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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, July 3, 2015 • Vol.17, No.27

EMBATTLED FLAG Is Confederate symbol holding S.C. back? Page 8

SALUTE TO SERVICE Upstate Warrior Solutions celebrates the Fourth Page 15

STAR TIME Willie, Jackson and Jay headed to Peace Center Page 18

INSIDE THE UBJ

BEHIND

THE

BANG

Greenville Sports Leagues scores points in market

On the Fourth, a lot goes down before the fireworks go up Page 4

CINDY LANDRUM / STAFF

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PRESIDENT/CEO | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR | Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

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NEWS | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

page three

THEY SAID IT

Happy July 4th! We will be closed Saturday, July 4 and reopen Monday, July 13. Fine Jewelry Since 1946 PHOTO BY CAROL STEWART

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123 College St., Greenville 864-232-7385

“You can’t have a good finale without it.” James Woods of Pyro Shows (which puts on Greenville’s July Fourth fireworks show) on the necessity of including the 1812 Overture in the pyrotechnic extravaganza.

“Until serious white men in this state – men of influence, men of wealth – speak up, we’re going to be fighting this battle 100 years from now.”

Happy Independence Day!

SHOW YOUR PATRIOTISM

Greenville NAACP president J.M. Flemming, on the need to move past the flag to deal with other ways racism affects the state.

“Will the city stop at nothing to turn Greenville into Downtown Disneyland?” Greenville resident John Webster, on a proposed new zoning classification to allow smaller lot sizes in city neighborhoods.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

Lighting up the sky Upstate fireworks displays this Independence Day weekend KAYLA WILES | CONTRIBUTOR

kwiles@communityjournals.com GREENVILLE Wells Fargo Red, White & Blue Festival July 4, 5-10 p.m. Downtown Greenville Fireworks at 9:45 p.m. Free • greenvillesc.gov

SLATER-MARIETTA Slater-Marietta Moon Boom July 3, 6-10 p.m. Slater Hall and Jimi Turner Park 210 Baker Circle, Marietta Free • mariettasmiles.org

EASLEY Celebrate America July 3-4, 2-10 p.m. both days Downtown Easley Fireworks on July 4 after dark Free • easleyevents.com

PICKENS 4th of July Celebration at Pickens Amphitheater July 4, 7-10 p.m. Pickens amphitheater 114 W. Main St., Pickens Free • visitpickenscounty.com

SPARTANBURG Red, White and Boom July 4, 6-10 p.m. Barnet Park, Downtown Spartanburg Food and beverages available for purchase $5 • cityofspartanburg.org

ANDERSON 4th of July Celebration by the Homeland Park Fire Department July 4, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. 3299 S. Main St., Anderson Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. bit.ly/homeland-fourth

SENECA 4th of July Celebration in Seneca July 4, 5 p.m. Gignilliat Field Fireworks following concerts Free • seneca.sc.us

If your kids don’t like fireworks… GREENVILLE Red, White & Blue Day at The Children’s Museum of the Upstate July 4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 300 College St., Greenville Wear red, white and blue to receive $2 off admission Free to members • tcmupstate.org

Big bang theories Over in minutes, months of planning go into Fourth of July fireworks CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com It takes months of planning to elicit the “oohs” and “aahs” that will come during Saturday’s fireworks display during Greenville’s Wells Fargo Red, White and Blue Festival. Pyro Shows of Lafollette, Tenn., began working on the Greenville display two or three months ago, said James Woods, the company’s director of administrative operations. While the company worked to secure the necessary city and state permits, a team of show scripters worked to put a pyrotechnic show to the music that will be simulcast on radio station WESC.

GAFFNEY Celebration of Freedom Activities at Cowpens National Battlefield July 4, 9:45 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Hourly Battlefield tours until 2:45 p.m. Scavenger Hunt from noon – 3 p.m. Free • nps.gov/cowp

PHOTOS BY CAROL STEWART

Sales of consumer fireworks could exceed $725 million in revenue this year.

Professionals from Pyrotecnico of Saluda, S.C., set up fireworks for the Fluor Enterprises July 4 celebration last Saturday.

The scripters decide patterns and colors that will go best with the military branch songs and patriotic songs from Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA” to Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the U.S.A.” “We use a lot of old faithfuls,” Woods said. The company’s fulltime sound designer listens to find new compositions and new versions of patriotic songs, looking for 20-second to 30-second snippets that could be incorporated into future displays. Of course, most shows involve the 1812 Overture, he said. “You can’t have a good finale without it.” The colors produced by each shell depend on the types of metal-based compounds they contain. Titanium and aluminum burn white, strontium and lithium burn red and copper burns blue. The sound of fireworks comes from using different elements, too.

Once the show scripters know what patterns and colors they want to accompany the music, the shells are back-timed so they are detonated at the appropriate time to explode at their “high point” and at the right time musically. “We don’t like dead sky,” Woods said. Greenville’s show will involve around 1,000 pounds of explosives. A two-man crew will begin setting up at 7 a.m. on Saturday, Woods said. After the police and fire departments secure the launch area (Woods and city officials didn’t want to disclose the location for security reasons), the workers will arrange and load the mortar tubes, contained in narrow wooden crates called racks, and connect the fuses and wiring. Woods said Nashville, Tenn.’s show, billed the largest fire-

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NEWS | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

« THE CITY SAYS the best places to view the fireworks are Falls Park, the TD Amphitheatre behind the Peace Center and anywhere on Main Street from Court Street to Falls Park Drive (used to be Camperdown).

« « « « « « « «

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works show in the nation, takes 18 workers five days to set up. The mortars in Greenville’s show range from 3 to 5 inches in diameter and will go as high as 550 feet in the air. The fireworks are electronically fired, allowing a degree of precision and choreography that wasn’t possible in the days of manually controlled shows. “Manual shows are a thing of the past,” Woods said. “The introduction of music changed the entire dynamics of fireworks displays. It became more of a fireworks dance than shells going off. It’s a full entertainment show.” Pyro Shows does more than 2,000 fireworks shows a year, including Fourth of July celebrations, military shows and at athletic events. Woods said that while Fourth of July is the company’s busiest time, those shows only comprise about one-quarter of the company’s business. Memorial Day, New Year’s and Thanksgiving are also popular fireworks show holidays. “One of the greatest things we have in this country is freedom,” Woods said. “We’re providing the crescendo of the

celebration of the freedom for which our forefathers fought.”

So you know

Wells Fargo Red, White & Blue Festival entertainment WHEN: July 4, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. WHERE: Downtown Greenville INFORMATION: events.greenvillesc.gov

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | VIEWS

OPINION VIEWS FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Children, heat and cars make a deadly combination IN MY OWN WORDS

by Cynthia Fryer

Why do children keep dying in hot cars? Every year, news stories, Facebook posts and tweets remind parents and caregivers never to leave their child alone in a car, not even for one second. Yet every year there are news reports about the children who died from hyperthermia because they were left unattended in a car. The solution seems simple and obvious – but it isn’t. And don’t make the mistake of thinking that “better parenting” would have prevented these tragedies. Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash, vehicle-related deaths for children, and it can happen to anyone, anywhere. On average, every 10 days a

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor: “Cluster development” is a term the city of Greenville uses to encourage “McMansions” to be built on postage-stamp-sized lots in existing neighborhoods, as is currently planned between Hillcrest Street and Mountain View Avenue in North Main. Considerable effort by many citizens went into developing the much-touted city Infill Ordinance to protect our heritage neighborhoods from intrusive development. However, I understand the city is claiming that the infill ordinance does not control development on “new” streets, even if the street is inserted into and bound by an existing neighborhood. The street around which these houses are “clustered” is “new” and, therefore, not subject to the infill ordinance. So, any builder who puts in a new street can place McMansions with McGarages on tiny lots in existing neighborhoods. I thought the ordinance was to protect neighborhoods, not streets. What is also disturbing is that the city is apparently trying to use the much-touted Stone Avenue Master Plan to eliminate ex-

child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle. In 2014, there were 30 deaths nationwide of children who were left in hot cars, including two deaths in S.C. This year has already seen eight deaths nationwide, with one of those deaths in nearby Columbia. Children, heat and cars are a deadly combination. Not only does a child’s body temperature rise more quickly than an adult’s, the temperature inside the car can increase as much 20-30 degrees higher than the outside temperature in minutes. In just over half the cases, frazzled caretakers – especially when their routine has been disrupted – actually leave children in the car. In 47 percent of these deaths, children get into the cars without anyone’s knowledge. We need to remember that children

are absolutely fascinated with cars, trucks and moving vehicles. We need to be hyper-vigilant about ensuring children are not in and around cars when they are not being transported. We must ACT: • A: Avoid heatstroke-related injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. Lock your car when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own. • C: Create reminders by putting something you will need at your final destination in the back of your car next to your child, such as a briefcase, a purse or a cellphone. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine. • T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to re-

isting businesses through the underhanded government tactic of non-renewal of business licenses. These “non-conforming” longtime businesses, such as the lawn mower repair shop on Stone, the day care center on Earle Street, and the Soda Shop on Main, are not grandfathered or protected. The lawn mower shop already must relocate. I fear for the future of other businesses. It appears that, from the city’s view, new tax dollars for both business and residences determine if you’re in or out of the plans for the “new” North Main. Augusta Road is already feeling the pressure. Beware Parkins Mill. You could be the next target in the city’s move toward Gentrification of Greenville. Now Bryan Wood, Greenville planning and zoning administrator, is going even farther to insure that developers can “shoehorn” houses on micro lots. He has placed a proposal on the July 16 Planning and Zoning Agenda to add a new zoning classification, R-4, allowing lots as small as 4,000 square feet in any neighborhood. Will the city stop at nothing to turn Greenville into Downtown Disneyland? John Webster, Greenville

Drawn Out Loud

spond to these situations. One call could save a life. Every one of the children who died due to heatstroke is a sad and 100 percent preventable death. Help us prevent this from happening to one more child by remembering to ACT. Cynthia Fryer is the manager of Safe Kids Upstate, a coalition of agencies in Greenville, Pickens and Oconee counties devoted to reducing Fryer preventable childhood accidents, which is led by Children’s Hospital of the Greenville Health System.

BY KATE SALLEY PALMER

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@communityjournals.com.


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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

Bringing down the flag Did the NAACP economic boycott launched in 1999 influence today’s backlash against the Confederate flag? ASHLEY BONCIMINO | STAFF

aboncimino@communityjournals.com More than 15 years after the start of a blanket boycott staked against the Confederate flag presiding over the Statehouse grounds in Columbia, companies and politicians are eagerly jumping on the anti-flag bandwagon. But did the boycott influence the backlash? Are the two connected? According to flag opponents, such as Rev. J.M. Flemming, president of the NAACP’s Greenville chapter, the answer is a resounding yes. “The intent was to bring attention to the injustice of the flag,” he said. “It stopped basketball and sports and other events from coming into our state. Other organizations wouldn’t hold their events here because of the boycott.” A go-to example for boycott advocates is the Atlantic Coast Conference, which pulled three baseball tournaments from South Carolina due to heavy criticism from the NAACP in 2009. Originally awarded to Myrtle Beach for 2011 to 2013, the ACC shifted tournaments – taking tourism dollars with them – across the border to North Carolina, where they’ve been held in various cities ever since. “Our baseball committee and institutional administrators awarded the championships to Myrtle Beach with the understanding that the event had the blessings of all parties within the state

Where does it stop? The crusade to remove Confederate symbols intensifies nationally CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Support continues to grow nationwide to remove the Confederate flag from the South Carolina Statehouse grounds – and from store shelves, Internet sales sites and flags of other states. It hasn’t stopped there. Officials are considering removing Confederate mon-

and $10.9 billion in 2005. While the state hasn’t recently broken those figures into revenue categories, the industry represents 10 percent of the state’s total jobs, according to a representative from the state’s Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism. Flemming said the potential loss of tourism dollars was well worth the boycott in light of the centuries of oppression represented by the flag. “Until it comes down, we’re going to stand and hold that position that we’re going to block as many events from coming into South Carolina that we can,” he said. “South Carolina can no longer afford to live 500 years ago. We can’t live back then anymore.”

nesses will benefit,” he said. In the grand scheme of economic development, however, other factors such as workforce, transportation and education are often higher on the totem pole for prospective companies, he said. The Greenville and Spartanburg chambers of commerce released separate statements on the issue, both noting that the symbol sends the wrong message about the state. The Spartanburg Chamber “recognizes that it is imperative to send the message that South Carolina is a welcoming place for all people. Symbols that have grown to represent otherwise have no place on the Statehouse grounds,” it said in a news release. “For far too long, our state’s future and its prosperity have been restrained by the shadow of a regrettable chapter of our state’s history,” said the Greenville Chamber of Commerce in a news release. “Now is the time to do away with the things that divide us and prevent our state from moving forward.” But while removing the flag from state grounds would signal the end of a chapter, South Carolina still has work to do, said Flemming. Larger issues related to the state’s health and education policies are next in line, he said, but they won’t be addressed if people see the flag’s removal as the final goal. “The difference with dealing with racism now and dealing with it 50 years ago is you knew what you were dealing with 50 years ago,” he said. “Until serious white men in this state – men of influence, men of wealth – speak up, we’re going to be fighting this battle 100 years from now.” Staff writer Sherry Jackson contributed to this story.

of South Carolina,” ACC Commissioner John Swofford told ESPN at the time. “It has become clear this was not the case.” Other ACC events haven’t skipped South Carolina altogether, however, especially since Clemson is an ACC member institution, but no neutral sites will be awarded a site bid without the NAACP on board, ESPN reported. The ACC did not return requests for comment in time for publishing. Closer to home, the NCAA has largely decided to steer clear of the controversy – and by extension, the state – reportedly due to the boycott. That means that Bon Secours Wellness Arena in Greenville hasn’t shared in the wealth of a NCAA tournament since 2002, said the arena’s general manager Beth Paul in an email. “Due to the boycott against South Carolina from the NCAA, our arena, as well as all others in the state, have been unable to bid on additional NCAA events,” she said. “Once the restriction is removed, we will certainly do everything we can to bring these tournaments back to the Upstate.” “Since the boycott of the NAACP in 2000, we cannot quantify businesses that have not come to or selected Greenville due to the flag,” said Jennifer Stilwell, chief marketing officer with VisitGreenvilleSC. “We do believe, however, we would have the opportunity to win some nice pieces of business with the flag removal.” South Carolina’s $18 billion tourism industry enjoyed record years in 2013 and 2014, up from $7.5 billion in 2000

CATALYST FOR CHANGE While the boycott has been a part of the conversation for a decade and a half, recent events in Charleston and nationally clearly catalyzed the issue’s current momentum, Flemming said. “It was a tragic event, and out of that tragedy it caused others to focus and see what we see,” he said. The growing national attention has raised some concern – if minor – that the flag issue could set back the state’s recruitment efforts, but often that’s out of South Carolina’s control, said Greenville Area Economic Development Corp. President and CEO Mark Farris. “I’m sure there’s always been perceptions about the South … and it’s difficult to erase perceptions. When things like this happen, then it’s impossible to control,” said Farris. However, he said he couldn’t recall a company ever citing diversity as a reason to cross the state off the list. “If it leads to positive actions that help break down that stereotype, then busi-

uments in New Orleans, Baltimore and Nashville, Tenn. Closer to home, the Clemson University Board of Trustees came out in support of removing the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds, but Chairman David Wilkins said the board will not consider renaming the school’s Tillman Hall – named after Ben Tillman, a former South Carolina governor, U.S. senator and unapologetic racist. So far, no calls have been made to remove Confederate memorials in South Carolina. “Every monument tells two stories,” said Steve O’Neill, a professor of history at Furman University. “There’s the ostensible story and then there’s the other story of who put it up and when.” Many Confederate memorials seen on main streets in small and medium-sized towns were erected at the end of the 19th

James F. Byrnes, considcentury and beginning of ered one of the greatest the 20th century to comstatesmen of 20th-century memorate veterans who America and one of the were dying, O’Neill said. leaders of South Carolina’s “There was an effort to fight against desegregachange the memory of the tion, be renamed? What war,” he said. “There was a about Wade Hampton or strong connection between John C. Calhoun? the re-interpretation of the O’Neill said he generCivil War and a rise in segally does not favor toppling regation. That’s no coincistatues of previous leaders dence, and the North and as took place in Germany, the federal government Clemson University’s Tillman Hall the Soviet Union and Iraq. were complicit.” O’Neill said the original meaning of The debate gives South Carolina a chance the Confederacy “is not one of valor. It to look at itself, he said. “We should look at practical ways rathhas always been connected to white suer than symbolic ways of dealing with the premacy at one level at least.” The problem with removing monu- racism that is still affecting people’s lives,” ments is determining where it ends and he said. “The substance of the damage of who decides, O’Neill said. For instance in slavery and segregation are still there,” the Upstate, would objects named after whether the statues stand or fall.


NEWS | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

Survey shows enough votes Greenville GOP and Democrats find to furl Confederate flag COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A survey of South Carolina legislators shows enough votes to remove the Confederate flag from Statehouse grounds if all supporters cast a vote. The Post and Courier newspaper, the South Carolina Press Association and The Associated Press polled all lawmakers on how they intend to vote. At least 33 senators and 83 House members say the flag should go. That appears to meet the two-thirds majority needed from both chambers to move the battle flag. The two-thirds rule is part of the 2000 compromise that removed the flag from the Statehouse dome and raised a smaller, square version beside a monument to Confederate soldiers. The flag push follows the shooting deaths of nine people at a historic black church in Charleston on June 17. The pastor, state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, was among the dead. The suspect in the shooting, Dylann Storm Roof, was shown in photographs brandishing the flag as a symbol of hate. Republican Gov. Nikki Haley called on legislators a week ago to send the battle flag to a museum. There are currently 123 legislators in the House and 45 in the Senate. The exact number needed to pass a bill is uncertain. The two-thirds requirement applies to whoever is present and voting at the time. A day after Haley made her public request, legislators overwhelmingly approved a resolution allowing them to add the flag to their special session’s agenda. But that doesn’t mean the debate will go smoothly; some did not want to risk harsh words amid a week of funerals. Legislators are expected to return to Columbia on Monday to consider Haley’s budget vetoes and take up legislation that would remove the flag. Some legislators told reporters that they would not weigh in on the flag until after

agreement on flag issue

the funerals for all nine victims. Others say they’re still undecided. Two bills have been filed in the House. BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF Both were sent through the committee probjeffers@communityjournals.com cess. The Senate decided to take a quicker route, sending a bipartisan bill introduced in They may not agree on much, that chamber straight to the floor for debate. but Republicans and Democrats GOP Sen. Kevin Bryant, R-Anderson, is in Greenville County are showing among the legislators saying the Charlessolidarity to bring down the Confedton massacre, followed by an outpouring erate battle flag from the Statehouse of forgiveness from the victims’ families, grounds. changed his opinion on the flag. Derrick Quarles, a member of “It’s a testament to my good friend, Sen. the Young Democrats of Greenville Clementa Pinckney, that a [gunman] so County, helped organize a rally evil and full of hate was offered forgiveness Monday outside City Hall, where and the light of Christ by the very people he said members of both parties whom he sought to destroy,” Bryant said. came together to call for the flag’s “Sen. Pinckney is no longer with us, yet his removal. message of love and forgiveness is strong in Quarles, who works as a politiSouth Carolina.” cal consultant for Rep. Chandra Dillard (Dthe Legislative Greenville) said, “We can do Black Caucus in this, let’s remove the flag for Columbia, said, one South Carolina.” Sen. “Every day I come Thomas Alexander (R-Walout of the Statehalla), told reporters he “suphouse and see the ported the amendment to the [Confederate] flag Sine Die resolution for us to flying, and it turns have the discussion. After the my stomach every debate I look for us to do the single time.” right thing.” When people tell Two proposals to remove him that the flag SARAH ELLIS / CONTRIBUTING the flag would send it to the stands for heritage, Quarles said he state Confederate Relic Room & Military Muasks them, “What is it about that flag seum. A third simply takes it down. Some that you want to remember?” legislators are looking for an alternative. He said the Confederate flag Possibilities under discussion include stands for enslavement of Africanputting the state flag on the 30-foot pole, Americans. replacing the current battle flag with one Nate Leupp, vice chair of the that looks nothing like it and was unique to Greenville GOP, said that while South Carolina soldiers, and being specific to him the flag is a symbol of the on what will be displayed at the ConfederSouth’s heritage and not hate, he ate Relic museum. supports removing the flag from

the Statehouse grounds due to the offense it causes people going to the Capitol. He said he hopes both sides of the political spectrum can come together to help mitigate negative actions in response to the flag debate. Leupp and Quarles made a Facebook video together that highlights their political differences but emphasizes their unity on asking legislators to take down the flag. State legislators are expected to debate the flag’s removal next week. “I have very little doubt that it’s going to come down,” Leupp said. “It’s just a question of when and how crazy it’s going to get before it comes down.” This week a fight broke out on the Capitol grounds, where one flag supporter was arrested and a statue of Benjamin Tillman, former governor and avowed white supremacist, was vandalized with paint. On Saturday an out-of-state activist climbed the flagpole in front of the Statehouse to remove the flag. A North Carolina chapter of the Ku Klux Klan has planned a July 18 rally on the South Carolina Statehouse grounds in support of the Confederate flag. While Quarles doesn’t believe bringing the flag down will solve all racial problems throughout the state, he thinks it’s a good start. “I’m not a fool; I know it’s not going to create peace all over, but I feel people are going to rest a little easier,” he said.

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10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

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Fire department leads charge to prevent deaths BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com Many Upstate homes don’t have enough smoke detectors to be safe, says Greenville Fire Inspector Will Broscious. At minimum, residences should have a smoke alarm in each bedroom and at least one additional alarm both outside the sleeping area and in the common area, Broscious says. Broscious is helping lead the efforts of the Greenville City Fire Department (GCFD) to ramp up public education about fire safety. In 2014, fire fatalities in the state increased 35 percent over the previous year. Greenville Fire Chief Steve Kovalcik recently authorized the formation of a 20-member Community Risk Reduction Team, which he tasked with public education, youth fire-setter intervention programs, post-fire response programs and other efforts designed to prevent fires and other catastrophic events. The push for stronger fire prevention programs started in 2013, Broscious said, when Kovalcik asked him to spearhead fire safety programs. He said smoke alarm blitzes have proved “a huge home run right from the very beginning.” Members of the fire department go door-to-door through city neighborhoods, making sure homes are properly protected. The response has been immediately positive, he said.

Since the beginning of the program GCFD has visited about 500 homes and installed over 1,200 smoke alarms. Of the homes visited, over 65 percent are unprotected from fire and over 19 percent are under-protected, Broscious said. The lack of adequate smoke alarms is “not bound to a socioeconomic status,” he said. He recounted an instance where he came across a house on the west side of Greenville where a husband, wife, mother-in-law and three kids lived with no working smoke alarms anywhere. A short while later he found the same situation in the Gower Estates community. Broscious said he’s been contacted by fire departments around the county about how GCFD uses data to improve fire safety. Using a tablet, firefighters can quickly pull up a map of the city with color-coded dots and see what houses they’ve visited. The app they use also aggregates data about the house and information about the residents, such as special circumstances like disabilities. “Data is everything in community risk reduction,” he said. When responding to non-lifethreatening situations, firefighters make a point of checking homes for proper protection and installing alarms. Broscious said he’s proud of the work GCFD has done so far to prevent fire fatalities, but he’s looking to do more. “I’m happy, but I’m not satisfied.”

Fire fatalities in S.C. 96

73

73

63 57

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 YEAR

(Source: Office of State Fire Marshal)


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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

THE NEWS IN BRIEF

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BEN CARSON STOPS IN GREENVILLE Dr. Ben Carson, one of 14 declared GOP presidential candidates, isn’t a fan of political correctness – it shuts down discussion and ends up with “someone imposing their view of how Carson something should be,” he told reporters before speaking to a group of realtors in Greenville Wednesday. A neurosurgeon known for the first successful separation of twins conjoined at the head, Carson rose to political fame in 2013 when he spoke at the National Prayer Breakfast and criticized several Obama administration policies with the president sitting several feet away. Carson’s speech to the Greenville realtors touched on a range of topics from the economy to terrorism. He warned of the national debt and pointed to Greece as “a harbinger of what’s going to happen to us” if government isn’t run according to sound business practices. Carson cited his past experience on the boards of the Kellogg Company and Costco Wholesale Corporation as “opportunities to see what real efficiency looks like.” Carson has done well in the polls. A Quinnipiac University Poll of Iowa voters that was released this week showed him tied in second place with Donald Trump with 10 percent support. Scott Walker led the poll with 18 percent.

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PC NAMES INTERIM PRESIDENT Presbyterian College’s interim president has Greenville ties. Bob Staton, a board member of Delta Apparel, will replace Dr. Claude Lilly effective July 15 while a nation- Staton wide search is conducted for a new president. Lilly announced his decision to step down on Tuesday. He had been president since 2012 and led several initiatives for improvement of the campus grounds and buildings, including an $11.8 million Neville Hall Renovation Campaign, of which commitments of $7.4 million have been received. Staton, a 1968 PC graduate, served on the school’s board of trustees from 1997 to 2006. He joined PC’s administration as executive vice president for external rela-

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NEWS | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

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THE NEWS IN BRIEF

tions in 2007, a job he held until 2012. He received an honorary doctorate of public service degree at spring commencement. “I am honored to have been selected to serve PC in this role,” Staton said in a release. “PC has played a significant role in my life and that of my family.” PC Board Chairman Pat Phillips said Staton has been a faithful member of the PC community. UPSTATE BLOOD SUPPLIES RUNNING LOW Upstate blood supplies are expected to run low in advance of the July 4 holiday weekend and continue throughout the summer. Regular donors are less available due to vacation season, and with schools out for the summer, clinics lose young donors from high schools, tech schools and colleges, who contribute nearly 15 percent of the supply, said Donna Ehrlich, marketing manager of The Blood Connection. “During the summer they [students] take the summer off, but the need does not,” she said. “Summer is a tough time for us.” Donations must top more than 400 units daily to meet the needs of Upstate hospitals and for emergencies, she said. Donated blood has a shelf life of 42 days, so stockpiling is not an option and donors must wait 56 days between donations, she said. Holiday travel also typically increases automobile accidents, which impacts the need for blood. New donors are asked to help fill the gap. Those as young as 16 years old can donate with parental permission and people who cannot donate are encouraged to host a blood drive, she said. For more information, visit thebloodconnection.org or redcross.org/blood. MINIATURE WORLD OF TRAINS CLOSING, PLANS TO OPEN NEW VENUE The Miniature World of Trains (MWOT) on Falls Park Drive is ending all operations on July 4. Museum operators are working on a new venue to be announced within two weeks. Chairman and Executive Director Frank Ruby said in a release the museum on Falls Park Drive was a test location and was always slated “to close at some point.” Ruby said the critical lack of parking downtown led to the MWOT board decision to shut down its West End location and “dedicate continued on PAGE 14

®


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | NEWS

STATEHOUSE WATCH

THE NEWS IN BRIEF

WITH BENJAMIN JEFFERS

Haley issues 87 budget vetoes

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Gov. Nikki Haley issued 87 vetoes on the state budget passed by the Legislature. The vetoes total more than $30 million and most addressed a “number of special pork projects,” the governor said. “What we saw was the rebirth of earmarks this year in the budget, and so you will see a lot of our vetoes are earmarks,” she said at a press conference Tuesday. While Haley and legislators have publicly feuded over the budget on occasion this year, Haley praised lawmakers Tuesday for working together to finish the budget before July 1. She said the “heated” exchanges of recent months helped members of the General Assembly prioritize projects. She was happy that the state’s $367 million in unexpected revenue will go

continued from PAGE 13

toward fixing roads and paying down the state debt. “We know there will be future conversations about roads, but I think that’s something the taxpayers can feel good about,” she said. One of the largest spats between the governor’s office and legislators centered on a roughly $230 million bond proposal for building and maintenance projects. Haley had threatened to veto the bond bill, causing lawmakers to throw it out, and she promised to fight such proposals in the future. “The way we fought the bond bill this year, we will fight it again next year,” she said. Lawmakers will address the governor’s vetoes next week. During that time, they could also begin debate on bills removing the Confederate battle flag from the Statehouse grounds.

all of our efforts to the new location.” The new MWOT permanent display will have a footprint of about 6,000 square feet and is expected to open at its new location in the first quarter of 2016. LONG-TIME HOLLYWILD FOUNDER/ DIRECTOR RETIRING After more than 45 years on the job, Hollywild founder and executive director David Meeks is retiring. The Hollywild Animal Park in Inman originated in the 1940s from the Meeks family farm in rural Spartanburg. In 1970 Meeks created the M&M Zoo and eventually changed the name to Hollywild to reflect Meeks’ and the parks animals’ connection to Hollywood with appearances in many movies, films and TV commercials. Meeks announced his plans to retire earlier this week at a staff meeting. Kim Atchley will serve as the new executive director. Atchley has spent the last six years managing communications and working to develop community partnerships for the park.

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COMMUNITY | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

Supporting the service Upstate Warrior Solution offers help, celebrates July 4 veterans in the area.” In addition to serving as UWS Anderson outreach coordinator, Hulon is now pursuing a master’s degree in psychology.

APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Army 82nd Airborne infantry paratrooper Sgt. Ryan Hulon spent a decade serving in such places as Kosovo, Egypt, Afghanistan and Iraq. After a jump injury, he spent a year with a National Guard unit and was discharged in 2006. After returning to the Upstate, Hulon worked in several locations, but lost his job in 2011. “At that point I had an idle mind and all the stuff I had been through in the military kind of caught up with me,” he said. Financial difficulties led his family to move in with relatives. “We had lost almost everything we had … our house and cars,” he said. The family later opted to move back to Anderson, and after finding a house in 2013, Hulon met Charlie Hall, executive director of Upstate Warrior Solution (UWS). Hulon attended an overnight camp sponsored by the YMCA and UWS, and “it started me thinking about my next step in life,” he said. Upstate Warrior Solution is a nonprofit

By the numbers

200-300 36 48 72 95 121

number of warriors in technical college programs in the Upstate during any given time

helped with housing

received informal financial management and budgeting help

‘KNEE-TO-KNEE’ APPROACH

Upstate Warrior Solution staff Nate Moore, health and benefits program manager; Charlie Hall, executive director; Charlie Pannell, Tri County outreach; and Chris McRae at the Fox Run Golf Tournament where proceeds were raised for the nonprofit.

devoted to helping both veterans and active duty military members access services, including health care, education and training, housing and employment. UWS helped Hulon get help via the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and enroll in school, he said. “When I first got home, I didn’t realize I was having issues,” Hulon said. “I was trying to be as far away as possible from anything to do with the government and military.” He did not seek support and ended up “putting everything towards work and for a while with alcohol,” he said. The days at camp “really brought camaraderie back,” Hulon said, and Upstate Warrior Solution helped. “It set me on a long-term life plan for goals I want to achieve for myself and my family.” Soon Hulon felt he was ready to help others who were in his position. “I felt like I had to give back and volunteered. Since I was born and raised in Anderson, I thought I could help connect with

Hulon said the organization’s approach is key, focusing on an in-person, relationship approach. UWS director Charlie Hall calls the method “knee-toknee” and says it begins with peer mentors like Hulon connecting with a warrior over something as simple as a cup of coffee. A warrior who needs assistance gets face-to-face help, Hulon said. “We don’t take a phone call or fill out a form online. If we can get in front of a veteran … we can build a rapport.” UWS was formed in 2012 as a community-based nonprofit in response to holes in veteran and warrior care in the Upstate, “to really embrace the warrior and their family,” said Hall. The nonprofit exists to complement local, state and federal programs and serves approximately 100 warriors each month, he said. A mentor may work with a warrior for a week, six months or a year, Hall said. “We meet them wherever we find them.” A social work team is also available for complex cases and offers a more holistic approach, he said. The guidance and assistance can help with civilian transition or even later, Hall said. Many returning warriors have initial unrealistic expectations, he said. “These men and women are trained to run through brick walls, but then they come out and they’re faced with real life. We want to broaden the

World War II veteran Dick Willis and Army paratrooper veteran Ryan Hulon during a planning meeting for an air show held in Anderson in May.

So you know JULY 4 A NIGHT WITH DARRYL WORLEY • Charter Amphitheatre, Simpsonville • Gates at 5 p.m., aerials at 5:45 p.m. and music at 6:30 p.m. • Free admission for military and their families and first responders • $20 per carload • axs.com

JULY 5 MILITARY APPRECIATION GAME GREENVILLE DRIVE • Fluor Field • 4:05–7 p.m. • Featuring U.S. Army Special Forces Parachute Team, Warbirds vintage aircraft flyover and Purple Heart presentation. • Female warriors can participate in a tugof-war competition at the game. Contact tthompson@upstatewarriorsolution.org.

scope of their potential, but also offer reality checks as a friend, as a mentor,” Hall said. By late 2014, UWS had grown enough to hire multiple full-time staff members and recently launched satellite offices in Clemson and Spartanburg, Hall said. Community involvement is essential, whether for obtaining referrals or for volunteers, said Theresa Thompson, UWS community development director. “Everyone wants to help the military and veterans, but they don’t know what to do. They can always come to us.”

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Jeeps carried veterans during the Honoring Their Service event traveling from JB Red Owens Recreation Complex in Easley to Keowee Key. PHOTOS PROVIDED


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | COMMUNITY Homes For Hope – Kingsview

Investing in social impact Capital investment tax credit benefits nonprofits and yields returns APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Scoop the Poop POOP ETIQUETTE:

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BeFreshWaterFriendly.org

An investor seeking to make an impact and benefit those in need may simply give a donation to a favorite nonprofit. However, local housing nonprofit Homes of Hope has a capital investment program that yields not only visible social impact, but a return for investors, said Homes of Hope president and CEO Don Oglesby. The 16-year-old nonprofit constructs affordable housing and combines this mission with a program to offer job training and mentoring to men overcoming drug and alcohol addictions. Homes of Hope is one of 25 community development corporations (CDC) in the Palmetto State that are authorized to issue a state tax credit for capital investors. The tax credit existed for years, but without anyone to monitor who was applying for the credits, investors could not know when a statewide threshold was met and were unsure whether they would be guaranteed the credit. After the South Carolina Association of Community Economic Development (SCACED) took over monitoring in 2014, more investors were coming forward, said Oglesby. “Over the last two years we have attracted the capital we intended to attract,” he said. To date, Homes of Hope has raised approximately $250,000 in capital this way. The legislation, dating back to 2000, offered up a total of $5 million in tax credits with $1 million in credits allowed statewide each year, said Bernie Mazyck, president and CEO of SCACED. As long as funds remained of the $5 million, legislation has been renewed. Gov. Nikki Haley has signed a renewal through 2020.

According to Mazyck, approximately $3 million in tax credits is still available. At a luncheon June 15, Homes of Hope will be outlining the program for potential investors seeking an opportunity to take advantage of the 33 percent tax break. For investors who want to make a social investment instead of a donation, Homes of Hope is a sure bet, said Oglesby. The organization averages construction of up to 40 affordable homes each year and the dream is to double the number of homes built annually and give investors returns. Through Homes of Hope, an investor can physically see the results of their contribution with the homes built and lives changed, Oglesby said. “We’re offering social impact and their money back … they can see tangibly that it works.” In the future, Homes of Hope would like to use the invested capital to become less dependent on the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grants that pay for “sticks and bricks,” said Oglesby. “This is attractive to people who think we depend too much on the federal government,” he added. With the investment infusion, his organization can increase construction to up to 80 houses yearly, he said. In addition to Homes of Hope, other tax-credit eligible organizations in the area include Community Works Carolina, Genesis Homes and Soteria CDC. “This is a great tool for individuals and companies to invest in improving economically challenged areas, and they get a return on their investment,” said Mazyck.

So you know

Homes of Hope capital investment luncheon WHEN: July 9, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. WHERE: 3 Dunean St., Greenville INFORMATION: Includes tour of homes built in the area. CONTACT: 269-4663, homesofhope.org


COMMUNITY | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

OUR COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Greenville Health System has been named one of the top 50 companies for women and diverse managers to work by Diversity MBA Magazine. The magazine also recognized GHS with a “Best in Class” award, identifying the healthcare provider as one of the top 10 companies for accountability and board diversity.  Bradley Wingate, an arts academy specialist for Greenville County Schools, was nominated by the Peace Center and received the 2015 League Educator Apple Award from the Broadway League. The league is a national trade organization for the commercial theatre industry. Connie Cleveland, owner and CEO of Dog Trainers Workshop in Fountain Inn, was awarded first place with her golden retriever Micah in the Utility Division at the recent second AKC Obedience Classic. Later this year, Mitch will be competing in the Masters Division, where Cleveland will also coach students from Dog Trainers Workshop. She will coach three juniors for the National Junior Obedience Competition, held in conjunction with the Obedience Classic.

Discovery Education and 3M have named Preston Norwood, a student at St. Mary’s Catholic School, as one of 35 State Merit Winners in the 2015 Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge. Norwood’s project was honored for using scientific thinking and imagination to devise a solution to an everyday problem. His project was entitled “Solving the Pollution Problem in the Reedy River and Other Water Sources.” 

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com. Don’t see your school’s news in the Greenville Journal this week? Visit greenvillejournal.com/life-culture/education for more education happenings.

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

United Way of Greenville County has launched the application process for its new three-year funding cycle for Life Essentials programs. Agencies and organizations interested in learning more about the application process can visit unitedwaygc.org/apply.

Newman’s Own for Greens for Good, a salad recipe contest where fans can submit their favorite salad recipe and dressing pairing, is offering residents the opportunity to direct a $35,000 donation to their charity of choice. Entries can be submitted from June 23-Aug. 21 at newmansown.com/greensforgood. The Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF) awarded Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute the official designation as a Community Hospital Center of Excellence. The ALCF Centers of Excellence award recognizes community hospitals for individualized care and treatment of lung cancer patients. The institute is implementing a standard of care, including ensuring all patients receive genomic testing, access to new diagnostic tools and therapies, and emphasis on early detection and follow-up. GHS’ Greer Memorial Hospital was named among Becker’s Hospital Review’s 100 Great Community Hospitals. Becker’s formed its list based on multiple rankings and awards received by hospitals, including Truven Analytics, which recognized Greer Memorial Hospital this year. The hospitals featured on the list have fewer than 550 beds and teaching programs.

Greenville Family Partnership/Red Ribbon Works has awarded two Jeanette C. Cannada/ Red Ribbon Memorial Ruble Scholarships. Beth Brice, owner of Greenville’s Home InThis scholarstead Senior Care, is on a mission to see more ship is awardfamilies share sit-down Sunday dinners with ed annually their senior loved ones. The Home Instead Seto Greenville nior Care Foundation will donate $1 to Meals on high school Wheels America for each person who commits seniors who to regularly scheduling family dinners at sunare commitdaydinnerpledge.com. ted to volunteering in the community and living an alcohol, tobacco and drug-free Young lifestyle. The two recipients are Charlotte Ruble, a senior at St. Joseph’s Catholic School, and Breauna Young, a senior at Greenville Technical Charter High School.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

Peace Center announces 2015-2016 season

1

2

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Big names. Big shows. Big talent. From Hall of Fame musicians and epic television shows and TV personalities to traditional Japanese drumming and modern Chinese acrobats, the Peace Center’s 2015-16 season is pitched for broad appeal. Also part of the 2015-16 season are the already announced shows on the Broadway Series, including “Dirty Dancing – The Classic Story on Stage,” “Jersey Boys,” “Motown the Musical,” “Disney’s Newsies,” “Matilda the Musical,” “Cabaret,” “The Sound of Music,” “Riverdance – the 20th Anniversary World Tour” and “The Bridges of Madison County.” More events will be added as the season unfolds. Tickets for all shows except the Broadway Series go on sale to the public July 10 at 10 a.m. Broadway subscriptions are available now and individual show tickets will go on sale later on dates to be announced. Tickets may be purchased at the Peace Center box office, online at peacecenter.org or by calling 467-3000. Handling fees are charged on phone and online sales.

5

4

3 1. WILLIE NELSON TUESDAY, SEPT. 22, 7:30 P.M. During his six-decade-long career, outlaw-country music legend Willie Nelson has won every conceivable award. The Country Music Hall of Famer is the creative genius behind the historic recordings of “Crazy,” “Red Headed Stranger” and “Stardust.” Tickets: $55-$85. VIP package available.

2. JACKSON BROWNE THURSDAY, OCT. 8, 7:30 P.M. A member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, Jackson Browne has defined a genre of songwriting charged with honesty, emotion and personal politics. His latest album, “Standing in the Breach,” is a 10-song collection said to explore his thoughts on love, hope and the uncertainties everyone faces in everyday life. Tickets: $55 -$75. VIP package available.

3. AUDRA MCDONALD TUESDAY, OCT. 13, 7:30 P.M. Winner of six Tony Awards and two Grammy Awards, Audra McDonald’s artistry is marked by breadth and versatility as both singer and an actress. McDonald released her fifth solo album, “Go Back

6

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Home,” in 2013, and has appeared on NBC’s “The Sound of Music Live!” and on ABC’s “Private Practice.” Tickets: $35-$65.

4. STREB: FORCES SATURDAY, OCT. 17, 7:30 P.M. The STREB dance company’s motto is “anything too safe is not action.” In “STREB: Forces,” the action heroes take that motto and embrace it, giving audience members a different type of dance experience that feels like something straight out of an action movie. Tickets: $15-$45.

5. FOREIGNER SUNDAY, OCT. 18, 7 P.M. The band founded by Songwriter Hall of Fame inductee Mick Jones had hits such as “Feels Like the First Time” and “Waiting for a Girl Like You.” The group had 10 multi-platinum albums. Tickets: $55-$85. VIP package available.

7. MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER TUESDAY, DEC. 22, 7:30 P.M. Mannheim Steamroller has become synonymous with Christmas over the past three decades. Grammy Award winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the group’s signature sound and dazzling multimedia effects. Tickets: $55-$85.

8. THE TENORS THURSDAY, JAN. 28, 2016, 7:30 P.M. In 2007, four Canadians – Remigio Pereira, Victor Macallef, Fraser Walters and Clifton Murray – came together to form a classically inspired vocal quartet with a versatile sound. They’ve been featured on television shows such as “Oprah” and shared the stage with Neil Young, Andrea Bocelli, Elton John and Sting. Tickets: 25-$55. VIP package available.

9. THE HOT SARDINES

6. MINNEAPOLIS GUITAR QUARTET FRIDAY, NOV. 13, 8 P.M. The newest program from the Minneapolis Guitar Quartet is played entirely from memory, featuring music from classical and contemporary composers as well as original pieces. Tickets: $35.

9

FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 2016, 8 P.M. It started with a washboard and a piano. With a French-inspired 1930s sound and the style to back it up, The Hot Sardines have taken New York City by storm. Their original songs blend French and New Orleans jazz with lyrics written in both French and English. Tickets: 15-$55.

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CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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10. STAR TREK: THE ULTIMATE VOYAGE SUNDAY, JAN. 31, 2016, 3 P.M. “Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage” includes a live symphony orchestra and international solo instruments while the most iconic “Star Trek” film and TV footage is simultaneously beamed in high definition to a 40-foot wide screen. The concert will feature some of the greatest music written for the franchise. Tickets: $35-$65. VIP package available.

11. YANNI TUESDAY, FEB. 16, 2016, 7:30 P.M. Yanni blends world music, jazz, classical and adult contemporary to create a unique sound. Fourteen of his albums have reached No. 1 on Billboard’s Top New Age Album charts. Tickets: $55-$95. VIP package available.

12. YAMATO WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17, 2016, 7:30 P.M. Yamato is a troupe committed to taking the Taiko, a drum that is deepseeded in Japanese culture, all over the world. Yamato, which has performed in more than 51 countries, seeks to preserve the instrument’s traditions and explore new possibilities. Tickets: $15-$45.

13. PATTY GRIFFIN, SARA WATKINS AND ANAIS MITCHELL: TOGETHER ON STAGE TUESDAY, FEB. 23, 2016, 7:30 P.M. This singers-in-the round show will feature Grammy Award-winner Patty Griffin along with Sara Watkins and Anais Mitchell on the stage together, sharing songs and accompanying each other. Griffin’s songs have been covered by acts such as the Dixie Chicks and Emmylou Harris. Watkins is the cofounder of bluegrass’s Nickel Creek and Mitchell writes music that has been compared to Bob Dylan. Tickets: $15-$35.

14. VOCALOSITY THURSDAY, FEB. 25, 2016, 7:30 P.M. Vocalosity brings some of the best voices in the country together for a “Pitch Perfect”- style night of a cappella. The show, the brainstorm of longtime arranger, singer and “Pitch Perfect” musical director Deke Sharon, features expert arrangements of beloved songs. Tickets: $15-$35.

15. THE PEKING ACROBATS SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2016, 3 P.M. The Peking Acrobats bring their gravity-defying skills to the Peace Center Concert Hall. The group has been featured on television specials, including Nickelodeon’s “Unfabulous,” “Ellen’s Really Big Show” and “The Wayne Brady Show.” Tickets: $15-$35.

16. ROSANNE CASH FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2016, 8 P.M. Rosanne Cash, the eldest daughter of legend Johnny Cash, has had 21 Top 40 country singles, including 11 No. 1’s, four Grammy Awards and two gold records. Her 2014 album, “The River & Thread,” features 11 songs she wrote with longtime collaborator and husband John Leventhal that celebrate the rich landscape of the American South. Tickets: $25-$55.

17. JAY LENO SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2016, 8 P.M. In 1987, Jay Leno began filling in on “The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson” when Carson was unable to host. In 1992, Carson passed Leno the torch and over the next 17 years, Leno built a loyal latenight following. He retired from “The Tonight Show” in 2014 but maintains a steady touring schedule. Tickets: $65-$95.

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CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

LOOK

Miss Greater Greenville, Deja Dial, was crowned Miss South Carolina. Miss Greater Greer, Anna Brown, was First Runner-Up. Miss 2014 Miss South Carolina, Laney Hudson, crowned Deja Dial. GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

BASF in Mauldin employees brought chemistry to life for more than 90 area children at two YMCA summer camps last week. Kids’ Lab is an award-winning program with more than 472,000 children in 35 countries taking part and designed to open up the ideas of science and chemistry to kids ages 6-12 years-old. The Eastside Family YMCA holds camps each summer that focus on children experiencing science. This is the first time BASF in Mauldin has taken part.

The Doobie Brothers play the Charter Spectrum Amphitheater.

PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County has kicked off construction for the 330th Habitat home built in the Upstate. Community members joined together last week in the Abigail Springs Subdivision for a wall-raising ceremony, accompanied by the homeowners.

Bon Secours St. Francis and the BeWellFans enjoyed a halfday of family fun and fitness at Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

To celebrate childhood reading as part of Read Greenville, local author Stephanie Morgan hosted story time for the children of Greenville Technical College’s Child Development Center at the college’s main library. Morgan read her first two books from the Tails on the Trail series, “Hey, Blue!” and “Oh, Beautiful.” This series is a collaboration with local illustrator Laura Lynn Luce and will be a collection of five stories about a family of bunnies who live on the Swamp Rabbit Trail.


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

LOOK

Miss Greater Greenville, Deja Dial, was crowned Miss South Carolina. Miss Greater Greer, Anna Brown, was First Runner-Up. Miss 2014 Miss South Carolina, Laney Hudson, crowned Deja Dial. GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

BASF in Mauldin employees brought chemistry to life for more than 90 area children at two YMCA summer camps last week. Kids’ Lab is an award-winning program with more than 472,000 children in 35 countries taking part and designed to open up the ideas of science and chemistry to kids ages 6-12 years-old. The Eastside Family YMCA holds camps each summer that focus on children experiencing science. This is the first time BASF in Mauldin has taken part.

The Doobie Brothers play the Charter Spectrum Amphitheater.

PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County has kicked off construction for the 330th Habitat home built in the Upstate. Community members joined together last week in the Abigail Springs Subdivision for a wall-raising ceremony, accompanied by the homeowners.

Bon Secours St. Francis and the BeWellFans enjoyed a halfday of family fun and fitness at Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

To celebrate childhood reading as part of Read Greenville, local author Stephanie Morgan hosted story time for the children of Greenville Technical College’s Child Development Center at the college’s main library. Morgan read her first two books from the Tails on the Trail series, “Hey, Blue!” and “Oh, Beautiful.” This series is a collaboration with local illustrator Laura Lynn Luce and will be a collection of five stories about a family of bunnies who live on the Swamp Rabbit Trail.


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

Brandon Fellowship offered at GCCA CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Danielle Fontaine and Bill McLendon are both Rhodes scholars and know how transformative such programs can be. Fontaine, an artist at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts in the Village of West Greenville, and McLendon, her husband, who met through the Rhodes scholar program, said the program provided them opportunities they otherwise would not have had. They hope to do the same with the Brandon Fellowship, a scholarship program at GCCA that will provide three emerging artists – one African-American, one Hispanic and one for an artist from the community at large – university-style studio space, access to classes, a stipend for art supplies, the opportunity to participate in exhibitions and community events and a sense of community. Fontaine said she became one of 16 studio artists at GCCA because of the art center’s potential to transform the community and her art as well. She said the fellowships could provide the same opportunity to artists who otherwise couldn’t afford studio space or to take art classes.

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Brandon Fellowship WHERE: Greenville Center for Creative Arts WHO’S ELIGIBLE: Artists between 21 and 30 years old who are citizens of the U.S. HOW TO APPLY: Applications may be found online at artcentergreenville.org or at the front desk at GCCA at 25 Draper St., Greenville. WHAT IT INCLUDES: University-style studio space at GCCA for six months, renewable for an additional six months; a stipend for supplies and access to classes taught at GCCA. FOR INFORMATION: artcentergreenville.org

“Art can be lonesome if you have no support,” she said. The Brandon Fellows will have access to the center’s education program, which features about two dozen teaching artists. This summer, the center’s offerings include 16 classes and eight workshops. Sixty-seven students enrolled in six classes offered this spring. GCCA Executive Director Cherington Love Shucker said the GCCA expects that number to grow to several thousand a year. The deadline to apply is July 17.

CORRECTION: The Greenville Journal listed the wrong date for the Salsa Under the Stars event this past Saturday, June 27. For any of our readers who missed the evening of dance and cultural experience, the event series will continue on July 25 and Aug. 29. For more information, visit internationalupstate.org.

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So you know

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www.greenvillepets.org


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

Must-See Movies

By Eric Rogers

What day is it?

Delivering dialogue

JULY 4 – Independence Day

57 - total who signed the Declaration of Independence 45 - average age of signers 26 - age of youngest signer (Edward Rutledge of South Carolina) 70 - age of oldest signer (Benjamin Franklin) July 4, 1826 - date signers John Adams and

Thomas Jefferson both died

97 - percentage of imported fireworks from China 150 million - hot dogs expected to be consumed

July 4 in the U.S.

1785 - first year of the oldest continuous Independence

Day celebration in the U.S. (Fourth of July Parade in Bristol, R.I.)

63 -

Most feature films have a very obvious formula: 30 minutes of introducing the characters and setting; an hour of the characters finding a problem, solving it and then finding another problem; then 30 minutes wrapping it all up.

percentage of Americans expected to attend a Fourth of July fireworks display

80 -

percentage expected to attend a barbecue, picnic or cookout

So it’s nice to see one from time to time without this overused formula. “My Dinner with Andre” is one such film. “Andre” was written and produced by Wallace Shawn and Andre Gregory and directed by Louis Malle. Most people are likely to recognize Shawn from his role in “The Princess Bride,” in which he played a character who often found very conceivable things to be “inconceivable!” What makes the film unique is that it’s one long conversation, over dinner. There are no chase scenes, explosions or special effects, just the two of them having a conversation. That may sound like a recipe for dullness, but Gregory and Shawn developed the script by sitting down and talking to one another about whatever was on their minds. They recorded the conversations and then developed a script from the most interesting parts, so it’s actually a pretty entertaining film, particularly if you’re the kind of person who likes to eavesdrop on conversations in a restaurant. The film was made for $475,000 and released in 1981. Since the budget was so low, Wallace decided to forego his own salary as many of us independent filmmakers often do, but as a result the Screen Actors Guild fined him for violating union rules by acting in a film, his own, pro bono. Nevertheless, the film did well at the box office and has since become a cult classic.

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The film is available on Netflix DVD and on Amazon for rent or purchase. If you like it you may also want to check out 2003’s “Coffee and Cigarettes,” directed by indie film icon Jim Jarmusch. This one does not involve a single couple having a conversation in a restaurant. It involves multiple couples having conversations in multiple restaurants. Despite its obvious low budget, it features people such as Steven Wright, Bill Murray, Tom Waits, Iggy Pop, Steve Buscemi, Roberto Benigni and Cate Blanchett.

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“Coffee and Cigarettes” is available on Amazon Prime.

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ALL AMERICAN ART. July at the GCMA

Third Thursday Tour July 16 11 am FREE Travel through South Carolina history via Palmettopalooza. Sunday at 2: Music in the Galleries July 12 2 pm FREE Relax to the sounds of saxophone quartet, Quatrophonics. Food Truck Friday on Heritage Green July 17 11:30 am – 1:30 pm Join us on Heritage Green for delicious food truck fare. After lunch, stroll through the GCMA galleries. Sunday at 2: Greenville Shakespeare Company July 19 2 pm FREE Settle in for an hour of chaotic, comedic romance in “Love’s Labor’s Lost.” Sunday at 2: Artist Demonstration July 26 2 pm FREE Join collage artist Judy Verhoven to learn how she creates images that reflect her sense of humor, commitment to family, hope for peace and appreciation for the creatures of our planet. Closed Saturday, July 4

GCMA-1542 Journal FP All American Art.indd 1

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

free admission

6/25/15 12:17 PM


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Supersized pop

rock river T H E

S U M M E R C O N C E R T S E R I E S AT T H E P E A C E C E N T E R

JULY 30

Kansas Bible Co. creates original music from ‘things we love’

WHO: Kansas Bible Company WHEN: Friday, July 3, 9 p.m. WHERE: Independent Public Ale House, 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

I’m typically not someone who shows up for a band’s pre-show setup, but I must admit I’m INFO: 864-552-1265; tempted to stop by Independent Public Ale House ipagreenville.com a little early on Friday to see how in the world the TICKETS: $8 Goshen, Ind., band called Kansas Bible Company is going to fit onstage. “Our full-band lineup is 12 people,” says the band’s bassist, Nathan “Bones” Morrow. “Sometimes logistically, that doesn’t work out and we cut it down to 10 or 11, but when we have everybody, we’re a 12-piece.” This is a band that sports three guitarists, two drummers and a five-piece horn section, and even if they weren’t always that supersized of a band, the Kansas Bible Company (named after the fictitious Bible company that Ryan O’Neal’s con-man character creates in the 1973 film “Paper Moon”) started out on the large side. “It started as a seven-piece,” Morrow says, “and it was more or less just a band playing college parties.” After an extended hiatus, the nucleus of the band regrouped with the intention of taking their music more seriously, but I doubt that anyone could’ve predicted what their sound would become. Quite simply, Kansas Bible Company is one of the most nimble, light-footed ensembles I’ve heard recently. Their vocal harmonies are infectiously tight but airy, their songs are drenched in both pop melodies and progressive exploration, and their songwriting is a lot closer to a classic four-piece pop-rock combo than a blaring R&B dance-band or skank-happy ska group. “We all appreciate different styles of music, but there are certain styles we all agree on,” Morrow says. “We all love ’60s pop; we all love the Beatles and the Stones and the Kinks and early Chicago.” Morrow says while their sound is always evolving, the Kansas Bible Company knew from the beginning what styles they weren’t interested in. “There are certain things that we didn’t want to do, even though we had a horn line,” Morrow says. “We didn’t want to be a ska band. We didn’t want to be neo-soul. We wanted to do our own original music but still take from things that we loved.” Morrow says that most of the band’s songs come from three main songwriters, but the arrangements are where the musicians all express themselves equally by writing their own parts. “We’ve gotten better at realizing that not everyone has to play all the time,” he says. “It’s both plus and a minus when you have such a large group; there are so many things to explore. Sometimes it gets a little overwhelming, but it’s also really fun to look into all these different possibilities with all the different instruments. We want to make the songs as tight as they can be but keep them interesting.” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR | vharris@communityjournals.com

JULY 10

JULY 16

PEACE CENTER peacecenter.org 864.467.3000


Veteran Services Division Lee Vining, Director/U.S. Army Staff Sergeant, Ret.

“We believe America’s heroes deserve the best representation to help navigate all the intricacies required to fulfilling their dreams of owning a home.” Proudly serving our Veterans and their families in the Greater Greenville area with all of their home-buying, selling or renting needs. 864.467.0085 • 864.897.9641 • www.marchantco.com 100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, SC 29609

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Decades of trust. Confidence in the future.


HOME

On The Market • Open Houses • Design • Trends

FEATURED BUILDER

Cromwell Avenue The Cambridge, an American Tudor Style home, is one of the eight homes located in Judges Alley. Nestled among the mature oaks of the Alta Vista neighborhood, Judges Alley lies between Augusta Road and Crescent Avenue. The newly constructed home allows for an elegant lifestyle with convenient access to museums, art galleries, recreation, boutiques and fine restaurants. The Cambridge offers an open floor with a large Master Suite on the Main Floor. The spacious Living Room which features a gas fireplace opens up to a beautiful Kitchen with Granite Countertops and Energy Star Appliances. Upstairs boasts 3 bedrooms and a wonderful loft area. Other amenities include a 2-car garage, office and screen porch! Don’t miss this amazing opportunity to be part of Judge’s Alley, best in location and style!

HOME INFO Price: Starting in 750’s Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Sq. Ft.: 3162 Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary, Hughes Middle, & Greenville High Academy Patrick Franzen | 864.250.1234 Highland Homes | highlandhomessc.com

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | HOME

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

OPEN SUNDAY, JULY 5 FROM 2–4PM FOXCROFT

ON THE MARKET

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES FOR SALE

MOORCROFT

BRIDGEWATER

SUMMERWALK

15 RED FOX CT . $389,999 . MLS#1303080

16 ANNENBERG LN . $274,999 . MLS#1283593

322 BRIDGE CROSSING DR. . $248,000 . MLS#1301328

16 SUMMER GLEN . $234,900 . MLS#1301164

5BR/3.5B You won’t believe the incredible space that this home offers! Hudson to Devenger. Right into Foxcroft. First Right-W Queen Ann. Left-W Red Fox Trail. Right on Red Fox Court.

4BR/2.5B Great well kept home. Many updates. Big backyard. Bonus room! Boiling Springs Road to Moorcroft, Left on Blanding, Left on Annenberg Lane. Home in Cul-de-sac.

5BR/3B Fabulous 5 bedroom home with many upgrades. Wood floors through out main level. Main level guest rm. Great location to Historic Simpsonville and Five Forks area.

4BR/2.5B Conveniently located near Five Forks and 385. Spacious home with updates like new roof and HVAC to keep you comfortable for years to come. Optional den/ study. Hardwoods, stainless appliances, granite.

Contact: Sharon Gillespie 553-9975 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Jon MacDonald 979-7055 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Charlene Panek 404-9544 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Jolene Wimberly 414-1688 The Marchant Company

Advertise your home with us Contact: Annie Langston at 864-679-1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com

OPEN HOUSE

NEW LISTING

SUNDAY, JULY 5TH & MONDAY, JULY 6TH 2-4 PM

322 E. Faris Rd. • MLS #1303933 • $309,000 Truly a charming bungalow with “good bones” and “great lines” accented by two attractive exterior stacked stone chimneys and a fabulous wide side patio. Featuring 4 bedrooms and 4 full baths and a layout that offers so much versatility. Be sure to check out the separate apt that was formerly a garage for a Model T. The stone work is amazing – oozing with charm. If you are looking for a project with the end result of one “cool” house – get your creative juices running. Located on a deep lot on the corner of Longview Terrace and E. Faris with garage access on Longview Terrace.

Helen Hagood

864.419.2889

HelenHagood.com

PE OPL E, AWARDS , HONORS The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in April 2015 The Marchant Company, the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties, is proud to recognize select REALTORS® for outstanding performance Marchant Slayter Miller through April 2015. Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Tom Marchant & Kathy Slayter – Top Unit Listing  Leaders of the Month Scott & Johnson Turpin & McCrory Tom Marchant – Top Volume Listing Leader of the Month Kathy Slayter – Top Unit Sales Leader of the Month Valerie Miller – Top Volume Sales Leader of the Month Mikel-Ann Scott & Lydia Johnson – Top Unit Listing Sales Team of the Month Karen Turpin & Nancy McCrory – Top Volume Sales Team of the Month

Travis Harris Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Travis Harris as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. Harris joins Coldwell Banker Caine with a background in sales. He previously worked as a Sales Consultant for AT&T. In the community he is a member of Spartanburg Young Professionals, and in his free time he enjoys spending time with family, sporting events, live music and homebrewing. Harris His wife, Cameron, is an occupational therapist at Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System. Harris and his wife reside in Spartanburg with their dog Pepper. “We are excited about Travis joining our Spartanburg team,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Given his sales expertise and customer relations experience, he will provide excellet service for his clients.”


HOME | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD The Reserve at Asheton Lakes, Simpsonville, SC At The Reserve at Asheton Lakes you can enjoy being a homeowner, without the hassle! These maintenance-free townhomes provide upscale living without the work, leaving your weekends open to explore the Upstate and surrounding areas. Homes at Asheton Lakes range in size from 2400-2700 square feet. All floorplans feature the master suite on the main level, three to four bedrooms, two car garages, and high quality finishes throughout. Free finished bonus room on move-in ready homes!

CONTACT INFO Contact: Cothran Homes | 864.214.3024 CothranHomes.com

Directions to Neighborhood: On I-385 South take exit 35 left on Woodruff Road, The Reserves at Asheton Lakes is on the left after the Hwy14 intersection.

To submit your Neighborhood Profile: homes@greenvillejournal.com

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Community Size: 32 homes Amenities: Private Gated Access & Community Pool Schools: Oakview Elementary Beck Academy Middle J.L. Mann High School

Available Homeplans: The Sutton – 2,449 sq. ft. 3 Beds / 2.5 Baths Starting at $249,900 The Howden – 2,742 sq. ft. 3 Beds / 2.5 Baths Starting at $268,900 The Ardleigh – 2,672 sq. ft. 4 Beds / 3.5 Baths Starting at $283,900


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | HOME

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T I O N S

FO R T H E W E E K O F J U N E 1  5 , 2 0 1 5 TOP TRANSFERS OF THE WEEK

REGENTS GLEN @ KINGSBRIDGE – $1,190,000 14 White Crescent Lane, Simpsonville

JONES RIDGE – $785,000 184 League Road, Simpsonville

CLAREMONT – $728,000 500 Chamblee Blvd., Greenville

CLAREMONT – $712,500 100 Madren Court, Greenville

SUNSET HILLS – $712,000 15 Waccamaw Circle, Greenville

VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO – $530,000 14 Chianti Drive, Greenville

$518,000 108 Snipes Road, Greenville

HAMPTON TOWNES – $480,000 210 Hampton Avenue, Greenville

SUBD.

PRICE

$11,550,000 $2,315,000 BEVERLY HILLS $1,613,327 $1,535,000 REGENTS GLEN @ KINGSBRIDGE $1,190,000 BOYCE ADD. $980,000 $950,000 JONES RIDGE $785,000 JIM W. BRAKE $775,000 CLAREMONT $728,000 CLAREMONT $712,500 SUNSET HILLS $712,000 $692,500 $567,121 ROPER PROFESSIONAL PARK $565,000 PINEY RIDGE $545,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $530,000 $518,000 IVEY SQUARE HORIZONTAL PROP REGIME $515,000 CYPRESS RUN $495,000 HAMPTON TOWNES $480,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK @ VERDAE MANOR $475,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $467,500 $462,000 $428,600 HIGHLAND PARC $427,481 WELLINGTON $426,332 HIGHLAND PARC $425,172 LAKE LANIER $425,000 KILGORE FARMS $408,000 POINSETT CORNERS $403,714 CLEAR SPRINGS $372,074 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $365,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $364,000 $357,500 ADAMS CREEK $351,995 $350,000 $335,000 THE RIDGE AT SUNSET $330,000 HILLSIDE PLANTATION $320,000 $315,312 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $304,900 $300,000 $300,000 CHEROKEE PARK $297,000 PELHAM ESTATES $293,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $290,000 $289,000 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $284,076 MERRIFIELD PARK $270,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $265,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $263,128 PINEHURST AT PEBBLE CREEK $257,500 AMBER OAKS FARM $254,799 $250,000 SUGAR CREEK $247,000 GARLINGTON PLACE $242,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $237,096 OVERLOOK AT BELL’S CREEK $235,505 CLEVELAND CONDO OFFICE PARK $235,000 $235,000 TWIN CREEKS $232,670 WESTCLIFFE $230,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $228,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $227,075 STONEWYCK $226,000

SELLER

BUYER

LEXINGTON GREENVILLE L P CANAL INSURANCE COMPANY RIVER STREET PROPERTIES WEST END GREENVILLE APAR NETXUSA INC OLD MAIN PROPERTIES LLC CYRUS INC MICHELIN NORTH AMERICA I HAAS ALFRED CHUMNEY KIM E (JTWROS) LEHERT LLC DEACON HOLDINGS LLC WILSON MARY LOUISE WEST END GREENVILLE APAR BOGER WILLIAM C MCKINNEY JEFFERY L (JTWR WELLS FARGO BANK N A WHITE HORSE PROPERTIES L GALLOWAY CUSTOM HOMES LL SMITH PAUL D (JTWROS) GOODWIN FOUST CUSTOM HOM TOPE TIMOTHY JAMES (SURV CUNNINGHAM TODD (JTWROS) PFENNIG CAMIRON L (JTWRO CEL PRODUCTS LLC MCKENZIE KENNETH W & YOL HARPER ANTHONY C LIFE ES HARPER ANTHONY C (L-EST) PTUE PROPERTIES LLC POOCHANINA HOLDINGS LLC SAH INVESTMENTS LLC DWH JR PROPERTIES LLC J FRANCIS BUILDERS LLC BAKAES NICHOLAS I NUNEZ JOEL WINKLER ASHLEE DAVIS FAMILY PROPERTIES HONESTO PROPERTIES LLC MOSELEY LEHMAN A JR GENERATION MORTGAGE COMP BELL TED TREW ROESER MATTHEW H VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC KELLY ANGELA L AMENDED & BEATON JOSEPH M ELIZONDO-AGUIRRE JUAN RA BRACKIN DAVID A BRISSIE ROBERT L JR COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT F RDM3 LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC KIM CHRISTINA L (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC HYDRICK JEFFERY W (JTWRO D R HORTON-CROWN LLC LARTEY KINGSLEY JOHNSON BARBARA B SMITH MARGUERITE N MORDAS DONALD M BRUNER ERIC S BRANDON JERRIS FAYE REVO BPC2 LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH BEVANS ALVARO E PEREZ MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH PHILLIPS ROBERT N (JTWRO JONES BRIAN J MURPHY JUSTIN M ANDERSON CADDEN ELIZABET ANDERSON CADDEN BEELAND D R HORTON - CROWN LLC BEST ROBERT G REID RHONDA MICHELE HARRISON HENRY C SLLIM LLC II M PROPERTIES LLC TMG CUSTOM HOMES LLC BLUME WYLENE ADDIS (JTWR GHP FARM LLC MARTINS JOHN (JTWROS) SMITH ANGELLA S FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG LS RESIDENTIAL LLC BRAND KEMPER MARION II DEBRUHL ALONZO BANK OF TRAVELERS REST SITTON KAREN NICOLE SIMPSON RONNIE L JR (JTW HUTCHISON CHESLEY I SHIELDS CHARLES JAMES JR BAD COMPANY PROPERTIES L DAVIDSON JASON R (JTWROS MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH IVANCIC KIMBERLY RENEE ( MS PROPERTIES OF SC LLC WILSON MARY LOUISE (JTWR DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SMITHERS CHARLES JOSEPH DOOLITTLE ROBERT J PALUCH ELIZABETH FRYE LINDSEY S SZYNAL DANIELE S (JTWROS ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC YEAGER CHARLES D (JTWROS DIETZ DOUGLAS A DUMIT TOM C (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC ROLLINS GEORGE (JTWROS) DAVIS LUKE ALLEN GUSSMANN DETLEF M SULLIVAN BERNARD F HOLT WILLIAM H HUDSON MICHAEL KIRBY ADAM L (JTWROS) ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC ROBINSON TEDDY (JTWROS) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SNIDER LEONARD A (JTWROS BEATLEY MARTHA BRUCE SWAMP RABBIT HOLDINGS LL ALLEN BETTY N BISHOP JUSTIN DALE NVR INC LORRAINE MICHAEL BURNS LEONARD D MD REVOC MCKINNEY HENRY III (JTWR WM CAPITAL PARTNERS XV L MUNGO HOMES INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC RAMEY TAMERA G (JTWROS) SHAW JONATHAN HOHMAN JULIE MOCK (JTWRO

ADDRESS 400 E STONE AVE 4500 CAMERON VALLEY PKWY STE 3 231 BEVERLY RD 1 PARKWAY S 14 WHITE CRESCENT LN 408 E NORTH ST 60 E RIO SALADO PKWY STE 1100 184 LEAGUE RD 2738 N PLEASANTBURG DR 500 CHAMBLEE BLVD 100 MADREN CT 15 WACCAMAW CIR 13492 CAMINITO CARMEL PO BOX 9297 201 ROPER CREEK DR 2409 WADE HAMPTON BLVD 14 CHIANTI DR 108 SNIPES RD 3089 S HWY 14 3565 PIEDMONT RD NE STE 300 210 HAMPTON AVE 8 ROLLESTON DR 4 BENEVENTUM CT 1009 MOORE RD 431 W MAIN ST STE 108 324 SUNNYBROOK LN 204 GRACEFIELD CT 320 SUNNYBROOK LN 1293 CAROLINA DR 203 PLACID FOREST CT PO BOX 394 10 FALL BROOK CT 20 KNIGHTS VALLEY DR 10 LOTUS CT 407 E FARIS RD 112 ADAMS CREEK PL 1213 SHADOW WAY 509 BLAIRHILL RD 43 SETTING SUN LN 1 BOLERO LN 2812 BRUSHY CREEK RD 23 KITTERY DR 42 PLAZA DR 101 FARIS CIR 14 CATEECHEE AVE 306 REDCLIFFE RD 201 OYSTERCATCHER WAY 108 RIDGE SPRINGS RD 12 KITTERY DR 305 SEABURY DR 200 STRASBURG DR 6 BRADSTOCK DR 10 TEE TIME CT 6 CREEKWATER WAY 17 JERVEY RD 319 S WINGFIELD RD 204 GELSEMIUM PL 405 ASHLER DR 229 BERGEN LN 15 HIALEAH RD 104 MANLY DR 9 BAUDER CT 1706 E SALUDA LAKE RD 441 WESTERN LN 101 ASHLER DR 500 STEAMBOAT CT

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HOME | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

Let’s celebrate the tasty tomato

Vodka Bombs

It’s tasty tomato time, y’all – the time ronmental sustainability and social jusof year when the celebrated tomato is tice – and Sustainable Midlands, a nonperfectly ripe and abundant, a cool, profit that works toward sustainability juicy treat when we’re othon all fronts, including erwise spending our days local food production. Guest columnist cursing the July heat. The groups wanted to I moved to Greenville shatter the notion that from Columbia just a year tomatoes are always ago. We’ve settled in to bright orangey-red, our new home in the Uptasteless and sometimes with Emily Yepes state, where festivals are mealy, and redefine as plentiful as the tomato the heirloom tomato crop, but forgive me if I adfor folks outside of the mit that Columbia does a gardener and/or foodie much better job of paying bubbles. So they created tribute to the tomato. a festival with live music Now six years old and and activities that draw going strong, the Palmetto a crowd, and created, Tasty Tomato Festival alas the central focus, the ways takes place on a faheirloom tomato tastmously hot July afternoon, ing table, a beautiful at the peak of tomato and plentiful display of season, on a farm, where all colors and flavors of shade and breezes are scarce. Columbitomatoes. ans turn out by the thousands despite the In the first few years of the tomato inhumane temperatures. Families come festival, the Slow Food group (of which for the tasting tables, the tomato bobI was a member) hosted a potluck in the bing, and the tomato skee-ball. Young hour before the event began. The only people show up for the bloody marys rule was that the dish must feature heirand live music. Home gardeners are ealoom tomatoes. These dishes are intendger to enter their prized tomatoes in the ed to impress. I’m hopelessly nervous Homegrown Tasty Tomato Contest. about foodie potlucks and the fear of The inaugural festival was a collaboramy dish being compared to all the othtion between the local Slow Food chapers, so I tend to avoid the obvious dishes. ter – a volunteer-run international orgaSo for my last Tasty Tomato potluck benization that champions a food system fore moving to Greenville, I decided to based on high quality and taste, envigo out with a bang – I brought Vodka

1 pint firm heirloom cherry tomatoes

(a.k.a. Drunken Tomatoes, a.k.a. Bloody Mary Bites)*

1/2 c. pepper vodka 3 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1 tbsp. superfine granulated sugar 1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest

PUT ON YOUR APRON

FORREST CLONTS / CONTRIBUTING

6TH ANNUAL PALMETTO TASTY TOMATO FESTIVAL July 18th, 4-9 p.m. at City Roots Farm 1005 Airport Boulevard, Columbia Tickets are $12 tastytomatofestival.com

OPTIONAL: Old Bay seasoning

Cut a small, shallow X in skin of blossom end of each tomato using a serrated knife (just break the skin). Blanch tomatoes, five at a time, in a saucepan of boiling water 3 seconds and immediately transfer with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking. Drain and peel. Stir together vodka, vinegar, sugar, and zest until sugar is dissolved, then pour in a large zip-top bag with tomatoes, gently tossing to coat. Marinate in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour. Drain the excess marinade and sprinkle the tomatoes with a little bit of highquality sea salt. Optional: Also sprinkle tomatoes with a little bit of Old Bay. Serve on a platter with toothpicks or in a martini glass as part of a bloody mary bar.

FORREST CLONTS / CONTRIBUTING

Bombs. They’re like a bite of bloody mary, a chilled, juicy mouthful of black pepper vodka and perfect heirloom tomato, served up as an hors d’oeuvre. I stood anxiously near my dish to watch reactions as fellow potluckers bit into what looked like a humble tomato on a toothpick. After a string of surprised eyes, happy smiles, and returning foragers with friends in tow to try the boozy tomatoes, I was eventually able to give up my post by the Vodka Bombs and enjoy myself. Emily Yepes is an advertising representative at Community Journals, a board member of Slow Food Upstate and a fitness instructor at Barre Evolution and RevUp Indoor Cycling. She is “just” a home cook whose favorite hobby is to test and perfect recipes for her annual family cookbook.

Make ahead: Tomatoes can be peeled and vodka marinade prepared 1 day ahead and kept, separately, covered and chilled.

*This recipe is a slightly modified version of “Vodka-Spiked Cherry Tomatoes with Pepper Salt” first published in Gourmet magazine in June 2001 and now available on Epicurious.com.


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HOME | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

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PEOPL E, AWA R D S , HONOR S Allen Tate Realtors Announces Top Producers Kathy Weeks, Upstate Regional Vice President at Allen Tate REALTORS®, is proud to announce Top Agents for May 2015. In the Greenville Office, Lisa McDowell was Top Listing Agent and Teresa Brady was Top Producer. The Robby Brady Team was the Top Listing and Producing Team for the Greenville office. For the Easley/Powdersville Office, Judy McDowell Brady Messer was Top Listing Agent, Yolanda Austin was Top Producer, and The Missy Rick Team was the Top Listing and Producing Team. In the Greer Office, Nicole Seppala was Top Listing Agent and Denise Riddle was the Top Producer. The Herseys (Paul and Marcia) were the Top Robby Brady Team Listing and Producing Team. Top Listing Agent for the GreenvilleWoodruff Road Office was Shelly DeVreese and Top Producer was Ryan Rosenfeld with The Yukich Team as the Top Listing and Producing Team. The Simpsonville Office congratulates Susan Messer Austin McMillen as Top Listing Agent and Top Producer.

Missy Rick Team

The Herseys

DeVreese

Seppala

Rosenfeld

Coldwell Banker Caine Hosted 121 Rhett Groundbreaking Ceremony Coldwell Banker Caine hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for 121 Rhett, Greenville’s new upscale condo development in the historic West End. The ceremony took place at the 121 Rhett development site in Downtown, Greenville on Wednesday, June 10 at 10:30 a.m. Developer Tom Croft, Yeargin Potter Smith Construction Executive Vice President Sam Smith and Council Member Lillian Brock Flemming broke ground to launch the beginning of construction for 121 Rhett. Future residents, developers and realtors were in attendance to celebrate construction that starts next week. “We are excited to officially begin building this highly anticipated condo development,” said Tom Croft, developer of 121 Rhett. “ Our buyers come from all over the United States, which speaks volumes about how Greenville’s growth is making an impact both locally and nationally.” Marketed by Tracy Bogie of Coldwell Banker Caine, 121 Rhett is an impressive seven-story building that will include 35 condominiums with spectacular views and convenience to Main Street dining, shopping and entertainment. Features include: On-site private, secure parking, 10-12 foot ceilings, expansive windows, spacious balconies and beautifully landscaped common areas. 121 Rhett starts in the $390,000’s and ranges in size from 1,300 square feet to over 3,000 square feet. With 29 units under contract, 121 Rhett is one of Greenville’s most sought after luxury living opportunities.

Riddle

Yukich

Sugarmill

McMillen

REAL ESTATE NEWS Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® Now Accepting Nominations for the 2015 Revitalization Awards

If you or someone you know took a chance, invested a substantial amount of time and money in a property in the Greater Greenville Area that acts as a catalyst to improve a particular community, the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® would like to know. GGAR will be accepting nominations until July 8, 2015 for properties in The Greater Greenville area. We are seeking properties that have made an impact on a particular area, not a remodeling project. Some examples of the types of properties include: Residential – individual homes, subdivisions Commercial – businesses or multi-family dwellings Public property – parks, trails, etc. The GGAR Revitalization Committee and a panel of independent judges will meet in July to review all nominations. Nominated properties will be visited by the judges and the committee in August. All nominees will be notified following the visit. The awards will be presented in November at the GGAR REALTOR® luncheon. Nomination forms are available online at www.ggar.com or contact Leah Duke at GGAR to request a copy: Email: leah.duke@ggar.com or phone 864-672-3209. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 2,100 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www. ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

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34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

Page turners

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 21, 2015 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE TIGERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2016 TAX YEAR. THE TIGERVILLE BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11-275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL INCREASE THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX FOR THE TIGERVILLE FIRE DISTRICT, BY EIGHT-TENTHS (0.8) MILL BRINGING THE TOTAL MILLAGE FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE TO TWENTYTHREE AND SIX-TENTHS (23.6) MILLS, WHICH REPRESENTS A CONSUMER PRICE INDEX OF 1.62% AND POPULATION GROWTH OF 1.8% AS ALLOWED BY THE STATE LAW UNDER S.C. CODE ANN. § 6-1-320(A). THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE INCREASE SET FORTH HEREIN IS BASED ON 20142015 MILLAGE RATES AND IS SUBJECT TO REASSESSMENT YEAR CALCULATIONS PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. § 12-37-251(E). BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE OF ELECTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE Notice is hereby given that the Special Election for the Dunklin Fire District office will be held at the DUNKLIN FIRE DEPARTMENT on Tuesday, August 11, 2015. Filing for this Special Election is June 12, 2015 noon and end on Jun 22, 2015 noon. Any person wishing to register to vote in this election must do so no later than July 11, 2015. The poll shall be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the locations designated below. The Managers of Election shall see that each person offering to vote takes the oath that he is qualified to vote at this election according to the Constitution of this State and that he has not voted before in this election. Voters who are blind, physically disabled, or unable to read or write are entitled to assistance in casting their ballot. This assistance may be given by anyone the voter chooses except his employer, an agent of his employer, or an officer or agent of his union. The Managers must be notified if assistance is needed. Voters who are unable to enter their polling place due to physical disability or age may vote in the vehicle in which they drove, or were driven, to the polls. When notified, the Managers will help voters using this curbside voting provision. Registered electors who cannot vote in person may be eligible to vote by absentee ballot. Persons wishing more information concerning absentee voting should contact their County Board of Voter Registration. At 2:00 p.m. on Election Day the County Election Commission will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601. On Friday, August 14, 2015 at 12 Noon, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in these elections. This hearing will be held at 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900 Greenville SC 29601.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 21, 2015 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE LAKE CUNNINGHAM FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2016 TAX YEAR. THE LAKE CUNNINGHAM BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11-275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL MAINTAIN THEIR PRESENT MILLAGE RATE OF THIRTY-TWO AND SEVEN TENTHS (32.7) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE, WHICH IS ABOVE THE FIFTEEN (15) MILLS ESTABLISHED BY STATUTE FOR THE LAKE CUNNINGHAM FIRE DISTRICT. THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE SET FORTH HEREIN IS BASED ON 2014-2015 MILLAGE RATE AND IS SUBJECT TO REASSESSMENT YEAR CALCULATIONS PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. 12-37-251(E). THE REQUEST OF THE LAKE CUNNINGHAM BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL REPRESENTS NO INCREASE OVER LAST YEAR’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE LEVY. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 21, 2015, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE DUNKLIN FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2016 TAX YEAR. THE DUNKLIN BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11-275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL MAINTAIN THEIR PRESENT MILLAGE RATE OF TWENTYSEVEN AND NINE-TENTHS (27.9) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE. THIS REQUEST INCLUDES ONE AND SEVENTENTHS (1.7) MILLS FOR A RESERVE ACCOUNT PREVIOUSLY LEVIED PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. § 6-1-320(D). THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE SET FORTH HEREIN IS BASED ON 20142015 MILLAGE RATE AND IS SUBJECT TO REASSESSMENT YEAR CALCULATIONS PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. 12-37-251(E). THE REQUESTED MILLAGE, WHICH IS ABOVE THE TEN (10) MILLS AUTHORIZED BY LAW FOR THE DUNKLIN FIRE DISTRICT, REPRESENTS NO INCREASE OVER LAST YEAR’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE Certificate of Need is being applied for Home Health Agency by Hope Advancement Inc. located at The Merovan Center, 1200 Woodruff Rd, Greenville SC 29607; contact number (980)335-0066 . Our Home Health Agency is primarily engaged in providing nursing services, aide services, supplies, and other therapeutic services. The estimated project capital cost is $100,000.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 21, 2015, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE BOILING SPRINGS FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2016 TAX YEAR. THE BOILING SPRINGS BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL MAINTAIN THEIR PRESENT MILLAGE RATE OF TWENTY-FOUR (24.0) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE, WHICH IS ABOVE THE TWENTY (20) MILLS ESTABLISHED BY STATUTE FOR THE BOILING SPRINGS FIRE DISTRICT. THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE SET FORTH HEREIN IS BASED ON 2014-2015 MILLAGE RATE AND IS SUBJECT TO REASSESSMENT YEAR CALCULATIONS PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. 12-37-251(E). THE REQUEST OF THE BOILING SPRINGS BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL REPRESENTS NO INCREASE OVER LAST YEAR’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE LEVY. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2015-CP-23-01536 GENNIE L. STEWART, Plaintiff, v. THE CITY OF GREENVILLE, THE COUNTY OF GREENVILLE, THE GREENVILLE COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT AND KEYOKA WHITE, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS, KEYOKA WHITE, ABOVE-NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION SALE Properties owned by the Forfeited Land Commission (FLC) of Greenville County will be sold at auction by Meares Auction Group on Monday, July 20, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. in the Greenville County Council Chambers located at 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601. Details can be obtained in the Forfeited Land Commission section of the Greenville County Treasurer’s web page –http:// www.greenvillecounty.org/ County_Treasurer/ or in the Greenville County Treasurer’s Office, located at 301 University Ridge, Suite 600, Greenville, SC 29601, telephone number (864) 467-7210.

NOTICE COYFS of SC is a Behavioral Health Agency applying for a Certificate of Need for Home Health at 213 E. Butler Rd, Mauldin, SC 29662; contact number (803)955-6993. Our Home Health Agency is primarily engaged in providing rehabilitative nursing services, aide services, supplies, and other therapeutic services medically necessary. The estimated project capital cost is $40,000.000.

NOTICE Washington Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact number 864-295-2011 is seeking Title to a Mobile Home, that is not registered in South Carolina, through a judicial sale in the Magistrates Office in Spartanburg County, SC. This mobile home is a 1989 Fleetwood/Cream mobile home with serial number A74 and is located at 664 Berry Shoals Rd., Duncan, SC 29334.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that John & Sung LLC / DBA K-Town, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR, at 120 Millport Circle, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 5, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dollar Superior, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE, at 6300 White Horse Rd., Ste 116, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 12, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Silver Bay Seafood Restaurant, Inc, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE, at 6513 White Horse Road, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 19, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

Land of the free and home of the reads Fun and educational patriotic picks for kids

As you and your children get ready for Independence Day, consider celebrating your freedom to read. Here are a few excellent books to add to your July 4 festivities: “The House That George Built” by Suzanne Slade; illustrated by Rebecca Bond If you take the familiar story of “The House That Jack Built” and combine it with the history of America’s most famous home, you’ve got “The House That George Built.” This book tells readers about the building of the White House, and how George Washington, the only president who never actually lived in the house, oversaw its construction. “The Secret of the Sealed Room: A Mystery of Young Benjamin Franklin” by Bailey MacDonald “The Secret of the Sealed Room” is an enjoyable book for anyone who would like to see what Benjamin Franklin may have been like as a young person. Everyone knows him as an inventor, statesman and revolutionary, but his experiences as a younger man made him one of the central figures in American history. Even though this story is fictional, it’s fairly easy to imagine a young Ben Franklin being inquisitive enough to get himself involved in a murder investigation. “White House Kids” by Joe Rhatigan Young readers will enjoy learning that many children who grew up in the White House weren’t exactly angels and that it’s not easy being a White House kid. As one kid put it, “It’s

like living in a fishbowl.” Privacy is nonexistent, parents are always traveling, the press and public always want a piece of these kids, and people often say bad things about their families or even the children themselves. Would you want to be a White House kid? Read more to find out. Freedom to read More America-centric picks for young readers: “Capture the Flag” by Kate Messner “The First Pup” by Bob Staake “Lady Liberty: A Biography” by Doreen Rappaport; illustrated by Matt Tavares “John, Paul, George & Ben” by Lane Smith

Reviewed by Kelly Knight, Fork Shoals School librarian. Visit her blog for young adult and middle grade readers at Knight Reader (knightreader.wordpress. com) and for the elementaryaged set Knight Reader Junior (knightreaderjunior.wordpress.com).


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

WHAT’S HAPPENING

July 3

Main Event

JULY 8

Who’s Coming to the Lunchtime Pile-Up July 8?

CONCERT

Daniel Z

Corner of Broad and Falls streets (lot leased by Table 301 Restaurant Group) 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Gottrocks Versatile, talented jazz vibraphonist. 235-5519 gottrocksgreenvile.com

This week’s Pile-Up will include Ellada Kouzina, Greek cuisine The Chuck Truck, gourmet burgers The Nomadik Few, gourmet shaved ice

CONCERT

Skyelor Anderson

Sponsored by Euphoria

Moe Joe Coffee (Greenville) Rising country singer/songwriter and “X Factor” contestant. 263-3550 moejoecoffeeandmusic.net CONCERT

Snopes Family Band Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant Tickets: $5

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Band shows off unique combination of strings, brass and sousaphone. 558-0747 drmacarnoldsbluesrestaurant.com FESTIVAL

Slater-Marietta MOON BOOM Slater Hall and Jimi Turner Park 210 Baker Circle, Marietta 6-10 p.m. FREE There will be food, crafts, entertainment and free fireworks. Concurrently at Slater Hall, American Bandstand original dancer Jack Fisher will be hosting a Blast from the Past dance contest from 7-9 p.m. A new dance, “The Slater Marietta Mule Kick,” will be presented. facebook.com/mariettamoonboom CONCERT

Mason Jar Menagerie, w/ Italo & The Passions & Debbie & The Skanks Radio Room Tickets: $5/$7 Fountain Inn band blends punk energy with classic folk and blues. 263-7868 wpbrradioroom.com CONCERT

Smooth Jazz with “Latitude 35” Runway Cafe | Downtown Greenville Airport 21 Airport Rd Ext, Greenville 8-11:30 p.m. $6 at the Door

Smooth Jazz Pre-July 4th Celebration. See additional music events for July to be announced on facebook.com/ johnhoffmanpromotions. Sponsored by John Hoffman Promotions. 202-1561 facebook.com/johnhoffmanpromotions

a lawn chair. Sponsored by Taylors First Baptist Church. 244-3535 taylorsfbc.org kimk@taylorsfbc.org

CONCERT

July 4

Shades of Brown

FAMILY

Main Street Fridays FREE

Red, White, and Blue Day

Soul/funk band brings the dance party. bit.ly/main-street-fridays CELEBRATION

Freedom Celebration Peace Center | TD Stage 101 W Broad St,, Greenville 7:30-9:30 p.m. FREE Celebrating our great country and the freedoms we enjoy. Concessions available by Larkin’s on the River and The Sno Hut. Free children’s activities. Bring

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $8 adults $7 children Wear Red, White, or Blue to receive $2 off admission. Special programs to celebrate America’s Birthday will be held throughout the day. tcmupstate.org mbaugh@tcmupstate.org FESTIVAL

Saturday Bluegrass Festival Red, White and Bluegrass Fountain Inn Commerce Park

110 Depot St., Fountain Inn 5 p.m., music at 7 p.m. and fireworks at dark FREE The City of Fountain Inn presents Saturday Night Bluegrass as a part of their Summer Concert Series. This is a great time to come out and relax and listen to great music. Don’t forget your chair. 408-9755 | fountaininn.org/scs diane.turner@fountaininn.org

thru July 5 EXHIBIT

The Fantastic World of Dan Yaccarino Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St, Greenville FREE Award-winning artist Dan Yaccarino grew up in New Jersey, where he whiled away the hours with comic books, vintage cartoons and films, and toys. Today,

»


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

» children around the globe know

Yaccarino from his more than 30 books, including “The Fantastic Undersea Life of Jacques Cousteau” and “All the Way to America.” Yaccarino has also had work featured in a number of publications, including The New York Times, Rolling Stone, and Time. 271-7570 | gcma.org info@gcma.org

July 8 CONCERT

“Weird Al” Yankovic: The Mandatory World Tour

be on-site each week. events.greenvillesc.gov

July 9 TICKETING

SAVE-A-SEAT Peace Center | Concert Hall 6 p.m. FREE Save-A-Seat gives the public the opportunity to come inside the Peace Center to look for just the right seat for the 2015-2016 Broadway season. Available seats will be tagged for purchase that day, and the first 50 people through the doors will receive a Peace Center tote bag. The 2015-2016 Broadway season features Tony Award winners, family favorites, classic love stories and hit songs. Seven-show season ticket packages start at $180. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org PRESENTATION

The Four Thousand Year Mystery Pyramid to Steam Engine Zen - The Event Center 924 S. Main Street 6:30-8 p.m. FREE

Peace Center | Peace Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $45 with VIP ticket packages available Weird Al is the biggest-selling comedy recording artist in history. He has won three Grammy Awards and countless accolades for “Eat It,” “Yoda,” and “White & Nerdy.” His latest album, “Mandatory Fun,” includes parodies of Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines” (“Word Crimes”), Lorde’s “Royals” (“Foil”) and Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy” (“Handy”). “Word Crimes” debuted in the Billboard Top 40, placing Weird Al with Michael Jackson and Madonna as artists with Top 40 singles in each of the last four decades. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org CONCERT

SC Blue Reedy River Concerts Peace Center Amphitheater 7-9 p.m. | Every Wednesday, through August FREE Bring your lawn chairs and a picnic, sit back and enjoy a variety of free musical concerts June-Aug., 7-9 pm at the Peace Center Amphitheater. Food trucks will

Find out how to escape thousands of years of individual misery. Explore Individual Sovereignty and venture into an imaginary place to see what a free world would actually look like. This is the biggest idea since the 1st Century, A.D. 449-0809 | greenvilleteaparty.com ron@thetamaccios.com

July 10

Entertainer of the Year Award, entered the music scene at Carolina beach bars in the Coastline Band. Eventually, Quick became the group’s front man, creating Jim Quick and the Coastline. 7 p.m.: Free shag lessons with Carolina Shag Club in the Wyche Pavilion. 467-3000 peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org CONCERT

Mr. Atomic & Mindelixir Ground Zero EDM double-bill keeps the beat going. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

July 11 TASTING

Ice Cream Social VOM FASS Greenville 4 Market Point Dr., Suite F 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE Experience ice cream like you never have before. VOM FASS provides a variety of unique and exciting ice cream toppings including our staff favorite - Pumpkinseed Oil and sea salt. Taste how oils, vinegars, liqueurs and spirits can take your ice cream to a whole new level with ease. Complimentary event. 288-3277 | greenville.vomfassusa.com CONCERT

Mountainwalker, w/ Charles Hedgepath & John Byce Independent Public Ale House Tickets: $5 Aaron Berg (a.k.a. Mountainwalker) mixes spoken-word/hip-hop performance with a reunion of jazz trio Byce, Berg & Hedgepath. 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com CONCERT

Eric Weiler Band Smiley’s Acoustic Café FREE Multi-talented guitarist heads genrejumping combo. 282-8988 | smileysacousticcafe.com CONCERT

Jim Quick and the Coastline Peace Center | TD Stage 8 p.m. | Tickets start at $20 Unmatched stage presence and a chill, grab-another-beer vibe, Jim Quick and the Coastline might be the most fun you’ll have by the Reedy River. Quick, 9 time winner of Carolina Music Awards’

CONCERT

Nick Finzer Quartet

July 12 DINNER

Farms and Food Forever On the Farm Dinner Bio-Way Farm 197 Bio-Way Farm, Ware Shoals 5:30-8:30 p.m. $45 dinner only, $55 with beer/wine option Join Slow Food Upstate and Upstate Forever as we gather around the table, share a meal together, and learn about the Land Trust Program at Bio-Way Farms. The meal is generously sponsored by Whole Foods Market so that ticket sales will benefit the Upstate Forever Land Trust Program. 992-6987 brownpapertickets.com/event/1691781

July 13-16 CAMP

Children to Teen Art Camp 10 Central Avenue Studios | Greenville 2:30-4:30 p.m. | $125 Eight years old to teens. Each session will cover painting, drawing, glass mosaics and print making. Instructors will be Julia Peters and Laura K. Aiken. 360-3811 | 10centralave.com laura@laurakaiken.com

thru July 15 REGISTRATION

NAMI’s Crisis Intervention Team Training Registration Deadline FREE Crisis Intervention Team Training (CIT) is a program designed to educate individuals to recognize signs and symptoms of mental illness and to respond safely and empathetically to people who are experiencing psychiatric crises. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) will be conducting 4-hour CIT sessions in Greenville on Aug. 4-5. The training is free of charge, but registration is required. Seating is limited. The deadline for registration is July 15. 331-3300

July 16

Blues Boulevard (Greenville) Tickets: $10 (plus $10 food/drink minimum)

CONCERT

Award-winning trombone player, bandleader and composer. 242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

Peace Center | TD Center 8 p.m. | $35 starting ticket price

Robert Randolph and the Family Band

»


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

July 17 BOOK SIGNING

Susan Crandall Book Talk and Signing Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Rd, 2-4 p.m. $27.56 or $10

» Robert Randolph & The Family Band

first gained national attention with the album Live at the Wetlands in 2002, followed by three studio recordings: “Unclassified,” “Colorblind” and “We Walk This Road” and tireless touring. Performing at Bonnaroo and Austin City Limits, Randolph’s unprecedented prowess on his instrument garnered him a spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list, a growing list of fans, and collaborations with Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org

From Susan Crandall, the award-winning author of Past the Graveyard, comes “The Flying Circus” ($26, on sale 7/7/15), an adventure tale about two daredevils and a farm boy who embark on the journey of a lifetime across America-s heartland in the Roaring Twenties. Susan will be discussing her book at Fiction Addiction on Friday, July 17, at 2 p.m. $27.56 admits two and includes copy of book. $10 admits one and is a merchandise voucher. 675-0540 | info@fiction-addiction.com bit.ly/fiction-addiction-events

July 18 FAMILY

Build It Day The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street

9 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 adults $8 children Exercise your creativity as you build with our big blue Imagination Playground Blocks, Legos, and more. We’ll have a photographer on hand to snap photos of your creations, which you can then submit to Imagination Playground for a chance to win one of over 500 prizes, the grand prize being a trip for two to New York City Burling Slip Imagination Playground Park or your own (custom) Imagination Playground Big Block Set. 553-7935 tcmupstate.org/build-it-day mbaugh@tcmupstate.org

Crossword puzzle: page 38

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Complete our easy-to-use online form at www.bit.ly/GJCalendar by Monday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in that week’s Journal. Sudoku puzzle: page 38


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.03.2015 | CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. COLORFUL CHARACTERS By Myles Mellor and Sally York ACROSS 1. Corkwood 6. Nosh 11. Econ. measure 14. Antivenins 18. Over 19. Ill-gotten gains 20. Bucket of bolts 22. Broadcast 23. White singer, actress, fairy tale maiden, and rhythm and blues band leader 27. Language of Pakistan 28. Congers 29. Ex-lax? 30. Rubberneck 31. Annoy 33. ___-Altaic languages 34. FedEx, say 35. “I see!” 38. Lay members of a religious order 40. Winged topper 44. Filthy 46. Contents of some barrels 47. Après-ski drink 48. Foofaraw 49. Nettle 50. Cantina cooker 52. C-worthy? 53. “Desire Under the ___” 54. Green singer, author and football player 60. Gold braid 61. It’s made in Japan 62. Atlas features

63. Glassblower, for one 66. Freelancer’s enc. 67. Garden plants 69. Melodic 70. Cry at fireworks 71. Ring-tailed animal 72. Brown rapper, author, and two comic strip characters 80. Channel marker 81. Swerve 82. It may be minced 83. One of three vessels 84. Beast of burden 85. Loss of muscular coordination, var. 87. Au ___ 88. Trousers 90. Ensures 92. Tear 95. Potato feature 96. Slog 97. ___ Fyne, Scotland 98. Like some walls 100. Like some talk 102. Good, long bath 103. Computer picture 104. Bird venerated by ancient Egyptians 108. Black child actress, Supreme Court justice, and comedian 112. Twisting force, var. 113. New Mexico art community 114. Like Cheerios

115. Edible fish 116. “Awright!” 117. Functioned as 118. A goner 119. Biscotti flavoring DOWN 1. Hindu Mr. 2. Food thickener 3. Enrich 4. Sticky sweetener, var. 5. “Take your pick” 6. Ace place? 7. Cherry pit, for one 8. Follower of John 9. Bawl 10. Small falcon 11. Grave robber 12. Colorful salamander 13. “Polythene ___” (Beatles song) 14. Angel 15. Arab chieftain 16. Houston university 17. Downed a sub, say 21. Iranian language 24. Drunken 25. Indian bread 26. City near Syracuse 32. Abate 33. Husband of Bathsheba 34. Bolivian capital 35. Indian tourist city 36. Husk 37. Kind of hoop 39. Groves

40. “Whatcha ___?” 41. ___ ID 42. Fesses up 43. Presents 45. London’s Big ___ 47. First offer? 50. Creole vegetable 51. Been in bed

SUDOKU

Difficult

52. At liberty 53. Ultimatum word 55. Clamorous 56. Having a rear, slangily 57. Indian nursemaids 58. Window measurement 59. British Commonwealth member

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 37

63. Excite 64. Pentose sugar 65. Drinking mug 66. Bar order 67. Carbonado 68. A pop 69. Old Jewish scholars 70. Toe the line 71. Break off 73. Be of use 74. Barbershop call 75. Have an impact on 76. Cellular stuff 77. Vermin 78. Black 79. Alleviate 85. Bikini, e.g. 86. Sitting room? 87. Great thing to hit 88. Kind of operation 89. Jeans brand 91. Certain stiffener 92. Good earth 93. Wealth 94. Away 97. Windblown soil 99. Mustard choice 100. Loafer, e.g. 101. Actress Sorvino 102. Ancient gathering place 103. Stiff hair 105. “Road” film destination 106. Frosts, as a cake 107. ___ terrier 108. Farm area 109. Deviation 110. ___-tzu 111. Wood sorrel Crossword answers: page 37


CULTURE | 07.03.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

COMMUNITY VOICES PAST AND PRESENT WITH COURTNEY TOLLISON HARTNESS

Tyranny abroad North Korea sustains one of the most brutal regimes in history Violence, terrorism, and hatred are constants in our unsettled world. Even the peacemaking efforts of diplomacy often present their own nightmares and tripwires. Dealing with North Korea in the 21st century is a strong example. With dismaying consistency, the despicable actions of North Korea’s leaders seize the headlines of newspapers around the world. Recently, one North Korean cabinet member was brutally executed with an anti-aircraft gun. What prompted this? The official had dozed off in a meeting. Last year, a United Nations committee launched an effort to condemn North Korea for crimes against humanity. The yearlong investigation concluded with a 372-page report that told of systematic torture, execution and rape, alongside atrocious individual acts, including forcing one mother to drown her baby, and a family imprisoned and tortured for watching a banned foreign soap opera. The report stated that North Korea’s appalling human rights violations are “without parallel in the contemporary world.” Many consider the North Korean actions comparable to Nazi Germany’s horrendous acts in World War II. This nationalized evil has been managed for the past 70 years by the Kim Dynasty. The current dictator, Kim Jong-un, succeeded his father, Kim Jong-il, who had succeeded his father, Kim Il-sung; the latter assumed power in 1945 with the defeat of the Japanese in World War II. Shortly after assuming postwar power, he launched the Korean War in an attempt to reunify the country after its partitioning. The United States provided significant troop presence and leadership even though the U.S. Congress never officially declared war on North Korea. What some called a “police action” in Korea quickly became known as the Korean War (1950-1953). Global headlines today are frequently punctuated by the latest horrendous actions of North Korea’s leadership, but more often than not, even U.S. newspapers rarely mention the fact that our military maintains a presence in

U.S. lost 36,000 in the conflict, with over South Korea. Recently, my husband and I visited 100,000 wounded in action. U.S. military veterans of the Korean War South Korea and toured Incheon’s Freedom Park, near Seoul. Here, one can sur- are rarely accorded the attention that vetvey the beaches below where American erans of World War II receive. “The forgottroops landed in 1950 as part of a bril- ten war” was a proxy conflict motivated liant and risky double offensive planned by President Harry S. Truman’s policy of by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. The nearby “containment,” limiting communism to war memorial includes a 15-foot tall the places where it existed but fighting statue of MacArthur, with a chiseled rec- against its spread. The agonizing, costly ognition of “the incredible height of his years in Korea foretold a similar conflict genius.” He is held in high regard, as are years later in Vietnam, another proxy war Americans in general; several individuals that was much longer, cost far more in dolspoke very kind and grateful words to us, lars, and exacted many more casualties. referencing the events of 65 years ago. “Recently, one North Korean Unlike in the U.S., the cabinet member was brutally war that began on Korean shores 65 years ago executed with an anti-aircraft gun. is seared on the psyches What prompted this? The official of many Koreans. In 1953, had dozed off in a meeting.” after the opposing forces fought to a stalemate, both sides agreed to a cease-fire, Since the cease-fire in 1953, North and but not a more formal peace treaty. The border between the two countries re- South Korea have evolved in dramatically mained where it was prior to the conflict, different ways. In contrast to the oppresand a massive Demilitarized Zone devel- sion and poverty that diminish life in oped on both sides of the border. Today North Korea, South Korea has thrived ecoit is considered one of the most heavily nomically and enjoys high degrees of civil liberty and political stability. The South fortified DMZs in the world. Today, technically, the two Koreas are Korean per-capita gross domestic product still at war. The South Korean side of the (GDP) is $32,400, compared to $1,800 in DMZ is frequented by tourists and school the North. North Korea exports about $4 groups. The three-hour tour indicates billion annually, while in South Korea the how seriously the South Koreans regard tally is about $550 billion. However, North the situation. The visitor experiences a Korea dominates in the size of its military: propagandized “orientation film” prior to 1.19 million to South Korea’s 665,000. Even with a consistent deployment of entering one of the tunnels laboriously carved by the North Koreans in their at- roughly 30,000 U.S. troops in Korea, totempts to launch attacks on South Korea. day there is rarely a focus on removing At one stop, high-powered binoculars our soldiers. With the demonstrated horenable visitors to gaze across the DMZ. rors north of the DMZ, there seems to be Dominating the view are a very tall North consensus about the wisdom of this deKorean flag and a statue of Kim Jong-un. ployment. The troops continue to ensure Also on view is a bullet-ridden railroad that North Korea’s regime is not only engine that once passed between North contained but also, hopefully, in accorand South Korea. Another sobering ex- dance with the U.N., held accountable. While in Seoul, a high-tech, thriving perience is to walk along the Freedom Bridge over which nearly 13,000 prison- metropolis, we marveled at the legacy ers slowly made their way from North of the U.S. and U.N. presence, and found Korea into South Korea, in accordance ourselves repeatedly wondering aloud, “What if all this never was? What if all with the provisions of the cease-fire. At perhaps the most emotionally this had become just like North Korea?” Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness charged stop, the visitor is offered an teaches history at Furman Univeropportunity to write on a ribbon that is sity. She can be reached at courtplaced with thousands of others at a meney.tollison@furman.edu. morial to the casualties of the war. The

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Feel the Wind......

......Saturday, July 18, 2015 Best Hand $2000 • Worst Hand $250 • Door Prize Drawings Registration 8 A.M. • First Bike out 9 A.M. • Last Bike out 10 A.M. Registration fee $25 (includes a FREE t-shirt) Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative, 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

or

Harley-Davidson of Greenville, 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube

Benefitting

Cooperative Care

Rain Date August 8 Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667

• PO Box 700 • Laurens, SC 29360 • LaurensElectric.com

Profile for Community Journals

July 3, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

July 3, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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