping back in. “That coffee shop just stayed there, and as I started putting all these new tools in my tool belt, I started going, like, ‘What would it look like if we could start this back up?’” he says. Williams met with a couple friends who challenged him to push past his excuses — “It’s going to be hard”; “I don’t know if I’ll make money”; “I’m not a morning person,” he says. But, he has the passion. “I taught myself how to do coffee a couple years ago, and really fell in love with the science of it,” he says. Williams experienced his first pour-over coffee preparation almost four years ago in Dakar, Senegal, while there leading worship for a missions conference. “It was a game changer,” he says. When he returned home, he started buying coffee paraphernalia and getting serious about perfecting the process.

Soon after, Methodical Coffee opened in downtown Greenville, and Williams further developed his palate there. His plan, however, is not to be exclusive, catering only to those with his particular tastes, but rather, the exact opposite. “What makes our shop different is that it’s not just coffee,” he says. “A big aspect is community. Comes back from my ministry background. I’m good with people.” So whether his customers order tea, black coffee, lattes, or a little bit of coffee with their cream and sugar, they are all treated the same. “My goal is to try to make them feel like they’re welcome,” Williams says. “I wanted to build a place that gave everybody a seat. So that’s where our first value comes from. There’s no judgment. You don’t get that weird look.” After sampling locally roasted coffee, Williams has chosen instead to source the beans his shop will use from Steadfast Coffee in Nashville, Tenn., whose motto is “Everything Well Considered.” And that wasn’t because the local options weren’t excellent. Williams says he’d rather provide coffee that wouldn’t compete with local coffee shops already serving the same beans. The coffee shop, as Williams envisions it, will be visually driven. “Every angle is meant to be photographed,” he says. That includes every aspect of the customer experience — from the way the tables feel, how the walls look, and how the light interacts. Every drink will be set down at the exact angle with the best presentation, like a high-end restaurant, whether it’s a cup of black coffee or a latte. The aesthetic will be clean and modern with a prominent white quartz or marble coffee bar, and also use gray, white, and burnt orange accents as a nod to Mauldin. “Everything matters,” Williams says. 04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39


feast

small plates

April 19 | 6:30 p.m. | Studio 220 | Hyatt Regency

Blues Brothers

Three pieces of news here worth noting. First, Blues Boulevard jazz venue is under new ownership now by Freddy Foster and Julius Tolbert, two Upstate restaurateurs with quite the interesting resumes, which include merchandising in the music biz, selling a successFOOD NEWS ful pizza chain to Silicon Valley Restau& EVENTS rant Group, managing various Upstate BY ARIEL TURNER restaurants, and throwing great house parties. Blues Boulevard sits squarely in their wheelhouse of Southern hospitality with some rhythm and blues. Second, these two entrepreneursturned-friends have partnered to form a restaurant consulting group, Cornbread Consultants. They want to use their years of experience in food & bev to help other owners be successful. Blues Boulevard is their first official venture, and they’re looking for more. And third, maybe most importantly, the chef they’ve hired to redo the menu at Blues Boulevard and act as corporate chef for Cornbread Consulting is a former Brazwells and Nose Dive cook who is cranking out some seriously tasty dishes. Chef Gee Jones, as he’s known in the kitchen, did a stint in Columbia but is now back in Greenville. His dry-rub wings, collard green dip, and Hoppin’ John, for instance, are exactly the type of Southern fare you’d want to eat by the Reedy River with a jazz accompaniment.

No more mussels So, the good news is there will still be a restaurant in the BIN112 space at 112 Trade St. in downtown Greer. The bad news is that Jason and Lori Clark, co-owners of BIN112 for the last 10 years, have sold the property and are closing the beloved Greer restaurant. Jeff Gossett, who opened Select Restaurant in 2015 in Spartanburg, purchased the property and will be opening his second location. And nothing against Gossett or the future success of Select, but if you ever enjoyed dinner at BIN112 over the last decade, you know he has some big mussels to fill. More like big buckets of mussels for less than $20. They truly were one of the best deals in town, and many people will miss them. The Clarks will continue to operate their other restaurant, The Strip Club 104, at 104 E. Poinsett St., Greer. “We would like to thank all of our devoted customers, friends, and family for your continuous support over the last 10 years,” said Jason Clark, chef and co-owner. “We are so proud of the strides our team has made during this time and of the awe-inspiring amount of blood, sweat, and tears they have dedicated to the growth and success of BIN112. After our best year ever, we are closing and are excited that something new and fresh will take our place.”

See where your food comes from

Our Sponsors

Greenbrier Farms will host its ninth annual plant sale on April 14, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., rain or shine. They’ll be selling certified organic starter plants (heirloom tomatoes, pepper varieties, squash, cucumbers, okra, eggplant, herbs, flowers, and more) — all from the farm. Also available will be Greenbrier’s pastured and grass-fed meats and other local vendors’ landscaping plants. The farm is located at 766 Hester Store Road, Easley.

ICYMI from UBJ

Patrons Marla Rogers, State Farm Insurance | Mitch & Suzanne Gault | VFW of Simpsonville

Larkin’s Restaurants, which has opened Limoncello, Grill Marks at Haywood Mall, and a new catering and events center in the last year, has signed a lease for the 6,000-square-foot, second-floor location of the building also occupied by The Greenville News at East Broad and Falls streets. This is the first of many forthcoming restaurant tenant announcements in the Camperdown development. Restaurant co-owner Larkin Hammond says the space includes a patio, dining for 250 guests, private dining for 40 to 45 guests, and a conceptual kitchen/dining room. The result will be unlike anything in Greenville, she says. The lease for Larkin’s on the River, 318 S. Main St., is up in 2022, but Hammond says this new concept will not be taking its place regardless of future plans.

40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

APR. 15

FESTIVAL

ShalomFest ’18

ShalomFest is the annual one-of-a-kind Jewish festival in the Upstate featuring educational programs, specialty foods, and entertainment. Admission is free, but tickets will be sold to purchase traditional Jewish foods and pastries. Tickets are $1, with foods ranging from one to 20 tickets. Festivalgoers will enjoy Jewish music and dance, tour exhibit rooms, attend a lecture, see cooking demonstrations, watch a mock Jewish wedding and Passover seder, and shop at vendor booths and gift shops. Children can enjoy bounce houses, crafts, and more at ShalomFest. Attendees should park at Temple of Israel or at Butler Springs Park (shuttle service provided). –Melody Wright

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

WHEN Sunday, April 15, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. WHERE Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road ADMISSION Free INFO www.templeofisrael.org/shalomfest 

PATRICK KELLEY “I have been using Corley for many years now. I have never encountered

workmanship or quality of work. Always very pleased.” — Sharon U., Greenville

a problem with the

Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

presented by

FRIDAYS, 5:30 PM - 9:30 PM FREE ADMISSION • NOMA SQUARE Full schedule at www.gvilleevents.com

(864) 908.3360

| W W W. CO R L E Y P R O. CO M


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT APR. 19 “Promoting Global Peace” Talk LUNCHEON

World Affairs Council Upstate and the Poinsett Military Interest Group will host a “Promoting Global Peace” talk by the Chairman of Coalition Forces for U.S. Central Command, Brigadier General Hans Ilis-Alm. At the luncheon, Ilis-Alm will explain nations’ workings to encourage peace and stability in CENTCOM’s area of responsibility and beyond. The CENTCOM Coalition includes 51 nations and was formed to fight terrorism after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Doors for the event at the Poinsett Club will open at 11:30 a.m., and the presentation will begin at noon. The event is open to the public, but tickets must be purchased online. –Melody Wright

WHEN Thursday, April 19, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. WHERE 807 E. Washington St. ADMISSION $30 for standard ticket, $25 for WACU/UI members INFO https://conta.cc/2qggtTX

BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA

Saturday, May 19

ON SALE NOW AT TICKETMASTER.COM • VENUE BOX OFFICE

Congratulations! Look who won a 3D printing pen from Craig Gaulden Davis

Tom Quinn (not pictured) Pictured are Randy Vogenberg and Ed Zeigler from Craig Gaulden Davis

North Greenville Rotary Club

E L F F A R R E P 2018 SU P U R C H A S E YO U R T I C K E T AT

www.RotaryRaffle.org

.


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

APR. 21

FESTIVAL

Community Tap Beer Festival

The Community Tap is hosting its sixth annual Craft Beer Festival at Fluor Field. The festival will feature over 60 craft breweries from all over the country. With over 110 rare beers to try, small-batch beers, funky seasonals, and one-off selections from each brewery will be the focus of this year’s festival. Festivalgoers will also celebrate the art of craft beer with live music, food, and fun. All who attend must be 21 or up; no children or pets allowed. Craft Beer Festival will be held no matter the weather — rain or shine. –Melody Wright

TLC

GARDEN DESIGN

Design. Transform. Enjoy. Specializing in landscape consultation and design, custom flower containers, annual and perennial beds Traci Carver/Horticulturist 864-553-9566 | carvertlc@yahoo.com

WHEN Saturday, April 21, 2-6 p.m. WHERE 945 S. Main St. ADMISSION $55 INFO http://fest.thecommunitytap.com/

APR. 27

FOOD & DRINK

Strawberry Festival at Swamp Rabbit Cafe

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery celebrates spring with cafe specials and festivities all day at its Strawberry Festival in support of local berry farmers. “Swamp Rabbit is committed to providing the community with food-centric events that highlight the most spectacular seasonal items,” events coordinator Rachel Pitman says. “Right now, it’s strawberry season in South Carolina, and 27 we’re going to celebrate.” The café will be serving berry foods and drinks for the day, including strawberry smoothies, strawberries and cream, strawberries with chocolate for dipping, strawberry dessert pizza (pizza and taps service begins at 5 p.m.), strawberry wine tasting, and strawberry beer on tap. The grocery’s strawberry items will also be on sale, including 20 percent off Jeni’s Strawberry Buttermilk Ice Cream and 20 percent off Modern Forestry Strawberry Rhubarb scented candles. Children can jump in the bounce house from noon-7 p.m. and get their faces painted from 1-6 p.m. “Festivalgoers can expect lots of exciting food items that showcase just how juicy, sweet, and delicious this year’s strawberries are,” Pitman says. –Melody Wright

WHEN Friday, April 27, 7:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. WHERE 205 Cedar Lane Road ADMISSION Free INFO http://swamprabbitcafe.com/events/


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Billy Currington w/ Drake White & The Big Fire Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. | 7:30 p.m. | $45-$65

It’s easy to think of the modern country singer as a carefully constructed product with just enough grit and twang to pass muster, and a lot of ready-made pop songs written by the Nashville assembly line. But Billy Currington breaks that mold in several respects. Sure, he’s got the requisite red-hot track record with singles; he’s hit the top of the country charts 11 times, starting with “Must Be Doing Something Right” in 2005 and continuing through “People Are Crazy,” “Hey Girl,” and “We Are Tonight.” But he’s also maintained his success for more than a decade, co-written a chunk of his own catalog, and resisted the urge to polish up his Georgia twang in a quest for crossover appeal. He’s also better at selling full albums than the average Nashville confection, moving nearly 10 million records in the past 10 years. In fact, his most recent album, “Summer Forever,” stayed on the Billboard charts for more than a year, spawning three No. 1 singles. –Vincent Harris

CONCERT

THERAPY FOR EVERYBODY

APR. 13

ANDERSON | BOILING SPRINGS | GREENVILLE | SIMPSONVILLE | SENECA

With 7 convenient locations... No Referral Required OFFICE HOURS: 7:00am to 6:00pm

In In In In

the Anderson area, call: Greenville/Simpsonville, call: the Seneca area, call: the Spartanburg area, call:

elitetherapycenters.com

864-964-0505 864-233-5128 864-886-0007 864-641-0175

THRU FRI

13

VISUAL ARTS

Art & Iron

Metropolitan Arts Council 16 Augusta St. Featuring works by Frank McGrath. 864-467-3132 | mac@greenvilleARTS.com www.greenvillearts.com/events/art-iron/ FRI

13

MUSIC

Furman Symphonic Winds

Furman University McAlister Auditorium | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8 p.m. | $15/adult, $10/seniors, $5/student Conducted by music professor Leslie W. Hicken, the Furman Symphonic Winds will present a concert featuring a Consortium World Premiere of music by David Werfelmann of St. Louis. His composition “On the Shoulders of Giants” is built around the scientific accomplishments of Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler. Each movement portrays the revelations these men made to further our understanding of the universe. Also conducting is Furman’s Director of Athletic Bands Jay Bocook, who will conduct Sousa’s “Free Lance March.” 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2q46gtF furmanmusic@furman.edu COMMUNITY

TR Town + Art Crawl

Main Street | Travelers Rest 6-8 p.m. | 5/11 & 6/8 | FREE The TR Town & Art Crawl is a grass-roots event series highlighting the Southern charm of Travelers Rest and bringing together our local business and arts community. The second Friday of the month through June, and Fall Series, September through November, we will meet on Main Street in downtown Travelers Rest. We’ll have local artists, live music performed at The Grove at Upcountry, and a Kids Crawl area with art activities and games just for them. www.travelersresthere.com/town-art-crawl/ CONCERT

Greenville Blues Festival

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 8 p.m. | $79, $64, $54 Greenville Blues Festival will feature Sir Charles Jones, Theodis Ealey, Pokey Bear, Nellie “Tiger” Travis, Lacee, and Lenny Williams. 800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com

FRI-SAT

13-21

PERFORMING ARTS

“Dragons Love Tacos”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre The Salvation Army Kroc Center 424 Westfield St. | $9 Dragons love tacos. They love chicken tacos, beef tacos, great big tacos, and teeny tiny tacos. So if you want a bunch of dragons at your party, you should definitely serve tacos. Buckets and buckets of tacos. Adapted from the New York Times best-seller, “Dragons Love Tacos” is a deliciously funny tale of new friends and the perfect snack, and is full of fiery fun for your entire family. 864-235-2885 www.scchildrenstheatre.org michelle@scchildrenstheatre.org THRU SAT

14

LESSONS & TRAINING

Fiction 101

Bobby Pearse Community Center 904 Townes St. 1-4 p.m. | Saturdays $45/class/city resident; $50/class/non-city residents; entire course - $225/city resident; $250/non-city resident Fiction 101 is geared towards the serious adult or young adult who has dreamed of writing fiction but didn’t have the tools to pursue that goal. Each class will include a short lecture, writing activities, feedback, and discussion. In an informal manner, local author Carol Baldwin, provides a blend of information and hands-on learning experiences. Registration caps at 15. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com SAT

14

PERFORMING ARTS

One Voice: Daybreak of Freedom

Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra Younts Performing Arts Center 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn 7:30 p.m. | $20 The Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Michael Moore, will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King with a one-night only performance of “One Voice: Daybreak of Freedom.” Jeremiah Dew, JDew, will be the narrator for this concert and will also bring you several


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Barre Fusion

The Pole Academy 637 Congaree Rd Suite G | 10-11 a.m. | $10 Barre Fusion is a ballet-based workout that incorporates Pilates, stretching, balance, and musicality. This class fuses the posture and discipline of ballet with pilates and various forms of exercise to create musically exciting and stress free class. Bring/wear pole/yoga wear, yoga mat, and water bottle. Space is limited to 15 spots. Must register online. 864-520-2834 | www.thepoleacademy.com info@thepoleacademy.com HEALTH & WELLNESS

Strike Out Parkinson’s

Greenville Area Parkinson Society Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-noon | FREE Please join us for the 5th Annual Strike Out Parkinson’s Fundraiser & Community Walk. Come to Fluor Field to walk around the baseball field with our community members living with Parkinson’s disease. This fun, inspiring event features live music, food, games, and information about how the Greenville Area Parkinson Society (GAPS) supports people with Parkinson’s in the Upstate and their caregivers. 864-905-2574 | www.strikeoutpd.com laryn@gapsonline.org

COMMUNITY

Cribbs Kitchen Burger Cook-Off

Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas corner of W. Main Street and Daniel Morgan Avenue, Spartanburg | 2-8 p.m. | FREE All proceeds from the event will benefit Children’s Cancer Partners and help to provide support for local children who are struggling with cancer and their families. The event features a friendly cooking competition giving participants the chance to sample slider-sized portions of the team burgers while enjoying live music by Missing Monday and The HanG, and children’s activities such as inflatables, face-painting, balloon animals, and even cornhole. New for 2018 participants will also be able to vote for the People’s Choice Winner and have a voice in ensuring their favorite burger creation is recognized. An after-party will be held on site through 8 p.m. 864-582-0673 www.childrenscancerpartners.org info@childrenscancerpartners.org CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Whiskeys for Whiskers

Southern Bleachery | 250 Mill St., Taylors 6-10 p.m. | $55/designated driver, $65/taste tester This is a tasting event for eight local distilleries that will benefit five area animal rescue organizations: Carolina Basset Hound Rescue, Carolina Poodle Rescue, k9.5 Rescue, Lucky Pup Rescue, and Paved Paws Animal League. The event has a speakeasy theme and will feature a best-dressed contest. A DJ and dance floor, silent auction, and mystery raffle round out the festivities. www.whiskeyforwhiskers.wixsite.com/rescue whiskeysforwhiskers@gmail.com

APR. 15

LITERATURE

Emry’s Write What You Know (Well Enough To Lie About) with Scott Gould 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | $75 This one-day workshop will explore how to use autobiographical incidents and information as the basis for writing fiction, specifically, a short story. There will be a no-fail, 100 percent guaranteed prompt designed to shake loose some long lost memories. There will be nuts-and-bolts

The company we keep makes it a pleasure to be in business. 2013 – BBB Integrity Award – 1st merchant processing company to win this award 2014 – A+ Better Business Bureau Rating 2015 – SC 15th Fastest Growing Small Business (SCBIZ Magazine) 2016 – INC 5000 - Tandem ranks 2442 Fastest Growing Private Company in the Nation

Finally there’s a local credit card processing company who does it right.

Together, A Better Way Forward. 728 N Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville | (864) 672-1570 | tandempayment.com Tandem is a registered ISO/MSP of Chase Paymentech Solutions, LLC. Tandem Innovative Payment Solutions LLC is a registered ISO of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Concord, CA

Radio Room | 110 Poinsett Highway | 8 p.m. | $7

The only problem with singer/pianist Eric Stevenson’s description of his duo, Pocket Vinyl, is that he sells himself short considerably. “It’s a duo of me kind of slamming the piano and screaming,” Stevenson says with a laugh, “and Elizabeth [Jancewicz] creating a masterpiece painting onstage, which we then auction off at the end of the show.” In truth, Stevenson does far more than slam the piano and scream; he’s got a knack for creating crisp, melodic pop songs with an emphasis on nakedly confessional lyrics, which he delivers onstage while Jancewicz paints next to him. “Every painting is different, and I have no idea what she’s going to paint before the show,” he says. “So each show is unique.” The group formed in 2010 after Stevenson decided to do a solo tour, but things got complicated. “I was going to just grab the keyboard and go on the road,” he says, “but around that same time, Elizabeth and I started dating, so we figured, why doesn’t she just come and paint onstage? We made money on our first tour, which doesn’t usually happen, and we thought, ‘Well, this kind of works!’” –Vincent Harris

The company you keep says a lot about you. • • • •

Pocket Vinyl

CONCERT

voices from his black history narrative stage performance, “One Voice.” Students will be admitted free of charge with a paying adult. www.yountscenter.org

discussions about conflict and character and setting. You will be required to tell some lies about the truth. The only things you need to bring to the workshop are your memory and a pencil. www.emrys.org/writing-room-workshops/ TOURNAMENT

New Fishing Tournament Hopes to Reel in Money for Eye Care

Lake Robinson | Greer | $100 The Greer Centennial Lions Club hopes to bring


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM new excitement of fishing for big bass with a tournament. The event, which is open to the public and sponsored by Greer CPW, will provide outdoor enthusiasts the opportunity to win $1,000 for the biggest fish and other top prizes. Registration is now open and applications can be found at the Lake Robinson warden’s office, Greer CPW and various bait and tackle shops around the Upstate. Participants must have a fishing license through the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and a boating and fishing permit through Greer CPW. www.document.li/bvaR www.document.li/DZYq PERFORMING ARTS

World of Dances 2018

Association for India’s Development, Clemson Chapter | Tillman Auditorium | 101 Gantt Circle, Clemson | 5-8 p.m. Early bird: $10 for students, $15 for non-students. Prices increase by $5 on the day World of Dances is Association for India’s Development (AID)- Clemson Chapter’s annual fundraiser. The proceeds from the event go towards providing kindergarten education to underprivileged kids in Murshidabad, West Bengal, India. 864-986-5844 | aid@clemson.edu http://aid.people.clemson.edu/ LITERATURE

Greenville Author Jessica Leake to Celebrate Launch of Debut YA Novel

Carolina Olive Oil | 104 S. Main St., Simpsonville 4-7 p.m. | FREE Greenville author Jessica Leake will be celebrating the launch of her debut young adult novel, “Be-

yond a Darkened Shore.” Fiction Addiction will be selling books on site, or you can pre-order online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Spring in Bloom Festival & Bazaar

Mauldin Garden Club Mauldin Cultural Center | 101 East Butler Road 9 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Hosted annually by the Mauldin Garden Club and the City of Mauldin, this spring festival is your chance to pick up everything you’ll need for your garden and home. Families and friends alike can listen to local bluegrass, enjoy a classic car show, and grab a bite to eat. 864-881-4426 | www.bit.ly/SpringInBloom18 mauldingardenclub@gmail.com THRU SUN

15

PERFORMING ARTS

“Mamma Mia!”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Thursdays-Sundays | $20-$35 The storytelling magic of ABBA’s timeless songs propels this enchanting tale of love, laughter, and friendship, creating an unforgettable show. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org SUN

15

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Spring Fling Pole Party & Easter Egg Hunt

The Pole Academy | 637 Congaree Rd Suite G 6-9 p.m. | $10 Join us for the best way to bring in the new season - a pole party and egg hunt. All levels welcome - no experience needed. Learn from all the students, watch the instructors perform

and get your Easter egg hunt on. Prizes up for grabs so come join in! First 12 party-goers get a free Easter basket to use during the Easter egg hunt. Bring a basket if you’re late to participate. Hunt starts at 7 p.m. 864-520-2834 | www.thepoleacademy.com info@thepoleacademy.com COMEDY

Brian Regan

Peace Center Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. | $40-$60 Fresh off of the November 2017 release of his first Netflix special, “Brian Regan: Nunchucks and Flamethrowers,” celebrated comedian Brian Regan comes to the Peace Center. Regan is the unique comedian whose material is relatable to generations of fans and revered by comedians as the best in the business. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org TUE

17

MUSIC

The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. 7:30 p.m. | $15-$45 The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain is a group of all-singing, all-strumming ukulele players that believes all genres of music are available for reinterpretation… as long as they are played on the ukulele. From Tchaikovsky to Nirvana, a concert by the Ukulele Orchestra is a virtuosic, twanging, foot-stomping obituary of rock ‘n’ roll and melodious light entertainment featuring only the bonsai guitar. By royal request, the orchestra proudly performed at

a private 90th birthday party for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org TUE-SAT

17-21

PERFORMING ARTS

“The Shadow Box” by Michael Cristofer

Furman University The Playhouse | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. $18/adult, $15/senior, $10/student In this Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play, three terminally ill patients, family members, and friends gather at a hospital where the patients agree to participate in a psychological protocol. In exchange for sharing their intimate thoughts with a resident psychiatrist, the patients can live out their days at the hospital. This is a compelling and compassionate play about the empowering act of self-realization – about the act of living one’s last days with courage, love, and dignity. 864-294-2125 | www.bit.ly/2uLBbkd Mickie.spencer@furman.edu WED

18

FOOD & DRINK

Environmentally Responsible Beer 3.0

Sierra Club Upstate Growler Hous of West Greenville | 12 Lois Ave. 6:30-8 p.m. | FREE Our April meeting will serve as a Sierra Club Spring Social, centering around the Upstate’s craft beer scene. We look forward to this yearly event as an opportunity for Sierrans to meet and mingle in a lively atmosphere. Come enjoy this opportunity to have fun and meet nice people, over a cold locally brewed beverage. www.sierraupstate.org

Smile More. Live More.

CROWNS IN ONE VISIT • WHITENING • VENEERS • ORTHODONTICS

1212 HAYWOOD RD., SUITE 300, GREENVILLE • 864-213-4442

W W W. M E Y E R D E N T I S T R Y. C O M


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

APR. 19

After Funk

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9:30 p.m. | $5

EXPAND YOUR PLAYLIST

CONCERT

After Funk is a pretty apt name for this Toronto quartet, because it takes danceable, funky grooves and moves them forward musically, working in heavy rock, extended, experimental jams, and nods to prog-rock and reggae, as well. The band formed in 2011 at the University of Western Ontario, and drummer Jaime Rosenberg says it came by its musical eclecticism honestly. “I think it just comes from all of us having such diverse influences,” he says. “Yanick [Allwood], our singer and keyboard player, he does most of the writing, and he comes from a gospel and classical background. The mix of that makes some interesting compositions. I come from more of a funk and rock and hip-hop background, [guitarist] Phil Tessis comes from jazz and fusion, and [bassist] Justin Bontje was a metal guy at one point.” Ultimately, though, there’s one place that all of the band’s musical influences converge. “It’s a big melting pot, but everyone likes feel-good, funky, groovy stuff,” Rosenberg says. “That’s kind of the common denominator.” –Vincent Harris WED-THU

18-19

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Comedy’s Best Kept Secret Tour

Rainer’s Cafe and Bar | 610 S Main St. $12 pre sale or $15 at door Blues Boulevard Jazz | 300 River St #203 | $10 7-8:30 p.m. Come see what happens when national touring comedians take over the town for one night only to raise money for the Liberty Humane Society. Dan Frigolette and Mia Faith Hammond and a few special guests in each city are Comedy’s Best Kept Secret - amazingly talented comedians who haven’t made it into the limelight...yet. All presold tickets come with a copy of Dan Frigolette’s new album, “Naked and Amused - comedy at a nudist colony.” Contains adult content. www.comedysbestkeptsecret.com THRU THU

19

LECTURE

The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Adult Workshops

Ramsaur Studio at Huguenot Mill 101 W. Broad St. 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Thursdays | FREE The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Peace Voices program presents spring adult workshops and span a series of days and ask participants to mine their own personal histories as poet-inresidence Glenis Redmond takes them through a variety of styles and all stages of the writing process with the theme “Poetry as Memoir.” 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org THU

19

MUSIC

Piano Ensembles Concert

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Smith Recital Hall | 15 University St. 7:30-9 p.m. | FREE Student pianists from the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities will perform a variety of music in two-person ensembles. Experience the talent of South Carolina’s young pianists who have performed in public schools across the state, as well as in European schools and in concert venues in Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, and Italy. 864-282-3945 | www.scgsah.org

FAMILY & EDUCATION

UWP Youth Writing Camps Preview Night

Clemson - Upstate Writing Project University Center Greenville 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive, Suite A-7 5-6:30 p.m. | FREE Come and learn about all five of our youth writing summer camps. Our camps cover from rising third-graders to rising 10th-graders. Our preview night will include an overview of each camp, Clemson goodies, raffle prizes, and a taste of what our camps are like. www.clemson.edu/upstate-writing-project/ camps/index.html YWC@upstatewritingproject.org

APRIL 28

RICKY SKAGGS &

KENTUCKY THUNDER

MAY 29

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured picture book “Harriet Gets Carried Away” by Jessie Sima. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com VISUAL ARTS

Peace of Triune Art Auction

Upstate Woman’s Club Studio 220 Hyatt Regency 6:30 p.m. | FREE For the sixth year, the Upstate Woman’s Club will host the Peace of Triune Art Auction benefiting Triune Mercy Center and its programs that minister to Greenville’s homeless. The evening will begin with a silent auction featuring art and other items contributed by area businesses, restaurants and attractions. A live auction will follow at 7:15 p.m. The Peace of Triune Art Auction features the works of visual artists in the Upstate along with those by artists in the Triune Art Room. www.facebook.com/peaceoftriune/ THU-SAT

19-21

FASHION & BEAUTY

Greenville Fashion Week

H Factor LLC The Village Green | 50 W Broad St. | $75 A fashion festival featuring local and national designers, models, photographers, hair and

LET LOVE RULE TOUR WITH SPECIAL GUESTS MELANIE FIONA AND TWEET

M AY 3 0

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org @peacecenter

GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM makeup artists. The festival is comprised of several events including fashion brunches, black tie parties, runway shows, and much more. The purpose of the event is to build the fashion blueprint in our wonderful city of Greenville, which has already established itself nationally, and to give the arts and fashion lovers another outlet and networking opportunity. Ultimately giving back to our community and the avantgarde thinkers in the Upstate. 864-360-4556 | www.gvlfashionweek.com info@gvlfashionweek.com

MAY 17–OCTOBER 7, 2018

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

THRU FRI

Fit for the Cure campaign

20

Wacoal’s Fit for the Cure events raise funds for breast cancer research, patient care, and community health programs. For every bra fitting, Wacoal will donate $2 to Susan G. Komen. For every Wacoal or b.tempt’d item purchased during the event, Wacoal donates an additional $2 Susan G. Komen. Local ev ents include March 31 at Macy’s at Haywood, April 18 at Belk at Town and Country Plaza, and April 20 at Belk at Haywood. FRI

20

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

One Main Roar

Clemson MBA Student Association 5th floor 1 N. Main Street 6-9:30 p.m. $50/student; $85/individual; $135/couple One Main Roar, the MBA Student Association fundraising event, will raise money to support the Greenville Health System ALS Clinic and the Upstate patients and families living with ALS. The evening will consist of speakers from the ALS clinic, dinner, beverages, a silent auction, and music. temcgee@clemson.edu

Dale Chihuly, Float Boat, 2014, 3 x 10 x 5’ Denver Botanic Gardens Copyright © Chihuly Studio

CONCERT

Little Big Town: The Breakers Tour

Make Biltmore your getaway—any day! SPE C I A L SP R I NG SA L E

on new Annual Passes April 1–May 11, 2018 biltmore.com/passoffer Purchase your new Biltmore Annual Pass for $109 plus tax. Savings of $65 based on regular $174 Biltmore Annual Pass. Some restrictions may apply.

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. Tickets start at $15 After launching a historic sold-out year-long residency at Nashville’s famed Ryman Auditorium, Grammy Award-winning vocal group Little Big Town will bring their critically acclaimed harmonies to the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. 800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com www.LittleBigTown.com FRI-SUN

20-22

MUSIC

Humans and Animals

Greenville Symphony Orchestra The Peace Center | 300 South Main St. $45-$55 We close our Chamber Orchestra season and welcome spring with the sunny music from three Mediterranean composers. Contrasting moods fill the hall, from the passionate drama of “Carmen,” to the sparkling humor and satirical take of Saint-Saens’ famous musical zoo, “Carnival of Animals,” featuring Lisa Kiser and David Gross on piano, and narrated by Furman University’s Music Department Chair, Hugh Floyd. 864-232-0344 | www.greenvillesymphony.org todd@greenvillesymphony.org PERFORMING ARTS

“The House Without Windows”

Electric City Playhouse | Anderson “The House Without Windows” is an original one-act written by Montessori school of Anderson senior Katie Homer-Drummond. It deals with the topics of depression in college

students and the struggle with handling mental health issues when you’re on your own for the first time. The show also incorporates a lot of art and music. There will be a talkback with the author, director, and actors after the show. thehousewithoutwindowscontact@gmail.com SAT

28

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Wheels for Meals Charity Ride

Meals on Wheels of Greenville Trailblazer Park 235 Trailblazer Dr., Travelers Rest 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. | $55 Join us for the 12th Annual Wheels for Meals Charity Ride. With four routes, a Family Fun Ride and a post-ride celebration, Wheels for Meals is perfect for cyclists of all ages and abilities. Proceeds further the Meals on Wheels of Greenville mission. 864-233-6565 | www.WheelsforMeals.com vvanvick@mowgvl.org BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

Catch the Wind

Kingdom Winds The Kroc Center | 424 Westfield St. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | $39 An event to empower, inspire, and unleash the full potential of Christian Creatives and Ministries. Join us in beautiful downtown Greenville for an exciting day of worship, prayer, instruction, and inspirational messages specifically designed for Christian authors, artists, musicians, and ministries. Kingdom Winds is a groundbreaking new enterprise and platform with a mission to advance the Kingdom by helping others fulfill their callings and prosper. www.eventbrite.com/e/catch-the-wind-tickets-43796730199 SUN

29

PERFORMING ARTS

Pan Harmonia: Pink Moon in the Sky - Harp and flute

Pan Harmonia Greenville Center for the Creative Arts Brandon Mill, 25 Draper St. 3-4:30 p.m. | $5-$40 Come enjoy a glass of wine with snacks and incredible art before an achingly beautiful acoustic concert. Iconic harpist Jacquelyn Bartlett and flutist Kate Steinbeck combine their expressive music mastery to create a program of sweeping sensations with music by GF Handel, Osvaldo LaCerda, Henk Badings, Dana Wilson, and Witold Lutoslawski. Bassoonist Rosalind Buda will join in trios by Adrienne Albert and Andre Jolivet. Seating is very limited for this special concert. Buy two adult tickets and get a third for free. 828-254-7123 | www.panharmonia.org office@panharmonia.org CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Red Ribbon Classic Celebration & Auction

Greenville Family Partnership Green Valley Country Club 225 Green Valley Road 5-8 p.m. | FREE Eat, drink, and fundraise with Greenville Family Partnership and Chris and Kelly’s HOPE Foundation. Our business casual event will feature heavy hors d oeuvres, drinks, and a silent and live auction. Last year’s auction featured over 85 incredible items for bid. Geoff Hart will emcee the evening and is sure to entertain as well. Former Rep. Eric Bedingfield will be speak-


04.13.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 49

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM ing on the importance of substance use and the community’s involvement in making a change. Whether you have time or an item to donate, we welcome you to join in on the celebration. 864-467-4099 | www.redribbonclassic.com emily@gfpdrugfree.org MON

30

BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

NAFTA: Perspectives from Canada, Mexico, and the U.S.

World Affairs Council Upstate Greenville One | 1 N. Main St. 5:30-8:30 p.m. | $30, $25/WACU/UI member The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) entered into force more than 23 years ago, and since that time, the U.S. economy and global trading relationships have undergone substantial changes. Last summer, the Trump Administration issued a broad plan, including goals for re-negotiating NAFTA. An expert panel consisting of Mexican Consul General Remedios Arnau, Canadian Consul General Nadia Theodore, and former United States Ambassador to Canada David Wilkins will be providing an update on the status of NAFTA and the perspectives of the countries they represent on proposed changes to the agreement. They will also look into the effects of the changes on business in South Carolina and the Upstate. 864-631-2188 | www.upstateinternational.org info@upstateinternational.org

MAY THRU THU

03

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Presents Art by Class of 2018

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE Art by 15 Furman seniors will be on display in the exhibition, “Disappointing Episodes.” Students will show a variety of mediums: painting, print making, ceramics, photography, film, textiles, and sculpture. In a statement, the Class of 2018 says, “When we experience disappointing episodes, we must choose to learn and grow from them, or allow the episodes to define who we are. Our senior class … has chosen to prosper in the face of adversity.” 864-294-2995 | www.bit.ly/2q1gxH7 Marta.lanier@furman.edu FRI

04

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

4th Annual Spirit Banquet

Advanced Institute for Development and Learning Crowne Plaza | 851 Congaree Road 6:30-9:30 p.m. | $75 The Advanced Institute for Development and Learning’s 4th Annual Spirit Banquet is coming up. The Spirit Banquet honors and features individuals with disabilities who have made significant community and professional contributions. This year, we are featuring Kerry Magro. The proceeds from this banquet will go toward the mission to help community families who have kids with special needs. Programs include monthly date nights where we take care of the kids while parents and guardians have an evening off, quarterly family fun nights in a sensoryfriendly environment, sensational snips which is a hair-cutting program for kids who may have

difficulty being around hair-cutting equipment, and a K4-3rd grade school, among others. The evening will include a plated dinner catered by Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse and a silent auction. 864-520-8910 | www.aid-l.org zachary.henning@aid-l.org FRI-SAT

11-12

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Spring Garden Tour “Gardening for Beauty & Backyard Habitat”

Greenville Council of Garden Clubs 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | $22 or $25 day of Six beautiful gardens located in the suburbs of Greenville and Greer will offer visitors a tranquil atmosphere where nature’s beauty and wildlife abound. www.kilgore-lewis.org/spring-garden-tour/ THU-JUN

17-16

VISUAL ARTS

The Southerner Abroad

West Main Artists Co-op 578 West Main St., Spartanburg FREE Spartanburg artist Elizabeth Bagwell will exhibit her latest collection of work, “The Southerner Abroad: A Modern Lifestyle Installation,” at West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg. This new collection is a vibrant mix of 40 plus paintings on canvas, paper, and metal based on the energy and movement drawn from vintage photographs of Paris, France, from the late ’30s to early ’40s. A public reception will be held May 17, 5-9 p.m., during the city’s monthly ArtWalk. The exhibit will be open to the public Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. 864-804-6501 | www.WestMainArtists.org THRU SAT

26

VISUAL ARTS

Yuri Tsuzuki: “Forest Meditation”

Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd. Suite 10, Taylors 1-5 p.m. | FREE Exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Greenville artist Yuri Tsuzuki. 864-268-2771 | www.hamptoniiigallery.com sandy@hamptoniiigallery.com

JUN THU

14

FAMILY & EDUCATION

ADHD Workshop

RTD Educational Consulting Hilton Garden Inn | 108 Carolina Point Parkway 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | $299 Students with ADHD have difficulty focusing for extended periods. Are we allowing our students to fall through the cracks? Know the symptoms of students with ADHD and learn the strategies to support the instructional process. This session will teach you strategies on how to support and manage students with ADHD and will dispel myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes about ADHD. 803-410-2944 www.eventbrite.com/e/understanding-students-with-adhd-tickets-42037866390 rtd.edconsultants@gmail.com

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Jesse Rogers/DBA Cherokee Rose Saloon intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2824 Geer Highway, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 15, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Mariscos Mazatlan Seafood intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6119 White Horse Road, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 15, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Smart Pigments, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 541 Haywood Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 29, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chief’s Franchise, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 723 Congaree Rd., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 29, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

APRIL TOWN HAS ARRIVED! AVAILABLE IN GREENVILLE: Barnes & Noble - 735 Hawyood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Enter your event information at www.greenvillejournal.com/submit/ submit-events/ by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

Community Journals 581Perry Ave., Village of West Greenville OR ONLINE: towncarolina.com


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.13.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Pick a Card ACROSS

1 Firing sound 6 Frog sound 11 Kerfuffles 15 Soldiers of Seoul 19 Old Aegean region 20 Singer with the 2013 #1 hit “Royals” 21 Typesetter’s option 22 Saber’s kin 23 Film that’s both funny and gloomy 25 Thin material used in painting and baking 27 Bulls scores 28 Putt-putt 30 Yard sale proviso 32 With 40-Across, classic grape drink 33 Step inside 34 “Mirage” actor Edward James — 38 Boolean logic operator 40 See 32-Across 42 Opening bets 45 Overhead air circulator 48 Films, TV, hit songs, etc. 51 Fancy snack 52 — McAn 54 See 50-Down 55 Chilly powder 56 “The Simpsons” shopkeeper 57 Clock setting in NYC

By Frank Longo

59 “... man — mouse?” 61 Sketched 63 Priest follower? 64 Homeland 69 “— Brockovich” 71 Cynic’s look 72 Sheep group 73 — vu 75 Metal debris 79 Pianist Hines 81 Alternative medical practices 84 Rubble maker 87 TVs “Better Call —” 89 “— -hoo!” (“Hello!”) 90 Equal: Prefix 91 Subpar mark 92 High cards 94 FBI agent 96 Bulky brass 98 Michigan county or its seat 101 Important biblical meal 104 Clownish type 106 Really bug 107 Give and take 109 — chi 110 Sales talk 111 Of Tehran 114 Fish story 116 Pulitzer winner William 118 Dictionary, e.g. 122 Film theaters 127 Ethiopia, formerly 128 Playing card apt to this

puzzle’s theme (hint: see the ends of the longest answers) 130 “That’s — bad idea” 131 One fibbing 132 Barbecue 133 Ruhr Valley’s chief city 134 Tie feature 135 Many August babies 136 Determined to carry out 137 Sown things DOWN

1 Lettuce variety 2 Dancer Falana 3 Santa — (some winds) 4 Ill 5 Test the tea, say 6 Shutting 7 CD- — 8 City NNW of Provo 9 Also include 10 Economist John Maynard — 11 Scared by 12 “Get busy!” 13 Well-timed 14 Rigid 15 Mixtures for chemical analysis 16 Well-timed 17 Boat’s spine 18 Feudal peon 24 Dollar or euro divs. 26 Blossom bit

SPRING SPECIALS Get Your Home Ready for Spring!

29 Breakfast chain, briefly 102 Big names 120 “Gotta run!” 31 Unstiffened shoe part 103 Broccoli — (salad green) 121 Make a sweater, e.g. 34 — razor (“keep it simple” 105 “Honest Abe” 123 Additionally principle) 108 Fork parts 124 Think deeply and at 35 Tackle 112 Sam of “Backtrack” length 36 Part of rpm 113 Many a navel 125 Under the covers 37 Suffix with boff 115 Bête — (pet peeve) 126 IDs for the IRS 39 Rally cry 117 Certain PC pic file 129 “Xanadu” rock gp. 41 Imitated 118 Echelon 43 Winged god 119 Very dark, to poets Crossword answers: page 31 44 Makes a dress, e.g. 46 At no time, to poets 47 12 p.m. 49 Quaker products by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 50 With 54-Across, service charges 53 “D.C. Cab” actor 58 Slobby sort 60 Difficult and tiring 62 Far-reaching 65 “— -haw!” 66 Epochs 67 Java holder 68 “— out!” (ump’s call) 70 Gun rights org. 74 Relative of handball 76 Nickname for Yale 77 “Remington —” 78 Singer Crow 80 Sauce brand 82 Kiddie 83 Halo-worthy 84 Fish story 85 Univ. sports org. 86 Serve as evidence of 88 Racing units 93 Eyes 95 They begin on January 1 97 Iota 99 Failures to attend Sudoku answers: page 31 100 Domino dot Medium

Sudoku

Cleaner is Better! • Fully bonded and insured • Family owned and operated for over 40 years • Residential Maid Service • Air Duct Cleaning • Carpet Cleaning • Oriental & Area Rug Cleaning • Upholstery Cleaning • Tile & Grout Cleaning • ProWash Power Washing (Residential & Commercial) • Hardwood Floor Cleaning & Refinishing • 24/7 Emergency Water Removal

CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL

33

$

PER ROOM

Clean any room in any condition up to 300 sq. ft. 3 room minimum. Must present coupon at time of estimate. Offers cannot be combined. Limited time offer.

HARDWOOD/LAMINATE FLOOR CLEANING SPECIAL

25

$

OFF

Hardwood floor cleaning and recoating. Must present coupon at time of estimate. Offers cannot be combined. Limited time offer.

864.297.6440 | ronscarpetcleaners.com


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Full-Service Elevator Maintenance, RFP #6304/30/18, until 3:00 PM, EDT, Monday, April 30, 2018; a Mandatory Pre-Proposal Meeting with Site Visit to Follow, will be held at 9:00 AM, EDT, Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at Greenville County Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. • Metal Recycling Services, RFP #62-05/03/18, until 3:00 PM, EDT, Thursday, May 3, 2018. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

PUBLIC NOTICE: Powdersville Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, contact number: 864295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in Magistrate Court in Anderson, South Carolina. This mobile home is a 1984, 14' X 56', Conner Mobile Home. The serial number is: 321MS32238. This mobile home is located at 109 Doris St., Easley, SC 29642. The South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles has no record of this mobile home. Anderson County shows that Fannie Williams, 109 Doris St., Easley, SC 29642 as the owner of this home. We have notified Ms. Williams by regular and certified mail to inform her of this matter.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-23-5232 Sherillyn Rose Bocchio, Plaintiff, -vs- Italo Bochio, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint upon the Subscriber at 2-B Cleveland Court, Greenville, SC 29607 within thirty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Complaint filed 11/28/2017 at 4:23 pm in Clerk of Court’s Office, Greenville, SC. V. B. (TRIPP) ATKINS III (SC Bar No. 74697) Attorney for Plaintiff 2-B Cleveland Court Greenville, SC 29607 Telephone: 864-558-0512

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Janitorial Services, RFP #5904/26/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., April 26, 2018. Debris Management Services, RFP #58-05/01/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., May 1, 2018. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP #64-05/16/18 – Greenville County Comprehensive Planning Services, May 16, 2018, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 60-04/26/18 Traffic Study, April 26, 2018, 3:00 P.M. RFQ# 61-09/30/18 Swamp Rabbit Trail Food Cart Vendors, September 28, 2018, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT BOUNDARIES SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF WEST GEORGIA ROAD AND SULLIVAN ROAD. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THAT AREA KNOWN AS GREENVILLE TAX MAP NUMBERS (TMS#) 0585010100603; 0585010100604 AND 0585010100606. A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTING OF SEWAGE AND WASTE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, NOR WILLTHERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA. COUNTY OF GREENVILLE FAMILY COURT LAWANA MICHELLE LITTLE V. JESUS MANUEL MORALES (CA NO. 2018-DR-23-0551) TO: JESUS MANUEL MORALES, DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the original Summons and Complaint in the above entitled action was filed with the Greenville County Family Clerk of Court on February 7, 2018 at 12:13PM. The object and prayer of the Complaint is to obtain custody of the minor children identified in the complaint, child support, alimony, attorney’s fees and other relief as set forth in the Complaint. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint and to serve a copy of your answer to the pleadings upon the subscriber at the offices of Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler, P.A., P. O. Box l0828, Greenville, South Carolina 29603, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Plaintiff’s Attorney: Kristine Braswell-Amin of Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler, P.A., 900 E. North Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT BOUNDARIES SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE REAL PROPERTY IDENTIFIED AS LOT 160 LOCATED IN COUNTRY ESTATES SUBDIVISION. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THAT AREA KNOWN AS GREENVILLE TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) 0555050106400. A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTING OF SEWAGE AND WASTE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, NOR WILLTHERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA GREENVILLE COUNTY The Republican and Democratic parties will hold primaries on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. Any necessary runoffs will be held on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. Any person wishing to vote in the primaries and runoffs must register no later than Sunday, May 13, 2018. Voter registration by mail forms will be accepted if postmarked by Monday, May 14, 2018. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place: • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES. org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on June 12, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at Greenville County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601. At 12 Noon on June 14, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in this election. This hearing will be held at Greenville County Square, County Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601. The following precincts and polling places will be open during the primaries and runoffs from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: PRECINCT LOCATION ADDRESS Greenville 01 League Academy 125 Twin Lake Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Greenville 03 Summit Dr Elementary School 424 Summit Dr Greenville, SC 29609 Greenville 04 Stone Academy 115 Randall St Greenville, SC 29609 Greenville 05 Sears Shelter 100 E Park Ave Greenville, SC 29601 Greenville 06 TBD Greenville 07 W Greenville Recreation Center 8 Rochester St Greenville, SC 29611 Greenville 08 West End Comm. Development Center 404 Vardry St Greenville, SC 29601 Greenville 10 Springfield Baptist Church 600 E McBee Ave Greenville, SC 29601 Greenville 14 Sterling School 99 John McCarroll Way Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 16 Augusta Rd Baptist Church 1823 Augusta St Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville 17 St Matthew United Methodist Church 701 Cleveland St Greenville, SC 29601 Greenville 18 Augusta Circle Elementary School 100 Winyah St Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville 19 Pleasant Valley Connection Center 510 Old Augusta Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville 20 @ Greenville 16 Augusta Rd Baptist Church 1823 Augusta St Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville 21 Meals On Wheels 15 Oregon St Greenville, SC 29605 Greenville 22 Sanctuary Church 302 Parkins Mill Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 23 Sara Collins Elementary School 1200 Parkins Mill Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 24 Beck Academy 901 Woodruff Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 25 McCarter Presbyterian Church 2 Pelham Rd Greenville, SC 29615 Greenville 26 E North St Academy 1720 E North St Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 27 Overbrook Baptist Church 1705 E North St Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 28 Francis Asbury United Methodist Church 1800 E North St Greenville, SC 29607 Greenville 29 J L Mann High School 160 Fairforest Way Greenville, SC 29607 Aiken Alexander Elementary School 1601 W Bramlett Rd Greenville, SC 29611 Altamont Forest Redeemer Presbyterian Church 6150 Old Buncombe Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Asheton Lakes Five Forks Baptist Church 112 Batesville Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Avon First Church of God 709 Brushy Creek Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Baker Creek Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church 8323 Augusta Rd Pelzer, SC 29669 Belle Meade Disciples Fellowship Baptist Church 105 Crestfield Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Bells Crossing Bells Crossing Elementary School 804 Scuffletown Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Belmont Belmont Fire Station 701 Fork Shoals Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Berea Berea Elementary School 100 Berea Dr Greenville, SC 29617 Boiling Springs Devenger Rd Presbyterian Church 1200 Devenger Rd Greer, SC 29650 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd Greenville, SC 29615 Botany Woods Lutheran Church of Our Saviour Bridge Fork Kingdom Life Church 416 Holland Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Brook Glenn Brook Glenn Elementary School 2003 E Lee Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Canebrake Buena Vista Elementary School 310 S Batesville Rd Greer, SC 29650 Carolina Carolina High and Academy 2725 Anderson Rd Greenville, SC 29611 Castle Rock Washington Baptist Church 3500 N Highway 14 Greer, SC 29651 Chestnut Hills Dunean Baptist Church 21 Allen St Greenville, SC 29605 Circle Creek Cross Roads Baptist Church 705 Anderson Ridge Rd Greer, SC 29651 Clear Creek Pleasant View Baptist Church 110 Old Rutherford Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Conestee Reedy River Missionary Baptist Church 25 Lakewood Dr Greenville, SC 29607 Darby Ridge Velocity Church 1720 Reid School Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Del Norte Brushy Creek Elementary School 1344 Brushy Creek Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Devenger St Giles Presbyterian Church 1021 Hudson Rd Greenville, SC 29615 Donaldson Donaldson Center Fire Station Hdqt 2291 Perimeter Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Dove Tree Dove Tree Clubhouse 2 Sugarberry Dr Greenville, SC 29615 Dunklin Dunklin Fire Station Hdqt 11353 Augusta Rd Honea Path, SC 29654 Eastside Eastside High School 1300 Brushy Creek Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Ebenezer Heritage Elementary School 1592 Geer Hwy Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Edwards Forest Taylors Elementary School 809 Reid School Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Enoree Enoree Career Center 108 Scalybark Rd Greenville, SC 29617 Feaster @ Rolling Green Rolling Green Retirement Center 1 Hoke Smith Blvd Greenville, SC 29615 Fork Shoals Fork Shoals Elementary School 916 McKelvey Rd Pelzer, SC 29669 Fountain Inn 1 Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N Main St Fountain Inn, SC 29644 Fountain Inn 2 Fountain Inn Activities Center 610 Fairview St Fountain Inn, SC 29644 Fox Chase Northwood Baptist Church 888 Ansel School Rd Greer, SC 29651 Frohawk Grace United Methodist Church 627 Taylor Rd Greer, SC 29651 Furman Woodlands at Furman 1500 Trailhead Ct Greenville, SC 29617 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Highway 11 Campobello, SC 29322

Granite Creek Pleasant Grove Baptist Church 1002 S Buncombe Rd Greer, SC 29651 Graze Branch Holly Ridge Baptist Church 260 Adams Mill Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Greenbriar Messiah Lutheran Church 1100 Log Shoals Rd Mauldin, SC 29662 Grove Grove Elementary School 1220 Old Grove Rd Piedmont, SC 29673 Hillcrest Hillcrest Middle School 510 Garrison Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Holly Tree Faith Baptist Church 906 Highway 14 Simpsonville, SC 29681 Jennings Mill Cleveland First Baptist Church 5 Church Dr Cleveland, SC 29635 Kilgore Farms Gilder Creek Farm Clubhouse 404 Grimes Dr Simpsonville, SC 29681 Lakeview Lakeview Middle School 3801 Old Buncombe Rd Greenville, SC 29617 Laurel Ridge St Mark United Methodist Church 911 Saint Mark Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Leawood Hampton Park Baptist Church 875 State Park Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Locust Hill Fairview Baptist Church 1300 Locust Hill Rd Greer, SC 29651 Long Creek Rocky Creek Missionary Baptist Church 239 Rocky Creek Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Maple Creek Southside Baptist Church 410 S Main St Greer, SC 29650 1798 N Highway 25 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Maridell New Liberty Baptist Church Mauldin 1 Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E Butler Rd Mauldin, SC 29662 Mauldin 2 Forrester Woods Clubhouse 424 Piney Grove Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Mauldin 3 Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S Main St Mauldin, SC 29662 Mauldin 4 Mauldin United Methodist Church 100 E Butler Rd Mauldin, SC 29662 Mauldin 5 Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 802 Miller Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Mauldin 6 Ray Hopkins Senior Center 203 Corn Rd Mauldin, SC 29662 Mauldin 7 Mauldin Middle School 1190 Holland Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Mission Pelham Rd Elementary School 100 All Star Way Greenville, SC 29615 Monaview Monaview Elementary School 10 Monaview St Greenville, SC 29617 Moore Creek South Greenville Fire Station #6 1800 W Georgia Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Mountain Creek Mountain Creek Baptist Church 255 W Mountain Creek Church Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Mountain View Mountain View Elementary School 6350 Mountain View Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Mt Pleasant Mt Pleasant Community Center 710 S Fairfield Rd Greenville, SC 29605 700 Harrison Bridge Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Neely Farms Christ Community Church Northwood Northwood Middle School 710 Ikes Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Oakview Oakview Elementary School 515 Godfrey Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Oneal Eastside Apostolic Lutheran Church 2200 Mays Bridge Rd Greer, SC 29651 Palmetto Grace Church 2801 Pelham Rd Greenville, SC 29615 Paris Mountain Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt 2119 State Park Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Pebble Creek Pebble Creek Baptist Church 1300 Reid School Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Pelham Falls Cornerstone Baptist Church 8508 Pelham Rd Greenville, SC 29615 Piedmont Community Center - Beattie Hall 3 Main St Piedmont, SC 29673 Piedmont 100 Hillside Church Rd Fountain Inn, SC 29644 Pineview Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Poinsett Duncan Chapel Elementary School 210 Duncan Chapel Rd Greenville, SC 29617 257 Harrison Bridge Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Raintree The Bridge Church Ranch Creek Robert E Cashion Elementary School 1500 Fork Shoals Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Reedy Fork Reedy Fork Baptist Church 3115 Fork Shoals Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 River Walk River Walk Clubhouse 103 River Walk Blvd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Riverside Riverside High School 794 Hammett Bridge Rd Greer, SC 29650 Rock Hill Mitchell Rd Elementary School 4124 E North St Greenville, SC 29615 Rocky Creek Rocky Creek Baptist Church 1801 Woodruff Rd Greenville, SC 29607 Rolling Green Rolling Green Retirement Center 1 Hoke Smith Blvd Greenville, SC 29615 Royal Oaks Rock Of Ages Baptist Church 105 Donaldson Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Saluda Unity Baptist Church of Berea 12 Piney Rd Greenville, SC 29611 Sandy Flat Double Springs Baptist Church 3800 Locust Hill Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Sevier Sevier Middle School 1000 Piedmont Park Rd Greenville, SC 29609 Silverleaf Heritage Bible Church 2005 Old Spartanburg Rd Greer, SC 29650 Simpsonville 1 Simpsonville City Park Center 405 E Curtis St Simpsonville, SC 29681 Simpsonville 2 Plain Elementary School 506 Neely Ferry Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Simpsonville 3 @ Sycamore First Presbyterian Church 510 E Curtis St Simpsonville, SC 29681 Simpsonville 4 @ Simpsonville 2 Plain Elementary School 506 Neely Ferry Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Simpsonville 5 Center for Community Services 1102 Howard Dr Simpsonville, SC 29681 Simpsonville 6 Calvary Baptist Church 3810 Grandview Dr Simpsonville, SC 29680 Skyland Skyland Elementary School 4221 N Highway 14 Greer, SC 29651 Slater Marietta Slater Marietta Elementary School 100 Baker Cir Marietta, SC 29661 Southside Southside High School 6630 Frontage Rd Greenville, SC 29605 Sparrows Point Immanuel Lutheran Church 2820 Woodruff Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Spring Forest Greenville Nazarene Church 1201 Haywood Rd Greenville, SC 29615 Standing Springs @ Simpsonville 2 Plain Elementary School 506 Neely Ferry Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Stone Valley @ Edwards Forest Taylors Elementary School 809 Reid School Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Stonehaven TBD Suber Mill Praise Cathedral 3390 Brushy Creek Rd Greer, SC 29650 Sugar Creek Sugar Creek Clubhouse 103 Sugar Creek Rd Greer, SC 29650 Sulphur Springs Armstrong Elementary School 8601 White Horse Rd Greenville, SC 29617 Sycamore First Presbyterian Church 510 E Curtis St Simpsonville, SC 29681 Tanglewood Tanglewood Middle School 44 Merriwoods Dr Greenville, SC 29611 Taylors Taylors Ministry Center 1 W Main St Taylors, SC 29687 Thornblade Airport Baptist Church 776 S Batesville Rd Greer, SC 29650 Tigerville Tigerville Elementary School 25 Tigerville Elementary School Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Timberlake Aldersgate United Methodist Church 7 Shannon Dr Greenville, SC 29615 Trade Needmore Recreation Center 202 Canteen Ave Greer, SC 29650 Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest City Hall 6711 State Park Rd Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Travelers Rest 2 Renfrew Baptist Church 951 Geer Hwy Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Tubbs Mountain Enoree Baptist Church 881 Tigerville Rd Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Tyger River Chandler Creek Elementary School 301 Chandler Rd Greer, SC 29651 Verdmont Hopewell United Methodist Church 1420 Neely Ferry Rd Simpsonville, SC 29680 Wade Hampton Faith Baptist Church 500 W Lee Rd Taylors, SC 29687 Walnut Springs Clear Spring Baptist Church 301 Bethany Rd Simpsonville, SC 29681 Ware Place Ellen Woodside Elementary School 9122 Augusta Rd Pelzer, SC 29669 Welcome Welcome Elementary School 36 E Welcome Rd Greenville, SC 29611 Wellington E North Church 4108 E North St Greenville, SC 29615 Westcliffe Westcliffe Elementary School 105 Eastbourne Rd Greenville, SC 29611 Westside Agnew Rd Baptist Church 400 Rainbow Dr Greenville, SC 29617 Woodmont Middle School Woodmont Middle School 325 N Flat Rock Rd Piedmont, SC 29673 Woodruff Lakes Woodruff Rd Christian Church 20 Bell Rd Greenville, SC 29607

LEGAL NOTICE RATES

ABC Notices $165

| Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com


OUTDOOR SALE 35-50% OFF IN-STOCK AND CUSTOM ORDER

VALID ONLY ON PURCHASES FROM APRIL 13 - 30, 2018

Browse our collections online at oldcolonyfurniture.com

|

3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

April 13, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

April 13, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.