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IN THIS ISSUE

THE UNBREAKABLE OPTIMISM OF NATHAN ANGELO • CLASSY COCKTAILS IN TR • MOTHER NATURE’S ATTORNEY

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, September 8, 2017 • Vol.19, No.36

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Cheers!

Saluting Allen and Suzanne McCalla’s 25 years at the Greenville Little Theatre

Photo by Will Crooks.


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com

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DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | Tori Lant tlant@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES | David Rich ACCOUNT MANAGERS Donna Johnston Stephanie King | Rosie Peck Caroline Spivey | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT | Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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PAGE 3

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Health Events

THEY SAID IT

“WHEN WE FIRST GOT HERE, WE COULD NOT HAVE DONE IT. WE WOULD HAVE HAD PEOPLE BOYCOTTING.” Suzanne McCalla, producing director at Greenville Little Theatre, on the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar,” which the theater put on in 2015

“I think when you’re constantly consuming writing, you’re tempted to try your hand at it.” Dan Leach, author of the short story collection “Floods and Fires,” on his decision to try his hand at creative writing after a few years of teaching high school

“Greenville has historically sited its dirtiest industries in underserved communities, and it’s all happening in the shadow of the downtown we praise.” Michael Corley, an attorney with the S.C. Environmental Law Project, on a recent case involving a former industrial site that he says has posed health risks to the Southernside area of town

POLL: The City of Greenville is about to conduct a study of downtown traffic. What do you think will alleviate downtown’s traffic woes? 53% Turn Main Street into a blocked-off pedestrian thoroughfare. 16% 21%

Take a Loved One to the Doctor Day Sat., Sept. 16 • 8 a.m.-noon • University Center This event aims to raise awareness of ways to stay healthy among minority communities. The day offers an array of free health and wellness screenings by GHS health professionals, including prostate exams, diabetes and cholesterol testing, and more. Learn more at 1073jamz.com. Girls on the Run Sept. 19-Dec. 2 • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with an esteem-enhancing curriculum for girls ages 8-15. Visit ghs.org/girlsontherun. Men’s Health Forum Thurs., Sept. 21 • Noon-1 p.m. • Hilton Greenville Join GHS urologist William Flanagan, MD, for a discussion on men’s health and recommended screenings. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Talk with the Docs Mon., Sept. 25 • 3:30 p.m. • Facebook Live Visit the GHS Facebook page to take part in a live discussion with host Cedrek McFadden, MD, and pediatrician Kerry Sease, MD, on preventing and treating childhood obesity. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017

OPINION

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Views from your community

Greenville County Schools is a business like no other By Lee Yarborough

Greenville County Schools (GCS) serves more than 75,000 students. It is the largest school district in the state, the 44th largest in the nation, and the second largest employer in the county. Consider this: All 12 Spartanburg and Anderson school districts combined serve just 5,000 more students than our single district. Meeting the needs of tens of thousands of students and 10,000 employees, while complying with the complex regulatory, statutory, and policy requirements of modern education, is a daunting task. Is it a business? Yes, but it is a business unlike any other. Like most corporations, GCS is led by professionals, most with advanced degrees, professional certifications, and decades of experience in the areas of human resources, technology, finance and accounting, construction, maintenance and building services, planning, and demographics, just to name a few. These skills are in high demand and are highly compensated in the corporate world, yet these professionals have chosen to focus their energies on ensuring a quality school experience for the children of Greenville County. Take technology, for example. The GCS networking infrastructure is exceedingly complex. Qualified professionals oversee more than 90,000 user accounts, 4,000 digital radios, 70,000 computers and Chromebooks, 7,000 tablets, 2,000 servers, and multiple data centers, plus their redundant systems that are in place in case of a catastrophic event. Protection of this network and the sensitive data it contains also requires constant vigilance by specialists in cybersecurity. A network outage, even

during the weekend, brings to a halt important system updates, security functions, and monitoring systems. Also crucial to Greenville County Schools’ success are highly qualified professionals with expertise in curriculum, instruction, behavior management, literacy, and child development whose focus is on producing college and career-ready graduates. A bachelor’s degree is required to teach, but about 65 percent of teachers in Greenville County Schools also have a master’s or doctorate degree, and the district is 13th out of 14,000 districts nationwide in the number of teachers who are National Board Certified. Psychologists, social workers, nurses, interventionists, counselors, and other support positions also contribute to student success, as do experts in special education monitoring, due process, and the requirements of a Free and Appropriate Education (FAPE), which is guaranteed to all students, whether they have multiple, concurrent disabilities, or are gifted in all things academic. Top district administrators must be experts in both operations and academics, and they must understand how each impacts the other. Likewise, good principals must marry their knowledge of instruction, management, and public relations with the skills needed to supervise budgets, facilities, community interactions, communications, and 100 or more faculty and staff members. In short, the seemingly simple task of education is much more complex than most realize. Greenville County Schools unites the bottom-line mindset of a business with a nurturing environment supportive of students, and the results are outstanding. The district’s graduation rate is at an all-time high of 86.8 percent; students are outperforming the national average on the SAT college entrance exam; and last year’s graduating class received scholarship offers totaling $128 million. Yet, GCS spends less per pupil than all but four of the 81 districts in South Carolina. GCS high school students earned thousands of college credit hours last year through dual credit and Advanced Placement courses and had countless opportunities to develop leadership skills through co-curricular and extra-curricular activities. They also earned more than 600 career certifications last year in subjects ranging from welding to cosmetology to health care. Opportunities for students to do, learn, and experience more are increasing each year, and families in Greenville County are embracing these options to extend learning beyond the classroom. So let’s take this opportunity to celebrate GCS and the great work of students, teachers, staff, and administrators. Recruiting and retaining high-quality personnel is crucial to our community’s current and future success, so take time to thank an educator today. Lee Yarborough is president and shareholder of Propel PEO Inc., a payroll and HR outsourcing company. She serves as the board chair of Public Education Partners and is an advocate for public education.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

HEALTH GAP WIDENS BETWEEN UPSTATE AND THE REST OF US WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE

People who live in rural Appalachia, which includes six South Carolina counties, generally suffer from poorer health than other Americans, according to a new report. The 400-page report, which was released earlier this month by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, and Appalachian Regional Commission outlines “dramatic disparities” in both health issues and outcomes between the 13-state Appalachian region and nationwide figures. It shows the region, which encompasses 25 million Americans from Mississippi to New York, has higher rates than the rest of the country in seven of the 10 leading causes of death, including heart disease and cancer. Disparities were most severe in rural areas and low-income counties, according to the report. Hilary Heishman, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said the data brings attention to the growing health gap between Appalachia and the rest of the country. “The U.S. can’t be healthy as a whole if we are leaving whole regions behind,” she said.

Our towns

The Appalachian portion of South Carolina, which includes Greenville, Anderson, Pickens, Oconee, Spartanburg, and Cherokee counties, fares far worse than the rest of the nation when it comes to stroke, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and other health measures, according to the report. For example, the number of people who die from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the six-county region is 28 percent higher than the national average.

The reasons for the disparities include everything from high rates of smoking and physical inactivity to fewer grocery stores and physicians.

Among other findings in the report: • The cancer mortality rate in Appalachian South Carolina is 5 percent higher than the national average. • Appalachian South Carolina also has among the highest rates of deaths related to injuries, 32 percent higher than the national average. • The number of people who die from strokes in the six-county region is 22 percent higher than the rest of country. • The heart disease rate is 3 percent higher in Appalachian South Carolina than the national average. • Appalachian South Carolina has one of the highest rates of deaths related to suicide, 30 percent higher than the national average.

The reasons for the disparities include everything from high rates of smoking and physical inactivity to fewer grocery stores and physicians, according to Dr. Shaniece Criss, an assistant professor of health science at Furman University. She also noted that incomes in Appalachia have not kept up with the cost of living. “The employed population makes significantly lower amounts of money, which can affect diet and a variety of other health factors,” Criss said. For example, she said, people who use food stamps usually purchase cheaper foods that are packed with calories and saturated fats yet lack nutrition. That can lead to various health issues, including diabetes and heart disease. “It’s really difficult to eat healthy on a limited budget,” she said. “And many people actually lack the time and skills to prepare healthier meals.” Poverty can also create chronic stress, which can lead to poor health decisions such as smoking. “Many people smoke to relieve stress,” Criss said. “I think that could be one of the factors behind the higher rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.” She added that Appalachian residents in South Carolina would likely benefit from more mental health providers. The rate of mental health providers across the region is 33 percent lower than the national average, according to the report. “Many people are dealing with hard life circumstances,” she said. “They really need more access to counselors so they can talk about those struggles.” Criss also said solutions must focus on improving


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

The region’s opioid crisis has likely been fueled by the sudden emergence of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that’s

Education That Lasts a Lifetime

50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. Nutrition for a Healthy Family Monday, September 11 at 6 p.m. Learn how to keep the family healthy despite busy schedules and picky eaters. Brief cooking demo and tasting included! community services and health education across the region. “There isn’t a silver bullet to solve all of our issues, but I think more collaboration from our community is a step in the right direction.”

The opioid crisis

One health discrepancy that will require special attention is the region’s poisoning deaths, according to Criss. Deaths by poisoning, which include accidental drug overdoses, are 13 percent higher than the national rate. The increasing rate of poisonings is likely a result of the opioid addiction crisis that has gripped the area for years, according to Criss. “It’s become a really big problem across the entire state,” she said. “But it’s much worse in the Appalachia area.” Since 2011, more than 3,000 South Carolinians have died from prescription opioid overdoses. In 2015, 71 people died in Greenville County from opioid overdoses, rivaling the number of lives lost in car accidents. The year before, 65 people died from overdoses, according to the Greenville County Coroner’s Office. Criss said the region’s opioid crisis has likely been fueled by the sudden emergence of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that’s 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. In recent years, illegal manufacturing of fentanyl has skyrocketed and led to an alarming increase in opioid overdose

deaths across the U.S. In Greenville County, there were 33 fentanyl-related deaths in 2015, the last year data is available. That’s more than five times the number of fentanyl-related deaths in 2013, according to Greenville County Deputy Coroner Jeff Fowler. “There are law enforcement initiatives happening across the state to address opioid addiction, but it’s not going away anytime soon,” Criss said. “Many dealers are now mixing heroin with fentanyl.”

Pre-diabetes and Insulin Resistance Tuesday, September 12 at 6 p.m. Find out what these terms mean for your health and learn ways to prevent the onset of diabetes.

Nicotine Cessation and Management Monday, September 18 at 5:30 p.m. Get acquainted with our QuitSmart® program which combines several effective methods to produce a potent stop-smoking treatment.

The good news

But the news for Appalachia residents isn’t all that bad, according to the report. The region is doing better than the nation in several measures, including the incidence of chlamydia, prevalence of HIV, and student-teacher ratio. “This report begins to identify key health challenges confronting Appalachia,” said Earl Gohl, the federal co-chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission. “Now we need to understand the implications these findings have for Appalachia’s economy so we can continue working towards a brighter future for the region.” Later this year, the groups will release the results of a second study, “Bright Spots,” that highlights 10 Appalachian counties that are defying the region’s trends and what can be learned from them.

Stress Management Monday, September 25 at 6 p.m. Learn techniques for managing everyday stress and gain a new, healthier perspective.

HealthyU education classes are free and are held at St. Francis Millennium. Please call 864-400-3651 to register.

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NEWS

YOU DIG? ReWa asks for noise variance for around-the-clock Dig Greenville project CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Renewable Water Resources has asked the City of Greenville for a noise variance that would allow around-the-clock work on its Dig Greenville underground tunnel project. But the utility says residents near Cleveland Park project’s starting point will hear more nighttime noise from another source. “They’ll get more noise from the zoo,” said Jeff Wells, a Greenville-based associate vice president for Black & Veatch, a global firm that has overseen tunnel projects all over the world. Working around the clock would trim six months and $1.4 million off the price. City Manager John Castile will decide whether to grant the variance. Bids are being sought from eight prequalified contractors for the $46 million Dig Greenville project that ReWa officials say will meet the demand for sewer in the Reedy River basin from downtown Greenville up to Travelers Rest for the next century. They expect to award the contract this fall. Without the additional sewer line, the current sewer system for the Reedy River will run out of capacity and development would grind to a halt, he said. In addition to providing capacity for future growth, the project will meet immediate needs by providing an additional buffer against sewer surcharges due to inflow and infiltration during rainy weather. Construction will begin in January when a parking lot will be built on the Washington Street side of the Cleveland Park playground to replace part of the parking lot off Cleveland Park Drive that will be used as a construction staging area during the project. After the 30-month-long construction project is completed, that parking lot will be restored, resulting in more parking for Cleveland Park and the Greenville Zoo. The project will have open-cut construction near the Zoo and on Westfield Street near the Kroc Center, where the tunnel will

connect with the existing sewer system. ReWa studied 18 options for the line before deciding on the tunnel, the largest underground tunnel project in Greenville’s history. “Certainly going through the park was considered, but it was quickly dropped,” Wells said. “We would have been run out of town.” Access shafts will have to be constructed at each end of the tunnel, expected to take one year. Blasting of rock will occur at each end of the tunnel. Blasting will be limited to once an hour from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. The tunnel itself, which will be about 100 feet underground, or roughly the height of a 10-story building, is constructed without blasting by utilizing a tunnel-boring machine that cuts the rock as it moves along the 1.3-mile long tunnel alignment. Once the boring starts, work will go on 24 hours a day, seven days a week if the variance is granted. The 20,000 to 25,000 cubic yards of rock will be removed by mine rails and dumped in the construction staging area. Trucks will remove the rock. ReWa is working with the city on the truck routes, likely on Washington Street and Laurens Road. The contractor will be required to adhere to the 60-decibel limit if the variance is granted, Wells said. If the contractor violates the noise level, the project could be stopped and the contractor removed, Wells said. In addition to the noise ordinance, the contractor will also be required to keep granite dust and particulate matter below industry standards. “This is a much less impactful project than the Greenville News project,” Wells said. Camperdown is a multiuse development that includes retail, office, and a hotel on the former Greenville News site across from the Peace Center.


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

GHS AWARDS $12.4M IN GRANTS TO BOOST COUNTY HEALTH WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE

G

ateway House, Greenville County EMS, and seven other organizations across the region have been selected as the winners of the first Healthy Greenville 2036 grants. Announced last week by the Greenville Health Authority board of trustees, the nine winning grants amount to $12.4 million and provide funding for one to five years, according to a press release. “We asked for bold initiatives and are thrilled that the community responded with these incredible proposals,” said board chair Lisa Stevens. “We continue to believe that implementation of these programs could touch every life in Greenville County, which has been our goal from the beginning. This is day one of a 20-year journey of change.” Greenville Health System established the Healthy Greenville 2036 program earlier this year to provide approximately $4 million in grants each year for the next 20 years for projects that improve the health of Greenville County residents. The program aims to return the $82 million in county tax funds GHS received from 1947 to 1997 to build parts of Greenville Memorial, Hillcrest Memorial, North Greenville Hospital, and Allen Bennet Memorial. The funds will come from the health system’s $2 billion annual budget, according to Stevens. Nearly 130 organizations from across the region submitted initial applications for the program, but only 19 were invited to submit a formal application. That list was then dwindled down to nine organizations that are targeting chronic health issues and addressing immediate public health needs. A total of $3.38 million over five years is going to a coalition led by GHS that will create a streamlined comprehensive health initiative that serves Greenville County’s highestneed children. The program will provide students with health education, nutrition, physical activity, and psychological support for abuse and neglect in West Greenville schools. The coalition members include the United Way of Greenville County, SHARE Head Start, and the Greenville County School District. A coalition led by Greenville County EMS will receive $2.55 million over four years to provide standardized training and equipment for 900 first responders countywide as well as add automatic external defibrillators to 266 deputy patrol cars. Coalition partners include GHS’s emergency department and health sciences center, the Greenville County Fire Chief’s Association, and the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office. Another $2.52 million over five years was awarded to a coalition led by Clemson’s public health sciences department for diabetes prevention and management services in

Greenville County to be offered in client homes, and potentially at locations like the GHS Life Center, Phillis Wheatley Association Center, and Clemson’s cooperative extension office in Greenville County. The coalition includes GHS, Clemson’s cooperative extension service, the state Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Lt. Governor’s Office on Aging, and the American Diabetes Association. And $2.06 million over four years was given to a coalition led by the University of South Carolina Educational Foundation to provide scholarships to 10 medical students trained in areas such as lifestyle medicine or in addiction or substance misuse. Other coalition members include Faces and Voices of Recovery Greenville and Greenville Technical College’s Culinary Institute. Approximately $250,000 in seed money was awarded to a coalition led by Gateway House Inc. to expand mental health services in Greenville County. The funds will be used to help the nonprofit construct a new facility that would offer rehabilitative support services for adults living with mental illness.

OTHER GRANTEES INCLUDE:

• The Upstate Fatherhood Coalition was awarded $661,200 over three years to strengthen efforts to assist noncustodial fathers. Partners include the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families, Above All Healthy Lifestyle, Fleet Feet Sports, Greenville Family Partnership, and the American Lung Association. • Little Steps was awarded $588,800 over five years to provide more individualized case management for young families. Partners include Greenville County First Steps and United Way of Greenville County. • The Clemson University School of Nursing and GHS received $410,000 over two years to expand primary care access through 10 scholarships for nurse practitioners from diverse or underrepresented groups. • Greenville County First Steps, GHS Nurse-Family Partnership, and Little Steps were awarded $270,000 over three years to offer more than 400 childcare scholarships. The GHA board will release a new request for proposals for the next round of grants by Oct. 9. The deadline to submit letters of intent is Nov. 14. For more information, visit ghs.org.


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS COMMUNITY

Local company sends kayaks to Texas for Harvey relief

Confluence Outdoor, which is based in a 480,000-square-foot factory along Mauldin Road, employs about 400 people making eight brands of kayak, canoe, surf, and stand-up paddleboards, and paddle sports accessories. Photo by Will Crooks.

A Greenville company that manufactures kayaks and canoes is sending boats to Texas to help with flooding relief and rescue efforts following Hurricane Harvey. Confluence Outdoors has donated 80 kayaks, 140 paddles, and 175 life preservers to the Houston Police Department and Harris County Precinct One, according to a press release. The supplies, which were expected to arrive in Texas late last week, will be used by authorities for high-water rescue operations in a 444-square-mile area. The company said in a statement that the boats, which can hold 450 pounds each, are ideal for transporting supplies and supporting the rescue of people and animals. “In working directly with the authorities, we were able to assess the specific needs for rescue and water evacuations and deliver specific kayaks capable of safely rescuing victims of the hurricane,” Confluence CEO Rich Krause said in a prepared statement. “We coordinated with the Houston Police Department, Harris County, and local nonprofits to deliver exactly the boats needed as quickly as possible to save lives and assist in the rescue efforts.” Hurricane Harvey hit the coastline of Texas as a Category 4 hurricane on Aug. 26, dumping over 50 inches of rain and causing several deaths. Harvey led to catastrophic flooding across Harris County, which is home to 4.5 million people in the Houston region, according to the National Weather Service. Officials estimated that up to 30 percent of homes in the area were under water. “Our hearts are with the people of Houston. As a company, we have members of our team, retail partners, and family in the area,” Kraus said. Confluence said it plans to continue to work with Houston authorities to “monitor and further respond to the region’s ongoing needs.” —Andrew Moore NEWS continued on PAGE 13

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09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

The last traffic study for downtown was completed in 1999. Photo by Will Crooks.

NEWS continued from PAGE 11

CITY

Think downtown traffic stinks? Well, the city plans to study it. The last comprehensive traffic study completed for downtown Greenville didn’t take into account Falls Park, the Liberty Bridge, and the apartments and hotels that have taken up increasing space in the city’s central core. That’s because they didn’t exist in 1999 when the study

was done. Not surprisingly, a new study is in the works. The city plans to update the study to include the impact of those developments as well those in the pipeline on traffic and what might be done to help mitigate congestion, said Assistant City Engineer Valerie Holmes. “Development isn’t showing signs of stopping,” she said. NEWS continued on PAGE 15

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NEWS NEWS continued from PAGE 13

While the city requires a traffic impact analysis for individual developments, the traffic study will take a broader look at downtown traffic overall, Holmes said. The Greenville City Council gave initial approval last week to accept $43,252 from the Greenville Pickens Area Transportation Study United Planning Work Program to help pay for the study. It has already approved the inclusion of $150,000 in the city’s 2018-19 budget. No starting date has been set for the study, Holmes said. —Cindy Landrum GOVERNMENT

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would commence nine months prior to hotel completion, according to the agreement. The second part of the project will improve the other portion of East Camperdown and the Falls Street intersection. No specific timeframe was laid out for construction of that section until Kessler better understands how that infrastructure will serve other redevelopment planned in the immediate vicinity of the hotel. The agreement requires Kessler to acquire the Wyche property no later than the first quarter of 2018. Construction

– REUTERS

City gives final approval to Grand Bohemian money Greenville City Council members on Aug. 29 gave final approval to a development agreement with The Kessler Enterprise Inc., the company building the Grand Bohemian, a highly anticipated lodge-style boutique hotel on the banks of the Reedy River. As reported by the Greenville Journal in July, the city will take $3.5 Architect Christian Sottile shows a rendering of the Grand million from its Economic Bohemian Greenville. Development Fund to pay for public improvements would be completed in the fourth quarter to Falls Park’s East Camperdown Way of 2019. entrance. The project is slated to play a key role Part of the concrete parking lot between in the area’s transformation into the East the Wyche firm and Bowater building will Gateway District, which also includes be turned into a green lawn that would the Camperdown development under lead to the Liberty Bridge and could be set construction at the Greenville News site up for small concerts and public events. at Main and Broad streets. While there’s plenty of green space in The Grand Bohemian project is Falls Park, flat green space is scarce. Construction on that part of the project

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NEWS NEWS continued from PAGE 15

expected to cost more than $75 million, the agreement said. —Cindy Landrum HEALTH CARE

GHS to open new maternity unit at Patewood

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Greenville Health System’s Patewood Memorial Hospital will open a maternity unit this month. The 26,000-square-foot space will be located on the fourth floor of the hospital and feature 10 labor/delivery rooms with tubs for water therapy, 30 postpartum rooms, a recovery room, an operating room, and a nursery, according to a press release. “The brand-new facility is fully equipped to provide great comfort in spacious new rooms as well as all the medical technology, equipment, and staff expertise to assure a joyous and safe delivery,” said Dr. Donald Wiper, chair of GHS’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and medical director of the GHS Women’s Hospital.

%

Officials didn’t disclose the cost of the unit. But Wiper said it was needed at Patewood, which has served as a surgical short-stay hospital for residents on Greenville’s Eastside, because Greenville Memorial no longer had enough space for delivering babies. According to a press release, the newly constructed maternity unit at Patewood will open on Sept. 25 for women with lowrisk pregnancies. It will become Greenville Health System’s seventh location to offer maternity services. The maternity unit will be staffed around the clock by pediatric hospitalists trained in neonatology and newborn care. It will also participate in a telemedicine program that brings Greenville Memorial’s neonatologist to Patewood when needed. Obstetricians from Piedmont OB/GYN and Greenville OB/GYN Associates will deliver up to eight babies a day once the unit opens, according to Terri Negron, director of nursing for GHS’s Women’s Hospital and interim chief nursing officer

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS for Patewood. “It is a big decision to entrust someone with your birth experience and the health of your baby. We take that responsibility seriously,” said Dr. Rebecca Wright, medical director of newborn services at Patewood Memorial. “Our newborn physicians are excited to provide the same excellent, innovative newborn care on the Patewood Medical Campus that we have been providing in Greenville and across the Upstate for years.” —Andrew Moore ART

Artisphere 2017 adds $6M to the local economy, shatters previous records Artisphere, ranked one of the top fine arts shows in the country, poured money into artists’ pockets and Greenville’s economy. In 2017, the festival broke all previous records for economic impact, attendance, and sales. “Artisphere is a celebration of the arts in its many forms, and I believe that it is also a celebration of Greenville. By every measure we track, the 2017 festival

was our most successful yet, and the festival’s success is directly related to the extraordinary support we have from our community,” said Tod Tappert, Artisphere board president. Economic impact from the weekend was estimated at $6,642,682, a 4 percent increase over 2016. Attendance was estimated at 99,817, up 2 percent over the previous year. Artists recorded average sales of $9,150, up 11 percent from 2016’s $8,200. Total art sales during the threeday festival were $1,228,500, according to artist surveys. One hundred and 35 artists participated in Artists Row. Artisphere contributed a total of $20,000 to its Arts Partners for their volunteer assistance during the festival. Art Partners were Boy Scout Troop 266, Greenville Chinese Cultural Association, Greenville Chorale, Greenville Concert Band, Hispanic-American Women’s Association, International Ballet, Palmetto Statesmen, South Carolina Children’s Theatre, Vocal Matrix, and the S.C. School for the Arts and Humanities. The 2018 festival will be May 11–13. —Cindy Landrum

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COVER

Bravo!

Allan and Suzanne McCalla celebrate a quarter-century at Greenville Little Theatre WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

Photo by Will Crooks


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09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COVER “A lot of people didn’t think we could produce ‘Les Miserables.’ I said, ‘Wait and see.’ It’s the best musical we’ve produced, just the show itself, and we produced it really well.”

Photo by Will Crooks


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COVER

A

llen and Suzanne McCalla weren’t sure how long their tenure was going to last at Greenville Little Theatre. When they were hired in 1993, the theater was in trouble. Debt had climbed, and season subscriptions had plummeted after a series of missteps. The board made the McCallas a deal: the board would take care of the debt if the husband-and-wife duo would take care of the audiences. The McCallas succeeded… and then some. This year marks the McCallas’ silver anniversary with the theater. During their tenure, they’ve produced more than 180 shows and tripled attendance. Here are some of the highlights:

“Little Foxes,” 2002

“[Allen] was much beloved by the audience, and I am playing Regina, who is the biggest b**ch in written history,” Suzanne says. “Allen is an invalid in the show and he’s dying. He’s in a wheelchair, and they’re having an argument and he starts having a heart attack. As he is trying to take his medicine, he drops the spoon. He’s trying to pick it up and people are screaming, ‘Pick up the spoon.’” She decides to let him die. “We say there are still people who like to hold it against her,” Allen says.

“Ah, Wilderness,” 2005

“Ah, Wilderness” is the only time the McCallas have appeared in a GLT play with their son Sam. They, fittingly, played the parents and he, the son. “The ‘Ah, Wilderness’ dad is probably calmer and wiser, but he’s still a dad,” Allen says.

“Romeo and Juliet,” 2007 “The New Odd Couple,” 1993

Allen was performing in a production of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” with Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre when a friend of his mother told him GLT was looking for new leadership. All of the applicants had to direct a play in that theater’s season. The McCallas wanted “To Kill a Mockingbird” but were given a female version of “The Odd Couple” instead. Allen directed, and Suzanne designed the sets and costumes. The play was a success.

“Beehive,” 1995

GLT, like a lot of theaters, was set up for Broadway shows, not pop musicals. “A show would run on Broadway for three years, closed, and then released to theaters like ours,” Allen says. Suzanne adds, “Things began to change. Musicals closed on Broadway, and went on tour and not released. Different types of musicals began being written as well. ‘Beehive’ was somebody who wanted to do a set of songs and felt like they couldn’t do it without words.” So GLT put the show in its season, not realizing that it might be hard to cast because it required a lot of black talent, something the theater had had difficulty y

Born Yesterda

attracting before. The theater was able to find the performers it needed, and the show was a success.

“Born Yesterday,” 1995

The first play the McCallas appeared in at GLT was “Born Yesterday,” something they had done in Kentucky. “There’s a role in it that is written for Suzanne practically, Billie Dawn, and she was fantastic in it,” Allen says. He played a love interest. “And you were good in it,” Suzanne says.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” 1998

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” was the first Shakespeare play performed on the GLT stage. The play really brought out the company’s creative side. One artist made fairy wings out of watercolor chiffon that were mounted on sticks and branches, while another painted Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” as the backdrop. The rest of the set was a series of slides that went into pools of water. “It was just a lot of fun. It was a jungle gym of fun for the fairies, and the people, too,” Suzanne says. She still has those wings.

“Romeo and Juliet” was the only other Shakespeare play produced by GLT. “I thought everybody would love ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ We did it for Sam, who was about to go off to college, and it was like, ‘OK, you’re going to be trained by the master right here. You’re doing Shakespeare before you go,’” Suzanne says, “and there was a lot of artistic interest in the show.” It was also the first time GLT created all the costumes for the show.

“Ain’t Misbehaving,” 2007

This was GLT’s first all-black cast, and it included high school student Delvin Choice, who later would go on to compete on NBC’s “The Voice.” “We were so proud that our audience embraced it. It was a fantastic show with fantastic music. It really speaks well of the audience we have,” Allen says.

“A Streetcar Named Desire,” 2010

“Every element of it worked. There wasn’t a miss at all,” says Suzanne, of her set design. “It just screamed New Orleans.” Allen adds, “If you’re designing a box set, it’s one room. Clever plays like ‘Streetcar’ take place in several places. You have to create an environment, and she created a great environment.”

Beehive

Les Miserables


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

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COVER “Les Miserables,” 2014

Noises Off

This 2014 production was one of the most important in the history of GLT. “A lot of people didn’t think we could produce ‘Les Miserables.’ I said, ‘Wait and see,’” Allen says. “It’s the best musical we’ve produced, just the show itself, and we produced it really well.” It also highlighted the talent pool in Greenville. “Even if we had the money, we couldn’t have done this show earlier on. The people weren’t here. At times, we struggled to fill just basic roles,” Suzanne says. “‘Les Mis’ let the community know how great the talent pool is here. It was one of the first times where people could come and see this cast was local. It really highlighted how much the acting pool had grown.”

“Jesus Christ Superstar,” 2015

Jesus C

hrist S

uperst

ar

Escobar Photography

“Jesus Christ Superstar” is one of Suzanne’s favorites, but she doubted the McCallas would be able to do it. “When we first got here, we could not have done it. We would have had people boycotting,” she says. When the Peace Center had “Jesus Christ Superstar” on its Broadway season, people protested out front and Bob Jones University put up billboards. “Allen says we’d never be able to do it here because nobody would come.” Then Allen wanted to put on “Carousel.” “Kimberly [Ferreira, GLT’s choreographer] says, ‘Oh, my God. I hate ‘Carousel.’ We’re not doing it,’” Suzanne says. They finally agreed, but only if Allen would add “Jesus Christ Superstar” later. As fate would have it, “Jesus Christ Superstar” wasn’t released for five years, and by that time, the controversy was gone.

“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” 2016

This show made the list not because of the show itself, but because it is part of GLT’s touring program. Last year, 35,000 children saw “Alexander.” “That’s been one of the most rewarding things,” Allen says. “[The touring program] really took off when Sam came back from the Barter Theater, because they have one of the most successful children’s touring programs in the country and he worked for them,” Suzanne says. “We could just never get it to work. They have a formula at the Barter that works, and he set it up like that.” The Piano Lesson

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22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

LAW OF NATURE

Greenville’s Michael Corley fights for environmental justice in the courtroom WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Greenville’s Michael Corley will be the first person to admit he’s not a “cliché environmental hippie” in sandals who chains himself to trees. Instead, he prefers to seek environmental justice in the courtroom. Corley is an attorney for the South Carolina Environmental Law Project, a public interest law firm that works to protect the state’s natural resources through “forceful legal advocacy.” Toward that end, he’s represented dozens of citizens and a variety of nonprofit conservation groups in the courtrooms of South Carolina in order to prevent environmental harm. In fact, Corley has been at the forefront of some of the state’s biggest environmental cases, including successful efforts to protect Charleston County’s Angel Oak from development and to stop construction of a mega-landfill for out-of-state waste in Pickens County.

“Environmental resources like rivers, mountains, and air are public assets that we all share and enjoy, but they can be destroyed or diminished by the actions of a few,” Corley said. “Environmental law, in my mind, is so important because it is the embodiment of our public rights. In South Carolina, we have many high-quality resources, but also a great deal of pressure on those resources, so our environmental laws are that much more important.” Corley developed a passion for the outdoors as a young boy while roaming the woods and fishing near Clinton in Laurens County. That passion continued to grow over the years, and he decided to intern at SCELP during his time as a law student at the University of South Carolina. After graduating, Corley began a career in legal work and clerked for United States District Judge Terry Wooten. It wasn’t long after that Corley learned about a job

opening at SCELP’s office in Georgetown. He was hired in 2010. One of his first cases with SCELP was representing a citizens group in Laurens County against the construction of a landfill by Raleigh, N.C.-based MRR Southern. Corley challenged the company’s landfill permit, arguing there was no need for the landfill because the region already had more landfill capacity than it needed. After multiple courtroom battles and appeals, the S.C. Supreme Court sided with Corley and the citizens group in 2014 and denied the company’s permit. “It was a big win for me,” Corley said. “I would dare to say it shaped my outlook on law and solidified my passion for environmentalism. It was really inspiring to see a group of citizens rally around an issue and challenge big industry to preserve their community.”


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COMMUNITY

09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

Understanding “Environmental resources like rivers, mountains, and air are public assets that we all share and enjoy, but they can be destroyed or diminished by the actions of a few.”

Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Dr. Harold Ivan Smith Assisting Grievers in the Community

A FREE seminar for educators September 26, 2017 3:00pm to 5:00pm Corley spent four years at SCELP before resigning and moving to Greenville in order to work as a labor employment attorney for a private practice. But his love for conservation only grew stronger as he integrated himself into the region’s environmental community and joined the board of various advocacy groups, including Greenville’s Friends of the Reedy River. In 2016, Corley rejoined SCELP and was selected to lead the firm’s first office in Greenville. “When I was working in private practice, I started to notice a wide range of environmental threats, including diesel spills in the Reedy,” said Corley. “The Upstate definitely needed a permanent legal presence to tackle these issues. SCELP stepped up to fill that role.” Corley has since overseen a number of high-profile legal cases across the state. For instance, Corley made headlines earlier this year after he persuaded a federal court to order the removal of the seawalls on Harbor Island and Isle of Palms. Corley, who was representing the S.C. Wildlife Federation and the Sierra Club, argued that the experimental walls designed to control erosion were actually keeping rare sea turtles from reaching their nesting sites. More recently, he’s begun working with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control to oversee the cleanup of a former industrial site along the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail that’s allegedly leaked toxins into the nearby Reedy River and likely crossed over onto the nearby property of Legacy Charter Elementary. Corley said the site has “festered with coal tar for more than 70 years” and posed a significant health threat to the surrounding Southernside area, a predominantly low income, African-Amer-

ican community. “Greenville has historically sited its dirtiest industries in underserved communities, and it’s all happening in the shadow of the downtown we praise,” he said. “There is a side to Greenville that nobody sees or cares to talk about. But it’s our mission going forward to shine a light on it.” Corley said working for the “underdogs” is what he was supposed to do, but it hasn’t come without its challenges. Often the effort has required him to spend several years on a single case and constantly battle teams of corporate lawyers who are better paid and better staffed. He’s also had to combat stereotypes inside and outside of the courtroom. “Many people, including judges and other public officials, believe environmental lawyers value the resources over the community,” Corley said. “That’s not how I approach my job. Yes, I have cases that are focused on waterways and other natural resources, but I see environmental law as a platform for defending and preserving the public’s health.” As for the future, Corley plans to continue his fight against large corporations looking to construct landfills across the Upstate, as well as educate the future generation of conservationists. Since 2015, Corley has taught environmental law as an adjunct professor at Furman University’s Shi Center for Sustainability. “It’s a wonderful program that allows me to both teach and learn at the same time, because there are students who hold opposing viewpoints,” said Corley. “I believe it’s absolutely vital to educate students about environmental policies that could affect them and their communities.”

“When I was working in private practice, I started to notice a wide range of environmental threats, including diesel spills in the Reedy. The Upstate definitely needed a permanent legal presence to tackle these issues. SCELP stepped up to fill that role.”

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24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers needed for Fall for Greenville

in scholarship support for Greenville Health System’s Medical Experience (MedEx) Academy. The support will help fund stipends, scholarships, and educational materials for students in the award-winning initiative that’s helped introduce more than 500 students into the health care field since launching in 2010. Brown’s

partnership with MedEx has included his own personal giving, fundraising on behalf of the program, and serving as long-time chair of the MedEx Advisory Board. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

Volunteer registration is open for BB&T Fall for Greenville, Oct. 13–15, in downtown Greenville. A variety of different volunteer shifts and positions are available throughout the three-day weekend. Volunteer positions include festival concierge, ticket seller, beer server, wine server, baby station attendant, will call, runner, volunteer hospitality, merchandise, and more. Visit fallforgreenville.net/150/Become-A-Volunteer to learn more. DONATION

$50,000 donated to GHS MedEx Academy The recent GHS Night at the Drive turned into “Operation Home Run” for baseball team owner Craig Brown when community members surprised him with $50,000

Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

HUGHES ACADEMY

Science teachers selected for Science P.L.U.S. Institute Roper Mountain Science Center, a facility for Greenville County Schools, announces that Melanie Helling and Elia Partin, science teachers at Hughes Academy of Science and Technology, were selected to attend the Science P.L.U.S. Institute during the sum-

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09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

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HOME

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Stately basement home on a 1.3 acre wooded cul-de-sac lot! This 4 Bed/3.5 Bath painted brick home showcases a fully renovated gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry, high-end appliances & granite countertops, refinished hardwoods on main level, and fully renovated master bath with spa-like fully-tiled shower and garden tub with bead board surround. The home has a very open feel yet offers various spaces for relaxation, home offices or entertainment. The main Great Room with wood burning fireplace is off of the kitchen & breakfast area

and there’s a large sunroom or craft room with custom vaulted ceiling & skylights. All of the home’s bedrooms are upstairs. One has its own private bath and the other two share a large hall bath. The master suite is at the opposing end of the home with enough space for a sitting area and French Doors leading to the updated bathroom & two walk-in closets. The basement level has a large recreation space, another office/study & a huge closet for storage. The two car garage has an impressive workshop and a yard door leading to the side and rear grounds.

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26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017

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HOME : On the market Alta Vista � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Alta Vista � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Chatsworth � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road Area � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

303 Crescent Avenue · $1,575,000 · MLS# 1346383

805 Crescent Avenue · $945,000 · MLS# 1347748

131 Haddon Lane · $674,900 · MLS# 1345118

420 Longview Terrace · $463,500

4BR/3.5BA Timeless traditional elegance! Wonderful Willie Ward home has been exceptionally renovated throughout. Second floor master suite. Saltwater pool. Must see! McDaniel Avenue to right on Crescent Avenue. Home on right.

6BR/5.5BA Greenville’s Crescent Avenue. Updated kit/dual master brs/3 fps/private bkyd/extensive molding /plantation shutters/ fully finished bsmnt w/wine cellar/excellent schools! Cleveland St. to Crescent Ave-House corner Crescent and Pine Forest.

4BR/3.5BA Priced below appraised value! Stately home on 2.5 acres. Freshly painted interior, salt water pool and koi pond. Must see! Pelham to Batesville Rd. Left into Chatsworth. Left on Haddon.

3BR/3BA Charming Augusta Road cottage, move-in ready! Energy efficient, deep lot and $45,000 in improvements. Truly a great find! Augusta Road from Downtown, left on Faris, right on Longview.

Contact: Sharon Wilson 918-1140 Wilson Associates

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Contact: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 The Marchant Company

Weatherstone � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Real Estate News

The Marchant Company is proud to announce the certification of Realtor Celeste Purdie as a Military Relocation Professional

105 Ebenway Lane · $459,900 · MLS# 1350996 4BR/3.5BA Stately stone and brick home on quiet street. Main level master suite. Private backyard and 3-car garage. A must see! Harrison Bridge Rd to Hillstone into subdivision, right on Ebenway.

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Realtor Celeste Purdie has become a Military Relocation Professional (MRP) as certified by the National Association of Realtors. As a former Veteran, Celeste has a desire to help fellow Veterans through the home buying and selling

process while making them aware of all their available resources. The MRP certification educates the Realtor on the benefits and support in place for past Purdie and present military members as to better guide them through the home buying or selling process. This certification

is awarded after required coursework is completed and an exam is passed. Being able to offer guidance and direction to a Veteran client is vital as the amount of information and assistance available can be hard to navigate alone. We are proud to have Celeste as the Coordinator for our Veteran Services Division and are confident she is ready and able to help Veterans buy or sell their homes. continued on PAGE 27

Join us Today! Greenville Animal Care 328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville

3:00 - 5:00 PM Enjoy a snow cone from Nomadik Few, a hot dog from Resident Dogs, tour the facility, and meet all the furry friends available for adoption. #cainecares


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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HOME Featured Home

Ledgestone

101 Ledgestone Way, Greer, SC 29651

Home Info Price: $659,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4/1 Lot Size: 0.64 Acres

MLS#: 1347129 Sq. Ft: 3,885 Built: 2014

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Riverside Middle, and Mauldin High Agent: Ty Savage | 864.444.7399 ty@tysavagehomes.com

$20,000 PRICE REDUCTION LIKE NEW, “RUSTIC” INSPIRED EXECUTIVE HOME This 4BR/4.5BA custom built home boasts AMAZING CURB APPEAL and the finest finishes. From the moment you enter the Stacked Stone Archway into the 2 story foyer, you understand the quality of the design and its functionality. You are greeted by a perfectly finished, private guest suite on the main level, the foyer then opens up to the Family and Entertaining area of the home with its large Great room, Gourmet Kitchen, and Dining Area.

Real Estate News continued

Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Top Producers for July Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®  announces  the top producers from each of its residential sales offices for  the month of July. These agents and teams  earned  the highest gross commission incomes  (GCI) based on closings completed  July 1 – 31, 2017.

Great Room includes a Stacked Stone Fireplace, Cedar Beams and loads of Natural Light. The “Chefs Dream” of a kitchen features an Eat Up Bar, Custom Cabinetry, granite countertops, restaurant quality Brick Framed Gas Range, Brick Backsplash & Stainless Appliances. With Loads of Storage, a magnificent Laundry Room and oversized Garage, this home is perfect for anyone who has thought of building their dream home, without the hassle. Sitting on over .64 acres in the highly sought after “Ledgestone Community” in Five Forks, this home is priced to SELL!

ANDERSON OFFICE                    4. Charee McConchie Top Teams: 5. Keith Boling 1. The Clever People 6. Carmen Crigler Feemster 2. At Home Associates BOILING SPRINGS OFFICE 3. Sheila Newton Team 1. The Hazzard Team Top Individuals: 2. Alex Ly 1. Deenise Parrett EASLEY/POWDERSVILLE 2. Gia Townsley OFFICE     3. Cole Oraham Top Team: AUGUSTA ROAD OFFICE                       1. Sheri Sanders Team 1. The Norman Group 2. Mary & Jerry Ross 2. Beth Crigler Top Individuals: 3. Ginger Sherman 1. Twila Kingsmore  

2. Donna Stegall 3. Linda Ballard GARLINGTON ROAD OFFICE Top Team: 1. Ronda & Chris Holder Top Individuals: 1. Sheila Smalley 2. JoAnn English 3. Bob Moffatt GREER OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Jan Walker Team 2. The Shepherd Team

Top Individuals: 1. Paige Haney 2. Stephanie Miller 3. Jada Barnette N. PLEASANTBURG OFFICE Top Teams: 1. The Chet & Beth Smith Group 2. The Morgan Group 3. MacDonald HomeTeam Top Individuals: 1. Anthony Hackney 2. Melissa Morrell continued on PAGE 29


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HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Aug. 7 – 11, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,225,000 PARK PLACE ON MAIN $1,195,000 COBBLESTONE $965,000 COBBLESTONE $900,000 MONTEBELLO $760,000 $745,000 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $714,900 $710,000 $700,000 $652,000 $610,790 CHESTNUT POND $605,000 $595,000 $530,000 BROOKHAVEN $519,500 STAFFORD GREEN $498,688 KINGSBRIDGE $490,000 $472,000 HAMMETT’S GLEN $469,500 JONES MILL CROSSING $455,000 CHANTICLEER $437,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $435,000 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $429,900 STAFFORD GREEN $429,280 $426,693 WATERS EDGE $423,000 CLARENDON $415,000 RIDGEWATER $410,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $410,000 $410,000 KILGORE FARMS $405,500 BOTANY WOODS $405,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $405,000 HAMMETT CORNER $398,000 $388,000 EAGLES GLEN@KIMBRELL $371,217 CARRONBRIDGE $359,800 VINEYARDS @ NORTH MAIN $359,000 SILVER MEADOWS $351,678 HUNTERS RIDGE $350,000 SUGAR CREEK $343,000 $335,000 THE TOWNES@FIVE FORKS $334,235 COACHMAN PLANTATION $332,000 SUMMIT@CHEROKEE VALLEY $329,500 COOPER RIDGE $321,788 GREYTHORNE $320,000 VERDMONT $316,000 CLIFFS@GLASSY $310,000 WOODLAND RIDGE $310,000 WOODLAND RIDGE $310,000 WESTCLIFFE $310,000 HERITAGE POINT $309,300 SILVERLEAF $307,000 $305,000 CARILION $304,552 $300,000 CLIFFS VALLEY $300,000 COOPER RIDGE $291,771 WOODLAND CREEK $290,000 CAROLINA OAKS $288,500 $288,000

GREENVILLE DT1 LLC BRUCE ROBERT W DINICOLA ANTHONY (SURV) KUPEC ALAINA NASELLI CHARLES GREEN DEER PROPERTIES LL GAMBLE CARRIE R CIARDI ERNEST PSSOUTHCAROLINA LLC SK BUILDERS INC STEPHENS JAMES B TRUSTEE GALLOWAY CUSTOM HOMES LL EARGLE JOHN ADAM (JTWROS MAXWELL MILLS DAVID MARK III PROPERTIES INC MUNGO HOMES INC DAVE PANKAJ CLYNE FAMILY TRUST WASHNOCK PATRICIA G JONES MILL PROPERTIES LL BLACKWELL LARRY G LESTER TRISTAN J ASTERISK LAND PARTNERS L MUNGO HOMES INC HULSEY JOHN D WOFFORD KIMBERLY M MILANI NEIL P MILLER KIMBERLY DOREEN REECE PATRICK B (SURV) GUEVARA OBED E WILLIAMSON RAFAEL S LUDOLF CHARLOTTE ANN ROB NOON BRIAN M (JTWROS) PHILLIPS AMANDA K HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF D R HORTON INC NVR INC MORRISON SEAN W COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC 55 PARK VISTA WAY LAND T SIMMONS ANDREW B KILCOYNE MICHELLE C MARK III PROPERTIES INC CALLAHAN JAMES (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC D R HORTON INC DEFALCO MARGARET (JTWROS MASITTO MARTIN L NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERS WU CATHERINE MIAO XIAN ( WEICHERT WORKFORCE MOBIL MIDDAUGH CLARKE MUNSEY ANDREA K SATTERFIELD STEPHEN H STYLES DARRELL L DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH LAMB ERIC R (JTWROS) DUNCAN MARY ELLEN D R HORTON INC JUSTUS CHRISTOPHER (JTWR GONZALEZ ALBERTO (SURV) SNELLING CAYLEE A (JTWRO

SUSAN REID 864.616.3685

sreid@cbcaine.com

Home is where your story begins! www.susanreidrealestate.com

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

CRH DT LLC ODELL PATRICK B REVOC TR SALVATORE ALICE B (JTWRO PENN DIANA ELIZABETH (JT BAYNES-DUNNING KAREN B ( MAXWELL LAUREN THORNE (J VAN STEENBURGH AMANDA (J RHYNE ANNMARIE (JTWROS) PAR 5 DEVELOPMENT GROUP MCMASTER GINA ROSSI (JTW STEPHENS JAMES MICHAEL R SALAK MELORDINA D (JTWRO MCDONALD EVA L NETHERLAND BRYAN (JTWROS D R HORTON INC BROWN GAYLE ELIZABETH RE PALADUGU RAJA WARREN COLEMAN GIBSON EUGENE HALLUM JR SABAL HOMES AT JONES MIL MCCAW DAN L KUPEC ALAINA YANKOW JEFFREY J PIDUGU MAHESWARI R (JTWR BARRON JON GOAD CHARLES E III LIVIN KELLEY CHRISTOPHER MARTI GUTHY MARYPATRICIA (JTWR CLAGG CHRISTOPHER D CAZEL ELIZABETH A (JTWRO ENGLAND DIANE MOISTER BRENT R DICARLO DONNA M (JTWROS) WEBER KARL (JTWROS) RUTHERFORD ROAD BUSINESS WEISBECK CHAD R (JTWROS) ALLEN KAREN GIBBES ALISON A (JTWROS) BROWN CHRISTOPHER A (JTW WILLIAMS WINN F (JTWROS) PHILLIPS JENNIFER M (JTW LAURAM HOLDINGS LLC NVR INC LAWYER BRIAN R (JTWROS) COOLBAUGH SHIRLEY A (JTW KURTA BARBARA GAIL (JTWR WHITE RAYMOND REESE BRIAN (JTWROS) COLEMAN ADRIENNE (JTWROS WEICHERT WORKFORCE MOBIL NEAL DEBORAH EDWARDS EATON JULIE A BARTRAM PAUL R (JTWROS) CRONIN JAMES ALEXIUS IV RAIRIGH JOHN (JTWROS) THRONE ANGELA (JTWROS) STRAWHORN DONNA E (JTWRO THORNE KYLE S JUDY SUZANNE S (JTWROS) BILDERBACK DONNA M (JTWR RICKEY ROBERT C (JTWROS) RIDGEWAY CAROLINE B (JTW

PO BOX 1805 18 S MAIN ST UNIT 403 5 COBBLER LN 108 TOOLEY RD 2310 WINCHESTER RD 12 HIGHLAND DR 6 WESTMINSTER DR 175 WATERS RD 2075 JUNIPER LAKE RD 156 AUGUSTA CT 230 HIDDEN HILLS DR 300 TANOAK CT 315 CROFT ST 28 W MOUNTAINVIEW AVE 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 320 CANNOCK PL 404 KINGSGATE CT 225 MEYERS DR 101 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY 421 WANDO PARK BLVD STE 230 1849 PLUMBAGO WAY 211 ALGONQUIN TRL 100 S HUDSON ST UNIT 104 105 STAFFORD GREEN WAY 200 N TRAILS END 1 PENNY MEADOW CT 400 W FARIS RD 251 IVY WOODS CT 42 MODESTO LN 207 FRANK ST 6 MEADOW FIELD CT 14 BRIDGEWATER DR 300 ANGELINE WAY 15130 GARVOCK PL PO BOX 4339 304 BALD EAGLE CT 15 CARRONBRIDGE WAY 9 CLARET DR 38 ENOREE FARM WAY 55 PARK VISTA WAY 210 OAK RIDGE CT 138 MOUNT VISTA AVE 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 405 LADYSMITH DR 119 CLUB CART RD 8 PORTICO PT 9 DAWN MEADOW CT 108 LISMORE ST 161 CATNIP TRL 91 WOOD HOLLOW CIR 91 WOOD HOLLOW CIR 11 SALUDA LAKE CIR 361 HERITAGE POINT DR 109 CHIPPING CT 85 GREAT VIEW LN 20 WHITEGRASS WAY 3046 BRUSHY CREEK RD 119 FOXBORO RD 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 400 19 LAUREL SPRINGS DR 157 CAROLINA OAKS DR 1521 SPRING GATE DR UNIT 10107

WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE $286,000 HERITAGE COVE $280,000 GLENS @ LEXINGTON PLACE $279,900 PELHAM FALLS $277,000 GREYSTONE@NEELY FARMS $275,900 AMBER OAKS FARM $273,620 NEELY FARM - IVEY CREEK $273,500 THE RESERVES@RAVENWOOD $270,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $270,000 VALLEY @ GILDER CREEK FARM $268,747 BLACKBERRY FARM $268,000 WARRENTON $267,500 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $266,050 THE COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $265,000 GREENBRIAR OAKS $265,000 AMBER OAKS FARM $260,044 $260,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $260,000 COPPER CREEK $260,000 COUNTRY KNOLLS $254,000 $253,750 VISTA HILLS $250,000 KELSEY GLEN $249,900 MCCAULEY MOUNTAIN $247,000 DEVENGER PLACE $245,000 LISMORE PARK $244,500 LISMORE PARK $244,500 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $239,000 VICTORIA PARK $237,500 HERITAGE HILLS $237,500 VICTORIA PARK $231,226 SHADOW CREEK $228,000 COUNTRY KNOLLS $226,500 WEMBERLY WAY $225,000 VERDMONT $223,000 $222,500 $220,000 DEVENGER PLACE $219,000 PEBBLECREEK $218,400 HOWARDS PARK $217,900 LANDING@SAVANNAH POINTE $217,500 WEBBINGTON $215,000 AVONDALE FOREST $215,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $215,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $215,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $215,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $214,900 BELL’S CREEK $214,900 FIELDSTONE $214,500 EDGEBROOK $214,096 WATERMILL $212,122 FAIRVIEW POINTE $209,900 ORCHARD FARMS $209,000 WADE HAMPTON TERRACE $208,500 LINKSIDE@BONNIE BRAE $205,000 TOWNES@CARDINAL CREEK $203,050 TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK $202,761 $200,000 GOWER ESTATES $198,000 VICTORIA PARK $194,275 $194,071 SUMMERFIELD $194,000

OPEN HOUSE ~ SUNDAY, 2-4 214 ABERDEEN DRIVE, GREENVILLE AUGUSTA RD. AREA • 5BR/3BA • $649,000 This fabulous home sits on .39 acre terraced yard that that will accommodate a pool, guest house or very large garden. The open floor plan is perfect for entertaining and family living. A huge deck overlooks the large back yard.This home is so livable and comfortable, inside and outside! It’s ready for you and your family to make it your own! Walk to Augusta Circle School, neighborhood shops and restaurants! MLS 1345733. Come see for yourself this Sunday!

PRICE SELLER GRAZIANO JAMES J (SURV) LUCK BENJAMIN B MACK REBEKAH BEACH KEVEN E COLEMAN COREY M SK BUILDERS INC PERLEY THOMAS F MCCOMAK TREVOR D RORER NORMA M (L-EST) GAUL AMY M ATTARDO DINO C CROCKETT JOSHUA L NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH ANGELETTE JESSICA M SK BUILDERS INC BRIDWELL GEORGE MICHAEL SHF VERDAE LLC LEE LONNIE JAMES (JTWROS CYMBALSKI TOMASZ HOWARD WILLIAM REX YODER DANIEL F (JTWROS) SCHULZE JENNIFER M (JTWR PAYNE DARRELL G JR (JTWR MORENO EMILIA (JTWROS) RIVAN ANDREW L (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO SMITH ADAM JOSEPH (SURV) VICTORIA PROPERTIES LLC SPENCE BETTY JANE JONES GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC ALSTADTER STUART (JTWROS SPECHT JAMES K SIMONS RITA J BOYD ANGELA NICOLE SMITH WENDI P LISTER BOYD C REVOCABLE CLINT CHAD P KOCH JENNIFER L R (JTWRO D R HORTON-CROWN LLC KAMPOUROGLOU JO ANN (JTW MCABEE DANNA M (JTWROS) APPLEBY CLYDE R (JWROS) MCCLAIN DAUMONIC D ZANDARSKI ELIZABETH E (J AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R LINDSEY KEITH VAUGHN JASON LEE VAN WIE PAUL W SK BUILDERS INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL PLEMMONS CANDACE B LUMM DANIEL C ALEXANDER HOLDINGS LLC VAN SLYKE RICHARD E NVR INC NVR INC BRITT JAMES R JR (JTWROS WHITE JANET TRAYNHAM GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC STEPHENS JAMES B TRUSTEE PHILLIPS JOSHUA D

BUYER

ADDRESS

LANCASTER JASON T (JTWRO JACKSON JAMES D (JTWROS) HANEY JOHNATHAN B (JTWRO BUSHEY ELIZABETH A SCHUMAN GEORGE ANDREW STARR ABBEY P MCLEOD LENA PHILLIPS JOSHUA D (JTWRO KILPATRICK AMY L (JTWROS REID LISA B MCANDREW ANGELA (JTWROS) REYES RICARDO A PARRA GARCIA MARLON (JTWROS) ROZZANO MARK E (JTWROS) STATON THOMAS DUTY JONATHAN D (JTWROS) FLEMINGS STEPHEN D NVR INC SWIFT JENNIFER L (JTWROS NEEDLES APRIL (JTWROS) GREISER DANA L (JTWROS) EDWARDS JOANNE ELIZABETH CALLIS MARCUS JOHN (JTWR LOUZRI MELISSA L GAMBLE KELVIN J (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO RODRIGUEZ-MORENO EDUWIN SCHWELLING ERIC IAN (JTW GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC KOCH JENNIFER L (JTWROS) LAWRENCE BRANDON LYNN BARBER DEBORAH ANN MCMILLAN JAMES E (JTWROS STRONG KIMBERLY D ABATE DANIELLE (JTWROS) MURRAY DAVID J (JTWROS) GOSNELL AMY (JTWROS) KRUMENACKER ERIN LAPIERRE KYLE LEVETT JAMES L JR (JTWRO HANFORD LIVING TRUST SLAUGHTER JOCELYN (JTWRO STRICKLAND ERIKA L (JTWR DRIGGERS BRIAN (JTWROS) AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R CARLTON BRANDON D MONTANEZ ANGEL R (JTWROS BALSHAW ANITA S HAGEN TERRY L PEREZ MARCOS M (JTWROS) CRAWLEY TIFFANY T CORNWELL COLBY C BRIDGES DAVID I (JTWROS) MCMILLAN KINLEY M NELTHROPE HADIYA PATEL HINA LEE ASHLEY B (JTWROS) JERNIGAN JASON E (JTWROS COWHIT LLC DAVIDSON RYAN K STEPHENS JAMES MICHAEL T RHEE HAI (JTWROS)

23 ARBOLADO WAY 34 FOX CREEK CT 5 SUFFOLK DOWNS WAY 14 MISTY OAKS DR 501 WORCHESTER PL 413 GOLDEN AMBER LN 1005 FARMING CREEK DR 71 COPPERDALE DR 404 KENILWORTH DR 211 ELSTAR LOOP RD 828 BRIELLE CT 207 MONTGLEN CT 234 SANDUSKY LN 331 SABIN CT 118 DIXIE AVE 425 GOLDEN AMBER LN 41 TURRENTINE CIR 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 1 KENNARD CT 108 COUNTRYGLEN CT 531 SCUFFLETOWN RD 314 CHICK SPRINGS RD 200 CHAPEL HILL LN 2559 HIGHWAY 11 111 BAYBERRY RD 2707 N 118TH ST 203 KYLEMORE LN 59 RAMAPO CT 90 N ROYAL TOWER DR 809 BUTLER SPRINGS RD 8 CHADMORE ST 313 SEDGEBROOK DR 104 COUNTRY GLEN COURT 118 SUNSHINE DR 11 MARTELE CT 104 PARKER SLATTON RD 305 WATERS RD 201 ROCKY SLOPE RD APT 310 3 FOX RIDGE WAY 816 LIBERTY WALK LN 200 KILSOCK CT 8 PADDOCK RUN LN 8 CRAFTON ST 18 KIRKSHIRE LN 26 VALLEY BLUFF LN 26 VALLEY BLUFF LN 3 TAUNTON CT 113 HORSEPEN WAY 56 CANTERA CIR 400 TRILLIUM CREEK CT 451 RIVERDALE RD 5 ROSE PETAL CT 20 N ORCHARD FARMS AVE 35 LISA DR 211 SANDY LN 216 ABBY CIR 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 510 TIGERVILLE RD 119 COLLINS CREEK RD 102 DUNSBOROUGH DR 230 HIDDEN HILLS DR 7 SHAIRPIN LN


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HOME Real Estate News continued 3. Lisa Norton Reese PELHAM ROAD OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Spaulding Group 2. The Toates Team 3. Pam McCurry Team Top Individuals: 1. Jennifer Van Gieson   2. Liliana DeAngeli 3. Sam Hankins SIMPSONVILLE OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Cousins & Associates 2. Sandra Palmer & Associates 3. Vernon & Linda Smith Top Individuals: 1. Bob Schmidt 2. Kevin Crawford 3. Melissa Coleman “Congratulations to these teams and agents for a tremendous July,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “The Upstate real estate market remains hot as we head into late summer, and our agents are committed to getting results for their buying and selling clients.”

Coldwell Banker Caine Names July Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from July through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s Team efforts listed below. Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/closed units include: • Alicia Waynick • Beth Beach • Charlianne Nestlen • Cynthia Serra • Donna Morrow • Faith Ross • Francie Little • Gloria Seaver • Heidi Putnam • Hilary Hurst • Holly West • Jacob Mann

• Jane McCutcheon • Jennifer Wilson • Jake Dickens • Kathy Harris • Lori Thompson • Marshall Jordan • Mike Dassel • Pat Loftis and Brett Smagala • Patty Einstein • Sherry Sponseller • Susan Gallion • Suzanne Cook • Tracey Cappio • Trey Cole • Victor Lester • Virginia Hayes • Wanda Stewart Circle of Excellence Groups (2-3 agents) achieving $1.5 million in listing/ closing volume or six units listed/closed include: • Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group • Lewis & Company

OPEN HOUSE & COMMUNITY TOUR! SEPTEMBER 10 & 24 | FROM 2-5PM

Mountain Views

1797 ALTAMONT ROAD | GREENVILLE, SC 29609 STUNNING

Downtown Greenville YET ONLY MINUTES TO

John McAllister Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed John McAllister as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. John joins Caine with McAlister a Bachelors degree in Psychology from Coastal Carolina University. Prior to becoming a REALTOR, John was an award winning professional golfer for numerous labels and a professional caddie for the PGA tour. John is eager to translate his passion on the golf course to his new career. In addition to playing golf, John enjoys teaching the sport and was a volunteer coach at Wofford College. He also enjoys other outdoor activities, including boating and jogging. John comes from a lineage of golfers—his father and grandfather were both head golf professionals for the Spartanburg Country Club. “We warmly welcome John to our Spartanburg office,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “John’s enthusiasm and knowledge of the Upstate will arm his clients with an incredible partner in the home buying and selling process.”

RIDGES LOT 1 FOR SALE Custom Designed & Built by

SALES BY CALL CONSERVUS REALTY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS EXCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

864.608.4608

theridgesatparismountain.com Conservus Realty provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetics. In addition to federal law requirements, [Company Name] complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.


feast WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER PHOTOS BY ANDREW HUANG

BLAST OFF Rocket Surgery launches in TR with classy cocktails and creative small plates

Gabrielle with gin, elderflower, gentian, honey, lemon, and bitters served up with a lemon twist

L

ocated two doors down from Farmhouse Tacos, the white, nofrills exterior of Rocket Surgery doesn’t necessarily scream cocktail bar. But the front French-style glass doors give way to a modern, eclectic space with a vaulted ceiling and exposed wooden beams. The focal point is the sputnik lights over the half-moonshaped bar. One dark gray accent wall is adorned with more than a dozen pewter round mirrors of various sizes. Co-owner Andy O’Mara, of Sidewall Pizza, says the arrangement is meant to resemble the solar system. The opposite wall features a large, framed, preserved moss art piece that reminds O’Mara of the moon. He deliberately avoided live plants. “I’m struggling to keep the succulents alive,” O’Mara jokes, referring to the planters filled with succulents that serve as dividers throughout the dining room. Upholstered dining and bar chairs and banquet benches provide comfortable seating at lightly finished wood tables for two to four people. No white tablecloths here. The polished concrete floors – a Sidewall distinguishing feature – are sleek and low maintenance. A back door visible from the front has the numbers five, four, three, two, and one in descending order as a nod to a NASA countdown. Overall, the appearance is organically eclectic, yet tastefully simple, with elements of outer space. “We’re not trying to be a theme restaurant,” O’Mara says. As for the menu, it offers creative twists on small plates and more traditional bar food. Snacks include an impressive preparation of calamari that’s been buttermilk battered, fried, and tossed in butter, garlic, roasted red peppers, sweet banana peppers, hot cherry peppers, kalamata olives, and garnished with pecorino and “just a little bit of spice.” Served on a rectangular plate, that colorful pile of crunchy and savory is made for sharing. The crispy Brussels sprouts, while not uncommon to see on menus these days, have the delightfully unexpected addition of a honey lemon Sriracha glaze. Speaking of unexpected, the

30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast Casey O ’Mara moved to Travelers Rest from Rochester, N .Y., to run the cocktail program.

Snack-size burgers on house-made brioche buns: lamb with feta, spicy harissa, and fresh spinach; soft shell crab, pickled red cabbage, and toasted paprika aioli.

e om W

n’s Health Is

taurant was to showcase craft cocktails. The program is headed up by O’Mara’s cousin, Casey O’Mara, who previously worked in a Rochester, N.Y., cocktail bar.

su

The base spirits of Casey O’Mara’s creations run the gamut – gin, bourbon, rye, rum, tequila, and vodka. There’s something for every flavor palate, from sweet to sour to smoky.

lemon, sweet tea, cucumber, strawberry, and house-made bitters is the perfect Southern grown-up iced tea. The rum-based, tropical Painkiller, served

in a tall, narrow glass, is impressive in both presentation and flavor when that nutmeg hits, while the Prospector is O’Mara’s twist on a Manhattan, featuring bourbon, Averno, house-made bitters, and port instead of vermouth. It’s clear this concept, which opened Aug. 24, is a departure for the Sidewall owners. “It’s totally different than what TR is used to,” Andy O’Mara says. “It’s open later. People can eat at a real place and not a seedy bar.”

Rocket Surgery Small plates, cocktails Thursday–Monday, 5–10 p.m. 11 p.m. closing on weekends 164-D S. Main St., Travelers Rest

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RUN, DON’T WALK!

Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) Barefoot, 1992 ©Andrew Wyeth Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

LAST DAY TO SEE WYETH DYNASTY IS SEPTEMBER 10

Wyeth Dynasty

In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N.C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 70 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. Join us for a FREE tour of Wyeth Dynasty before the exhibition closes. Thursday, September 7 11 am Sunday, September 10 2 pm

Special Thanks to

Exhibition Sponsor

Journal Wyeth Run/Walk.indd 1

Greenville County Museum of Art

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ARTS & CULTURE

THE SOULSHAKING STORIES OF DAN LEACH page

34

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WE WILL ALWAYS LOVE THE MUSIC OF WHITNEY HOUSTON page

35

THE VIKINGS ARE COMING page

39

09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

SOUTHERN DISCOMFORT

Clemson grad Dan Leach dishes on debut short story collection EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

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Dan Leach never expected to be a fiction writer, but it wasn’t due to a lack of interest on his part. The Taylors native, who graduated from Clemson University in 2008 with a double major in English and secondary English education, admits that he didn’t have the confidence to pursue creative writing during his undergrad years. “I was intimidated,” Leach says, explaining that he never thought he could measure up to the celebrated writers he read for class. “Frankly, it just frightened me.” It wasn’t until Leach spent a Dan Leach few years teaching high school in Columbia and on James Island that he decided to sign up for a poetry old women will make songs of all these workshop to develop and refine his skills. sorrows and sit on the porch and sing “I think when you’re constantly consum- them on mild evenings.” Leach says the excerpt is a fitting refering writing, you’re tempted to try your ence to his characters, many of whom are hand at it,” he says. Since taking that first plunge into cre- “trying to understand what’s happened to ative writing, Leach has pivoted to short them.” “They’re looking back at a moment and stories. To date, his works have been published by various literary magazines, in- trying to understand it and maybe redeem cluding The New Madrid Review (Murray it and give meaning to it,” he adds. The quote stuck with him. “I never State), The Greensboro Review (the University of North Carolina at Greensboro), wanted to parse the name from another and The Appalachian Heritage (Berea author’s work, but when I read it, it just College). And on Sept. 12, the Southern dawned on me, and there was no fighting author is set to release a short story col- it,” he says of the title. Of the 17 stories that appear in “Floods lection, “Floods and Fires,” from the Uniand Fires,” the two Leach is most proud versity of North Georgia Press. The collection has garnered praise from of are “Midnight Showing” and “Not Yet Southern fiction writer George Single- Home.” The former focuses on the immediate ton, who described “Floods and Fires” as “beautifully written” and “soul-shaking.” aftermath of a wife presenting her husOther reviewers have favorably compared band with divorce papers after meeting Leach’s writing to that of Ron Rash and someone new. In a last-ditch attempt to the late Larry Brown. That endorsement salvage their relationship, the husband is significant to Leach, who mentions Sin- takes his wife on a car ride, only to learn gleton and Rash as two of his main influ- that the destination he’s heading to — a drive-in where they first met — has been ences. The title — and overarching theme — shuttered for years. In “Not Yet Home,” a couple’s relationof “Floods and Fires” originates from a quote in author Marilynne Robinson’s ship is on the verge of collapse due to infi1980 novel “Housekeeping.” It reads, delity. It’s compounded by a conflict over “Families will not be broken. Curse and the male partner’s misbehaving mutt who expel them, send their children wander- keeps getting loose and killing a neighing, drown them in floods and fires, and bor’s hens.

Both stories, Leach says, are linked through their focus on moments. “I’m taken with moments — moments in a song, on TV,” the author says. “I love bringing a reader to an emotional point or something big with imagery… where everything comes together with language and character.” Leach says his characters are often given a “limited awareness” and “blind spots” in their thinking and judgment, because ultimately characters that are completely aware of what is happening to them and why are not very compelling. In many of Leach’s stories, alcohol serves as a common vice. “It’s interesting to give them [my characters] a limitation to wrestle with,” the author says. Readers will find that many of Leach’s stories end on a vague note, and while the writer says that isn’t a deliberate choice, he’s comfortable ending a story with a lack of closure. “I’m impressed with how ambiguous and strange life is, and I like to capture that in literature,” Leach says. “Floods and Fires” can be ordered via ungpress@ung.edu or by calling 706-8641556.


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CULTURE

09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35 MAIN STAGE PLAY PRESENTED BY

BODY DOUBLE

Deborah Cox developed her sound and style while listening to the ‘Bodyguard’ soundtrack. Now she’s starring in the Broadway adaptation. CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Deborah Cox was a little-known singer from Toronto when the 1992 film “The Bodyguard” was released, but it had a profound impact on the performer that she would one day become. The story of a pop diva that hires a former Secret Service agent to protect her from an unknown stalker, “The Bodyguard” was not only a big hit, it turned its female lead, Whitney Houston, into a bona fide movie star. The soundtrack also featured Houston’s unforgettable cover of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You.” “The film had a huge influence on me,” Cox says. “I was doing a lot of session work and backing up Celine Dion, working on her own record. I was a Whitney fan, and it was really great to see her acting. It was mesmerizing. “Those songs were my music lessons,” she adds. “I learned about dynamics, intonation, key. It helped shape the tonality and timbre of my voice.” Today, Cox is a Grammy Award-nominated multiplatinum R&B and pop singer. She’s also starring in the role that Houston first made famous, Rachel Marron. Next week, Cox and the rest of the national touring company of “The Bodyguard” musical will begin an eight-show run at the Peace Center. The show is something of a musical revue, featuring songs from throughout Houston’s entire career. Cox, who is perhaps best known for her 1998 single “Nobody’s Supposed to be Here,” took on the role of Rachel knowing that members of the audience would want to hear the iconic music of Houston in a certain way. That was all well and good, but at the same time Cox had to find her own way of telling the story through the songs. “I had to strip it down and approach each song from the script,” she said. “I had to try to find that balance of singing it not as a recording artist but in a way that helped tell the storyline to the audience and where it was going. It’s all about storytelling first and foremost.” For Cox, “The Bodyguard” is ultimately

SEP 12 - 23 By Leslie Kimbell Winner of the 2016 New Play Festival Tuesday - Saturday 8 pm Saturday Matinee 2 pm Sunday Matinee 3 pm

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Deborah Cox as Rachel Marron and Judson Mills as Frank Farmer in “The Bodyguard.”

a story about love and sacrifice. “Rachel is telling us how she feels about being a star. The audience gets a chance to look into her world and what she’s going through. And they find great love for the characters,” she said. This musical adaptation keeps the film’s basic plot and soundtrack but adds some of Houston’s other hits, including “So Emotional,” “One Moment in Time,” and “I Wanna Dance with Somebody.” “With the additional songs you get more, I think, of a musical. You hear all the songs in their entirety, as opposed to just snippets like in the movie,” Cox says. “Performing live you get that exchange

and vibe from the audience,” she adds. “It’s where the songs come to life, the story comes to life.”

“THE BODYGUARD” WHEN Sept. 11, 12, 13, 14 at 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 15 and 16 at 8 p.m.; Sept. 16 at 2 p.m.; Sept. 17 at 1 p.m. WHERE Peace Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. TICKETS $35+ INFO peacecenter.org

Generously sponsored by The Faust Boyer Group of Raymond James, ADG Preferred Payroll, and Greenfield’s Bagels and Deli

GET TICKETS 864.233.6733 CENTRESTAGE.ORG

501 River Street, Greenville SC 29601 info@centrestage.org


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017

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CULTURE

A FAMILY EMERGENCY

“I’m sharing more about my daughter onstage, and people are coming up afterwards and telling me they had similar experiences with their kids and how scary it was.”

Nathan Angelo opens up about the medical crisis that shaped his new album VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Singer-songwriter Nathan Angelo’s daughter Lucy was only 20 months old when she was diagnosed with maple syrup urine disease, a rare metabolic disorder in which a child is unable to process amino acids properly, according to the National Institutes of Health. If untreated, NIH notes, the disease can lead to seizures, coma, and death. But nearly a year removed from it all, Angelo talks about the scariest moment of his life with some degree of detachment. It’s almost like he’s describing a movie or, perhaps, even a dream. He talks about his daughter’s serious illness, her desperate need for a liver transplant, about him and his wife having to

feed her through a tube every three hours around the clock, about the six months she waited on the transplant list, about all of it like he’s still bewildered by it. “My wife and I had to make a lot of big medical decisions very quickly,” he says. “We had to be strong together and make those calls. We were in survival mode, and it was super tiring.” That’s the situation in which Angelo, a gifted singer, songwriter, and pianist, wrote his new album, “A Matter of Time” — working alongside his wife, Lindsay, to the point of exhaustion to keep his daughter alive and waiting for the call that would let them know if she would ultimately live or die. On the surface, listening to the album, you might never even realize what Angelo

https://soundcloud.com/nathan-angelo/sets/a-matter-of-time/s-qxJMv

and his family were going through. The music is the same warm, incredibly melodic blend of pop and soul that Angelo has been making his entire career, full of passionate vocals, richly detailed arrangements, horns, an R&B-style rhythm section, and Angelo’s skillful piano and organ work. Every song seems like some

lost late ’70s gem that blends Elton John’s songcraft with a more personal lyrical approach. But it’s those lyrics that, on closer inspection, go beyond mere love-and-heartbreak songs. On “Timeless,” when he sings about the “ups and downs and thick and thin,” or “Lifetime,” where the line

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CULTURE “free-falling forever” is delivered in such a seductive falsetto that the fear in that phrase almost doesn’t cut through, Angelo isn’t singing about some blissful dreamland of love, even if it seems like he is. “I try to put a piece of my own story in most of my songs,” Angelo says. “But I definitely do like to move from my experience to a broader picture so other people can relate. I like leaving it open a little bit so that more people can relate to it. So with a song like ‘Timeless,’ you probably don’t get it just from hearing it, but it’s actually about what you should do to preserve your marriage.” If people do come away with a more optimistic feel from Angelo’s songs than he might intend, it might be because he has a natural tendency toward uplifting music. “When I was kid, my dad was a pastor in a small church in South Florida, and the music was this joyous, uplifting sound,” he says. “And in church, a lot of times you’re singing about how life is hard and things aren’t great, but you’ve got hope. I think to a large degree that will never leave me, because it was such a big part of my childhood. That’s my angle on expressing music. And if you look at some of

my other influences, the Stevie Wonders, the Michael Jacksons, there’s some darkness, but there’s a brightness that typically shines through.” With his daughter’s post-transplant health improving all the time, Angelo has found a new perspective on his music while on tour. “I’m sharing more about my daughter onstage, and people are coming up afterwards and telling me they had similar experiences with their kids and how scary it was,” he says. “It’s kind of a special thing to be able to put your heart on the table and let it bring some healing and peace to other people as well.”

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WHEN Friday, Sept. 8, 9 p.m. WHERE The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer TICKETS $10 advance, $14 day of show INFO 864-469-6416, thespinningjennygreer.com

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38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017

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THEATER

“The Mousetrap” Agatha Christie’s murder mystery “The Mousetrap” is the longest running play in the history of London’s West End, and the production is making its way across the pond to the Greenville Little Theatre. Four guests arrive at Monkswell Manor, a newly converted guesthouse run by a young married couple, Mollie and Giles Ralston, shortly after the murder of a local woman. When Detective Sergeant Trotter arrives following a snowstorm that leaves everyone shut in, the basic connection between the murder and Monkswell is soon established. At the crime scene, a notebook is recovered with the manor’s address and the words “Three Blind Mice.” Another note warns that this is only the first of many murders. Trotter has been sent to find out if any of the manor’s guests are involved in the crime. Are any of them future victims? Is one of them the murderer?

SUNDAY MIRROR

Like many of Christie’s works, the audience finds out who’s culpable in a twist ending. But keep your lips sealed, as there’s been a long-held tradition of not revealing the killer’s identity so that future audiences can enjoy the suspense of the classic whodunit. —Emily Pietras

TM

WHEN Sept. 8-9, 14-16, 21-23, and 28-30 at 8 p.m.; Sept. 10, 17, 24, and Oct. 1 at 3 p.m. WHERE Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. ADMISSION $20 for ages 4-18, $30 for adults INFO greenvillelittletheatre.org/2017-18-season

© THE BODYGUARD (UK) LTD. Designed by DEWYNTERS

SEPT. 9

LITERATURE

Southern Author Panel Talk & Signing A detective and federal agent attempting to solve a murder and kidnapping, two reporters trying to crack a notorious cold case, an attorney fighting to clear his name as a murder suspect, and a frozen dystopian universe where the sun is about to disappear.

THERE’S A NEW STAR IN TOWN

DEBORAH COX WITH HER BODYGUARD

JUDSON MILLS Deborah Cox is not scheduled to perform at the Monday evening and Saturday matinee performances.

SEPTEMBER 11-17 • OPENS MONDAY! GROUPS (15+)

These are the plot to the four novels by Roger Johns, Lawrence Thackston, Sean Keefer, and Brock Adams, respectively, at the center of Fiction Addiction’s Southern author panel on Saturday. The four writers will be in conversation to discuss their works and answer audience questions. The event will also include an opportunity for book signings. The $10 admission price can be redeemed for a $10 discount on one of the attending authors’ books. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 9, 2 p.m. WHERE Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 ADMISSION $10 INFO bit.ly/2emg9gL


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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Celebrate the Medieval Period and the age of Vikings at the seventh annual Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire. This year’s highlight will be an appearance from the Austlend Vikings, a reenactment group from North and South Carolina and Tennessee. They’ll be stationed at an encampment on the festival ground, where attendees can learn about their culture, traditions, travels, and folklore.

‘‘

Dr. Robertson provided a very comprehensive exam and her comments regarding no change in my hearing deficits were very reassuring. We discussed the possibility of updating my hearing aides, since I purchased mine six years ago, and there have been advances in technology. Again, she was very through and quite knowledgeable. I have been very pleased with Davis Audiology and is well worth driving 1.5 hours to see them. — Alex Morton

Other activities include arts and crafts, games of skill and combat, and defense demonstrations. Friday night will feature live music, fire performers, and entertainment from TimTv & The Secret Cirkus. More than 60 vendors will also be on site selling whimsical crafts. And it wouldn’t be a true renaissance fair without plenty of turkey legs and mead. The ComONalong SALE munity Tap will be pouring the latter, withNOW! draft beer and wine. —Emily Pietras

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40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE 08

ARTS CALEN DAR SEP T. 8 -14, 2017

Main Street Fridays

Southern Crescent Sep. 1 — 233-2273

VISUAL ARTS

Paul Yanko Artist Reception and Gallery Talk

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery 300 River St., Ste. 202 6-9 p.m. | FREE Riverworks Gallery presents Paul Yanko’s sitespecific wall mural plus recent mixed media works on paper: “Snap to Grid,” “Migrate from Center,” and “Deviate and Expand.” Exhibit can be viewed through Sept. 24. gvltec.edu/dva

Greenville Little Theatre

MUSIC

Sep. 8-Oct. 1 — 233-6238

Radio Room 110 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-11:45 p.m. | $8 Enjoy funky and fresh vapordance and phenomenal blasts of bass in this end of summer smash hit for all ages. If you have the need to live layers deep in irony, love posting fresh memes, blurry neon lights, thicc/kawaii bass, obscure ‘90s subcultural references, badly translated Japanese, or have an unquenchable thirst for impossible aesthetics, then this dance party will destroy your sadmemes. Wash away the shame of watching the “Emoji Movie” with Carpoolparty’s funky and fresh blend of disco, hip-hop, funk, and vaporwave and then lose your mind to bass connoisseur, YUKI. It’s the only way to say goodbye to this summer. 864-326-6052 carpoolpartymain@gmail.com

The Mousetrap

Greenville County Museum of Art

“Wyeth Dynasty” “In a Mirror, Darkly” Works by Carew Rice

All through Sep. 10 — 271-7570 Peace Center

The Bodyguard

Sep. 11-17 — 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Tom Flowers & Jeanet Dreskin Sep. 11-Oct. 20 — 467-3132 Centre Stage

Four Old Broads

Sep. 12-23 — 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Laura Nance & Dan Williams Through Sep. 15 — 242-1050 Riverworks Gallery

Works by Paul Yanko

Through Sep. 24 — 271-0679 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Annual Showcase Exhibition Through Sep. 27 — 271-0679

Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Kiah Bellows

Through Sep. 30 — 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art

“Victoria Wyeth: My Andy” Through Oct. 22 — 271-7570

Works by Grainger McCoy Through Dec. 31 — 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com 16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

End of Summer Dance Party

CONCERT

Furman Hosts Jazz Ensemble, Joel Frahm Trio

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $15 for adults and $5 for students Presented with funding support from the Furman Student Government Association, Joel Frahm is described as a “post-bop tenor saxophonist with a deft and assertive command” by The New York Times. Frahm is a regular on the New York City club circuit. He has appeared alongside musicians such as Brad Mehldau, Bill Charlap, and Matt Wilson, and has recorded with Diane Schuur, Kurt Elling, Jane Monheit, and other top jazz artists. Fans know him for his big tenor sound, which is characterized as fluid, inventive, and filled with passion. Downbeat Magazine’s critics’ poll has named him a rising star. 864-294-2086 |bit.ly/2uLYXrE furmanmusic@furman.edu VISUAL ARTS

Fall Workshop Line-up at GCCA

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St., Ste. A The fall 2017 schedule of one and two-day workshops kicks off Sept. 8 and offers a range of experiences for artists and arts enthusiasts to learn a new skill or refine a technique in a favorite medium. From drawing and painting to tapestry weaving and street photography, you’re sure to find a rewarding and challenging workshop offering this fall at GCCA. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 artcentergreenville.org

SEPT. 9 CONCERT

FRI

youtube.com/watch?v=5rxbird5pck

2017 Swamp Rabbit Music Festival

Featuring Doug Jones & Simple Syrup, Lesley Diane, Hillary Keane, The LOZ Band, Jillian Sprague, Mark Dye, Rush Morgan, and Lindsay Holler Swamp Rabbit Inn | 426 S. Main St., Travelers Rest | 4 p.m. In addition to being part of the Upstate rock-reggae-funk group The LOZ Band, guitarist John Durham has spent the last few years organizing a series of multiband events, like the Local Green Family Band shows and his multivolume Build-A-Band series. And he’s learned something from each of them. For example, in the wake of last year’s inaugural Swamp Rabbit Music Festival, he learned that the 12-act lineup was a little much. “The first one was too long,” he says. “I tried to make it an allafternoon thing, but it was a hot summer day, and it was unrealistic to expect people to stay for the whole thing.” There are slightly fewer artists on the bill this year, and the sets are going to be considerably shorter, but Durham has also added some fresh faces, including powerhouse vocalists Hillary Keane and Lindsay Holler and rising local singer/songwriter Jillian Sprague. “One of the tricky things about this is balancing artists who have played it before and new artists,” he says. “I thought I would open up a few new slots. I hope that by combining all these forces we can put these people in front of an audience they deserve.” —Vincent Harris FUNDRAISER

11th Annual Sippin’ Safari

Greenville Zoo | 150 Cleveland Park Drive 6:30-9:30 p.m. | $20 for designated drivers, $45 til 9/1, $55 after 9/1 Sippin’ Safari 2017 will feature over 40 great wines to sample, a beer garden, amazing food from local restaurants and vendors, and live music from TJ Laser and The New Detroits. Guests must be 21+. bit.ly/SippinSafari2017

FAMILY

Children’s Book Illustrator Alice Ratterree to Celebrate Launch of New Picture Book

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 4-6 p.m. FREE Greenville children’s book illustrator Alice Ratterree will be celebrating the launch of her new picture book, “Dangerous Jane,” by Suzanne Slade at her launch party. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com MUSIC

Greenville Heritage Main Street Fridays

NOMA Square 5:30-9:30 p.m. | FREE Kick off the weekend with Main Street Friday. Bring the whole family down for a night of fun. There will be inflatables for the kids in the Sabal Homes Kids’ Area, beverages for the adults from KW Beverage, and dancing for all ages at the CPI Security Stage. Sept. 8 features Southern Crescent. gvilleevents.com FRI-SUN

08-10

COMMUNITY

Historic DC-3 Flagship Detroit to Arrive

Greenville Downtown Airport Runway Park | 21 Airport Road Ext. Free ground tours on Saturday from 11:30 a.m.–4 p.m. and Sunday starting at 11:30 a.m. Become a member of this 501(c)3 organization for just $100 (tax deductible), and you can ride in this historic aircraft! Only 21 seats available on each flight. Join in advance to reserve your seat at flagshipdetroit.org/FSD/Join_Us.html. In the comments section, please list when you would like to fly: Friday afternoon, Saturday morning, Saturday afternoon, or Sunday morning. 864-270-6660 greenvilledowntownairport.com LaraLKaufmann@gmail.com PERFORMING ARTS

Screen Artists Talent Upstate Meet and Greet

Screen Artists Co-op Dark Corner Films 15 Wellington Ave., Ste. E FREE Upstate actors, it’s time to make your mark on the Southeastern film industry. Doors open 30 minutes early. Please be prompt. The presentation will begin immediately at the top of the event. RSVP to info@screenartistsco-op.com. Limited seating available. Children should be accompanied by only one adult, due to space restrictions. Bring a headshot and resume if available. All ages, sizes, and types welcome. Every actor/candidate will have an opportunity to meet and talk with the agents and mentor of the program. Those will take place after each introduction on Friday and Saturday as well as between 2-6 p.m. on Sunday. 828-808-2468 screenartistsco-op.com info@screenartistsco-op.com


AJH CUSTOM HOMES He discovered his life’s work early – as a teenager doing construction

services from initial architectural drawings all the way through to interior

during a mission trip to Miami – and Ariel Hartman has been building

design. Keeping the design/build process under one roof sets AJH Custom

hearth and home, some simple, some simply exquisite, ever since.

Homes apart from many other local builders who sub out all their work.

“The mission projects piqued my interest in construction,” says Ariel, whose hands-on skill soon transformed into a heart-felt calling. “It’s amazing what we can do with our own two hands.” Thus Ariel built a business at the age of 18 – before even finishing his construction management degree at Greenville Tech – laying the foundation for what’s grown,

“Employing our own carpenters, who do the majority of our

My goal is to create a home that captures a client’s vision while staying within their budget.

over the past dozen years, into a trio of complementary design/construction companies. The cornerstone for all three – AJH Renovations, AJH Custom Homes, Designed for Downtown – is impeccable craftsmanship; the keystone, a commitment to communication. Each one offers “Something Uncommon.” “There’s one thing every homeowner needs, whether they want a remodel

work in-house, ensures consistent craftsmanship,” Ariel says. “It provides a smoother process for us, and a better finished product for our clients.” Ariel’s wife, Deborah, is also part of the AJH team, handling payroll, insurance and bookkeeping for the three companies. Away from work, the Hartmans stay busy parenting three children – ages 11, 8 and 2 – and volunteering through Fellowship Bible Church. Hiking is a favorite hobby, as is

mountain biking. They’re convinced there’s no better place to live, work and raise a family than their vibrant hometown. “What I love about this industry is the ability to give people what they want,” says Ariel, whose portfolio includes everything from in-fill projects

or a new custom home – and that’s a builder who will listen to them

downtown to luxury lake homes. “My goal is to create a home that captures

throughout the entire process,” says Ariel, who today heads up AJH Custom

a client’s vision while staying within their budget.”

Homes while sharing leadership of AJH Renovations with his father, Chuck. “Residential construction requires so many varied skills – carpentry, masonry, welding, it’s a long list – but a good builder also knows how to communicate.” AJH Custom Homes is based on a traditional corporate structure, with its own on-staff carpenters who do everything from frame up to trim out, and a sister company, Designed for Downtown, that provides creative

AS SEEN IN – THE 2017

BTC PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

BEHIND THE COUNTER

215 East Belvue Rd., Taylors 864.320.1599 ajhcustomhomes.com


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SEPT. 9 CONCERT

Attract And Enjoy Hummingbirds In Your Yard

CULTURE

youtube.com/watch?v=gx6RJZMelds

THRU SAT

09

Photo provided Celia Kelly

SIRSY w/ Rochambeaux

Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive 9 p.m. | $10

PRODUCT FEATURES: • High perch for unobstructed viewing • Built-in ant-moat to deter insects • Can accommodate bee guards • Easy to clean HUMMINGBIRD NECTAR RECIPE: • Four parts water to one part sugar • NO added color

Rather than putting themselves across with pure volume like other guitar-anddrums duos, the New York two-piece known as SIRSY has spent the last decade finding ways around that formula, crafting a more intricate, poppy kind of music centered as much around singer/ drummer Melanie Krahmer’s vocal harmonies as Rich Libutti’s guitar riffs. Of course, it’s easier to branch out from the basic formula when both members have a setup that allows them to play bass and keyboards onstage, sometimes with one of Krahmer’s drumsticks. “We’re less raw on purpose,” she says. “Our style allows us a bit of a ‘wow’ factor that a traditional setup doesn’t have, because the two of us are making so much noise that it makes the audience wonder how we’re doing that with just two people.” There was a brief time when the duo thought about expanding their lineup, but ultimately, Krahmer says that they couldn’t find anyone who could keep up. “We play 250 shows a year and travel 60,000 miles,” she says. “So it’s hard to find two other people who want to keep that schedule.” — Vincent Harris FRI-OCT

08-15 Locally Owned and Operated Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5

626 Congaree Road 864-234-2150 www.wbu.com/greenville BIRDSEED • FEEDERS • BATHS HOUSES • HARDWARE • GIFTS

clinched a berth in the South Atlantic League playoffs by winning the first half Southern Division title. With the South Atlantic League playoffs less than two weeks away, the Drive are excited to announce that playoff tickets are officially on sale. 864-240-4528 | greenvilledrive.com

VISUAL ARTS

In the Gallery at Centre Stage

Centre Stage | 501 River St. 2-6 p.m. | Tuesday-Friday | FREE The art of Lin Pulliam will be on display in cooperation with the Metropolitan Arts Council. This partnership is sponsored by South State Bank. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org FRI-SAT

08-16

SPORTS

Greenville Drive Playoffs — Tickets Now On Sale

Fluor Field | $8-$16 An exciting season at Fluor Field in 2017 reached its apex in June, when the Greenville Drive

FAMILY

Story Time & More: “A Color of His Own”

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission To kick off TCMU’s month of color, kids will help a chameleon find his color in the book “A Color of His Own” by Leo Lionni. Kids will then choose their own watercolors to paint chameleons to take home. tcmupstate.org PERFORMING ARTS

Donny Edwards: An Authentic Heart & Soul Tribute to The King

Flat Rock Playhouse 125 S. Main St., Hendersonville $15-$33 Donny Edwards is an international, multiple award-winning professional Elvis tribute artist. Today, he is one of the most sought after performers in the business, bringing his show to stages in casinos, theaters/venues, fairs/festivals, corporate/ special events, cruises, and production shows worldwide. He is a versatile performer with the ability to re-enact each era of Elvis’ life and career. His dynamic performance will take you back to the 1950s and the early years of rock ‘n’ roll, getting you “all shook up” all over again. Then you’ll go on a ride through the 1960s, from Elvis’ biggest hit movies to the famous black leather “68 Comeback Special.” Finally, you’ll revisit the legendary Las Vegas years of the 1970s as Edwards recreates the performances that made Elvis the one and only King of Rock ‘n’ Roll. 866-732-8008 | flatrockplayhouse.org SAT

09

FUNDRAISER

#JackIsAFighter

The Elks Lodge | 7700 Pelham Road 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Jack is a happy 2 1/2-year-old recently diagnosed with pre-B childhood acute leukemia. He will be undergoing treatment for the next three years. Join the Elks Lodge in his fight against leukemia. Stop by and grab barbecue plates and raffle tickets. FAMILY

LEGO Weekend

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 11 a.m.-noon & 2-3 p.m. | Free with admission Engage in some LEGO activities for all ages. This is a drop-in program. tcmupstate.org COMMUNITY

TD Saturday Market

Greenville Health System Main Street between Court and Washington streets Saturdays through Oct. 28 | FREE TD Saturday Market presented by Greenville Health System brings farm-fresh produce, baked goods, meats, cheeses, seafood, and other specialty foods to downtown Greenville. This year’s market features the Lowes Foods Front Porch.

THRU SUN

10

VISUAL ARTS

“In a Mirror, Darkly”

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. Wednesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. | FREE Explore the issues and images created when white artists portray black subjects and experiences in this insightful exhibition. 271-7570 | gcma.org VISUAL ARTS

Exhibition: “Carew Rice”

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. Wednesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. FREE Renowned silhouettist and South Carolina native Carew Rice captured the Lowcountry landscape and its people in these captivating silhouettes from the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org FAMILY

Off the Wall: We All Scream for Ice Cream

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Mondays-Fridays, 2-4 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 1-4 p.m. | Free with admission Create an ice cream cone this week with colorful cupcake liners and more. tcmupstate.org SUN

10

CULINARY

A Celebration of American Grocery

M.Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 South Main St. 7 p.m. | $100 M. Judson will host Joe Clarke and his team from American Grocery for an evening of remembering this groundbreaking Greenville institution. The format will be familiar — yes, there will be a cocktail — with four courses of the food that made AGR what we’re going to miss most in the West End. But attendees will also get to hear from Joe and Darlene about all the great plans in store for this dynamic duo. 864-603-2412 mjudsonbooks.com/presale-agr-sunday-supper CONCERT

Concert Series feat. Pan Harmonia

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. $20 in advance | $25 day of Based in Asheville, N.C., Pan Harmonia has created quite a name for itself across the region. Its visionary director, flutist Kate Steinbeck, has been lauded for the alluring and enchanting music she presents. This fall marks Pan Harmonia’s 18th season of exquisite and exhilarating performances. Don’t miss this opportunity to experience captivating acoustic sounds performed by world-class musicians in the Village of West Greenville. There will be refreshments available. Treat yourself and friend to an unparalleled experience — sumptuous sounds surrounded by art. Seating is limited for these events. Series dates include Sept. 9, Nov. 13, March 18, and April 29. 828-254-7123 | PanHarmonia.org


09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE CONCERT

SEPT. 15 youtube.com/watch?v=FD-iFa5IjB8

THRU MON

11

EDUCATION

South Carolina Children’s Theatre fall registration

EXPAND YOUR PLAYLIST

Registration is open for fall acting classes. Classes will start the week of Sept. 11 in their temporary location at 1200 Pendleton St. in the West Village. scchildrenstheatre.org MON-SAT

11-16

FAMILY

Story Time & More: “Teeny, Tiny Mouse: A Book About Colors”

Tim McGraw & Faith Hill: The Soul2Soul World Tour Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 7:30 p.m. | $80–$119.50

The Miranda Lambert-Blake Shelton marriage might have fallen by the wayside, but Tim McGraw and Faith Hill are still going strong as the First Couple of Country, having sold around 80 million records combined and scored nearly 40 No. 1 hits, including “It’s Your Love” (one of several duets they’ve recorded), “Don’t Take The Girl,” “This Kiss,” and “Live Like You Were Dying.” And those hits were on full display during their series of joint tours, the second of which, called Soul2Soul II, still stands as the highest-grossing country tour of all time, breaking the previous record set by Garth Brooks and hauling in $141 million. There was a time when there was some mild controversy over the two artists’ crossing over into pop territory, whether it was with Hill’s “Breathe” or McGraw’s collaboration with Nelly, “Over & Over,” but given the watered-down state of country radio these days, those concerns seem almost quaint. And if they ever split up, we’re giving up on love entirely. —Vincent Harris VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2 Gallery Tour: “Wyeth Dynasty”

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. FREE “Wyeth Dynasty” takes an important look at the first family of American painting, offering not only a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s work, but also a glimpse into the work of his father, N.C.; his son Jamie; and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. Join us for an overview of the “Wyeth Dynasty” story before the exhibition closes. 864-271-7570 gcma.org info@gcma.org

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission This week, kids are following a tiny mouse who names all the colors in his teeny house in the book “Teeny, Tiny Mouse: A Book About Colors” by Laura Leuck. This week the kids will be able to decorate their own house with materials and colors of their choice. tcmupstate.org MON-OCT

11-21

EDUCATION

Back to Art School

Greenville Center for Creative Arts | 25 Draper St. Get ready for the fall schedule of classes and workshops at GCCA (Fall Session I: Sept. 11-Oct. 21, Fall Session II: Oct. 23-Nov. 31). Whether you’re a beginner looking for introductory-level instruction or an advanced student looking for guidance in a challenging new medium, you’re sure to find a class or workshop to fit your creative timing this fall at GCCA. 864-735-3948 | artcentergreenville.org THRU TUE

12

12

PERFORMING BLONDE ON BLONDE OCTOBER 21

COMMUNITY

Grief Support Class

Century at Keith Office Park 5 Century Drive, Suite 220 5:30-7 p.m. | FREE Are you struggling with loss of your cherished loved one? These 10 weekly sessions will help you cope and adjust with the painful reality of deep loss in the presence of those who are or have been where you are. The sessions focus on basic principles and tools using Alan Wolfelt’s five-star book, “Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing.” Classes available at varying times in Greenville, Easley, and Spartanburg. Visit hospicegriefsupport.com for more info. 864-627-7049 | hospicegriefsupport.com Tonya.Taylor@interimcares.com TUE

SEPTEMBER 21

OCTOBER 11

LITERATURE

South Carolina Mystery Author David Burnsworth to Celebrate Launch of New Book

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 6-8 p.m. | FREE South Carolina author David Burnsworth will be celebrating the launch of “In It for the Money,” the first book in his new Blu Carraway mystery series, at his launch party at Fiction Addiction. This event is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served. Books may be purchased online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032 @peacecenter


Home & Garden Show features more than 10 SEPTEMBER profes ional, g15-o-to17co•mpTDanieCONVENTI s for homeOimNprCENTER ovement. From landscaping to light fixtures, fences to fireplaces — whether lo king to polish of a punchPhliosttcoourrtessytoafGratleorynofLtighhatintg forever home, homeowners have trusted the Southern Home & Garden Show for more than 5 years. Photo courtesy of Gal ery of Lighting

44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting

SEPTEMBER CENTER SEPTEMBER 15-17 15-17 •• TD TD CONVENTION CONVENTION CENTER Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting

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CULTURE COMMUNITY

GHS Brain Aneurysm Support Group

701 Grove Road, Conference Center, Room 1 5 p.m. | FREE This group is for anyone affected by a brain aneurysm: survivors, caretakers, family and friends of survivors and of lost ones, and individuals with an aneurysm they are monitoring, etc. We discuss brain aneurysm-related topics, and attendees will receive valuable information. Come and ask questions in a comfortable setting. julie.hunter@yahoo.com TUE-SAT

12-16

Southern Author Festival

Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place FREE Meet cookbook authors Alice Randall, “Soul Food Love,” and Ashley English, “A Year of Picnics,” Sept. 16 and explore Southern food traditions. Authors’ books will be available for purchase. Lead-up programs include History of Barbecue, Sept. 12, and Southern Foods and Film, Sept. 14. 864-527-9293 greenvillelibrary.org explore@greenvillelibrary.org TUE-SAT

12-23

PERFORMING ARTS

“Four Old Broads”

Centre Stage 501 River St. Tuesday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 3 p.m. $15-$30 This Southern comedy was the winner of the 2016 New Play Festival at Centre Stage and is directed by Ruth Wood. “Four Old Broads” will also kick off the 2017 New Play Festival with a free performance on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 7 p.m. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org TUE-SUN

Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting 12-01 SEPTEMBER 15-17 • TD CONVENTION CENTER Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting PRODUCED BY

Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting

SEPTEMBER

LITERATURE

FAMILY

Off the Wall: The Great Outdoors

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting 15-17 • TD CONVENTION CENTER Tuesdays-Fridays, 2-4 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 1-4 p.m. | Free with admission PRODUCED BY Photo courtesy of Gallery of Lighting Create a campfire scene using finger paint and construction paper. PRODUCED BY its the Southern Southern tcmupstate.org its kind kind in in South South Carolina, Carolina, the PRODUCED BY

The The largest largest of of Home more than than 100 100 Home && Garden Garden Show Show features features more The largest ofgo-to its kind in Southfor Carolina, the Southern professional, companies home improvement. professional, go-to companies for home improvement. Home & Gardento Show features more than 100 From landscaping light fences to fireplaces From landscaping light fixtures, fences to fireplaces The largest of its to kind in fixtures, South Carolina, the Southern—— professional, go-to companies for home improvement. whether to aa punch or start start on 100 that whether looking to polish polish off features punch list list or that Home looking & Garden Showoff more thanon From landscaping to light fixtures, fences tothe fireplaces — forever home, homeowners have the Southern forever home,go-to homeowners have trusted Southern professional, companies for trusted home improvement. whether looking to polish off a than punch or start on that Home Garden more 55 list years. Home GardenShow Show for more From && landscaping to for light fixtures, fences to fireplaces — forever home, homeowners have trusted the Southern whether looking to polish off a punch list or start on that Home & Garden Show for more than 55 years. forever home, homeowners have trusted the Southern SouthernHomeandGardenShow.com SouthernHomeandGardenShow.com Home & Garden Show for more than 55 years.

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THU

14

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured story is “Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True” by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and illustrated by Brigette Barrager. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com CONCERT

Furman Hartness Organ Series Opens with Recital for Organ and Strings

Furman University Charles E. Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $15 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $5 for students The 2017-18 Hartness Organ Series opens with a

recital for organ and strings performed by organist Dongho Lee and New England Conservatory of Music faculty members Nicholas Kitchen, violinist, and Yeesun Kim, cellist. The pieces include Vitali’s “Chaconne” for violin and organ, Bruch’s “Canzone” for cello and organ, and two works for violin, cello, and organ: Saint-Saëns’ “La Muse et le Poéte” and Rheinberger’s “Trio” Opus 149. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2wY2rZ0 furmanmusic@furman.edu COMMUNITY

Hispanic Heritage Month Kickoff Event

Clemson One Building | 1 N. Main St. 6 p.m. Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15– Oct. 15. Greenville Technical College will be part of Hispanic Heritage Month opening night sponsored by the Hispanic Alliance. The event will feature a panel conversation focused on the central role of Hispanic youth in the global competitiveness of the Upstate with leaders including Dr. Keith Miller, president of Greenville Technical College. Artwork created by area high school students will be sold during the event to raise money for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) student scholarships. Dr. James P. Clements, president of Clemson University, will serve as keynote speaker. Panel participants will include W. Carlos Phillips, president and CEO of the Greenville Chamber, and Fernando Fleites, senior vice president of human resources for Bon Secours St. Francis Health System. Anne Marie Stieritz, chief impact officer for Liberty Fellowship, will serve as panel moderator. go.activecalendar.com/gvltec THU-SAT

14-16

GARDENING

Small Standard Flower Show

Simpsonville Garden Club Simpsonville Community Center 10 Park St. | FREE The Simpsonville Garden Club will sponsor A Small Standard Flower Show at the South Greenville Fair. Everyone is invited to submit horticulture specimens (cut plant material), which will be judged in accordance with The National Garden Clubs Inc. (NGC) criteria. August is the perfect time for anyone planning to enter a specimen in the Flower Show to choose the plant they will be entering, keep it well watered, and remove any brown spots or insect-damaged leaves. simpsonvillegardenclub.com FRI

15

CONCERT

Tickets for Trans-Siberian Orchestra’s Winter Tour 2017 — “The Ghosts of Christmas Eve”

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N Academy St. 10 a.m. Over the past 20-plus years, Trans-Siberian Orchestra has become a critically acclaimed, multiplatinum musical powerhouse, and its annual winter tours are a beloved, multi-generational holiday tradition. This year’s tour, a completely updated presentation of TSO’s unforgettable “The Ghosts of Christmas Eve,” is set to begin on Nov. 16 and will visit more than 60 cities for 100-plus performances before concluding on


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE Dec. 30. Tickets go on sale Sept. 15 at 10 a.m. The show is Dec. 8 at 4 and 8 p.m. 800-745-3000 | ticketmaster.com MUSIC

Songs and Premieres

Greenville Fine Arts Center Recital Hall 102 Pine Knoll Drive 7-8:30 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students The Fine Arts Center will play host to a concert of song and piano music with Ariana Wyatt, soprano, and Richard Masters, piano, on the faculty of the School of Performing Arts at Virginia Tech University. They will perform songs by Clara Schumann, Fanny Mendelssohn, Alma Mahler, and Frank La Forge. Dr. Masters will also give the premiere of Fiddlins’, a sonata on Appalachian fiddle tunes commissioned from Jon Jeffrey Grier, composer-in-residence at the Fine Arts Center. 864-355-2561 fineartscenter.net jgrier@greenvile.k12.sc.us FRI-FRI

15-29

THEATER

“Radium Girls”

The Academy of Arts, Logos Theatre | 80 School St., Taylors Sept. 15, 22, and 29 at 7 p.m. and Sept. 16, 23, and 20 at 2 p.m. | $25 In 1926, radium was a miracle cure, Madame Curie an international celebrity, and luminous watches the latest rage – until the girls who painted them began to fall ill with a mysterious disease. Inspired by a true story, ”Radium Girls” traces the efforts of Grace Fryer, a dial painter, as she fights for her day in court. Appropriate for junior high and high school audiences. 864-269-9342 | theacademyofarts.org THRU SAT

16

FAMILY

Random Acts of Science: Color Mixing

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 11:30 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. | Wednesday-Saturday Free with admission Learn about primary and secondary colors. tcmupstate.org SAT

16

BOOK SIGNING

John Fowler

Hub City Railroad Museum 298 Magnolia St., Spartanburg 10 a.m.-noon Join author John Fowler for a book signing of his recently released children’s version of “Trotting Sally.” Refreshments will be served. “Trotting Sally” is a folk legend who lived in the Spartanburg area and allegedly raced a train from Inman to Spartanburg and beat it to the depot. 864-963-4739 FAMILY

Colorful Weekend

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 11 a.m.-noon & 2-3 p.m. | Free with admission Explore various colors today with color-mixing activities. From biopaint and sensory bins to colorful art and science experiments, all ages are welcome. tcmupstate.org

EDUCATION

America’s Boating Course

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, #H101 9:30 a.m-5 p.m. | $50 America’s Boating Course, developed by the United States Power Squadron, will be presented by Lake Hartwell Sail & Power Squadron. The eight-hour course covers boat handling, anchoring, finding directions, adverse condition, and using the marine radio. This course has been approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and is recognized by SCDNR and many major insurance carriers and the United States Coast Guard. UpStateBoatingCourse.org THRU SUN

24

PERFORMING ARTS

“You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown”

Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown 125 N. Main St, Hendersonville 7 p.m. with matinees Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. $12.50-$25 The Flat Rock Playhouse and Studio 52 Family Series continues with the classic cartoon turned family musical, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Happiness is this charming musical featuring the beloved Charles M. Schulz Peanuts gang: Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Sally, Schroeder…and, yes, Snoopy, too. 828-696-0731, 866-737-8008 flatrockplayhouse.org THU-NOV

28-02

MUSIC

Have Fun Learning to Play Appalachian Music

Trinity Campus of Buncombe Street UMC 2703 Augusta St. $60 Register now for lessons learning to play banjo, guitar, fiddle, or mandolin. Classes are grouped by skill level. Beginners are welcome. These lessons are open to children and adults (children must be at least 9 years old). The total fee for 6 weeks of lessons is $60. Also, rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. 864-979-9188 SAT

30

PERFORMING ARTS

“Snow White The Ballet”

Carolina Ballet Theatre Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 2:30 p.m., 7 p.m. | $35 Carolina Ballet Theatre’s “Snow White The Ballet” is a unique retelling of the classic fairytale. Traditionally, the story portrays the deep envy of the wicked stepmother and the evil it ensues. Carolina Ballet Theatre’s imaginative adaption of the classic favorite beautifully captures both the comedic side of the dwarfs and wicked stepmother and the innocence of Snow White. “Snow White the Ballet” masterfully conveys the beauty in the fact that true love comes in many formats. The unique retelling features choreography by the acclaimed Mark Diamond, choreographer for Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux at the Chautauqua Institution and program director for Charlotte Ballet II. Diamond has taught and choreographed in Europe, Japan, and the U.S. and has choreographed over 20 ballets for the Charlotte Ballet. peacecenter.org/events/detail/snow-whitethe-ballet

OCT THRU FRI

13

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Presents Sculptures by Elaine Quave

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday FREE Elaine Quave presents sculpture exhibition “Anthro/Botanical.” Quave, ceramic instructor at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, says her work compels us to “recognize loss of biodiversity and the extinction that is quietly happening around us in the current geological age – referred to as the Anthropocene – an age characterized by the impact of human-related activities on the ecological balance of nature.” FESTIVAL

BB&T Fall for Greenville — Volunteers Needed

Downtown Greenville We offer a variety of different volunteer shifts and positions throughout the three-day weekend. There is something for everyone. Grab your friends, family, and co-workers for a weekend you won’t want to miss. Individuals must be 10 years of age or older to volunteer. Ten- to 13-year-olds must have a parent or guardian volunteering alongside of them. fallforgreenville.volunteerlocal.com/ volunteer/?id=20279 THRU THU

14

EDUCATION

Fall 2017 Language Classes

Upstate International 9 S. Memminger St. Mondays-Thursdays $50 for membership; $90 for regular classes; $300 for intensive classes Upstate International (UI) is proud to offer classes in numerous languages that accommodate a variety of skill levels. Whether you are a beginner, advanced, or anywhere in between, UI’s language classes will give participants confidence and skills needed to develop proficiency in a foreign language. Programs are flexible and taught by passionate native teachers who love to share their culture and language. Programs are geared toward engagement and exploration, not rote memorization. Taking a language class at UI is an experience that will widen cultural horizons, build valuable skills in language and comprehension, and bring the world to the classroom. 864-631-2188 info@upstateinternational.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

09.08.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Harrey

Waggin’ All the Way to the Waterpark My tail hasn’t stopped wagging in days. I think it’s even wagging in my sleep because all I can dream about is my absolute favorite day of the year: Waggin’ at the Waterpark! When the waterparks close for the season and the humans are all done splashing, the waterparks go to the dogs. That’s when we show them how to REALLY do the waterpark. There are two glorious chances to lap up this fun in the sun. Sign up to go to Discovery Island on September 9 or hit Otter Creek on September 23. Personally, I am getting a combo ticket for both days. It saves you money and doubles your fun. Humans love this day too! Someone has to throw the ball into the pool...

GreenvillePets.org


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.08.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Novel Couples ACROSS 1 High-fiber cereal ingredient 8 Thwacked 15 Something imperative 20 Endorse 21 Many a quaint cabin 22 “The Gypsy” singer Shore 23 Tree anchors growing in a groundwork? [AsimovHaley] 25 Split in two 26 Lyric poems 27 — chi 28 Dirtier, as a chimney 30 Headland 34 Awful review 36 Actress De Mornay after marrying “Star Trek” ensign Harry? [du MaurierKipling] 39 Egg-shaped instrument 42 Defeat in cleverness 45 Lays (down) 46 Dear granny? [MorrisonZola] 48 Indulges fully 50 Belle of a ball 51 Butler’s girl 53 Knight’s tunic 58 Livy’s “to be” 61 Geller of the paranormal 63 Small, thin part of a beach hill? [Herbert-Levin] 67 Government financial assistance 69 — News (Utah paper)

72 Elliptical 73 Laughter syllables 74 Scott Joplin’s “The Entertainer,” for the film “The Sting”? [DoctorowRand] 77 Long of film 78 Boise locale 80 Related compounds 81 Wielded, as power 83 Distress after a really deep sleep? [Cook-King] 85 Eminent lead-in 86 Gives help to 87 Neighbor of Norway 88 Biblical queendom 92 Woolen cap 94 Nash of funny poems 98 President Grant is gabby? [Joyce-Benchley] 103 Blood type, informally 107 Physician who may cry “Stat!” 109 Hall of talk TV 110 Have a phobia of queasiness? [HubbardSartre] 112 “i” finisher 114 Dog ID sites 115 Pistol, e.g. 116 Sarge, e.g. 119 Lacerations 122 Tough guy’s claim 123 Abducted old Japanese chief? [Stevenson-Clavell] 131 Give rise to

By Frank Longo 132 Brainless 133 Treat as a hero 134 Finisher 135 Moves very quietly 136 Tallinn’s land DOWN 1 Clumsy type 2 Of yore 3 Mr. Capote, briefly 4 Singer Folds 5 Total change 6 Very little 7 Memo tablet 8 — -mo 9 — Blanc (Alps peak) 10 Home to Taj Mahal 11 Groups in church robes 12 “Kitchy —!” 13 Lifesaving pro 14 Pie, e.g. 15 Not standing, as a committee 16 Sporty two-seaters 17 Not typical of 18 “Don’t waste your breath!” 19 Heat units 24 “Life — cabaret” 29 Eight-player bands 30 Kernel holder 31 Strikeout star 32 Good friend 33 Ate away at 35 Actor Beery 37 Printers’ widths 38 Ewe’s cry

40 “So — heard” 41 Space cloud 43 One, to Juanita 44 Road coater 47 “— do not!” 49 Dancer in Matthew 52 “Be — and help me” 54 ROY G. — 55 1972 Jack Lemmon film 56 Made tighter, as a knot 57 Horrors 58 Moral code 59 Eye makeup 60 Bagel variety 62 Former TV host Philbin 64 Some vases 65 Mesh 66 Thin air 68 Start of a cry from Juliet 69 Gucci alternative 70 Awards for Tina Fey 71 Recognize 75 Philosopher Lao- — 76 Phillips — Academy 79 Harbored 82 Kind of plane engine 84 Engaged, as a car engine 85 Ballet step 89 Lean-to’s kin 90 Roy Wood’s rock gp. 91 51-year senator Robert 93 Equine beast 95 It includes a snare 96 Mag. team 97 — Valley, San Francisco 99 Lazed about 100 Comic Gasteyer 101 Faux hair 102 Maritime “Mayday!”

103 Business workplace 104 — Marcus (retailer) 105 Accessory for an iPod 106 Oily matter 108 Am unable to 111 Reformer Ralph 113 Native metal 117 “The Elder” of Rome 118 Andy Taylor’s tyke 120 Greek letters 121 Quick drink

Sudoku

Hard

124 Africa’s Amin 125 Quick swim 126 HP products 127 Artist Yoko 128 Gimlet liquor 129 Arm of Israel 130 Tchr.’s org.

Crossword answers: page 17

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 17


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE INVITATION TO BID: MILLER PLACE COURT DUPLEX DEVELOPMENT, MAULDIN NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR BIDS for new construction of nine (9) duplex homes for a total of eighteen (18) dwelling units within the City of Mauldin SC. The Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) is the developer and federal requirements will apply. Bids are due to GCRA c/o LS3P Associates, Ltd. / 110 West North Street / Greenville, SC 29601 by 5:00PM on November 8, 2017. For information and to request an electronic bid package, contact John Edwards at LS3P Associates, Ltd. 864-272-1228 or johnedwards@ LS3P.com. Electronic transmitted bids will be accepted. GCRA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Local residents, Women & Minority Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in the bidding process. EOE, EHO.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that LIDL US Operations, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1866 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 17, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 9/23/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A010, Katherine M Flanagan Furniture, Boxes, Misc. 2. Unit: D12, Kory P Johnson Ladders, Tools, Boxes/Misc. 3. Unit B089, Edmund Jacek Golf Clubs, Clothes, Furniture, Misc. 4. Unit: A049, Andrew LaLonde Loveseat, Picture/Mirror, Totes 5. Unit B135, Michael Purser Metal, Clothes/Shoes/Misc. 6. Unit B249, Kristopher A Anderson Toys, Boxes/Misc. 7. Unit C283, Simon Hentschel Boxes/Misc. 8. Unit C157, Alan Matson, Jr. Bags/Boxes/Misc. 9. Unit B154, Deborah Quartey Table, Totes/Boxes/Misc. 10. Unit B154, Lauren Canady Boxes 11. Unit D37, Nora Hussein Cedar Chest, File Cabinets, Boxes, Misc.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23- 02324 A Kenneth Wheeler and April Wheeler, Plaintiff, vs. Clyde E. Pruitt, Robin K. Pruitt and Washington Mutual Finance, LLC, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference or that the Court may issue a general Order of Reference of this action to a master/special referee, pursuant to Rule 53, South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. _/s/ Scott F. Talley Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that YWB LLC /DBA WHAT ALES YOU intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 105 C New Plaza Dr., Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 10, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3 Reid School Road, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Liability Brewing Company intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of WINE, and the sale and ON & OFF premises consumption of BEER at 109 W. Stone Avenue, Greenville, SC 29609 To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 10, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 103 Shaw St., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS (Non-Jury) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-05126 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. James R. Brockman, Yolanda Miles Brockman, Billy Young, Bernice Barber, Greenville Hospital System, The State of South Carolina, The City of Greenville, and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0119.00-07-005.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: NFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, designated as Lot 15 Block C on plat of the lands of Melville Land Company shown in plat book A, page 97 recorded in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. References made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. TAX MAP #0119.00-07-005.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

AMENDED SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23-00184 35 Hummingbird Co., LLC, Plaintiff, vs. First Investors Holding, LLC, Central Carolina Bank, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Heat Pump, Greenville County Juvenile Facility, IFB #1009/27/17, 3:00 P.M. Pre-Bid meeting and site visit 9 A.M., September 13, 2017, at 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. • Bridge Parts for Greenville County, IFB #11-09/19/17, 3:00 P.M. • Sports Fields Fencing with Installation, Greenville Count Sports Fields, IFB #13-09/28/17, 3:00 P.M. Mandatory Pre-Bid meeting and site visit 9 A.M., September 14, 2017, at 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. • HVAC Repairs for Greenville County, RFP #14-09/26/17, 3:00 P.M. Mandatory Pre-Proposal meeting and site visit 9:00 A.M., September 19, 2017, at 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line 864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF OCONEE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-37-415 Erica Beth Merchant, Plaintiff, -VS- Kodi Paul Merchant, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to Reply to the Complaint of the Plaintiff in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Reply to the Plaintiff upon the undersigned at his office at 1743 Blue Ridge Blvd., Post Office Box 4, Seneca, South Carolina 29679-0004, within THIRTY (30) DAYS after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to REPLY to the Complaint within that time, Judgement against you will be rendered by default for the relief sought in the Complaint. TO INFANTS UNDER EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE, IMPRISONED PERSONS AND INCOMPETENT OR INSANE PERSONS: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED and notified to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within THIRTY (30) DAYS after the service of this Summons upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Defendant herein. YOU ARE FURTHER ADVISED of your right to have an attorney represent you in this matter. Should you retain legal counsel, (s)he is directed to advise this Court of such representation, forthwith. Robert K. Whitney Whitney Law Firm P. O. Box 14, Seneca, SC 29679-0014 864-882-1414 fax 885-0675 Attorney for the Plaintiff

SEPTEMBER TOWN SEPTEMBER TOWN HAS ARRIVED! HAS ARRIVED!

AVAILABLE IN GREENVILLE: Barnes & Noble - 735 Haywood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals - 581 Barnes Perry Ave.,& Village of West Greenville AVAILABLE IN GREENVILLE: Noble - 735 Haywood OR ONLINE: towncarolina.com

Rd.

Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals - 581 Perry Ave., Village of West Greenville OR ONLINE: towncarolina.com Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!


September 8, 2017 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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