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IN THIS ISSUE

HOW TO WASTE $9 BILLION • BACKYARD BEEKEEPING • THE BREAKFAST (TOUR) CLUB

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, AUGUST 11, 2017 • Vol.19, No.32

THE TEN PROJECTS THAT WILL CHANGE HOW YOU WORK, LIVE, AND EXPERIENCE GREENVILLE

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | Tori Lant tlant@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES | David Rich ACCOUNT MANAGERS Donna Johnston Stephanie King | Rosie Peck Caroline Spivey | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT | Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

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PAGE 3

Photo by Andrew Moore

THEY SAID IT

“IT DOESN’T HURT TO HAND OUT SOME LEFTOVER HONEY TO NEIGHBORS.” Matt Putnam, on the popularity of his beekeeping hobby

“It’s kind of a throwback to 1990s-era Wes Craven, with a little bit of John Carpenter’s ‘Halloween’ thrown in.” Writer/director Jeff Martell, on the artistic inspiration of “Risers,” a horror flick being shot around town

“Imagine, if you will, what life would be like if you could not get into a grocery store or a school or a government office, or in this case, eat in a restaurant.” U.S. Attorney Beth Drake, on the letters 10 Greenville-area restaurants were sent regarding compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017

OPINION

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Views from your community

The V.C. Summer nuclear debacle matters to the Upstate, too By Shelley Robbins

Every time I’ve written about the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station project in the Midlands, I’ve intentionally avoided the term “meltdown.” It was too trite. But after last Monday’s announcement that the project, undertaken jointly by SCE&G and Santee Cooper, would be abandoned, “meltdown” seems to be the only term that fits. So what happened? Basically, South Carolina’s laws and regulatory oversight all cataclysmically failed, and the project collapsed under its own weight. Upstate Forever saw this coming. Back in 2016, we challenged the Dominion Transco to Charleston pipeline. We questioned the “need” for the pipeline with new nuclear power generation coming online that would free up gas capacity. With the help of the South Carolina Environmental Law Project, we fought the Dominion pipeline with every tool we had. In late spring, we were faced with a choice — whether to appeal the final permit and take the whole issue to court. And then Westinghouse, the contractor hired to build the two nuclear reactors, filed for bankruptcy, and we realized we’d lost our argument that the new pipeline was not needed. Upstate Forever calculated the cost to complete the V.C. Summer project and compared it to current costs for natural gas plants and grid scale solar, which are much cheaper. The numbers simply didn’t add up. How could the powers that be possibly determine that finishing the nuclear plants was in the best interest of South Carolina ratepayers?

This was in April — three months ago. It was clear then that V.C. Summer was in deep trouble, but they didn’t pull the plug when they should have. The ratepayers will pay the costs. And it’s not just the Midlands and Lowcountry that’ll bear the consequences— the Upstate will be affected, too.

Gov. Henry McMaster has called for hearings on the nuclear failure, but this isn’t enough. The entire system needs an overhaul. First, we must suffer the environmental damage and the assault on property rights caused by a pipeline that will serve Midlands and Lowcountry customers. We get no benefit. Second, Duke Energy will need to make some decisions about future capacity in the Upstate soon. They will almost certainly have to decommission the Oconee Nuclear Station around 2030. While Duke has received a license for a new nuclear facility in Cherokee County, UF does not believe that station will actually be built. Massive nuclear capacity simply isn’t justified or cost-effective. The V.C. Summer failure was the nail in the coffin. The good news is that this situation has brought systemic regulatory problems to light — specifically, the deep flaws in the state’s Base Load Review Act from 2007. The act’s problems are exacerbated by a weak Public Service Commission and an Office of Regulatory Staff that operates under a conflicting mission — to represent the interests of both citizens and industry in matters before the commission. This structure must change. Fortunately, Gov. Henry McMaster has called for hearings on the nuclear failure, but this isn’t enough. The entire system needs an overhaul, and now is the perfect time because the state’s energy paradigm is currently shifting dramatically. Costs for utility-scale solar have fallen; battery storage technology has improved; and there is a significant interest in energy efficiency options. All of these things can be incentivized by the state, but the regulatory structure in South Carolina either doesn’t allow it or makes it very difficult. I wonder how many residential batteries or solar panels could be incentivized with the money spent on one peaking plant? It’s also completely conceivable that new base load will not need to be built at all. This is already being proposed in California and New York, where nuclear base load is being replaced by aggressive efficiency, renewables, and storage programs. This option restores the carbon neutrality of the project in a way that natural gas simply cannot. We have the opportunity right now to make positive change, to raise a phoenix out of this incredible nuclear dumpster fire. Let your legislators know that you want more accountability, more transparency, and more clean energy options for all of us in South Carolina. You can also help by supporting Upstate Forever. We work tirelessly to protect our natural resources through conservation and advocacy. Join us and help keep the Upstate green, vibrant, and prosperous. Shelley Robbins is the energy and state policy manager for Upstate Forever.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

OPINION

Views from your community

Repeal the Base Load Review Act Customers shouldn’t bear the brunt of costs for failed projects like V.C. Summer Nuclear Station By William Timmons

Last week, SCANA and state-owned utility Santee Cooper decided to abandon two nuclear power plants in Fairfield County after roughly five years of construction and $9 billion spent to date. Over 5,100 people will be out of work. Local businesses that relied on this workforce will suffer. No new energy capacity will be produced. The project will essentially render this once growing area a ghost town. How did this happen? How can a project like this simply stop? SCANA and Santee Cooper have jointly operated one nuclear plant in Fairfield County since 1983. In 2008, they decided to expand their nuclear capacity and jointly build two new nuclear power plants on the same site, the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station. Two and a half weeks ago, on July 18, I toured the construction site with several senators and staff to get an update on the project. During the tour, the project manager told me that they were 70 percent complete. While we were cautioned about what the Westinghouse bankruptcy filing would mean for the project, it seemed after touring the site that surely a solution could be reached to continue. On July 31, Santee Cooper and SCANA announced their intent to abandon the project. To add insult to injury, SCANA announced that it would seek a rate hike to cover the approximately $3 billion of abandonment costs. Days later, they announced quarterly profits of $120 million. The facts surrounding the decision to abandon the nuclear power plants are complicated. They include changes in federal energy policy, the massive failure of Westinghouse to manage project deadlines and construction costs, Toshiba’s refusal to bail out Westinghouse after bankruptcy, and perhaps a failure on SCANA and Santee Cooper’s part to meaningfully address these factors sooner in the process. What can we change right now? Santee Cooper needs to be dealt with. It is a state-owned asset, and as such, it will have to answer to the General Assembly next legislative session. SCANA is privately owned, so our options are more limited; however, we can make sure that customers stop bearing the brunt of this project’s failure. We do this by repealing the 2007 Base Load Review Act.

The General Assembly passed this bill with good intentions and in preparation for a growing energy infrastructure. When it was enacted, legislators did not anticipate five years of construction, $9 billion, and more than 5,100 jobs lost. Among other things, the legislation essentially allows utilities to pass along estimated project costs to ratepayers prior to construction, should the Public Service Commission (PSC) deem the decision to build the nuclear plant prudent. If a project is abandoned after the prudency determination, then the utility is allowed to defer costs and include them in its next rate case, but it must prove that abandonment was prudent. Again, while there is a provision for abandonment, no legislator truly considered that we might find ourselves in this situation. We cannot shift costs to ratepayers in order to finance such a tremendous risk, especially when a state-owned asset is involved and the parties are providing something as essential as power generation. This legislation must be repealed immediately. Like many of you, I cannot simply sit back and accept our current set of facts. We must demand answers. More importantly, we need accountability and to make sure that this cannot happen again. The first step is to repeal the Base Load Review Act. The General Assembly has the ability to reconvene in statewide session between now and January for matters of this magnitude. If we do nothing in the next few weeks and the PSC approves the pending $3 billion rate hike to let SCANA walk away scot-free, then the legislature will be powerless to hold SCANA accountable for their failure. It is imperative that we carry out the duties you elected us to exercise on your behalf. I urge my colleagues to recognize this opportunity to protect ratepayers going forward. We must act to protect the thousands of South Carolina families that will be adversely affected by this decision. William Timmons represents District 6 in the South Carolina State Senate and is an entrepreneur and attorney in Greenville.

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

COMPLIANCE CHECK, PLEASE The federal government targets some Greenville restaurants to make sure they meet Americans With Disabilities Acts standards CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com and ARIEL TURNER | STAFF aturner@communityjournals.com

Ten Greenville restaurants are getting reviewed — but not in the way they are accustomed. Instead of being rated by the quality of their entrees, appetizers, and desserts and the attentiveness and knowledge of their wait staff, these 10 eateries, all located within a 5-mile radius of downtown, are being reviewed for their compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Upon receiving the letter and survey, Beeby filled it out immediately and sent it back. “I don’t foresee any issues,” he says. “It was very clear no one had complained.” When planning the Trappe Door’s design, instead of incurring the expense of installing an elevator from the street-level front entrance to the ground floor, the restaurant turned its attention elsewhere — the backdoor in the rear alleyway behind the Trappe Door and Barley’s. From the alley to the backdoor, they constructed a ramp, making it fully accessible to wheelchairs and those who cannot descend the entryway stairs. The ADA requires the U.S. Department of

When planning the Trappe Door’s design, instead of incurring the expense of installing an elevator from the street-level front entrance to the ground floor, the restaurant turned its attention elsewhere — the backdoor in the rear alleyway. Recently, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Columbia sent letters to 10 restaurants it found on a third-party website that identified the city’s most popular restaurants. Rob Sneed, an assistant U.S. Attorney who is one of the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Civil Rights coordinators for the District of South Carolina, would not disclose which restaurants received letters because the investigation is open. The office also declined to specify which site they consulted. However, after consulting several different lists and making calls, The Greenville Journal received verbal confirmation from management at Sully’s Steamers and The Trappe Door, both on Washington Street downtown, that they are among the 10 restaurants that received the letters. Josh Beeby owns the Belgium-inspired Trappe Door, which features a rather long set of stairs from its front Washington Street entrance to the basement-level restaurant below. Needless to say, their stairs would not be suited to wheelchair access. Despite appearances, the Trappe Door was built to ADA code when it was created in 2011, according to Beeby. Many older restaurants downtown are grandfathered.

Justice to do periodic reviews to see if restaurants are compliant, and to bring civil enforcement actions to obtain compliance and issue penalties as appropriate. Similar restaurant ADA compliance reviews have been conducted in other cities, including Houston and Philadelphia, but this is the first in South Carolina, Sneed said. Greenville was picked because it is one of the state’s three biggest cities, and there hasn’t been as much ADA enforcement activity here as in Columbia and Charleston. Greenville’s growth and emergence as a tourist destination was considered as well. “I’m sure that was a factor,” he said. Restaurant owners who received the letter were asked to complete a survey regarding the restaurant’s accessibility, such as entryway width and restroom design, as well as their building’s age and any building modifications. An investigator also schedules a visit to evaluate ADA compliance. Those visits likely will begin in September, Sneed said. If violations are found, the DOJ pursues voluntary compliance measures first, but civil lawsuits may be pursued in federal court if necessary, Sneed said.

The ADA ensures those with disabilities can access public spaces such as restaurants.

“Imagine, if you will, what life would be like if you could not get into a grocery store or a school or a government office, or in this case, eat in a restaurant,” said U.S. Attorney Beth Drake. “We look forward to working with our restaurants. If any restaurants are noncompliant, we will work with them to bring them into compliance, so that the entire community can enjoy their facilities,” she added. Similar compliance reviews were conducted last year at Richland County polling places, and violations were found at onethird of them, Sneed said. The review resulted in an agreement with the county election board to ensure all polling places are ADA compliant. Another investigation resulted in an agreement with the Columbia Police De-

partment to provide sign language interpreters so people who are deaf or hard of hearing can communicate with officers.

Greenville was picked because it is one of the state’s three biggest cities, and there hasn’t been as much ADA enforcement activity here as in Columbia and Charleston.


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NEWS IN BRIEF CITY

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Police to close top decks of all garages except two during eclipse As thousands of people prepare to descend upon Greenville to view the total eclipse on Aug. 21, Greenville’s public safety agencies — from police to fire to emergency medical services — are preparing for every kind of emergency under the sun. From increased traffic and, potentially, more wrecks to roof collapses caused by too many people getting on top of buildings that cannot structurally handle the load, to overloaded wireless networks, police and fire officials have been prepping for a once-in-a-lifetime event. Greenville officials say one of the biggest concerns is people gathering on rooftops that are not engineered for rooftop gatherings. The extra weight can cause buildings to be structurally undermined, potentially causing a roof collapse. “We’re really discouraging rooftop events,” Miller said. If somebody insists on having a rooftop event, planners should have the fire marshal inspect their roofs to determine how many people can be safely accommodated, Miller said. The top deck of two of Greenville’s parking garages will be open for pedestrians during the eclipse — the Commons garage adjacent to the Hyatt and the Poinsett garage. All of the other garage’s top floors will be sealed off and staffed to prevent people from going up to them, Miller said. “The load of people moving around is different than the load caused by cars traveling to park,” he said. Police will patrol areas where eclipse viewers are expected to gather. As far as traffic goes, Miller said motorists who want to view the eclipse are asked to pull into a parking lot, not just onto the shoulder of the road. If one driver pulls onto the shoulder, others will do the same and the close proximity of cars increases the chance of a distracted driver running off the road and causing a multi-vehicle wreck. If it is overcast in Greenville on the day of the eclipse, police are still expecting increased traffic downtown, especially around the Bon Secours Wellness Arena, which is the inclement weather site of Eclipse @ Furman events and will livestream the eclipse from NASA. Lastly, Miller urges people to download the Greenville Police Department’s mobile app so they can still receive notifications of emergencies and detours in case wireless networks are taxed too much by people trying to livestream or post eclipse photographs to social media sites. “In the area where there will be the greatest concentration of people, we will have the least capacity for cell service,” he said. Local and state officials have asked Verizon to increase bandwidth along the path of totality, Miller said. — Cindy Landrum

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Clemson professor receives $6M for research to lower drug prices Clemson University professor Sarah Harcum has been awarded a $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to lower the cost of drugs for illnesses such as Crohn’s disease, breast cancer, severe anemia, and multiple sclerosis. Harcum and several other researchers plan to research better ways of engineering Chinese hamster ovary cells, which the drug industry uses to produce half of all biopharmaceuticals. According to Harcum, a bioengineering professor, Chinese hamster ovary cells are highly adaptable, bear no human viruses, and are capable of high-level production. But the hamster cells have one flaw: genetic drift, a series of mutations that ultimately hinders drug production for manufacturers and increases prices for patients. Genetic drift begins at cell development, according to Harcum. A line of ovarian cells ideally develops with a uniform genetic composition, which is necessary for the efficient production of all biopharmaceuticals. Unfortunately, the composition drifts as cells reproduce, and they become less effective at creating drugs. As a result, production becomes more expensive as it requires more monitoring, control, and analysis throughout the manufacturing process. Some biopharmaceuticals under current pro-

duction conditions can cost patients thousands of dollars per treatment, according to Harcum. Harcum said the study is expected to improve the manufacturing process for biopharmaceuticals, creating more affordable prices for patients. “We expect by the end of the study we will have identified some genes that cause the instability,” said Harcum. “With success, the Chinese hamster ovary cell line will stay more stable during the manufacturing. We hope to get that drift to be reduced; that’s the ultimate goal.” —Andrew Moore

FOOD

Growler Haus opens in the Village of West Greenville The newest addition to the growing Village of West Greenville restaurant scene opened July 28. Growler Haus Village, located at 12 Lois Ave. across from Shindig Furnishings and next to the Village Wrench bike shop, joins the Village Grind, Golden Brown & Delicious, and the Anchorage, with Kuka Juice and Neo Burrito planned to open later this summer. Founder Craig Kinley owns locations in Anderson, Fountain Inn, and downtown Spartanburg. The 2,400-square-foot completely renovated indoor space and an 800-square-foot partially covered patio are decorated with remnants of projects in the Village and reclaimed materials from around the Upstate. NEWS IN BRIEF continued on PAGE 11


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS IN BRIEF The main feature – the 32 taps – line the back left wall. A second and smaller set of taps is located in the right side of the space near the kitchen. That space will be used for private parties or to accommodate heavier weekend crowds. Most of the beer will be local or regional, Kinley says. A small-plate menu made for snacking while relaxing with a cold one will change seasonally. —Ariel Turner

Sidewall Pizza owners announce new cocktail bar Rocket Surgery The owners of Sidewall Pizza announced the identity of their mystery project next to the Tasting Room and Farmhouse Tacos in Travelers Rest — a new cocktail bar called Rocket Surgery. Located at 164D S. Main St., the new spot will also offer snacks, full meals, and brunch, and it will open in just a few weeks, says co-owner Andy O’Mara. “We’re not long-time chefs,” says O’Mara. “We just want to create a great place for people to hang out.” The Rocket Surgery space was initially supposed to house a barbecue joint the Sidewall owners had previously announced. But after going through all of the permitting and planning for the 146 S. Main St. location, O’Mara says the Martha’s Hardware property at 21 S. Main St. became available. Shortly after, the owners decided Martha’s was a better fit for the barbecue concept, which should open later this year. O’Mara says he and his partner, Loren Frant, are fans of craft cocktails, but they haven’t yet had a chance to enter that world because Sidewall Pizza sells wine and beer only. By contrast, the Rocket Surgery beverage program will be spirits-focused with fewer than eight beer options – all bottled or canned – and a limited selection of wines. Rocket Surgery will seat 55 indoors and is designed to have more of an adult feel than the family-friendly Sidewall. O’Mara also plans to have outdoor patio seating at some point, but not until they’re ready for it. Initially, Rocket Science will be open Thursday through Monday at 5 p.m. for dinner, with brunch offered on Saturday and Sunday. —Ariel Turner

CITY

Work begins on new public plaza in Village of West Greenville The Village of West Greenville will soon have a new public plaza scheduled for completion in October. Located between The Anchorage and Community Journals on Perry Avenue, the roughly 5,000-square-foot plaza will feature catenary lights strung from rooftop to rooftop, one-of-a-kind cast-iron light poles donated by local businessman and community leader Richard Heusel, and public art as a nod to the area’s thriving arts scene. The plaza will also include a large artis-

tic Village of West Greenville sign funded by a $3,000 Placemaking Micro-Grant from the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors. Tracy Ramseur, the city’s development coordinator, said the Village’s need for such a space is driven, in large part, by the community-minded entrepreneurs opening new businesses in the area. “The Village of West Greenville is fortunate to have an eclectic mix of small businesses, ranging from artist studios to restaurants, as well as a very active business association,” Ramseur said. “They host a variety of free community events, like VILLive concerts and monthly First Fridays, that bring hundreds of people to the Village’s epicenter, and the new plaza will serve as the ideal backdrop for those special events.” Saluda Construction, who is also working on the Augusta Road streetscape improvements, began work on the plaza in mid-July. —Ariel Turner

New Augusta trolley route has no stops in Alta Vista neighborhood When the idea of having a new trolley route in the Augusta Street area was first proposed, residents of the Alta Vista neighborhood were all for it. But when the new route started on Aug. 3, it included no stops in the area bordered by Augusta Street, Faris Road, Cleveland Street, and Church Street. Nicole McAden, public affairs specialist for Greenlink, said staff were unable to identify stop locations along McDaniel that met Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility requirements, had “buy-in” from the adjacent property owners, and had encroachment permits approved by the state Department of Transportation in time for the route’s first service day. “When the trolleys were discussed, a lot of folks thought it would be great to have stops in the neighborhood,” said Alta Vista Neighborhood Association President Curt Hall. “But there’s a difference between wanting a stop and having that stop near your house. I guess I understand why people wouldn’t want a stop in front of their house.” Greenlink will evaluate any requests or recommendations for stops as they come in, and plans to re-evaluate the route when its season ends in October. The Augusta route, one of the new routes in Greenlink’s expanded trolley service, includes Cleveland Park and the Greenville Zoo, popular attractions where parking can get extremely scarce, especially on weekend days when the weather is nice. Traffic on Augusta is a major concern as well and was one of the biggest reasons residents banded together to successfully fight against a Chick-fil-A drive-thru restaurant in the redeveloping Lewis Plaza. Another new route, Arts West, will include the growing arts and restaurant district in the Village of West Greenville. It will also serve the Hampton-Pinckney and Southernside neighborhoods, as well as provide access to Heritage Green, the home of Greenville’s main library and museums. —Cindy Landrum

Health Events Meet the Midwives Tues., Aug. 22 • 6 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Talk with the Docs Wed., Aug. 30 • 11 a.m. • Facebook Live Visit the GHS Facebook page to take part in a live discussion with our doctors on how to ease kids back to school, keep them well during the school year and more. Caregiving ABCs Sept. 7-Oct. 10 • 6-8 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This six-week educational series is for those caring for a loved one with a memory health condition. Free; registration required. Girls on the Run Sept. 19-Dec. 2 • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Visit ghs.org/girlsontherun. Men’s Health Forum Thurs., Sept. 21 • Noon-1 p.m. • Hilton Greenville Join GHS urologist William Flanagan, MD, for a discussion on men’s health and recommended screenings. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/healthevents.

ghs.org 17-0818GJ


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COVER

THE BIG ONES Several projects in and near downtown will impact the city and its residents for decades to come. Here’s a look at how those projects are progressing. WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

2. GREENVILLE HEALTH SYSTEM SWAMP RABBIT TRAIL EXPANSION Despite the fact that the county has yet to identify where an extension to the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail will cross Laurens Road with a flyover bridge, work has started on the 2.9 miles of trail from Pleasantburg Drive to Verdae Boulevard. A contractor has begun pulling up railroad ties on that section, and paving is expected to begin by January 2018. The county expects to identify the location of a trail bridge over Laurens Road soon as negotiations with private property owners

are in their final stages. Greenville County is overseeing construction of the project, and the city is pitching in $2.5 million to build bridges across Laurens Road, Haywood Road, and Verdae Boulevard. The trail will go under Pleasantburg Drive. “When it comes to interchanges, we’re going to make sure trail users have safe passage,” said Greenville City Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle. “We’re not going to make the mistakes we did in the past.” Other sections of the trail cross busy four-lane roads. The bridge over Verdae Boulevard will be 280 feet long to accommodate the lanes of traffic and to make sure the grade is Americans with Disabilities Act compliant, she said.

1. CAMPERDOWN Work on Camperdown, a mixed-use project that has already transformed the look of South Main Street, continues. The old Greenville News building has been demolished, and the newspaper has moved into a smaller office building on the site, a city block across from the Peace Center. Work has started on the podium for the development’s multifamily building, and Centennial American Properties took the plaza’s design and finishes to the City of Greenville’s Design Review Board this week. In the fall, another DRB meeting will be held regarding the architecture of Camperdown’s second office building and the buildings in the plaza. The public should see new buildings being constructed on the site by this time next year. The project should be finished early in the second quarter of 2019. Camperdown will have a 140-room AC Hotel from JHM Hotels, a 217-unit apartment development, about 80,000 square feet of retail, 150,000 square feet of office space, and 18 condominiums. The hotel has long been an anchor component of the site, but recently it was announced that portions of the hotel would draw some inspiration from newspapers in acknowledgment of the site’s predecessor.

Rendering by Wakefield Beasley & Associates


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COVER 3. 85-385 GATEWAY

5. COUNTY SQUARE

Construction on a new flyover bridge from Interstate 385 North to Interstate 85 South started last week and is expected to take several weeks, said S.C. Department of Transportation spokeswoman Kimberly Bishop. The bridge is part of the I-85-385 Gateway project, slated to cost $231 million and be completed by 2020. The Gateway project, approved by the DOT in 2012, includes construction of 12 new interchange bridges, including two flyovers that will replace the existing loop ramps that tie I-85 and I-385 together. In addition to the bridges, the project includes the extension of the fourth auxiliary lane on I-85 northbound and the addition of another lane southbound between I-385 and Pelham Road; widening I-385 from four to six lanes between Butler Road and Roper Mountain Road; reconstruction of the traffic signal system on Woodruff Road between Ketron Court and Highway 14; flood warning signs on I-85 near Rocky Creek; and construction of additional turn lanes and reconstruction of three intersections on Woodruff Road between I-85 and I-385. Bishop said the project is on schedule.

4. DIG GREENVILLE Renewable Water Resources will hold an informational meeting about Dig Greenville, the utility’s largest-ever underground sewer tunnel project, on Aug. 29. The $46 million project calls for a 1.3 mile-long tunnel through granite rock 100 feet underground for a new sewer line that will run from Cleveland Park near the Greenville Zoo to near Hudson Street. ReWa said the project should meet the sewer needs of the Reedy River basin for the next century. The underground tunnel will be 10 feet in diameter and house a 7-foot diameter pipe. Construction is expected to begin in January, said Greg Wright, ReWa’s engineering director. Access shafts will have to be constructed at each end of the tunnel. Blasting will occur at each end, but a tunnelboring machine that cuts through rock will be used for the corridor itself. The

city’s noise ordinance allows construction from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., but nighttime limits are 55 decibels, about the volume of a conversation. Some neighborhood residents had concerns that nighttime work would be too noisy. ReWa has been recording background noise levels over the summer so it can calibrate a desktop noise model it completed earlier with actual data. “The neighborhood gets quiet at night,” Wright said. “However, noises go beyond the ordinance requirement.” The noises come from a number of sources, including vehicular traffic, Greenville Zoo animals, cicadas, and other insects, he said. ReWa will use the data to determine whether asking for a variance to the noise ordinance makes sense. Working around the clock would cut up to six months off the project and save up to $1.5 million. The Aug. 29 meeting will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at United Community Bank, 306 E. North St.

Perhaps the biggest question in downtown Greenville is what’s going to happen to County Square, the former shopping mall that has served as Greenville County’s base of operations for the past three decades. The public will have to wait a while longer for the answer, as Greenville County Council is still trying to choose from the three remaining private developers that submitted proposals. The county has not officially disclosed the names of the finalists, chosen from an initial six developers, although there has been media speculation about who they are. Bob Taylor, chairman of the Council’s County Square Development Ad Hoc committee, said the Council has not set a timetable for a decision. County Square is nearly 38 acres and is within walking distance of Falls Park, Fluor Field, and the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail. The redevelopment will include a 250,000-square-foot office building to house the county offices currently located on the site. County officials also asked for a 1,000-space parking garage to be included in the proposals. Because the redevelopment will eliminate County Square parking spots that are used by the public when they go to baseball games at Fluor Field or elsewhere in that area of downtown, County Council has agreed to spend up to $15 million for a new parking garage somewhere in the West End. The City of Greenville would pick a site for the parking garage, operate it, and keep any parking revenue it would generate, according to an intergovernmental agreement.


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COVER 6. VERDAE Several projects are underway at Verdae. Lots are being sold for Bella Grove, an 82-lot neighborhood of single-level homes located with Verdae Development’s Hollingsworth Park. The cottage-style homes, which have a maximum height of 1.5 stories, start in the high $400,000s. Work continues on a mixed-use commercial project by Verdae Properties on nearly 70 acres at Henderson and Laurens roads. The project, which includes the former Sam’s Club and Best Buy sites, is a part of a $100 million redevelopment effort Verdae announced in 2014 that includes retail, residential, and a new park and trails connecting to the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail. Camperdown Academy plans to build a new school on the site, while construction of Verdae Commons Drive, the main entrance to the new development, continues.

7. CITY PARK The first visible sign of work on the new City Park will come in mid-September, when the city is scheduled to move the public works department from its current facility on

Hudson Street to its new home on Fairforest Way. The move will pave the way for work to begin on the park, the city’s signature park on the west side and one that Mayor Knox White said could be as transformative to that area as Falls Park was to the West End. The city has committed up to $2 million per year for 10 years. City Park is expected to include a great lawn, a “sprayground” water feature, a picnic area, basketball courts, and the transformation of Welborn Street into a pedestrian promenade. The park could also include an eight-story tower, a veterans memorial, and other features. Groundbreaking for City Park could be held as early as spring 2018.

8. NORTHPOINTE Before work on the buildings of Northpointe, a mixed-use development that will transform one of downtown Greenville’s key gateways, can begin, the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and Stone Avenue must be transformed first. Work to make the Wade Hampton Boulevard and Stone

Avenue intersection T-shaped is underway. Once the intersection is complete, Column Street, a small road that cuts through the property on which NorthPointe will be built, will be closed. Vertical construction should begin next summer. A 58,000-square-foot Harris Teeter grocery store will anchor the development, which will also include 284 apartment units and 22,000 square feet of retail space.

9. ENCLAVE AT LAURENS Construction drawings for a sewer line serving a mixeduse development on the 10-acre site at Laurens and Pleasantburg that was once home to the Department of Motor Vehicles and the surrounding area are being finalized, said Dwayne Cooper, City of Greenville engineering services manager. McCall Capital plans to build a mixed-use development that includes about 300 studio, one-, and two-bedroom apartments called Enclave at Laurens Village, retail and restaurant space, and perhaps office space and a boutique hotel. The development will also have a park and an easement from the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail to Laurens Road.

Photo by Mark Susko Visual Design

View of Survivorship Education Center from other side of the Spirit Bridge.

10. CANCER SURVIVORS PARK Construction of Cancer Survivors Park is expected to be complete by the end of the year. The $7.5 million park connects Cleveland Park to Falls Park via the Swamp Rab-

bit Trail. The trail is open on weekends only (6–9 p.m. on Fridays and 5 a.m.–9 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays) until construction of the Cancer Survivors Park’s education center is complete. Work is expected to end by mid-fall, according to Kay Roper, Cancer Survivors Park’s executive director. In addition to the education center, the park will include a children’s garden, a grot-

to with benches, a sculpture, a small amphitheater, and a man-made waterfall. Programming is expected to start in January. “The survivorship education center is the hub of what the park is all about,” Roper said. She also noted the park should start connecting survivors to programs at the Greenville Health System, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, the Gibbs Cancer

Center, the American Cancer Society and the Cancer Society of Greenville, and other organizations beginning Jan. 1. “We want to be Switzerland, a neutral source of information,” she said. More than $7.3 million has been raised for the park so far, Roper said. An official grand opening is planned for spring.


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feast John Nolan’s new breakfast tour includes Famous Toastery, Biscuit Head, and LeGrand Bakery.

MOVABLE FEAST

T

Photo by Will Crooks

John Nolan guides Greenvillians and guests alike on a culinary journey of the city Words by Ariel Turner | Photos by Will Crooks

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en years and 40,000 guests later, Greenville History Tours’ John Nolan is just getting started. What began as a walking tour advertised by an A-frame sign on the sidewalk in front of City Hall has grown to include 11 different driving tours and classes, with half of them focusing on Greenville’s growing culinary scene. Two more culinary offerings were just added to the lineup – a breakfast tour launching Aug. 15 and a world coffee course beginning in September. At an Aug. 2 press conference at Soby’s, Nolan announced he’s also writing a book for Arcadia Press called “Lost Restaurants of Greenville.” It’s scheduled to be published fall 2018. “Lost Restaurants of Greenville” will highlight such long-gone eateries as Boston Lunch and Ye Olde Fireplace and the more recent closures of Bistro Europa and American Grocery Restaurant. “Greenville is growing, and I want to grow with it,” Nolan said on the Soby’s patio after Mayor Knox White and Visit Greenville SC’s Chris Stone publicly lauded his contribution to Greenville’s exploding tourism industry. Eight years ago, Nolan experienced his first restaurant tour in New York City and had such a great time that he knew he wanted to bring the concept to Greenville. He met with Carl Sobocinski of Table 301, and the two partnered for the At the Chef’s Table tour, which continues to sell out twice a week. The tour, which allows guests to dine at five chef’s tables, is two and a half to three hours long and makes stops at Table 301’s Nose Dive, Soby’s on the Side, The Lazy Goat, Soby’s New South Cuisine, and Passarelle Bistro. Nolan’s partnering restaurants have since grown to include more than 30 stops, mostly downtown and in the West End, but also extending out to the Augusta Street, Haywood Road, and San Souci areas. He recently partnered with Famous Toastery, Biscuit Head, and LeGrand Bakery, which allowed him to launch the first breakfast tour. “[Breakfast] places closer to downtown are more recent, and I wanted to feature newer places offering unique twists on things,” Nolan said at the beginning of one of his recent trial runs of the tour. The tour begins at 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays in front of Joel’s Java at the

Poinsett Hotel. From there, Nolan leads the group around the corner to Famous Toastery, which has been open in the former Two Chefs location for less than a month. After a brief intro by owner Cindy Stone, coffee, freshly squeezed orange juice, and an Avocado Benny with a side of grits are served. Stone says the half avocado topped with a poached egg, melted pepper jack, and fresh pico de gallo has been a big seller. At Biscuit Head, guests are treated to a mimosa, coffee, and on this occasion, a grilled chicken biscuit with avocado mango salsa, poached egg, and lime crema. Of course, a trip to the jam bar for a selection of house-made spreads and jams to slather on the biscuit is a necessity. Insider tip: Try the sweet potato chai jam. The third and final stop is LeGrand Bakery on Augusta. After three pastry samples, including a chocolate croissant, and a third cup of coffee before 9 a.m., it’s back to the van to head to the starting point. Speaking of coffee, Nolan’s love for it led

“Lost Restaurants of Greenville” will highlight such long-gone eateries as Boston Lunch and Ye Olde Fireplace. him to take a coffee class while in Italy, which prompted a conversation with friend and Bob Jones University colleague Vincenzo Antignani about offering such an experience in Greenville. Antignani, who is from Italy, has partnered with Nolan to offer an international coffee discovery class at the newly opened 101 Espresso Bar on Wade Hampton Boulevard. Beginning in September, the class will feature Italian and French brewing methods and give guests a look at the roasting process. “My goal is to make great experiences for people whether they’re visitors or local,” Nolan says. Visit greenvillehistorytours.com for tour dates and tickets.

08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

Photo by Andrew Moore

Greenville beekeeper Matt Putnam removes a lid from one of his backyard beehives to check for honey.

THE BEEKEEPER NEXT DOOR Why one Greenville man is keeping bees near downtown ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Dressed in a white long-sleeved jacket and ventilated hood, Matt Putnam pries open a waist-high box in his backyard and gently reaches inside with a gloved hand to remove a wooden frame, exposing a golden slab of honeycomb crawling with thousands of honeybees.

As Putnam edges closer to the hive, a frenetic buzz emanates from the tiny insects as they enter and leave their abode to zoom off into the air above. But they don’t pay much attention to Putnam as he grabs a tin canister and puffs a thick cloud of smoke over the hive entrance. Putnam explains that the smoke interferes with the bees’ ability to communicate chemically, to warn one another of his presence. “It calms the bees,” he says, squeezing another puff of smoke from the canister. “I’m not a fan of getting stung.” While one would expect to see Putnam caring for his hives on a farm in the countryside, his surroundings are anything but pastoral. In fact, his backyard is located in a

densely populated Greenville neighborhood off Highland Drive. He’s not alone. Putnam is aware of several other bee hobbyists within the city limits. His neighbor, Lee White, for instance, is a beekeeper of four hives with more than 80,000 bees. White, an eighth grader at Hughes Academy, started a business last year and sold 130 jars of honey. And next month, Farm Fresh Fast, a restaurant that’s located at 860 S. Church Street, plans to install a rooftop hive to source local honey for recipes. “Bees are sort of the new backyard chickens,” says Jennifer Tsuruda, a honeybee researcher and beekeeping specialist at Clemson University.

One reason behind the rise of urban beekeeping is the desire for homegrown and organic food. “People want to know where their food comes from,” she says. “And they want to feel more connected to the environment.” For Putnam, it’s all about the honey. “I use it as a sugar substitute,” he says. “I’m probably addicted at this point.” Honey, besides tasting great, offers health benefits, says Putnam, who swears it helps his joints. And propolis, a material that bees use to seal small cracks and gaps in their hive, is a natural antibiotic. Every spring, Putnam slips on his beekeeping suit to protect himself from stingers and extracts honey from his two backyard


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hives, which contain about 40,000 bees each. Last year, he harvested roughly 30 pounds of honey. “I don’t waste a pound of it,” he says. Putnam, a software consultant for Hitachi Solutions, fell into beekeeping by accident. In 2014, he found an article about beekeeping in Edible Upcountry, a local food publication, and his interest was piqued. “The article made it seem so doable,” says Putnam. “At first, I couldn’t find the time to start. But I eventually quit fighting the urge and just fell into it from there.” Putnam read some books and eventually purchased his protective suit, bees, hives, and equipment from the Carolina Honey Bee Company in Travelers Rest. “It’s not the cheapest hobby,” he says. “I probably spent several hundred dollars.” Putnam uses Langstroth hives, patented by the Rev. Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth in Philadelphia in 1852. The hives, which usually cost more than $100, resemble a filing cabinet of eight to 10 frames that hang like files, covered in honeycomb. According to Putnam, they are especially easy to harvest. He simply removes the top from the cabinet and pulls out a frame. But every year presents new challenges. “The learning curve is pretty steep,” he says. “I’ve had to read a lot of forums and books to improve my honey harvest.” Like most beekeepers, Putnam didn’t harvest any honey during the first year, because the bees needed food to survive through the winter. “Ideally, you want to start a colony of bees in the late winter or early spring, because they have to grow during that first year,” he says. “After the first year, there is a small window to harvest honey. They start making honey around late March to the middle of June.” But a strong hive can produce up to 100 pounds of surplus honey, according to Putnam, who expects to harvest more than 50 pounds this year. Luckily, his neighbors have no problem with his new hobby. And neither does the city, which doesn’t require a permit to keep bees. “It doesn’t hurt to handout some leftover honey to neighbors,” he says. According to Putnam, beekeeping has made him more environmentally conscious. For instance, he’s quit using herbicides and other chemicals associated with the country’s declining bee population. “I’d like to think I’m actually helping the country’s bee population recover,” he says. Since the 1940s, the number of managed honeybee colonies in the United States has declined from 5 million to 2.5 million because of various threats, including invasive species, diseases, pesticides, and habitat destruction, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Like Putnam, a new group of backyard

COMMUNITY

08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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Graphic by Andrew Moore

beekeepers has sprung up to “save the bees,” according to Susan Jones, president of the Piedmont Beekeepers Association. “Beekeeping has traditionally been limited to farms,” she says. “But I think people everywhere want to feel like they’re actually doing something to help out.” According to the USDA, $30 billion a year in agriculture depends on the health of honeybees, which pollinate more than 90 flowering crops, including most fruits and vegetables. But about 30 percent of the country’s managed colonies have died, according to the research nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership. Around a third of the deaths are related to colony collapse disorder, which occurs when a colony, except for the queen and immature bees, has randomly died. Some beekeepers point to a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids as a possible cause of colony collapse, a link rejected by Bayer and other manufacturers. According to Tsuruda, monocultural farming practices, diseases, and pesticides could be responsible for colony collapse disorder. However, she says there isn’t a definitive cause. “We’ve found that many things impact honeybee health,” she says. The varroa mite, for instance, has become a growing problem for beekeepers to solve over the years. Introduced to South Carolina in the 1990s, the parasitic insect survives off the blood of developing bees, transmits diseases, and eradicates hives from the inside out. Putnam regularly checks his colonies for the mites and sprays a treatment to keep them out of his hives. “I do what I can, but there’s no guarantee they won’t get in,” he says. However, Putnam says pesticides pose an

even larger threat to his bees. “I constantly worry about neighbors spraying their gardens for mosquitos and other pests, because chemicals can drift over to my place and affect my bees,” he says. Many people misuse pesticides, according to Jones. “I think some people are afraid of bees and spray to keep them away from their homes. I also think people overspray for mosquitos, because they’re afraid of Zika virus,” she says. But insecticides aren’t the only chemical harming bees, according to Putnam, who claims herbicides disrupt the ability of bees to learn and remember, reducing the chances of colony survival. He also says they deplete food for his bees when neighbors spray weeds, goldenrod, and spring flowers, before planting their gardens in the spring. “Those weeds aren’t weeds,” he says. “They’re forage for the bees.” Luckily, Putnam has only lost one of his hives to “robbing,” which occurs when a weak beehive is attacked by invaders from other hives. He couldn’t explain what weakened his hive but speculated that pesticides or herbicides could have been involved. That’s why Putnam has used his hives to educate nearby neighbors. “I get a lot of questions from curious neighbors,” he says. “I like it, because it gives me a chance to talk about bees and why they’re struggling.” Putnam even dissuaded a nearby neighbor from spraying for mosquitos last spring. “When you think about all the colonies that are dying off, it’s hard to say whether or not I’m actually impacting the global population,” he says. “I think education is a bigger component for me. I’m sort of an ambassador for the species.”

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COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

SCHOLARSHIPS

H. C. Jennings Scholarship Foundation funds presented to three students

% 5 2

F F O

The Harold C. Jennings Foundation presented scholarships on Aug. 3 to children of police officers. The recipients for the 2017-18 scholarship awards are as follows: Danielle Blair, daughter of Lt. Chi Blair, will be a freshman at the University of South Carolina majoring in international business and political science. Monica Colwell, daughter of Cpl. Rob Colwell, is a previous scholarship winner who will be a senior at North Greenville University majoring in criminal justice and legal studies. Audrianna Cureton, daughter of Sgt. Eric Cureton, is a previous scholarship winner who will be a sophomore at Greenville Technical College majoring in nursing.

AWARDS

Greenville Federal Credit Union awarded for public education contribution Greenville Federal Credit Union has been selected as the 2017 State Board of Education’s Business Volunteer Award Recipient. The State Board of Education Volunteer Awards Program annually recognizes businesses, civic organizations, individuals, and school improvement councils for significant contributions to public education. Recipients of the awards are among a select number of organizations, school improvement councils, and individuals in South Carolina that demonstrate a commitment to excellence in public education.

FUNDRAISING

Students raise $1,300 for Ronald McDonald House 3219 Augusta St., Greenville 864-277-4180 ThePickwick.net M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3

Students from Bridges to a Brighter Future spend one Saturday each summer washing cars to raise money for a charity of their choosing. This year, the group of 75 high schoolers raised more than $1,300 for the Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas in Greenville. Bridges to a Brighter Future is a nationally recognized and award-winning program for Greenville County high school students who have the potential to go to college but have significant financial, personal, and cultural barriers. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Choosing the right university can be fun and exciting. Mark your calendar and plan a visit to USC Upstate! Explore our buildings, talk to current students, meet faculty and gain a better understanding of what it’s like to attend school at USC Upstate.

LEARN MORE! Take a campus tour during

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October 6, 2017

November 18, 2017

November 3, 2017

March 31, 2018

December 1, 2017

April 28, 2018

February 2, 2018 March 2, 2018 April 6, 2018 All events in Spartanburg begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Health Education Complex.

To register, call 800.277.8727 or visit, www.uscupstate.edu


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COMMUNITY Our Community

08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

Community news, events, and happenings

DONATION

Countybank donates $100K to Greenwood Habitat for Humanity Countybank, celebrating 85 years of community banking in the Upstate, has announced a gift of $100,000 over the next five years to the Greenwood Area Habitat for Humanity. This donation will support general operations, programming, and infrastructure for the organization, including area home builds. Funds for this gift come from The Countybank Foundation.

GRANTS

Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina awards grants Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina has awarded community enrichment grants to provide financial support to organizations whose services go beyond meeting basic needs and will help lift people out of poverty. Compass of Carolina received $10,000 to support the Domestic Violence Starts Small program, which provides free therapy hours for children and adolescents victimized by witnessing domestic violence in their home. Foothills Family Resources received $20,000 to move those living in poverty throughout northern Greenville County from crisis to self-sufficiency. Palmetto Place Children’s Shelter received $15,000 to support the Palmetto Place Unaccompanied Youth program, which provides shelter and services to teens that have been forced to leave their families and to teens that have never had a family support system. A $25,000 grant to United Ministries will support the United Ministries-Interfaith Hospitality Network community, which is deeply committed to assisting congregations to help homeless families with children find a home and hope in Greenville and the Upstate. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

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BTC BEHIND THE COUNTER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

DESIGNED FOR DOWNTOWN “What sets us apart is that we stay with clients throughout the entire process,” When the young designers at Designed for Downtown say “We’ve Lenzi says. “We draw the plans – then stick around to help select all the got you penciled in,” it means your plans are anything but tentative. That’s interior finishes. We are the whole shebang!” because Lenzi Waits and Emily Michko do design the While the name implies an in-city focus, Designed for old-school way – with pencil and paper and T-squares What sets us apart is Downtown has a portfolio of projects throughout the Upstate. – hand-drafting their fresh ideas into big, bold plans for that we stay with clients “No matter where a home is located, it should be unique,” Lenzi residential construction projects. throughout the entire says. “We don’t believe in drawing the same house over and over “We’re millennials, but we still use pencils for all of our process. We draw the again – every one of our designs is different.” construction-grade drawings,” says Lenzi, explaining that plans – then stick around Designed for Downtown embraces all styles, working Designed for Downtown specializes in new custom homes, to help select all the directly with homeowners to get a sense of what they need in residential remodeling and additions, and interior design interior finishes. a new or renovated home. “Before we start designing, we ask services. “Hand-drawing allows for a more in-depth design.” ‘What will fit this family best? What will work with how they live Graduates of Clemson University’s School of their lives?’” Emily explains. Architecture, Lenzi and Emily are both well-versed in AutoCad – but they Even away from the studio, the Designed for Downtown staff is all believe creativity is more readily transferred when there isn’t too much about creativity. Emily likes to paint, for example, and Lenzi is into technology in the way. thrifting and restoring/re-purposing old furniture. They enjoy hanging out “We don’t want to draw lines on a computer,” says Emily. “Using a pencil downtown and indulging their inner-Foodies by trying new restaurants and keeps an artistic flair in everything we do. Clients love to highlight the cooking classes. charm of their home and hand-drafting adds old-world charm to the design process. We love melding the old with the new.” Designed for Downtown was seeded through AJH Renovations in 2012, and has since grown into its own business, with Chuck Hartman as president. Services include everything from plan and elevation drawings all 803.351.1385 or 770.862.5341 the way through interior design, with extra emphasis on creating a home designedfordowntown.com that captures their clients’ vision whilst staying within their budget.


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Featured Neighborhood

Coming Soon

Braxton Ridge

Off Hunter Road in Simpsonville, SC

Coming Soon

Coming Soon Coming Soon

American Eagle Builders, Inc., an independent franchise

Home Info

Come explore Braxton Ridge so you too can “Love Where You Live”. Braxton Ridge welcomes you home to Simpsonville, SC. This custom home community encourages the southern hospitality and values that have gotten Simpsonville recognized as one of the 10 Best Towns by Family Circle Magazine and one of the 25 Best Affordable Towns by Money Magazine. Come visit the Arthur Rutenberg Model in the Acadia Community at 220 Saluda Run Trail, Piedmont, SC, to learn more! Now accepting lot reservations!

American Eagle Builders, Inc., an independent franchise

Price: From the $400s Amenities: Spread across 100 acres, the 122 lot Braxton Ridge community boasts wooded views, a community pool and cabana, and close proximity to Fox Run Golf Course. Schools: Bryson Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Contact Information: Calum Mackenzie | 864.655.7702 CMackenzie@arhomes.com

American Eagle Builders, Inc., an independent franchise

Real Estate News

Yes, You Need a Realtor Allen Tate CEO Pat Riley shares why you need professional advice – not just when you’re buying or selling a home Inventory is low, home prices are rising, and just about every home buyer you know is competing against other buyers for the right house.  So in today’s market, do you really need a Realtor to help you sell your home? Actually, you need a Realtor more than ever in today’s fast-paced real estate mar-

ket. In fact, you need a Realtor even if buying or selling a home is not even in the short-term forecast. “You need a Realtor for Life,” says Allen Tate Companies President and CEO Pat Riley in the June edition of Carolinas Market Update. Most of us think about retaining the services of a Realtor when it’s time to buy or sell a home. We often select our Realtor by chance – calling the name on the yard sign, contacting the person whose photo appears online next to a property, or ask-

ing a friend. But all of these things carry risk. The agent on the sign represents the seller’s interests. The person who appears online may not be associated with the home; they just bought advertising. And the person your friend suggests might be right for them, but not what’s best for you.  A long-term relationship with a Realtor helps eliminate these risks – and offers ongoing reward for your entire homeownership journey, when it’s time upgrade, refinance or add insurance coverage. 

“Think about it. We surround ourselves with professionals to manage things. We don’t find someone new every time we get sick, pay our bills, mow the grass, have the car serviced or the dog groomed. And yet, we find ourselves selecting a new Realtor every time we are ready to make what is likely our largest purchase,” said Riley. Many people don’t realize that a Realtor can find the home you want or need,American Eagle B even before it comes on the market. A Realtor will help you make your best offer, continued on PAGE 25


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017

OPEN HOUSE & COMMUNITY TOUR!

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HOME : On the market Stone Lake � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

AUGUST 13 & 27 | FROM 2-5PM

1797 ALTAMONT ROAD | GREENVILLE, SC 29609

RIDGES LOT 1 MODEL OPENING SOON

126 Lakecrest Dr · $649,900 · MLS# 1346708

104 Brookview Circle · $639,000 · MLS# 1343326

5BR/4.5BA IN TOWN GEM!! Stone Lake, waterfront, beautiful, spacious, brick ranch! Minutes to downtown, shopping, restaurants, and award winning schools! Chick Springs to Lakecrest Dr.

4BR/4BA New construction built by C&G Construction. Flexible floorplan and private back yard. 2-car attached garage and nearly 0.5 acre lot. Augusta Road to W. Faris. Left on Brookview Circle.

Contact: Angela Reid 350-6670 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Highland Terrace � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Mcrae Park/031 � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

106 W Hillcrest Drive · $615,000 · MLS# 1340702

67 McRae Place · $599,900 · MLS# 1347595

4BR/3.5BA Fabulous new construction in heart of N Main. Taller ceilings on main level, open floorplan, beautiful finishes. A must see! N Main to Left on W Hillcrest. Property on right.

5BR/5BA Come see this lovely custom home in the gated community in Five Forks Area! Four levels, large lot, inground pool! On Woodruff Road, through Five Forks area, L@Sunnydale Dr

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Stephanie Kestner 202-0477 Allen Tate

Augusta Road � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Summerwalk/032 � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

26 Wilmont Lane · $439,900 · MLS# 1339972

309 Summerwalk Place · $267,900 · MLS# 1347622

4BR/3.5BA Custom built home with efficiency in mind! Fabulous open floorplan and beautiful hardwoods. Large bonus room. 2-car detached garage! Augusta Street to WIlmont Lane. House on right.

4BR/2.5BA Lovely one-owner home w/4BR PLUS Bonus Room! Hardwood floors up&down! Super lot! Screened porch & new SS appliances! Come see! I385S to LonWoodruff, R@Hwy14, L@Adams Mills, R@Summercrest Cir, L@Summerwalk Place

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Melissa Tomberg 252-6621 Allen Tate

Devenger Place � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Bonnie Brae � Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Designed & Built by

SALES BY CALL CONSERVUS REALTY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS EXCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

864.608.4608

theridgesatparismountain.com Conservus Realty provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetics. In addition to federal law requirements, [Company Name] complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.

100 Brigham Creek Ct · $255,000 · MLS# 1349854

143 Birkhall Circle · $198,900 · MLS# 1347479

4BR/2.5BA Exceptional value on the East Side! Large corner lot and fenced in yard. Fresh paint inside. Large bedrooms. Must see! Hudson Rd to Right on Phillips. Right on Brigham Creek.

4BR/2.5BA Best house in Bonnie Brae, priced to sell! Already inspected and ready to move in to. Enter Bonnie Brae, left on Sandy, left on Birkhall Cir

Contact: Kathryn Curtis 238-3879 Wilson Associates

Contact: Carl Jones 430-4793 Allen Tate Realtors


08.11.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

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HOME Real Estate News continued increasing your chances of winning the contract. And your Realtor will make sure your home is ready to show off to potential buyers. “A common misunderstanding is that buyers today will buy anything,” said Riley. “Buyers are particular. Homes in great condition, that are current and priced right for the market, will move quickly. But homes that are outdated, in need of repair, or priced unrealistically will linger.” Sellers often have unrealistic price expectations because they turn to an automated valuation tool online to determine the value of their home. Unfortunately, online calculators are based on things like tax values and square footage, not details like condition and location of the home in relation to others in the neighborhood. “The chance of the same homes of the same age in the same neighborhood having the same value is slim to none,” said Riley. “A Realtor lives in your world and serves your marketplace. They can make that differentiation.” 

Joy Joyner Joins The Pelham Road Office Of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Joy Joyner has joined The Toates Team at the company’s Pelham Road office. Joyner Joyner has lived and worked in Greenville since her graduation from Winthrop University over 30 years ago. Most recently, she has worked as a vice president for the third largest bank in the United States. She is excited to bring this experience to real estate to help buyers and sellers have the best experience possible. “Greenville is a dynamic market, and with Joy’s knowledge of the area, financial experience and the backing of C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS, it is a winning combination,” said  Elizabeth Gray-Carr, Broker-In-Charge of the Pelham Road office. “There are exciting things to come for her.” Joyner and her husband, Darrell, are parents to three children and reside in Greenville.

Teresa Sheriff Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Seneca Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Teresa Sheriff as a residential sales agent to its Seneca office. Previously, Teresa worked as an administrative assis-

tant with an emphasis on technological support for 28 years. Teresa brings her passion for helping people and her technical and organizational skills to her new role in real estate. Sheriff In her free time, Teresa is active in the military community, while also spending time outdoors with her family, gardening and boating. Teresa is married to Brigadier General Timothy Sheriff and together they have two daughters and five grandchildren. “We are thrilled to have Teresa join our Seneca office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her enthusiasm to serve others and lifelong knowledge of the area will offer her clients full support in their home buying and selling journey.”

Alex Dmyterko joins BlackStream Real Estate Alex Dmyterko has been hired as the president of BlackStream Real Estate, a position that will focus on both the growth and development of the overall company. Dmyterko Alex has an extensive real estate and business background, as most recently serving as Vice President of Franchise Development for SVNIC. He was responsible for the company’s growth by strategically identifying key markets, companies, and Advisors. With more than 25 years of commercial real estate experience, Dmyterko has handled hundreds of sale, leasing, financing, and development transactions in excess of $1.5 billion. Prior to joining SVN, Dmyterko served as president of Dmyterko & Wright, a Chicago, Illinois based development, brokerage, and consulting firm. As president and founder, Dmyterko grew the company from zero to $90 million in assets in a five-year period. Previously, Dmyterko was president of Crosland Inc.’s retail division in Charlotte, North Carolina, and president of CNL’s Commercial Net Lease Realty, a large publicly traded, net lease REIT in Orlando, Florida. Dmyterko began his real estate career with Trammell Crow Company in Chicago, where he served as the Midwest retail group’s managing director and was founder of Trammell Crow Build-To-Suit, a net lease development subsidiary. As president of three  commercial real estate companies, Dmyterko has developed over 100 comcontinued on PAGE 27

Wendi Ruth | 864-979-3046 | wruth@cbcaine.com cbcaine.com/agents/WendiRuth

12 Sevier Street, Greenville 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com


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$1,600,000 MEYERS PARK $1,212,000 CHANTICLEER $912,460 EASTON RIDGE $910,000 THORNBLADE $805,000 $800,000 $772,000 $763,800 LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS $727,500 $695,000 M WEST TERRACE HOMES@WEST END $656,586 CONGAREE CORNERS $650,000 $625,000 $610,000 $574,750 TUGALOO FARMS $555,000 $549,500 HAMPTON’S GRANT $510,000 IVY GROVE $505,000 WOODLANDS $500,000 $499,200 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $499,000 BUNKER HILL $485,000 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $460,305 SYCAMORE RIDGE $460,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $460,000 LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS $438,605 HIGHLAND TERRACE $437,000 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $425,000 VISTA HILLS $425,000 KILGORE FARMS $425,000 KILGORE FARMS $410,000 $408,550 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $405,000 $400,000 $400,000 $400,000 THE ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE $400,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $398,900 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $396,600 $395,000 $395,000 NORTH PARK $392,000 KILGORE FARMS $383,063 $382,500 RIVER WALK $372,500 SUGAR CREEK $370,000 JAMESTOWNE ESTATES $369,000 GOWER ESTATES $365,700 $360,000 CALHOUN ST AND GRIFFEN ST $358,000 WESTHAVEN $353,216 COPPER CREEK $350,609 CAROLINA COURT $348,000 HOLLAND PLACE $346,000 $343,000 SUGAR CREEK $340,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $340,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH PK $336,815 CYPRESS RUN $335,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $328,645 SUGAR CREEK $327,900 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH PK $326,375 HAMMETT CORNER $326,000 COLLINS CREEK $325,700 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $325,000 COPPER CREEK $320,584 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $315,000 UNIVERSITY PARK $310,000 SUNSET HILLS $310,000 BOTANY WOODS $305,000 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $300,000 $300,000 PEBBLECREEK $295,000 SPRING FOREST $290,000 BIG OAKS $285,500 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $281,333 RESERVE@PLANTATION GREENE $281,250 SADDLEHORN $281,000 $280,800 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH PK $278,900 AUTUMN TRACE $275,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $271,000 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $270,915 PELHAM FALLS $270,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $268,475 SUGAR CREEK $266,900

POINSETT LLC STEINBACH MELANIE (JTWRO MONTGOMERY JOHN JUSTIN EASTON RIDGE ASSOCIATES MATHIS CHARLES A (JTWROS SOWS EAR LLC BATSON LEIGH W MARKHEIM DAVID BRIAN SEA COW LLC SMITH PAIGE SUTTON 1027 PARTNERSHIP LLC OLD MILL STREAM #14 LLC DOANE DAVID J SAWYER ROBIN S D & V LLC REID KAY AYERS COLLINS SUSAN E REVOC LI SCHOEN CRAIGEN S MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH HAWKEY REVOCABLE LIVING SREBAN TOO LLC COLLINS KAY A (JTWROS) COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC DYAL ASHLEY B (JTWROS) BAYADI ANNE T NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO MATKOVICH JOHN J III (JT BURTTRAM JESSE L BEATTIE PARK INC CAMERAS UNLIMITED INC HORNER JASON D (JTWROS) MCGLASHAN ROBERT S ARTHUR WILLIAM B MARTIN DAVID W (JTWROS) PLATING CYNTHIA L REVOCA BRI LLC WILSON BURT LEE BRYANT R ROGER JR (JTWRO WATSON LORRAINE S DUSENBERRY DEBORAH ANN ( TEMPLETON C MORRIS MILLER RYAN THOMAS FRANZEN JUDITH C MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH FERGUSON BARBARA L MILLER DENNIS F (JTWROS) GLANDER AMY H (JTWROS) KINNUNEN DUSTIN (JTWROS) SMITH PHILIP CHRISTOPHER PRESTEL JOEL D (JTWROS) CAROLINA CRAFTED CONSTRU D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MUNGO HOMES INC SIGMA HOLDINGS LLC VORHERR MARK R M2 INVESTMENTS LLC BRIGHT JAMES M JR HOWE HAROLD R III NVR INC SCHNEEMANN ROSEMARIE ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC FRASCINO BRIAN N (JTWROS NVR INC FIELDS JASON W CLARKSON HELEN M BOYKIN WILLIAM MUNGO HOMES INC VICINO CHRISTIAN M (JTWR GIBBS DANIELLE BAKER BRIGGS ROBERT S JR POWELL JOHN BRADFORD ANDERSON CHRISTOPHER L ( KLOPPER FREDERICK J JR ( CORDONIER ALAN E LOPEZ JENNIFER W (JTWROS SANDERS ANDREW W DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BRUNETTO JULIETTE (SURV) PATTON ADAM B SREBAN LLC NVR INC THOMPSON MICHAEL J MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH NVR INC THEODORE REVOCABLE TRUST NVR INC HULL LOWELL S & VIONE M

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SC GREER POINSETT LLC SCHARF ANDREW W (JTWROS) BHATIA ERIN G (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC WINTER CLYDE III F&P LLC CROSS FAMILY TRUST ZAHNISER FAMILY TRUST WYNIA BLAKE A MIZGA CORY L (JTWROS) MANCERA MARIA VICTORIA D G & N HOLDINGS LLC FAIREY JILL HARBERT (JTW MENDELOW MICHAEL J (JTWR INKMASTERS LLC NESTBERG HOLLY (JTWROS) KALISMAN PHILIP T DINICOLA ANTHONY PAUL (S MOBLEY JANE MEBANE SAPIRO SANDRA E (JTWROS) HK BEREA LLC RNK FAMILY TRUST SMITH TED A MAYS DEBRA M (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO MAZUR ROBERT J (JTWROS) DUDLEY JULIE H (JTWROS) BROWN NATHAN D HATHAWAY FRED G WICKER WADE HAMPTON LLC SHEPARD MICHAEL LOUIS (J BOOKER DENISE W KARAKAS MICHAEL JOSEPH GRAY RONALD D (JTWROS) PANNILL ALLAN REID (JTWR NAIK RAKESH B FARMER DAPHNE A (JTWROS) GLASER DONALD PAUL (JTWR BATSON JAMIE M (JTWROS) SMITH STACEY LYNN ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GOSSE MARKUS FRASCINO BRIAN N (JTWROS RIKALA JEREEMY (JTWROS) SHOCKLEY WALTER F (JTWRO SMITH JOHN IRVIN (JTWROS LOESCHER TODD W (JTWROS) BARRETT KENNETH T REVOC CLARKSON HELEN M (JTWROS BRUBACHER MYRON LEE (JTW FLECK DANIELA (JTWROS) BRIGHT JAMES M III (JTWR WHITTINGHAM EDWARD D II 1411 LAURENS LLC TRZEMZALSKI JOSEPH A (JT PARK WEST I INVESTORS LL GIBBS DANIELLE B (JTWROS WHITNEY KEVIN N FARQUHARSON ALEXANDER II HUFFAKER THOMAS L (JTWRO TAYLOR JEANNE (JTWROS) BRANDENBURG ALEXANDRA (J CHAN HONG CHOO PHILLIPS NORMA J (JTWROS SMITH PHILIP CHRISTOPHER SILVERS EDWARD BERGE DEDESMA GEORGE (JTWROS) SHADY COURTNEY MICHELLE WILSON MARK A (JTWROS) JONES WILLIAM STEPHEN JR RUTLAND JEFFREY (JTWROS) BERRY NICOLAS KYLE (JTWR MCGAHA SHERYL KUZMICK GOLDEN SUZANNE M (JTWROS BIALAS TIMOTHY G (JTWROS ARNDT MATTHEW (JTWROS) COUTRE CYNTHIA A DAY-LEWIS TIGHE C (JTWRO TUTWILER RALPH E III HK BEREA LLC LOCKWOOD BRIAN K GRINDSTAFF THOMAS PATRIC STRAIT MARK F FRANKLIN MICHAEL (JTWROS SPENCER RYAN ELIZABETH MCCOOEY RYAN R (JTWROS) DES BOODRAM LLC

550 S MAIN ST STE 300 53 FOREST LN 217 CHAPMAN RD 441 WESTERN LN 103 GOLDEN WINGS CT 110 W BUTLER RD 106 FONTAINE RD 47 ROBERTSON RD 130 LANNEAU DR 24 DOGWOOD LN 1027 S MAIN ST UNIT 204 495 S PLEASANTBURG DR 8 W PRENTISS AVE 212 LOIS ST 307 TANNER CHASE WAY 1220 S BARTON RD 200 E LONG LAKE RD STE 180 238 ALENDER WAY 16 GROVE VALLEY WAY 401 RIVER CREST DR 600 PARK ST 14 STRATTON CHAPEL CT 14 COLONEL STORRS CT 54 LATOUR WAY 2707 N 118TH ST 100 FAZIO CT 205 E FARIS RD 125 W MONTCLAIR AVE 204 BELLE OAKS DR 5300 OLD PINEVILLE RD STE 150 209 PLACID FOREST CT 201 PLACID FOREST CT 414 RANDALL ST 312 LAGUNA LN 99 HOPE ST 113 MOORCROFT WAY 444 PINK DILL MILL RD 2 KINROSS ROW 2 W THISTLE LN 345 LAGUNA LN 106 MORGAN CIR 160 STALL ST 1203 N MAIN ST 123 FORT DR 2411 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 4 BRAMBLEWOOD TER 214 BRIAR CREEK RD 404 ISAQUEENA DR 711 WEMBLEY RD 51 HOEDAD DR 118 S CALHOUN ST 500 SOUTHINGTON CT 424 STRATHPINE DR 37 VILLA RD STE 200 7 AMSTERDAM LN PO BOX 2487 107 WINTERWOOD CT 190 MARKET ST 220 ROCKY SLOPE RD 115 CLAIREWOOD CT 631 PONDEN DR 109 CHERRYWOOD TRL 212 ROCKY SLOPE RD 241 WELSH POPPY WAY 110 COLLINS CREEK RD 27 TIPPECANOE ST 220 GOSFORD RD 4 WYNTERHALL DR 1700 STURBRIDGE DR 29 SUNSET DR 33 HIAWATHA DR 105 REDWATER WAY 107 COOPER DR 108 WHITTLIN WAY 201 AYRSHIRE DR 18 OAKMONT CT 123 SUMMER OAK LN 42 BARNWOOD CIR 304 SADDLEBRED DR 600 PARK ST 214 ROCKY SLOPE RD 11 FARM BROOK WAY 407 SABIN CT 309 FRONT PORCH DR 102 BRIARPARK DR 119 SANDUSKY LN 108 SHADY CREEK CT

COVENTRY $266,359 SHENANDOAH FARMS $265,000 RESERVE@PLANTATION GREENE $262,000 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $260,000 HARTWOOD LAKE $259,475 BRYSON MEADOWS $256,178 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $255,000 AMBER OAKS FARM $252,627 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $252,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $250,000 PARK RIDGE $250,000 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $249,000 $245,000 BONNIE VISTA $245,000 PEBBLECREEK $245,000 STEEPLECHASE RUN $242,232 GRESHAM PARK $239,000 STILLWOOD@BELL’S CROSSING $238,000 $235,000 AUGUSTA ROAD HILLS $235,000 PARTRIDGE RIDGE $232,500 PARK RIDGE $232,500 $232,000 PEBBLE CREEK VILLAGE $227,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II $226,465 SHERWOOD FOREST $224,500 LENNOX LAKE $224,000 WATERTON $224,000 $223,000 MORNING MIST FARM $222,000 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $222,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $220,000 RIVER RIDGE $219,000 $217,000 HOWARDS PARK $216,725 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $215,000 MORNING MIST FARM $215,000 LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE $214,900 VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK $214,900 SHERWOOD FOREST $214,500 CHURCHILL FALLS $212,500 CASTLE ROCK $211,777 EDGEBROOK $208,975 HAMPTON FARMS $206,000 $205,560 ONEAL VILLAGE $205,000 WYNDHAM PLACE $204,900 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $203,500 WAGON CREEK $201,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $200,000 DEL NORTE ESTATES $199,000 SUMMER WOOD $199,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $198,000 EDWARDS FOREST $195,000 SEVEN OAKS@BLUE RIDGE PLNTN $193,000 FOXWOOD $193,000 TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK $192,025 VALLEY HAVEN ACRES $192,000 CHESTNUT HILL PLANTATION $189,900 HEATHER HILLS $186,000 SPARROWS POINT $184,500 WATERMILL $184,272 GREENS AT ROCKY CREEK $180,000 SPARROWS POINT $180,000 SPRING FOREST $179,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II $178,545 $178,000 CANEBRAKE $176,000 THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL $175,982 THE TOWNES AT EASTSIDE $175,030 $175,000 VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW $175,000 BRENTWOOD $174,000 BETHEL GREENE $174,000 $170,000 LAUREL TRACE $169,000 TANGLEWOOD $166,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $165,000 ARCADIA HILLS $158,000 MEADOW VIEW $155,000 ST MARKS POINTE $153,000 BOTANY WOODS $152,500 WESTHAVEN $152,200 OLD MILL ESTATE $150,101 $150,000 $149,500 VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW $148,900

PRICE SELLER DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SHROPSHIRE EDWIN D III BENTLEY P RANDALL CEGELIS BRYAN W D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MUNGO HOMES INC WHEELER ERIC J SK BUILDERS INC ELMORE BEVERLY H O’NEAL CDSF LLC XQUISITE PROPERTIES LLC WILSON PAMELA E GEIGER SHANNON B GERALD GLUR REAL ESTATE ALDERMAN D WENDELL EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL RITTER RUTH E WONDRASEK MICHAEL A JR CARBAUGH JACQUELINE CANNON CATHERINE KIRIAKI BOONE BARBARA E CASSANO GERARD D BROOKS FRED C REVOCABLE LATTIN CHARLES T JR (JTW BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC OWENS CHRISTOPHER PAUL TINSLEY JAMES T JR (SURV JOHNSON DREW B BURT JON C JANULIS MARK T DANTONIO MICHAEL JR TOATES DELLA T (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC CURE BENJAMIN D D R HORTON-CROWN LLC WELCH MATTHEW W DUNAGAN RODNEY MOTES LINDSEY-THOMAS & M BACK YARD PROPERTIES LLC HR PROPERTIES AND CONSTR CHRISTY DAVID (JTWROS) BURGESS BEVLIN P (JTWROS SK BUILDERS INC HAMM STEPHANIE A (JTWROS WILSON JOSHUA A CLAY JAMES ROBERT (JTWRO MILLER JAMEEN L (L-EST) LYDA JOEL KEITH ABIDING ABODES I LLC TORNI KYLE A (JTWROS) LANE BRIDGET N (JTWROS) CHARLES CHRISTOPHER A (J BENNETT ADAM J ANGELL ALEXA H SK BUILDERS INC SKELTON LORI F NVR INC HILLS SIDE PROPERTIES LL LEE KELLY K GOMEZ DIEGO STANSELL MARTHA J EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL GRINDSTAFF THOMAS P MAGGIO JOSEPH R JR PRICE MARY WILLIAMS LIVI BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC BOITER MICHAEL W SIGHTLER APRIL EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL 401 BRUSHY CREEK LLC MID-ISLAND MORTGAGE CORP BRYSON MICHAEL J ROPER ELIZABETH ANN OWEN SHELTON AMY HOWELL BARBARA VICARS CONSTRUCTIONS LLC NORWOOD CONSTANCE SUE COMSTOCK ELIZABETH R (JT SHELLEMAN ERIC P CHANDLER MACKENZIE PRYOR LARRY J HAYWOOD PATRICIA DESKINS MARK III PROPERTIES INC LARA JORGE A SIMMONS THOMAS G MORGAN GENA H WALDROUP JEANETTE GRACE

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MAGNER JENNIFER A (JTWRO ARMSTRONG SUNCHA PRASCH BARBARA P VAN ETTA AUSTIN W (JTWRO BRYANT JASON (JTWROS) DUNN ZACHARY C (JTWROS) COVIELLO GINA GOOS CHERYL L (JTWROS) CEGELIS BRYAN W (JTWROS) CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC PEEK SARA (JTWROS) D’ANTONIO GWENDOLYN S SMITH ADAM PERRY (SURV) PUTT MARY CATHERINE HALBERT STEVEN J (JTWROS SCOTT RYNE A DICARRO JACQUELINE (JTWR REED FRANK R (JTWROS) CHAMBERS CHARLES K DONNON ANDREW (JTWROS) POWELL JERRY D MARSH JEFFREY T (JTWROS) CHAPMAN RALPH T TUCCI AMANDA ELIN (JTWRO HABINA ALICE M EFIRD CARL MATTHEW (JTWR DOYLE CHARLES H (JTWROS) CLARK ROBERT JR (JTWROS) ANESKIEVICH CAROLINE CALVERT MICHAEL A FISHER TERRY P (JTWROS) SIBLEY DEAN S (JTWROS) MENNIEFIELD RODERIGUS PICKENS MARY BENNETT (JT CUNNINGHAM JAVARUS M (JT DSOUZA ROBERT S REVOC TR HILL CHRISTOPHER M (JTWR MCCONNELL BETH (JTWROS) KIRKBRIDE DANA MCCULLOUGH DANIEL J BLUM LAUREN C (JTWROS) JOHNSON KEITH AND TRINA WRIGHT ANN G (JTWROS) MARKHEIM DAVID B (JTWROS WALDRON RENNIE J THELEN REVOCABLE TRUST BLOCK LARRY E (JTWROS) DURHAM JOEL J (JTWROS) FOSTER ALAN GLENN (JTWRO MITCHELL DONALD LAKE JOSHUA M SCHRECK DAVID W (JTWROS) EDMISTEN JACOB A (JTWROS NEELY LIVING TRUST THE KINARD CARLOS FILKINS SCOTT (SURV) AMIN RUSHI (JTWROS) FORD JAMES L THOME ANTHONY P (JTWROS) HOLCOMBE CALEB VERNEL II WANG YAKUN MORLOCK MITZI R BOWEN CHARLES BENJAMIN I LYNN CECIL D (JTWROS) LEPAK ELIZABETH ANNE CUMBERBATCH RACHEL D SETZER LAUREN M ROWLAND BRUCE K TOMLINSON PATRICIA J SAHM ANNIE A GOMEZ CONSUELO PARRA VICTOR WORKMAN ANDRE VESCO PIRKLE BRADLEY C (JTWROS HOWELL HVAC LANKFORD JAMES A VANHOOSE LISA N BRYANT ELIZABETH C (JTWR MATTHEWS JOEL (JTWROS) CRONIN JAMES A III (JTWR BLACK SARAH ANN 614 CHEROKEE HOLDINGS LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC MAI THIEN (JTWROS) RACKLEY JAMES T COLLETTI CARLA S (JTWROS

104 LONGFELLOW WAY 116 STRASBURG DR 1 BARNWOOD CIR 241 RAVEN FALLS LN 421 GRAYPOINTE DR 16 BURGE CT 103 HONEY CRISP WAY 501 TURNING LEAF LN 820 PLANTATION DR 527 SAVANNAH HWY 1 CABRINI CT 22 CHESTATEE CT 1515 E NORTH ST 31 OTAGO PL 206 SASSAFRAS DR 116 FURLONG CT 104 BEDFORDTON CT 108 AMBERLEAF WAY 561 NEW HARRISON BRIDGE RD 16 HIGH HILL ST 5 KINGSBURY WAY 1 GLENLOCKE CT 7 FLAMINGO DR 74 MADELINE CIR 725 ELMBROOK DR 3 LADY MARION LN 309 LAKE LENNOX DR 506 WATERSTONE WAY 27 BLAIR ST 503 STONEMINT CT 520 CREST HILL DR 303 ROLLINGREEN RD 106 CROSSBILL DR 100 TWINBROOK DR 904 LIBERTY WALK LN 248 TUXEDO LN 703 BINDON LN 112 BIRKHALL CIR 201 ROMSEY CIR 14 FRIARTUCK RD 18 WAR ADMIRAL WAY 5 HANNU CT 409 TRILLIUM CREEK CT 215 DOWNS RD 107 WAYMAN DR 6 KELVYN ST 120 HIGH CREST CT 102 BEASON FARM LN 516 WAGON TRL 221 WATERCOURSE WAY 13 ELLESMERE DR 23 RUSTCRAFT DR 230 MAREFAIR LN 693 FRANKLIN AVE 195 BUR OAK DR 701 SPRING MEADOW WAY 117 EMERYWOOD LN 1517 MEMORIAL DR EXT 811 OAK HAVEN CT 119 ASHBY CROSS CT 106 WAVERLY HALL LN 2857 WESTPORT RD 212 WINDSONG DR 103 INNISBROOK LN 405 BUTLER SPRINGS RD 729 ELMBROOK DR 393 TANYARD RD 125 CANEBRAKE DR 806 APPLEBY DR 3 HARVEST BELL LN 6 ALLWOOD CT 8 KNOLLVINE CV 403 BRENTWOOD WAY 146 GREENAPPLE WAY PO BOX 588 224 LAUREL TRACE CIR 11 CASCADE CT 310 RIVERSIDE CHASE CIR 121 PROVENCE ST 11 NATALIE CT 10 CALALLA CT 30 GREENWOOD AVE 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 PO BOX 4068 871 N RUTHERFORD RD 15 S POINSETT HWY 102 PEACH GROVE PL


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME Real Estate News continued mercial projects spanning from Alaska to Puerto Rico, as well as 15 shopping and mixed-use centers. Dmyterko has launched five businesses or subsidiaries during his career, including CorpRex, a joint venture with First Union Securities and REStores, a joint venture with Goldman Sachs’ Whitehall Funds. In 2001, he developed Birkdale Village in Huntersville, North Carolina, a premier $100 million mixed-use lifestyle center with apartments, homes, office, retail, and a cinema. Dmyterko also redeveloped an obsolete manufacturing plant in Skokie, Illinois, into Village Crossing, an 800,000-square-foot shopping center. Dmyterko has also served on the Board of Directors of Lucernex Inc., been a member of the Charlotte Plan Commission’s Vacant Big Box Committee, Chicago Metropolitan Council’s Redevelopment Committee, and ICSC’s Carolina and Florida Program Committees, and was on the Board of Governors of the Citrus Club of Orlando. Dmyterko earned a graduate degree in administration and management from Harvard University Extension in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a BA in gov-

ernment from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. He has been a guest real estate lecturer at Rollins College’s Crummer Graduate School of Business and has been a frequent speaker at industry conferences.

Sharon Aponte Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Sharon Aponte as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Sharon joins Coldwell Banker Caine with a Bachelor of Fine Aponte Arts degree in graphic design from the University of Missouri. She has extensive graphic design experience, including two design firms, a stint as a teacher, and creating her own graphic design company, Chick and a Mouse Graphic Design. Sharon is looking forward to bringing her passion of turning dreams into reality for her clients into her new field of real estate.

From Greenville’s Fine Dining

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continued on PAGE 28

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HOME Real Estate News continued Sharon is a member of FirstRock Church and enjoys reading in her spare time. You can also find her exploring Greenville by trying new restaurants, hiking, running, and salsa dancing. Sharon is married to Edgar and together they have one daughter. “We are delighted to have Sharon join our Greenville office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her creative background and attention to detail will give her unmatched potential in her future business at Caine.”

18 community leaders go head-to-head in a Pro-Am Culinary Challenge. Join us at the 3rd annual CHOP! Cancer to watch our competitors do their thing! Enjoy dinner and cocktails while being thoroughly entertained by the battles in the kitchen.

Friday, August 25th, 2017 6-10pm, TD Convention Center For more information, voting or ticket purchases, visit: ChopCancerUpstate.com

PRESENTING SPONSOR: Fred Collins Foundation Logo

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Cynthia Cole Jenkins Joins Blackstream | Christie’s International Real Estate Cynthia Cole Jenkins is best known across South Carolina for her dedicated preservation efforts working with historic residential neighborhoods, central business districts’ and community planJoyner ning. Her work with historic preservation brought her in close contact with the business of real estate and real estate law and that led her to BlackStream/ Christie’s with a focus on both historic and contemporary properties in the South Carolina upcountry. Cynthia served as executive director of two of the state’s most respected historic preservation non-profit organizations, Historic Beaufort Foundation and the Preservation Society of Charleston. Cynthia authored “Historic Resources of the Lowcountry, A Regional Survey” written for Lowcountry Council of Governments and was a professor in the Clemson University/ College of Charleston joint graduate program in Historic Preservation. Cynthia has served on numerous boards and commissions and is currently President of the South Carolina Department of Archives & History Foundation Board of Directors and Chairman of the Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission’s Blythe – Goodwin – Hagood House Renovation Committee. A graduate of Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Cynthia holds the honor of being the first recipient in America of an under-graduate degree in Historic Preservation. She is an alumnus of the prestigious Attingham Summer School in Great Britain and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) Summer Institute in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In addition to assisting buyers and sellers with upstate historic properties Cynthia will work closely with John “Clark” Kent in a cross-section of luxury property transactions including The Cliff ’s Com-

munities in foothills of northern Greenville County; Cliff ’s at Glassy Mountain, Cliff ’s Valley and Cliffs at Mountain Park.

Coldwell Banker Caine Names June Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from June through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s Team efforts listed below. Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/closed units include: Alicia Waynick Andrew Little April Garrison Berry Gower Donna Morrow Francie Little Heather Durbin Heidi Putnam Holly West Jacob Mann Jake Dickens Jane McCutcheon Jennifer Wilson Joel Deweese Judy McCravy Kiersten Bell Kristi Moon Kristy Karen Lindsay Blanton Lori Bayne Lori Thompson Maggie Worsham Meredith Tye Mike Dassel Monica Agema Pam Hall Pat Loftis and Brett Smagala Patty Einstein Rhonda Porter Ryan Rosenfeld Sarah Gilley Sharon Tootell Susan Gallion Suzanne Cook Victor Lester Virginia Abrams Virginia Hayes Wanda Stewart Circle of Excellence Groups (2-3 agents) achieving $1.5 million in listing/ closing volume or six units listed/closed include: Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group Lewis & Company


ARTS & CULTURE A GREENVILLE HORROR STORY PAGE

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DAN OVERLY TICKLES THE IVORIES PAGE

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ARE YOU READY TO ROCK THE RANCH? PAGE

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CHRIS BOTTI Trumpeter Chris Botti is one of the few jazz artists who has managed to cross over into major pop success while maintaining some credibility in the oldschool jazz world. He’s best known for the platinum-selling “Italia” and the Grammy-winning “Impressions.” Both blend his warm, confident tone with lush orchestral backings. From the start of his solo career, Botti displayed a knack for composition, frequently writing the bulk of the songs and playing in the style of late-period Miles Davis. Since then, Botti has taken a more mainstream approach, but he has a great ear for standards and is still an inventive, intuitive soloist.

WHEN Friday, Aug. 18, 8 p.m. WHERE Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ADMISSION $45-$65 INFO 864-467-3000, peacecenter.org COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

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CULTURE

film has always been my goal.” What’s perhaps the most interesting about “Risers” is that about half the crew for the film is made of volunteers from restaurants and bars around the Upstate. “Both [co-writer and director of photography] John-Paul Newton and I know a lot of people who work in the bars and restaurants,” Martell says. “Greenville is a food-and-drink town, so you almost can’t avoid getting to know people in that busi-

ness, plus John-Paul actually used to work at The Owl on Wade Hampton Boulevard. As we started getting ready for the shoot, we started going to our friends and asking for help and volunteers, and it just ended up that our friends in the service industry were interested and wanted to be part of the film.” In fact, Martell actually sees a parallel between creating a successful restaurant and making a movie. “You have to build a crew and do a lot of prep work, and you need a lot of money to do it,” he says. Martell got to know Newton through the latter’s work as a photographer, and as the two became friends, they realized they had a shared passion. “We both love horror movies,” Martell says. “So I just said, ‘Hey, let’s make a horror movie together.’ We ended up writing a script over four years.” There’s a brief cameo by a local bartender in the film, as well. Kirk Ingram, who crafts some seriously creative high-end cocktails at Vault & Vator in downtown Greenville, appears at one point in “Risers,” and (spoiler alert) he doesn’t last too long. Martell would like to use Ingram’s appearance, as well as his service-industry crew, to forge some sponsorship arrangements with restaurants and bars around the Upstate. “We’d like to have a partnership with Vault & Vator, since we’re going to kill their bartender,” Martell says with a laugh, “but we’d also like to get a sponsorship or partnership going with a local brewery.” Martell and Newton are seeking funding to complete their shoot, and Martell says that he might have figured out why their fundraising efforts so far have been met with some resistance. “I did some research, and I found two or three local features that reached their goal on Kickstarter but didn’t get made for whatever reason,” he says. “So we have to prove to people that we’re worth investing in, because they might feel like they’ve been burned before.” For more information, visit risersmovie. com.

Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

HORROR BUSINESS

The team behind the fright flick ‘Risers’ turns to the service industry for help

Photo By John-Paul Newton

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

In “Risers,” the new horror movie being filmed around town by writer/director Jeff Martell, a group of teens are aching to leave their hometown. But the city doesn’t want them to leave, unleashing a horde of monsters to stop them. “It’s kind of a throwback to 1990s-era Wes Craven, with a little bit of John Carpenter’s ‘Halloween’ thrown in,” Martell says. “It centers on this group of teenagers looking forward to escaping their small town, and the neighborhood starts attacking them like an autoimmune response. A couple of them get picked off, and then we follow a couple of them who are trying to figure out what’s going on and trying to survive.” “Risers” is Martell’s first venture into

Martell actually sees a parallel between creating a successful restaurant and making a movie. “You have to build a crew and do a lot of prep work, and you need a lot of money to do it.” creating a full-length movie after studying film and photography at the Fine Arts Center and working on features and short films. “I actually edited a local feature called ‘More Than Diamonds’ that was shot in 2010 in Greenville and Berea, and I’ve directed a couple of shorts of my own,” he says. “But I’ve spent most of the last few years working in advertising, which has been really good practice. But I’ve never directed a full-length feature, and a narrative

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The Rise And Potential Fall Of Solar In South Carolina By Ryan Davis

When it comes to solar energy in South Carolina there’s good news and bad news. The good news is the incentives are better than ever for homeowners to put solar on their roof. The bad news is the incentives are going away and residential solar may not make financial sense in the not too distant future. Over the last two years you have probably seen solar systems popping up on homes all over the Upstate. This is the result of a combination of federal tax incentives, South Carolina state tax incentives, utility rebates, and solar equipment costs at an all time low. The combination of these incentives has created the perfect storm for homeowners to take advantage of getting solar put on their homes without paying a dime upfront and enjoying less expensive, clean power for years to come. In the past, solar was considered a product for environmentalists or the rich. The incentives have paved the way for everyone, regardless of political

beliefs, environmental views or income level, to get a solar system for less of a monthly payment than their current monthly electric company bill. There has never been a better time to go solar! This storm is passing and the solar incentives are likely to fade quickly. The first metric that is talked about the most is the falling cost of materials. While it’s true the price of solar products have fallen rapidly during recent years, prices have now leveled off; however with new tariff increases possibly going into effect, it is likely that materials will be harder to obtain and costs will have a floor much higher than what we are currently seeing. The next major change in store is the 30% federal tax credit, which is set to decrease to 26% in 2020, 22% in 2021, and be gone altogether by 2022. No end date has been announced by South Carolina for their 25% state solar tax credit.

The third issue the solar industry faces in South Carolina is the 2% net metering cap is approximately half full. A net metering agreement was passed in 2014 that allows homeowners to earn full retail value bill credit for each kilowatthour produced from their solar system that goes back onto the grid. Once the 2% cap is met, customers will no longer receive net metering credits on their bill, making the return time on their investment much longer than before. Once all of the incentives are gone, going solar in South Carolina will only make financial sense if equipment costs somehow fall lower than where they currently are and utility rates rise faster than what they are today. What does this mean for us today? Solar has never been easier or cheaper to attain than it is today. Local programs offer solar ownership to homeowners for no money out of pocket and a bill that is less than what they pay today. Homeowners in South Carolina can currently take advantage of a 30% federal tax credit, 25% state tax credit, and local programs

that allow the homeowner to pay no money out of pocket for the system and simply pay the balance over 10,15, or 20 years. The average solar system in South Carolina would typically cost around $30,000. A homeowner would get back $9,000 (30%) on their federal taxes and $7,500 (25%) on their state taxes. That means the homeowners net cost of the solar system would only be $13,500! Instead of writing a check, the program allows you to pay the system off over the next 10,15, or 20 years with no money out of pocket and a payment much cheaper than what it currently is. Keep in mind; these tax incentives are credits, and not deductions. Therefore, you would get back the 30% and 25% on your tax bill. As the program incentives come to an end over these next few years, the backlog of customers is going to grow quickly. The best thing for you to do is take the first step and schedule a free energy assessment to determine if your house is a good fit for solar and what your financial benefits will be.


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CULTURE Animal Care’s

Correspondent

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Sally

KEYS TO SUCCESS

The First Place to Look When Your Pet is Lost It’s every pet owner’s nightmare. You let your best friend out for a bathroom break, let them roam off leash for a bit, or can’t close the door fast enough to stop your darting four-legged family member. The panic sets in and you’re frantically calling their name. A lost pet is one of the worst feelings a pet owner can have. I just want you to know that Animal Care is the FIRST place you should look when your pet goes missing. If someone finds your pet or if Animal Control is called to pick he or she up, they’ll be taken to Animal Care, the only open admission shelter in the county. They get dozens of animals in every day. One of them could be your lost pet.

GreenvillePets.org

Pianist Dan Overly wraps up his second summer as a Tanglewood Fellow

Photo By Alex Cooke

A Bob Jones University graduate, Dan Overly (right) received a Fulbright scholarship and earned a master’s degree from the Vienna Conservatory.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

As a child, Dan Overly told his father he wanted to be a professional trombonist just like his dad. The problem was Overly wasn’t quite old enough to play the instrument, so his father told him to take piano lessons first. That turned out to be great advice. Overly, a pianist from Greenville, is spending his second summer as a Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s summer academy for advanced musical study. Be that as it may, Overly never abandoned that childhood dream. “I still pull out the trombone occasionally, but only for family members,” he said. Tanglewood has provided Overly with the opportunity to interact with some of the world’s best musicians. The school’s alumni include Leonard Bernstein and Wynton Marsalis. Meanwhile, about 20 percent of the members of American symphony orchestras, and 30 percent of all first-chair players, have studied at Tanglewood. “All of the faculty members I work with are legends in their fields,” he said, “and I work with them closely, not just 20 minutes in a master class.” This summer, Overly has already per-

formed with pianists Lee Musiker in a tribute concert to Ella Fitzgerald and Alex Smith in a concert that explored humor in song. Overly has also performed with mezzo-sopranos Stephanie Blythe and Kelly Newberry, as well as prominent baritone Sanford Sylvan. Being a collaborative pianist has forced Overly to broaden his repertoire. Soloists even in the most intense competitions may have three or four concertos ready at a time. Collaborative pianists often have different full recitals every week. “The volume of repertoire they play all the time is staggering,” Overly said. Tanglewood is known for its support of contemporary music, and Overly said he’s had to learn some “gnarly music.” Last year, he had to learn four large contemporary pieces in one week. “You have to learn incredibly quickly and at a high level of refinement,” he said. “A collaborative pianist needs to be as strong or stronger than the other partners.” Some composers, Overly said, write their absolute best music for piano in sonatas for violin, cello, or clarinet. “There’s an endless amount of music to explore,” he said. Overly, a Bob Jones University piano performance graduate, received a Fulbright

scholarship and earned a master’s degree from the Vienna Conservatory in song interpretation and opera coaching. He graduated with honors from the Cleveland Institute of Music. As a chamber musician, Overly has performed at the Kennedy Center, the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford uponAvon, and the Mozarthaus Vienna. He recently appeared in a recital with Karl-Heinz Schutz of the Wiener Philharmoniker. In the fall, Overly will participate in a fellowship for collaborative pianists at Yale University that is designed to help launch their professional careers. There, he hopes to expand his repertoire, refine his skills, and make career connections. Eventually, Overly hopes to have a position where he can both perform and teach, something he said he appears destined to do. “Both my parents are teachers and three out of four of my grandparents are teachers,” he said. Overly said in some ways being a Tanglewood Fellow is stressful; two weeks ago he played in four different recitals. “But it never feels stressful because there is so much support,” he said. “The encouragement from faculty members gives me the confidence that maybe I’m not just pursuing a mirage in the desert, that I can have a professional music career.”


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TIME FOR AN ENCORE

youtube.com/watch?v=5k1li7xSoYE

Future Chord, Rock the Ranch music fests return for second year VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

youtube.com/watch?v=wdtKGca0QDA

Provided by Refresh Records / Photo by Nicki Rohloff

from out of town and mixing it with some really solid local bands.” This year’s lineup features headliner Junior Astronomers, a passionate indie-rock outfit from Charlotte, N.C., whose longawaited second album, “Body Language,” has just come out. The band, which hasn’t played Greenville in two years, will be joined by Greenville’s Brother Oliver, the Francis Vertigo, Apricot Blush, and Italo & The Passions, among others. “I think all of these bands from the Upstate deserve more attention,” Theall says. “And I’m happy to be able to give them a platform. I want people to realize what’s going on in their backyard.” Rock the Ranch will feature the Dead 27’s, Dangermuffin, Sam Burchfield, and other local and regional favorites. But according to Kyle Nicholson, who co-organized the festival, the purpose of the event is bigger than just the bands. “My friend Michael Gray and I were thick as thieves since high school, and we played a lot of music together,” Nicholson says. “He passed away very unexpectedly in his sleep in January of 2015, and we wanted to do something to honor him and bring people together.” That’s where Nicholson’s friend Nick Crenshaw came in. “Nick and his family have a farm on the outskirts of Seneca that used to be the venue for a huge concert series in the 1970s,” Nicholson says. “It was called Charlie B’s Ranch Arena, and bands like Fleetwood Mac, ZZ Top, REO Speedwagon, and more all came and played there in little old Seneca. So I called Nick and told him my crazy idea about reviving that concert series as a tribute to Michael.” Proceeds from the festival will be divided between three worthy causes: the Shriners Hospital for Children, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, and Kathy’s Home, an organization that helps refugee children in Taiwan. “Nick has cystic fibrosis, so we wanted money to go to that,” Nicholson says. “We’re both passionate about the Shriners Hospital, and then we asked Michael’s family to choose a charity, and

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they chose Kathy’s Home.” As for what he learned from the first edition of Rock the Ranch, which took place last October, Nicholson laughs about his inexperience while preparing for last year. “I had no idea about licensing and permits, and no idea how to promote the festival on social media,” he says. “Now that we have that learning curve out of the way, we’ve been able to put more effort into finding these amazing bands to honor our friend Michael and to revive this historic festival.”

FUTURE CHORD FEST

FEAT. JUNIOR ASTRONOMERS, BROTHER OLIVER, THE FRANCIS VERTIGO, WASTED WINE, THE APARTMENT CLUB, APRICOT BLUSH, TOM ANGST, BEKET, ESTUARIE, ITALO & THE PASSIONS, EXCONS, AND SPARROW’S POINT

WHEN Saturday, Aug. 12, 1 p.m. WHERE The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer TICKETS $15 INFO 864-469-6416, bit.ly/2rDMTaq

ROCK THE RANCH MUSIC FESTIVAL

FEAT. DANGERMUFFIN, DEAD 27S, THE SOULFEATHERS, PLOMA DRIVE, SAM BURCHFIELD, TAUGHT BY HEROES, AND GRITTY FLYRIGHT

WHEN Saturday, Aug. 12, 3 p.m. WHERE Charlie B’s Ranch Arena, 155 Charlie B Farm Drive, Seneca TICKETS $10–$30 INFO bit.ly/2w7HBXq

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There are two daylong music festivals in the Upstate this Saturday, and though they might seem like very different events, they share some important things in common. Future Chord Fest, which kicks off at 1 p.m. at the Spinning Jenny in Greer, and Rock the Ranch Music Festival, which starts at 3 p.m. at Charlie B’s Ranch Arena in Seneca, are both returning for their second year. And they both pay tribute to great music from the area, with nods to the national scene as well. Future Chord Fest is the brainchild of Jeremy Theall, founder of the Future Chord artist management and event promotion company. Theall drew around 300 people to last year’s inaugural fest, which featured local acts like Carpoolparty and regional bands like Athens, Ga.-based math-rockers Art Contest, Atlanta’s dancemusic duo We Roll Like Madmen, and Myrtle Beach psychedelic rockers Canopy Hands. It was a great turnout for a first-time festival, but Theall felt there were some things he could’ve done differently to bring more people out. “Last year, about half the bands were from out of town. I felt like what I was doing was playing a more tastemaking role, and so there were a lot of bands who hadn’t played in Greenville before,” he says. “What I learned was that I could’ve had higher attendance if I’d done what I’m doing this year, which is getting a good headliner

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EXPAND YOUR PLAYLIST

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

AUG. 11-13

LITERATURE

Really Good, Really Big, Really Cheap Book Sale The Greenville Literacy Association (GLA) spends nearly a year collecting donated books from the community, and that effort culminates on one summer weekend at the Really Good, Really Big, Really Cheap Book Sale. The atrium of McAlister Square is transformed into a giant discount bookstore, with over 125,000 books in 130 categories, including fantasy, mystery, science fiction, classics, cookbooks, anthologies, and many more. There’s also a wide range of titles for beginning, middlegrade, and young adult readers.

AUGUST 18 SWEET PLANTAIN OCT.12 PEACE CHAMBER CONCERT SERIES

A ticketed preview party will be held Friday, Aug. 11, from 5:30–8 p.m. Attendees can enjoy small bites from Larkin’s Catering and a glass of wine while getting an advanced look at this year’s selection. On Saturday, Aug. 12, shoppers who pay $10 can participate in the Early Bird Sale and begin shopping at 7:30 a.m. before the general public sale begins at 8:30 a.m. Sunday’s clearance sale gives shoppers a chance to fill designated bags with books for just $10. Event proceeds benefit GLA, which seeks to provide adults in the community with educational opportunities through Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language programs to increase literacy and employability. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Friday, Aug. 11, 5:30–8 p.m. (preview party); Saturday, Aug. 12, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sunday, Aug. 13, 1–4 p.m. WHERE McAlister Square, 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive ADMISSION Preview party is $35/person or $60 for two. Early Bird Saturday entry is $10. General shopping hours are free. INFO greenvilleliteracy.org

AUG. 12

RECREATION

Superhero 5K

NOVEMBER 14

Photo by Will Crooks

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org 864.467.3000 GROUPS 864.467.3032 @peacecenter

If you’ve been searching for a legitimate excuse to proudly dress up as your favorite superhero in public, you’re in luck. The annual Superhero 5K will be held Aug. 12 with a course that begins at the Kroc Center and incorporates the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail and views of Falls Park. Participants of all ages are welcome, but pets need to be left at home. If running isn’t one of your superpowers, walking the race route is also permitted. The Superhero 5K benefits the Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club of Greenville County, which serves more than 500 local children by providing quality afterschool programs and educational enrichment. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Saturday, Aug. 12, 8 a.m. WHERE The Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St. ADMISSION $30 adult, $20 teen, $10 youth (closes Aug. 11 at 2 p.m.) INFO bit.ly/2f9ajD0


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

AUG. 12

COMEDY

Stand-Up w/ Shivani Nadarajah Alchemy Comedy Theater is primarily known for improv shows, but occasionally they like to mix things up. Saturday night will be a stand-up show with headliner Shivani Nadarajah, an Alchemy performer who began doing stand-up about four years ago. Nadarajah, who was born to Sri Lankan parents and raised in Canada before moving to the South as a teenager, says her comedy is “another way to bridge the gap culturally.” “Most of it is about being raised by immigrant parents and the challenges of doing that in the South. And being 30 and unmarried, which is like being 60 in brown years,” she quips. The show’s name, “The Final Night of 30,” will also inspire a few of Nadarajah’s punchlines. “It’s the eve of my 31st birthday, so a lot will be poking fun at that,” she says. In addition to performing in Charleston, Atlanta, Charlotte, N.C., and Los Angeles, Nadarajah opened for comedian Nicole Byer of MTV’s “Girl Code” for a January show at Clemson University. Some of her favorite stand-up comedians include Russell Peters, Aziz Ansari, Jo Koy, and Allie Wong. “I love any kind of minority comedian right now,” Nadarajah says. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Saturday, Aug. 12, 9–10:15 p.m. WHERE Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St. ADMISSION $10 INFO alchemycomedy.com

2017 Fri & Sa Aug 18 & 19, Pack Square, Downtown Asheville

Sponsored by

Friday & Saturday August 18 & 19, 2017 Asheville NC

Sat Aug 19, Renaissance Hotel, Downtown Asheville

This Year, Savor The Mountains Like Never Before With nationwide recognition for being one of the top culinary and wine destinations, this vibrant and eclectic mountain city once again brings you the Asheville Wine and Food Festival. In its 9th year, come visit this exciting two-day event in the heart of downtown to celebrate the chefs, restaurants, vineyards, distilleries, breweries, and farmers who have elevated Asheville's status to a "Foodtopian Society".

ADVANCE TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE FOLLOW US

AshevilleWineAndFood.com


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XB-z4iQA1Yw

Travers Brothership w/ Griffin Dean

CONCERT

AUG. 11

Welcome to our newest Doctor of Audiology, Dr. Maggie Robertson Dr. Robertson looks forward to serving patients in both the Greenville & Travelers Rest offices

Davis

Gottrocks 200 Eisenhower Drive 9 p.m. | $10 gottrocksgreenville.com

The music on Travers Brothership’s 2016 album “A Way to Survive” sounds for all the world like some sort of lost early ’70s soul classic. The production is rich and gritty, emphasizing the rhythm section’s effortless groove, the funky electric piano and Hammond B-3 touches, and singer Kyle Travers’ emotional testifying. The Asheville, N.C., band, led by twin brothers Kyle and Eric, might call themselves “alternative funk and soul” in their bio, but you can leave out the “alternative” part. “I think the material that we wrote for ‘A Way to Survive’ demanded that old-school production in order to make the songs greet the ears how they were intended to,” Kyle Travers says. “We all love the production of so many of the ’60s and ’70s records and thought it was an appropriate approach for the album. As far as writing the material, the old-school vibe unconsciously sneaks its way into the music because of all of the older influences we have.” —Vincent Harris

FRI

11

COMMUNTIY

Back to School Bash

Molina Healthcare Parkside Pediatrics Parking Lot 525 Verdae Blvd. 9 a.m.-noon | FREE In an effort to help local youth prepare for the upcoming school year, Molina Healthcare of South Carolina is hosting a Back-to-School Bash at Parkside Pediatrics in Greenville. At the event, Molina will distribute approximately 500 free drawstring bags. Parkside will offer to schedule immunizations and well checks with attendees. Additionally, guests can enjoy fun games and activities and a DJ. molinahealthcare.com

MUSIC

Heather Gillis Band Rocks It ‘Southern-Style’ on First Tour

Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant 1237 Pendleton St. | 8 p.m. | $10 Heather Gillis, former guitarist-vocalist with Butch Trucks and the Freight Train, fronted by late Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks, rocks it Southern style on her first tour as the Heather Gillis Band. The youthful Gillis is the complete rock, soul, and roots package as a guitar player, lap steel player, songwriter, singer, and arranger. 864-558-0747 | drmacarnoldsbluesrestaurant.com dougdeutschpr@gmail.com

MUSIC

Simpsonville Summer Music Series

Kristin Davis, Au.D.

Alexandra Tarvin, Au.D.

Lynda Clark, Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology

Doctor of Audiology

Doctor of Audiology

Over 20 Years Experience Improving Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare

4318 East North Street, Greenville, SC 29615 135 Botanical Circle, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 11 Five Forks Plaza Court, Simpsonville, SC 29681 www.davisaudiology.com

CALL 864-655-8300 TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT!

The Tater Shed | 110 Academy St., Simpsonville 7-9 p.m. | Fridays through Aug. 11 FREE The free Simpsonville Summer Music Series will be held at The Tater Shed (or, in case of rain, at The Arts Center). Chairs, blankets, and picnic baskets are welcome. August 11 will feature The Sound Committee.

THEATER

“The Ant and the Grasshopper”

The Academy of Arts, Logos Theatre 80 School St., Taylors 7 p.m. | $10 This brand new, exciting, and witty children’s musical follows the life of one courageous little ant named Theodore who finds himself having to lead his friends through the jungle, only to find the treasure of a lifetime. 864-269-9342 | theacademyofarts.org

COMMUNITY

Call Before You Dig Day

Greer CPW Headquarters 301 McCall St., Greer 10 a.m.-3 p.m. | FREE The day will feature a free hot dog lunch from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., bounce houses, and a drawing for gift cards. The Blood Connection will be onsite from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. greercpw.com

FRI-SEP

11-24

VISUAL ARTS

Paul Yanko exhibit

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery 300 River St., Ste. 202 Riverworks Gallery presents Paul Yanko’s site-specific wall mural plus recent mixed media works on paper: “Snap to Grid,” “Migrate from Center,” and “Deviate and Expand.” gvltec.edu/dva

SAT

12

COMMUNITY

BeWell Mauldin Market

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin 8 a.m.-noon Saturdays through Aug. 26 | FREE The market features a variety of vendors from around the Upstate selling locally sourced and produced items including produce, dairy, eggs, honey, gifts, clothing, accessories, treats, pastries, and more. The market will also feature free healthy activities such as small-group fitness, health screenings, and cooking demos.

COMMUNITY

School Tools Distribution Day

United Way of Greenville County Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 8 a.m.-noon FREE Giving kids the tools they need to succeed in school - and in life. That’s the ultimate goal of United Way School Tools, a program designed to give students of low-income families the best possible start to the school year. Free parking is being provided in the parking garage adjacent to the arena. Families will need to bring a photo ID and one of the following: a Medicaid card for each elementary or middle


ART CONDITIONED. IT’S COOL INSIDE!

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm free admission

Journal FP Art Conditioned 2017.indd 2

7/26/17 1:57 PM


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https://soundcloud.com/tides-in-transit

CONCERT

AUG. 11

Tides In Transit (EP release show) w/ Not Cops and The Apartment Club Radio Room 110 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $7 radioroomgreenville.com

The three songs on the Easley sextet Tides In Transit’s new self-titled EP confidently mix anthemic late-’90s style alternative rock (think Live or Third Eye Blind) with a serious progressive streak. The choruses might be all big hooks and catchy riffs, but the rhythms through the verses twist and turn in unpredictable directions. They’re a three-guitar band, but rather than trade in show solos, they prefer to explore complex melodic ideas, weaving riffs and melodies around one another with the occasional touch of icy synths. “Our style is a melting pot of different genres,” says guitarist Justin Roe. “And it all comes together to make our sound. We feel like we have enough different styles of everybody.” Roe says the band picked the three songs on the EP from a larger repertoire because they best displayed the different sides of their music. “We’d fleshed those out the most, and they showed what our sound is all about,” he says. —Vincent Harris school student, a letter of free/reduced lunch eligibility from the Greenville County School District, or an EBT card for the family. School supplies will be given out on a first-come, first-served basis to those who qualify. Supplies are limited and only available while supplies last. unitedwaygc.org

ART

Beyond Realism: Acrylic Abstract Landscape

Greenville Center for Creative Arts | 25 Draper St. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | $69 Take inspiration from the landscapes around you and reference photos to create abstract paintings. Painting “what you see” doesn’t have to involve creating

an exact replica of your reference. Learn to create images that go beyond realism. Explore methods for establishing compositional structure, values, color, and the mood of a scene. There will be plenty of fun exercises to help you loosen up your painting style as you go. Students should have some experience with acrylics, but beyond that, all levels are welcome.

COMMUNITY

TD Saturday Market

Greenville Health System Main Street between Court and Washington streets | Saturdays through Oct. 28 | FREE TD Saturday Market presented by Greenville Health System brings farm-fresh produce, baked goods, meats, cheeses, seafood, and other specialty foods to downtown Greenville. This year’s market features the Lowes Foods Front Porch.

FAMILY & EDUCATION

ECPI University Career Discovery Day

ECPI University Greenville Campus | 1001 Keys Drive 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE ECPI University is hosting Career Discovery Day, an open house. Attendees will have the opportunity to see exciting interactive demonstrations, tour the campus, meet faculty and staff, observe the hands-on learning environment, and explore career education for the technology, business, nursing, and medical professions. 864-288-2828 | ecpi.edu | dbrandt@ecpi.edu

THRU SUN

13

THEATER

“I Feel The Earth Move”

Greenville Little Theatre | 444 College St. $35 Get ready to travel back to the 1970s with GLT’s latest rockin’ musical review. Show dates are Aug. 4-5 and 10-12 at 8 p.m. and Aug. 6 and 13 at 3 p.m. 864-233-6238 | greenvillelittletheatre.org

TUE

15

COMMUNITY

Simpsonville Garden Club

Rotary Club | 205 S. Maple St., Simpsonville 1:30 p.m. | FREE The August meeting of the Simpsonville Garden Club will take place at its new time, 1:30 p.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 15, at the Rotary Club’s new location, 205 S. Maple St., Simpsonville. Accredited flower show judge, Linda Howle, will provide a presentation on floral design for the Flower Show. Admission is free and anyone with an interest in gardening is welcome to attend. simpsonvillegardenclub.com

TUE-DEC

15-05

EDUCATION

Homeschool Series on Media Literacy

Children’s Museum of the Upstate |300 College St. 10-11 a.m. | Tuesdays | $25-$70 In our ever-changing world, The Children’s Museum of the Upstate wants to give little ones an introduction to media literacy, providing children skills to more objectively discern images and information they are exposed to every day. For ages 3-5. 864-233-7755 | tcmupstate.org info@tcmupstate.org

WED

16

FAMILY AND EDUCATION

Around the World in 80 Slides

Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship | 1135 State Park Road 7:30-9 p.m. Sally and Peter Potosky went around the world on a 21-day trip by private jet with National Geographic’s team of top-notch experts. The Boeing 757 specially configured with VIP-style seating for just 75 passengers is ideally suited for these remarkable expeditions.


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The itinerary included legendary places on everyone’s must-see list and a photographer’s dream - Macchu Picchu, Easter Island, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, Angor Wat, the Taj Mahal, Serengeti Plain in Africa, and Petra, Jordan. 864-787-4999 | bit.ly/2qHP9gA

THU-SAT

17-19

ART

Exploring Light

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $285 Investigate the aspects of light in paintings. In painting from life, photographic reference, or invention, painters need to know and be consistent throughout the painting with answers to questions such as: What is the source of your light? What direction is the light coming from? All of these things are necessary to acheive the illusion of depth in painting and will be the primary topics of discussion and exploration in painting during this workshop with William Jameson.

THU-THU

17-24

FOOD & DRINK

Slow Food Upstate Tapas Cooking Class

Slow Food Upstate | The Mediterranean Corner 420P The Parkway, Greer | 6-9:30 p.m. | $65 Learn to make Spanish tapas with Chef Alba Sunyer. Class will start with “welcome tapas,” followed by a hands-on cooking experience and finished with dessert tapas. Class sizes are limited to 30 people per class. Slow Food Upstate will be holding two classes this August led by Chef Alba on Thursday, Aug. 17, and Thursday, Aug. 24. Both member and nonmembers feel free to attend. To reserve your spot for this event, please email Mary White at macarne@clemson.edu. 864-884-3624 | slowfoodupstate.com macarne@clemson.edu

THU-SEP

17-17

VISUAL ARTS

Spartanburg Art Co-Op To Host ‘Full Circle’ Exhibit

West Main Artists Co-Op 578 West Main St., Spartanburg Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE The mixed-media and ceramic work of Spartanburg artists Susan Eleazer and Christina Dixon will be on display in a duel exhibit entitled “Full Circle.” The public and free opening reception will be Aug. 17, 5-9 p.m., as part of Spartanburg’s monthly ArtWalk. 864-804-6501 WestMainArtists.org

FRI

18

MUSIC

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates 1 Lodge St., Asheville 7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Aug. 18 will feature The Newsboys with special guest Mandisa. 866-336-1255 biltmore.com/concerts

FRI-SAT

18-19

FASHION AND BEAUTY

SHE Weekend 2017

TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive | 11 a.m.-6 p.m. | $4-15 The 10th Annual SHE Weekend is an event full of shopping, creating, learning, tasting, making, laughing, and having a great time. This year marks the 10th Annual SHE Weekend, with more unique vendors, more choices, more activities, and extended hours. 864-235-1073 SHEGreenville.com

ARTS

EDUCATION

OPEN

HOUSE

THRU SAT

19

THEATER

“Million Dollar Quartet”

Centre Stage 501 River St. $20-30, $15 for students with ID 8 p.m., Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m., Sunday Four performances added for this show. The Tony Award-winning musical, “Million Dollar Quartet” is set on December 4, 1956, when an extraordinary twist of fate brought Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Elvis Presley together at Sun Records in Memphis. “Million Dollar Quartet” brings that legendary December night to life with an irresistible tale. With a cast of all local actors perfected by director Glenda ManWaring, pristine vocals led by Matt Rexford (also playing Jerry Lee Lewis), and dynamite choreography and co-direction by Paige ManWaring, “Million Dollar Quartet” will transport you back to 1956. centrestage.org

VISUAL ARTS

Art & Light, Fibers of the South

Art & Light Gallery | 16 Aiken St. Sarah Mandell is a Greenville staple and crafting genius. And now she’s upping her game and releasing a new series of felted landscapes that will be exhibited at Art & Light. 864-363-8172 | artandlightgallery.com/blog/

SAT

19

CONCERT

Laura Story in Concert

6 p.m. | FREE Grammy award-winning singer/songwriter Laura Story will perform at Buncombe Street United Methodist Church. It will take place in the parking lot at the corner of Buncombe and Richardson streets in downtown Greenville. The Richardson Street parking

garage, located across from the church, is free after 6 p.m. Food and summer refreshments will be available for purchase beginning at 5:30 p.m. In the event of inclement weather, the concert will relocate indoors to Sisk Hall within Buncombe Street United Methodist Church.

MUSIC

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates | 1 Lodge St., Asheville 7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Aug. 19 will feature Tony Bennett. 866-336-1255 biltmore.com/concerts

MUSIC

Rolling Waterwheel Gospel Revue

Hagood Mill | 138 Hagood Mill Road noon-3 p.m. | FREE | $5 parking The wheel will be turning and the hills resounding in song at Hagood Mill with an old-time gospel singalong. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and be prepared to belt out all the familiar old gospel songs with Hagood Mill’s heritage singers. visitpickenscounty.com

SEASONAL & HOLIDAY

Bon Dance Japanese Culture Festival Japan-America Association of South Carolina McAlister Square | 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive 12:30-4:30 p.m. | FREE Celebrate the end of summer with a Japanese culture festival. Enjoy taiko drumming with Ronin Taiko, delicious food and snacks, Japanese crafts, games, martial arts demonstrations, traditional Japanese arts, and the Bon Dance, or bon odori, featuring

MAULDIN CULTURAL CENTER

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18

6:00 - 8:30 PM mauldinculturalcenter.org

101 EAST BUTLER ROAD MAULDIN 29662

WOOD CARVING MULTI-MEDIA ART VOICE COOKING GUITAR


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017

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CULTURE

participants in colorful kimono, happi, and yukata. Admission and participation in many activities are free. Tickets can be purchased for food and games. This event is family-friendly and is held indoors in comfortable air conditioning, regardless of weather conditions. 864-626-5507 | jaasc.org jaasctomo@gmail.com

LITERATURE

Children’s Author Sheri S. Levy

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m.-4 p.m. | FREE South Carolina children’s author Sheri S. Levy will be celebrating the launch of her new young adult novel, “Starting Over,” the sequel to “Seven Days to Goodbye,” at her launch party at Fiction Addiction. This event is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served. Books may be purchased online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

THRU SUN

20

COMMUNITY

Tucanos School Supply Drive

Tucanos Brazilian Grill 1025 Woodruff Road Tucanos Brazilian Grill is hosting a school supply drive for Greenville County Schools and those in need before the academic year. Tucanos’ guests will have the opportunity to drop off school supplies of any kind to benefit the local school district. Those who donate will be given a free Brazilian lemonade coupon to use at their convenience. During the supply drive, Tucanos will also provide free desserts to area teachers with a valid school ID. 864-288-2486 | tucanos.com/greenville

SUN

20

VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: Artist Talk with Grainger McKoy

Greenville County Museum of Art | 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE Join renowned South Carolina carver and artist Grainger McKoy for an engaging look at his exhibition of intricately carved birds and gravity-defying sculptures. 864-546-4064 | gcma.org | ebarbee@gcma.org

MON

21

COMMUNITY

Lights Out Mauldin

Sunset Park |211 Fowler Circle 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | FREE Visit Sunset Park for a solar eclipse viewing party. There will be food trucks on-site, bounce houses, free eclipse viewing glasses (while supplies last), music and giveaways by 99.5 CHUCK FM, and more. This event is free and requires online registration and a parking pass. bit.ly/2uGjDDX

EDUCATION

Eclipse@Furman

Furman University | Paladin Stadium 3300 Poinsett Highway | noon-3 p.m. | FREE Furman University is hosting a free viewing of the total solar eclipse at Paladin Stadium. Most of the United States will see only a partial eclipse, but Greenville falls directly within the eclipse’s region of totality. Furman’s spacious Paladin Stadium offers the perfect place to view this rare sighting while enjoying live music and concessions with family and friends. The event also features streaming coverage from NASA, narration by Furman scientists, educational activities, and special viewing glasses while supplies last. Rain location: Bon Secours Wellness Arena in downtown Greenville (with live streaming from NASA). 864-294-3774 | bit.ly/2tul5Xl

1.05

COMMUNITY

Upstate Republican Women’s luncheon Upstate Republican Women Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $18 members and guest, $20 nonmembers Upstate Republican Women will have associate Lynn Ballard from the Greenville County Council speak about local opportunities with the Greenville County Boards and Commissions. Reservations not made by Aug. 16 will result in an additional charge. UpstateRepublicanWomen.org upstaterepublicanwomen@gmail.com

MON-FRI

21-25

THEATER

Broadway Boot Camps

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road | 5:30-9 p.m. Lights. Camera. Action. In these one-week camps, youth (grades 2-6 and grades 7-12) will learn the ins and outs of being in show biz. They’ll sing new songs, assess a character and how to portray them, learn how to dance, and finally bring it all together for a Friday production. Classes are taught by local musical director Tim St. Clair II and limited to 30 students. Students should wear comfortable, loose clothing that they can move well in. Camp for second through sixth grade meets 5:30-7 p.m. Camp for seventh through 12th grades meets 7:30-9 p.m. 864-335-4862 | bit.ly/2eUkV8X nmartinson@mauldincitysc.com

THRU SAT

19

ART

Greenville Center for Creative Arts Summer Workshops

25 Draper St. Summer 2017 workshops at GCCA are brimming with creative potential. From one-day concentrated

%

instruction like anatomy for artists, life drawing with Anthony Conway, and three-day immersive experiences like acrylic painting, you’re sure to find a workshop that fits your busy summer schedule. bit.ly/2qGx96U

THU

24

MUSIC

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates 1 Lodge St., Asheville 7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Aug. 24 will feature REO Speedwagon. 866-336-1255 | biltmore.com/concerts

THRU FRI

25

VISUAL ART

Art Exhibit: Liz Rundorff Smith

Furman University, Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building | 3300 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE Liz Rundorff Smith, art school director for Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA), will present “Found Paintings” on the campus of Furman University. Rundorff Smith served as program director for Greenville’s Artisphere arts festival from 2006-16. Exhibit is open Monday-Friday. Reception and talk will be held Aug. 25, 6-7:30 p.m. 864-294-2995 | bit.ly/2uVgZZ3

FRI

25

MUSIC

Carolina Jamfest

Bon Secours Wellness Arena | 650 N. Academy St. 7 p.m. | $65-$100 Jamfest includes Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, Betty Wright, The Whispers, and Lenny Williams. 864-241-3800 | bonsecoursarena.com info@bswarena.com

MONEY APY MARKET

Guaranteed until July 2018

Open your account online today!

hometrustbanking.com/cool-gvl 499 Woodruff Road, 864.335.2200 8599 Pelham Road, 864.605.6200 1. Limited time offer. The 1.05% Money Market APY (Annual Percentage Yield) is fixed through July 16, 2018. After July 16, 2018, or if the balance falls below the minimum requirement, the rate is variable and subject to change at any time. The minimum principal balance to earn the stated APY is $5,000. Balances below $5,000 earn 0.10% APY. Rates accurate as of August 1, 2017. Account must be funded by money not already on deposit with HomeTrust Bank at the time of account opening and is subject to bank approval. Fees may reduce earnings on the account. Interest payments are subject to IRS tax reporting requirements. Federal regulation limits money market accounts to 6 transfers or withdrawals per month for most types of transfers and withdrawals. Certain transfers and withdrawals are not subject to this limit.

1

$5,000 minimum to open Jo, Manager Woodruff Road


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CULTURE CONCERT

AUG. 11 youtube.com/watch?v=3HLGu9Fw-IE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

India Day Celebration

India Association Of Greenville TD Stage at the Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. This event will showcase the unique traditions, culture, and cuisines of modern day India, with a keen eye on its glorious heritage. Visitors will get an opportunity to experience a glimpse of India. myiag.org/indiaday

SAT-SUN

26-27

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

FUNDRAISER

Upstate S.C. Law Enforcement Memorial Softball Tournament

Awake At Last w/ The Funeral Portrait

Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg 7 p.m. | $10 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2 Awake At Last creates a dizzying style of progressive rock that’s as complex as it is passionate. On their just-out new EP, “Life/Death/ Rebirth,” singer Vincent Torres rages over a twisted tower of shifting rhythms, unpredictable song structures, and brutally intricate riffs, trying to maintain a positive outlook in the face of anger and desperation. Much of that struggle has its root in the nonstop touring the band did behind their previous release; they’ve been averaging around 200 shows a year since they formed in 2011. “The root of the EP comes from the struggles of touring and the depression you can sometimes feel. That’s the personal story,” Torres says. “But the songs are more about overcoming those struggles and finding the human and spiritual connections we’re all lacking these days.” Those are complicated ideas that almost by definition need adventurous music to express them, so that’s what the band created. “The music comes out complex, because we’re going through complex stuff as a band,” he says. “I try to use the lyrics to be the positivity of it all, but the music represents the clashing of swords in the battle we’re going through — the anxiety and fear.” —Vincent Harris

MUSIC

PNC Bank Zootunes Concert

$150, VIP $250 ZooTunes is a concert series, hosted by The Greenville Zoo Foundation, and offered in partnership with the Greenville Zoo, the City of Greenville, and Eleven Events. August 25 will feature The Revivalists and is offered in an intimate and unique setting at the Greenville Zoo. Proceeds benefit the Greenville Zoo Foundation. zootunes.eventbrite.com

SAT

26

MUSIC

Greer Police Department | Century Park 3605 Brushy Creek Road, Greer | $250/team Public safety agencies from across the Upstate will compete in the softball tournament to honor law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. All money raised goes to support the families of fallen officers in Upstate South Carolina. gallaghersarmy.com/upstate-sc-law-enforcementmemorial-softball-tournament/

TUE

29

LITERATURE

Book Talk & Signing with Debut Southern Author Leah Weiss

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | FREE Southern author Leah Weiss will discuss her debut novel, “If the Creek Don’t Rise,” at a book talk and signing at Fiction Addiction. Leah will be introduced by her friend and fellow author Sue Inman, Greenville author of “Year of the Snake: 1989.” This event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served, but please RSVP to Fiction Addiction if you plan to attend. Books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

THRU THU

31

COMMUNITY

TCMU August Events

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | Free with admission Visit The Children’s Museum of the Upstate for reccurring events like Random Acts of Science, Off the Wall, and Storytime, as well as special one-time events. This month’s events center around the theme of space, with special emphasis on the solar eclipse occuring in August. All events and activites are free with museum admission. tcmupstate.org

THU-NOV

31-13

COMMUNITY

Meet MHAGC

Mental Health America of Greenville County | 429 N. Main St., Ste. 2 | FREE Have you heard about the work of CRISISline and other programs of Mental Health America of Greenville County (MHAGC) but have never had the chance to see it for yourself? Sign up for an upcoming “Meet MHAGC!” events: Thursday, Aug. 31, 9-10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sept. 11, 1-2:30 p.m.; Thursday, Sept. 21, 9-10:30 a.m.; Monday, Oct. 9, 1-2:30 p.m.; and Monday, Nov. 13, 1-2:30 p.m. Learn more about our organization and efforts at an upcoming “Meet MHAGC!” event. Please RSVP with name, organization (if applicable), title ( if applicable), and an email/phone number. 864-467-3598 | MHAGC@MHAGC.org

DALE JOHNSON,

Plumber

“Dale Johnson did a super job conducting my service-program plumbing review. My wife and I appreciated the attention-to-detail, care, small adjustments, and recommendations, all from someone who clearly knew what he was doing. Never had a concern or reason for doubt – people or work. We can’t ask for more.” Barry & Janet L., Simpsonville

Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates 1 Lodge St., Asheville 7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Aug. 26 will feature the Goo Goo Dolls: Long Way Home Summer Tour 2017 with Special Guest Phillip Phillips. 866-336-1255 biltmore.com/concerts

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

(864) 908.3360

| W W W. CO R L E Y P R O. CO M


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.11.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Show Honor ACROSS

1 Inflate 7 Cattle pen 13 Sucks up 20 Ida of old Hollywood 21 Excite 22 Graduation document 23 Verdi opera set in Cyprus 24 Carrot, tater or cuke 25 Barn bash 26 “Spread the news!” 29 Sore, as muscles 30 Mermaid setting 31 Dernier — (newest fashion) 32 Mauna — (Hawaiian peak) 35 Mom’s mate 38 Give relief of 40 “Hip, hip, hooray!” 45 “— From Muskogee” (country hit) 47 Tons of, informally 50 Down a meal 51 Author Nin 52 1975 Joni Mitchell hit 55 Feed voraciously 57 Conan O’— 58 Rialto glower 59 Itinerary specification 61 Piqued state 62 Totally fill 65 Santa — (some winds) 67 Warm up

By Frank Longo

69 USN jr. officer 70 Country that one’s forebears are from 74 Unwell 76 “Farewell!” 77 City near Grenoble 78 Enjoys anew, as a book 81 Wine valley in California 83 Sonic the Hedgehog’s creator 85 Pouchlike parts 87 Lower leg bone 88 Refrigerator part for 24-Acrosses 90 1953 Bing Crosby film 94 Metropolis in Japan 95 Find a sum 96 Lucky number 97 Actress Liu 98 Title dance in a 1962 novelty song 102 River in Germany 104 Blue Jays, on sports tickers 105 Grammy-winning Brian 106 Kauai wreath 107 Peak periods 110 “Yeah, right!” 112 Prize won by the ends of 26-, 40-, 52-, 70-, 90- and 98-Across 120 Its capital is Kingston 123 Quite polite 124 “Damien: —” (1978

sequel) 125 Structure near a tonsil 126 Voting item 127 Thread puller 128 1949 Tony winner Fabray 129 Derisive smiles 130 Sergeant Bilko and others DOWN

1 Ink spot 2 Mandolin kin 3 German auto 4 “One of Ours” writer Cather 5 Loosen, as a skate 6 Place to play snooker 7 Guinea pig 8 Cookies since 1912 9 Knavish one 10 Toddler 11 “Yeah, right!” 12 Roué’s look 13 Hang on (to) 14 Having artificial body parts 15 Hurried 16 It made the Cutlass 17 Joey, e.g., informally 18 German auto 19 SFPD part 27 Common disinfectant 28 “Power” rapper 32 Heard of

Sayonara High Rates, Impersonal Service

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*Promotion dates: August 1 – September 30, 2017. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined with another promotion or offer. Refinance of a GHFCU loan will qualify with more than $5,000 in new money. Mortgages excluded.

DOWNTOWN

COUNTY SQUARE

SCTAC

SIMPSONVILLE

34 Good traits 100 Like “Carrie” in 2013 116 New York ball team 35 Pundit Lou 101 Modest 117 “... — in my cap ...” 36 Film director — Kurosawa 103 Juicing gizmo 118 Vex 37 Yamaha or Casio product 108 Norman Vincent — 119 Goes totally kaput 39 Princely school 109 Tijuana Mr. 120 “Brady Bunch” sister 41 Witch’s spell 111 12-year-old, say 121 Toothpaste box abbr. 42 Sortie, e.g. 112 Glazier’s unit 122 Pawns, e.g. 43 Witch 113 Large brawl 44 Slaughter in the outfield 114 Rubber duck locales Crossword answers: page 32 46 “There wasn’t a dry — the house” 48 Take a vow 49 Not in any key by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 53 Ratify 54 Market researcher 55 Old numbing liquid 56 Zora — Hurston 60 PIN taker 63 Rib 64 Aspartate, for one 66 Young pigs 68 Toadlike, in a way 71 Gift stick-on 72 Aunt’s spouse, in Soissons 73 Actor Sam of “Backtrack” 74 Earned pay 75 Cartoonist Gary 79 Style for the Bee Gees 80 Lustful deity 82 Queries 84 Actor Alan of “The Aviator” 86 Golfer Ballesteros 89 Margarine square 91 Billfold items, briefly 92 Make hazy 93 In single file Sudoku answers: page 32 95 Gal pal, in Grenoble Easy

Sudoku


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Pax LLC/ DBA VaporWize intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER at 3234 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 13, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION SUMMON Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Landfill Compactor including training RFP #06-08/30/17, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., August 30, 2017. • LEC BOILER, Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 3:00 P.M. A pre-proposal meeting and site visit will be held at 9:00 A.M., E.D.T., Tuesday, August 22, 2017 , at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty.org/ apps/procurementpdf/projects.aspx?type=RFP or by calling 864-467-7200.

SOLICITATION SUMMON Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 07-09/14/17, Greenville County Pavilion Renovation/ Expansion Project, September 14, 2017, 3:00PM. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Sports Entertainment Management Group, LLC/Hall of Fame Sports Grill intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & LIQUOR at 531 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 13, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that La Habana, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 20, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dailey Cigar LLC / DBA /TCB intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 23 College Street, Greenville, SC 29601 To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 27, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that NS Stark LLC/ DBA Liquor Express intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 225 East Butler Road, Mauldin, SC 29662 To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 27, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF ANDERSON IN THE FAMILY COURT CASE NO: 2017-DR-04-710 JACOB AND YESENIA SMITH, Plaintiffs, ALFREDO RODRIGUEZ, TRINITY, GENESIS, AND HAVANA minor children under the age of fourteen (14) years, Defendant. To: Alfredo Rodriguez, Trinity (2009), Genesis (2010), Havana (2012) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is attached hereto and is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at this office at 113 North Main Street, Anderson, SC 29621, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff(s) in this action will apply to the Court for the said relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, Todd W. Pruette, SC Bar Number 80686 Goodwin & Pruette, Attorneys at Law, LLC Attorney for the Plaintiffs 113 N. Main Street Anderson, SC 29621 864-375-0909 todd@mjgoodwin.com

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION FILE NO. 16 JA 72 COUNTY OF CALDWELL IN THE MATTER OF: Natalia Abigail Meneses Martinez, a juvenile TO: Edgar Ivan Meneses Martinez, Putative biological father of Natalia Abigail Meneses Martinez, a female child born January 30, 2016, in Burke County, North Carolina; and any unknown father of Natalia Abigail Meneses Martinez. Take Notice: A Petition and Motion seeking to terminate the parental rights of Edgar Ivan Meneses Martinez and any unknown father have been filed in Caldwell County File No. 16 JA 72, In The Matter Of: Natalia Abigail Meneses Martinez. The nature of relief being sought is TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS. Take Notice: You are hereby directed to file written answer to this Pleading with the Clerk of Superior Court, Juvenile Division, 216 Main Street, N.W., PO Box 1376, Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina 28645, not later than the 14th day of September, 2017, said date being 40 days from first publication of this notice, and upon your failure to do so, your parental rights to this child shall be terminated. Take Notice: If you are indigent and cannot afford counsel, you are entitled to appointed counsel. You are directed to contact the Clerk of Superior Court, Juvenile Division, immediately to request and make application for appointed counsel. Take Notice: This is a new case and any attorney appointed previously will not represent you in this proceeding unless ordered by the Court. Take Notice: The date, time and place of hearing will be mailed by the Clerk upon filing written answer or 30 days from this date of service if no answer is filed. Take Notice: You may attend the termination hearing. This the 4th day of August, 2017. Heather Hennessee, Staff Attorney Caldwell County Department of Social Services 2345 Morganton Blvd., Suite A Lenoir, NC 28645

AMENDED SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2016-CP-23-02960 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., f/k/a The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successorin-interest to all permitted successors and assigns of The Chase Manhattan Bank as Trustee for IMC Home Equity Loan Owner Trust 1998-7, PLAINTIFF, vs. Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins; and if Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins be deceased, then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins, distributees, and devisees at law to the Estate of Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins; and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; CIB Financial, Inc.; First Greensboro Home Equity, Inc., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30)

days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 12, 2016; that the Amended Summons and Amended Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County on June 28, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Elizabeth S. Carper, Plaintiff, Vs. Barbara J. Cooper, Nancy Ann Nesemier, and all unknown heirs of Francis S. Cooper, Jr., Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO , ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land, situate, lying and being on the northern side of Alhambra Boulevard in Gantt Township, Greenville County, South Carolina, being shown and designated as Lot No. 42 on a plat of Cutler Ridge made by C. O. Riddle, Surveyor, dated November 25, 1962 and recorded in the RMC Office for Greenville County, South Carolina in Plat Book YY at Page 107, and having, according to said plat, the following metes and bounds, to – wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin on the northerly side of Alhambra Boulevard, joint front corner of Lots Nos. 41 and 42 and running thence N. 26 – 09 E. 104.1 feet to an iron pin, joint rear corner of Lots No. 41 and 42; thence S. 63 – 39 E. 46.1 feet to an iron pin; thence N. 64 – 38 E. 95.9 feet to an iron pin, joint rear corner of Lots Nos. 42 and 43; thence S. 25 – 54 W. 178.8 feet to an iron pin on Alhambra Boulevard, said point being the joint front corner of Lots No. 42 and 43; thence along the northerly side of Alhambra Boulevard N. 63 – 51 W. 105 feet to an iron pin, the point of beginning. C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-01708 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006 EQ2 Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-EQ2, PLAINTIFF, vs. Craig H. Williamson; Willi Henny; and if Willi Henny be deceased then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of Willi Henny; distributees and devisees at law to the Estate of Willi Henny; and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; Cora L. Henny; Cindy Sturgis; Michelle Sims; Glenlea Homeowner’s Association, Inc., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and

separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on March 14, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.


August 11, 2017 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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