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IN THIS ISSUE

GENTRIFICATION: THE COMEDY • HAWAII’S FAVORITE FOOD • DOGGIE PADDLING AT THE PARK

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, September 22, 2017 • Vol.19, No.38

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SHATTERED

Mandy Learo hopes Sylvia House will help addicts pick up the pieces page 16

Will Crooks / Staff

Greenville Federal Credit Union

You profit because we don’t. Join and prosper. Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join. © 2016, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Specific services, rates, and fees may vary. Member NCUA. Checking accounts and VISA debit cards are subject to credit approval.

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com

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DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | Tori Lant tlant@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES | David Rich ACCOUNT MANAGERS Donna Johnston Stephanie King | Rosie Peck Caroline Spivey | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT | Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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As a not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers members more money-saving advantages. Greenville Federal Credit Union is truly a low-cost alternative to traditional banking. We have all the products and services found at traditional banks but we are fundamentally different in that our members (account holders) are also owners. Our philosophical difference is huge - we view and treat our members as owners, not as potential sources of income. As a not-for-profit entity, our focus has always been to help our members prosper by providing money-saving advantages and reasonably priced financial services. Joining a credit union is better for you. Isn’t it time to consider joining ours?

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800.336.6309 greenvillefcu.com

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09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

POLL Was the Greenville County School District correct in canceling classes last Monday and Tuesday in response to Hurricane Irma?

Health Events Image from NOAA/CIRA

No. The reports of Irma’s ferocity were greatly exaggerated.

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THEY SAID IT

“A person might be able to name two classical composers who were known by everyone; one of them would of course be Mozart, and the other would be Beethoven. Even those who haven’t heard his music know who he is.” Edvard Tchivzhel, maestro at the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, on the decision to open the GSO’s 70th season with a Beethoven tribute concert

“I actually think cleanups can inspire people to think about the river more often in their daily lives and consider what role they play in keeping it healthy as the region continues to grow.”

Caregiving ABCs Sept. 7-Oct. 10 • 6-8 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This six-week educational series is for those caring for a loved one with a memory health condition. Free; registration required. Talk with the Docs Mon., Sept. 25 • 3:30 p.m. • Facebook Live Visit the GHS Facebook page to take part in a live discussion with our doctors on preventing and treating childhood obesity. Race for the Cure Sat., Sept. 30 • Fluor Field Join Team GHS in raising funds for breast cancer programs and research through this 5K run/walk. Register at komensouthcarolina.org. Stroke Camp Oct. 6-8 • Pleasant Ridge Camp and Retreat Center This camp for stroke survivors and their caregivers features guest speakers, crafts, entertainment and more. Fee: $125. Call (309) 688-5450 or please visit strokecamp.org. Run4Life Sat., Nov. 4 • Caine Halter YMCA Help raise funds for cancer research and support programs by participating in this 10th annual 5K run/walk. Price increases on Oct. 4, so register now at run4lifesc.org. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

Patricia Carson, executive director of Friends of the Reedy River, on a cleanup of the Reedy River last weekend that involved more than 100 volunteers

“It makes coming to work every day feel like it really means something.” Jay Briggs, director of the Warehouse Theatre’s production of “Clybourne Park,” on the timely nature of the play’s exploration of gentrification

ghs.org 17-0957GJ


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

It’s time to talk about depression and anxiety By Mimi Wyche

It still feels risky to share that for over 40 years I’ve experienced bouts of crippling depression and anxiety. I’ve sought numerous avenues to recovery, including psychotherapy, holistic medicine, macrobiotics, an array of psychotropic drugs, and off-label FDA trials. Each time I’d think, “This one will work! This is the regimen to forever turn the tide!” But relief was followed by relapse, and I’d find myself retreating farther from the swirl of normal life, feeling more deeply shamed by the stigma attached to these mental conditions. I withdrew into silence. Sadly, my story is not unusual. Depression and anxiety continue to rise in the United States today, along with the num-

Speak your mind

ber of anti-anxiety and anti-depression pharmaceuticals being prescribed. Consider how feelings of despair and helplessness have fueled the opioid crisis. Yet many still remain silent. I’ve often been approached by acquaintances that confess that they are struggling and want to talk about it – if I swear to tell no one. Thirty years ago, people who reached out for support were often rebuffed with responses like, “Count your blessings!” or “Quit worrying so much!” The subtext was clear: “Don’t feel the way you feel, and don’t talk about it!” Isn’t this often still the case? Today, despite advances in scientific research, books, movies, and television specials – all addressing the prevalence

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

and potentially devastating effects of depression and anxiety – these conditions still carry a stigma. Mental illness is exactly that: a biological illness. So why do so many continue to consider it a character flaw? The shame of not being “fine” – the fear of being blamed and labeled as lazy, immature, or “broken” – stifles the desire to open up about the problem. People in acute emotional pain will often flat-out deny it if asked. Because they are still able to function at work or in social environments, they’ll convince themselves nothing is wrong. But denial can lead to treacherous waters. Unaddressed depression and anxiety can lead to emotional collapse, even suicide. In 2016, 742 South Carolinians died by suicide. Seven hundred and forty-two human beings. How many of those deaths were preventable? Most of them, I think. For the past several years, I’ve maintained a remission and led a full, active life. Therapy, meditation, a healthy lifestyle, medications, and even hospitalization have all been critical tools in my recovery. I can tell you from my own experience that talking is where recovery begins. And though the act of talking may seem insignificant, it is powerful. It also requires courage from both parties. At times I was brave enough to initiate the conversation, but there were just as many times when I wasn’t. On those occasions, a friend or loved one had the insight and grace to insist that we talk about how I was feeling and then just listened. Here’s the thing: Letting someone talk about his or her feelings and really hearing them has a profound healing effect. Often loved ones hesitate because they feel they have no skills to help out, or fear they’ll be expected to become a therapist.

But all you have to do is simply listen. You can interject short phrases that show you’re following what’s being said. Most importantly, listen actively. Resist the urge to judge, scold, advise, or “fix.” All of these imply that you have the answer, but in reality, it isn’t necessary to fix anything, only to exhibit the compassion that allows the other person to share openly. Listening and acknowledging another’s feelings without judging is real validation, and the effect can be astonishing. I encourage us to honestly ask ourselves, “Have I unintentionally discouraged a friend or loved one from opening up about their depression or anxiety? Do I have the courage to initiate that conversation?” And I encourage anyone in the throes of depression, anxiety, or other emotional distress, to ask themselves, “Can I push past whatever stigma I fear and tell one person that I’m feeling scared, hopeless, or overwhelmed?” For me, talking has been a lifesaver – literally. It’s something each of us is capable of. Talk about it.

Mimi Wyche will be the keynote speaker at Mental Health America’s Greenville County annual luncheon on Tuesday, Oct. 10, at 11 a.m. For more information, visit mhagc.org.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

OPINION Views from your community

Are Greenville County’s growth policies adequate? By H. G. “Butch” Kirven Jr.

Increasingly, people are coming to Greenville County Council to express their frustration with the effects of largescale suburban developments on local roads, landscapes, utilities, and services. Citizens feel overwhelmed by the volume of development and by the massive scale of cutting and grading being done. People are concerned about how all this is changing their lives. Since 2010, Greenville County’s population increased by about 50,000 people. That’s another Simpsonville, Mauldin, and Travelers Rest put together. High-density residential areas are essential to meet the needs of our growing population, but they should be located where the roads can handle higher traffic volumes, utilities already exist, and sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and mixed-property uses are encouraged. Bringing infrastructure to locations where high-density developments make sense is more cost effective than the current pattern of simply building new subdivisions in the outlying areas. That pattern brings sprawl. Sprawl is caused by redundant developments expanded over areas where infrastructure is inadequate and where semi-rural and low-density neighborhoods are established. It consumes land faster and less efficiently than compact, mixed-use developments situated where adequate infrastructure and services are available. Subdivisions tend to become obsolete faster as newer developments come on line farther out. Sprawl is also more expensive for taxpayers due to the higher costs of extending utilities, roads, and services over a large area. It is detrimental to achieving cohesive and complete communities that retain their desirability generation after generation. How best can we plan for continued population growth in Greenville County? What neighborhood characteristics do people value most and want to see in new subdivisions? Is it worthwhile to help some areas retain their rural characteristics? How can we encourage a range of housing types, including affordable housing? Is it good public policy to promote

a balance of development types and land uses so that people may choose to live, work, shop, learn, and recreate more conveniently and efficiently? The county has a responsibility to help shape land-development policies attuned to the citizens’ interests and preferences. It is also in the public interest to encourage a balance of development types, because commercial and other nonresidential property taxes subsidize services provided for owner-occupied residences. Greenville County’s comprehensive plan, Imagine Greenville County, is in its eighth year. It is effectively outdated. A few area plans have been approved for certain districts and sections that reflect citizens’ preferences and interests in those areas. Area plans are a useful, but limited, tool that would be more effective when aligned with a full array of land-use policies including zoning, drainage, subdivision and land development regulations, codes, etc. Such a policy alignment has not been done in the past. It should be done going forward. Over the next two years, a new comprehensive plan will be created with public participation to focus on a vision for Greenville County out to 2030. Two years is too long to wait. If the goal is to match the public’s concerns with practical solutions to guide the development industry in meeting the demand for new housing, interim steps are needed. It may be time for a temporary moratorium on residential rezoning and new subdivision approvals to allow for immediately needed measures to be considered and adopted. The current situation is not satisfactory for citizens or builders. Much more can be done to ensure growth meets demand in ways that preserve and promote the great quality of life enjoyed here – now and into the future. That’s in everyone’s interest. H. G. “Butch” Kirven Jr. represents Greenville County Council, District 27. He is also the council chair.

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

TROUBLED WATERS

How a stormwater ordinance is preventing Spero’s Pete’s Original Too from being rebuilt WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

File photo

Spero’s Pete’s Original Too was damaged by an explosion following a flash flood and subsequently demolished.

Spero John Conits wants to rebuild Spero’s Pete’s Original Too, but he can’t. The restaurant, located at the corner of East North Street and Stone Avenue, was severely damaged by an explosion that followed a 2014 flash flood. It was subsequently demolished, and the spot has remained vacant since. Recently, Conits sought a building permit to resurrect his restaurant, but on Sept. 14 the City of Greenville’s Board of Zoning Appeals upheld a previous decision to deny him a permit because of the city’s stormwater ordinance. After the 2014 flood, the Federal Emergency Management Agency changed the designation of Conits’ property, and those surrounding it, from a floodplain to floodway. And under the city’s stormwater ordinance, construction is prohibited within a floodway. The ordinance also prohibits reconstruction of a damaged building if the damage equals greater than 50 percent of the building’s market value. While Conits contemplates his next step, the city and county are continuing to try to decrease the chances of somebody else being in Conits’ shoes – having to rebuild their lives after their homes or businesses are destroyed by a flood.

Repeat flooding

The storm that flooded the Stone Avenue and East North Street area parked over Greenville and dumped up to six inches of rain in just a few hours, causing flash floods that destroyed businesses, damaged homes, shut down part of Interstate 85 for hours, and caused the death of two people who were swept away by floodwaters. But flooding is not limited to that area of the county. In 1995, Hurricane Jerry, which by then had been downgraded to a tropical storm, drenched Greenville County with 18.9 inches of rain in 36 hours. The Brushy Creek and Gilder Creek area, which was prone to flooding during a normal heavy rain, was hit hard. Several homes in the Del Norte and Eastgate subdivisions flooded. Years later, Tropical Storm Cindy resulted in some Del Norte residents being rescued by boat after rain turned their homes and surrounding yards into islands. Del Norte and other subdivisions throughout the county were built in floodplains before tighter government regulations restricted or outlawed them outright. At one time, dredging nearby Brushy Creek was pro-

posed. Property owners in the area nixed that. The county considered floodwalls, elevating homes, and stream bank stabilizations, said Paula Gucker, the county’s public works department director, in a Federal Emergency Response Agency article on flood mitigation best practices. Some houses were so far in the floodway that the county wouldn’t be able to elevate them high enough to get them out of the water. In 2007, a property acquisition program was started in which the county would buy the properties most prone to flooding. To date, the county has purchased 179 properties totaling 92 acres. Once the homes and other structures were removed, the

RISING WATERS 10

Average number of properties purchased by Greenville County under its flood purchasing program

92

Acres returned to the floodplain in Greenville County

179

Properties acquired by Greenville County since 2007 through its program to minimize flooding

1995

Year Tropical Storm Jerry dumped 15 inches of rain on parts of Greenville County in 36 hours

15 MILLION

Dollars spent by the city on stormwater projects since 2005

properties were allowed to return to their natural state, said Greenville County spokesman Bob Mihalic. “At the beginning, the properties most prone to flood damage were put on a priority list,” Mihalic said. “We’ve seen dramatic improvement.” The benefits are twofold — the county gains green space, and the land is returned to the floodplain. Since the program started, the county purchases on average 10 properties a year and there’s a waiting list, Mihalic said.

Stormwater 2.0

Since 2005, the city has spent more than $15 million on stormwater projects in flood-prone areas of the city: the Henderson basin in the Parkins Mill area, Chick Springs, White Oaks, Broad Street, and near McAlister Square. In some areas, such as a location up from Bennett Street, flood elevations were reduced by 5 feet and quite a few houses were removed from the floodway, said Dwayne Cooper, the city’s engineering services manager. The city has also purchased one property on Karen Drive, which had repetitive flooding losses. Currently, the city is working with a consultant to formulate a new stormwater plan, dubbed “Stormwater 2.0.” As a part of Stormwater 2.0, the city is modeling Richland Creek, which runs behind Conits’ property, and other parts of the city to determine how stormwater flows, and at what volume, into the city’s streams and rivers. Development has affected flooding because there isn’t as much ground for the water to seep into. Stormwater 2.0 will look at regional detention, as well as focus on water quality, Cooper said. Stream bank erosion reduction will also be a priority. “We’re trying to slow the water down,” he said.

Plan B

Spero’s Pete’s Original Too was in compliance with regulations from the time it was built to the time of the 2014 flood, and the restaurant was destroyed through no fault of Conits, said his attorney Pat Paschal. Paschal said not being able to rebuild amounts to the regulatory taking of Conits’ property without compensation. Conits said in an email that with the BZA’s rejection of his appeal, he would go to Plan B. When asked if that meant going to court, he said it was too early to say, but a lawsuit is highly possible.


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09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS CITY

Volunteers come together to clean the Reedy River More than 100 volunteers armed with trash bags, boots, and gloves worked last Saturday morning to clean parts of the Reedy River, from the city line near Mauldin to Cleveland Park and along the banks near Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery. The cleanup effort was organized by Friends of the Reedy River, a Greenvillebased nonprofit dedicated to improving and protecting the waterway’s health. The group, which was established in 1993, holds two cleanup events annually. “The Reedy River contributes to the economic and social vitality of our city,” said Patricia Carson, executive director of Friends of the Reedy River. “Participating in a river cleanup is one way that citizens can do their part for the river we all love.” She said volunteers removed trash from 9 miles of waterways along the Reedy. One group worked behind the Caine Halter Family YMCA near downtown Greenville to remove trash and tree limbs that were impeding the river’s flow. Another group removed trash from Richland Creek, a tributary of the Reedy located in Cleveland

Park, to prepare the surrounding area for a restoration project later this month. While the exact amount of trash is still being tallied, Carson estimated several thousand pounds were cleared out of area streams. About 170 volunteers removed 3,500 pounds of trash from the river last year, according to Carson. Carson said her group’s cleanup efforts not only improve the Reedy’s water quality but also offer people a chance to get personally involved in the cleanliness of their environment. “The Reedy is an important resource to our community, but many people aren’t aware of its vulnerability to stormwater runoff and other threats,” she said. “I actually think cleanups can inspire people to think about the river more often in their daily lives and consider what role they play in keeping it healthy as the region continues to grow.” — Andrew Moore POLICE

Foundation raises money to buy attachable lights for firearms When it comes to Greenville Police officers on a nighttime call and what they need to remain safe, the math doesn’t quite add up.

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Police Chief Ken Miller said officers need three items to be safe — a radio, a gun, and a light. The problem is officers only have two hands. The newest fundraising campaign by the Greenville Police Foundation aims to help by equipping officers with lights that attach to their firearms. The foundation, launched last summer, is a nonprofit organization formed to provide the police department with grants to buy equipment, provide specialized training, and fund employee recognition programs that aren’t covered under the department’s budget. Charlotte, N.C., and Greensboro, N.C., both cities where Miller worked before coming to Greenville, have police foundations. The foundation wants to raise $40,000 to equip 160 officers with the lighting systems and holsters. It costs $250 to equip one officer. “High-risk, nighttime situations include many things happening at once – commands, covering your suspect, situational awareness, radio communication, handcuffs, and the lack of illumination,” Miller said. “There’s no time for overreaction or mistakes.” The lights will allow officers to illuminate

%

and secure their surroundings while still being able to communicate effectively, he said. Donors to the foundation may specify whether they want their contributions to fund a specific project, such as the attachable lights, or be used by the foundation to provide grants to the Greenville Police Department. Individual, business, and corporate donations made to the foundation are tax-deductible. The foundation allows the department to accelerate the implementation of safetybased initiatives. Without the foundation, it could take the department several years to purchase new safety equipment or implement new training programs. The foundation’s initial project funded officer training in crowd-control management. That initiative came after a peaceful rally in downtown Greenville in July 2016 turned contentious when protestors threatened to shut down Interstate 385. — Cindy Landrum ART

Council decommissions ‘The Path of Becoming’ sculpture “The Path of Becoming,” a piece of public art that had been on Greenville’s

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS Main Street, was a casualty of the ongoing Camperdown development on the site of the now-demolished Greenville News building. But the city will use $30,000 from the developer, Centennial American Properties, to pay for another brick sculpture by Brad Spencer, the artist who created “The Path of Becoming,” to be installed at an undetermined property. City Council has given final approval to the decommissioning of “The Path of Becoming,” which actually consisted of three sculptures – “Emerge,” “Connect,” and “Transcend” – and a path of paver bricks connecting them. The sculpture, which was located in front of where Liz Daly Designs had been located on South Main Street, could not be moved because it was specifically created for that site and the foundation was incorporated into the sidewalk. “The Path of Becoming” was installed in 2009. Sean Scoopmire, chairman of the city’s Arts in Public Places Commission, said a new site hasn’t been chosen for the new piece, which, according to the ordinance approved by City Council, will be a facsimile of the original piece. —Cindy Landrum

GIVING

Greenville hosts Michael J. Fox ride to benefit Parkinson’s research The Michael J. Fox Foundation’s annual charity Blue Ridge Tour de Fox bicycle ride is coming to Greenville later this month to help fight Parkinson’s disease. “Today’s Tour de Fox Series celebrates the energy and spirit of the Parkinson’s community by bringing together thousands of passionate fundraisers to strap on their helmets and push critical research forward,” according to a statement from the Michael J. Fox Foundation. The cycling event will take place on Saturday, Sept. 23, at Furman University. Cyclists of all levels are invited to participate in the ride, which is sponsored by Furman, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, Synterra, Swamp Rabbit Cafe, Robino’s, and Freehub Bicycles. Participating cyclists can choose from a ride of 10, 40, or 65 miles. Registration is $50 and participants are asked to raise an additional $200 before the ride. All of the event’s proceeds will go to organizations that are working to create treatments and cures for Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder that affects a person’s

HEIT’S RE ! Four days of great eats including Bratwurst, Sauerbraten and Pretzels! Look for live music, games, contests, lots of German beer, and an authentic Bavarian biergarten on North Main Street.

Education That Lasts a Lifetime

Nutrition for a Healthy Family Monday, September 11 at 6 p.m. Learn how to keep the family healthy despite busy schedules and picky eaters. Brief cooking demo and tasting included!

Pre-diabetes and Insulin Resistance Tuesday, September 12 at 6 p.m. Find out what these terms mean for your health and learn ways to prevent the onset of diabetes.

Nicotine Cessation and Management Monday, September 18 at 5:30 p.m. Get acquainted with our QuitSmart® program which combines several effective methods to produce a potent stop-smoking treatment.

Stress Management Monday, September 25 at 6 p.m. Learn techniques for managing everyday stress and gain a new, healthier perspective.

Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for more details! @NOMASquare #NOMAOktoberfest

HealthyU education classes are free and are held at St. Francis Millennium. Please call 864-400-3651 to register.

OCT. 5-8, 2017 nomasquare.com/Oktoberfest

presented by


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS ability to easily and effectively control body movement. The Michael J. Fox Foundation, which was founded in 2000, is named for the popular star of “Back to the Future” and “Family Ties.” Fox publicly disclosed his personal diagnosis of Parkinson’s in the late 1990s. The organization launched its charity cycling series in 2015. The event has since brought in nearly $2.5 million for Parkinson’s research. For more information, visit tourdefox.michaeljfox.org/ blueridge. —Andrew Moore

United Way announces $17M fundraising goal for Greenville County United Way of Greenville County hopes to raise $17 million during its 2017 campaign to support various nonprofits and their community programs, officials recently announced. “We’re frequently recognized as one of the best places to live in America. But our goal during this campaign season is to make sure that is true for all of our neighbors, because we know too well that not every citizen in our community has access to the same Greenville,” said Kurt Rozelsky, campaign

chairman and partner with Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP. The fundraising goal was announced last week during the organization’s annual kickoff event at the TD Convention Center. The amount is the same as last year’s goal, which has eluded the organization for the past three years. The total raised in 2014 was $16.6 million. In 2015, the campaign raised $16.7 million – the highest ever in the organization’s history, as well as the largest amount raised by a United Way organization in South Carolina. It then raised $16.5 million last year. Rozelsky said 33 pacesetter companies, including United Way and its partner agencies, have already turned in more than $3.9 million in employee pledges, or 22 percent of the overall campaign goal. Four of those companies – Fluor Corporation, Greenville Health System, Michelin North America, and Greenville County Schools – have raised nearly $2.3 million combined. The campaign will conclude on Oct. 31, with a final report scheduled for Nov. 19. Last year, the initiative helped more than 100,000 people in key areas such as life essentials, school readiness, high school graduation, and financial stability, according to the United Way. —Andrew Moore

BEETHOVEN THE GREAT Featuring Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony An all-Beethoven concert featuring the mighty “Emperor” Piano Concerto performed by Dmitri Levkovich, as well as one of the most powerful and popular works, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

September 23 at 8:00 p.m. September 24 at 3:00 p.m. Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor The Peace Center Reserve your seats before it sells out. For tickets call 864-467-3000 or purchase online at greenvillesymphony.org.


NEW

ING LIST

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2-4 PRICE NEW UNDAY NS OPE

ING LIST

1000 McElhaney Drive Travelers Rest • $999,690

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D BRAN

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HENIGAN LANE • Lot 3 • North Main • $175,609 HENIGAN LANE • Lot 4 • North Main • $175,609 HENIGAN LANE • LOT 5 • North Main • $225,609 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 27 • $239,605 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 26 • $209,605 ACADIA • 229 Saluda Run Dr. • $99,673

www.jha-sothebysrealty.com 502 Summitbluff Drive Poplar Forest • $264,617 Jackson Herlong 313-2520

Each office independently owned and operated.


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Putting the

Back Together With Sylvia House, Mandy Learo hopes to reduce the number of relapses WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Greenville’s Mandy Learo spent more than 10 years battling drug addiction and alcoholism. Now, four years after getting clean and sober, she is on a mission to help others experience a life free of substance abuse. Learo, a yoga instructor, plans to open a transitional living facility for women who are in the early stages of recovery from drug addiction and alcoholism. “The first months of sobriety are the most difficult for recovering drug addicts and alcoholics,” Learo said. “Sylvia House will provide a temporary living space and structured program that helps addicted women not only maintain their sobriety but gradually integrate back into society once they’ve completed detox treatment.” Sylvia House will focus on women, because they face more challenges during the early stages of recovery, according to Learo. Some studies, for instance, show women actually tend to crave drugs more often than men and relapse at higher rates after treatment. Learo said her house will be more effective in combating addiction than sober living homes and other recovery facilities, because Sylvia House will offer longer periods of treatment and a wide variety of services, including nutritional, emotional, and therapeutic support. “Some studies show longer periods of support and treatment increase the chances of long-term sobriety,” Learo said. “But many sober living homes and halfway houses provide nothing more than a temporary bed, weekly drug test, and transportation to AA and NA meetings. I think that lack of continued support in these facilities is why we’re seeing high relapse rates.” Learo is familiar with the struggle to find an adequate recovery program. In 2009, after completing a detox treatment for heroin addiction, Learo relocated to a sober living home in South Florida but relapsed after 30 days. She then lived in five more halfway houses before 2010. While she eventually kicked her addiction to heroin, Learo became an alcoholic and spent years in treatment centers and even a psychiatric floor. In 2013, she entered a treatment center for a Vicodin detox and spent a year in 12-step meetings to get sober. Since then, Learo has watched drug overdoses continue to ravage the United States, as opioids push the death count higher. Drug overdoses killed 64,000 people in the United States last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s an increase of more than 22 percent compared with the 52,404 drug deaths recorded in 2015. Opioid abuse has also been on the rise nationwide. More than 29,000 people died from opioid overdoses last year. Comparatively, nearly 34,000 died in car crashes. In South Carolina, Greenville County is the epicenter of opioid-related deaths. In 2015, 71 people died from opioid overdoses, rivaling the number of lives lost in wrecks. The year before, 65 people in Greenville County died from opioid overdoses — nearly twice the number that died in Charleston, Lexington, or Richland counties. But despite the rapid growth of overdose deaths, the treatment industry remains highly unregulated and saturated with corrupt or illegitimate facilities, according to Learo.

COMMUNITY “As our county and our region battle an unprecedented opioid problem, the options for long-term support are not meeting the need,” she said. “Sylvia House aims to help fill that need.” Learo said a key goal is to help recovering addicts learn self-discipline and self-care. She added that many people who have suffered from addiction don’t have the skills or coping mechanisms to achieve full independence when they complete treatment. For example, recovering addicts usually have trouble with everyday tasks such as eating breakfast or waking up with an alarm, according to Learo. While these tasks seem simple, recovering addicts have to relearn the basics of practical functioning.

“Some studies show longer periods of support and treatment increase the chances of long-term sobriety. But many sober living homes and halfway houses provide nothing more than a temporary bed, weekly drug test, and transportation to AA and NA meetings.” “Addicts usually get out of treatment with the capabilities of a teenager,” Learo said. “It’s our job to get them back on their feet.” Learo is also working with a registered dietitian to prepare a nutrition program that helps residents adopt healthier diets and regular fitness routines. When using drugs or alcohol, addicts can experience suppressed appetites, forget to eat while under the influence, and choose substance abuse over their diets, according to Learo. Drugs and alcohol also prevent the body from properly absorbing nutrients, which can oftentimes lead to malnourishment. “We’re going to provide all meals and a nutrientdense diet to heal the long-term effects of addiction,” said Learo. “We’re also going to provide in-house yoga and fitness classes to help our residents enjoy the benefits of exercise.” Sylvia House will also work with residents to address underlying psychological barriers to recovery. Learo said psychological issues, such as anxiety and depression, can emerge when drugs and alcohol are no longer available to cover them up. And when those underlying issues go untreated and unchecked, they can lead to relapse.

Learo has recruited a clinical psychologist to hold inhouse therapy sessions twice a week for both individuals and groups. Sylvia House will also provide access to 12-step programs and work with residents to develop a spiritual practice, according to Learo. “I think spirituality is an important component to recovery, but our program won’t focus on a particular religion. It’s not our job to tell people what to think or feel,” Learo said. “I believe someone who’s not comfortable in a church service may find it more enjoyable to be in nature and connect with a higher power there instead.” Sylvia House will accommodate at least 10 women at a time, according to Learo. Women who enroll at the facility will be able to stay there for up to nine months. Learo said the house will be wired with cameras for monitoring, and residents will have house rules, which they’ll agree to by signing a contract. If a resident does relapse and chooses to use drugs or alcohol, they will be asked to leave the facility. “It is of paramount importance to protect the community in a sober living environment and to ensure to the best of our ability a drug- and alcohol-free zone. We will have a zero-tolerance policy for relapse,” Learo said. “A woman can return to Sylvia House after a coolingoff period during which time she could complete another detox if needed or in some other way show recommitment to recovery. This would have to be determined on a case-by-case basis,” she added. For funding, Learo has launched a crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo to raise $60,000. The funds will be used to acquire a rental house as well as pay for staff salaries, utilities, furniture, and other essentials. But the campaign, which ends in October, has only raised $13,000 to date. “I’d like for the house to be community supported,” Learo said. “But I’m more than prepared to seek out startup capital from a socially conscious investor or take out a loan from the bank if I don’t meet my funding goal.” Learo plans to search for a physical location in Greenville once the campaign ends. The house is expected to open by summer 2018, according to Learo. But it will not be a nonprofit. Instead, Learo plans to structure the business as a social venture. “There are numerous nonprofits in Greenville that focus on supporting people in recovery,” she said. “I don’t want to compete against them for government grants or resources. Sylvia House will rely on monthly resident fees.” Learo said rates aren’t yet finalized, but residents can expect to pay at least $2,000 a month for the facility’s services, which include transportation and career counseling. The profits will be used to improve the facility and offer additional services, according to Learo. Sylvia House will also use a portion of its profits to award a yearly scholarship to one resident and to aid other Greenville organizations that are helping addicts in early recovery. “For me, this is not about money, but about providing a service in the Greenville area that is deeply needed,” Learo said.


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COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

WASHINGTON CENTER

SOUTH CAROLINA GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL

Donated book helps teach positivity

Schools host informational meeting

Students began the year with a focus on positivity, caring for others, and overcoming adversity by sharing concepts from “The Energy Bus for Kids” book by Jon and Noah Gordon. The book was purchased for every class thanks to donations from a Donor’s Choose grant. Songs, crafts, and projects were enjoyed through this school-wide literacy theme.

The South Carolina Governor’s School for Science & Mathematics (GSSM) and the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) are hosting a joint information session for prospective students and their families on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. at Hughes Main Library, Meeting Room B, 25 Heritage Green Place. This joint information session is designed for students and parents who are interested in learning more about GSSM and SCGSAH’s two-year, public, residential high schools for gifted and talented juniors and seniors interested in pursuing advanced studies in STEM disciplines or the arts. RSVP to attend at scgsah.org/governors-schools.php.

GREENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

School announces spirit week total

CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

Seniors announced as National Merit semifinalists

Pamela Dunlap / Provided

On Sept. 15, Greenville High School announced they had raised a total of $170,595 during their 2017 Spirit Week competition for their charity beneficiary, SYNNEX Corporation. Share the Magic provides funding for Upstate children facing incredible challenges, such as life-threatening illnesses, abuse, neglect, or developmental delays. The four beneficiaries are A Child’s Haven, Clement’s Kindness, Make-A-Wish South Carolina, and Pendleton Place. Greenville High School competed in a friendly rivalry against J.L. Mann. The schools held a series of fundraising events to raise money for their respective charities.

Our Community

Four seniors have qualified as National Merit semifinalists for the 2018 National Merit Scholarship Competition. They are Cliff Gandis, Marion Geary, Noah Matricciani, and Paula Pieper. These semifinalists will now have the opportunity to continue in the competition for 7,500 National Merit Scholarships worth more than $32 million that will be offered next spring. Three of the semifinalists have attended CCES since their primer (K5) year and one arrived as a freshman for a total of 39 cumulative years attending CCES. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Community news, events, and happenings

PHILANTHROPY

Commerce Club charity classic raises $45,000 Commerce Club, a member of the ClubCorp family of clubs, has announced that its 2017 Charity Classic Gala raised more than $45,000. All proceeds are donated equally to the three charity beneficiaries: A Child’s Haven, ALS Augie’s Quest, and ClubCorp’s Employee Partner Care Foundation. Commerce Club’s board of governors was the presenting sponsor this year. Other sponsors include Bank of Travelers Rest, Bryon

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Culbertson of Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner Commercial Division, Find Great People, Fluor, Greenville Technical College, Premo Ventures, and Saulsbury Industries. In 2016, the annual ClubCorp Charity Classic raised more than $3 million nationwide for ALS Augie’s Quest and other deserving charities. Locally, the Commerce Club raised more than $40,000 last year. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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HOME

Featured Home

Montebello

120 Sorrento Drive, Greenville, SC 29609

Home Info Price: $1,400,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4/2 Lot Size: 1.36 Acres

MLS#: 1352279 Sq. Ft: 5600-5799

Schools: Summit Drive Elementary, Sevier Middle, and Wade Hampton High Agent: Sharon Wilson | 864.918.1140 sharon@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

One look will do! Make the discovery of the beauty, warmth, and value this stunning property offers. Situated on an exceptionally landscaped 1.36 acres with amazing mountain views, only a short drive to Downtown Greenville. Custom designed from the inside out! No detail was spared. 4 bedrooms all en suite, 2 half baths,open floor plan, two-story kitchen and living room with exposed wood beams and oak wood floors throughout. The kitchen boasts large center island with copper vegetable sink, under counter lighting, six burner gas range, built in refrigerator,

wine cooler and double wall oven. Master suite on main level with double vanity, walk-in stone and tile shower, and his and her custom closets. Gue st suite also on main floor. Lower level features a recreation room, pool table room, 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, great potential for in-law suite or au pair. Explore the garden and charming stone garden shed with patio and fireplace. Three carriage style garages with separate fourth garage at rear of house. Very attractive home! Schedule your appointment today.


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPEN HOUSE & COMMUNITY TOUR!

HOME : On the market Cobblestone • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Claremont • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

101 Ramsford Lane · $859,000 · MLS# 1348744

23 Rolleston Drive · $779,500 · MLS# 1343817

6BR/5BA Priced below most recent appraisal! Family dream home positioned on .76 acres. Guest suite and master on main. Must see! Roper Mountain to right on Brixton Circle. Right on Ramsford.

5BR/4BA Beautiful home in the gated community of Claremont. Master on main plus guest suite. 3-car garage with custom built-ins. Roper Mountain towards Hwy 14. Right into Claremont.

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Contact: Sharon Wilson 918-1140 Wilson Associates

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theridgesatparismountain.com Conservus Realty provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetics. In addition to federal law requirements, [Company Name] complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.

Real Estate News

Coldwell Banker Caine Names August Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from August through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s Team efforts listed below. Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/closed units include: Jane McCutcheon Pam Hall Alicia Waynick Jennifer Simms Philip Ziganto Andrew Little Jennifer Wilson Rhonda Kirby Ben Stoudenmire Rhonda Porter Pat Loftis and Brett Smagala JoAnn Williams Joel Deweese Ryan Rosenfeld Charlianne Nestlen Jordan Corbett Sharon Tootell Donna Morrow Kathy Harris Shay Felknor Eva Sandfort Kiersten Bell Shelbie Dunn Francie Little Heather Durbin Kristi Moon Spencer Ashby Heidi Putnam Linda Wood Tracy Bogie Helen Hagood Lindsay Blanton Trey Boiter Hilary Hurst Lori Hope Wanda Stewart Jacob Mann Lori Thompson Jake Dickens Maggie Worsham Circle of Excellence Groups (2-3 agents) achieving $1.5 million in listing/closing volume or six units listed/closed include: Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group Lewis & Company

Andrew Brashier Joins the Simpsonville Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Andrew Brashier has joined the company’s Simpsonville office as a sales associate. From the start of his professional life, Brashier has had a passion for helping others. After beginning a successful career in law enforcement and earning a Master’s degree, he turned that passion to education as a college instructor. In 2011, Brashier transitioned to a new career in franchising and discovered a love for business. He Brashier was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to play a large part in building a virtually unknown company into one of the fastest growing franchises in the world. Brashier is honored to have the opportunity to take the same drive and passion and turn that into helping others find the home of their dreams. “Drew comes to BHHS with a vast array of business knowledge and zeal. His business background will certainly enhance his skills in his new venture,” said Matthew


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

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HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Aug. 21 – 25, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$8,338,095 PELHAM DAVIS PARK $1,961,904 $1,940,000 $1,040,000 $925,000 COLONIAL ESTATES $883,000 CHANTICLEER $860,000 MCBEE STATION RESIDENTIAL $740,000 J.D. LANDFORD $635,000 $602,500 $600,000 CHANTICLEER $595,324 BELLS MEADOW $584,000 ROCKWOOD PARK $582,500 SPAULDING FARMS $577,500 SPAULDING FARMS $577,500 WEATHERSTONE $509,900 TUXEDO PARK $500,000 ALLEGHENY $500,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $499,939 GOWER ESTATES $479,000 TERRA WOODS $474,900 RIVER OAKS $474,000 SUNSET HILLS $465,000 GOWER ESTATES $463,900 SUGAR CREEK $462,500 $442,500 CLEAR SPRINGS $442,000 STONEHAVEN $428,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE AT HOLLINGSWORTH $427,827 $425,000 HIGHGROVE $423,500 FOREST HEIGHTS $422,050 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $407,330 GROVE PARK $405,000 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $403,540 SADDLEHORN $396,487 SYCAMORE RIDGE $396,000 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $392,381 WATERS RUN $391,615 $390,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE AT HOLLINGSWORTH $389,905 $372,000 CYPRESS RUN $369,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $361,029 TUSCANY FALLS $359,900 MARES HEAD FARM $359,629 WESTHAVEN $358,421 WESTHAVEN $356,185 SADDLEHORN $355,694 DEVENGER POINTE $352,000 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $350,000 $350,000 WILLIE H. MARTIN $348,500 VERDMONT $347,000 WALDREPS ACRES $345,800 CLEVELAND RIDGE $344,000 CARRONBRIDGE $337,975 GREYTHORNE $335,000

GREENVILLE-PELHAM AT HYL SOMERA INTERSTATE SOUTH MAR DEVELOPMENT INC KINDBERG B LEE REVOCABLE 10 STAG STREET LLC MOSELEY KATHLEEN D BELL NICOLE S HILE SCOTT PHIFER JAMES R (JTWROS) SKINNER DWAIN MARY MARTIN LIMITED PART COLEMAN DEBORAH CHEEK (J PALMETTO TRUST OF SC LLC LANGLEY ASHLEY G (JTWROS FAHEY MARIE T (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WINKLER KIMBERLY A (JTWR SMITH PENNEY M (JTWROS) GODLEY WILLIAM TYLER MUNGO HOMES INC LKC PROPERTIES LLC HANNAH JAMES L (JTWROS) GROUT VICTOR K (JTWROS) SWIGER JAMES W JR (JTWRO T&C VENTURE PROPERTIES L FLANAGAN JAY ARCH JR LAROCCA-CAROLL JUNE HAWKINS MARK (JTWROS) AARDEMA CHARLES M (JTWRO NVR INC T J BLAIR LLC KOLPATZIK BERT O (JTWRO BRINSON CALLAWAY W (JTWR NVR INC VESTERBY FAMILY TRUST TH D R HORTON INC SADDLE HORN LLC DILL DEBORAH P D R HORTON INC NVR INC JACKSON LINNIE NVR INC ROOF NANCY K CUNNINGHAM JENNIFER W ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GREEN DAVID W (JTWROS) DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC SADDLE HORN LLC CRICHTON DAVID D IV DEMILIO DANIEL R HOYT LESLIE A (JTWROS) GILLIAM JOHN BENJAMIN DUNN MICHELLE L REVOC TR BLAKELY TERRY A MARSHALL DIANE B NVR INC ROBERTS BOBBY L JR (JTWR

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GERBER PELHAM REALTY LLC GERBER PELHAM REALTY LLC GARLINGTON INVESTORS LLC BRLP GREER LLC SKANTAG LLC HOWELL JAMES W JOHNSTON ERIN (JTWROS) LINCOLN DONALD ROBERT (J KENNEDY JAMES HAMMETT JACOB A (JTWROS) FAIRVIEW PARK ILF LP SWIGER JAMES W (JTWROS) CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC THOMPSON ANDREW J (JTWRO NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO HAWKINS MARK A BOLD JESSICA M DODGE JERRELD WAYNE II ( GODLEY RICHARD A SR SMITH SCOTT ELLIOTT (JTW AYERS WHITNEY (JTWROS) ROBINSON JAMES P (JTWROS TERRY BENJAMIN S (JTWROS BRENNAN ASHLEY P (JTWROS BOYD ELLEN FRANCES (JTWR HENNESSY KATHRYN L (JTWR MOSELEY EDWARD H PRITCHETT GINA CHRISTINE DILL DEBORAH PYFROM (JTW DESAI GINGER (JTWROS) MESSNER KIMBER E (JTWROS HARDEN JAMES R (JTWROS) CARRINGTON SARAH PATTON KORNACKI MEAGEN P (JTWRO KAKOURAS SHEENA D (JTWRO KORNAROS FAMILY TRUST KELLETT MARY ANN (JTWROS GEER SARA CRISTINA (JTWR BEIBER RAYMOND O (JTWROS COVERDALE LEE JAMES (JTW MACEK ASHLEY ANNE (JTWRO ELLISON BEVERLY W (JTWRO CWB GROUP LLC BIGGER KAREN GRAY DEANNA M (JTWROS) VICKERY AARON AIELLO DEBORAH HAWKINSON FREDERICK N (J SON JONG SUH AGNEW AMANDA (JTWROS) OLIVER SUSAN T CRUVER PATRICIA L (JTWRO KLINE LARRY L NICOLOPULOS GINA M SHARP DENNIS W (JTWROS) CAMPOS LUIS MIGUEL BRAVO PRESTO VINCENT JOHN GRAY KAREN S (JTWROS) NAJI KRISTI (JTWROS)

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SAVANNAH $334,000 CREEKWOOD $333,900 $332,500 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $329,847 $326,500 WEST FARM $325,000 BRIDGEWATER $320,000 CARILION $304,900 ASHETON LAKES $301,100 $300,000 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $295,320 SILVERLEAF $295,000 BELSHIRE $288,133 KELLEY FARMS $287,500 COVENTRY $285,251 SUNSSET HILLS $285,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $285,000 $285,000 WOOD BRIDGE $285,000 $282,900 COPPER CREEK $282,500 PEBBLECREEK $280,000 WETHERILL PARK $278,000 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $277,216 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $274,328 COPPER CREEK $270,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $265,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $265,000 COVENTRY $264,961 BOTANY WOODS $260,000 HERITAGE CREEK $259,000 LONGLEAF $250,000 HUNTERS PLACE $248,000 LONGLEAF $245,990 STONEWYCK $245,000 CROFTSTONE COMMONS $245,000 WOODSIDE $241,494 WESTMORELAND CIRCLE $241,000 COTTAGES AT NEELY $239,281 $239,000 ORCHARD FARMS ARBOR WALK $237,700 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $236,490 THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL $236,417 COVENTRY $236,218 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $235,095 CREEKWOOD $235,000 MOORCROFT $232,500 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $232,400 $230,000 HERITAGE LAKES $230,000 POPLAR FOREST $229,000 GRAY FOX RUN $227,000 $225,000 FOX TRACE $222,500 DEVENGER PLACE $221,000 WATERMILL $220,713 $220,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $219,382 MEADOWBROOKE $215,000

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KENNEDY LOUIS L JR (JTWR LAFORGE ANTHONY ALAIN DA PRENTISS AVENUE PRODUCTI JONES DEBORAH A (JTWROS) GRAY STEPHEN C STAGLIANO JOHN A (JTWROS DICKSON JASON WESLEY (JT KELLER RODNEY M DELOACH ROBERT SCOTT HOLLAND J DARRYL HURLBUT CAROLYN C (JTWRO HOLLAND WILSON GLENN (JT HORTON TOMMY J (JTWROS) ROSELLE JOSEPH NEAL III FINDLAY JULIA L (JTWROS) POUCH GRACE P (JTWROS) SEIDENBERG EMANUEL KNUDSEN PETER M MERVOSH CECILIA (JTWROS) BURRESS EMILY M (JTWROS) ALLEN ERIK A BARBARE LAVERNE (JTWROS) MILLER BENJAMIN NEWELL VINAS CHRISTINA M NOLAN MICHELLE A HUFFMAN COREY D (JTWROS) NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM HOGAN ADAM MONAGHAN MARGARET ANNE WALLS LINDSEY MCDONALD CHRISTOPHER ROB FOSTER RICHARD S II BRUCALIERE ELIZABETH A ( VEGA-HAWKINS CARMEN L MARTIN-BROWN STEPHANIE L GERHARD DAVID SIDNEY (JT DINH NHU ELLIOTT KEVIN C KAIB NOREEN M (JTWROS) COOK EMILY A JMG CAPITAL MANAGEMENT L GRAY MICHELLE (JTWROS) STILES TALETHA C JEFFCOAT ANNE-JACKSON C MULLEY EMANUEL G (JTWROS ZAPF CAMERON A (JTWROS) JOYE CARSON L (JTWROS) COSTANZO NICHOLAS A HARGROVE ANNE MCINTYRE MARTINS LEWIS J GRANGER ELAINE SIKKELEE BAIRD M PSALM 127 LLC HOUSER JAMES D (JTWROS) HERLUGSON GRACE (JTWROS) DAVIS JEFFERY W (JTWROS) POMALES JOSE A PLUM JANE M IRREVOCABLE HALL ROBERT L

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Real Estate News continued Thrift, Broker-In-Charge of the Simpsonville office. through the intricate process of setting up, managing and marketing their company As a Simpsonville native, he has a thorough knowledge of all the Upstate has to of- websites. He then transitioned into a career as a private investigator servicing South fer. Brashier is an avid craftsman and self-published author, and his favorite times are Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia, where he specialized in insurance fraud cases. spent making memories with his wife and two little boys. LaLonde is now a licensed real estate agent who services Greenville and Spartanburg County, South Carolina with both buying and selling of residential property. He Andrew LaLonde Joins the Boiling Springs Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors believes in integrity, honesty, hard work, ethical dealings and building a solid foundation with his clients for a long lasting relationship. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is LaLonde’s love for his community and the people within in it shows through his pleased to announce that Andrew LaLonde has joined the company’s previous experiences. He volunteers with the Greenville County Parks to maintain the Boiling Springs office as a sales associate. community. In his free time he loves to hike in the surrounding areas and take in all LaLonde grew up in Muskegon, Michigan and began a career as a beauty the upstate of South Carolina has to offer. paramedic, working both in Emergency Rooms and in the field upon  “Andrew joins our company with a background as a paramedic and private investihis graduation from Baker Business College. He thrived helping othgator. His desire for honesty, integrity, and ethical dealings will surely benefit his cliers in the community. ent and customer relationships,” said Matthew Thrift, Broker-In-Charge of the Boiling LaLonde After moving to Greenville, South Carolina in 2005, LaLonde began Springs office. a career as an interactive project manager guiding numerous clients


feast

ALOHA POKE WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Hawaii’s favorite raw fish treat comes to Greenville

Chances are, if you know the difference between ceviche and crudo or tartare and carpaccio, you didn’t learn that at the local meat ‘n’ three. Raw proteins – whether it’s ceviche crudo, tartare, or carpaccio – are often relegated to the fine-dining category in our part of the world for a variety of reasons. For starters, if you want to serve it raw, you have to seek out higher-quality ingredients, which mean a higher price. Another is simply a matter of exposure: Raw animal proteins are not a regular part of the average Southern diet. Still, the times, they are a’changing. Today, there’s one raw treat that’s currently making it big on the casual dining scene – poke. Similar in pronunciation to “okay,” poke is a Hawaiian favorite featuring cubes of raw ahi tuna, salmon, or octopus placed on sushi rice and topped with soy sauce,

sesame oil, chilies, seaweed, and, occasionally, vegetables. Think of it as deconstructed sushi in a bowl. And what started out as a simple snack for fishermen – who has better access to fresh seafood, after all? – has become one of the hottest dishes across the nation. Currently, poke is a regular menu item at a handful of area restaurants – Happy + Hale, Takosushi, and Bonefish Grill, for instance – and part of a rotating menu at Golden Brown & Delicious and The Anchorage. Spartanburg landed its own poke-focused joint, Pokenori, a few months back, but Greenville is still lacking in that area. But not for long. Greenville’s first all-poke restaurant, Poke Bros., will open at 3935 Pelham Road in about a month, says Braden McGlone, digital marketing manager with Signal Interactive Inc., who handles communications

for the Columbus, Ohio-based chain. Poke Bros. currently has two locations in the Columbus area, as well as two in the Columbia, S.C., area. The chain was founded in 2015 by T.J. Wellman, Scott McCarthy, and Xuegong Chen, all of whom had been involved in the seafood industry for years and had previously opened Asian bistros in Ohio. They discovered poke during a trip to California, and with their industry connections, it wasn’t long before they launched Poke Bros., bringing in fresh fish every day to the Midwest. “There isn’t a whole lot of seafood here,” McGlone says about the Columbus area. Poke Bros. creates its own sauces and marinades that range from mild to spicy, and all of its bowls are customizable. There’s even tofu and chicken options. “You always have that one friend or family member who won’t do seafood,” McGlone says, explaining that

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feast

G N I R U T A E F E T I R O V S A U F P N O T A I C I A O W R A O H , N A O S I M L A S Y , POKE O A S N U H T T I I W H A D E W P A P R O F T CUBES O SUSHI RICE AND , SEAWEED, N S E O I L D I E H C C A , L I PL O . E S E M L A B S A E T S E G E V , Y SAUCE, L L A N O I S A C C AND, O

Happy + Hale’s ahi poke bowl ($10.95) with raw ahi, avocado, sticky rice, sliced scallion, tuxedo sesame, ginger wasabi, and citrus ponzu dressings

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

the founders are tuned in to customer feedback. The proteins are tuna, salmon, octopus, and grilled shrimp, while additional toppings include jalapeños, edamame, cucumber, avocado, seaweed, green onion, and masago (bright orange roe). In the meantime, however, if you’re new to poke and want to give it a shot before the new store opens, there are some options. Located across the street from Falls Park, Happy + Hale offers an ahi poke bowl ($10.95) with raw ahi, avocado, sticky rice, sliced scallion, tuxedo sesame, ginger wasabi, and citrus ponzu dressings. As with most H+H menu items, the bowl can be customized with less rice for the carb conscious, additional mixed greens, and extra sauce. You can even substitute tofu for the tuna. Takosushi, 34 S. Main St., has an ahi poke ($11) appetizer. It’s served on a plate with red onions, scallions, sesame oil, soy sauce, salt, and pepper over rice with strings of rutabaga and beet as a salad. For a locally owned option, keep a social media eye on GB&D and The Anchorage. You never know when poke may show up on the rotation, but both are worth a last-minute change of dinner plans.

09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23


OCTOBER 13, 14 & 15

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ARTS & CULTURE ‘FUN HOME’ IS NOT JUST A TONY AWARD-WINNING MUSICAL; IT’S A STORY FOR OUR TIMES page

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MEET THE RESIDENTS OF ‘CLYBOURNE PARK’ page

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BEETHOVEN THE GOAT page

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(From L) Carly Gold as Small Alison, Luké Barbato Smith as Christian and Henry Boshart as John in ‘Fun Home’ Photo Joan Marcus.

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CULTURE

TRUE TO LIFE An exploration of gentrification in ‘Clybourne Park’ hits close to home in Greenville EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

out rehearsals – is what the concept of progress means to a community. “It’s a very personal thing for people,” he says. “Not just for the people that are possibly being displaced from their homes they’ve been in forever or seeing their neighborhoods change in a way they disagree with, but even for someone who reads the paper and says, ‘Man, why are they complaining? These construction companies and developers are doing something good.’ So it’s full of blind spots.” Briggs hopes the production will help “further complicate” some of the tough questions the Greenville community faces today. “I don’t think it’s necessarily our job as artists to provide easy answers to these complex questions. I think it’s our job to make them human and to sort of… create an opportunity to put a human face to perhaps the other side of the argument you haven’t considered,” he says. “And I hope that sort of leads us to take a look at our own motivations, our own personal connections to the issues, and what we might be bringing to the table.”

epietras@communityjournals.com

Greenville’s unprecedented growth has sparked debate regarding affordable housing and gentrification, and the Warehouse Theatre is preparing to tackle the latter issue head-on in its production of Bruce Norris’ “Clybourne Park.” The play, written as a spinoff to Lorraine Hansberry’s 1959 drama “A Raisin in the Sun,” is set before and after the events of Hansberry’s work. Act I takes place in 1959, when a white couple is preparing to sell their house to the neighborhood’s first black family. But during a time of racial strife, not everyone approves of the impending sale. Circumstances are reversed in Act II, set in 2009, when a white couple wants to purchase the same home, now located in a predominately black neighborhood on the verge of gentrification. The couple’s plan to demolish and rebuild the property leads to tension-filled encounters with members of the neighborhood’s housing board. For director Jay Briggs, one of the highlights of his involvement in the production has been that “Clybourne Park” is a work that “feels relevant” to Greenville right now. “It makes coming to work every day feel like it really means something,” he says. But bringing Norris’ script to the stage hasn’t come without its challenges. “Anytime you’re going to deal with a topic or subject matter that has the potential to be very personal, as well as being very topical, that can potentially bring some things into the rehearsal room that can be challenging to deal with. And I think we’ve been doing a nice job of setting the right tone as a group,” Briggs says. That “Clybourne Park” is also a comedy dealing with hot-button issues adds another layer of complexity. Malikah McHerrin-Cobb, who plays Francine, a housekeeper, in Act I, and Lena, a member of the housing board, in Act II, says the play’s humor can help inspire further dialogue outside of the theater. “We make light of the subject because it is a truth, and comedy is another tactic to get underneath the things that we are saying,” she says. “I think audiences will be able to take away an honesty about what is happening in real life instead of masking these feelings and pretending like everything is OK.”

“CLYBOURNE PARK” Photo by Andrea Johnson

(from left, clockwise) Shea Stevens (Albert), Miranda Barnett (Bev), and J. Richey Nash (Russ) in the Warehouse Theatre’s production of “Clybourne Park”

Brock Coontz, who plays Karl, a neighbor who resents that the house is being sold to a black family, in Act I, and Steve, the husband who wants to buy the house, in Act II, says he hopes “Clybourne Park” will lead the audience to reflect on their own viewpoints. “I think it’d be a huge success if people were to leave the show being able to pull back the veil on their own values and perceptions and do a little personal assessment of, ‘Okay, do I have blind spots, growing up where I grew up, living where I live? Have I really recognized what my intentions are, opinions are?’” he says. “Because I don’t doubt that someone is going to sit there and recognize the fact that they’ve said some of these lines before.” “People come in with their opinions and defensiveness – because of the language, because of the topic – but I think seeing yourself in each of these characters or just noticing how you act behind closed doors

says a lot about how we can solve some of these problems,” McHerrin-Cobb adds. Coontz says that one of the chief questions “Clybourne Park” asks – and something the cast has grappled with through-

NEXT-DOOR NEIGHBORS

WHEN Sept. 22–Oct. 8; showtimes vary WHERE Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St. TICKETS $35 INFO warehousetheatre.com/clybourne-park

The Warehouse Theatre is intertwining its production of “Clybourne Park” with a two-part forum series focusing on Greenville’s recent growth and development. The first event, titled The Ups and Downs of the Development Vision of Greenville Through the Years, was scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 6:30 p.m. Part two, The Effects of Gentrification on the Community of Greenville, will be held Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 6:30 p.m. Scheduled panelists include Darian Blue, senior pastor at Nicholtown Missionary Baptist Church; Don Oglesby, president/CEO of Homes of Hope; and Ivory Mathews, executive director of Greenville Housing Authority. Jason Johnson, managing director of the Warehouse Theatre, says they hope to secure an additional panelist “whose occupation is focused on development in Greenville.” Both forums are free, open to the public, and held at the Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St. —Emily Pietras


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CULTURE

CROWD PLEASER GSO opens season with Beethoven tribute, return of soloist Dmitri Levkovich VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

When Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel, conductor and artistic director of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, began planning the opening performance of the orchestra’s 2017-18 season, he knew he wanted to do something big. After all, this is the GSO’s 70th season, and a milestone like that deserves something powerful, passionate, and, above all else, crowd-pleasing. That’s what the Maestro needed, and there was only one name that came to mind: Ludwig Von Beethoven. “Beethoven was very unique in terms of his intelligence and power, and the many obstacles he overcame,” Tchivzhel says. “All his life he fought adversity, and he had a desire for freedom. I think that’s why his music is so beloved by everyone, and why he is still one of the most popular composers in the world. A person might be able to name two classical composers who were known by everyone; one of them would of course be Mozart, and the other would be Beethoven. Even those who haven’t heard his music know who he is.” So for the GSO’s season opener, which will take place in two performances this weekend, the program will be an all-Beethoven performance called, appropriately enough, “Beethoven The Great.” The show will feature three of the iconic composer’s greatest works: “The Egmont Overture” (which served as the theme for a play by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe), the Piano Sonata No. 5, and the universally known Symphony No. 5.

“He had a rebellious spirit. Through his music, he was always trying to express heroism and the fight for freedom and justice.” In addition to Beethoven’s popularity and power, Tchivzhel says he has always been moved by the compassion and passion in the German composer’s work. “He had a rebellious spirit,” the maestro says. “Through his music, he was always trying to express heroism and the fight for freedom and justice. He was very concerned about humanity, and he was able to express his deepest feelings and passion through his music. That intensity and power is what makes him so special.” Symphony No. 5 is the obvious fan favorite of the program, which is probably why the GSO is saving it for the finale. But the other two choices were more personal for Tchivzhel for different reasons. “We chose the ‘Egmont Overture’ because the play is about the heroic sacrifice of a man [Count Egmont] who was condemned to death for struggling against oppression,” Tchivzhel says. “In fact, in the 20th century, this overture became the unofficial anthem of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.” “Then we go to another extremely famous piece, the Piano Concerto No. 5,” he continues. “It was Beethoven’s last piano concerto, which is especially well-known because of its great en-

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ANNUAL

SEPT 24 - 28, 2017

Featured soloist Dmitri Levkovich

Photo by Jens Braune

ergy and spirit.” The Piano Concerto gained the nickname “Emperor” after Beethoven’s death because of its regal feel and extravagant length; it runs over 40 minutes. The daunting, demanding piece will feature soloist Dmitri Levkovich, who is making a return appearance after a well-received Rachmaninoff performance last year. “He’s technically an absolutely perfect player, and that allows him to interpret any type of music, because he can play anything, in any way he wants,” Tchivzhel says. “He’s not limited in his skills, and he has a very creative mind. And I would also say he’s a very romantic player. Beethoven had a very romantic style.” “Dmitry is quite brilliant,” Tchivzhel says. “He’s very young, but he’s very mature as a musician, so he’s up to the task of playing the ‘Emperor’ concerto with power and passion. He dazzled the audience last year, and many people asked for him to back.” Ultimately, Tchivzhel says that he thinks the program will both challenge and delight everyone involved. “I think it will be a great opening performance for the audience and the orchestra,” he says. “We like to make everybody happy on our opening night.”

5 PLAYS. 5 NIGHTS. ALL FOR FREE! Generously sponsored by The Metropolitan Arts Council, The Greenville Journal, RiversEdge Apartments, and Aloft Hotel

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE Foil the Squirrels. Feed the Birds. (Weight controlled, adjustable)

NO PLACE LIKE HOME

Based on a celebrated graphic memoir, ‘Fun Home’ was a surprising Broadway success

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Kate Shindle (left), a former Miss America, stars as Alison Bechdel in “Fun Home.” Photo by Joan Marcus

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

At first, Alison Bechdel’s “Fun Home” doesn’t exactly seem like ideal source material for a hit Broadway musical. The graphic memoir is an often-sober exploration of Bechdel’s identity as a lesbian and complicated relationship with her father, a closeted gay man who may have died by suicide. But, then again, a story about a butcher who kills people and bakes them into pies didn’t appear to be set up for success either, said Katie Shindle, a former Miss America who is playing the lead role in the national tour of “Fun Home,” the winner of the 2015 Tony Award for best musical. “It’s not what most people would think of as source material that would make good sense as a musical,” she said. “But with the care and craftsmanship of the creatives, ‘Fun Home’ is terrifically successful on the page as well as the stage.” While “Fun Home” is the first Broadway musical with a lesbian protagonist and the first show written exclusively by women — Jeanine Tesori wrote the music, while Lisa Kron handled the book and lyrics — to win a Tony for best musical, the show resonates with all audience members, Shindle said. “It’s about a family that seems perfect

from the outside but, on the inside, has a number of things they don’t talk about but should be talking about,” she said. And its timing is perfect, Shindle said. “It’s an important show,” she said. “We’re at a moment in our cultural history as Americans when we’re starting to question why individuals aren’t allowed to live their own identities. People should be able to be who they are.” It’s a message that is resonating in large cities such as New York and Dallas, the city in which the tour was in when Greenville Journal talked with Shindle last week. It has also been embraced by smaller cities as well. “When I was first cast in the show, I had friends asking me how well I thought this was going to tour,” Shindle said. “But the show sold out in Durham, [N.C.], which was our second stop.” She adds, “I think no matter the size of the city, there are always people interested in good theater. ‘Fun Home’ is a great show. It’s a piece of theater for people who love theater and who love what theater can do and what it can teach us.” Shindle played Sally Bowles in the national tour of “Cabaret” and had Broadway stints as Lucy in “Jekyll & Hyde,” the Mad Hatter in “Wonderfuland,” and Vivienne Kensington in “Legally Blonde: The Musical.” She said “Fun Home” is a good

show for people who like musicals and want to see what the next generation of musicals will look like. Shindle is president of the national union Actor’s Equity and mentioned the Peace Center and the arts’ role in the revitalization of downtown Greenville in a speech in March about possible funding cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts. According Shindle, “Fun Home” has a more singer-songwriter vibe to the music than more traditional musicals. “People who love plays will like it because the book scenes are very important and are not just there to fill space between songs,” she said. “There’s an inherent drama in Alison’s search for the truth.”

“FUN HOME” WHEN Sept. 26-28 at 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 29 and 30 at 8 p.m.; Sept. 30 at 2 p.m.; and Oct. 1 at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. WHERE Peace Center TICKETS $25-$85 INFO peacecenter.org


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE

Photo provided

Aimee Grace LaRue in rehearsal

TALL ORDER Dwarves take center stage in CBT’s ‘Snow White the Ballet’ ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

Carolina Ballet Theatre’s 2017-18 season opener, “Snow White the Ballet,” is a unique retelling of the classic fairytale — and this go round, the dwarves are more than supporting players. The performance features choreography by Mark Diamond, choreographer for Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux at the Chautauqua Institution and program director for Charlotte Ballet II. Diamond previously worked extensively with CBT’s artistic director Hernan Justo and ballet mistress Anita Pacylowski-Justo at North Carolina Dance Theatre when they were dancers there. He first choreographed “Snow White the Ballet” in 2000 for North Carolina Dance Theatre, which was renamed Charlotte Ballet in 2014. It has since been performed multiple times in that company and others. Diamond says he chose Snow White as the subject for his choreography because he was looking for a family ballet that had a variety of interesting characters. The music Diamond chose is a variety of spirited and comical works from romantic composers Leo Delibes, Edvard Grieg, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, and prolific

“Classically trained ballet dancers are used to dancing with poise and good posture, but in this ballet, I am required to forget about all that training and move in a different way to portray the character of an ill-mannered dwarf.”

09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

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opera composer Gioachino Rossini. “I didn’t see any reason to limit it to any one composer, so I had a lot of freedom in my choices to match the mood of the scenes,” Diamond says. He also notes that the audience should keep an eye out for Grouchy the dwarf, who objects to Snow White’s appearance at their cottage but later becomes the one who loves her most. Laura Mortimer, who has danced with CBT for five seasons, plays Grouchy and says the role has been particularly challenging. “Classically trained ballet dancers are used to dancing with poise and good posture, but in this ballet I am required to forget about all that training and move in a different way to portray the character of an ill-mannered dwarf,” Mortimer says. Megan Loman, who has worked with

CBT for almost a decade and is in her fourth season as a company member, plays Giddy the dwarf. “I think it’s important that the audience tries to see the minute details of each character and their interaction between one another,” she says. “You could watch the show a thousand times and never see it all.”

“SNOW WHITE THE BALLET”

Come experience an open air Craft Beer Garden, multiple Culinary Demo Stages, and a Grand Wine Tasting along with live music on the Yard House Music Stage. Enjoy unlimited samplings of delicious food and delectable beverages from over 60 breweries, wineries, distilleries, local restaurants and regional chefs.

WHEN Sept. 29, Education Show, 10 a.m.; Sept. 30, 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.

euphoriagreenville.com

WHERE The Peace Center, 300 S. Main St.

Proudly Supported by

INFO carolinaballet.org

Tickets on sale now at

Greenville Journal


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

YOU NEED YOUR HEARING CHECKED

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

SEPT. 23

MUSIC

The Swamp Rabbit Squeezebox Festival Most of the time, when someone creates a music festival, it’s to bring great bands to town, expose lesser-known artists, or benefit a good cause. The Swamp Rabbit Squeezebox Festival might be the first Upstate multiband event to have been created out of envy.

‘‘

Dr. Robertson provided a very comprehensive exam and her comments regarding no change in my hearing deficits were very reassuring. We discussed the possibility of updating my hearing aides, since I purchased mine six years ago, and there have been advances in technology. Again, she was very through and quite knowledgeable. I have been very pleased with Davis Audiology and is well worth driving 1.5 hours to see them. — Alex Morton

’’

“I was looking at accordion festivals in other places, like the Bay Area and Vancouver, and I was jealous that no one had created an accordion festival in Greenville, so I decided to organize my own,” says Upstate musician T.C. Costello. That’s right. Costello, an accordion player himself, has created Greenville’s first-ever accordion-based music festival, which will be held at the Radio Room. The lineup will include local players like Wasted Wine and Costello, alongside an array of national squeezebox pros including Robert Wilusz, Apathy Wizards, Tiny Wonder, and The Hold Steady’s Franz Nicolay. “I thought Robert would be a good traditional choice, and musicians like Apathy Wizards and Tiny Wonder are more on the alternative side,” Costello says. “And Franz is one of the bestknown accordion players in the country, so he brings a lot of marquee value. What I’d really like for people to take away from this is a better understanding of what people are doing with accordions, across all genres of music.” —Vincent Harris

WHEN September 23, 6 p.m. WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway ADMISSION $10 INFO radioroomgreenville.com

Davis

SEPT. 23 Kristin Davis, Au.D.

Waggin’ at the Waterpark

Doctor of Audiology

Alexandra Tarvin, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology

PETS

Greenville County Rec is saying farewell to summer and letting the waterpark go to the dogs. Bring your pup to Otter Creek for a fun day of swimming and splashing in the water. The event is sponsored by Rocky Creek Veterinary Hospital and Pet Resort.

Lynda Clark, Au.D.

Maggie Robertson, Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology

Doctor of Audiology

Over 20 Years Experience Improving Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare

4318 East North Street, Greenville, SC 29615 11 Five Forks Plaza Court, Simpsonville, SC 29681 www.davisaudiology.com

CALL 864-655-8300 TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! Walk-in Hours for both locations M-F 11-11:45: Hearing aid cleanings/repairs (excludes programming)

“It’s a great day for families and dogs,” says Joni Dilworth at Greenville County Rec. “Lots of smiles for some great pictures!” Vendors at Waggin’ at the Waterpark will include the Noble Dog Hotel, Tail Lights Dog Resort and Training, PetSmart, Astro Kennels, and Greenville County Litter Prevention. Dogs must be at least 3 months old and have had their first round of vaccines. This event is rain or shine. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 23, 9–10:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m. (large dogs over 25 lbs.), 12:30–2 p.m. (small dogs under 25 lbs. and senior dogs) WHERE Otter Creek Waterpark, 101 W. Darby Road ADMISSION $22 INFO greenvillerec.com/event/waggin-at-the-waterpark-otter-creek


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

SEPT. 29

EXPAND YOUR PLAYLIST

HOMES

Symphony Tour of Homes Visit some of Greenville’s classic homes during the Guild of the Greenville Symphony’s 39th annual Tour of Homes next weekend. The five homes on this year’s tour are in the Crescent and McDaniel areas and include 309 McDaniel Ave., 415 Crescent Ave., 201 Crescent Ave., 312 Crescent Ave., and 412 Crescent Ave. “From the beginning of its development to the present, it has been a popular location in which to live,” says Ellie Mioduski, marketing and publicity chair of the Guild. “Located in close proximity to downtown Greenville, it was not a planned subdivision. The area evolved from large tracts of land, which were divided over the years into home sites. Most of the homes were built for individuals and are unique. Because of its closeness to downtown, Falls Park, and the Swamp Rabbit Trail, the area has retained its appeal through the years.” Tours are self-guided, and homes can be explored at the visitors’ own pace. Each home will be decorated with flowers from a floral designer, with participating shops including ModFete, Embassy Flowers and Nature’s Gift, EON, Petals & Co., and Twigs. On Tuesday, Sept. 26, from 7–9 p.m., there will be a patron party to celebrate the homeowners and sponsors of the tour at 800 Crescent Ave., a 12-acre English manor and the home of Mary Burnett and Ellis Johnson. The party will include hors d’ouevres, wine and champagne, and live music. This home is only open for the patron party.

OCT. 11

SWEET PLANTAIN OCT. 12 PEACE CHAMBER CONCERT SERIES

“The tour requires several hundred volunteers, months of preparation, and the cooperation and generous donations of everyone involved, especially the owners of the homes on tour, without which there would be no tour,” Mioduski says. All proceeds from the Tour of Homes go toward supporting the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and its various programs. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 29–Oct. 1, Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sunday, 1–4 p.m. WHERE Crescent/McDaniel area of Greenville ADMISSION $20 in advance, $25 tour days; $75 for patron party INFO guildgso.org/tour-of-homes, bit.ly/2fpy33j

THE AMERICAN CHAMBER PLAYERS

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GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032 @peacecenter


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To make an appointment at one of our 25 locations across the Carolinas, visit

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09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE youtube.com/watch?v=YFwNtRqeN6c

Walter Salas-Humara

CONCERT

SEPT. 22

Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave. 7 p.m. | Free

As the singer and primary songwriter for The Silos since 1985, Walter Salas-Humara has spent over three decades writing guitar-driven short stories, mixing straight-ahead rock with folkier, more intimate balladry. As the band hung on the periphery of mainstream success through the years, Salas-Humara built a substantial catalog of first-rate songs, and after spending the last few years focusing on a prolific solo career, he’s returned to those Silos classics on the recent “Work: Part One” and “Part Two” albums, albeit with very different arrangements. “The rule I made was no electric or percussion instruments of any kind,” he says. “I wanted to have a record of all my best songs in a style that was kind of unaffected.” The albums also gave Salas-Humara a chance to collaborate with producer, singer, and multi-instrumentalist Richard Brotherton. “I’ve known Rich for so long, and he’s such a great singer and player and producer,” he says. “The nice thing for me is that he’s a very spare player, and he has great instincts. He plays in a way that makes it all about the songs.” —Vincent Harris

FRI

22

CONCERT

Edwin McCain

The Collective | The Peace Center 101 W. Broad St. | 6-10 p.m. | $125 Called the “great American romantic” by the New York Times, Edwin McCain has built an enviable career over the past 20 years by balancing his massive pop success with the year-round touring schedule of a tireless troubadour. 615-610-1790 | info@collectiveartistmgmt.com euphoriagreenville.com LEISURE

A Night to Be Remembered

Tobacco Plus | 1921 Highway 101 S., Greer 2-4 p.m. Another exciting night of cigars, food, cocktails, wine tasting, and some amazing cigar specials. tpluscigars.com COMMUNITY

Sippin’ In Simpsonville’s Oktoberfest Downtown Simpsonville 6-10 p.m. | $10-$25 Sippin’ In Simpsonville’s Oktoberfest is a beer tasting tour of downtown shops and local businesses. Ticket holders will enjoy craft and seasonal beer samples, food pairings from local vendors, and Simpsonville’s downtown shops. This event will sell out, so act now to get tickets. simpsonvillechamber.com HEALTHCARE

Digital Health SouthEast Healthcare + Culture

Greenville ONE Building | 1 N. Main St. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. | $495 Health is being democratized, and the opportunity to better understand and maintain our health and wellness is at an inflection point. Join leaders from the Southeast and celebrate the swell of startups, practitioners, and movers increasing value and driving down costs. digitalhealthse.com

CHECK OUT OUR 2017 FALL SEASON mauldinculturalcenter.org

7TH ANNUAL MAULDIN BBQ COOK-OFF

SEPT. 22-23

LIVE MUSIC x CRAFT BEER & WINE x FREE ENTRY

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

11 AM - 3 PM BBQ Cook-off

6 - 9 PM Anything Butt Competition

LIVE MUSIC BY: Jack Roper and the Weatherman Band Doug Hunt & Burning Daylight

LIVE MUSIC BY: Brooks Dixon Band

LEARN MORE AT MAULDINBBQ.COM

COMEDIAN

HENRY CHO

MUSIC

Greenville Heritage Main Street Fridays

NOMA Square 5:30-9:30 p.m. | FREE Kick off the weekend with Main Street Friday. Bring the whole family down for a night of fun. There will be inflatables for the kids in the Sabal Homes Kids’ Area, beverages for the adults from KW Beverage, and dancing for all ages at the CPI Security Stage. Sept. 22 features True Blues. gvilleevents.com

OCTOBER 7

Doors 7:00 PM Show 7:30 PM

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR BY PHONE mauldinculturalcenter.org

RECREATION

Wheelchair Tennis at the Kroc Center Kroc Tennis Center | 205 Gibbs St. 5-7 p.m. | Fridays Eligibility requirements: lower limb physical disability (do not need to use a wheelchair regularly), able to independently propel manual and/or power chair, and interested on playing on a tennis team. Open to all ages. 864-324-8310 | sarahslc@aol.com FRI-SAT

22-23

864.335.4862

MAULDIN YOUTH THEATRE PRESENTS

FOOD & DRINK

SOOIE Mauldin BBQ Cook-Off

Mauldin Cultural Center Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin Free/$10 tasting ticket Produced by the City of Mauldin, the annual two-day festival is a showcase of the heritage of our community including its food and music. The festival features more than 20 cookers from all over the Southeast and includes a barbecue cook-off competition with a panel of certified barbecue tasters, live music, family activities, and a relaxing atmosphere. We pair this delicious barbecue with music and family – making this the perfect festival to enjoy all that Mauldin has to offer. mauldinbbq.com | 864-335-4862 events@mauldinculturalcenter.org

directed by Tim St. Clair II

NOVEMBER

17-18 7:30 PM

NOVEMBER

19

3:00 PM

OPEN AUDITIONS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7 TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR BY PHONE mauldinculturalcenter.org | 864.335.4862

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin mauldinculturalcenter.org


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE THRU SAT

23

TH E T H M R H Y N NA IS GOYOU! GET

PERFORMING ARTS

“Four Old Broads”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Tuesday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 3 p.m. $15-$30 This Southern comedy was the winner of the 2016 New Play Festival at Centre Stage and is directed by Ruth Wood. “Four Old Broads” will also kick off the 2017 New Play Festival with a free performance on Sunday, Sept. 24, at 7 p.m. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 11 a.m.-noon & 2-3 p.m. | Free with admission Explore with clay this weekend and make a special ornament to take home. Sign up at admissions the day of – space is limited. tcmupstate.org

FAMILY

HEALTH & SCIENCE

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission What are the colors of the rainbow? Kids will be reading the book “A Rainbow of My Own” by Don Freeman and imagine what it would be like if they had their own rainbow! They will learn

Haywood Mall | 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | FREE The mobile unit served more than 7,400 women and detected 30 cases of cancer throughout the Southeast in its two years on the road. The BelkGives on the Go Mobile Mammography Center, a 39-foot-long, state-of-the-art screening center on wheels, will offer free, convenient mammogram

Story Time & More: “A Rainbow of My Own”

Photos: Matthew Murphy

On Sale Today at 10 AM!

GROUPS (15+)

Helping Hands When You Need Them

23

Play in Clay

BelkGives on the Go Mobile Mammography Center to Visit

youtube.com/watch?v=iCPAf327ZJs

Malcolm Holcombe w/ Stevie Tombstone

CONCERT

SEPT. 22

December 26-31

about the colors of the rainbow then make their own rainbow to take home. tcmupstate.org FAMILY SAT

The Spinning Jenny 107 Cannon St., Greer 8 p.m. | $12 adv/$15 door

Since 1994, Waterville, N.C.’s Malcolm Holcombe has been writing songs about hard luck, hard choices, hard times, and hard love, creating a universe of characters and putting across their stories with a thorny, gritty rasp that drips with emotion. Because Holcombe often plays these songs in stripped-down arrangements centered around his acoustic guitar, he’s been commonly labeled a folk artist, even if other kinds of music are frequently part of his style. “It’s Andrea Furlan folk-blues, folk-rock, all kinds of stuff,” Holcombe says. “It’s hard to label things. I like to call it folk music just to keep it simple, but it’s a little bit of everything.” Holcombe’s new album, “Pretty Little Troubles,” has a darker atmosphere than some of his other efforts, and references abound to difficult times, whether the songs are about matters of the heart or people struggling just to get by. “It’s hard for me to ignore the world around me now,” he says. “I don’t drink anymore, so I can’t enjoy a blackout to try to avoid reality.” —Vincent Harris

945 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29302

26 Rushmore Drive, Greenville, SC 29615

864-573-2353

864-268-8993

• Companion Care • Light Housekeeping • Personal Care • In-home Safety Solutions

GREENVILLE

SPARTANBURG

26 Rushmore Drive

945 E. Main Street

864-268-8993

864-573-2353

www.ComfortKeepers.com


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE screenings. Women age 40 and over with no breast concerns, who have not had a mammogram in the last 12 months, and have a primary care physician are eligible by calling to schedule an appointment. 855-655-BMMC (2662) | belk.com/pink RECREATION

Carolina Dance Collaborative

First Baptist Greenville, AYMC Building 10:30-11:30 a.m. | Saturdays through April 28 $50/month or $15/class Come move with Carolina Dance Collaborative on Saturday mornings as we learn to connect with our bodies, each other, and the concepts of movement. Classes have begun and will follow the Greenville County School Calendar until April 28. For additional information and to apply for scholarships, please email info@ CarolinaDanceCollaborative.com. info@CarolinaDanceCollaborative.com FAMILY

Saturday Safaris

Greenville Zoo | 150 Cleveland Park Drive 10 a.m.-noon | Saturdays through May 12 Members/$15; nonmembers/$25 Classes are designed to help children (ages 4-6) discover the fascinating world of animals. Classes are held in the Conservation Station and combine a lesson with crafts, activities, trips into the zoo, and animals in the classroom. Program length is two hours. Find out more information on the Greenville Zoo website. 864-467-4300 | greenvillezoo.com COMMUNITY

Fourth Saturday series

en’s m o W

Health

The Flat | 1606 Woodruff Road 8:30 p.m. | $5 Nationally touring comedian Krish Mohan explores the idea of happiness and perceptions of mental illness in today’s society. He is removing the stigmas associated with immigration, drugs, gun control, racism, and being accountable for the problems we’ve created, all revolving around the subject of mental health. Krish will be performing his one-hour show called “Approaching Happiness” at The Flat, presented by Stone Grown Comedy. ramannoodlescomedy.com ramannoodlescomedy@gmail.com SAT-SUN

23-24

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Great Pumpkin Fest

Carowinds 14523 Carowinds Blvd., Charlotte, N.C. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays & Sundays | through Oct. 29 Cost of Carowinds admission During the day, Carowinds puts the “Wee!” in Halloween. The Great Pumpkin Fest has familyfriendly Halloween attractions for the little ghosts and goblins including a costume parade, foam zone, mazes, and more. It’s kid-sized frights that every age will love and, of course, all of your favorite rides. It’s all fun and no fear at Carowinds. Join us for a day packed with Halloween activities for kids. 704-588-2600 | social@carowinds.com carowinds.com/play/great-pumpkin-fest THRU SUN

24

PERFORMING ARTS

“You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown”

Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown 125 N. Main St, Hendersonville 7 p.m. with matinees Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. | Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays | $12.50-$25 The Flat Rock Playhouse and Studio 52 Family Series continues with the classic cartoon turned family musical, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Happiness is this charming musical featuring the beloved Charles M. Schulz Peanuts gang: Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Sally, Schroeder…and, yes, Snoopy, too. 828-696-0731, 866-737-8008 flatrockplayhouse.org

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Paris Mountain State Park | 2401 State Park Road 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. $5/ages 16-64, $3/ages 6-15, and $3.25 for S.C. seniors and disabled persons The Friends of Paris Mountain State Park will host a program at 10 a.m. called Turtle Talk, led by Mary Lou Jones. Meet in the Park Center. No registration is required, and the program is free after park admission. Interpretive ranger Cathy Taylor will present a program at 1 p.m. called The Animal/Plant Connection. The program costs $7 per person, payable at the admission booth instead of admission, and will begin at the Park Center. Registration is required. 864-244-5565 | ctaylor@scprt.com SouthCarolinaParks.com | pmspf.org

COMEDY

“Krish Mohan is Attempting to Approach Happiness”

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE VISUAL ARTS

“ONE OF THE BEST NEW MUSICALS OF OUR ERA. A rare sighting that could induce a theater critic to genuflect if not erupt in a chorus of hallelujahs” – Charles McNulty

Paul Yanko exhibit

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery 300 River St., Ste. 202 Thursdays-Sundays | 1-5 p.m. Riverworks Gallery presents Paul Yanko’s sitespecific wall mural plus recent mixed media works on paper: “Snap to Grid,” “Migrate from Center,” and “Deviate and Expand.” gvltec.edu/dva

SEPT. 23 CONCERT

CRITIC’S CHOICE

soundcloud.com/marq-noir/marq-noir-ice-blue-mink

THEATER

“Pinkalicious: The Musical”

The National Tour Company of FUN HOME. ©Joan Marcus

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. | $18-$27 Pinkalicious loves pink, and after overindulging in pink cupcakes, she wakes up to her dream come true of being pink. A series of “pink-tastic” adventures lead Pinkalicious to follow the doctor’s orders of eating green in order to return to normal. Lessons about self-control and moderation are learned in this wildly popular musical. 864-467-3000 | scchildrenstheatre.org tickets.peacecenter.org SUN

24

VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: Sketching in the Galleries

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE Take a closer look at the soaring sculptures of Grainger McKoy and learn 3-D sketching techniques with artist Christina Laurel. Open to any skill level. Sketchpads and pencils are provided or bring your own. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org | info@gcma.org SUN-NOV

SEPTEMBER 26 – OCTOBER 1 OPENS TUESDAY!

Contains mature content.

GROUPS (15+)

24-05

VISUAL ARTS

Back To The Drawing Board: Life Drawing Sessions

Synergy Mill | 400 Birnie St. Ext., Suite B noon-3 p.m. | Sundays | $150 This fall, Synergy Mill teams with the Art Haus Project (Art Haus Greenville) to offer exciting opportunities. The sessions for “The Back To The Drawing Board: Life Drawing Sessions” are intended for adults, although teens may attend with permission from parents. Local artist/educator Harlan Lovestone will host the sessions with refreshments provided. 864-326-0050 | synergymill.com

Bad Internet presents Palace III, featuring Marquise Noir, Maxx Good$, and The Rowdy Ruff Boyz Artistry Workshops & Gallery 12 Andrews St. | 8 p.m. | $20

Promoter, producer, and rapper Brent Best (aka $amson) is unveiling his latest Palace show this weekend. His previous two events – through his management and production collective Bad Internet – were created to put the talent of the Upstate’s visual artists on display. But for the third volume at Artistry, he’s changing things up a bit. “The past two were strictly art installations, with maybe a DJ,” Best says, “but this one’s going to take it to another level. We’re going to have interactive pieces, live musicians, two house DJs, and a full gallery.” As for the reason behind the expansion, he says it’s simply a matter of room. “It’s the biggest venue we’ve been in so far,” he says. “I plan these things based on the space we’re in, and this space allowed for it. I felt like in the last two, the music would have been distracting people from enjoying the art, but here, you can enjoy the art and then go across a threshold to a whole different area with drinks and music. It’ll make for a more complete experience. I wanted it to be equal parts art show, live music, and party.” —Vincent Harris


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE MON

25

COMMUNITY

Opportunity Greenville Registration

Mondays Chamber Investors are $375/three or more attendees is $350 per person. All others are $475. This popular five-week program is designed to teach participants about the community and how to get involved. Sessions are from 2–6 p.m. Dates and topics are Oct. 2: Greenville’s Past, Present, and Future; Oct. 9: Government and Law Enforcement; Oct. 16: Education and Health Care; Oct. 23: Economic Growth and Diversity & Inclusion; and Oct. 30: Culture and Community/ Graduation Reception. Preregister by Sept. 25. 864-239-3743 | greenvillechamber.org tmiller@greenvillechamber.org COMMUNITY

Greater Greenville Rose Society Meeting Greater Greenville Rose Society MD360 in Powdersville | 7 p.m. Information on the Edisto Memorial Gardens Renewal and a representative from a major rose-growing company will present the program on roses that are fragrant, more disease-resistant, and easy to care for. 864-884-9853 PERFORMING ARTS MON-FRI

25-29

Lights, Camera, Action! Broadway!

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin | 5:30-7 p.m. (grades 2-6); 7-9:30 p.m. (grades 7-12) | $150 Youth theater director Tim St. Clair is offering one-

week camps where youth will learn the ins and outs of being in show biz. They’ll sing new songs, assess a character and how to portray them, learn how to dance, and finally bring it all together for a Friday production. September’s boot camps will focus on themes from “The Lion King Jr.” mauldinculturalcenter.org MON-SUN

25-01

FESTIVAL

13 Stripes Oktoberfest

13 Stripes Brewery 250 Mill St., Ste. PW3101, Taylors FREE Monday: Hefeweizen collab with Ciclops Cyderi and Brewery beer release. Tuesday: Vienna Lager release. Wednesday: Roggenbier release. Thursday: Oktoberfest release. Friday: Festivities will take place in the parking lot out front on this day. Music from Polymath, Field and Stone Bakery pretzels, Swamp Fox Donuts, caricatures and face painting by Baricatures, grilled brats and sauerkraut, and liters and half-liters for sale. Saturday: Festivities will move into the brewery for this day with a small outside food area. Music from Swamp Rabbit Railroad, Field and Stone Bakery pretzels, Swamp Fox Donuts, caricatures and face painting by Baricatures, grilled brats and sauerkraut, and liters and half-liters for sale. Sunday: Festivities will take place in the parking lot out front on this day. Music from Foothills Oompa Band, Field and Stone Bakery pretzels, caricatures and face painting by Baricatures, grilled brats and sauerkraut, and liters and half-liters for sale, best beard and

mustache competition, stein holding competition, and a special beer release. 864-349-1430 | 13stripesbrewery.com 13stripesbrewery@gmail.com THRU TUE

26

COMMUNITY

Free Coffee Tuesdays

Seasons Cafe | 1054 E. Butler Road 7:30 a.m. Tuesday mornings Seasons Cafe and Catering is offering a space for parents to stop by after dropping off the children at school to enjoy a free hot coffee when you purchase a homemade cinnamon roll. info@seasonscafeandcatering.com TUE-WED

26-27

COMMUNITY

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes Hosts 16th Annual Grief Seminar

TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes is pleased to announce Dr. Harold Ivan Smith as the speaker for the 16th annual grief seminar. The seminar begins on Sept. 26 with “Assisting Grievers in the Community” from 3-5 p.m. This seminar is geared toward school professionals, teachers, nurses, social services, clergy, and administrative staff. Designed for the general public, Smith will present “How Long Does Normal Grief Last” on Sept. 26 from 6:45–9 p.m. These two seminars are free. On Sept. 27, Smith will present the professional caregivers’ workshop “If I Were Grieving Right Should I Be Done by Now.” This six-hour work-

09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

ARTS CALEN DAR SEP T. 22-28, 2017

Main Street Fridays

True Blues

Sep. 22 ~ 233-2273 The Warehouse Theatre

Clybourne Park

Sep. 22-Oct. 8 ~ 235-6948 Foothills Philharmonic

Masterworks #1 Sep. 23 ~ 326-5780

Greenville Symphony Orchestra

Beethoven the Great Sep. 23-24 ~ 467-3000 Centre Stage

Four Old Broads

Through Sep. 23 ~ 233-6733 SC Children’s Theatre

Pinkalicious the Musical Through Sep. 24 ~ 467-3000

Sayonara High Rates, Impe Works by Paul Yanko Riverworks Gallery

Discover a Better Way and Receive Throughto Sep.Bank 24 ~ 271-0679 Peace Center

Fun Home

Say

Sep. 26-Oct.1 ~ 467-3000 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Annual Showcase Exhibition Through Sep. 27 ~ 271-0679

Main Street Real Estate Gallery

to Your Big Bank! Open a Checking Account. Get a Loan. Refer A Friend or Family Member. Crossword puzzle: page 42

The more business you bring us, the more rewards you earn!

Free custom debit card with every new checking account — a $20 value! $50 Cash Back on each loan over $5,000! Up to $55 Cash when you refer a friend or family member and they get a loan with GHFCU!

NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN! Call 467.4160 or visit our website at www.greenvilleheritage.com for information on this promotion or how to join.

Works by Kiah Bellows

Through Sep. 30 ~ 250-2850 Greenville Little Theatre

The Mousetrap

Through Oct. 1 ~ 233-6238 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

From Her Mind’s Eye: Works by Lin Pulliam

Through Oct. 15 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Tom Flowers & Jeanet Dreskin Through Oct. 20 ~ 467-3132

Greenville County Museum of Art

“Victoria Wyeth: My Andy” Through Oct. 22 ~ 271-7570

Works by Grainger McCoy Through Dec. 31 ~ 271-7570

*Promotion dates: August 1 – September 30, 2017. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined with another promotion or offer. Refinance of a GHFCU loan will qualify with more than $5,000 in new money. Mortgages excluded.

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

DOWNTOWN

COUNTY SQUARE

SCTAC

SIMPSONVILLE

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com 16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

58TH ANNuAL

art on main FINE ART / FINE CRAFT FESTIVAL

September 30 & October 1 10 am - 5pm both days

Main Street Hendersonville NC SHOP FOR FABULOUS FINE ART AND CRAFT ON HENDERSONVILLE’S HISTORIC MAIN STREET, PLUS SEE LIVE ART DEMONSTRATIONS! Hypnotized, glass by Paula Marksbury

Henderson County Tourism Development Authority

www.visithendersonvillenc.org

More Info:

PRESENTED By:

MAjOR SPONSOR:

MORRIS BROADBAND, LLC

www.acofhc.org

shop, which takes place from 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m, will explore “getting into” grief rather than “getting over” it. Funeral directors, social workers, nurses, and chaplains will receive six continuing education hours for attending this session. The cost is $35 if receiving continuing education hours. thomasmcafee.com TUE-SUN

26-01

Be Pretty”

acofhc@bellsouth.net

828.693.8504

Furman Theatre Presents Neil LaBute’s “Reasons to

Furman University | The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Highway Sept. 26-30, 8 p.m.; Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, 3 p.m. $18 for adults, $15 for seniors, $10 students Directed by Jay Oney, “Reasons to Be Pretty” is a hopelessly romantic drama about the hopelessness of romance. The play is the first installment in Neil LaBute’s trilogy focusing on two young couples whose lives and careers become extremely entangled. “Reasons to Be Pretty” has the razor-sharp wit and insight expected from LaBute, but with an extraordinary new twist — hope! 864-294-2125 | bit.ly/2xZrV8L TUE-NOV

26-21 This project was supported by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources.

THEATER

FAMILY

2nd Stage presents “Balloonacy”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. | $9.50 Imagine the difference a single balloon can make. “Balloonacy” is a charming theater experience that finds an old lady alone on her

birthday. Children and their caretakers will delight in the comic antics that are generously sprinkled through her story and the friendship that floats into her life at just the right moment. With a little help from the audience and a lot of clowning around, she soon comes to find that companions come in all shapes. This nonverbal comedy for the very young is perfectly suited for audiences as young as 1 year old and invites all to share in the joy of togetherness. Performances run 30-40 minutes. 864-235-2885 | scchildrenstheatre.org THRU WED

27

VISUAL ARTS

“Drifters Project” by Pam Longobardi

Lee Gallery at the Center for Visual Arts | 1-101 Lee Hall, Clemson University Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The Lee Gallery at the Clemson University Center for Visual Arts’ (CVA) first art exhibit of the fall semester focuses on the importance of striking a sustainable balance between nature and the current global consumer culture with Pam Longobardi’s “Drifters Project.” Visitors to the gallery will experience various installations along with select paintings and drawings. THRU THU

28

RECREATION

Adaptive Sports Opportunities with RCP

FREE GHS’s Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital is the area leader in adaptive sports. Their clinics are

SAVE MONEY & GET FIT! Join early and save with the PAY THE DAY promotion.*

Join on Sept. 1 your joining fee is just $1. Join Sept. 2 for a $2 joining fee, and so on! Each Y Family membership includes child care while you work out and a discounted rate for the afterschool program. *Offer ends Sept. 30, 2017.

YMCA OF GREENVILLE

ymcagreenville.org 864.412.0288


09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE free, but reservations are required. The wheelchair basketball team practices every Thursday, 5–6:30 p.m., at St. Mathew UMC, 701 Cleveland St., and is for 5–18 years old with lower limb disability. Adaptive cycling rides will be held at Swamp Rabbit Cafe, 205 Cedar Lane Road, on Sept. 28 from 6–7:30 p.m. Adaptive fencing will be held on Sept. 23 from 10-11:30 a.m. 864-455-3262 | kcaldwell5@ghs.org THU

28

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured story is “Groovy Joe: Dance Party Countdown” by Eric Litwin and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Rock Out Hunger

Loaves & Fishes | Revel | 304 E. Stone Ave. 7-10 p.m. | $27 Rock Out Hunger 2017 will feature Tommy Tutone. Enjoy great music and tastings from some the state’s finest distilleries at the SC Craft Spirit Tasting. All proceeds go to support Loaves & Fishes’ mission to rescue food that would otherwise be wasted. 864-232-3595 loavesandfishesgreenville.com/roh paulette@loavesandfishesgreenville.org COMMUNITY

The Future of Korea

Hornitos® Tequila, 40% Alc./ Vol © 2017 Sauza Tequila Import Company, Chicago, IL | Drink Smart

World Affairs Council Upstate ONE Building | 1 N. Main St. 5:30-9 p.m. | $30/members; $45/nonmembers The objective of this program is to broaden and deepen our understanding of Korea and the U.S.- Korean relationship and will feature an engaging panel discussion among representatives from the U.S. Department of State, the Korean Embassy, and the Korean Economic Institute. Enjoy a catered buffet dinner, a panel discussion, and plenty of time for specific Q&As. Come early to enjoy pre-dinner networking on the rooftop patio at the ONE building. 864-631-2188 | upstateinternational.org info@upstateinternational.org

COMMUNITY

3rd Annual Keys to Freedom 2017 Gala Set Free Alliance TD Convention Center, Main Ballroom 1 Exposition Drive 6-8:30 p.m. | $75 Set Free Alliance (SFA), a nonprofit organization that helps rescue children in India from slavery, will hold its third annual Keys to Freedom Gala with special guest speaker Praveen Chakravathy. The theme of this year’s gala is REUNITED, which will focus on stories of families who were once torn apart, but have now been reunited through the work of Chakravathy and SFA. setfreealliance.org THU-SAT

28-30

28-02

Story Time & More: “White Rabbit’s Color Book”

MUSIC

Have Fun Learning to Play Appalachian Music

Trinity Campus of Buncombe Street UMC 2703 Augusta St. | $60 Register now for lessons learning to play banjo, guitar, fiddle, or mandolin. Classes are grouped by skill level. Beginners are welcome. These lessons are open to children and adults (children must be at least 9 years old). The total fee for six weeks of lessons is $60. Also, rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. 864-979-9188 THRU FRI

29

Join us September 29th - October 1st for 3 Day Specials

FAMILY

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission To end TCMU’s month of color, kids are going to follow White Rabbit as he splishes and splashes into different paint, causing new colors to appear. Kids will read the book “White Rabbit’s Color Book” by Alan Baker and mix colors with daubers to paint rabbits. tcmupstate.org THU-NOV

Fall Celebration

20% OFF

All Outdoor Pots

8" Premium Mums

4 for $26

Trapp Candles Buy 4 Seasonal Scents

Get 1 FREE

2249 Augusta Street, Greenville www.RootsofGreenville.com | 864-241-0100

Open 7 Days! Monday-Saturday 10am - 6pm & Sunday 1 - 5pm

Help Us Celebrate The Fall Season with Special Deals, Refreshments & Door Prizes!

THEATER

“Radium Girls”

The Academy of Arts, Logos Theatre | 80 School St., Taylors Sept. 15, 22, and 29 at 7 p.m. and Sept. 16, 23, and 20 at 2 p.m. | $25 In 1926, radium was a miracle cure, Madame Curie an international celebrity, and luminous watches the latest rage – until the girls who painted them began to fall ill with a mysterious disease. Inspired by a true story, ”Radium Girls”

SHOT WORTH T KING

SEPTEMBER 29TH THRU OCTOBER 1ST FRIDAY & SATURDAY 10-6 • SUNDAY 1-5

SPIN THE PRIZE WHEEL! GET UP TO 40% OFF!

100% PURO AGAVE TEQUILA

FREE PUMPKIN FROM ROOTS with any purchase of $50 or more

#AShotWorthTaking

864-241-0100 • 4roomsgreenville.com • 2222 Augusta St., Greenville


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE traces the efforts of Grace Fryer, a dial painter, as she fights for her day in court. Appropriate for junior high and high school audiences. 864-269-9342 | theacademyofarts.org FRI

MUSIC

Presents Distinguished 29 Furman Visiting Professor of Violin William Preucil in Recital

Furman University | Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Highway | 8 p.m. | FREE The Furman Department of Music presents distinguished visiting professor of violin William Preucil in a free recital. Preucil will be accompanied in the performance by Furman associate

professor of piano David Gross. The program includes music by Brahms and Beethoven. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2uJkDZK furmanmusic@furman.edu FRI-SAT

29-30

EDUCATION

Upstate Fall Handbell Festival

Carolina Bronze Buncombe Street UMC | 200 Buncombe St. $35 through 9/7, $40 after Carolina Bronze, the Upstate’s auditioned community handbell ensemble, is excited to offer this festival to handbell enthusiasts around the Upstate and beyond. Join us for a weekend of

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Angelina

Hurricane Advisory: It’s raining cats & dogs! Our country has had quite the series of hurricanes lately. Irma was HUGE and just as scary for those of us with four legs as it was for all of you. Thankfully, Greenville County was impacted far less than coastal areas, which enabled Animal Care to take in dogs and cats from other shelters in more affected places. We have just loved having our new friends here to stay. They’re part of the crew now and we want to show them how amazing our community is by finding them forever homes. If you are looking to adopt, help a hurricane victim by coming to Animal Care! These kittens from the Charleston coast are absolutely adorable. See you soon!

GreenvillePets.org

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE The Special Primary Election for House District 28 will be held on Tuesday, November 14, 2017. Any Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver’s License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES.org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on November 14, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601, (864) 467-7260. At 12 noon on November 16, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in this election. This hearing will be held County Square, 301 University Ridge, and Suite 1900 Greenville SC 29601. The following precincts and polling places will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: Precincts Polling Places Greenville 29 Baker Creek Conestee Donaldson Dunklin Fork Shoals Long Creek Moore Creek Neely Farms Pineview Raintree Ranch Creek Reedy Fork Standing Springs Verdmont Ware Place Woodmont

Reedy River Missionary Baptist Ch Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Ch Reedy River Missionary Baptist Ch Reedy River Missionary Baptist Ch Dunklin Fire Station Hdqt Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Rocky Creek Missionary Baptist Ch South Greenville Fire Station #6 Christ Community Church Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt The Bridge Church Robert E Cashion Elementary Sch Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Ch Standing Springs Baptist Church Hopewell United Methodist Ch Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Ch Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Ch

25 Lakewood Dr 8323 Augusta Rd 25 Lakewood Dr 25 Lakewood Dr 11353 Augusta Rd 100 Hillside Church Rd 239 Rocky Creek Rd 1800 W Georgia Rd 700 Harrison Bridge Rd 100 Hillside Church Rd 257 Harrison Bridge Rd 1500 Fork Shoals Rd 8323 Augusta Rd 1111 W Georgia Rd 1420 Neely Ferry Rd 8323 Augusta Rd 8323 Augusta Rd

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Sardigna, LLC / DBA Tito’s intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2018 N. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 8, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

ringing, learning, networking, and fun. carolinabronze.net THRU SAT

30

VISUAL ARTS

SC WaterMedia Exhibit

West Main Artists Co-Op 578 W. Main St., Spartanburg Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE For the first time in more than 10 years, the South Carolina WaterMedia Society’s annual Traveling Exhibit will come to Spartanburg in September 2017 and will be on public display at West Main Artists Co-Op. 864-804-6501

SOLICITATION NOTICE AMENDED SUMMONS Greenville County, 301 University STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 29601, will accept responses for IN THE COURT OF COMMON the following: PLEAS • Two (2) Pro Patch Asphalt C.A. No: 17-CP-23-00184 Pothole Patcher Vehicles and 35 Hummingbird Co., LLC, Training Services RFP #16Plaintiff, vs. First Investors 10/10/17 due at 3:00 P.M., Holding, LLC, Central Carolina E.D.T., October 10, 2017. Bank, Defendants. Solicitations can be found at TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE http://www.greenvillecounty. NAMED: org/apps/procurementpdf/ YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED projects.aspx?type=RFP or by calling 864-467-7200. and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve SOLICITATION NOTICE SOUTH CAROLINA a copy of your Answer on the Greenville County, 301 University subscribers at 134 Oakland Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC Avenue, Spartanburg, South 29601, will accept responses for Carolina, 29302, within thirty the following: (30) days after the service RFP# 17-10/12/17, Automated PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Transport Network System hereof, exclusive of the day of There will be a PUBLIC HEARING such service; and if you fail Feasibility Study, October before the GREENVILLE to do so judgment by default 12, 2017, 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. A COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING will be rendered against you pre-proposal meeting will APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, be held on September 27, for the relief demanded in the 2017 at 9:00 A.M. E.D.T., in OCTOBER 11, 2017 AT 3:00 Complaint. the Procurement Services P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. Division office located at 301 –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC University Ridge, Suite 100, SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY Bar 70364) Greenville, SC 29601 RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for 134 Oakland Avenue Solicitations can be found at the purpose of hearing those Spartanburg, SC 29302 www.greenvillecounty.org/ persons interested in the 864-595-2966 Procurement/ or by calling petitions listed below. (864) 467-7200. Attorneys for Plaintiff PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO BIDDING NOTICE SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR ATTENTION DBE, MBE’S, & WBE’S SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. Michels Corporation is requesting quotations for the following CB-17-48 APPLICANT: DUKE ENERGY project: Reedy River Basin Sewer Tunnel Project in Greenville, CAROLINAS, LLC/McAdams South Carolina which bids on October 10, 2017. TAX MAP#: 0586.01-01-006.16 We are seeking quotes from DBE’s, MBE’S, & WBE’s for any LOCATION: 3804 Fork Shoals portion of the project listed that you are qualified to perform Road, Simpsonville SC which may include the following Trades and/or Suppliers: REQUEST: Use by Special Site Prep, Clearing & Grubbing, Grading, Tree Removal, Exception for a substation Excavation, Concrete Removal/Installation, Paving, Pavement on site Markings, Retaining Wall Construction, Sound Walls, Locating CB-17-49 Underground Utilities, Fire Hydrant Removal/Relocation, Bollard APPLICANT: BRIDGEWAY Installation, Wet Utility Construction (Sewer, H2O, Storm), CHURCH Wooden Structure Relocation, Stamped Concrete Installation, TAX MAP#: 0533.03-01-014.00 Traffic Control, Traffic Control Equipment, Street Signage LOCATION: 725 Garlington Supply/Installation, Chain-Link Fencing & Gates, Cable Fencing, Road, Greenville SC Security Fencing, Sodding, Seeding, Hydro Mulching, Irrigation REQUEST: Use by Special Services, Landscaping, Trucking/Hauling, Collection & Disposal Exception for building of Class I, II and Hazardous Groundwater, Collection & Disposal expansion on site of Class I, II Non-hazardous Waste Soils, Engineering Consulting, CB-17-50 Surveying, Construction Inspection, Television Inspection APPLICANT: BOARD of FIRE CONTROL EAST SIMPSONVILLE/ of Storm Drain Installation, Pipe Supply, Materials Testing, Laboratory Testing, Geotechnical Instrumentation & Monitoring, Seamon Whiteside TAX MAP#: 0548.02-01-005.00 Waste Disposal Facilities & Removal, Health & Safety Monitoring, Safety Inspection, Temporary Utilities & Services, Temporary LOCATION 3008 Woodruff Road, Simpsonville SC Field Offices, Porta Johns, Erosion & Sedimentation Control, REQUEST: Use by Special Silt Fencing, Rebar, Structural Steel, CIP Concrete, Precast Exception to rebuild fire station Concrete, Ready- Mix Concrete, Construction Material Suppliers, on site Aggregates, Mortar, Steel Doors & Frames, Access Hatches, CB-17-51 Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing, Door & Window Supply/ APPLICANT: STONE & STONE Installation. Roofing, Masonry, Building Construction, Sodding, ASSOCIATES/Site Design, Inc. and Janitorial Services. TAX MAP#: WG05.00-01-008.03 Bidding Documents: Specs & plans for project can be viewed at LOCATION: 1137 & 1135 White https://michels.box.com/s/a7zujoves8i990ewmi9afsmx3jv1sfs7 Horse Road, Greenville SC Please fax your quote and certifications to: 262-814-0300 or REQUEST: Variance from Right side setback for #1135 to allow email to mrust@michels.us by October 5, 2017. division of the existing parcel. Equal Opportunity Employer

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

LIS PENDENS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2017-CP-23Nebraska Alliance Realty Co. Plaintiff, vs. Carolyn H. Jenkins & Bobby C. Jenkins; A. Kevin Hunter II, as Greenville County Tax Collector, And also all other firms and corporations entitled to claim under, by or through the above named Defendants, and all other persons or entities unknown claiming any right, title,) interest, estate in or lien upon the real estate described herein; And also any unknown adults being as a class designated as John Doe; And also any unknown infants or persons under disability being as a class designated as Richard Roe, Defendants TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action will be commenced in this Court upon the Complaint of the above-named Plaintiff above seeking a Declaratory Judgment to quiet title to the property described herein below in the name of the Plaintiff Property Description: All that certain piece, parcel or lot of land, together with improvements thereon, situate, lying and being on the southern side of Lanewood Drive in te County of Greenville, State of South Carlina, being known and designated as Lot No. 52 and the adjoining one-half of Lot No. 51, on a plat of Pineforest recorded in plat Book QQ at Page 106-107 in the Office of the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County, South Carolina. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however and portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Derivation: This being the same property conveyed to Carolyn H. Every, n/k/a Carolyn H. Jenkins and Alton Lyon Every by Wooten Corp. recorded in Deed Book 839 at Page 620 in the Register of Deeds for Greenville County on March 14, 1968; thereafter Alton Lyon Avery conveyed his one-half interest to Carolyn H. Jenkins by Deed recorded in Deed Book 958 at Page 253 on October 19, 1972. Carolyn H. Jenkins thereafter conveyed a one-half interest to Bobby C. Jenkins by deed recorded in Deed Book 1029 at Page 566 on December 31, 1975. TMS#009.04-13-004.00 Degenhart & Degenhart Law, LLC 2131 Park Street Columbia, SC 29201 (803) 771-6050 By: Mary Nell Degenhart Attorneys for the Plaintiff


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE FAMILY

Random Acts of Science: Ozobot

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 11:30 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. | Wednesday-Saturday Free with admission Ozobot teaches children about coding by following colorful instructions. tcmupstate.org SAT

30

MUSIC

Between Friends

Fellowship Hall at First Baptist Greenville 2 and 7 p.m. | $15 The Greenville Symphony’s 2017-18 Spotlight Series kicks off with a casual, laid-back program that features five intimate chamber pieces ranging from romantic to contemporary. The concert will highlight musicians from every section, from strings to brass to woodwinds and percussion. greenvillesymphony.org FOOD & DRINK

Sierra Nevada Oktoberfest

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. 100 Sierra Nevada Way, Mills River, NC 5-10 p.m. | $30 - $45 Sierra Nevada’s Oktoberfest returns to Mills River, N.C., to gather thousands of beer lovers together. It’s that time of year when lederhosen-clad and dirndl-sporting friends travel from far and wide to hoist a stein in celebration. Join Sierra Nevada for a fanciful evening of festbier, feasting, costumes, dancing, raucous music,

and more. Free shuttles from downtown Asheville and Hendersonville, N.C., and free parking provided at WNC Ag Center. 828-681-5300 sierranevadaoktoberfestnc.eventbrite.com producedevents@sierranevada.com

one and can be redeemed for $10 off any of the featured authors’ books prior to or at the event. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

FUNDRAISING

The Cliffs WINE + FOOD Grand Tasting at Mountain Park

SC Mountains to Midlands Race for the Cure

Fluor Field at the West End | 945 S Main St. 8 a.m. The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® Series is the world’s largest, most successful fundraising and education event for breast cancer. The race series includes more than 140 events on four continents, with over 1 million participants coming together every year to take part in the fight against breast cancer. This important annual event raises significant funds for the breast cancer movement, thanks to supporters and survivors around the world who step up and take action by fundraising for the cause. komen.org LITERATURE

Southern Women Author Panel Talk & Signing at Fiction Addiction

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | $10 Meet these Southern women authors at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session and a book signing: Emily Colin, “The Dream Keeper’s Daughter;” Dorothy St. James, “Asking for Truffle;” and Nicole Seitz, “The Cage-Maker.” Each ticket admits

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS (Non-Jury) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-05126 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. James R. Brockman, Yolanda Miles Brockman, Billy Young, Bernice Barber, Greenville Hospital System, The State of South Carolina, The City of Greenville, and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0119.00-07-005.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be

made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: NFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, designated as Lot 15 Block C on plat of the lands of Melville Land Company shown in plat book A, page 97 recorded in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. References made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. TAX MAP #0119.00-07-005.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3 Reid School Road, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 103 Shaw St., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2016-CP-23-07579 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, PLAINTIFF, vs. Kimberly S. Evans; David H. Evans aka David Evans and if David H. Evans aka David Evans be deceased then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of David H. Evans aka David Evans, distributees and devisees at law to the Estate of David H. Evans aka David Evans, and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the amended complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; The Reserve at Riverside Townhomes Homeowners’ Association, Inc.; Greenville Hospital System; GHS Partners in Health, Inc. DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60)

FOOD & DRINK

The Cliffs at Mountain Park 4050 Highway 11, Travelers Rest 6-9 p.m. | $125 Join The Cliffs for an enchanting evening and the largest epicurean event of the year. Attendees will sample more than 150 incredible wines and enjoy delectable food pairings, chef stations, a beer garden supported by local breweries, and handcrafted spirits from around the world. There will be culinary demonstrations throughout the evening inside the cabin, and live music and dancing under the stars as part of the grand finale to The Cliffs WINE + FOOD. cliffsliving.com/thegrandtasting 866-411-5771

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to

the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on December 22, 2016; the Amended Summons and Amended Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina on January 30, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN

FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. NOTICE TO APPOINT ATTORNEY FOR DEFENANT(S) IN MILITARY SERVICE TO UNKNOWN OR KNOWN DEFENDANTS THAT MAY BE IN THE MILITARY SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ALL BEING A CLASS DESIGNATED AS RICHARD ROE: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED that Plaintiff’s attorney has applied for the appointment of an attorney to represent you. If you fail to apply for the appointment of an attorney to represent you within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you Plaintiff’s appointment will be made absolute with no further action from Plaintiff.

09.22.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

Understanding

Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Dr. Harold Ivan Smith Assisting Grievers in the Community

A FREE seminar for educators September 26, 2017 3:00pm to 5:00pm

How Long Does ‘Normal’ Grief Last? A FREE seminar for anyone experiencing grief or loss September 26, 2017 6:45pm to 9:00pm

If I Were Grieving ‘Right’ Should I Be Done by Now?

A full day workshop for professional caregivers $35.00 Registration Fee for Professionals seeking CEU Credit

September 27, 2017 8:30am - 4:00pm All seminars are located at the TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC For more information or to make a reservation, call (864) 235-8330 or register online at www.thomasmcafee.com. Presented as a public service by:


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.22.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

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1 Persistent dull pain 5 Bohr studied them 10 Really toil 15 Mule or flat 19 Stubble spot 20 Thieving sort 21 Evita of “Evita” 22 Bigwig’s benefit 23 Units of absorbed dose 24 Ending theme for Roy Rogers’ show 26 Mata — (famous spy) 27 Ultimately occupy 29 Fencing implements 30 Added to the database 32 Unsaturated solid alcohols 33 “Cybill” actress Pfeiffer 34 Dozing audibly 35 Sam of “Sirens” 36 Rouse 37 Kind of PC terminal 39 Stephen of “Roadkill” 40 Conscious 45 Summertime drink 46 Whale herd 49 Most uncanny 51 Expand 52 Ancient region in Asia Minor 54 Perfume 55 Forest clearing, e.g.

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By Frank Longo 115 Troublesome critter 116 Part of IRS 117 Pig’s sound 118 Person flying the coop 119 Plaits of hair 120 Present perfect, e.g. 121 Fishers using nets DOWN

1 Plot units 2 Monastery song 3 “X marks the spot” stash 4 Guarantee 5 “Iliad” hero 6 Bilingual person, at times 7 Alley- — (hoops play) 8 Bike with a small engine 9 Big name in voice chat 10 Lively outing 11 Sublet, say 12 Shapiro of NPR 13 Beetle producer 14 Port in Lower California 15 Marble, e.g. 16 Going in the direction of 17 Hatch on the Senate floor 18 Struggling to earn, with “out” 25 “Life” director Demme 28 French fashion designer Paul 104 French kin of “danke” 89 The U.S., to Mexicans 31 Rustic types 105 TV financial adviser 90 Phone up 37 The “C” of C-section Suze 91 Not injured 38 Enact again 107 Not made up 92 Oklahoman, informally 40 “Super!” 108 Deli loaves 41 Place to order a Chianti, 93 Try very hard 110 Fashion’s Saint Laurent 96 Gnu or okapi marking say 111 Stun, as with a police gun 97 Expiating person 42 They may be classified 114 Silent film star Chaney 98 Calorific cakes 43 Buffets, e.g. 100 Eleanor of kid-lit 44 Inflames with love Crossword answers: page 37 101 College officials 47 Supplied with ventilation 48 Official charges 50 Turned on by by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 53 Missing, militarily 56 Analyze in grammar school 57 Birchbark craft 60 Extra-wide, as footwear goes 62 Gray color 65 City in Tibet 67 Ethyl or propyl ending 69 — Rock (central Australian landmark) 72 Nano and others 73 Sacred hymn 76 Driver’s lic. and such 79 Maiden-named 81 Nonsense song syllable 83 Back stroke? 85 Cuzco native 86 Buyer’s bottom line 87 Author Caldwell 88 Thin slices of Sudoku answers: page 37 Easy bacon

Sudoku

FRIDAYS 5:30PM-9:30PM NOMA Square - FREE Admission Fo r f u l l s c h e d u l e , v i s i t

www.GvilleEvents.com


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE The General Election for the City and Special Purpose District offices will be held on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. City of Greenville: City Council at Large and City Council District 2. City of Fountain Inn: City Council Ward 3, City Council Ward 5 and Referendum. City of Greer: City Council District 6. City of Mauldin: City Council Seat 3. City of Simpsonville: City Council Ward 2, City Council Ward 4, and City Council Ward 6. City of Travelers Rest: Mayor and City Council at Large. Public Service Districts: Belmont Fire and Sanitation District (two seats); Berea Public Service District (two seats); Brookfield Special Tax District (three seats); Canebrake Fire District (two seats); Clear Spring Fire-Rescue (two seats); Duncan Chapel Fire District (two seats); Foothills Fire Service District (three seats); Gantt Fire, Sewer and Police District (one seat); Glassy Mountain Fire Service Area (four seats); Gowensville Fire District (three seats); Lake Cunningham Fire District (two seats); Landrum Fire & Rescue District Region 3 (one seat); Marietta Water, Fire, Sanitation and Sewer District (one seat); North Greenville Fire District (three seats); Parker Sewer and Fire Sub District (two seats); Piedmont Park Fire District (one seat); Slater Marietta Fire & Police District (two seats); South Greenville Area Fire District (two seat); Taylors Fire and Sewer District (one seat); Tigerville Fire District (three seats); Wade Hampton Fire and Sewer District (one seat). School Trustee District 01 (five seats). Any person wishing to vote in this election must register no later than Saturday, October 7, 2017. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES.org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on November 7, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601, (864) 467-7260. At 12 noon on November 10, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in the Public Service District elections. This hearing will be held at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900 Greenville SC 29601. The following precincts and polling places will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: Precincts Polling Places CITY OF FOUNTAIN INN Fountain Inn 1 Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N Main St Fountain Inn 2 Fountain Inn Activities Center 610 Fairview St Pineview Fountain Inn Activities Center 610 Fairview St Simpsonville 5 Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N Main St Jones&Cooks Pine Grove Baptist Church 808 Gulliver St Walnut Springs Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N Main St CITY OF GREENVILLE Greenville 1 Greenville 3 Greenville 4 Greenville 5 Greenville 6 Greenville 7 Greenville 8 Greenville 10 Greenville 14 Greenville 16 Greenville 17 Greenville 18 Greenville 19 Greenville 20 Greenville 21 Greenville 22 Greenville 23 Greenville 24 Greenville 25 Greenville 26 Greenville 27 Greenville 28 Greenville 29 Dove Tree Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2 Mission Rock Hill Southside Spring Forest

Stone Lake Community Club Brutontown Community Center Brutontown Community Center Sears Shelter W Greenville Recreation Center W Greenville Recreation Center West End Community Dev. Center Springfield Baptist Church Phillis Wheatley Augusta Rd Baptist Church St Matthew United Methodist Ch Augusta Rd Baptist Church Pleasant Valley Connection Center Trinity United Methodist Church Meals on Wheels Sanctuary Church Eastlan Baptist Church Enoree River Baptist Association McCarter Presbyterian Church Overbrook Baptist Church Overbrook Baptist Church Francis Asbury United Methodist Church Enoree River Baptist Association Morningside Baptist Church Enoree River Baptist Association Enoree River Baptist Association Morningside Baptist Church Morningside Baptist Church Augusta Rd Baptist Church Greenville Nazarene Church

707 Chick Springs Rd 200 Leo Lewis St 200 Leo Lewis St 100 E Park Ave 8 Rochester St 8 Rochester St 404 Vardry St 600 E McBee Ave 40 John McCarroll Way 1823 Augusta St 701 Cleveland St 1823 Augusta St 510 Old Augusta Rd 2703 Augusta Rd 15 Oregon St 302 Parkins Mill Rd 625 S Pleasantburg Dr 421 Dallas Rd 2 Pelham Rd 1705 E North St 1705 E North St 1800 E North St 421 Dallas Rd 1115 Pelham Rd 421 Dallas Rd 421 Dallas Rd 1115 Pelham Rd 1115 Pelham Rd 1823 Augusta St 1201 Haywood Rd

CITY OF GREER Suber Mill Granite Creek Riverside

Praise Cathedral Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Riverside Baptist Church

3390 Brushy Creek Rd 1002 S Buncombe Rd 1249 S Suber Rd

CITY OF MAULDIN Conestee Greenbriar Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2 Mauldin 3 Mauldin 4 Mauldin 5 Mauldin 6 Mauldin 7 Ranch Creek

Mauldin First Baptist Church Messiah Lutheran Church Mauldin Cultural Center Forrester Woods Club House Mauldin First Baptist Church Mauldin United Methodist Church Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 Ray Hopkins Senior Center Holland Park Church of Christ Mauldin First Baptist Church

150 S Main St-Fellowship Hall 1100 Log Shoals Rd 101 E Butler Rd 424 Piney Grove Rd 150 S Main St-Fellowship Hall 100 E Butler Rd 802 Miller Rd 203 Corn Rd@699 E Butler Rd 1131Holland Rd 150 S Main St-Fellowship Hall

CITY OF SIMPSONVILLE Bridge Fork Graze Branch Hillcrest Moore Creek Neely Farms Raintree Simpsonville 1 Simpsonville 2 Simpsonville 3 Simpsonville 4 Simpsonville 5 Simpsonville 6 Standing Springs Sycamore

Kingdom Life Church Kingdom Life Church Kingdom Life Church Renovation Church Calvary Baptist Church Calvary Baptist Church Simpsonville City Park Center Renovation Church Simpsonville United Methodist Ch Renovation Church Center for Community Services Calvary Baptist Church Renovation Church Simpsonville City Park Center

416 Holland Rd 416 Holland Rd 416 Holland Rd 611 Richardson St 3810 Grandview Dr 3810 Grandview Dr 405 E Curtis St 611 Richardson St 215 SE Main St 611 Richardson St 1102 Howard Dr 3810 Grandview Dr 611 Richardson St 405 E Curtis St

CITY OF TRAVELERS REST Enoree Furman Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest 2

City Hall City Hall City Hall Renfrew Baptist Church

6711 State Park Rd 6711 State Park Rd 6711 State Park Rd 951 Geer Hwy

BELMONT FIRE & SANITATION DISTRICT Greenville 29 Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Belmont Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Conestee Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Donaldson Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Royal Oaks Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Mount Pleasant Belmont Fire Station Hdqt

701 Fork Shoals Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd

BEREA PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT Aiken Berea Fire Station Hdqt Berea Berea Fire Station Hdqt Enoree Berea Fire Station Hdqt Furman Berea Fire Station Hdqt Lakeview Berea Fire Station Hdqt Monaview Berea Fire Station Hdqt Poinsett Berea Fire Station Hdqt Saluda Berea Fire Station Hdqt Sulphur Springs Berea Fire Station Hdqt Westcliffe Berea Fire Station Hdqt Westside Berea Fire Station Hdqt

7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 7401 White Horse Rd

BROOKFIELD SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT Dove Tree Dove Tree Club House

2 Sugarberry Dr

BROOKFIELD SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT W/ WADE HAMPTON FIRE & SEWER Dove Tree Dove Tree Club House 2 Sugarberry Dr CANEBRAKE FIRE DISTRICT Dunklin Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Fork Shoals Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Pineview Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Verdmont Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt

100 Hillside Church Rd 100 Hillside Church Rd 100 Hillside Church Rd 100 Hillside Church Rd

CLEAR SPRING FIRE –RESCUE Bells Crossing Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt Circle Creek Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt Holly Tree Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt Kilgore Farms Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt River Walk Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt Sparrows Point Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt Walnut Springs Clear Spring Fire Station Hdqt

3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd 3008 Woodruff Rd

DUNCAN CHAPEL FIRE DISTRICT Altamont Forest Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt Enoree Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt Furman Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt Paris Mountain Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt Poinsett Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt Travelers Rest 1 Duncan Chapel Fire Station Hdqt

5111 Old Buncombe Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd

GANTT FIRE SEWER & POLICE DISTRICT Greenville 16 Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Greenville 19 Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Belle Meade Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Belmont Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Carolina Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Chestnut Hills Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Donaldson Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Grove Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Royal Oaks Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Southside Gantt Fire Station Hdgt Mount Pleasant Gantt Fire Station Hgdt

1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd 1201 White Horse Rd

GLASSY MOUNTAIN FIRE SERVICE AREA Gowensville Glassy Mountain Fire Station Hdqt Jennings Mill Glassy Mountain Fire Station Hdqt Maridell Glassy Mountain Fire Station Hdqt Tigerville Glassy Mountain Fire Station Hdqt

2015 Hwy 11 2015 Hwy 11 2015 Hwy 11 2015 Hwy 11

FOOTHILLS FIRE SERVICE AREA with SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 GLASSY MOUNTAIN FIRE SERVICE AREA with SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 GOWENSVILLE PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT Gowensville Gowensville Community Center Skyland Gowensville Community Center

14186 Hwy 11 14186 Hwy 11

GOWENSVILLE PUBLIC SERVICE DISTRICT w/ SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 LAKE CUNNINGHAM FIRE DISTRICT Castle Rock Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Clear Creek Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Darby Ridge Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Fox Chase Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Frowhawk Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Gowensville Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Laurel Ridge Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Locust Hill Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Mountain View Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Oneal Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Sandy Flat Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Skyland Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Tigerville Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Tyger River Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt

2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd

LANDRUM FIRE AND RESCUE DISTRICT w/SPARTANBURG SCHOOL DIST 01 Gowensville Gowensville Community Center 14186 Hwy 11 NORTH GREENVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Altamont Forest North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Darby Ridge North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Maridell North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Mountain View North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Sandy Flat North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Travelers Rest 2 North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Tubbs Mountain North Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Ebenezer North Greenville Fire Station #2 Furman North Greenville Fire Station #2 Slater Marietta North Greenville Fire Station #2 Sulphur Springs North Greenville Fire Station #2 Travelers Rest 1 North Greenville Fire Station #2

923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 923 Tigerville Rd 596 Hodgens Rd 596 Hodgens Rd 596 Hodgens Rd 596 Hodgens Rd 596 Hodgens Rd

PARKER SEWER & FIRE SUB DISTRICT Aiken Parker Fire Station #2 Carolina Parker Fire Station #2 Chestnut Hills Parker Fire Station #2 Greenville 06 Parker Fire Station #2 Greenville 07 Parker Fire Station #2 Greenville 08 Parker Fire Station #2 Tanglewood Parker Fire Station #2 Welcome Parker Fire Station #2 Westcliffe Parker Fire Station #2 Enoree Parker Fire Station #3 Greenville 04 Parker Fire Station #3 Lakeview Parker Fire Station #3 Leawood Parker Fire Station #3 Monaview Parker Fire Station #3 Paris Mountain Parker Fire Station #3 Poinsett Parker Fire Station #3 Sevier Parker Fire Station #3 Westside Parker Fire Station #3

104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 104 S Washington Ave 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd 700 State Park Rd

PIEDMONT PARK FIRE DIDTRICT Altamont Forest Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Clear Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Darby Ridge Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Mountain Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Paris Mountain Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Pebble Creek Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Sandy Flat Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Sevier Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt

2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2119 State Park Rd

SLATER MARIETTA FIRE DISTRICT Ebenezer Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt Jennings Mill Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt Maridell Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt Slater Marietta Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt Tubbs Mountain Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt

3001 Geer Hwy 3001 Geer Hwy 3001 Geer Hwy 3001 Geer Hwy 3001 Geer Hwy

SLATER MARIETTA FIRE DISTRICT with MARIETTA WATER, FIRE, SANITATION & SEWER DISTRICT Ebenezer Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt 3001 Geer Hwy Slater Marietta Slater Marietta Fire Station Hdqt 3001 Geer Hwy

NOTICE INVITATION TO BID: MILLER PLACE COURT DUPLEX DEVELOPMENT, MAULDIN NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR BIDS for new construction of nine (9) duplex homes for a total of eighteen (18) dwelling units within the City of Mauldin SC. The Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) is the developer and federal requirements will apply. Bids are due to GCRA c/o LS3P Associates, Ltd. / 110 West North Street / Greenville, SC 29601 by 5:00PM on November 8, 2017. For information and to request an electronic bid package, contact John Edwards at LS3P Associates, Ltd. 864-272-1228 or johnedwards@LS3P.com. Electronic transmitted bids will be accepted. GCRA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Local residents, Women & Minority Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in the bidding process. EOE, EHO. COMPLAINT NOTICE A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 123 Odom Circle, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0147.00-06-007.00, Greenville County, SC.

SOUTH GREENVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Baker Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Conestee South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Donaldson South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Dunklin South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Fork Shoals South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Long Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Moore Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Neely Farms South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Ranch Creek South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Reedy Fork South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Standing Springs South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Verdmont South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Ware Place South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt Woodmont South Greenville Fire Station Hdqt

8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer 8305 Augusta Rd Pelzer

TAYLORS FIRE & SEWER DISTRICT Clear Creek Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Darby Ridge Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Edwards Forest Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Laurel Ridge Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Locust Hill Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Mountain Creek Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Pebble Creek Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Stone Valley Taylors Fire Station Hdqt Avon Taylors Fire Station #2 Brook Glenn Taylors Fire Station #2 Del Norte Taylors Fire Station #2 Eastside Taylors Fire Station #2 Northwood Taylors Fire Station #2 Silverleaf Taylors Fire Station #2 Suber Mill Taylors Fire Station #2 Taylors Taylors Fire Station #2

3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 3335 Wade Hampton Blvd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd 405 Brushy Creek Rd

114 Bennington Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0534.04-01-069.00, Greenville County, SC.

TIGERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT Maridell Tigerville Fire Station Mountain View Tigerville Fire Station Tigerville Tigerville Fire Station

2605 Hwy 414 2605 Hwy 414 2605 Hwy 414

WADE HAMPTON FIRE & SEWER DISTRICT Avon Wade Hampton Fire Station Hdqt Botany Woods Wade Hampton Fire Station Hdqt Brook Glenn Wade Hampton Fire Station Hdqt Timberlake Wade Hampton Fire Station Hdqt Wade Hampton Wade Hampton Fire Station Hdqt Devenger Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 Dove Tree Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 Greenville 24 Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 Mission Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 Palmetto Wade Hampton Fire Station #2 Del Norte Wade Hampton Fire Station #3 Northwood Wade Hampton Fire Station #3 Wade Hampton Fire Station #3 Rock Hill Spring Forest Wade Hampton Fire Station #3 Wellington Wade Hampton Fire Station #3

2400 Wade Hampton Blvd 2400 Wade Hampton Blvd 2400 Wade Hampton Blvd 2400 Wade Hampton Blvd 2400 Wade Hampton Blvd 1112 Pelham Rd 1112 Pelham Rd 1112 Pelham Rd 1112 Pelham Rd 1112 Pelham Rd 4211 E North St 4211 E North St 4211 E North St 4211 E North St 4211 E North St

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23- 02324 A Kenneth Wheeler and April Wheeler, Plaintiff, vs. Clyde E. Pruitt, Robin K. Pruitt and Washington Mutual Finance, LLC, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference or that the Court may issue a general Order of Reference of this action to a master/special referee, pursuant to Rule 53, South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. _/s/ Scott F. Talley Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that TF Unlimited, LLC / DBA Taylors Food Mart intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1075 Reid School Road, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 8, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that FSY Social Club intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1119 Cedar Lane Rd., Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 8, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

508 Goldsmith Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0560.02-01-029.00, Greenville County, SC. 350 N Bates Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0644.02-01-009.00, Greenville County, SC. 82 Bruce Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number WG02.03-01-013.03, Greenville County, SC.

10 Foxhall Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0370.00-03-005.00, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before September 28, 2017.


September 22, 2017 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.