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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 4, 2019 • Vol.21, No.1

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LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Claire Billingsley cbillingsley@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Ariel Gilreath | agilreath@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Ed Ibarra | Donna Johnston MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Meredith Rice | Liz Tew VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks

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Photo by Will Crooks

Greenville Journal photographer Will Crooks recently captured images of young boxers honing their skills at Center for the Education Equity’s boxing gym. CEE provides after-school academic assistance for at-risk youth and offers boxing training. See more of Crooks’ photos on Page 23.

THEY SAID IT “This new facility features flexible teaching spaces, open-concept exhibits, and a host of new amenities unlike anything else we’ve been able to provide to visitors before.” -Michael Weeks, director, Roper Mountain Science Center – Page 4

“The tire industry accounts for a shocking 70 percent of global rubber consumption and, as a result, is a major driver of deforestation, which, as a whole, is responsible for approximately 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.” -Margaret Kran-Annexstein, campaign director, Mighty Earth – Page 12

“We have some die-hards who write reviews and say, ‘That’s not country music,’ but it doesn’t make any sense to me. I don’t know why people would want you to copy someone else. Merle, Hank, and Willie did their own thing; so if I try to make music like them, then I’m just ripping them off.” -Mitchell Tenpenny, country singer – Page 25 Editor’s note: In the Dec. 21 issue of the Greenville Journal, we incorrectly ran a headline for The Debutante Club of Greenville over the Carolinian Debutante Club’s debutantes and ball information. We apologize to both clubs for the error. See the corrected Carolinian Debutante Club spread on Pages 16-17. The Debutante Club of Greenville’s debutantes and ball information is on Pages 18-19.

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A Sustainable Future STORY BY ANDREW MOORE

Roper Mountain unveils designs for its new $14M environmental education facility A new facility at Greenville’s Roper Mountain Science Center is expected to become a symbol of environmental stewardship and education for Upstate residents. The science center, which is owned by the Greenville County School District, plans to construct a $14 million facility dedicated to environmental education and sustainability, according to Michael Weeks, director of Roper Mountain Science Center. “The new environmental science and sustainability building will provide a unique and immersive educational experience that fosters exploration and stewardship of natural resources,” he said. “It will enable visitors of all ages to engage in hands-on learning about personal and global sustainability and encourage their commitment to create solutions to the challenges arising from human interaction with the environment.” Weeks said design work for Roper Mountain’s new facility is well underway, with construction expected to begin sometime this spring or summer. It is tentatively scheduled to open in the fall of 2020. Once complete, the two-story facility will feature approximately 28,000 square feet of interior space,

RENDERING BY LEE H. SKOLNICK ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN PARTNERSHIP

The New Facility Location: 402 Roper Mountain Road Sq. Footage: 28,000 sq. ft. Stories: 2

according to Weeks. It will be located on a five-acre parcel of land beside the Harrison Hall of Natural Sciences. “This new facility features flexible teaching spaces, open-concept exhibits, and a host of new amenities unlike anything else we’ve been able to provide to visitors before,” Weeks said. The top floor of the facility will include a lobby, a pledge wall, and three classrooms for in-depth learning labs, according to Weeks. It will also include a 1,200-square-foot orientation space with a history of Roper Mountain; a habitat overview; and a digital interactive map of the Upstate. Weeks said a 2,200-square-foot museum exhibit, known as “Sustainable Future,” will feature a series of interconnected stations that highlight how decisions regarding energy, food, water, waste, transportation, and clothing “influence the future of our community and world.” “Each station contains a featured activity that challenges students and visitors to measure their impact on the environment. They also contain an explanatory graphic panel, action list, and stories of local organizations,” he said. “These stations

Classrooms: 7 Projected Opening: Fall of 2020 Cost: $14 Million


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM are visually connected by different-colored footprints that symbolize our impact on the environment and the interconnectedness of these topics and our global world.” The ground floor of Roper Mountain’s new facility will include a dining space with 200 seats and four classrooms, according to Weeks. It will also include a 2,000-squarefoot exhibit, titled “Water Story,” that highlights the processes of the water cycle and the importance of the Greenville Watershed. According to Weeks, the “Water Story” exhibit will also include graphics and models depicting the plants and animals that can be found within the watershed. “Water is a finite resource that is essential to life on Earth. It sustains an amazing biodiversity of plants, animals, and humans in the Greenville Watershed,” Weeks said. “Guests will learn more about the essential element of water and the amazing biodiversity it sustains in the Greenville Watershed through a collection of flexible, modular exhibit stations that can be customized for a variety of topics.” Craig Gaulden Davis, a Greenville-based architecture firm, and Lee H. Skolnick Architecture and Design Partnership of New York are working with the Roper Mountain Science Center to finalize conceptual designs for the facility, according to Weeks. The design process has so far included input from a number of Upstate businesses and organizations, including Michelin North America, Fluor Corp., BMW Manufacturing Co., Greenville Water, and Renewable Water Resources. Roper Mountain Science Center is currently working with the David E. Shi Center for Sustainability at Furman University “to incorporate new learning methods and techniques into brand new lesson plans that will be made available in the new facility,” according to Weeks. Greenville County Schools Superintendent Burke Royster said Roper Mountain Science Center’s new facility will ultimately help to expand the center’s middle school curriculum for earth and life sciences, subjects that were previously available only to elementary school students. The curriculum currently includes lessons about Earth’s weather and climate, plant and animal classifications, and more. It also includes lessons about current environmental issues.

“Environmental science and sustainability is a growing area of interest and focus, not just in Greenville, but worldwide. These topOnce complete, Roper Mountain Science ics are woven Center’s environmental science and throughout sustainability facility will feature about 28,000 the science square feet of interior space. A 2,000-squarecurriculum in foot exhibit on the facility’s ground floor South Caro— known as “Water Story” — will highlight lina and are the processes of the water cycle, and the well-suited for importance of the Greenville Watershed. hands-on lessons in which students study current data and use it in designing solutions to real-world challenges,” Royster said. “Due to capacity constraints, Roper Mountain’s natural science programs have focused on elementary grades. The new facility will enable Roper Mountain to increase opportunities for elementary students and expand its reach by providing many engaging lessons and labs for middle schoolers.” Weeks said the new facility will allow the center, which already provides handson science programs for 50,000 Greenville County school students annually, to serve an estimated 20,000 additional students each year within three years of completion. It’s also projected to result in a 25 percent increase in public participation at the science center through events and expanded access to the facility during weekdays, weeknights, and weekends. Current projections show the facility costing about $14 million to complete, according to Weeks, with about $10 million provided through the Greenville County School District’s “Long Range Facilities Plan and Capital Improvement Program.” Roper Mountain plans to launch a fundraising campaign in the coming months to secure the remaining $4 million. For more information, visit www.ropermountain.org.

THE IMPORTANCE

WHAT TO EXPECT

“This new facility features flexible teaching spaces, open concept exhibits, and a host of new amenities unlike anything else we’ve been able to provide to visitors before.”

Michael Weeks

director of Roper Mountain Science Center


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Greenville’s parking garages going coinless

but most daily users will end up paying more “WE NEED TO POSITION IT AS WE’RE GOING COINLESS, NOT BECAUSE WE’RE RAISING PARKING RATES EVEN THOUGH THE REALITY IS WE’RE RAISING PARKING RATES.” RUS SELL STALL

Councilman

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Greenville’s parking garages are going coinless and, for most hourly parkers, that means they’ll end up paying more. The first hour will remain free, but the second hour will cost $2, up 50 cents. Each hour after that will cost $1, up to a daily maximum charge of $7. Currently, the maximum daily charge is $7.50. Greenville Public Works Director Mike Murphy told city council members that 40 percent of parking garage equipment breakdowns are coin-related. A date for the new rates hasn’t been set yet, but the city wants to do it before the Residence Inn and Springhill Suites hotels open in midJanuary, Murphy said. In addition, the city expects to install a hightech parking-control system in its Spring Street garage in January. The Spring Street garage is a pilot and, if successful, the city will install the new equipment in all 11 of its garages at a cost

of $3 million. The equipment will allow drivers to reserve and pay for a space in advance, and will use license plate recognition equipment and a Bluetooth connection to allow drivers who have registered their tags to enter and exit the garage without a card. The city’s parking services general manager Bill Foster has said the equipment would allow the city to sell more monthly parking spaces in high-demand garages. The city currently oversells monthly spots in those garages, but Foster has said the city could sell even more spots if it had better data on when monthly parkers actually used the garages and how often. Most daily parkers stay two hours or less. According to city figures, the new rate structure will generate an additional $221,389 a year. “We need to position it as we’re going coinless, not because we’re raising parking rates even though the reality is we’re raising parking rates,” Councilman Russell Stall said. The new rates do not have to be approved by city council.

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BIG ISSUES

facing South Carolina legislators in 2019 STORY BY CINDY LANDRUM

Expect to hear a lot about education when state lawmakers return to Columbia for the 2019 legislative session that begins Jan. 8. Teachers in South Carolina watched as their counterparts in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Arizona walked out in 2018 to protest low pay and classroom conditions, and some say the Palmetto state is close to its own walkout if conditions don’t improve. But education is not the only area in which reform is on the agenda. Local lawmakers say they expect state-pension reform, tax reform, and what to do with state-run power company Santee Cooper will be big issues, too.

Education

South Carolina teachers say they get paid too little and spend too much time on testing and paperwork. That combination is contributing to the state’s growing teacher shortage. Approximately 6,700 teachers left their positions during or at the end of the 2016-17 school year, according to the latest teacher retention report from the Center for Educator Recruitment, Retention and Advancement. That’s 200 teachers more than the year before. The report said that school districts across the state reported 550 vacant teaching positions at the beginning of the 2017-18 school year, a 16 percent increase over the previous year. About 40 percent of new teachers leave the profession within five years. “We’re almost in a crisis,” said Rep. Chandra Dillard, D-Greenville. A proposal to pass a teacher bill of rights calls for South Carolina to pay its teachers at least the Southeastern average, which would be an added $2,200 per teacher. A bill filed by Sen. Karl Allen, DGreenville, calls for teachers to make the national average. That would require an additional $10,000 per teacher. The bill of rights also calls for teachers to have unencumbered planning time, equal to one quarter of their assigned instructional time. Teachers would also be compensated for work time beyond the regular school day and school year. In addition, teachers would be freed of excessive and burdensome paperwork related to disciplinary actions, state or district evaluation procedures, and other administrative inquiries that interfere with teachers’ directive to implement effective instruction for their students.

Pension reform

Last year, lawmakers voted to increase contributions to the state’s pension system by employees and their employers, which include cities, counties, and school districts. The pension funds had unfunded

liabilities of $24.1 billion, thanks to underfunding, investment underperformance, and fewer workers supporting more retirees. This year, lawmakers will consider switching the system to a defined-contribution plan instead of a defined-benefit plan that provides monthly payments for life, based on years worked and salary. “We do have to make the change,” said Sen. Tom Corbin, RGreenville.

Tax reform

Business and industry leaders have long complained that they have carried the tax burden since the passage more than a decade ago of Act 388, which replaced local property tax on owner-occupied homes with a 1-cent sales-tax increase on most retail purchases. Washington-based Tax Foundation laid out options for comprehensive tax reform in “South Carolina: A Roadmap for Reform.” The report’s “boldest” option would eliminate corporate income taxes and reduce the state sales tax. But it would add sales tax to items currently exempt such as gasoline, attorney and banking fees, and funeral expenses. The idea also would tax groceries, something the state eliminated a decade ago. “There’s a new energy to look at tax and pension reform,” said Rep. Bruce Bannister, R-Greenville, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee. “This is the most excited members have been in some time.”

C O M I N G

U P

THE FIRST DAY

The 2019 legislative session gets underway on Jan. 8 at noon.


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEW Here’s how your life could change BILLS Teachers could get hefty raises, voters would get a say on whether sports betting and casinos would be allowed in South Carolina, and independent political groups would be required to identify their donors and disclose how they spend their money if bills filed in advance of this year’s legislative session are passed. Lawmakers filed more than 700 bills ahead of the session that begins Jan. 8. Some of the bills are repeats of ones that did not pass in previous legislative sessions. Others are brand new. Some have no real chance of passing, while others could spark big debates.

Here is a sampling of some of the bills:

Education

Judicial

Government

Miscellaneous

Greenville Sen. Karl Allen filed a bill that requires teachers be paid the national average, while Rep. Wendell Gilliard wants to give teachers a 15 percent raise.

Sen. Brad Hutto is the primary sponsor of a bill that would increase penalties for solicitation of prostitution, keeping a brothel, or causing or inducing another person to engage in prostitution. The bill establishes affirmative defenses for victims of human trafficking who are charged with prostitution.

Sen. Nikki Setzler wants to establish a fund to increase the number of lanes on existing interstates. The state Infrastructure Bank would finance projects through the issuance of revenue bonds. The fund, which would be financed through fees collected by the Department of Motor Vehicles, could not be used to construct new interstates or for projects approved by the bank before July 1, 2019.

Voters would decide whether to allow gambling, including sports betting, in the state under a bill sponsored by Sen. Gerald Malloy.

Simpsonville Rep. Garry R. Smith filed the Forming Open and Robust University Minds (FORUM) Act that protects First Amendment expressions by students and student organizations in certain places on public college campuses unless the conduct is unlawful and would cause material interruption. Students with misdemeanor alcoholor drug-related convictions would no longer be prohibited from receiving Palmetto Fellows or LIFE scholarships under a bill filed by Rep. Leon Stavrinakis. School districts would be required to make advanced placement testing available to home-schooled students residing in their districts if they offer the tests to their students under a bill filed by Rep. John McCravy.

Rep. Cezar McKnight’s bill would create the “Defense Against Porch Pirates Act” that would make stealing a package delivered to a dwelling’s porch, steps, or the vicinity of any entrance or exit a felony. Rep. Chandra Dillard filed a bill that would make storing or leaving a firearm in any place within easy access of a child under 18 a crime. Defendants convicted of a crime they committed when they were under 18 could not be given the death penalty or life sentences under a bill filed by Sen. Gerald Malloy. Another bill filed in the Senate would make electrocution the state’s preferred method of execution.

Rep. Jason Elliott is among four House of Representatives members to file a bill that would create an independent redistricting commission to reapportion the House, the Senate, and the state’s congressional districts. Sen. John Scott Jr. filed a bill that would require a paper record of every vote. Rep. Laurie Funderburk’s bill would reduce the number of days a voter must be registered before an election from 30 days to 20.

Fifty-three House of Representatives members sponsored a bill that would require testing for a fetal heartbeat before an abortion. It would also prohibit an abortion when a heartbeat is detected, with exceptions for medical emergencies. Eight senators and a House member want a referendum on the ballot in 2020 asking voters whether South Carolina should participate in Medicaid expansion. Sen. Hugh Leatherman wants to try to limit “dark money” influence on the state through a bill that would require independent political groups to identify their donors and disclose how they spend their money.


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Fairy Gardens: Trending Now

by Martin Garden Fairy Gardens are all the Center rage lately, especially if you watch Laura on Garden Answer.

Martin Garden Center has containers, soil, fairy supplies and tiny plants (2 inch size). Ta da - a fairy garden is born! Let’s get started: You’ll need a large bowl type of container. Basically anything with a wide surface. Place a drainage material such as packing peanuts or small pebbles in the bottom. Add soil to about an inch below the lip of the container. Begin building your fairyland. Plant your plants first and then add the fairies and all the accessories. Some great ideas are playhouses, bridges, swings, streams, little signs, wagons, and wishing wells. So much is available to choose from! Use your fairy imagination and go! Happy Fairy Gardening!

WHAT WILL THE FUTURE HOLD FOR CLEVELAND PARK? These conceptual plans could provide clues

STORY BY CINDY LANDRUM | RENDERINGS BY MKSK

What if the confluence of the Reedy River and Richland Creek became the heart of Cleveland Park, a place that has a naturally graded amphitheater, swings, and overlooks? Or maybe the area on the other side of the river from where the new Swamp Rabbit Trail extension on Laurens Road will enter the park could be a small mountain bike-skills course? Perhaps Cleveland Park Drive could become the park’s main thoroughfare and part of Lakehurst Street closed. Those are some of the ideas included in three concepts presented by local landscape architecture and urban design firm MKSK to members of the city’s Cleveland Park Advisory Committee. Neighborhood and public meetings will be held early next year before a final consensus plan will be sent to the Greenville City Council, said Tee Coker, a planner with MKSK who is working on the project. The firm has been working on the park’s master plan since June. Cleveland Park is nearly a century old, and a lot has changed in Greenville since the park

opened. Development has surrounded the park and population has increased, both in the city, the county, and the Upstate. On nice weekend days, even those without a special event in the park or at the zoo, it can be tough to find a parking spot. The master plan will look at how individual spaces in the park perform, vehicular and pedestrian traffic, how the continued expansion of the Swamp Rabbit Trail will affect the park, and the effects of the Reedy River on the park and vice-versa. The three conceptual plans presented to the committee probably will change before they go to the public early next year, Coker said. The consensus plan will likely contain parts from more than one of the conceptual plans. “We want to explore as many feasible ideas as we can,” said Barrett Armstrong, landscape architect with MKSK. The first conceptual plan, called “the confluence” by MKSK, would leave the street network in the park largely intact. The plan would realign the lower part of Lakehurst and Cleveland Park Drive, which would naturally calm traffic. The plan would consolidate the playgrounds near the zoo. This plan is the only one of the three concepts that would keep Richland Way, a small

Photo by Will Crooks

street that winds along the Reedy River and through a stone tunnel beneath East Washington Street. The second conceptual plan, called “the bend,” closes Richland Way. Cleveland Park Drive remains open, but could be closed on a more-regular basis for events. The Greenville Zoo would engage with the river better and a butterfly garden could be built. A mountain bike-skills course could be built near the Washington underpass and a hillside nature playground could go near the tennis courts. The third plan, called “the flow,” allows better movement to and through the park, Armstrong said. “It really makes the most sense,” he said. In that plan, the zoo entrance would move, helping to create a space for events on par with the Saturday Market, said MKSK Principal Darren Meyer. A realigned Lakehurst Drive could allow zoo patrons to drop off at the entrance. The plan calls for a memorial plaza near the confluence of the Reedy and Richland Creek and a new pedestrian bridge over the river. The plan also eventually calls for an improved bridge and roundabout on McDaniel. All three plans call for better connection to the Nicholtown community.

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THE CONFLUENCE

The Confluence conceptual plan would make where the Reedy River and Richland Creek meet a focus of the park by adding an overlook, swings, and a terrace. “Cleveland Park doesn’t really have a quintessential spot,” MKSK Principal Darren Meyer said.


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

A Family Legacy Fletcher Kirkland

THE BEND

A mountain bike skills course would provide a unique place to learn and practice. It would be across from where the Swamp Rabbit Trail expansion from Laurens Road enters Cleveland Park.

Funeral Director Mackey Funerals & Cremations

A

rare and admirable milestone these days, Fletcher Kirkland recently celebrated more than 50 years with Mackey. And you will still see him at Mackey doing what

he does best – serving families. After all, it’s part of his family legacy. His father started his career working there back in the 1930’s; Fletcher then followed in his footsteps. Like his father before him, Fletcher is a former owner of Mackey, funeral director and an integral part of the Greenville community. “I’m a Greenville native and I have met a lot of families, and I just enjoy working with people and helping them,” Kirkland said. “Being able to help someone when they are at a loss for what to do and have questions – that’s the most important thing.” His extensive experience, friendly personality and calm demeanor are exactly what families are looking for when they place their trust in Mackey. A graduate of Furman University, he has been actively involved in the community for decades, including recent service on the Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital Board.

THE FLOW

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In this plan, Cleveland Park Drive moves to create a plaza for the zoo that could host events. Cleveland Park Drive becomes the main road to and through the park.

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OUTSIDER

Photo by Will Crooks

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP HOLDS RALLY IN GREENVILLE TO UR G E T I R E I N D U S T RY TO U S E D E F O R E STATI ON-FREE RUBBER

amoore@communityjournals.com

Environmentalists gathered in downtown Greenville on Wednesday, Dec. 19 to protest the tire industry’s sustainability policies and to raise awareness of deforestation. The rally, which was held at the Joel Roberts Poinsett Statue on South Main Street, was organized by Mighty Earth, an environmental nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Speakers included Dr. Frank Powell, a former health science professor and sustainability liaison at Furman University, and Kate Franch, chair of the Greenville County Democratic Party. Margaret Kran-Annexstein, campaign director at Mighty Earth, said the rally was one of three demonstrations held nationwide as part of the group’s “Driving Deforestation” initiative, which was launched in 2017 and pushes tire manufacturers to responsibly source natural rubber. Kran-Annexstein said forests throughout Southeast Asia and West Africa are often cleared to make room for growing rubber trees, displacing indigenous communities and destroying important habitat for endangered species, such as tigers, gibbons, and elephants. “The tire industry accounts for a shocking 70 percent of global rubber consumption and,

as a result, is a major driver of deforestation, which, as a whole, is responsible for approximately 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions,” Kran-Annexstein said. “As the major consumers of rubber, it’s critical for individual companies to make it clear to their vendors that the rubber they are buying for their tires should be free of deforestation and human rights abuses.” Kran-Annexstein said Mighty Earth decided to organize a rally in Greenville because of its proximity to Michelin North America. The company, which is an affiliate of the Michelin Group in France, has been headquartered off Interstate 85 in Greenville since the 1980s and operates more than a dozen tire plants nationwide, including several in the Upstate. In addition to Greenville, Mighty Earth also organized rallies in Nashville, Tennessee, where Bridgestone America is headquartered, and Atlanta, where Kumho Tire USA is headquartered, according to Kran-Annexstein. “Long-term, Mighty Earth is working to break the link between deforestation and agriculture for rubber,” Kran-Annexstein said. “Achieving this goal relies on the private sector immediately stepping up and taking action on an aggressive timeline, and Mighty Earth is committed to encouraging the private sector along this path.”

Several major tire manufacturers, including Michelin and Bridgestone, have adopted policies to address deforestation and other issues related to the natural rubber supply chain, and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development is working with the tire industry and other stakeholders to develop a Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber. The platform, which is expected to launch in March of next year, “will work to harmonize standards to improve respect for human rights, prevent land-grabbing, protect biodiversity and water resources, improve yields, and increase supply chain transparency and traceability,” according to a press release from the WBCSD. Mighty Earth published a critique of the platform shortly after its announcement in October, claiming that neither it nor other non-governmental organizations had been consulted throughout the development process, and that NGOs and other stakeholders, such as academics and

small-scale rubber-producing farmers, are currently left out of the platform’s decisionmaking body. A new proposal, however, has since been introduced that would alter the structure of the platform so that Mighty Earth and other stakeholders have equi-

ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

LONG-TERM, MIGHTY EARTH IS WORKING TO BREAK THE LINK BETWEEN DEFORESTATION & AGRICULTURE table voting rights, FOR ac- RUBBER. MARGARET KRAN-ANNEXSTEIN

campaign director at Mighty Earth


1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM cording to Kran-Annexstein. Michelin and other founding members of the platform are expected to vote on the proposal by early 2019. “In order for the platform to be successful, the tire industry must be prepared to give up the idea that they alone have final control over the platform’s decisions,” Kran-Annexstein said. Kran-Annexstein noted that Michelin’s policy for sustainable natural rubber is “strong” and that Mighty Earth’s rally in downtown Greenville was intended to thank the tire company for its efforts and to urge it to “encourage other founding members to support the proposal.” Michelin issued the following statement regarding Mighty Earth’s rally in Greenville: “Michelin appreciates Mighty Earth’s efforts to raise awareness about sustainable natural rubber production, a discussion that Michelin has led across the tire industry and globally in recent years … Many other global NGOs are working with Michelin and the tire industry in an ongoing dialogue to fine-tune governance and by-laws of a Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber. These discussions are very active and unfolding in a constructive and collaborative manner. At present, however, Mighty Earth stands alone in its opposition; we are hoping the group will rejoin the discussions in pursuit of the goal. All actors of the supply chain, civil society or other stakeholders are welcome to become founding members of the platform before the official launch that is scheduled for March 2019. Zero deforestation and responsible natural rubber production are core elements of Michelin’s long-term approach to sustainable mobility.” For more information, visit www.mightyearth.org.

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

Photo by Will Crooks

Holiday Sale December 1 - January 11

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Ozie L. Garrett

Lisa (Levison) Peters

1929 ~ 2018

Easley - Ozie Lee Garrett, 89, loving and devoted husband of Marlene Paris Garrett, passed away peacefully at Foothills Retirement Community in Easley on December 14, 2018. Born in Greenville on March 25, 1929, Mr. Garrett was the son of the late Lawrence Spurgeon Garrett and Inez Dodgens Garrett. A graduate of Furman University, he was a member of the Paris Island Marine Band during his service in the United States Marine Corps. Mr. Garrett was a public accountant and cofounded Pinnacle Associates (a KFC franchise) and Smithfields Country Club. He was Deacon Emeritus and a member of the adult choir of First Baptist Church in Easley, a former Trustee of S.C. Baptist Medical Center (Easley), a former Commissioner of the Easley Housing Authority, and past President of the Easley Lions Club. In addition to his parents, Mr. Garrett was predeceased by his first wife, Donna Stepp Garrett; a daughter, Susan Sumner; a grandson, Richard Garrett Martin; and his sisters, Maxine Henderson and Betty Taylor. In addition to his wife Marlene, Mr. Garrett is survived by his daughters Gwen Martin and her husband Brad, Laurie Hunter and her husband Andy, and Beth Patterson and her husband Patrick; and his grandchildren Olivia Weatherly, Neal Martin, Kathryn Kopp, Ryan Patterson, and Elliott Hunter; and his

wife Marlene’s children and grandchildren, who loved “Grampa Ozie” and he loved them as family: Greg and Susan Hollinger and their children Carol-Ann, Emily, Meredith and Elijah; Sherry and Aldo Tomassini and their children Adam and Ryan; Scott and Maureen Paris; Danielle and Scott Morrison and their children Zachary and Joshua; and Danny and Laura Paris and their children Alysa, Hannah, and Josephine. Mr. Garrett received loving care from the staff of Foothills Retirement Community. The family would like to extend special thanks to Gerry Miller, Teri Gray, and Rochelle Porterfield, whose skill as caregivers and devotion to Mr. Garrett are very much appreciated. Funeral services were held Friday, December 21, at First Baptist Church, Easley, with the Rev. Dr. John Adams officiating. The family received friends prior to the funeral. After the funeral, the burial took place in Robinson Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions may be sent to First Baptist Church of Easley (and designated for the Music Ministry), 300 East First Avenue, Easley, SC 29640. Condolences may be expressed online at www. robinsonfuneralhomes.com

December 1, 1949 ~ December 12, 2018 Lisa Levison Peters, 69, wife of Barry David Peters, of Greer, died Wednesday, December 12, 2018. Born in Englewood, NJ, she was a daughter of William Levison of Taos, NM, and the late Vera James Levison. Those who knew her will always remember her as a take charge, caring, giving “fireplug” who spent her time helping others whether through her philanthropic efforts with the Humane Society, Greenville Women Giving and countless others. She loved her volunteer time spent with organizations such as the Cancer Society of Greenville County where she ran their golf event in recent years. The one that touched her most was Wednesday mornings helping feed the homeless at the Greer Soup Kitchen of Daily Bread Ministries. When she wasn’t helping others, she loved to play golf, Mahjong and bridge where she

smiled her last smile. In addition to her father and loving husband of 34 years, she is survived by a brother, Michael Levison of Taos, NM; two brothers-in-law, Bruce Peters of Kernersville, NC and Brian Peters of Flourtown, PA; and a nephew, Amos Hockmeyer of Taos, NM. In addition to her mother, Lisa was preceded in death by a sister, Lorie Hockmeyer. A celebration of life service was held Sunday, January 6, 2019 at the Thornblade Club, 1275 Thornblade Blvd., Greer, SC 29650. DONATIONS MAY BE MADE TO: Brain Aneurysm Foundation, Lisa Peters Web: http://give.bafound.org/ site/TR/Events/General?px=1100 607&pg=personal&fr_id=1040

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of obituaries to our weekly print publication. Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

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ALL THE BIG NAMES ARE HERE.

Named one of South Carolina’s “10 Best Attractions,” by 2018 USA TODAY 10Best and as one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. And admission is always free! Learn more at gcma.org.

Jasper Johns, born 1930 Target with Four Faces, 1968 Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Big Names JJohns 2018.indd 2

admission free

11/20/18 3:04 PM


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CAROLINIAN DEBUTANTE CLUB PRESENTED SIXTEEN AT ANNUAL BALL The Carolinian Debutante Club presented sixteen young women on Dec. 22 during the 51st annual ball at the Poinsett Club. Miss Mary Elizabeth Chandler, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Archiebald Hortense Chandler III, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Patricia Johnson Hephner and the late Mr. Basil Max Johnson of Surfside Beach and Mr. and Mrs. Archiebald Hortense Chandler, junior of Bishopville. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by Mr. Reid Walker Howard. Miss Sophia Hagy Coburn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Boocock Coburn, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Myron Dexter Hagy, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, of Greenville and the late Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Leslie Coburn III of Sewickley, Pennsylvania. A student at Tufts University, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. Philip Boocock Coburn. Miss Allison Louise Copsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lynn Copsey, junior, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Joseph Sill and Mr. Ronald Lynn Copsey and the late Mrs. Copsey, all of Greenville. A student at the University of Georgia, she will be escorted by Mr. William Patterson Luce. Miss Olivia Grace Fox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Andrew Fox, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. George Ingild Theisen of Greenville and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Pennington Fox of Bluffton. A student at the University of Georgia, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. Thomas Pierce Fox. Miss Anna Lee Henry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Patrick Henry, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Cauble Boliek, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, of Greenville and Mrs. Joel Thomas Henry and the late Mr. Henry of Gastonia, North Carolina. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. John Patrick Henry, junior. Miss Amelia McGregor Madden, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Eugene Madden, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Sandra Taylor Campbell and the late Mr. Raymond Erl Campbell and the late Mr. James Britton McGregor, all of Greenville, and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Eugene Madden of Laurens. A student at the University

of South Carolina, she will be escorted by Mr. Robert MacFarlane Luce. Miss Martha Neel McLeod, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Parks McLeod, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hays Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. George Theran McLeod, all of Greenville. A student at Savannah College of Art and Design, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. James Parks McLeod, junior. Miss Madeline Brooke Moore, daughter of Mr. Robert Breece Moore, junior and the late Mrs. Sara Jill Salyer Moore, will be presented by her father and grandmother, Mrs. Ronald Norman Salyer. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Norman Salyer, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, and Mr. Robert Breece Moore, senior and Ms. Nancy Jane Savage, all of Greenville. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by Mr. Christopher Sean Riley II. Miss Rebecca Kathryn Norwood, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin King Norwood III, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gladden Hartness, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin King Norwood, junior, all of Greenville. A student at Auburn University, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. Benjamin King Norwood IV . Miss Reid Caroline Powell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Scott Powell, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Barbara Hamilton of Tifton, Georgia and the late Mr. Robert Franklin Cox of Greenville and Mrs. Charles Harris Powell and the late Dr. Powell of Winston Salem, North Carolina. A student at the University of Virginia, she will be escorted by Mr. Jackson Irvin Cooter. Miss Laughton Louisa Short, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Michael Short, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Hal Holland Crosswell, junior and the late Mrs. Regina Danner Crosswell all of Columbia, and Mrs. Robert George Short and the late Mr. Short of Greenville. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by Mr. John Hudson Davis. Miss Barrett Wynn Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Pickens Taylor, junior, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Woodrow Wilson Long, junior and Mrs. John Pickens Taylor and the late Dr. Taylor, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, all of Greenville.

A student at Furman University, she will be escorted by Mr. Robert Taylor Carsten. Miss Emilie Kaytina Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shane Taylor, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of The Honorable and Mrs. Nick Andrew Theodore and Mr. Robert Overton Taylor and the late Mrs. Taylor, all of Greenville. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by her brother, Mr. William Nicholas Taylor. Miss Jenna Ann Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Todd Holbrook Taylor, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Allan Henry and Mr. Robert Overton Taylor and the late Mrs. Taylor, all of Greenville. A student at the University of Virginia, she will be escorted by Mr. Jeffrey Michael Johnsen. Miss Emily Roe Willcox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Law Willcox, junior, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. Shirley Roe Tuck and the late Mr. Thomas Anderson Roe of Greenville and the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Law Willcox, senior, of Columbia. A student at Clemson University, she will be escorted by Mr. Bradley Allen Hughes. Miss Caroline Ruth Wilson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Alan Wilson, will be presented by her parents. She is the granddaughter of Mr. Kenneth Claud Porter and the late Mrs. Porter, and Dr. and Mrs. Freddie Ernest Wilson, sustaining members of the Carolinian Debutante Club, all of Greenville. A student at Wake Forest University, she will be escorted by Mr. Jeffrey Fletcher Mazzola. Mrs. Clarence Ross Turner III is the president of the Carolinian Debutante Club. Other officers are Mrs. Ronald Lynn Copsey, junior, president-elect; Mrs. John Laney Stephenson, recording secretary; Mrs. Frank Norris Wilson, assistant recording secretary; Mrs. Thomas Edward Baumgarten, corresponding secretary; Mrs. Brian Alan Rogers, treasurer; Mrs. James Wofford Bannister, ball chairman; and Mrs. William Arthur Luce, social chairman. Board members are Mrs. Thomas Andrew Fox, Mrs. John Edward Stelling, Mrs. Todd Holbrook Taylor, Mrs. Thomas Law Willcox, Mrs. Frank Norris Wilson, junior, and Mrs. David Alan Wilson. Mrs. Patrick Alan Duncan is the ex-officio member of the board. Advisors are Mrs. James Carnes Morton, Mrs. John Kenneth Nickles, and Mrs. John Alexander Reynolds.


1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Miss Mary Elizabeth Chandler

Miss Sophia Hagy Coburn

Miss Allison Louise Copsey

Miss Olivia Grace Fox

Miss Anna Lee Henry

Miss Amelia McGregor Madden

Miss Martha Neel McLeod

Miss Madeline Brooke Moore

Miss Rebecca Kathryn Norwood

Miss Reid Caroline Powell

Miss Laughton Louisa Short

Miss Barrett Wynn Taylor

Miss Emilie Kaytina Taylor

Miss Jenna Ann Taylor

Miss Emily Roe Willcox

Miss Caroline Ruth Wilson


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

A WEEK OF JURY DUTY AND THE UNSATISFYING ABSENCE OF JUSTICE

BY ARIEL GILREATH I reacted to my jury duty summons much like, I assume, my peers did — with a mix of curiosity and resentment. As an education reporter, I’ve had few opportunities to sit in on trials. During the instances I did, I never perceived what I now see as an invisible barricade between the audience and the participants. A safety fence between those who are interested, for whatever reason, in the outcome, and those involved in the outcome. It was not what I thought it would be. If you’ve served on a jury before and find the idea of reading about the process tedious, please skip the next two paragraphs. At the start, I and roughly 100 potential jurors were placed in a large jury assembly room where some of us were randomly selected to gather in courtrooms for smaller jury pools. There, attorneys — and often the defendants and plaintiffs — sat while a judge culled the pool into an even smaller number based on questions intended to root out bias. Do you have a personal or professional relationship with the plaintiff or defendant? Do you have a bias against Spanish-speaking legal residents? Attorneys then struck out a limited number of jurors they saw as unlikely to side with their case — based on appearance, age, careers, the careers of their spouses, etc. — and the lucky 13 (12 jurors and one alternate) were ushered into the jury stand. The trials immediately started from there. In the span of two days, I was not selected for three trials. I occasionally made it in the smaller pool of potential jurors but escaped the final cut. They don’t tell you they don’t serve you lunch unless you’re actually selected, and so I wept the first two days. At the end of the second day, I arose. It was the last trial of the week, and although I had nearly escaped without a single civic duty to add to my resume, I was finally among the chosen (Can you add “jury duty” to your resume? No? On second thought, don’t answer that).

It was a first-degree criminal domestic violence case — a woman accusing her exboyfriend of punching her and impeding her ability to call the police. The solicitor’s office showed us pictures of her distorted, black eye and tear-streaked face. We heard testimony from the urgent-care doctor who saw her two days after the incident, as well as from the deputy who took her statement after she left the urgent-care office. But nobody, including the defense, disputes any of that. In the jury training videos the courthouse employees showed us, the primary responsibility we were given was to determine if the evidence made us certain, beyond a reasonable doubt, of a party’s guilt. That idea was reinforced several times over — beyond a reasonable doubt.

THE JURY BOX

In the case we were given, the evidence wasn’t cut and dried — there was no simplicity that caused us to feel as though we knew what happened on the night in question, but there was the possibility of another culprit. Without getting into the arduous weeds of the case, which is complex and involves numerous details and scenarios, we knew, beyond a reasonable doubt, the victim had been assaulted, but we did not know with certainty it was the defendant. In the course of the investigation, deputies did not interview any witnesses. They did not interview the second suspect who could have also been the culprit. They took a statement from the victim and made an arrest. Either the defendant or the victim was lying about the assault, and both arguably had various motivations to do so.

A criminal case requires 12 jurors to make a unanimous decision of “guilty” or “not guilty” based on the evidence presented.

Prior to a trial, the presiding judge asks questions of the jury pool with the intention of rooting out bias. Once the jurors are selected, they are not allowed to discuss the case, including with each other, until they are sent back to the deliberation room to render a verdict.

After hearing all of the testimonies and arguments, I was pleasantly surprised to go back to the deliberation room and find that all of the jurors felt what I did — doubt and uncertainty. While we were inclined to believe the victim, could we put a person in prison based on an inclination, without sufficient evidence? I can’t speak to what the other jurors felt, but after we reached our verdict of not guilty, I didn’t feel relieved. Someone was lying. Someone hurt the victim. Someone deserved to pay. But who? “This comes down to shoddy police work,” one of the jurors said in frustration, after hours of deliberating. While I understand law enforcement, attorneys, and judges often have enormous caseloads in Greenville County, without sufficient evidence and testimonies, we couldn’t deliver a concrete verdict. We deliberated for hours, weighing the evidence and our doubt to determine if it was beyond reasonableness — it just wasn’t. I don’t feel satisfied with the outcome. I also don’t feel qualified to have reached a verdict. Maybe if the incident had been thoroughly investigated, the outcome would have been different. Maybe the case would have been closed quicker. Maybe it never would have reached a jury trial. Maybe not. I do feel more needed to be done on the case before leaving it up to 12 jurors to make the toughest decision in the courtroom. However, I also feel as though this was a case of the judicial system working. We didn’t convict based on our emotions or prejudices. We didn’t go with our modest inclinations. We tried to be as objective as possible, and settled on the realization we would never, and could never, know what happened that night based on the evidence presented to us. Sometimes, maybe a diverse jury of our peers is exactly what we need to settle disputes. I hope, when dozens of our peers file in deliberation rooms across the country, they can recognize when they’re unable to know someone’s innocence or guilt.


1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

OPINION

The Power of Advocacy and Aligning Efforts B Y S U S A N M C L A R T Y | Coordinator, Greenville Homeless Alliance

The Greenville Homeless Alliance wants to share an update on exciting, significant work happening in Greenville to address homelessness. There is a growing partnership working to make homelessness brief and rare in Greenville County through safe, affordable homes for all. Greenville has a history of committed partners providing emergency shelter, supportive services, and affordable housing. However, there are still gaps in our service system network. During the holiday season of 2014, a crisis called “Tent City,” launched the coalition. Since then, public, private, and nonprofit groups have been working toward more long-term coordinated strategies. The condemning of the Economy Inn in 2018 provided the most recent cooperative approach resulting in the “Motel Displacement Response Plan.” Last year also included the release of the “Greenville County Affordable Housing Study.” The study shows a shortage of 9,500 homes affordable to households in the County earning less than $25,000 a year. This study builds upon the 2016 report from the City of Greenville that

outlined a shortage of 2,500 homes for households in the City earning $20,000 or less a year. This gap continues to grow at approximately 534 units annually. Homelessness is a solvable problem and research is focusing on the solution of “housing first” models and affordable housing.

called “Reedy Place.” These 23 units are for people who have a history of homelessness, as well as physical or mental disabilities. Propelling development of additional housing first models is one of the highest GHA priorities. Data on the County states 954 new

Housing first offers permanent, affordable housing as quickly as possible for those experiencing homelessness, and then provides the supportive services and connections to the community-based supports people need to keep their housing. Greenville can be proud of being the first in our state to build a housing first model

low wage jobs are being created annually. Quality rental housing is incredibly scarce, and rents have been rising while wages for low and middle-income households have not. Affordable housing means that housing expenses, whether rent or mortgage payments, account for less than 30 percent of gross monthly

William was the jolliest of Santas in the hometown parade for over 30 years. He prepared himself once again on this 1st night of August.

Wherever you are. Whenever it is.

Reflections MEMORY CARE & ASSISTED LIVING

income. The median rent in Greenville County (excluding the City) is $787 per month. A household working full time at minimum wage earns $15,080 a year and can afford a rent of $419 per month. Therefore, a household earning anything less than $30,000 will struggle to find a decent place to live that they can afford. As reported by the Greenville Journal, the number of children in 84 Greenville County schools experiencing homelessness highlights the need for affordable housing across the county. This year we urge you continue to widen the group of stakeholders focused on housing solutions. The power of advocacy and aligning efforts cannot be overstated. We invite everyone in our community to become fiercely committed to ending homelessness and participate in creating a systemic and empathetic community-wide response to do so. If we succeed in this, we will have a healthier, better educated, and more prosperous population and workforce for our future. Visit the website at www.gvlhomes4all.org to learn more.


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM 20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.30.2018

Featured Listings January 2019

COBBLESTONE

AUGUSTA ROAD

GOWER ESTATES

SPAULDING FARM

113 Putney Bridge Lane Amazing home with open floor plan. Master and office on main level. Beautiful deck and screened porch with fireplace. Walkout basement with media, bonus, bedroom, office and exercise room. 1.53 acres.

113 Keowee Avenue Gorgeous 4BR/3BA fully remodeled bungalow off of Augusta Road (featured in Greenville’s Talk Magazine!). Open floor plan with bamboo throughout main living spaces & beautiful gas log fireplace in living room.

331 Henderson Rd Priced below appraised value. Beautiful home on 1.128 acres on corner lot overlooking tranquil creek. Privacy galore! Covered deck, patio and multiple decks. Fabulous outdoor space. Wonderful home for entertaining! Must see!

121 Hunters RunThis 5BR/3.5BA Tudor style home is located on a cul-de-sac lot in one of Greenville’s most sought after neighborhoods. Master on main, 2BRs with a full bath upstairs & 2BRs & full bath in basement. Beautiful Great Room.

MLS# 1379286 $1,299,000

MLS# 1377006 $664,900

MLS# 1373427 $614,900

MLS# 1368189 $595,000

Carole Atkison 864.787.1067

RED

UCE

Maggie Aiken 864.616.4280

D

JUST

LIST

Beth Crigler 864.420.4718

Margaret Marcum 864.420.3125

ED

DOWNTOWN/WEST GREENVILLE

TUXEDO PARK

TINSLEY PLACE

CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE

605 Arlington Ave Luxury Townhouse in the middle of it all! 3BR/3.5 BA multi level with attached two car garage and roof top terrace. Contact me today to schedule your private showing!

100 Murdock Lane Amazing 5BR/4 full BA & 2 half BA, 5600+ sf home in amazing location in Greer. Master BR with sitting room, also a media room and bonus room. Spacious 0.58 acre home site.

108 Tinsley Ct Beautiful custom built 4BR, 3.5BA home on Greenville’s Eastside. Hardwoods throughout, master on main, open floor plan, chef style kitchen, GR w/ stone fp & gas logs, extensive upgrades, screened porch & deck.

107 Cole Road Beautiful colonial white home on 9ac of land, 10 minutes to downtown Greenville! This home was the first stage coach in Greenville & the home was built around a log cabin. Hardwoods floors throughout. Large living room w/gaslog fp.

MLS# 1373105 $590,000

MLS# 1372950 $564,465

MLS# 1382197 $479,000

MLS# 1381827 $345,000

Stina Thoennes 864.304.9475

Bob Schmidt 864.313.4474

Margaret Marcum 864.420.3125

JUST

LIST

Maggie Aiken 864.616.4280

ED

WALNUT RIDGE/FIVE FORKS AREA

WINDSTONE

CAMERON CREEK

GOWER ESTATES/LAURENS ROAD

212 Gentle Slopes Way All brick ranch, 4BR/2BA home with many many extras-whole house generator, sec system, granite, stainless steel, appl upgrades, full yard irrigation, screened in covered patio with paver extension.

7 Stonefield Ct This 3BR/2BA, one level patio home is located on GVL’s desirable Eastside. Conveniently located to shopping, restaurants, health care and just minutes from downtown. Spacious great room with fireplace.

116 Cameron Creek Lane 4BR/3 Full BA Craftsman style home in Simpsonville. 3BRs on main level and 1BA upstairs with full BA. Open floor plan with large kitchen. Screened porch and fenced yard.

7 Carter Drive Looking for a great little house in Gower/Henderson Rd area...don’t miss out on this one. Well maintained, loved & cared for. The baths & kitchen need updating but you could move in and work on it a little at a time.

MLS# 1380765 Bob & Linda Brown $298,900 864.884.1284/864.884.0966

MLS# 1377693 $280,000

MLS# 1381656 $277,000

MLS# 1381281 $219,000

Margaret Marcum 864.420.3125

Ginnie Freeman 864.325.7463

Beth Sarmento 864.350.4118

© 2019 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Your Home’s Best Friend.

Match up with an agent that’s right for you and find your new home at www.cdanjoyner.com.


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

THE LIST 

/

  PROPERTY SALES FOR THE WEEK

/

  FEATURED HOMES

1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

REAL ESTATE and HOMES GREENVILLE JOURNAL  n  JANUARY 4, 2019  n  PAGE 21

New Year, new (construction) home THE LIST

When it comes to making one of the biggest decisions – and most major purchases – of your life, why not be picky? Every detail should be exactly how you want it. Here are some great options for newly-built homes with top-of-the-line touches and yet-to-bebuilt home with customizable plans.

➥ MAPS AND MORE HOMES ONLINE AT GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Greenville Country Club THE SCOOP This fully custom home designed by Carolina Custom Creations and built by James White Enterprises was carefully crafted from the foundation up. The open floor plan has plenty of space for entertaining. There are exquisite details throughout like quartz countertops in the kitchen and a spacious master suite with custom closets. ADDRESS: 7 Douglas Drive LIST PRICE: $684,000 LISTING AGENT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS, Sherman Price

Lake Keowee THE SCOOP If you want lakefront living and the chance to customize your home, then this property is for you. The house plans are designed to bring views of nature at every turn. Enjoy the scene from the front porch, screened porch, or sweeping windows. The home’s exterior offers stunning visual details like gables and archways. ADDRESS: 64 Aqua Vista Drive LIST PRICE: $441,600 LISTING AGENT: Blackstream Christie’s, Cheyenne Kozaily


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

THE LIST CON’T

The Cottages at Overbrook

Hampton Pickney Historic District

THE SCOOP This home in one of Greenville’s newest developments near downtown offers maintenance free living and luxurious design details. The home features granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, and architectural shingle roofing. Home plans options include 3 bedrooms and 2.5 and 3 baths.

THE SCOOP This “to be built” home has custom-designed architectural plans that feature 9-foot ceilings, granite countertops, and an open floor plan. There’s also a luxurious master suite with a walk-in closet. The historic neighborhood features beautiful homes in walking distance to downtown. If you want additional space, the lot next door is available for purchase.

ADDRESS: 27 Greenridge Drive LIST PRICE: $299,900 LISTING AGENT: Wilson Associates, Carmen Putnam

ADDRESS: 117 Butler Avenue LIST PRICE: $775,000 LISTING AGENT: The Marchant Company, Valerie Miller

Alta Vista Area

Carolina Moves Real Estate wishes you a healthy, happy, & prosperous 2019! We would love the opportunity to show you how our SMART approach to real estate will work for your needs! Call 864-448-1234 or email team@carolinamoves.com to discuss!

THE SCOOP It’s all in the details. This home has an open floor plan with finished hardwoods, 9-foot ceilings, a main-level master with granite vanities, and three additional bedrooms and two bathrooms upstairs. The location can’t be beaten. The home is in walking distance to Augusta road shopping and less than a mile to downtown. ADDRESS: 14 Cromwell Avenue LIST PRICE: $685,605 LISTING AGENT: Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty, Joan Herlong


Luxury Service at Every Price Point 9+ ACRES WITH STUNNING VIEWS

16 High Bluff Court, Cliffs Valley $2,695,000 MLS#1377161 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

COUNTRY ESTATE ON 30+ ACRES

600 N Glassy Mountain Road, Landrum $1,950,000 MLS#1367638 Meg Atkinson 843-601-4191

DYNAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS

608 Raven Road, Cliffs at Glassy $1,275,000 MLS#1374669 Damian Hall Group 864-561-7942

200 Knightsridge Road, Cliffs Valley $849,950 MLS#1361066 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

1.8 ACRES

106 Fire Pink Way, Cliffs at Glassy $795,000 MLS#1356127 Spencer Ashby 864-404-8295

115 Blazing Star Trail, Cliffs at Glassy $724,900 MLS#1380822 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

203 Southview Ledge Rd, Cliffs at Glassy $575,000 MLS#1353158 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

1489 Altamont Road, Paris Mountain $550,000 MLS#1373450 Damian Hall Group 864-561-7942

LAKEFRONT CORNER UNIT

423 Mount Vernon Rd, Views at Mount Vernon $519,900 MLS#1382040 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

108 May Apple Way, Cliffs at Glassy $499,000 MLS#1369764 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

TO BE BUILT

5 Thorncliff Court, Kilgore Farms $365,400 MLS#1378015 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

6 TOWNHOMES TO BE BUILT

144 Harbour Pointe, Unit E, Six Mile $349,000 MLS#1379442 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

RESIDENTIAL LOTS • 000 Pixie Moss Way, $59,000 1.17 Acres #MLS 1356282 • 117 Fern Springs Way, $50,000 1.75 Acres #MLS 1353744 • 00 Aqua Vista Drive, $42,000 2.61 Acres #MLS 1356129

63 Hardwood Pointe Drive, Lake Keowee $331,700 MLS#1360860 Cheyenne Kozaily 864-999-1959

26 Brookdale Avenue, Fair Heights $242,000 MLS#1373046 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

246 S Pearson Street, Woodruff $185,000 MLS#1381188 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303

• 5014 Bragg Road, $29,900 0.43 Acres #MLS 1363450


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

5 ways to

GREEN your 2019

MOST APPRECIATED

Off the market

The details behind some of the Upstate’s highestappreciated real estate transactions

Environmental issues can feel overwhelming, but we have opportunities to make greener choices every day. If your New Year’s resolution is to reduce your environmental impact, then we have some great places for you to start!

1.Ditch single use items

We’ve become creatures of convenience, but there’s really no such thing as throwing things “away.” While some single use items can be recycled, the majority end up in landfills or littering our riverbanks and shorelines. Reduce your consumption by making the switch to reusable water bottles, bags, and food containers.

2.Detox your yard

Chemicals like fertilizer wreak havoc on our natural world. Composting is a great alternative, and it will keep food scraps, leaves, and other organic materials out of the landfill. Plus, this will save you money and improve your soil. When choosing new plants and trees, always go native! They will require less up keep, pollinators love ‘em, and you’ll be preserving local biodiversity.

Alta Vista

LISTED: $709,000 SOLD 2018: $688,000 SOLD 2013: $360,000 ADDRESS: 18 Ben Street AGENTS: Coldwell Banker Caine, Heidi Putnam BRAGGING POINTS: This Cape Cod-style home brings a slice of country living to the city with its large shady oak trees, storage barn, and chicken coop. Homeowners can walk to downtown, Cleveland Park, and the Swamp Rabbit Trail. The main-level master has French doors that open to a rear patio. The kitchen has marble countertops and plenty of storage.

3.Eat local

Not only does eating local support local farmers - it supports Mother Earth too! Fewer food miles mean less fuel consumption and air pollution (and fresher food). Supporting local food also means protecting local land, wildlife, and soil that could otherwise be developed.

4.Spend less, save more

You save more than just money when you buy less or choose secondhand items. Everything we buy comes with an environmental impact. It’s estimated that one cotton t-shirt takes 766 gallons of water to make. Supply meets demand. To live greener means to demand carefully taking us back to #1.

Kilgore Plantation

5. Volunteer

There are so many opportunities to volunteer with local organizations, whether it’s a tree planting, restoring wildlife habitat, or a river clean-up. But you don’t have to wait on others to start! Download the ‘Litter Ends Here’ app and start making a difference one piece of trash at a time. GREENVILLE COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT

www.greenvillesoilandwater.com

LISTED: $724,900 SOLD 2018: $704,900 SOLD 1999: $72,000 ADDRESS: 5 Archers Place AGENTS: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS, Melissa Morrell/Keller Williams, Nancy Janich BRAGGING POINTS: Relax or entertain year-round on the sprawling rear porch with a wood burning fireplace and oversized-patio. The home’s interior has custom archways, thick crown moldings, and baseboards throughout. The kitchen truly stands out with its center island, granite countertops, and furniture-grade cabinetry. Neighborhood amenties include a pool, clubhouse, playground, and tennis courts.


1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SOLD Greenville Transactions for the week of Nov. 14-23 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$41,950,000 $13,250,000 $7,956,000 $1,233,100 CHANTICLEER $807,000 $805,000 LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS $700,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $680,000 $655,000 $640,000 TROLLINGWOOD $622,500 MAYFAIRSTATIONTOWNHOMECOMMUNITY $549,000 CHARLOTTE’S WOODS $540,000 STONEWOOD MANOR $520,654 CRESCENT TERRACE $515,000 KILGORE FARMS $511,320 $480,000 KANATENAH $470,000 BELHAVENVILLAGEATHOLLINGSWORTH $464,640 ACADIA $455,000 FORRESTER WOODS $450,000 KILGORE FARMS $449,986 $440,000 STILLWATERS $439,000 STONEHAVEN $437,000 RIDGESTONE COTTAGES $429,406 SUGAR CREEK $426,000 SILVER RIDGE FARMS $425,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE AT HOLLINGSWORTH $421,242 MCDANIEL GREENE WEST $420,000 ROCKBRIDGE TOWNHOMES $420,000 $419,000 PEGGY J KELLY $407,500 HIGHVIEW TOWNES $402,900 TUSCANY FALLS $400,000 $398,785 $395,000 POINSETTIA $390,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $385,000 BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION LAKESIDE $385,000 $377,500 AUGUSTA ACRES $370,000 PELHAM ESTATES $370,000 GOWER ESTATES $369,000

BRANDON MILL LLC DJ SERENITY PROPERTY LLC SILVER CREEK APARTMENTS GIVENS INVESTORS LLC PHILLIPS MICHAEL JWY REALTY LLC MOORE J DAVID (JTWROS) CORNELL AUREL AND CARMEN BROWN BARBARA W BATSON WILLIAM NEAL KASSAB THOMAS M JONES ROAD VENTURE LLC DOAK SUSAN A MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH TYLER JACK B MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WATSON ROBERT ASHER CALLOWAY BRIAN (JTWROS) NVR INC SHIRLEY MEGAN S (JTWROS) ROBERTS KIMBERLY L (JTWR MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH MASS PROPERTIES LLC COCHRAN DAVID N LEMMEN DEBRA L (JTWROS) ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CREAR CHRISTIAN ALAN (JT FOSTER GREGORY T (SURV) NVR INC MEYER JANET W (JTWROS) BCB & PRB 2 LLC SLOCUM CORY D MERRITT KAREN A (JTWROS) HIGHVIEW LLC RODGERS CARMAN ANN (JTWR CF INVESTMENTS LLC ELLER BLANCHE C REVOCABL PAONESSA BLANCA (JTWROS) MCGOWAN BRINSON LOMAX MARTIN CYNTHIA S (JTWROS CARUSO DAVID R (JTWROS) RASBERRY GEORGE S ALDRIDGE JEAN M AS TRUST CANADY AVERY J JR

BUYER

BIG BRANDON MILL SC LLC WOODLEA OAKS 2 LP CONTOUR SILVER CREEK LLC REDWOOD SIMPSONVILLE NEE HIPP SCOTT TIMMONS FARM PRODUCTS II LLC HAUGHEY MEGAN ELIZABETH COSTA SERGIO (JTWROS) 1503 OVERBROOK LLC MOORE J DAVID (JTWROS) LARSON LEVONNA M DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH MARTIN SCOTT E (JTRWOS) LEQUILLEUC GILES (JTWROS MILLER BLAIR (JTWROS) SOMANCHI BRIJ VINOD WISE GRIFFIN H (JTWROS) BRINKLEY MEREDITH H (JTW SALAMIN GINA ROSE (JTWRO HUSTON JAY T (JTWROS) SMITH KRISTINA (JTWROS) JOHNSON KEITH W CJMH PROPERTIES LLC RODGERS ALAN C (JTWROS) LONG RICHARD SHANE (JTWR BRUCE GARY FRANCIS (JTWR BYNUM HENRY CLARKE III ( KNOTTS MORGAN L (JTWROS) WATERS ANDREW (JTWROS) CALLOWAY BRIAN (JTWROS) SABAL HOMES AT ROCKBRIDG DOBSON KATHERINE M ADAMS ADEL MARIE (JTWROS NVR INC HARRISON BRANDON T (JTWR KELLER JESSE L (JTWROS) WHITE ELIZABETH BROMM RYAN COSTELLO FAMILY REVOCABL KOONS JENNIFER S (JTWROS NIHISER JESSICA (JTWROS) SALMERON RAMIOR RAMIREZ COUCH HEATHER (JTWROS) HAWKINS DANIEL (JTWROS)

ADDRESS

25 BROOKLINE 2409 MALL DR STE A 100 ASHE DR 7510 E PLEASANT VALLEY RD 4 LOWOOD LN 507 N MAIN ST 117 LANNEAU DR 337 SORONO DR 309 E STONE AVE 1491 ALTAMONT RD 123 GREYBRIDGE RD 211 CENTURY DR STE C100 90 WILLIAM OWENS WAY 204 COLERIDGE LN 132 CAPERS ST 28 LAROSE CT 411 JONES AVE 27 OREGON ST 206 ALISTER DR 116 ACADIA AVE 102 SANDERLING DR 401 PLACID FOREST CT 705 ROCK SPRINGS RD 7 WATERSIDE LN 305 SHADOWBROOKE CT 121 HAVERCROFT LN 106 STONE RIDGE CT 716 DILLS FARM WAY 205 VERLIN DR 211 MCDANIEL GREENE 421 WANDO PARK BLVD STE 230 410 OVERBROOK RD 115 DAWN LN 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 345 MONTALCINO WAY 624 CRESTWOOD DR 300 DUNCAN RD 709 N ALMOND DR 51 DEVONHALL WAY 25 DOUBLE CREST DR 101 WOODVALE AVE 11 WOODBURY CIR 8 CAPE CHARLES CT 207 PIMLICO RD

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

HAMMOND’S POINTE HOLLINGTON KILGORE FARMS KILGORE FARMS BRENTWOOD SUNSET HILLS PARKERS LANDING BELHAVEN PARC SHELLBROOK PLANTATION BRENTWOOD ASHCROFT COVENTRY PELHAM FALLS AMBER OAKS FARM BROWNSTONE MEADOWS WEST FARM BELSHIRE COPPER CREEK MERRIFIELD PARK PLEASANT MEADOWS TOWNES AT THORNBLADE PINEHAVEN ACRES SHERWOOD FOREST BRIAR OAKS WATERS RUN VILLAS @ WEST GEORGIA HAWTHORNE RIDGE OAKHILL AIRPARK BROWNSTONE MEADOWS HIGHVIEW TOWNES WILDAIRE ESTATES HIGHVIEW TOWNES HOLLINGTON WATERS RUN LINCOLN PARK HIGHVIEW TOWNES HIGHVIEW TOWNES KINGSFIELD

$367,500 $365,000 $365,000 $360,500 $351,153 $350,000 $350,000 $345,156 $338,000 $337,790 $336,670 $331,468 $329,000 $325,800 $322,493 $321,500 $320,445 $320,000 $319,600 $315,000 $311,141 $311,000 $310,635 $305,000 $300,711 $299,900 $294,900 $289,860 $288,907 $288,300 $284,553 $282,000 $281,326 $281,145 $280,000 $280,000 $280,000 $279,795 $278,000 $277,051 $276,507 $276,430 $275,495 $273,300

DYAS JAMES P HOPKINS BENJAMIN M (JTWR AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R PERRY BREGHANNA B (JTWRO D R HORTON INC KNIGHT NANCY LANDRUM (JT ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CURRY ANNA L D R HORTON INC D R HORTON INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL KING TRACY B SK BUILDERS INC KIRKLEN HOMES LLC GIGUERE ALEXANDRA B NVR INC HARVEY EMILY ERIN (JTWRO COUCH HEATHER R (JTWROS) OWEN EUGENE FRANK JR MCGEE PROPERTIES OF GREE GENDLIN HOMES LLC TOWNES AT THORNBLADE LLC PARKSIDE DEVELOPMENT GRO HOPPE JOHN G IV (JTWROS) JOHNSON ELLIE OTHA JR RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES NVR INC NVR INC NEWSTYLE CARRIAGE HILLS MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN SACKEL CANDIEST KIRKLEN HOMES LLC NVR INC MASTERS SHEILA I R MEJIA CARMEN ROOFTOP PROPERTIES OF BE NVR INC COMEAUX JONATHAN D NVR INC CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC NVR INC NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC

BUYER

ADDRESS

PINCIARO ALESSANDRA MICH RAVENELL TRINA NICOLE (J JIANG WENYAN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R ZHENG XUEQIN DOPPELHEUER INVESTMENTS GILMORE MARCUS (JTWROS) GODBEY FRANK R (JTWROS) SILIATO ALFRED M (SURV) MANALO JOSEPH JESSE LUGO OATIS JOHN E III (JTWROS PYE KRISTEN LEIGH CLEMMONS WILLIAM D (JTWR PRICE LIZA (JTWROS) BEISSER GARY S (JTWROS) CARUSO DAVID R (JTWROS) WASHINGTON BRENDA DONNA TOBY JENNIFER (JTWROS) DAVIS BENJAMIN R (JTWROS DETANDT JOANNA LEIGH (JT SCHWAB DENNIS LAWRENCE ( RIZZO FRANCES A HAGER PAMELA L (JTWROS) WILLIAMS ROBERT H JR GABRIEL MATTHEW CHAPIN BRANDON CHINN KATHRYN DIANE MARCHESE SALVATORE WILES HANNAH ELIZABETH AYALA LINDA RIAN DANIELLE DYKEMA BETHANY A LYMAN LAURA (JTWROS) BOBOTIS ALEXANDER CHAPPELL ROBERT LEE JR TALLY JOHN D JR (JTWROS) GIRALDO JORGE M WATTERS TARA HERSHBERGER COREY L LANAHAN CYNTHIA (JTWROS) DOBBS DONALD R JENSEN JORDIN (JTWROS) RIGSBY GEOFFREY BEST PAMELA (JTWROS)

10 KING EIDER WAY 227 ABBEY GARDENS LN 200 CARTERS CREEK CT 200 CARTERS CREEK CT 223 GRANITO DR 227 WACCAMAW AVE 11 LAKEWAY PL 201 ROUND STONE WAY 158 PALM SPRINGS WAY 225 GRANITO DR 405 CASTLEFORD PL 805 LOCKHURST DR 309 RIVER WAY DR 2 MEADOWDALE LN 208 KIRKLEN LN 108 BELGIAN BLUE WAY 201 CARROLLTON CT 156 LEIGH CREEK DR 32 HILLSBOROUGH DR 115 DOUGLAS DR 508 BLACKS DR 109 LADSON ST 2717 BERKSHIRE LN 113 PERCY AVE 212 ROBIN HOOD RD 103 LOGAN ST 111 BURNS ST 143 FAWN HILL DR 805 SILVERWOOD WAY 15 HERON GLEN WAY 224 JONES PEAK DR 15 AERONCA RD 212 KIRKLEN LN 27 ITASCA DR 6 RAMBLEWOOD LN 1609 E SALUDA LAKE RD 303 HARPSWELL PL 23 ITASCA DR 217 ABBEY GARDENS LN 405 FIELDSVIEW LN 10 BISHOP LAKE WAY 25 ITASCA DR 38 ITASCA DR 2 KINGSFIELD PL

www.SpauldingGroup.net

5 Summerchase Drive • Fairview Lake 3 BR/2.5 BA • $187,500 • MLS 1381397 Susan Waters | 864-380-0402

864.458.8585

NT R CO R UN DE

TIN NE

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LIS

IC PR W NE 25 Mims Avenue • Nicholtown 3 BR/2.5 BA • $249,900 • MLS 1379933 Amy Bower | 864-504-5145

202 Walnut Trace Court • River Walk 4 BR/3.5 BA • $475,000 • MLS 1372309 Pamela McCartney | 864-630-7844

AC T

110 Meilland Drive • Thornblade 4 BR/3.5 BA • $595,000 • MLS 1376030 Carole Atkison | 864-787-1067 Marie M Crumpler | 864-230-6886

G

113 Putney Bridge Lane • Cobblestone 5 BR/4 BA/2 HLF BA • $1,299,000 • MLS 1379286 Carole Atkison | 864-787-1067

E

Exceptional agents. Exceptional results.

NE W

AW ES

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PR

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IC

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Happy New Year!

105 Concord Court • Powderhorn 4 BR/3 BA • $169,900 • MLS 1381452 Margaret Marcum | 864-420-3125


ENVIRONMENT

CAPTURED

CCE Boxing Club PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Stepping in CEE Boxing Club is nostalgic for me. It feels like the real boxing gyms that barely exist anymore in large cities, much less in places the size of Greenville. The gym has a wellearned patina of hard work and sweat. The CEE, Center for Education Equity, provides at-risk youth with afterschool academic aid and gives them access to a sport that instills work ethic and self discipline like no other. Boxing requires anyone who steps into the square circle the most simple and yet the most complicated task. Simply put to hit and not get hit. These images capture the essence of the sport and the discipline and effort these young practitioners put into it every day.


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Local quartet creating a buzz in the Greenville music scene

VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

The recent two-track EP by the quartet The Apartment Club is one of the most promising local releases of 2018. On these two tracks, the band — singerguitarist Acen Herron, drummer Geoffrey Kelly, guitarist Jake Bagwell and bassist Nate Kelly — takes the more skeletal framework of guitar-driven indie-rock created for its self-titled EP and adds a sense of drama, along with a layer of dreamlike, moody production. The EP, called “Doubt Vol. 1,” begins with a grinding stomp called “Bad/New.” Over interlocked guitars that are alternately intricate and brutal, Herron wails in a wounded howl through the chorus, then retreats into a smoother delivery during the verses, lending a sense of vulnerability to the song’s tense give-and-take. The second track, “Doubt,” starts with a single choppy riff before building into a rage-fueled juggernaut; its structure feels similar to The Cranberries hit “Zombie,” ending with a hailstorm of guitars rising around Herron’s frantic scream. Herron says he’s especially proud of that

track, because it shows how far The Apartment Club has come in less than a year since its previous release. “The big difference is that for the first release, I wrote a lot of those songs by myself in my college dorm room,” he says. “But now, it’s turned into, ‘Let’s see what we can write as a collective unit.’ ‘Doubt’ is kind of the culmination of that. It’s just us working together, putting things into the pot and seeing what comes out. It’s turned into this beautiful mess, and we love it.” As indicated by its title, “Doubt Vol. 1” is only the first dose of new music from the Spartanburg-based band, which will perform at the Radio Room in Greenville on Friday night with 72nd and Central, Chew, and Courteous Monk. With an eye toward evershorter audience attention spans, the band has taken a set of six recently written songs and divided them up into a staggered release schedule. “You could put it all out there at once for people to listen to, but we’re pairing them up to have constant releases,” Herron says. “In today’s music industry, you have to constantly be releasing

Photo by Taylor Jarvis

THE APARTMENT CLUB WHEN Friday, Jan. 4th, 8 p.m. WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville TICKETS $7 INFO 864-609-4441, www.radioroomgreenville. com

something, because attention spans are short and it’s hard to find a foothold. And that’s something we wanted to get our hands around; we want to release something every two or three months. and have people waiting for more. And these two songs that are a great way to kick this off and get a feel for where the band is going sonically.”

Chart-topping country singer to play the Blind Horse Saloon VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Country singer Mitchell Tenpenny has been waiting a while for his new album, “Telling All My Secrets,” to come out. About nine months, in fact, ever since his single, “Drunk Me,” started climbing the charts. The song, which revolves around a perfectly country music stinger couplet, “I’ve been sober since you broke my heart in two/ ’Cause drunk me can’t get over you,” peaked at No. 2 on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart, and Tenpenny has been eager to capitalize on that momentum. So when his full album was released on Dec. 14, he was more relieved than excited. “I’ve wanted to get it out for so long,” he says, “and I was waiting to see what everyone said about it.” It’s still too early to tell how the album will do sales-wise, but Tenpenny, who grew up in Nashville, says he’s gotten enough positive responses to make the wait worth it. Perhaps one of the reasons that he’s been anxious to see how people responded is that

Tenpenny co-wrote all eleven songs on the album, a rarity in country music and an accomplishment of which he’s proud. “I’m going to write all my stuff,” he says. “It’s hard for me to make someone believe my song if I didn’t have a part in the writing process.” Musically speaking, Tenpenny, who will perform at the Blind Horse Saloon in Greenville Saturday, isn’t a pure-country artist by any means. He freely mixes modern-pop production techniques and rock ’n’ roll power into the tracks on “Telling All My Secrets.” But he also has little patience for being told his music isn’t “country enough.” “We have some die-hards who write reviews and say, ‘That’s not country music,’ but it doesn’t make any sense to me,” he says. “I don’t know why people would want you to copy someone else. Merle, Hank and Willie did their own thing; so if I try to make music like them, then I’m just ripping them off..” Tenpenny speaks with rock-solid determination when he talks about pursuing his own genre-blending musical style, and

1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

The Salvation Army Kroc Center Creative Arts Academy held its first talent showcase during the holiday season. It featured a production of Hansel and Gretel, a display of art projects, and several Christmas numbers sung by the academy children. Family and friends joined the celebration as they witnessed all that the children had accomplished in the first semester. The Creative Arts Academy is a Wednesday night youth group for ages K-12. Staffed by the Kroc’s pastor, Captain Wendy Lewis, church officers, and volunteers, the program provides children with the opportunity to participate in character building classes, worship through music, a warm meal, and a choice of elective classes. The Creative Arts Academy registration is now open and will hold the next semester January 9th through May 29th. It is the program’s mission to provide children with a chance to encounter God through sincere artistic expression, which reflects the creativity of God himself. A single $20 sponsorship will provide a wonderful experience for an interested, underserved child! It was Joan Kroc's vision that all individuals have equal opportunities to grow their natural gifts and talents. Help us continue and grow that mission. Interested participants and donors should visit KrocGreenville.org/CAA.

MITCHELL TENPENNY WHEN Saturday, Jan. 5th, 7 p.m. WHERE Blind Horse Saloon, 1035 Lowndes Hill Rd., Greenville TICKETS $19.50, $22.50 INFO 864-233-1381, www.blind-horse.com

that’s probably because he was raised in Music City, where aspiring artists have to grow thick skin if they’re going to make it. “I got to see people make it and not make it and see how long the process took,” he says. “It helped me stay focused and be prepared to hear ‘No’ a lot.”

(864) 527 - 5948 424 Westfield Street Greenville SC 29601 KrocGreenville.org


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Project Host served southern bibimbap with Greenbrier pork (bottom left dish) at the annual Campfire Social charity event held at Greenbrier Farms.

feast

Photo by Will Crooks

Project Host CULINARY SCHOOL GRADUATE TO COOK FOR UPCOMING FUNDRAISER

BY ARIEL TURNER

The upcoming Project Host fundraiser hosted by Leadership Greenville Class 45 will have special significance for one of the participants. Gregorio “V” Caraballo, a graduate of Project Host’s CC Pearce Community Culinary School, will not only be in attendance but will be cooking the dishes restaurant Golden Brown & Delicious (GB&D) serves to guests during the reception. The Leadership Greenville Class 45 Sponsor Reception will be held at Project Host, 525 S. Academy St., from 6-9 p.m. Jan. 17 to benefit the work that the Greenville Chamber’s Leadership Greenville (LG 45) is doing on behalf of Project Host, including a mural, new signage, bike racks, and landscaping. The reception will feature small plates from restaurant sponsors The Anchorage, The Cliffs, GB&D, and Project Host, and beer and wine will be provided by Greenco. Project Host seeks to alleviate food inse-

curity for all ages through a soup kitchen, culinary school, gardening program, and bakery, and works with its students to place them in jobs where they’d be a good fit. This LG 45 project will help create a welcoming atmosphere for those seeking and receiving services from Project Host and foster community awareness of the nonprofit’s mission to nourish the hungry and train the unemployed. “As is the process for LG project selection, we reviewed several project proposals and then chose a few to present in person — frankly, after Project Host’s presentation, it was almost immediately our top choice,” says Josh Tew, a member of LG 45. “They are doing incredible work in the community both on an immediate (soup kitchen) and strategic (career training) level. They have a prominent facility on Academy, but our group was generally not aware that Project Host was more than a soup kitchen. The objective of our project

Want to go?

is to assist Project Host in upgrading their branding in the community to match the services they offer.” Caraballo’s involvement in the fundraiser brings Project Host’s mission full circle, showing, rather than simply telling, the benefits of the teaching arm since its founding in 2003. “Project Host helped me become all I can be — knowing how the food-service industry works, knowing all the tools to succeed and gain a lot of experience, to mold me into a better chef,” Caraballo says. Caraballo graduated from Project Host’s culinary program in September 2016 and soon after joined the kitchen of GB&D, the popular Village of West Greenville lunch and dinner spot run by chef Alex George. George was already a Project Host supporter and says he even considered attending the culinary school at one time before his stint at Stella’s Southern Bistro in Simpsonville where he trained under chef

Jason Scholz. George says when he asked Tobin Simpson, the teaching chef at the culinary school, to send him some possible candidates for an open kitchen position, Caraballo stood out. For two years now, Caraballo has walked almost an hour each way, three days a week to work at GB&D and one day at the soup kitchen, always willing to tackle whatever project he’s given. “He works crazy hard,” George says. “And he’s really into food.” And that’s why Simpson recommended him for the job. “V was a very quiet and attentive student that was very concerned with all of the intricacies and details of a process,” Simpson says. “Once I had explained something to V’s satisfaction and he grasped the concept, I could count on that task being completed exactly the way it was taught. V also has a great work ethic and is constantly trying to figure out how he can best help the team.”

LEADERSHIP GREENVILLE CLASS 45 SPONSOR RECEPTION BENEFITING PROJECT HOST WHEN: 6-9 P.M. JAN. 17 WHERE: PROJECT HOST, 525 S. ACADEMY ST. TICKETS: PROJECTHOST.ORG


1.04.2019 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

small P L AT E S FOOD NEWS & EVENTS BY ARIEL TURNER

FOOD EDU

MOVE TO A NEW BEAT

CURRENTS BY MAYUMANA FEBRUARY 26

Go Whole Hog

Want to know where your food comes from? Greenbrier Farms wants to show you. Their upcoming whole hog butchery classes on Jan. 19 and Feb. 9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., will be a handson, instructional experience for all attendees. The class will feature Greenbrier’s pastured heritage hogs and be instructed by Culinary Institute of the Carolinas chef Patrick Wagner. In addition, guests will enjoy a farm to table lunch and 100 percent of the finished product, which means an equal share in pounds of meat that has been portioned and packaged. The class is $125 per person and space is limited. The farm is located at 766 Hester Store Road, Easley. For additional info or to sign up, email Roddy@greenbrierfarms.com.

IF YOU GO Get Crafty

MARCH 22

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery is hosting special guest Meredith Leigh — butcher, farmer, cook, and author of “The Ethical Meat Handbook” — Saturday, Jan. 26, 6 p.m. for a “Craft of Charcuterie” class along with Swamp butcher, Jeremy Hardcastle. Having attended this same class last year, I’ll tell you the board they will put together will be a thing of beauty. Drinks and music begin at 6 p.m. Hardcastle and Leigh will educate participants on the art of charcuterie and the importance of ethical meat at 6:30 p.m. Charcuterie feast commences at 7 p.m. Two free drinks are included with purchase. Get tickets at swamprabbitcafe.com/charcuterie.

IF YOU GO S’mores Saturdays Every Saturday night in January — weather permitting — Swamp Pizza will be selling s’mores ingredients and equipment outside at the pizza container. Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery will provide the fire pit, but the toasting and gooey, delicious mess is up to you. Swamp Pizza is open from 11a.m.-8:30 p.m.

MAY 11

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

GROUPS


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

AROUND TOWN   FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM SUNDAY | JAN. 6, 2019

A R T S C A LE N DA R JAN. 4 - 10

Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Susannah Mele & Ashley Kirby Through Jan. 4 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Kate Furman: West Greenville Fauna Through Jan. 4 ~ 467-3132 Peace Center

Russian Composers & Tea Jan. 8 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

Rodney Carrington Jan. 10 ~ 467-3000

Sensory-friendly Greenville Swamp Rabbits hockey game ■■ 3 – 7 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ■■ $15 – $20 Springbrook Autism Behavioral Health, an autismfocused residential behavioral health center for youth, along with the Advanced Institute for Development and Learning, a pediatric speech and feeding therapy clinic, are partnering to present a sensory-friendly experience during a Greenville Swamp Rabbits hockey game. The Swamp Rabbits will take on the Worcester Railers.

MONDAY | JAN. 7, 2019 South Carolina Children’s Theatre winter class ■■ 4 – 8:30 p.m. ■■ 1200 Pendleton St. Classes are available for ages 3 through 12th grade at the South Carolina Children’s Theatre. Dates, times, and prices vary. Visit www.scchildrenstheatre.org or call 864-235-2885 to register. 2019 Winter Language Classes ■■ 1 p.m. ■■ Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. ■■ $80 – $310 Upstate International provides the opportunity to take language skills to the next level in a unique and encouraging atmosphere. Beginner, intermediate, advanced, and conversational-level classes in 11 languages including English, German, French, Italian,

Spanish, Greek, Thai, Hebrew, and American Sign Language are offered. Programs are flexible and engaging, taught by native speakers, and are small in size to allow for more individualized attention. Complete schedules can be found on website.

SATURDAY | JAN. 12, 2019 Greenville Drive job fair ■■ 9 a.m. ■■ Fluor Field, 945 S. Main St. ■■ Free The Greenville Drive is hosting a job fair. The Drive will be making seasonal hires in five departments for the 2019 season at Fluor Field: box office, entertainment, food and beverage, game operations, and grounds crew. All interested parties will be directed to the Champions Club on the suite level, where Drive representatives will provide candidates with applications for their preferred departments. For more information on the fair, call 864-240-4500. Sierra Hull ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Gunter Theatre, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $35 Sierra Hull has been recognized from the age of 11 as a musical prodigy » Sierra Hull will and virtuoso mandolin perform at the Peace player. Alison Krauss called Center Gunter Theatre. her to the Grand Ole Opry stage when Hull was only 11 years old. Two years later, she

signed with Rounder Records and soon became known as a remarkable mandolin player, a tone-true vocalist, and a recording artist of high order. A Wintry Mix ■■ 7 – 8 p.m. ■■ First Baptist Greenville, 847 Cleveland St. ■■ $16 The Greenville Symphony Orchestra predicts a “wintry mix” for its second Spotlight Series concert, and no, they’re not talking about the weather. The concert is the perfect antidote to the post-holiday blues, as it offers a “wintry mix” of delightful chamber selections sure to chase those blues away. Harlem Globetrotters ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ■■ $30 The Harlem Globetrotters feature some of the most elite dunkers on the planet, exceptional ball handlers, and Guinness World Records holders. A Globetrotters game is more than just basketball — it is family entertainment that will bring smiles and fan interaction to people of all ages. Shows will be held at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. To purchase tickets, visit http:// www.bonsecoursarena.com/events/detail/harlemglobetrotters-2019.

WEDNESDAY | JAN. 16, 2019 Greenville Water Campus tour ■■ 3 – 4 p.m. ■■ Greenville Water Campus, 407 W. Broad St. ■■ Free Deb Sofield, Greenville water commissioner, will talk

Greenville County Museum of Art

Andrew Wyeth Watercolors Through Jan. 13 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Visions in Encaustic & Nostalgia

Celebrate a local tradition! Do you know a special child turning 6 this month?

Through Jan. 23 ~ 735-3948 Fine Arts Center

Works by Beatrice Coron Through Feb. 1 ~ 355-2550 Crossword puzzle: Page 34

Greenville County Museum of Art

Jasper Johns: More Than Meets the Eye Through Jun. 9 ~ 271-7570

Art & Artists of South Carolina Continuing ~ 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillear ts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

For details, visit WMYI.com or WSSLFM.com Keyword: BIRTHDAY

If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in JANUARY bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package! Monday - Friday, January 7th - 11th, 1pm - 5pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-242-6041 Sudoku puzzle: Page 34


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AROUND TOWN   PLAN YOUR WEEK WITH THE UPSTATE’S BEST LOCAL ACTIVITIES  |  FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM to this tour group about water quality and water quantity, and the role of the water commission on growth and development in Greenville County. The tour will be of Greenville Water’s downtown campus. Visitors should enter the main parking area using the drive off Broad Street. The meeting will begin in the community room.

audiences worldwide with its range of expression, tonal spectrum, and conceptual unity. The Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet — the first permanently established wind quintet in the famous orchestra’s rich tradition of chamber music — is also a popular guest at international festivals. Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet will also perform a master class for winds at 10 a.m. Feb. 14. Visit https://www.peacecenter.org for more information.

THURSDAY | JAN. 17, 2019 ‘Southern Hemisphere Astronomy’ ■■ 7:30 – 9 p.m. ■■ Wilkins Conference Center, Roper Mountain Science Center, 402 Roper Mountain Road ■■ Free John Coutts presents “Southern Hemisphere Astronomy.” Coutts is a native Australian and has unique experiences exploring astronomy from the Southern Hemisphere. Meetings are free of charge, open to visitors, and all levels of interest are welcome. An astronomy-related topic is presented at every meeting either by a member or guest speaker. Questions and discussion are a part of the meetings. Light refreshments will be served. The Stephen Lynerd Group ■■ 7 – 9 p.m. ■■ Downtown Presbyterian Church, 435 W. Washington St. ■■ Free Chicago-based jazz quartet the Stephen Lynerd Group will be performing a concert. Vibist and drummer Stephen Lynerd and his quartet will perform a mix of jazz standards, original compositions, and sacred jazz. A $10 donation is suggested.

THURSDAY | FEB. 14, 2019 » The Hungry Monks perform traditional, contemporary, and original acoustic songs and instrumentals.

Luke Combs: ‘Beer Never Broke My Heart Tour’ ■■ 7 – 11 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. Multi-platinum singer-songwriter and Asheville, North

Carolina, native Luke Combs will perform at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

FRIDAY | FEB. 15, 2019 TobyMac: ‘Hits Deep Tour 2019’ ■■ 7 – 10 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. TobyMac’s “Hits Deep Tour,” with special guests Jeremy Camp, Jordan Feliz, Ryan Stevenson, We Are Messengers, and Aaron Cole, will make a stop at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

SUNDAY | JAN. 20, 2019 The Hungry Monks ■■ 3 – 5 p.m. ■■ Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road ■■ $5 – $20 The Hungry Monks perform traditional, contemporary, and original acoustic songs and instrumentals in the Celtic tradition, including influences of folk, blues, classics, and jazz. Instruments include guitars, mandolin, banjo, fiddle, whistle, and bohdran.

WEDNESDAY | FEB. 13, 2019 Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet ■■ 7 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Gunter Theatre, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $55 The Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet entertains

January Birthstone

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AROUND TOWN   FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM SATURDAY | FEB. 16, 2019 Jerry Lee Lewis ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $65 – $85 Known for his iconic hits “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Great Balls of Fire,” Jerry Lee Lewis is one of the first true rock ’n’ roll musicians. Lewis is part of the Million Dollar Quar» Jerry Lee Lewis tet, along with Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, and Carl Perkins. Lewis has been honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a Lifetime Achievement Grammy award. Visit https://www.peacecenter. org for more information. ‘Hymn: Sarah Brightman in Concert’ ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. The world’s most successful and best-selling soprano Sarah Brightman will bring her world tour, “Hymn: Sarah Brightman In Concert,” to the Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

MONDAY | FEB. 18, 2019

TUESDAY | FEB. 19, 2019 I’m With Her ■■ 7:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $35 – $45 I’m With Her’s extraordinary chemistry is founded in the musicianship of Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan. Collectively, the multi-Grammy Award winners have released seven solo efforts, co-founded two seminal bands (Nickel Creek and Crooked Still), and contributed to critically acclaimed albums from a host of esteemed artists. Visit https:// www.peacecenter.org for more information.

THURSDAY | FEB. 21, 2019 Lara St. John ■■ 7 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Gunter Theatre, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $45 Starting the violin at only 2 years old, Canadian-born Lara St. John made her first appearance as soloist with an orchestra at age 4 and made her European debut with the Gulbenkian Orchestra when she was 10. St. John will also present a master class on the violin at 11 a.m. Feb. 20. Visit https://www.peacecenter.org for more information.

ONGOING EVENTS S.C. International Auto Show ■■ 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Jan. 11 – 12; 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Jan. 13 ■■ Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Drive ■■ Free – $8 The newest cars, trucks, crossovers, and SUVs will cruise into Greenville for the South Carolina International Auto Show. Guests can experience the latest in-car technology and see customs, classics, and exotics. Guests are also invited to take their favorite vehicle for a spin, with dozens of the latest models available for test drives. ‘Mix and Mingle’ dance class ■■ 7 – 9 p.m. Mondays, Jan. 7 – Feb. 11 ■■ Sears Shelter, McPherson Park, 120 E. Park Ave. ■■ $12 Participants can learn mixer dances from around the world. These dances — favorite social dances from around the world — encourage guests to meet everyone in the room. Beginners are welcome; no partner is needed. Southern Living Holiday Showcase Home Tours ■■ 3 – 6 p.m. Jan. 11 and Jan. 18; 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Jan. 12 and Jan. 19; 1 – 5 p.m. Jan. 13 and Jan. 20 ■■ 200 Jessen Drive, Greenville, SC 29605 ■■ $10 The Southern Living Custom Builder Program Holiday Showcase Home is in one of Hollingsworth Park’s newest neighborhoods, Bella Grove. The custom home was built by the Cottage Group and designed for the holidays by Tribus Design Studios. Ticket purchases will benefit the Greenville Humane

JANUARY 5

Russian National Orchestra ■■ 6:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Center Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $35 – $55 The Russian National Orchestra’s recording of “Sleep-

ing Beauty” is among the most-listened-to classicalmusic recordings of the last 75 years, and its recording of Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” and Beintus’ “Wolf Tracks” received a 2004 Grammy Award, making it the first Russian orchestra to win this honor. Visit https:// www.peacecenter.org for more information.

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■■ Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ $8 The Upstate nu-metal band REdEFIND has dubbed their upcoming Radio Room show “Don’t Call It A Comeback,” so we won’t, but it’s worth pointing out that the band hasn’t played a show in about seven months, due to some scary circumstances that were out of their control. “Back in the first week of June, we were getting ready to do some shows in Florida when our singer (Branden Knapp, aka B Nappy) was in a motorcycle wreck that was pretty bad,” says bassist Drew Porter. “He was laid up in the hospital with multiple surgeries, and we weren’t sure for a while there if he was going to make it. But he’s pretty strong-willed, and he’s up and around again and at almost 100%, so we’re ready to get back on the stage. There’s this pent-up feeling of energy; we’re just ready to get out there.” As one might expect, the brush with death has given everyone in the group (Porter, Knapp, D.J. Bobby Lark, guitarist Dru Cipher and drummer Dustan Snow) a new perspective. “It made us appreciate each other more,” Porter says. “You don’t think about stuff like that most of the time, and when that wrench got thrown into the plan, we started looking at things differently. I think it’s helped us as a band.”


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AROUND TOWN

sarah farrar

Mid-Century Moods

Society and Operation Finally Home. Learn to play Appalachian instruments ■■ 5 – 6 p.m. Thursdays, Jan. 24 – Feb. 28 ■■ The Church of the Redeemer, 120 Mauldin Road ■■ $60 Sign up for lessons to learn how to play banjo, guitar, fiddle, or mandolin. These lessons are open to children 9 and older and adults. The classes are grouped by skill level and begin Jan. 24. Beginners are welcome. The total fee for a six-week session is $60. Rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. ‘Arabian Nights & Winter Dreams’ ■■ 8 – 9:30 p.m. Jan. 26; 3 – 4:30 p.m. Jan. 27 ■■ Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $19 – $75 Featuring Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade” and Tchaikovsky’s “Winter Dreams,” tales as old as time come to life in this concert filled with exotic romance and adventure, sure to warm up even the coldest winter night.

January 11 – March 1, 2019

864-467-3000 or at http://www.peacecenter.org.

Friday, January 11th, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

‘Songs for a New World’ ■■ 7:30 – 10 p.m. Feb. 14–16 and Feb. 21–23 ■■ Billingsley Theatre, North Greenville University, 7801 N. Tigerville Road, Tigerville ■■ $5 – $12 “Songs for a New World” is an abstract, self-contained song cycle about the choices people make when confronted with change, loss, and opportunity. The music and lyrics were written by Jason Robert Brown.

Opening reception:

Mid-Century Moods is inspired by mid-century modern style. The art. The furniture. The fashion. It was a time when the design movement was explosive. The work included in this exhibition explores new paths of movement while referencing the divergent patterns of the mid-century era.

Centre Stage 501 River Street | Greenville, SC 29601 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org Hours: Tuesday – Saturday | 2 - 6 p.m.

JANUARY 10

‘Mr. Popper’s Penguins’ ■■ 10 – 11 a.m. and 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Jan. 26; 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Jan. 27 ■■ Peace Center Gunter Theatre, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $19 – $28 Flippers-flapping, squawking, circus tricks, dancing: These are just a few things you’ll see in this musical production based on the popular children’s book. See what happens when boy penguin meets girl penguin under the care of the Poppers. These tuxedoclad creatures will waddle their way into your heart. For ages 3 and older. Tickets are available by calling

» “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” will be performed Jan. 26–27 at the Peace Center Gunter Theatre.

Rodney Carrington

■■ Peace Center, 300 S. Main St., Greenville ■■ 7 p.m. ■■ $35-$55 Rodney Carrington could conceivably be called a “redneck comedian” in the tradition of Jeff Foxworthy or Larry The Cable Guy, but those with young children should note that there IS a difference. Carrington, who’s radiates Southern charm and slings cutting observations about everything from his own inability to control his urge to overindulge (“I’m Fat”) to comedic songs about…let’s say marital relations (“Marriage Advice Song”), doesn’t work in the same squeaky-clean style as Foxworthy or Larry. Now, that being said, Carrington is just the kind of comedian to deliver solid laughs to a Southern crowd, and his backwoods onstage persona has powered him through seven albums of down-home musings. And he’s even managed to score one gold and one platinum album, which hasn’t been an easy feat for comedians since the 1970’s. Is it for everyone? No. Is it G-rated? Absolutely not. But people with a little redneck in their blood will enjoy Carrington’s comedy.

Massage. Facials. Stretch.


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 1.04.2019 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Auto Supporter ACROSS 1 Halo sporter 6 Nest nuggets 10p Had no being 15 “Vamoose!” 19 “I wanna try!” 20 Cameo, e.g. 21 Lend — (pay attention) 22 Poi source 23 Participants in a guided discussion 25 Longtime kids’ nature magazine 27 Spanish for “bear” 28 McDonnell Douglas jet 30 Refuge 31 Thelma’s cohort, in film 34 Use an entryway 35 Velvet or Hallow ender 36 — hop (jitterbug) 37 14- to 18-year-old in a British youth association 40 Source copy: Abbr. 42 “BTW” part 43 You, in Berlin 44 Road given a no. 46 Pop-rock singer Simpson 50 Kind of sheet metal 54 Border illumination on some smartphones 57 Mini-whirlpools 58 What bran provides, to Brits 60 Grads.-to-be 61 Basso Pinza 62 Outfits anew 64 “No” voter 65 “— culpa!”

By Frank Longo

66 Slender nails 67 Large cosmological aggregate 71 Imams’ God 75 U.S. tax org. 76 Berlin article 77 Ejected lava 82 Waste time 83 Party game 84 “— not lost” 86 1980s TV’s Remington 87 1966 Wilson Pickett hit 90 The “I” of 75-Across 92 Show up for 93 Farm female 94 Abbr. for those with only one given name 95 Mil. unit 96 Tooth anchor 98 First extended stay on the International Space Station 104 Spiny plants 107 With 103-Down, didn’t know at all 109 Radio knob 110 Loin steaks 111 Put in order 113 Writer Franz 114 “Y” athlete 115 Annual Arizona football game 117 New York City fashionindustry agency whose name is apt for this puzzle 122 Shoe fillers 123 Conical tent 124 Comics’ Kett

125 “Peachy!” 126 Sommer of Hollywood 127 Lauder of fragrances 128 Asian nation 129 Garish DOWN 1 TV title alien 2 Natal lead-in 3 Yukon maker 4 Avian-based skin care product 5 To a smaller degree 6 Botch it up 7 “Sheesh!” 8 Biochemical sugar 9 Erma Bombeck’s “The Grass Is Always Greener Over the — Tank” 10 Alert 11 Actress Ortiz 12 Pick up on 13 1998 Winter Olympics city 14 Nonkosher 15 More direct 16 — terrier 17 Curved 18 Sweet white wine 24 Word after film or play 26 Frank topper 29 Musician Brian 31 Vowel, e.g. 32 Bull leather 33 Capsizes 35 Ending for major 38 Conn. hours 39 Compulsion

All Adoptions

41 Inferior mags 45 Someone — problem 47 Tony winner Minnelli 48 Writer Blyton 49 Huge heads 51 More, in music 52 “Psycho” co-star Janet 53 Dog in “The Thin Man” 54 Bidding site 55 Common battery type 56 Infuriated 59 “What You Need” rock band 63 Injured-arm supporter 65 Actor Paul 66 Yahoo 68 Left the bed 69 Kin of a tulip 70 Once, once 71 Mater lead-in 72 Yahoo 73 Rearmost 74 It lingers in the mouth 78 — annum 79 Bodily band 80 Benes on “Seinfeld” 81 Investigates 83 Annul 84 Author Haley 85 A lot like 88 Rub oil on 89 Wowed 91 Future louse 94 Bismarck is its cap. 97 Realm of Oedipus 99 PalmPilot, e.g., in brief 100 — Tower (Paris sight) 101 Agenda part 102 Like an oval or rectangle 103 See 107-Across 104 — latte Hard

105 Disney’s “Little Mermaid” 106 Streamlet 108 Become a parent to 112 Fence “door” 113 Swiss painter Paul 116 Really small 118 Berlin article 119 Water, to Somme folks 120 “Inc.” cousin 121 — latte 113 Pitcher — Wilhelm

Sudoku

114 Central Sicilian city 115 Golden — (senior) 116 “Hey ... over this way!” 118 “Car Talk” network 119 “Mystifier” Geller 120 Chest bone 121 Artist Yoko 122 Job for AAA 123 1960s univ. radicals Crossword answers: Page 30

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: Page 30


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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA GCRA 2019 HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM NOTICE OF FUNDING AVAILABILITY The Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) announces the availability of funding applications for 2019 Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The GCRA is interested in financing projects that increase the production and availability

of decent, safe, sanitary and affordable housing for low and moderate income persons in Greenville County, outside the City limits of Greenville. Eligible non-profit and forprofit housing developers and providers are encouraged to apply. Applications are available on the GCRA website at www. gcra-sc.org. The 2018 HOME funding application deadline is Friday, February 22, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Three hard copies and one full electronic copy must be submitted to the GCRA office located at 301 University Ridge, Suite 2500, Greenville, SC 29601 and emailed to GCRA Program Director, Imma Nwobodu, at inwobodu@gcrasc.org. An application training and workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, January 23, 2019 at 10:00 in the GCRA Board Room. All inquiries relating to the HOME application proposal and registration for the training

should be directed to Imma Nwobodu at 864-242-9801 x115. Responses received after the deadline will NOT be considered regardless of the postmarked date. Since Congress has not yet approved the 2019-2020 federal budget, a final budget for 2019 HOME funds cannot be determined. All application awards will be contingent upon the availability of 2019 HOME funds from HUD.

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line 864.679.1205

email: aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that July Eleventh Winery, LLC/DBA Elevation 966 Wines intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 301 Airport Road Suite B, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 20, 2019. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Purple Horse Holdings, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1 Villa Road, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 20, 2019. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Pie Guys Restaurants, LLC /DBA Rapid Fired Pizza intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 4100 Pelham Road, Greenville, SC 296155025. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 20, 2019. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Elvino’s LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 5000 Old Buncombe Rd. Ste. 44, 45, 46, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 20, 2019. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

ART. CULTURE. STYLE

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SC GREENVILLE COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-05939 JJSC ENTERPRISES, LLC v. THE ESTATE OF HAZLE G. MADSEN, et al., including ANY KNOWN OR UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF HAZLE G. MADSEN, TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Greenville County, SC court in action number 2018CP-23-05939. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. S. Lindsay Carrington Bell Carrington Price & Gregg, LLC 408 East North Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-272-0556, AMENDED SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-03476 Alba Sanchez, Plaintiffs, Vs. Doris Evestiana Monsalve, Erika Patricia Monsalve Escobar and Miryam Janeth Osorio, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply for the Court the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. AMENDED LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon amended complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding partition of property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: All that certain piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the City of Simpsonville, Austin Township, County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, being shown as Lot No. 87 of Section II of Westwood Subdivision as shown on plat prepared by Piedmont Engineers and Architects, dated November 19, 1970, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Greenville County in Plat Book 4 – F at Page 48, and as shown on a more recent plat entitled “Property of John D. Brooks and Ashley L. Knight”, prepared by Freeland – Clinkscales & Associates, Inc. dated January 11, 1990 and recorded in Plat Book 18 – E at Page 4. Reference to said recent plat is hereby made for a complete metes and bounds description of the property. Tax Map # 0574.07-01-006.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

JANUARY

TOWN HAS ARRIVED! AVAILABLE IN GREENVILLE: Barnes & Noble - 735 Hawyood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals 581Perry Ave., Village of West Greenville OR ONLINE: towncarolina.com Get TOWN magazine in your mailbox every month. 12 issues $65. Subscribe today at

TOWNCarolina.com/subscribe


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January 4, 2019 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals. Visit us online at GreenvilleJournal.com

January 4, 2019 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals. Visit us online at GreenvilleJournal.com