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GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | Tori Lant tlant@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES | David Rich ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jonathan Bowden | Nicole Greer | Donna Johnston Stephanie King | Rosie Peck Caroline Spivey | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT | Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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PAGE 3

Photo by Will Crooks

Health Events

THEY SAID IT

“REAL MEN AND REAL LEADERS CAN CRY AND TELL THEIR STORY AND HOW THEY FEEL.” Chase Garrett, a rising Southside High senior and champion at last month’s National Speech and Debate Tournament.

“It got to where it was almost comical.” Krista Bannister, a political consultant who was at the polls in Greenville County on primary day last month when many voters found out they no longer lived in the polling districts they thought they did, and thus couldn’t vote.

TD Saturday Market Saturdays, May-October • 8 a.m.-noon • Downtown Greenville GHS is sponsoring the weekly farmers market and its Spuds & Sprouts program for children. Visit saturdaymarketlive.com. Fall Vegetable Gardening Mon., July 17 • 6-7:30 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Learn how to grow vegetables from Master Gardener Suzy Seagrave. Free; registration required. Call 455-4001. Meet the Midwives Tues., July 25 • 6 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required.

“You’re looking at a substance, if you take one time, you die.” Will Lewis, sheriff of Greenville County, on a potentially lethal drug cocktail called “Gray Death,” which deputies confiscated for the first time locally.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

Investing in Neighborhood Parks Is Critical By Amy Ryberg Doyle

Greenville is experiencing a period of unprecedented economic expansion and record growth. The secret of our exceptional quality of life is out, and we are receiving national attention. As a result, businesses, families, and visitors are coming to Greenville to see it for themselves. With growth can come anxiety as the old Greenville evolves into something new. Greenville is proud to have its award-winning downtown and its mix of housing, office space, churches, schools, retail, restaurants, entertainment, and green and open spaces. We recognize with every new project comes questions about finding the right balance. At City Hall, daily discussions are centered around balance, as well as equity and quality of life for our citizens. As I speak with folks throughout Greenville, I hear concerns about the pace of change. People are worried that things are changing too fast. I sympathize with residents; however, I am excited about the possibility of what we can create if we work together. I believe this growth provides a special opportunity to continue our investment in our neighborhoods, parks, and trails and give them the attention they deserve. In this year’s budget, the city expands from its heavy downtown focus to neighborhoods. Over $500,000 will be invested as a catalyst for growth on critical commercial gateways such as Augusta Street, Laurens Road, and Stone Avenue. In this past year,

the city invested $2.8 million — one of the largest public investments outside of downtown — in Wade Hampton Boulevard’s NorthPointe project. This money will be invested in streetscaping, which will ensure the project is walkable and accessible to the eight surrounding neighborhoods. One success that makes downtown vibrant — its walkability — is also true for neighborhoods. Three upcoming sidewalk projects connect to neighborhood parks: University Park, Croftstone Park, and the Nicholtown Community Center. The NSTEP sidewalk construction program has built over 10 miles of sidewalk since the program began in 2008, and the city invests $1 million in new sidewalk construction every year. In addition, the city’s budget includes another $2.8 million for neighborhood parks. This is a big step forward in investing in green spaces and neighborhoods. Did you know that 58 percent of city residents live within a half mile of a public park or community center, or that the city has 450 acres of green space and 35 neighborhood and pocket parks? To ensure that the trail system expands to reach more neighborhoods, $1.1 million has been set aside to explore the feasibility of a new Laurel Creek trail, which the 2008 Trails and Greenways Master Plan recommended. While the city and community leaders have shown a strong commitment to building a new city park in West Greenville, we will not forget the small pocket parks in your neighborhoods. Amenities such as the mini-golf course and historic bridges at McPherson Park, the tennis courts at Holmes and Gower parks, the basketball courts at Pinckney-Fludd Park, the playground at Skyland Park, the wooded walking trails, baseball field, and restrooms at Timmons Park, and many more are scheduled for upgrades in the next 12 months. Cities across the country are building intelligently designed infrastructure including transportation, roads, trails, parks, green spaces, renewable energy, and water management systems. Once considered sleepy public works infrastructure, they are now dynamic projects that draw people in and have become an exciting part of our 21st-century urban landscape. Parks are central to that infrastructure, playing a critical role in helping our cities thrive, and they are good for our health. Families and businesses want to locate next to parks and trails. This helps create jobs and contributes to urban renewal. We must continue to build private and public relationships to develop green space. Many of our parks were originally land donations by Greenville’s prominent philanthropic families. Many cities have park conservancies to enhance the revitalization of green space in urban environments. The city of Greenville’s Tree Foundation is a good start for such a parks advocacy group. Parks — like cities, businesses, institutions, and all of us — must evolve. Greenville’s focus this year is accommodating the changing needs of neighborhood parks. Let’s continue to invest to ensure the greenest Greenville.

Amy Ryberg Doyle represents District 1 on Greenville City Council.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017

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NEWS

Districts circa 2017

1 Four years ago, City Council district lines changed. Last month, some voters showed up to vote in the wrong district on primary day. With the lines set to be redrawn yet again, this is one problem that probably won’t go away.

2

3

4

WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM Imagine that it’s election day and you’ve shown up to vote at your designated polling place, where you plan to cast your ballot for your longtime City Council person. It’s a City Council race in an odd-numbered year, which means voter turnout will be down, because odd-numbered years rarely, if ever, feature the high-profile races that blanket the TV with campaign ads for weeks, if not months. But you’re a civic-minded, patriotic sort, and so you’re ready and waiting to cast your vote. Then something funny happens: You discover that, unbeknownst to you, you’re no longer in the district you thought you were in and you can’t vote. Even worse, the elected official you’ve been complaining to about issues in your neighborhood hasn’t been your City Council person in years. That’s what happened to one voter we spoke with during last month’s Republican primary between longtime Greenville City Councilman David Sudduth of District 4 and his challenger, Wil Brasington. As it turns out, this voter wasn’t alone. Some members of District 4 reportedly showed up to vote because they saw campaign signs in their neighbors’ yards, even though their neighborhood wasn’t located within the district’s boundaries. Others even found themselves in a different district than their neighbors across the street. Greenville County Republican Party Chairman Nate Leupp said an unoffi-

«

Switched to District 1 (Doyle) from District 2 (Flemming)

Switched to District 1 (Doyle) from District 3 (Littlejohn)

Switched to District 3 (Littlejohn) from District 2 (Flemming)

Switched to District 4 (Sudduth) from District 3 (Littlejohn)


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

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NEWS «

cial tally by poll watchers on primary day EQUAL SAY put the number of people turned away at the Once per decade, district lines are repolls because they didn’t live in District 4 at drawn, block-by-block, based on new Cenabout 120 people. sus numbers. The redistricting is designed “It got to where it was almost comical,” to ensure each district has about the same said Krista Bannister, a local political consul- number of people in them so voters have an tant with the Banellis equal say. Group who was at the “Before the 2022 elecSwitched to District 2 (Flemming) polls that day. tion, things will be turned from District 4 (Sudduth) In the end, Brastopsy-turvy again,” Belanington defeated Sudduth gia said. 1,122 to 772 votes, From 2000 to a margin higher 2010, Greenville’s than the 120 population lost votes. grew from Green56,002 to ville Coun57,356. ty Voter But new RegistraCensus tion and estimates Election released D irector in May Conway showed Belangia Greensaid it’s ville’s not unusupopulation al to have increased to voters show 67,453. The up to vote for city’s populathe wrong race in tion grew nearly 6 any district election, percent from 2015 to especially in precincts 2016, behind only Conthat are split between disroe, Frisco, and McKinney, tricts. Texas, in year-to-year growth among “It’s confusing for voters, no doubt.” cities with 50,000 or more people. Because But with Greenville being one of the of the 2010 Census, hundreds of residents nation’s fastest-growing cities, it’s a were moved to new City Council districts problem that likely won’t disappear any during the last redistricting, which took eftime soon. fect with the 2013 election. Leupp, who lives on the Eastside, said his Further complicating matters, GreenSenate, House, and Council districts have ville had to contend with shifting racial changed since 2006. “If you live near a cur- demographics, changes that would impact rent line, there’s a good chance you’ll be in the city’s minority-majority districts. another district eventually,” he said. From 2000 to 2010, BLURRED LINES continued on PAGE 8

2000 CITY COUNCIL DISTRICTS

TOTAL VOTING AGE POP BLACK VOTING AGE POP % BLACK

District 1

12,457

1,084

8.7

District 2

10,192

5,569

54.64

District 3

10,544

5,523

52.38

District 4

11,633

1,437

12.35

2000 City Council Districts with 2010 Census if districts didn’t change District 1

12,989

1,231

9.48

District 2

9,891

4,733

47.85

District 3

10,629

4,752

44.71

District 4

13,579

2,572

18.94

12,919

851

6.59

Redistricted City Council Districts District 1 District 2

10,559

5,650

53.5

District 3

11,460

5,773

50.37

District 4

12,150

1,014

8.35


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS lian Brock Flemming against Republican challenger Matt Cotner. Voters will also elect either Republican John DeWorken or Democrat Russell Stall to one of the city’s two at-large seats, but district lines don’t come into play because it is a citywide race. Leupp said his party would work with campaigns in November to try to get the word out about changes to district boundaries, and he hopes the Democratic Party will do the same. “We’ll be relying on the candidates getting the word out,” Leupp said. The Republican Party will urge candidates not to give yard signs to people who live outside their districts and to not reach out to voters who don’t live in their districts. Bannister said candidates don’t waste their time courting voters who aren’t in their districts. However, on streets that are divided between districts down their centerlines, candidates may give yard signs to those living on the wrong side to increase their visibility on that street,

BLURRED LINES continued from PAGE 7

Greenville’s white population grew from 36,984 to 40,732, while the number of black residents declined from 19,019 to 17,677. While the districts based on the 2000 Census had cleaner, better-defined boundaries, the ones based on the 2010 numbers forced the city to reroute districts into new neighborhoods in order to maintain two majority-minority districts, keep all of the incumbent council members in the same district, and make all four proportionate to each other. Each of the City Council district’s boundaries was changed in the redistricting. Some districts were more affected than others, though. The biggest changes were around Earle Street and the Haynie-Sirrine neighborhood. Public hearings were held before the City Council adopted the new district boundaries in 2012, but attendance was sparse. Some of the districts hadn’t had competitive races until this year, the first in recent memory where each seat up for grabs is contested. That allowed some of the changes to go unnoticed until now. This confusion could be solved if county voter registration and election offices were required to notify voters when they are shifted from one district to another, but state law doesn’t do it. According to Belangia, the state is only required to tell voters when their polling place is moved.

CAMPAIGNS HEATING UP

Now that the City Council District 4 primary is over, the campaigns for the other contested races will start heating up in advance of the November general election. Two City Council races are up for election in November. The District 2 race pits longtime incumbent Democrat Lil-

she said. “That’s Marketing 101,” Bannister said. But if a voter is not receiving mailers from a candidate they want to support, it is likely because they don’t live in that district, she said. “A candidate knows who their voters are and reaches out to those voters,” Bannister said, “If you’re not receiving mailers from a particular candidate, more than likely you’re not a voter in that district. That’s a red flag.”

There’s a simple way for voters to check which district they’re in for City Council — go to bit.ly/2tVqQQq or the S.C. Election Commission site, scvotes.org.

Switched to District 3 (Littlejohn) from District 4 (Sudduth)

1

2

Districts circa 2011

3

4


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10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

“Gray Death” varies in consistency and looks like a concrete mix. Photo provided by GCSO.

POLICE

‘Gray Death’ comes to Greenville One of the most dangerous drugs on the streets has made its way to the Upstate. During a recent press conference, Greenville County Sheriff Will Lewis said the county’s interstate interdiction team confiscated 1.2 pounds of “Gray Death” earlier this month. “Gray Death” is a nickname for a highpotency drug cocktail comprised of heroin, fentanyl, carfentanil, and a synthetic opioid called U-47700. According to Lewis, it varies in consistency and looks like a concrete mix. Lewis said the appearance of “Gray Death” is alarming, because a single dose can kill users. “You’re looking at a substance, if you take one time, you die,” Lewis said. “People aren’t even familiar with this yet. The word isn’t even out.” “Gray Death” is thought to be a descendent of a gray pebble-like mixture of heroin that officials previously seized in San Diego, Chicago, and rural towns in Kentucky and Indiana. The drug was most recently found in Alabama, Georgia, and Ohio. Greenville County deputies located the mixture of deadly drugs after a K9 alerted on a bus that was pulled over for a moving violation. Lewis said deputies are using a laser scanner to test the drug because accidental exposure through skin contact can be deadly. Earlier this year, Greenville County deputies also stopped field-testing powders and switched from latex gloves to nitrile gloves, because various drugs like fentanyl can be absorbed through latex, according to Sgt. C.J. Todd. Todd added that deputies also wear paper masks during drug searches. According to Lewis, the county is also working with local veterinarians to determine how to protect K-9 units from accidental exposure to “Gray Death.” Earlier this year, Greenville County deputies started carrying Narcan to counter the often-deadly effects of heroin, fentanyl, and prescription painkillers. They are one of seven South Carolina law enforcement agencies trained to administer the antidote to opioid overdose victims.

They are also one of the only law enforcement agencies to use Narcan on their drug-sniffing dogs. Unfortunately, Narcan may not be effective against “Gray Death.” For that reason, Greenville County deputies are avoiding overdoses through preparation, according to Sgt. Doug Wannemacher, who trains police dogs for the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office. Before a K-9 unit can conduct a drug search, narcotics officers have to search the area for any powdery substances or drug paraphernalia that might be lying around. If the materials are in the area, deputies can’t deploy dogs, said Wannemacher. In addition to “Gray Death,” Greenville County deputies seized more than 17 pounds of heroin, 220 grams of methamphetamine, and 3 ounces of marijuana during three other traffic stops earlier this month on Interstate 85 and 185. —Andrew Moore

EDUCATION

Southside student is national champ in dramatic interpretation There’s no debating it — rising Southside High senior Chase Garrett is a national champion. Garrett won the dramatic interpretation competition at the National Speech and Debate Tournament held in Birmingham, Ala., last month. In the dramatic interpretation category, actors perform the life of a character in history they have never met before, showing how universal that person’s story is and how it has had an impact on people. Garrett, who also plays on Southside’s baseball and football teams, said dramatic interpretation is a main outlet for him. “In humorous interpretation, all you have to do is make people laugh. In original oratory, all you have to do is write a speech. In dramatic interpretation, you tell a story,” he said. “In speech and debate and dramatic interpretation, you can set aside being cool. It’s OK for guys to be emotional and express how they feel,” he said. “Real men and real leaders can cry and tell their story and how they feel.” Garrett performed “Animal,” a piece written by former speech and debate coach Kristy Thomas about a slave named Fredrick that uses a dog as a metaphor. Fredrick has a master that feeds him, gives him a place to lay his head, and teaches him how to be a good, loyal dog. But then he meets a sweet, beautiful cat named Evelyn who tells him he is not a dog, but a man. Fredrick begins to remember who he is, the effects of slavery and years of abuse coming back into his memory, and decides he must stand up for once in his life to his oppressors. “There are a lot of metaphors behind the piece,” Garrett said. At one point in the performance, he takes off the collar he was wearing. “No man should be treated as another man’s animal,” he said. “It’s about standing up for yourself. It’s a gift that a lot of people may not have.” Garrett called winning the national

«


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS career as an actor. Two hundred fifty-eight students competed in dramatic interpretation at the national tournament. The final six performed in front of a live audience. Their performances were livestreamed to more than 50,000 people. “I knew my ability. I just told myself to give it my all,” he said. “I was excited to hear the results.” —Cindy Landrum

COUNTY

Upstate’s search and rescue K9s earn national certification

Southside High’s Chase Garrett won the National Speech and Debate Tournament competition in dramatic interpretation. Photo by Will Crooks.

«

championship life-changing. “It has expanded my opportunities,” he said. Garrett said he has speech and debate scholarship offers from several schools, including Illinois State, George Mason University, Western Kentucky University, Wiley College in Texas, and William Carey University in Mississippi. Garrett said he wants to continue with speech and debate in college and pursue a

Four K9 teams with the South Carolina Search & Rescue Dog Association (SCSARDA) have attained national certifications. According to a press release, Mitch Henderson with K9 Remington, Sarah Hey with K9 Brand, Nancy Jocoy with K9 Beau, and Maria Pellegrino with K9 Duke all received certifications from the North American Police Work Dog Association (NAPWDA). The teams were certified in trailing, search and rescue, and cadaver detection. Trailing certification requires the teams to search for hidden subjects and objects on a 1.5-mile trail that includes various terrain such as vegetation, pavement, and water. Searchand-rescue certification requires a dog to clear an area while off-leash, finding and alerting the handler of a hidden subject. NEWS continued on PAGE 12

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dedicated human beings and some uniquely skilled K9s,” she added. The SCSARDA is an all-volunteer professional search and rescue team that helps emergency services agencies across the Upstate and Western North Carolina find lost children and hikers, people with Alzheimer’s disease, drowning victims, and others. All four teams have training in lost person behavior, managing the land search operation, and other advanced search and rescue courses. For more information, visit scsarda.org. — Andrew Moore

FOOD

The cadaver detection test requires dogs to search for human remains in 12 environmental scenarios such as rubble, water, open wilderness, vehicles, buildings, and buried. “SCSARDA is very fortunate to be able to field NAPWDA-certified teams in three disciplines — trailing, area search, and land and water cadaver detection — to assist emergency services agencies in finding missing persons,” said Pellegrino, president of the SCSARDA and a registered nurse anesthetist at Greenville Health System. “It is a real privilege to serve agencies in South and North Carolina and also to lead this team, which is full of very talented and

American Grocery, Breakwater close in the West End Two well-known restaurants in Greenville’s West End unexpectedly closed last week. The first was American Grocery Restaurant, located at 732 S. Main St., which for 10 years was a major player in Greenville’s farm-totable movement. Its last service was July 5, according to a statement released July 6 by their publicist, Becky Tanenbaum of Mise En Place Public Relations. The statement reads, “When Joe [Clarke] and Darlene [Mann-Clarke] opened AGR 10 years ago, they wanted to bring a new look of food and beverage to Greenville, and they are very proud of what they accomplished. Due to rising rents in the city, rising food prices,

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NEWS «

and the staffing challenges that restaurants are feeling nationwide, they felt like this was the right time to close and put their energy towards the next step in their careers.” The owners will focus on the growth of their most recent venture, the speakeasy Vault & Vator, as well as some developments with Renegade Vittles, AGR’s underground supper club. The second restaurant, Breakwater Restaurant & Bar at 802 S. Main St., announced July 6 it would close for good after service on July 8. The restaurant, which was the second South Carolina location for owners Gary and Donna Long, had previously closed on July 23, 2016, after four years in Greenville, and then announced it was reopening in December 2016 after not being able to find a tenant to take over the lease. Breakwater reopened with an updated menu and concept that included more small plates and more emphasis on the beverage program and lounge atmosphere. The original Breakwater is located in Beaufort. The new occupant will be a second location for OTTO Izakaya, the Japanese gastropub at 15 Market Point Drive owned by Peter Lieu. —Ariel Turner

CITY

City Council gives initial approval to Reedy River land purchase Greenville City Council on Monday night gave initial approval to a contract for the city to purchase property on the banks of the Reedy River at the edge of Falls Park where a developer had proposed to build an office building. The city will buy 0.93 acres along the river for $4 million and help pay for infrastructure improvements made by Centennial American Properties in connection with the Camperdown redevelopment of the block of South Main Street where the Greenville News has made its home since 1969. Centennial had proposed building a fourstory brick and glass office building mere steps from the historic Main Street bridge. The plan received a certificate of appropriateness from the city’s Design Review Board and drew immediate opposition. The city will take the money out of its economic development fund. Private groups have pledged $1.15 million. The Carolina Foothills Garden Club said it would contribute $900,000, while the Friends of the Red Cross pledged $250,000. The $200 million Camperdown project includes office space, a hotel, multifamily units, retail, and restaurants.

A letter of intent approved by Council in January also calls for Centennial to construct public improvements on the 55 Camperdown site to improve connectivity between South Main Street and the river, streetscape improvements, and a public plaza. Through a synthetic tax increment financing district, the city would reimburse Centennial for the cost of those public improvements over 25 years with payments based on the increased property taxes generated by the project. —Cindy Landrum

Orangutan briefly escapes enclosure at Greenville Zoo

Kumar, an 11-year-old male orangutan, was transferred to the Greenville Zoo in November. Photo provided.

Greenville Zoo officials say an orangutan was able to briefly escape its enclosure on Sunday morning. Kumar, an 11-year-old male orangutan who came to Greenville in November from the Oregon Zoo, was able to break one of the wires that held the enclosure’s netting together and climbed out through the hole around 11:30 a.m., according to Greenville Zoo Administrator Jeff Bullock. The orangutan sat on top of the roof holding area for about 10 minutes before returning to its enclosure through the hole. Lana, the zoo’s 31-year-old female orangutan, did not try to escape, according to Bullock. Staff members used water hoses and fire

extinguishers to get the orangutans to retreat into the den area so that crew members could make a temporary repair to the enclosure’s netting, according to Bullock. Bullock said the orangutan never wandered away into the park area after escaping and that the zoo was placed on lockdown for about 30 minutes. The zoo’s visitors were moved inside the gift shop and various other safe areas during the escape. No animals, crew members, or visitors were harmed during the brief escape. The zoo’s orangutan exhibit will remain closed until contractors check for other weak spots in the enclosure and make permanent repairs, according to Bullock. —Andrew Moore

PLAY TOGETHER GROW TOGETHER

Kids love to play soccer at the Y! Every season, they build on skills such as teamwork and leadership, learn respect from positive role models, all while getting exercise and having fun. Teams are forming now for ages 3-14. Register through July 31. Practices begin August 21.

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY FOR YOUTH SOCCER!

www.ymcagreenville.org/soccer

864.412.0288


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

(left to right) Lisa Davis, David Kulikowski, and Karis Peake, co-founders of The Main Collective.

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW The Main Collective marketplace fuses vintage, antique, and handcrafted goods WORDS BY EMILY PIETRAS PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

F

or Lisa Davis, David Kulikowski, and Karis Peake, the Greenville area has long lacked a niche for purveyors of vintage and antique items, producers of handcrafted and repurposed goods, and artisans to meet in one space. “There’s antique stores. There’s consignment shops… but there wasn’t really a place where you could mix all of these things together at a consistent location,” Davis says. “You’ll have markets here and there, but there’s none that’s at one place, constantly, all the time for vendors to be able to show up of all different types of crafts.” Enter The Main Collective, a new marketplace located at 1 E. Main St. in Taylors. Founded by Davis, Kulikowski, and Peake, the collective includes an indoor-outdoor market held every other Saturday and a

brick-and-mortar store with select vendors that is open by appointment. Currently, The Main Collective has 23 outdoor market vendors and five permanent vendors in the brick-and-mortar space. The indoor vendors sell antique and vintage items, refurbished furniture, and small collectibles, while outdoor vendors carry goods ranging from handmade candles and soaps to handcrafted jewelry and homemade food. “We wanted a good mix where someone could walk in and find something,” Peake says of the vendors housed in the brickand-mortar space. “Not all midcentury, not all farmhouse, not all salvage. We wanted a really good balance, and we were very fortunate to have the right people apply and get in.” Davis, Kulikowski, and Peake hadn’t originally planned on opening the collective

as a trio. In fact, they had never met until just a few months ago. A mutual friend and a few others first brought them in for the project, but they all ended up backing out, leaving Davis, Kulikowski, and Peake on their own. Despite that, the three decided to move forward together and signed a lease for their building on May 1. It was a fairly quick turnaround; the first Saturday market was held June 17. “We didn’t know each other well, but we got along, so it worked out,” Peake says. Founding The Main Collective gives Davis, Kulikowski, and Peake the opportunity to not only provide a unique platform for local artisans and makers but also expand their own personal ventures. In addition to their full-time jobs, the three co-founders each have creative side projects. Davis has previously collected antiques and wants to revisit her hobbies of woodworking and

repurposing. Kulikowski is a carpenter and constructs furniture and cabinets. Peake sells vintage items on eBay and Etsy. The building that houses The Main Collective is the perfect location, the trio says. “It’s so close to Greer, so close to Greenville. It’s really easily accessible without tons and tons of traffic,” Peake says. “It worked out to be what we probably would have chosen had we hand-selected after careful planning.” The three decided to open the brick-andmortar store by appointment only for two key reasons: They didn’t want to hire someone to constantly be at the store, and limited hours keep overhead costs down, which is ideal for both vendor and customer. “We’re trying to make it to where we’re not charging fees on what people sell, so they’re not having to put a huge markup on their items,” Davis says.


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY “There’s antique stores. There’s consignment shops … but there wasn’t really a place where you could mix all of these things together at a consistent location.”

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1.26% APY* for 13 Months “We want them to run their business from our business, instead of us run the business and have to charge them,” Peake adds. To make an appointment, an interested buyer contacts the vendor based on what they have listed on their individual Facebook, Instagram, or Etsy page. Then the vendor gets in touch with Davis, Kulikowski, or Peake to open the store. Future plans for The Main Collective aren’t yet solidified, but the three co-founders are already “getting a lot of feedback from vendors and customers,” Peake says. Suggestions for future opportunities have included opening the brick-and-mortar store during the same hours as the First Fridays art gallery crawl and the Thursday evening Taylors Farmers Market. But for now, the major focus is to make the community aware of The Main Collective’s presence and introduce people to the Saturday markets. Ultimately, the trio hopes that The Main Collective contributes to the revitalization of Taylors and complements other neighboring community entities like Taylors TownSquare and Taylors Mill, Davis says. Greenville, she adds, is “growing very fast, but beautifully, and keeping a lot of the integrity. That’s what we hope for this area — that it expands this way as well, and that we piggyback together.”

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The Main Collective, located in Taylors, includes a biweekly indoor-outdoor market and a building that houses five permanent vendors.


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

FURMAN UNIVERSITY

Five incoming freshman receive simultaneous admission to USC School of Medicine Greenville Five South Carolina high school graduates who will enroll at Furman University in August have been selected as the first participants in a new program that guarantees admission into medical school. The Furman University-University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Greenville Direct Entry Program, announced recently by both institutions, helps accepted Furman University students chart a pathway to medical school and allows the USC School of Medicine Greenville to identify talented South Carolina students who are interested in studying and practicing medicine. The students, all of whom are aspiring physicians and members of Furman’s class of 2021, are Samuel Cumby (St. Joseph’s Catholic School in Greenville), Javonia Davis (Charleston Collegiate High School in Johns Island), Sarah Feingold (Academic Magnet High School in Charleston), Bhumika Jakkaraddi (Southside High School in Greenville), and Riley Taylor (Greenwood Christian School in Greenwood). Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

ADVOCACY

Buncombe Street United Methodist Church partners with Bread for the World Buncombe Street United Methodist Church (BSUMC) partnered with the national 501(c)4 organization Bread for the World for Lobby Day on June 13. Bread for the World is a national organization that “equips people to write personal letters, emails, meet with their members of Congress, and to work with others to end hunger.” BSUMC and their satellite, Triune Mercy Center, participated in this mission by penning more than 8,000 letters, which were delivered to Congress on Lobby Day. Over 400 Bread for the World activists accompanied these letters in Washington, D.C., where they visited with their members of Congress, asking them to make budget decisions that would positively impact the poor and hungry in the U.S.

STEM EDUCATION

Fluor Field to host Advanced Manufacturing & Engineering Night The Greenville Drive and partners BMW, Hubbell Lighting, and Greenville Technical College will host the second annual celebration of Advanced Manufacturing & Engineering Night at Fluor Field on Monday, July 31. The goal of the event is to bring awareness to students and parents across the Upstate about the unique work experience and exciting career opportunities that are available in the rapidly changing world of advanced manufacturing and engineering. Manufacturing and engineering exhibits, special activities in the ballpark, and the evening’s programming and entertainment are designed to open the eyes of the young people in attendance who represent the workforce of the future. To help encourage students to enjoy this important learning experience, the Drive is providing tickets to all K-12 students at no cost.

FUNDRAISER

The Cancer Society of Greenville County recently held their 18th annual Ladies Golf Event at Furman University, raising almost $58,000.

Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.


E!! DABL I V I D UB ES! S R C A 3

CRS! CRES SIX A NTICLEER A ON CH

UNDER

IN 2 TRACT

CON

S

WEEK

! E HOUS ENNIS CRT T S E GU LAY T ,C POOL

AGENT ON CALL:

Ken Norsworthy REALTOR

864-297-3450

112 Putney Bridge Road Cobblestone • $1,750,681

2513 Augusta Street GCC • $2,999,605

100 Chapman Place $7,500,605

! LLINS PRICE NEW SARA CO TO WALK

POOL

114 Woodland Way Cleveland Forest • $974,601

12 Lawson Way Chanticleer Section 9 • $1,149,605

! DERN O M RY ENTU C D I M

1215 Brown Road Belton • $599,627

! POOL

14 Parkins Glen Court Parkins Mill Area • $819,607

17 Chanticleer Drive Chanticleer • $680,605

E PRIC W E N

CRES 75 A

1225 Parkins Mill Road Parkins Mill • $624,607

111 Rockingham Road Parkins Mill Area • $1,700,607

219 Boxwood Lane Cleveland Forest • $589,601

240 Byrd Blvd. GCC Area • $579,605 Katherine Hall 678-0820

35 Thistle Brook Court Thistle Down • $499,615

100 Sand Castle Drive Simpsonville • $345,681 Matt Crider 444-1689

117 Grove Road • Augusta Road $324,605 • Erin Johnston 504-2692

AREA PRICE NEW TA CIRCLE S AUGU

16 Old Augusta Road Augusta Road Area • $459,605

ER C

UND

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AC ONTR

18 Old Augusta Road Augusta Road Area • $459,605

217 Aberdeen Drive Augusta Circle • $454,605

HOURS 4 2 N I CT ONTRA C R E D UN

E PRIC W E N

SOLD 53 Forest Lane Meyers Park • $1,399,605 172 Ridgeland Drive, Unit 100 Ridgeland at the Park • $698,601 118 S Calhoun St. Downtown • $365,601

100 Doyle Drive Terra Pines • $280,615

502 Summitbluff Drive Poplar Forest • $264,617

AugustaRoad.com

7 Amberjack Court Foxglove at Pebble Creek • $224,687

1 Thornless Court Baldwin Forest • $179,680 Jackson Herlong 313-2520

110 Fudora Circle The Ravines at Creekside • $239,681 701 Spring Meadow Way Foxwood • $193,680

LOTS FOR SALE

UNDER CONTRACT

Realty LLC

EASLEY • 329 Price Perry Rd. • $2,600,640 • Lila Gray 615-415-5307

42 Mount Vista Ave Greenville Country Club • $849,605

Joan Herlong*Owner, BIC

HENIGAN LANE • Lot 4 • North Main • $180,609

864-325-2112

joan@augustaroad.com *Greenville’s NUMBER ONE REALTOR, for YEARS! Source: MLS sales volume: 2012-15. AND #4 REALTOR in the ENTIRE state of South Carolina! Source: REAL Trends 7/16.

HENIGAN LANE • Lot 2 • North Main • $295,609 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 27 • $239,605 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 26 • $209,605 ACADIA • 229 Saluda Run Dr. • $99,673

154 Riverplace, Unit 202 Riverhouse Condos • $650,601 1031 Summit Dr Croftstone • $279,609

1 Thornless Court Baldwin Forest • $179,680


feast

C PRICE CHECK

Comparison shopping in the discount grocery aisles Words by Ariel Turner | Photos by Will Crooks Interns Jonas Mullins and Peter Knezevich contributed to this report.

omparing prices between grocery stores, while often a frugal move, can feel like it takes more time than it’s actually worth. Driving across town, keeping notes, and checking sales flyers, especially in the summer heat, to save a few bucks isn’t how most of us would prefer to spend our time. But unless every store has prices listed online (which they don’t), there’s no other way to do it. Lucky for you, we did some of the heavy lifting. We visited the five main discount grocery stores in the Greenville area: Save-a-Lot/Rite Aid, Aldi, Trader Joe’s, Walmart Neighborhood Market, and Lidl, the newest German grocery store to come stateside. (In case you missed it, the Greenville Lidl opening last month was quite the jam-packed event.) For our comparison, we chose nine fairly typical grocery items at each stop: eggs, milk, whole-grain bread, bacon, shredded cheddar cheese, prepackaged salmon, avocado, strawberries, and paper towels. In addition, we highlighted

one thing that makes each store unique. By no means is this a 100 percent comprehensive survey, but it does provide a small cross-section that could offer some helpful information. For example, did you know Save-a-Lot sells a 12-ounce wild-caught keta salmon filet for $4.29? (Keta is a milder, lightercolored salmon than the more popular sockeye.) Or that Trader Joe’s ties for the least expensive paper towels with a recycled eight-pack for $3.99? There are also small differences among the costs of milk, bread, and eggs at each location, but none consistently rated the least expensive in every item. Gluten-free offerings are fairly mainstream, except at Save-a-Lot, as are organic items, which means you don’t necessarily have to shop at Whole Foods for specialty dietary preferences. Ultimately, we found that all five grocery stores are competitive on the basics. But based on customers’ needs and priorities, one may be the standout. We’ll let you be the judge. (Addresses are the locations visited for this survey.)

SKELETON OPTICS SUNGLASSES ARE RELIABLE, DURABLE AND PROVIDE EXTRAORDINARY VISION QUALITY.

1908 Laurens Rd. M-F: 9–6; Sat: 9–5 864.288.5905 | fowlerspharmacy.com 18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast SAVE-A-LOT/RITE AID 1 E. Stone Ave.

ALDI

1725 Woodruff Road

TRADER JOE’S

59 Woodruff Industrial Lane

WALMART NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET

LIDL

Unique feature: Wide variety of standard name-brand options.

Unique feature: Wide range of fresh bakery items.

2037 Wade Hampton Blvd.

2014 Wade Hampton Blvd.

Unique feature: Drug store and grocery items without the long lines of most grocery stores.

Unique feature: Sells one of the world’s top-rated rosés for $8.

Unique feature: Tasting section with recipe ideas and coffee samples.

$1.29

$1.39

$1.99

$0.98

$1.29 Conventional $1.35 organic

$0.99

$0.69

$0.99 Conventional $3.89 organic

$0.68 Conventional $4.34 cage-free

$0.79 Conventional $3.49 organic

$2.99

$1.59 Conventional

$2.99 Conventional $5.99 organic

$2.09 Conventional $4.46 organic

$2.09 Conventional

$3.99 Eight-count

$4.99 Eight-count

$3.99 Eight-count

$7.28 Eight-count

$5.29 Six-count large rolls

$4.29 16 oz.

$3.29

$5.49 12 oz.

$4.24 store brand

$2.79

$1.99 16 oz.

$1.19 16 oz.

$3.29 16 oz.

$1.98 16 oz.

$1.99 16 oz.

$4.29 12 oz. keta $3.99 20 oz. filet

$7.99 per pound

$11.99 per pound wild sockeye salmon filets

$8.74 per pound

$7.39 31.9 oz. frozen wild caught

$2.99

$2.79

$3.49

$2.22 store brand

$2.25

$1.59 store brand

$1.49

$2.99

$2.98 Sara Lee

$1.49

$24.41

$25.41

$37.21

$31.19

$25.37

avocado

eggs

milk

paper towel

bacon

strawberries

salmon

cheddar cheese

whole-grain bread total

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

07.14.2017 || GREENVILLE GREENVILLE JOURNAL JOURNAL || 19 19 07.14.2017


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SAIL JUNE 29, 2017

FORRESTER WOODS AT POINSETTIA

FOR MORE MEET RESULTS, OVERALL RESULTS, AND RANKINGS,

GO TO GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM/SAIL.

Photos by Christy Deliberto

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07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME

Featured Home

Spaulding Farm

6 Kelso Court, Greenville, SC 29615

Home Info Price: $689,900 MLS: 1347776 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4.5 Sq. Ft: 4,400-4,599 Lot Size: 0.62 Acres Schools: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and JL Mann High Agent: Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 mmorrell@cdanjoyner.com

Stunning All-Brick Beauty featuring a 3-car garage on a .62 acre cul-de-sac lot. This home boasts a newly installed outdoor grill, brick pavers, fire pit, gorgeous new staircase with wrought iron railings PLUS new hardwoods in the breakfast area and master bedroom! The large foyer makes the most inviting entrance with a large home office/study on the right and elegant dining room on the left with a butler’s pantry. The Great Room showcases large windows, gas log fireplace and built-ins. The master suite, on the main level, features hardwoods, a well appointed

bathroom with soaking tub, shower and large vanity and also has access to the rear patio areas and fully fenced manicured grounds. And don’t miss the HUGE walk-in closet with its own built-in dresser! The kitchen affords a center island, serving bar, granite countertops, tiled backsplash and large vaulted breakfast area. Upstairs you’ll love that each of the three bedrooms has its own PRIVATE bathroom! Plus there’s not one but two bonus rooms, one suited as game / recreation space and the other could be an area for a teen suite or homework.

Real Estate News

Coldwell Banker Caine Names May Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from May through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s Team efforts listed below. Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/ closed units include: Alicia Waynick Andrew Little Annette Starnes Beth Beach

Brett Smagala and Pat Loftis Brian Hurry Chad Searcy

Debbie Moseley Donna Morrow Eva Sandfort Faith Ross

Francie Little Lori Thompson Heather Durbin Heidi Putnam Hilary Hurst Holly West Jacob Mann Jake Dickens Jane McCutcheon

Jennifer Simms Judy McCravy Kaye McIntyre Kiersten Bell Landon Thompson Lori Bayne Marshall Jordan Mike Dassel Pam Hall

Rhonda Porter Ryan Rosenfeld Sharon Tootell Shay Felknor Shelbie Dunn Suzanne Cook Tracey Cappio Virginia Hayes Wanda Stewart

Circle of Excellence Groups (2-3 agents) achieving $1.5 million in listing/closing volume or six units listed/closed include: Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group Lewis & Company


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market Alta Vista • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Chatsworth • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

112 Longview Terrace · $1,099,000 · MLS# 1343520

131 Haddon Lane · $699,000 · MLS# 1345118

5BR/4f2hBA New Price! Gorgeous home with 10’ ceilings, master on main, open floorplan, wine cellar and freshly painted interior. McDaniel Ave to left on E. Lanneau. Left on Longview.

4BR/3.5BA Priced below appraised value! Stately home on 2.5 acres. Freshly painted interior, salt water pool and koi pond. Must see! Pelham to Batesville Road. Left into Chatsworth. Left on Haddon.

Contact: Sharon Wilson 918-1140 Wilson Associates

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

217 Meyers Drive · $475,000 · MLS# 1345065

445 Longview Terrace · $435,000 · MLS# 1347179

4BR/2.5BA Huge Price Drop! Endless possibilities. Master on main. Lot is large enough to subdivide and build 2 houses. Must see! Augusta Rd to Rockwood Dr. Right on Meyers.

3BR/2BA Fabulous all brick home with many new upgrades. Updated kitchen and fabulous master suite. Great backyard & two-car carport. From W Faris Road, turn onto Longview Terrace.

Contact: Sharon Wilson 918-1140 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Coldwell Banker Caine is proud to support the national Homes for Dogs Project, a partnership that has helped more than 20,000 dogs find homes nationwide. This September, we are partnering with local shelters to host an adoption day to find more homes for dogs in our area. Caine Cares is a company wide service platform that shares our culture of giving back in an impactful way. #cainecares


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME Featured Home

Ledgestone

101 Ledgestone Way, Greer, SC 29651

Home Info Price: $679,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4/1 Lot Size: 0.63 Acres

MLS#: 1342814 Sq. Ft: 3,885 Built: 1987

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Riverside Middle, and Mauldin High Agent: Ty Savage | 864.444.7399 ty@tysavagehomes.com

LIKE NEW, “RUSTIC” INSPIRED EXECUTIVE HOME This 4BR/4.5BA custom built home boasts AMAZING CURB APPEAL and the finest finishes. from the moment you enter the stacked stone archway into the 2 story foyer, you understand the quality of the design and its functionality. the foyer then opens up to the family and entertaining area of the home with its large great room, gourmet kitchen, and dining area. Great room includes a stacked stone fireplace, cedar beams and loads of natural light. the “chefs dream” of a kitchen features an eat up

bar, custom cabinetry, granite countertops, restaurant quality brick framed gas range, brick backsplash & stainless appliances. Open the sliding doors and let the outside in on your way to the covered porch. The “master on the main” is truly fit for a king and his queen with its “cedar barrel ceiling” and gorgeous master bath with its modern stand alone tub, large shower, granite vanities, and custom cabinetry. Sitting on over 0.64 acre in the highly sought after “Ledgestone Community” in Five Forks, this home is priced to SELL and wont last long!

HOME : On the market Carshalton By The Bay • Open Sun. 1-4 p.m.

Alta Vista

Davenport Condos

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 124 Carshalton Drive · $352,000 · MLS# 1346039

805 Crescent Avenue · $975,000 · MLS# 1347748

400 E Washington St #28 · $550,000 · MLS# 1347457

3BR/2BA Gorgeous LAKEFRONT one-level home with upgrades galore! Enjoy a private and serene setting on Lake Lyman. Highway 357. Turn Left onto Jordan Road. Subdivision on right.

6BR/5.5BA Kit has Viking appliances/Thermador downdraft/dual ovens/granite c’tops/tile backsplash. Dual MBR-optional in-law suite/guest quarters-1st floor/Main master on 2nd. Private backyard for entertaining. Finished basement with wine cellar.

Charming 3BR 2BA+office. Unique exposed brickwork/archways. Open kit with granite c’tops/warming drawer/custom cabinetry with plenty of storage/new dishwasher. Bamboo flrs. Master-walkin closet/lg shower w/jets/stand alone soaker tub/dual sinks.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Shannon Cone 908-6426 The Marchant Company

cspivey@communityjournals.com


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Put Your Apron On

with Emily Yepes

Fish sauce is an unexpected culinary catch That Honeymoon Salad, Sort Of serves 4

From the beauty of Falls Park

• 2 tbsp. coconut or vegetable oil

• 4 tsp. low-sodium soy sauce

• 1 cup minced shallots

• 1 cup basil leaves (Thai basil or purple basil is preferred, if available)

• 1 cup sliced red bell pepper • 2 tbsp. minced fresh garlic • 1.5 pound ground chicken, turkey, or pork • 1 small serrano or jalapeño chile

2 ld •

5 So

ved

er Res

• 2 tbsp. fish sauce • 4 tsp. brown sugar

• 3-4 limes • 2 avocados • 2/3 cup short-grain brown rice (dry) • 1 clamshell mixed salad greens (around 6 cups of greens) • Optional: chives

6 Augusta Walk Avenue Greenville

Open Saturday • 10:00 - 12:00 PM Open Sunday • 2:00 - 4:00 PM Will Crooks / Staff

3 Beds • 3.5 Baths • $899,000 Instructions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add rice and set timer for 30 minutes. Drain rice when done and set aside. (Note: This method only works for brown rice, not white!) Saute shallots in 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat for about two minutes. Add bell pepper; saute two minutes more. Add garlic and chile; saute 30 seconds. Remove shallot mixture from pan and set aside. Add remaining tablespoon of oil to pan and cook ground meat until browned, crumbling with a spatula as it cooks. Drain well. In a small bowl, whisk together fish sauce, sugar, soy sauce, and juice of one lime.

Jacob Mann, Virginia Hayes & Misty Hardaway (864) 406-WALK

Return meat to pan over low-medium heat and add shallot mixture and cooked rice, stirring to combine. Stir in fish sauce mixture; cook one minute and continue to stir and incorporate sauce into the meat/veggie/rice mixture. Remove pan from heat. Stir in basil. Taste for salt – it may not need any after the soy

«


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

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FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

Move-In Ready Homes Available NOW! You’ll love the low maintenance, high-style townhomes at The Reserve at Asheton Lakes. This gated community is located just off Hwy 14 in Simpsonville, and has a variety of homes available for immediate occupancy. There are three unique two-story floorplans, ranging from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an owner’s suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2.5 baths. Cothran homes are designed to maximize usable space, and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, a fourth bedroom or a third full bath. Incentives are available on move-in ready homes for a limited time only. Available Homes:

The Sutton 2,449 sq. ft. 3 BR / 2.5 BA Starting at $257,700

GREER The Townes at Thornblade 864-214-3024 Single family townhomes from the $270’s

The Howden 2,742 sq. ft. 3 BR / 2.5 BA Starting at $273,700

SIMPSONVILLE The Reserve at Asheton Lakes 864-884-1244 Single family townhomes from the $250’s

The Ardleigh 2,672 sq. ft. 4 BR / 3.5 BA Starting at $283,900

The Townes at Brookwood 864-214-3022 Single family townhomes from the $160’s

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO The Reserve at Asheton Lakes 804 Asheton Commons Lane Simpsonville, SC 29681 Amenities: Private gated access, landscaped yards, irrigated grounds, street lights, community pool & cabana Schools: Oak View Elementary, Beck Middle, & J.L. Mann High Contact Info: Cothran Homes CothranHomes.com | 864-844-1244

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sauce and fish sauce. Add salt if necessary.

In a large bowl, toss salad greens with the juice of half a lime and a pinch of salt. Plate by layering greens, then meat mixture, then chopped avocado. Serve with lime wedges and add more lime juice to taste. This was one of those rare but profound culinary introductions. The kind that opens the mind as well as the palate. When you realize that you’ve been missing out your entire life, but — the good news — you can eat this for the rest of your days, now that you’re enlightened. (Probably how

we’d all feel if we were old enough to remember our first taste of mac ’n’ cheese.) This is the day I first started to appreciate the magical umami wonders of fish sauce. I remember where I was and when it happened. We were honeymooning in Hawaii and I found a casual little Thai restaurant with raving internet reviews. The reviewers said we should let the chef/owner order for us, so we did. We took a few appetizers and a couple of entrees as takeout and enjoyed the meal while sitting on a rocky beach watching waves and surfers. The star of the meal was one of the appetizers, and honestly I can’t remember if it was larb or

nam sod (similar dishes), but it doesn’t matter. There was minced meat, lettuce, fish sauce, and lime juice. This was the first time that I experienced this particular combo of winning flavors typical in Southeast Asian cuisine. All the elements play their part — the brightness from the lime, the crisp lettuce, and the umami meat and fish sauce — but the fish sauce is the real hotshot. It’s both distinct and subtle (and no, it does not taste like straight-up fish.) If you’re a fan of the peach salad currently on the menu at The Anchorage, the larb appetizer at the new Basil Thai Cuisine, or the papaya salad at Mekong Vietnamese Restaurant, then you know exactly what I mean by that.

The recipe here is for a salad reminiscent of that honeymoon appetizer, but made more substantial for an entrée-sized salad. Although Thai basil is ideal, your salad will still taste great with any variety of basil from your summer garden. Emily Yepes is an account manager at Community Journals and a fitness instructor. She is “just” a home cook whose favorite hobby is to test and perfect recipes for her annual family cookbook.


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of June 12 – 16, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,296,150 STAFFORD GREEN $1,425,000 HALTON VILLAGE $1,175,000 BOTANY WOODS $890,000 $890,000 $876,566 CLIFFS VALLEY-LAKE RIDGE CROSSIN $797,756 GLEN ABBEY $740,000 $650,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $630,000 MAXWELL FARM $619,000 VISTA HILLS $615,000 CHESTNUT POND $609,000 $561,000 MONTEBELLO $550,000 SPAULDING FARMS $542,000 ONEAL FARMS $540,000 $537,000 CHANTICLEER $535,000 CHELSEA WOODS $533,500 HUNTINGTON $525,000 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $525,000 $500,000 $500,000 PARKWAY PLACE $492,401 TAPIO ACRES $487,000 ALLEGHENY $485,000 RIVER WALK $468,000 STONEHAVEN $465,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $460,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $434,865 STONEHAVEN $427,500 STONEHAVEN $425,000 HARTS COVE $404,414 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $400,000 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $400,000 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $397,129 MCDANIEL GREENE SOUTH $390,000 BRADLEY OAKS $389,900

ONE LAURENS LLC WINDSOR/AUGHTRY COMPANY INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA MALLORY MAUREEN GREENVILLE CO MEDICAL SO SMITH CLEMMON N TRUSTEE GENTLEMAN JOHN F MILLER KELLY G BIRD DAWG DEVELOPMENT LL MIGLIETTI PORTIA KING CYNTHIA F (JTWROS) ALLEN/SCHRUM LIVING TRUS FIRST CHOICE CUSTOM HOME YODER KENT A BLOOMQUIST SARA L WINGATE FRANK W PIEDMONT INVESTMENTS LLC PHELPS CAREY K (JTWROS) WHITE HARRIET H DEESE ANDREW D (SURV) COLLINS BARBARA H FOELSKE JENNIFER L CENTRAL REALTY HOLDINGS RIDDLE ANNIE LAURIE G RE DSR BUILDERS INC HOUSER ELIZABETH A REVOC TAYLOR JIMMY A (JTWROS) MIXON BILLY R MOREE PHILLIP A BRINKMAN HENRY D (SURV) NVR INC ANDERSON JODY LANE (JTWR KEENEY PHYLLIS C RELIANT SC LLC BEATTIE PARK INC BEATTIE PARK INC D R HORTON INC BANNEN-TODD FAMILY IRREV CARROLL FAMILY LIVING TR

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LA FERE LLC MUNGO HOMES INC ARCUATE REAL ESTATE LLC SMART ANDREW T (JTWROS) C&C PROPERTIES I LLC CJN LLC WELLS FARGO BANK N A KLINGLER JEFFREY FREDGRO LLC WORLEY LARRY J (JTWROS) SHEMROSKE MIKE J (JTWROS MATKOVICH JOHN JOSEPH II FOWLER JAMES R JR (JTWRO TESNER DONALD R (JTWROS) HOLLAND DAVID N (JTWROS) KOVAC DIANE L SK BUILDERS INC HAURITZ MILES TREMAIN HOWARD S HUNTER III (JTW PINION FRED W JR (JTWROS WILLIAMS J BETH OWENS CHRISTOPHER SHANE RIDGE PARTNERS LLC POTOTSKII ANDREI MICHAEL RANKIN JEREMY (JTWROS) RAFFERTY RUSSELL T BECK BECKY L (JTWROS) AKSEL MURAT SMITH BLAINE ROBERT ADKINS LORI ANN GREEN KAREN R (JTWROS) BROWN GINNY LYNN S (JTWR BABUSCI KELLY HOADLEY (J ELLIS TIMOTHY MICHAEL (J MASJAX ASSOCIATES LLC MASJAX ASSOCIATES LLC HARMS LISA NICOLE CAPLAN RICHARD (JTWROS) HUGHES KRISTA E (JTWROS)

244 ABENAKI WAY 441 WESTERN LN PO BOX 26383 7 CHINQUAPIN LN 1395 S CHURCH ST 4113 E NORTH ST ONE HOME CAMPUS 23 LONDON CT 1069 CANTON RD 501 VILLAGGIO DR 27 MAXWELL FARM DR 221 WAYNE ST 310 TANOAK CT 421 BOWERS RD 105 SORRENTO DR 9 TRIPLE CROWN CT 109 WHITE OAK RD 234 E LAKEVIEW BLVD 204 MEYERS DR 201 WATERFORD LN 403 HUNTINGTON RD 9 WACCAMAW AVE N/O/D 4 LANDSDOWN AVE 2213 RIVER RD 483 MOUNT LEBANON CHURCH RD 14 DRYSTACK WAY 209 WALNUT TRACE CT 11 SUNNING HILL RD 105 PLAYER WAY 220 VERLIN DR 213 BOBCAT TRL 108 GLENBRIAR CT 26 LAURELHART LN 615 PLUMLEY SUMMIT RD 615 PLUMLEY SUMMIT RD 201 MERITTA TRL 103 MCDANIEL GREENE 301 WOODBRIDGE WAY

$389,500 TROLLINGWOOD $387,800 TUSCAN WOODS $381,000 PLANTATION GREENE $380,000 SOUTH FOREST ESTATES $378,000 WATERS RUN $376,960 FOXCROFT $375,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $375,000 STONEHAVEN $375,000 RIDGEWATER $365,170 COPPER CREEK $361,250 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $356,405 KNOLL CREEK $355,000 WEST FARM II $354,605 CLIFFS@GLASSY SUNSET POINTE $350,000 $350,000 WEST END COTTAGES $341,000 $340,000 $339,900 RIDGEWATER $337,506 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $337,500 GILREATH EST $335,000 WESTHAVEN $332,077 $324,500 RUNION ESTATES $323,484 CARILION $322,007 HUDSON ACRES $320,000 BELSHIRE $318,110 LOST RIVER $316,644 SILVERLEAF $315,000 PILGRIMS POINT $315,000 GREYTHORNE $312,500 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $310,000 PEBBLECREEK PUD $310,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $305,000 TIMBERLAKE $295,000 PENNINGTON PARK $294,450 BELSHIRE $290,105 BRIDGEWATER $289,850

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1511 BATESVILLE LLC 15 GARLINGTON LLC RFH ADVISORS RUTHERFORD JOHNSTON FAMILY TRUST BEEZER MOLTEN PROPERTIES RYAN JAMES P (JTWROS) CALLAHAN SEAN P (JTWROS) HAWKINS VICKIE (JTWROS) COLSON LAURA JOHNSTON RENFROW BENJAMIN M VEGA ANGELINA M (JTWROS) ROUND LESLEY (JTWROS) WILLIAMS COURTNEY KIMBALL CHRISTINA S (JTW RUNGE WILLIAM T (JTWROS) CYRUS HARRIETTE M (JTWRO FINLEY STEPHEN H (JTWROS BECKER WILLIAM N II (JTW SIMMONS EDWARD M JR REVO PURCELL MAURICE A (JTWRO HERMAN DAVID (JTWROS) ROINESTAD WILLIAM C (JTW GARRIGUS ALAN (JTWROS) EJD LLC MULLINS ADRIENNE A (JTWR RIDGEWAY AVENUE REAL EST DS&B HOLDINGS LLC EISENBRAUN THOMAS SIMMONS MICHAEL G CLEVENSTINE WALTER M (JT BECK RYAN J (JTWROS) DUNN THOMAS KEVIN (JTWRO MURPHY JACKIE M FONTECCHIO JENNIFER DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC SALAS GABRIELLA MARIA CE SACK JOSHUA I (JTWROS) DAGOSTINO ANDREW D (JTWR AUGUSTINE JOSEPH J

1346 SUSSEX RD 2543 LOCUST HILL RD 260 NEWPORT CENTER DR 436 SOUTH POINT BLVD 1084 E MONTAGUE AVE 8 PARKINS OAK CT 305 E SEVEN OAKS DR 8 FARAWAY PL 36 QUAIL HILL DR 401 WACCAMAW AVE 75 GRIFFITH CREEK DR 209 BUTLER AVE 9 BAUDER CT 27 APPIAN CIR 9 PARKINS POINTE WAY 314 MEYERS DR 107 ALDRIDGE DR 8 DUNLEITH CT 26 N BROOKWOOD DR 1400 THORNBLADE BLVD UNIT 1 205 KEOWEE AVE 101 GINGER LN 308 VERLIN DR 501C MEMORIAL DRIVE EXT 40 OAK CREST CT 1200 WOODRUFF RD STE B9 7428 WILSON BLVD 6 ENOREE FARM WAY 102 OREGON ST 9 BECKWORTH DR 8 SHADWELL ST 106 ROCKBERRY TER 508 TERRA CREEK CT 690 PONDEN DR 535 ST MARK RD 200 VERLIN DR 50 FOXMOOR CT 301 MEADOWSWEET LN 204 WATER MILL RD

GREYTHORNE $376,500 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $375,000 WATERS RUN $371,751 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $371,190 HIGHLAND PARC $370,000 SUGAR CREEK $370,000 CARRONBRIDGE $359,915 KILGORE FARMS $359,900 WATERS EDGE $355,000 COPPER CREEK $354,597 LEAFMORE WOODS $352,300 AUGUSTA RD RANCHES $345,000 PARIS GLEN $340,402 $340,000 KILGORE FARMS $339,000 HIGHLAND TERRACE $337,000 BELSHIRE $330,867 100 COURT ST CONDO $330,650 KILGORE FARMS $330,000 CARRIAGE PARK $329,900 LOST RIVER $325,411 PARIS POINT $320,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $319,000 $315,000 COPPER CREEK $311,283 TERRA PINES ESTATES $310,000 TOWNES AT THORNBLADE $307,800 CARRIAGE PARK $305,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $302,537 KING’S CROSSING $300,908 $300,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $290,342 PELHAM FALLS $286,900 GARRISON WOODS $286,700 COVENTRY $286,430 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $286,108 THE VALLEY@GILDER CREEK FARM $286,000 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $285,400 CARRINGTON GREEN $285,000

REYNOLDS MITCHELL D MASSEY CATHY D CARROLL PATRICIA W SCHWARTZ RICHARD M CALE STEPHEN E NVR INC SANDERS PETER D 38 DEVONHALL TRUST WALKER BRICE MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN MUNGO HOMES INC NVR INC DUFFAU PAUL V JR MUNGO HOMES INC CAIN CHARLES R WILSON FARMS COMPANY HUDSON EDWARD WAYNE (JTW FREEBORN MARGARET E RILEY GIAVONNI MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WELSH LISA M HOLOMBO LUKE D R HORTON-CROWN LLC UNDERWOOD JOHN R DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH HUBBLE STEVEN L (JTWROS) NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN NICKELL ADAM JAMES (JTWR CAZEL ELIZABETH ALLEN TONY WILLIAMS THOMAS KEITH KRAMER DAVID C BARNES DOUGLAS A (JTWROS DYE DAVINA LEE (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH

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LINDSEY BRENTTON A (JTWR FIESTER STEVEN E (JTWROS MONTGOMERY CYNTHIA M (JT DUONG NGA B (JTWROS) H2MP LLC AMADOR LUIS (JTWROS) HANSSMANN THORSTEN (JTWR TERRY WILLIAM R JR (JTWR MORRIS DIANA Y (JTWROS) MCLANEY JEREMIAH F (JTWR AXSON HENRY (JTWROS) CAIAZZO NICHOLE M EPLEE MELISSA G (JTWROS) CLEVELAND BRENDA E MAZIARZ DAVID (JTWROS) CASSADY VERNE MCNULTY SAMUEL T (JTWROS WILLMOT KEVIN CHURCH ANTHONY W (JTWROS HARPER CARILYN J (JTWROS ROSSNAGEL MICHAEL J FARRELL JAMES M (JTWROS) BEGUM FARHANA S (JTWROS) HENRY MANUEL DANIEL (JTW BLANCHARD LORA CAFFREY GEORGE PRESLEY COURTNEY E (JTWR KIEFF CONSTANCE C (JTWRO STEVENSON CYNTHIA A (JTW ERWIN DOUGLAS G (JTWROS) LOPEZ JENNIFER W (JTWROS WEARDEN STEVEN J (JTWROS SEALINK PROPERTIES LLC COGSDILL KEVIN E LACEY VIRGINIA J ROWE TAYLOR J (JTWROS) THRAILKILL LORI F (JTWRO LIMA FRANCISCO JOSE (JTW BISSETTE MARY E

600 PACKS MOUNTAIN RIDGE RD 335 SHADOWMERE DR 116 APPLEWOOD DR 9 SPRING FALLS CT 217 DONALDSON RD 820 SILVERWOOD WAY 115 W RED FOX TRL 38 DEVONHALL WAY 10 ENGLISH OAK RD 200 IVY WOODS CT 144 LEIGH CREEK DR 208 VERLIN DR 111 KNOLL CREEK DR 224 HOLSTEIN CT 5613 S JERSEY TESS DR 7 E EARL ST 20 HOWE ST UNIT 1 7 ROWLEY ST 287 WILD AZALEA LN 11 COOL MEADOW WAY 401 WINDING RIVER LN 20 ALAN KENT LN 204 MANSFIELD LN 449 TALLEY BRIDGE RD 113 ROLLING CREEK CT 527 PALLADIO DR 2 GREENWOOD AVE 100 DAUPHINE WAY 109 QUAIL HUNT RD 106 FIRETHORNE CT 105 PILGRIMS POINT RD 200 DAIRWOOD DR 854 LOWCOUNTRY BLVD STE 100 2 BELLFORT CT 705 CANNONGATE DR 23 SELWYN DR 144 COUNTRY MIST DR 5 DAUPHINE WAY 43 GRAND RIVER LN

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LOPEZ EDWIN R ROLLISON JEFFREY HATCHEL STOLIC ANNA (JTWROS) KUKOLJ DANNY (JTWROS) ZHENG HANG (JTWROS) FRANKLIN SAMUEL E (JTWRO MITCHELL ANDREW C (JTWRO HILBRANT BRIAN W (JTWROS ALLMAN CARRIE W TURNER MAXINE ANNE SIVAKUMAR SANJEEV ALTMAN KYLE M (JTWROS) WELLS FARGO BANK N A BUCKLEY EDMOND (JTWROS) CARVAJAL JOSE ROBERTO MATHIS JENNIFER STACY EDGE CORY D (JTWROS) TWILLEY ALLYSON R BIANCHINO MARGHERITA (JT SCOTT CAITLIN MC MURTRIE GREEN JOSHUA E (JTWROS) GARROW JASON BURT BENJAMIN O JOY HORACE JACK DELGADO FERNANDO M JR (J WEBB CHRISTIAN D (JTWROS HARPER GARRY R PHAM JUDY T TALBOT ELMA C (JTWROS) CECIL ARLIE JAMES (JTWRO WEST GREENVILLE INVESTOR WHITEHURST BRENDA P CARMAN ALLISON (JTWROS) WARDLAW JOHNNY U (JTWROS HOBSON CRYSTAL (JTWROS) ANAND FAMILY TRUST LUETTERS DEBORAH L (JTWR CATENA MARY J HACKSHAW BENDY J (JTWROS

577 CENTRE AVE 1626 OMARA LN SE 800 SILVERWOOD WAY 639 PONDEN DR 348 SUNNYBROOK LN 102 SUGAR CREEK CT 115 BRENDAN PL 8 PETER BROOK CT 120 SHORE VIEW CT 148 LEIGH CREEK DR 30 LEAFMORE CT 201 CAMMER AVE 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 210 BARKER RD 7 PETER BROOK CT 7 W HILLCREST DR 304 BIENVILLE PL 100 W COURT ST 4 PETER BROOK CT 1 CREEDMOOR DR 607 BRIAR THISTLE CT 13 PARIS POINT DR 5 LYNELL PL 16 TRAXLER ST 404 STRATHPINE DR 202 TERRAMONT DR 304 SCOTCH ROSE LN 5 CREEDMOOR DR 632 PONDEN DR 108 FOXHILL DR PO BOX 728 616 PONDEN DR 10 BARLEY MILL DR 3 LEAF LN 112 LONGFELLOW WAY 103D REGENCY COMMONS DR 221 ELSTAR LOOP RD 106 HONEY CRISP WAY 16 STONEHAM PL

For the week of June 5 – 9, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$9,000,000 25 GARLINGTON ROAD $2,295,483 CROFTSTONE ACRES $1,725,000 CUSTOM HOUSE $1,575,000 $1,390,000 COLLINS PLACE $1,120,000 CHANTICLEER $820,000 THE PLANTATION ON PELHAM $797,500 QUAIL HILL ESTATES $768,000 $725,000 $698,000 $642,000 $640,000 COLUMNS @ ROPER MOUNTAIN $630,000 PARKINS POINTE $593,500 $590,000 GOWER ESTATES $588,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $570,000 $561,250 VILLAS AT THORNBLADE $513,825 IVY GROVE $500,000 PEBBLECREEK $499,900 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $487,062 $465,000 OAK CREST $464,000 $460,000 HAYWOOD ROAD INDUSTRIAL PARK $450,000 SILVER MEADOWS $443,843 KANATENAH $440,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $439,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE $435,830 RIVER WALK $435,000 TERRA CREEK COURT $430,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $413,447 KELLEY FARMS $404,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $398,151 LOST RIVER $388,598 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $385,000 SUGAR MILL $382,000

L1 LAND LLC GARLINGTON 100 LLC RUTHERFORD ROAD 1127 LLC STONER JOHN K 603 E STONE AVE LLC HOLLISON CUSTOM HOMES LL ATKINS ANTHONY W (JTWROS UBIQUITY HOLDINGS TRUST RUNGE ASHLEY C WILLIAMS E BRENT GALE MARY T (JTWROS) BOYD REBECCA D HASSETT MARY W FIRST RATE CONSTRUCTION PHILLIP ELAINE LLC PURCELL FAMILY REVOCABLE YOUNG CINDY S (JTWROS) FARRELL JAMES M (JTWROS) STEPHENSON THOMPSON AND HAAKSMA BARBARA L JARRELL JOHN ARTHUR IV ( TOTH MICHAEL J NVR INC MAUR VIMALJIT BLEVINS DANE PATRICK HSC HOLDINGS LLC E & A REAL ESTATE LLC COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC MULLINS ADRIENNE GLICK DOUGLAS D (JTWROS) LS RESIDENTIAL LLC SCHOTT MICHELLE B CANTRELL MARIE ANNETTE ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CF INVESTMENTS LLC NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SC INC PORTERFIELD FAMILY LIVIN BRAY CATHERINE DEARHART

PRICE SELLER BEAN JAN MARIE BEATTIE PARK INC NVR INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC WHITE CHESLEY I (JTWROS) NECHODOM PAUL D NVR INC HIERS DUSTIN REESE (JTWR BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN MUNGO HOMES INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH AZIZ LEILA N WRIGHT PAUL T JTRS WARDLAW JOHNNY U JR WEBER NINA BENGARD HANS NVR INC ROSS FAMILY TRUST SPENCER RYAN HARTIGAN ELAINE F MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN EMORY ROY PHILLIP AND EM FERRERIS ALEXANDER GONZA MEANS VINCENT L MUNGO HOMES INC VERVAET CAROL JO TOWNES AT THORNBLADE LLC MURDOCH BRIAN E ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MOPSEY LLC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC DRAPER JACK D PALMETTO CONSTRUCTION & DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CHEATHAM EUGENE A (JTWRO MCGEE EMILY TUCKER (JTWR MITCHELL PATRICIA (JTWRO


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of May 22 – 26, 2017 SUBD.

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HAYWOOD POINTE $21,500,000 $17,000,000 $12,500,000 $2,975,000 $1,525,000 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $1,125,000 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $875,000 $815,000 COLLINS CREEK $775,000 EAST PARK $750,000 GOWER ESTATES $650,000 THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $645,000 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $627,836 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $622,000 DEERLAND PLANTATION $590,000 IVY GROVE $575,000 $570,000 ORCHARD PROPERTIES $563,500 MEYERS PARK $542,000 SUNSET HILLS $539,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $516,500 EDISTO FOREST $497,500 LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK $457,500 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $445,243 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $440,243 CLEVELAND PLACE $437,500 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $418,500 COURTYARDS ON W. GEORGIA RD $410,118 HAMPTON’S GRANT $407,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $391,597 $390,000 RIVER WALK $387,500 TUSCANY FALLS $380,000 $378,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $378,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $372,954 BELL’S GRANT $372,500 POINSETT CORNERS $364,000 BOTANY WOODS $362,500

WREP HAYWOOD POINTE LLC WREP GLENEAGLE LLC WREP GREYEAGLE LLC QUIKTRIP CORPORATION UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCI MARSHALL DANIEL J RICE-SCHAEFFER JANE (JTW FULGHUM KASPER FERBER II PAUL GWENDOLYN N EAST PARK BAPTIST CHURCH HAGINS PRISCILLA F WOODLAND BUILDERS INC ASTERISK LAND PARTNERS L BERMUDEZ CARLOS E (JTWRO MOODY BRADLEY D (JTWROS) ARYA NEERJA B SMITH MELISSA GAIL ROSS ZMMR LLC JONES DAVID A MILLER RUSSELL MARK JR ( STONE KAREN I BROWN JAMES CLAY ASHBY PARK INVESTORS LLC ASTERISK LAND PARTNERS L NVR INC PATTERSON NANCY ELAINE VIRANI LLC ROMANA LLC YURICH VICKY A NVR INC MEEKS JAMES E ELLIOTT AMY R CALVERT JEREMY A (JTWROS STARR RESOURCES INC JONES LISETTE S MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH ALLEN EMILY (JTWROS) WRIGHT CHERYL (JTWROS) FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURC

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NICKLAUS AT HAYWOOD LLC NICKLAUS AT GLENEAGLE LL NICKLAUS AT GREYEAGLE LL ALJAOUNI AMEEN SPP NET LEASE REAL ESTAT CROW DAVID LEE (JTWROS) BROWN BRYANT C (JTWROS) HATFIELD ANGELA B KNIGHT ADAM (JTWROS) SPINKS FAMILY FOUNDATION SCHMIDT PAUL BOZKAN AYTEKIN BARRETO KAREN BOTTOMS TR GREEN WILLIAM TIMOTHY ERLENBAUGH PATRICIA A HOLLADAY JOSEPH C III (J TD BOILING SPRINGS STORA ATTICUS INVESTMENTS LLC MILLER RUSSELL MARK JR ( EICKEN JOHN J (JTWROS) GROUNSELL ANSLEY SHAW (J BURROUGHS ZACHARY T (JTW JWS PROPERTIES LLC CARRUS LLC COZIER JAMES (JTWROS) PAUL GWENDOLYN N CRUMP JUSTIN SINGLETON DARRYL L MIRANDA TINA P MORRIS CYNTHIA (JTWROS) DRAZ DEBRA (JTWROS) MOSSOP JOHN E COFFEY ALICIA (JTWROS) DAWSON JENNIFER M (JTWRO THOMPSON CYNTHIA BETH (J RHODES JONATHAN (JTWROS) GULLEDGE JAMES GORDON II OSMER ANITA B (JTWROS) SMITH SANDRA M

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PELHAM RIDGE-BUSINESS PARK $3,500,000 THE PLAZA@GREENVILLE MALL $3,250,000 $3,145,000 $1,900,000 $949,000 $900,000 $870,000 BARKSDALE $797,500 CLAREMONT $725,000 CLIFFS VALLEY LAKE RIDGE CROSS $665,000 MCBEE STATION RESIDENTIAL $630,000 $610,000 $601,000 LAKE LANIER $560,000 $525,000 $525,000 SPAULDING FARMS $510,500 MCDANILE GREENE CREEKSIDE $500,000 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $488,000 $479,000 MALLARD & ARLINGTON TOWNHOMES $474,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE $472,000 PELHAM POINTE $470,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $460,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $459,926 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $447,800 WAVERLY HALL $445,000 CHANDLER LAKE $435,667 MCRAE PARK $435,000 $430,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $425,000 PRESTIGE TERRACE $415,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $412,682 SWANSGATE $412,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $410,665 LONGLEAF $409,860 SADDLEHORN $402,851 $400,000 CARISBROOKE $400,000

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ARTS & CULTURE ELVIS HAS LEFT THE BUILDING, BUT ‘BYE BYE BIRDIE’ STILL PACKS THEM IN page

31

TWO DECADES OF ELF POWER page

32

SINGER-SONGWRITER JOHN MORELAND FALLS IN ‘LUV’ page

33

Drake King as Conrad Birdie in Mill Town Players' production of 'Bye Bye Birdie'

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77 PAINTINGS & DRAWINGS 37 PHOTOGRAPHS 5 ARTISTS 4 GENERATIONS 3 GALLERIES 2 EXHIBITIONS combine to tell the story of

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Animal Care’s

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“Bye Bye Birdie” offers a more metaphorical interpretation of the Elvis Presley craze through its titular character, rock ’n’ roll star Conrad Birdie. Photo provided

TWO STAGES, TWO KINGS ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ and ‘Bye Bye Birdie’ offer two takes on Elvis VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

The impact of Elvis Presley on American culture is so massive that you could spend an entire lifetime studying one phase of his career. Volumes have been written about his burst of brilliance at Sun Records, his post-Army move into kitschy films, his brief artistic comeback in the late 1960s, and his descent into Las Vegas irrelevance and drug abuse in the 1970s. But there are two musical productions being performed in the Upstate right now that look at Elvis through very different prisms, and it’s an intriguing thought that one could go see two very different versions of The King on two consecutive nights. At Centre Stage, the musical in question is “Million Dollar Quartet,” a dramatization of the December 1956 night when Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins jammed together at the legendary Sun Studios. Through the use of flashbacks and classic songs like “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “Long Tall Sally,” and “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On,” the Tonyaward winning musical tells the story of how Sun founder Sam Phillips discovered and nurtured each of these phenomenal talents, and also why they all eventually left his label. For this production, director Glenda ManWaring wanted all of the main actors to be real-life musicians, and she wanted her Elvis (played by T.J. Jones) to have none of the

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Ari

polish of his middle years or the cynicism of his later life. “This is set when they’re all young,” ManWaring says. “This is when they first started out. So you see a true and honest Elvis. There’s no façade; there’s no pretense. We see an endearing and true Elvis. There was an innocence I wanted to play, because he’s been played elsewhere as very hard and he’s been portrayed very harshly, depending upon the stage of life they’re portraying him in.” At the same time, though, she says she wanted a slight hint at where Elvis was headed. “He’s just at the beginning stages of the decay of his innocence,” she says. “T.J. Jones does a great job in letting us see his turmoil, because people are trying to use and abuse him, and he just wants to be Elvis and play his music.” It’s a more intimate, personal portrayal of an icon, whereas the second musical, the Mill Town Players production of “Bye Bye Birdie,” which will be performed at the Pelzer Auditorium, takes a more distant, metaphorical approach. The story focuses on an “Elvis-like” performer named Conrad Birdie (Drake King), whose upcoming visit to the town of Sweet Apple, Ohio, has the whole community in an uproar.

Birdie, who has the gold lamé suit and slicked-back swagger of Elvis in his late ’50s prime, is something of a distant figure in “Bye Bye Birdie,” acting almost as a cypher upon whom teenage fan Kim (played by the 15-year-old Meris Privette) casts her romantic fantasies while publicist Albert Peterson (Mark Wiles) and his secretary Rosie Alvarez (Meredith Woodard) try to keep any hint of scandal from tarnishing Conrad’s squeaky-clean image. It’s a portrait of a rock ’n’ roll rebel turned celebrity, already isolated behind his image. “We learn little snippets about this character,” says director Reed Halvorson. “You don’t really get to know who this person is as he pulls into Sweet Apple, Ohio, and throws everything into a tizzy.” Halverson says that there’s a cloud that eventually envelops superstars like Birdie or, indeed, Presley. “There’s a perception of who a celebrity is,” he says, “and people deal with that differently. If it’s a musical celebrity, people think, ‘They sing these great songs, so they must be wonderful human beings.’ But they’re normal people with their own flaws. Rosie and Albert are trying to cover that up and make sure Conrad is seen as this idol.”

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GOODBYE TO LO-FI Athens band Elf Power strikes a balance between scruffy rock and studio polish VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

The Athens, Ga., band Elf Power got their start in the 1990s as part of a loose musical collective called Elephant 6. The musicians in Elephant 6 were essentially united by an urge to push the boundaries of the nascent genre known as indie-rock, and a complete lack of the resources necessary to do so. So the bands that eventually grew out of the collective, like The Apples in Stereo, Neutral Milk Hotel, and Of Montreal, were initially forced to record their immensely melodic, structurally ambitious, and critically beloved music in the cheapest possible surroundings, which often meant in their homes. So what these bands ended up with was great, ’60s-influenced garage-and-psychedelic rock that sounded like it was recorded under a layer of tape hiss and lo-fidelity sludge, because that is how it was recorded. It was called “lo-fi.” Fast-forward through over 20 years to Elf

Power’s latest album, “Twitching in Time,” and it’s clear that things have changed significantly. The band, anchored since the beginning by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Andrew Rieger and keyboardist Laura Carter, is still bursting with melodic tunes and inventive arrangements. The eerie vocal harmonies and foreboding acoustic guitar-and-piano duet of “Halloween Out Walking” create a foreboding sense of menace; the drop-dead beautiful piano riff of “Watery Shreds” is suddenly broken in two by a serrated, distorted guitar riff that completely changes the song’s trajectory, only to be followed by a lovely, loping mid-tempo country-rocker called “The Cat Trapped in the Well” that recalls late-period Wilco. And none of it, not a note, sounds “lo-fi.” It’s not a crystalline-clear state-of-the-art studio production, by any means, and there are certainly patches of rough sound, but they’re deliberate and designed to add to a song’s texture rather than being the result of a low recording budget. And the fact is that

«

Elf Power

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THE REAL DEAL John Moreland broadens his sound with a full band on ‘Big Bad Luv’ VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

The words “real” and “authentic” are overused in just about any context, but they get an especially heavy workout when it comes to music. Sometimes it seems like anyone with a scruffy look and a battered acoustic guitar is considered the real deal before they even play a note. But if there’s anyone who can live up to those descriptions, it’s singer/songwriter John Moreland. He’s a singer whose voice is some heavenly mix of John Hiatt’s wily

300,000 times). And up until this year’s “Big Bad Luv” album, Moreland was essentially doing all of his recording by himself, making albums in his home and building the songs up track by track. “Big Bad Luv” is Moreland’s first full-band, studio-produced album, with Tchad Blake (Elvis Costello, Pearl Jam, Peter Gabriel) handling the mix and a more playful, rootsrock sound throughout. It’s a big surprise from an artist whose previous album, “High on Tulsa Heat,” was perhaps the most hushed and intimate of his career, and for whom that approach was paying off in spades, having landed three songs on FX’s “Sons of Anarchy” and garnered an Americana Music Association award nomination. But Moreland, who will play an in-store show at Horizon Records on Monday, July 17, knew from the beginning of “Big Bad Luv” that it was time for a change. “The main thing was that I didn’t want to engineer it myself, which I had done on the other things

I’d recorded,” Moreland says. “I was playing most of the instruments myself, and I knew that that was way too much work. I wanted to get a band and bring the band to a studio and have someone else engineer the session. And of course, all of that is going to make it sound different.” Different, yes, but not entirely alien.

There’s no excessive overdubbing on “Big Bad Luv,” and none of the songs seem too fussed over, despite Blake’s work in the past with some notorious studio perfectionists. “It does have a stripped-down sound,” Moreland says, “and that’s because even though it’s a full band, it’s mostly recorded live by a lean rock ’n’ roll band. In the past, I would spend a whole day building the tracks up, and maybe after eight hours you’d have a song. For this record, we went in and played them through once or twice and that was it.” Despite the new, more upbeat musical approach, Moreland’s lyrics are still poetically heartbroken. On the down-tempo, Dobrospiked “Old Wounds,” Moreland sings that “Love’s a violent word, don’t you forget it. … I’ve seen my seasons change. I was cryin’ out your name,” like a man for whom passion and desperation have become inextricably linked. And as it turns out, applying that same lyrical approach to his new music was more difficult than Moreland anticipated. “I do sort of struggle with writing upbeat songs sometimes, because I’m afraid the lyrics will go unnoticed,” he says. “I’m afraid to use my really good stuff in my upbeat songs,

are anymore. We’re neither lo-fi nor slick and polished; we’re somewhere in between, and I think that’s a nice place to be. I think we’re firmly in the middle somewhere.” In fact, Rieger says he’s not sure that any specific aesthetic description, whether it’s “indie-rock’ or “lo-fi,” or anything else, applies to what Elf Power does now. “I think journalists kind of latch on to an easy descriptor and kind of regurgitate what someone else has written,” he says. “And I get that, but I feel like we don’t neatly fall into one category. There’s elements of rock, psychedelic, folk, and punk; all those things

melded into one in our music.” Despite the continued misclassification of Elf Power, who will play a brief in-store set at Horizon Records in Greenville followed by a full show at The Spinning Jenny in Greer on Friday, Rieger says he’s not as upset by it as he used to be. “I’m glad when anyone cares about our music at all,” he says. “You kind of just have to move forward and do what you do. I think over time I’ve gotten numb to it because you can’t control what people say about it. It used to bug me when I was younger, but I’ve gotten used to it.”

“I do sort of struggle with writing upbeat songs sometimes, because I’m afraid the lyrics will go unnoticed.” John Moreland, singer/songwriter

rasp and Kings of Leon singer Caleb Followill’s soulful, gritty wail. He’s an unassuming, modest man who’s written some devastatingly emotional songs, like “Break My Heart Sweetly,” one of the most gorgeous heartbreak ballads of the last decade (his performance of the song on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” has been viewed almost

«

this isn’t an unusual sound for Elf Power. They’ve been making albums like this for a while now. So why is it that even a cursory search of articles about the band still use the term “lo-fi” incessantly? Does that term even still apply? “I don’t think so,” Rieger says. “The first two albums from the ’90s could be considered lo-fi because we were recording on 4-track and 8-track cassette tape machines. And that’s because we liked the sound, yes, but also because it was the only thing available to us. But I don’t think that’s what we

John Moreland’s latest, “Big Bad Luv,” was produced by Tchad Blake (Elvis Costello, Pearl Jam, Peter Gabriel).

which I became aware of when I wrote this record. So I tried to steer clear of that instinct and write the same lyrically as I always have.” As for touring, which Moreland has always done as a solo acoustic act, he seems to be in a bit of transition there, as well. He’s not alone anymore, but his only accompanist is John Calvin Abney, who switches between guitar, piano, and harmonica throughout the show. “This is like a segue into full-band touring,” he says. “After touring solo for a while, if we’d just thrown the band into it, I’d have been overwhelmed. I feel like we’re building up to that one step at a time.”

JOHN MORELAND VENUES: Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave., Greenville DATE: Monday, July 17, 7 p.m. ADMISSION: Free INFO: 864-235-7922, horizonrecords.net

ELF POWER VENUES: Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave., Greenville, The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer DATE: Friday, July 14 SHOWTIMES: 4:30 p.m. (Horizon), 8 p.m. (Spinning Jenny) ADMISSION: Free (Horizon), $11, $14 (Spinning Jenny) INFO: 864-235-7922, horizonrecords.net 864-469-6416, thespinningjennygreer.com


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

NEW GSO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: TIME TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

It’s a question that orchestras across the country are confronting: How do they make themselves relevant to an audience that has so many other ways to get music? That’s a challenge that Julie Fish, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s new executive director, is ready to face. Fish, who most recently served as vice president and chief operating officer of the Columbus Symphony in Ohio, will begin her new duties on Monday, July 17. “The orchestra industry as a whole is struggling, and the struggle is exacerbated because there’s so much competition for people’s attention and dollars,” Fish said in a telephone interview. “It’s the same for newspapers and publishing, and many other industries in Julie Fish, the Greenville Orchestra’s a rapidly changing and dynamic landscape. Any organization, sym- Symphony new executive director phonies in particular, must focus on sustainable growth.” Fish was a French horn performance major at Ohio State University and the Cleveland Institute of Music. She was a bandsman in the U.S. Air Force, leading four separate touring ensembles. She has previously served as vice president and general manager of the Milwaukee Symphony, vice president and chief operating officer of the San Antonio Symphony, and vice president and general manager of the Atlanta Symphony. “The GSO has done a good job of weathering [the challenge] and is ready to take that next step to stay relevant,” she said. “To me, the Symphony is definitely a jewel in Greenville’s cultural landscape, and there’s a lot of energy to keep the momentum going.” Fish said the Symphony must broaden awareness and increase the number of people it touches in an attempt to get them to experience the GSO and ultimately get involved with the organization.

She called the Symphony’s pop series a “bridge-builder,” a low-barrier invitation to orchestral music. She said her assumption is that it’s a good vehicle for the GSO to reach people who haven’t attended a GSO concert before, and she’ll look at expanding that. In addition, the GSO’s salon series, which are small concerts in private homes, are also ways to help people feel comfortable, she said. “The Symphony is always about the artistic quality and art created from the stage, but it’s also an experience,” she said. “People relate to the music in different ways. The connection point is the experience.” Fish said Greenville has incredible venues in town that have yet to be explored by the Symphony. “It’s more than getting the Symphony out and about. It’s being in the places where people will be. We need to stay relevant. With the generalized competition for people’s time and entertainment dollars, we have to give a transformational experience to the orchestral audience.” Fish said it will be important for the GSO to engage with corporations to increase awareness, support, and participation. She said the GSO’s budget is smaller than the other orchestras where she’s worked, and that was a point of attraction. “What attracted me was the opportunity for direct connections with the musicians, the director, the board, the community, and the staff. Having a collaborative team dynamic breeds success. I consider myself the chief inspirational officer,” she said. She said Greenville as a city has vibrancy, and the pride in the city is palpable. “The future of Greenville and the GSO is absolutely ready to explode. It’s right on the edge. It’s in a place where the momentum and energy is there to move it forward. I’m looking forward to being a part of that,” she added. Fish replaces Andy White, who has served as the Greenville Symphony Association interim executive director since March 2016, following the death of former Executive Director Sherwood Mobley. The GSO begins its 70th concert season in September.

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CAROLINA ACTIVE HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC grandparents who just want to walk without pain. “Thanks to the variety of In the game of Jenga, one small piece out of alignment can send the whole tools we have in our toolbox, we’ve been serving a pretty broad spectrum,” structure crashing down. Michael and Kelsey Nelson, owners of Carolina Kelsey said. Active Health Chiropractic, see the human body in a Michael started out as an athletic trainer for Ohio State, similar way. “Just like Jenga, if you have structural issues, Just like Jenga, Clemson, and the Buffalo Bills before returning to school for a then you can’t have proper function, and that can lead to a if you have structural chiropractic degree at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Florida. catastrophe,” Michael said. issues, then you can’t Kelsey majored in biosciences at Clemson before graduating The team at Carolina Active Health Chiropractic have proper function, Palmer as salutatorian of her class. can keep you functioning optimally, zeroing in on the and that can lead to a The Nelsons, who opened the practice in November 2015, spine – the foundation that forms the structure and catastrophe. celebrated their first year in businesses in a big way - they function of every movement. Combining traditional welcomed William Draper Nelson to the family. Now three chiropractic techniques with a variety of soft tissue work months old, little William has already hung out in the office while and therapeutic exercise, the Nelsons can help patients his parents worked and even had a couple of adjustments. keep doing the activities they love. Their techniques allow them to treat not If chiropractic care can stop a newborn from being fussy, imagine what it only spinal conditions, but also other orthopedic complaints. “With our can do for your sore back or aching knee. From adjustments and functional backgrounds, we are able to treat a variety of musculoskeletal issues as well, rehabilitation, Graston and Active Release Techniques, whatever your next from plantar fasciitis to shoulder problems,” Michael said. move, Carolina Active Health Chiropractic can keep you in the game. Michael and Kelsey have extensive experience working with athletes, and Michael is currently the team chiropractor for Clemson University Athletic Department – including the National Champion football team. “It was a 16 Mills Ave. Ste 3, Greenville great year to be a part of that,” he said. 864.881.2242 The Nelsons, avid athletes and outdoors-lovers themselves, focus primarily on treating the active population, but quickly found that their CarolinaActiveHealth.com techniques benefit everyone, from people who sit all day for work to great-


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JUL. 15

LITERATURE

Ruth Ann Butler book signing Before Google and Ancestry.com, many Greenville residents went to Ruth Ann Butler to research their roots. Butler, who 30 years ago next month founded the Greenville Cultural Exchange Center, a museum dedicated to the promotion and preservation of African-American history, searched through books, government documents, newspaper clips, microfiche, old telephone books, and interviews to research and share history and biographies. Butler said she’s never failed to find the information for which she was looking. “I’m batting 100 percent,” she said. After years of telling others’ stories, she’s telling her own in her memoir, titled “Roots, Research & Reflections.” And an interesting story it is. She grew up in the segregated South with a physical disability. She put her newborn son up for adoption in an era when single mothers faced social bias and bleak job prospects. She overcame financial hurdles to pursue a college education. And she’s kept the doors of the Cultural Exchange Center open. —Cindy Landrum

WHEN Saturday, July 15, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WHERE West End Community Center, 404 Vardry St. ADMISSION $24.88

BRANDON CASPERSON,

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Call Corley to experience the remarkable service your family deserves.

• MCALISTER SQUARE • 225 S. PLEASANTBURG DR., GREENVILLE, SC

(864) 908.3360

| W W W. CO R L E Y P R O. CO M

G R E E N V I L L E L I T E R A C Y. O R G 8 6 4 . 4 6 7. 3 4 5 6

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12

8:30-4:00

EARLY BIRDS PAY $10 • STARTING AT 7:30

SUNDAY, AUGUST 13

1:00-4:00

BIG BAG OF BOOKS SALE • $10 TO FILL A BAG

Greenville Literacy Association’s mission is to enrich our community by increasing the literacy and employability of our citizens.


07.14.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JUL. 19

SPORTS

Liberty Bridge Jump Off On July 19, Olympic silver medalist Sandi Morris will return to her hometown to compete in the Liberty Bridge Jump Off, hosted by the American Track League (ATL). It is the organization’s first athletic and party event in the Upstate for professional and Olympic-level track standouts.

Kasey Fay

wearing sunwear by Oliver Peoples

The Liberty Bridge Jump Off will transform the entrance of Falls Park on Main Street into a stadium outfitted for women’s pole vault and men’s long jump events, offering spectators unique, upclose views. Along with Morris, other athletes set to participate are Alysha Newman, Kortney Ross, Kelsie Abhe, Sophie Gutermuth, and Mary Saxer. In total, 12 athletes will compete for cash prizes. The street party following the contests will include a live DJ, food and beer, local vendors, and other entertainment.

GARRISON OPTICIANS

Admission to the Liberty Bridge Jump Off is free, and all ages are welcome. Athlete warm-ups will be held from 5–6:30 p.m. before the competition begins, and the street party is from 8:30–10:30 p.m. — Jonas Mullins

WHEN Wednesday, July 19, 6:30 p.m. WHERE Main Street, Falls Park entrance ADMISSION FREE INFO fleetfeetgreenville.com/events/liberty-bridge-jump-off

McDaniel Village • 1922 Augusta Street • 864-271-1812 M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. • www.garrisonopticians.com

M A I N S T A G E P L AY PRESENTED BY

Generously sponsored by Rolling Green Village

GET TICKETS

864.233.6733 CENTRESTAGE.ORG

501 River Street Greenville SC 29601

By Floyd Mutrux and Colin Escott “IT WAS ONE LEGENDARY NIGHT”

JUL 20 – AUG 12 THU-SUN


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

youtube.com/watch?v=txA6wzxJ6eg

Earsight

Pour Taproom 7 Falls Park Drive 8:30 p.m. | Free greenville.pourtaproom.com

CONCERT

JUL. 15

Guitarist Adam Knight spends most of his time as the bandleader for Earsight, a jazz-funk outfit that pulls from both the classic organ trios of the 1960s and the jazz-fusion bands of the 1970s. But he’s also working on putting together a tribute show for the band Soulive and one for the late jazz-guitar titan Grant Green. “I feel like these shows would be great ways to showcase local jazz musicians who want to get involved,” Knight says. “But also, I’m always looking to change things up. I kind of have a lot of eggs in one basket with Earsight, so it’s nice to do other things.” In the meantime, Knight and his cohorts in Earsight are working toward their next record, playing both quartet and trio shows to get the songs ready. “We’ve been doing a lot more jamming lately,” he says. “Things have been a lot looser and freer.” —Vincent Harris

THRU FRI

14

ART

Anatomy for Artists, Life Drawing Workshop

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $120 This one-day workshop taught by Anthony Conway will introduce students to how to accurately draw the human figure with a sense of movement and life. Students will learn how to focus on the key aspects of the figure and grasp the elements of anatomy that are important to depicting dynamic figures in their work.

COMMUNITY

Trailblaze Challenge Info Meeting

Take on the Trailblaze Challenge Fall 2017. Hike and conquer 28.3 or 16.4 miles in one life-changing day to help grant wishes for local kids with life-threatening medical conditions through Make-A-Wish South Carolina. Find locations and times of meetings and RSVP online. sctrailblazechallenge.org

FRI

14

COMMUNITY

Bastille Day Greenville

Embassy Suites Riverplace 250 Riverplace | 6:30-11:30 p.m. $75 per person, $1,000 corporate table of 10 Join us for a celebration of French people and culture to benefit Black Sheep Farm Ltd., a horse-assisted education nonprofit in Fountain Inn. Ticket price includes Kir, French food (heavy hors d’oeuvres), French wine, dessert, silent and voice auctions, and a fashion show. Auction includes one week in ClermontFerrand, France, one week in Saumur, France, and many other local and French-themed items. The Embassy Suites Riverplace is offering a special room rate ($179) for guests that stay on July 14 after the party. bastilledaysgreenville.com

MUSIC

Villive Concert Series 2017

OPEN 7 DAYS a week

For details and locations visit:

GreenvilleRec.com

The Village of West Greenville | 1288 Pendleton St. 6-9 p.m. | Fridays | FREE Enjoy an outdoor, pet-friendly summer concert series that benefits Safe Harbor domestic shelter. Come every Friday evening to enjoy great music, food trucks, draft beer, and artisan vendors. villivemusic.com

COMMUNITY

Beachin’ Fridays Concerts

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 7 p.m. | Fridays | FREE People come from all over the Upstate to converge on the Mauldin Cultural Center’s outdoor amphitheater for evenings of shag dancing, food trucks, and craft beverages. All shows are free of charge. July 14 features The Tams with 14 Karat Gold Band.

MUSIC

Simpsonville Summer Music Series The Tater Shed 110 Academy St., Simpsonville 7-9 p.m. | Fridays | FREE The free Simpsonville Summer Music Series will be held Friday nights through Aug. 11, from 7-9 p.m. at The Tater Shed (or, in case of rain, at The Arts Center). Chairs, blankets, and picnic baskets are welcome. July 14 will feature Adiago345.

THRU SAT

15

LITERATURE

Call for Manuscripts: Emrys Press Chapbook Prize

$20 entry fee The Emrys Press Chapbook Prize honors a book of original poetry in English by a single author. The winning poet will receive a $1,000 honorarium upon publication plus 20 copies of the book. In addition, the winner will be invited as a guest for one week at the Rensing Center, a gorgeous arts and writing retreat near Greenville in the Appalachian foothills. The winning book and author will be featured on the Emrys website. emrys.org

SAT

15

COMMUNITY

Cupcakes, Conversations, and a Book Signing

Christian Supply Store 1600 John B. White Sr Blvd., Spartanburg FREE Beverly N. Vercher will launch the “Cupcakes, Conversations, & A Book Signing” tour at the Christian Supply Store in Spartanburg. Vercher is the author of “Good Hearts are the Easiest Broken” (2015) and “Shattered But Not Broken” (2017), a fictional two-part book series. Since the release of “Good Hearts are the Easiest Broken,” Vercher has been featured in over 20 magazines across the country and has been interviewed by countless bloggers and six radio shows. beverlynvercheronline.com

COMMUNITY

BeWell Mauldin Market

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin 8 a.m.-noon | Saturdays FREE The market features a variety of vendors from around the Upstate selling locally sourced and produced items including produce, dairy, eggs, honey, gifts, clothing, accessories, treats, pastries, and more. The market will also feature free healthy activities such as small-group fitness, health screenings, and cooking demos.

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE COMMUNITY

Greenville Health System Main Street between Court and Washington streets Saturdays through Oct. 28 | FREE TD Saturday Market presented by Greenville Health System brings farm-fresh produce, baked goods, meats, cheeses, seafood, and other specialty foods to downtown Greenville. This year’s market features the Lowes Foods Front Porch.

JUL. 15 CONCERT

« TD Saturday Market

youtube.com/watch?v=-ZcsE_HAvQQ

COMMUNITY

Banjo Extravaganza

Hagood Mill Historic Site 138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens 10 a.m. | $5 parking fee Hagood Mill will host a Banjo Extravaganza featuring Art Rosenbaum, one of America’s foremost performers and teachers of traditional five-string banjo playing. In addition to Rosenbaum, there will be a wonderful team of banjo musicians who will help guide guests on this magical musical journey. Additional performers include Bob Buckingham (Blue Ridge Rounders), Jason Sykes, Owen Grooms (Pretty Little Goat String Band), Michelle Turner, Andy Brooks, Derrick Phillips, Logan Redding (Left Lane Bluegrass), Dean Watson, and many other special guests. This live music event will begin around 11:30 a.m. Grounds open at 10 a.m. 864-898-2936

SAT & SAT

15 & 22

ART

Reproducing the Masters

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $89 Learn from the masters to understand various painting techniques and methods from the type of brush the artist used to paint application. Investigate the techniques, methods, and style of Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Edward Hopper in this one-day workshop. Instruction will include a brief discussion of the artist’s process and brush work that will help you paint a copy of one or more of these masterpieces. Reference material will be available.

WED

19

COMMUNITY

Coffee & Conversation with Tour of the USC School of Medicine Greenville

USC School of Medicine Greenville | 607 Grove Road 8-9 a.m. FREE Learn how Greenville Health System (GHS) and its primary academic partners — Clemson University, Furman University, and the University of South Carolina — are working together to pave the way for breakthroughs in health care delivery, access, and affordability through a unique, dynamic collaboration known as GHS Health Sciences Center. Event includes a tour of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville. bit.ly/2tlAi01

THU

20

ART

GCCA 2017 Member Show Registration

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. The annual GCCA Member Show is scheduled for Aug. 4-Sept. 27 and is open to all current members of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts. If you’re a current member and you’d like to participate in the GCCA 2017 Member Show, please RSVP to exhibitions@artcentergreenville.org by Thursday, July 20, with your name, title, medium, and dimensions of your piece in order to reserve a space in the exhibition. Entry requirements are as follows. One piece of artwork may be submitted per GCCA member. Only original work,

The Grateful Brothers

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 9:30 p.m. | $8 | gottrocksgreenville.com The Grateful Brothers are a band led by Upstate singer/guitarists Zach Thigpen and Brad Crowe who got together to pay tribute to their two favorite groups, The Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band, blending the playful experimentation of the former with the Southernrock virtuosity of the latter. They hadn’t played many shows before their gig at Gottrocks a few months back, so they were stunned when they packed the club to capacity. “It really surprised us,” Thigpen says. “We knew that we were going to have a good turnout because we’d heard from a lot of people that they were coming out, but the fact that it was full to capacity was a bit of an eye-opener.” Thigpen thinks that in addition to the loyal fan bases of both bands, there might be some other factors behind the Grateful Brothers’ quick popularity. “There’s been a resurgence in interest in the Dead because of their 50th anniversary shows,” he says. “And obviously the Allman Brothers had stopped touring, and then Gregg and Butch passed away, so there’s more attention on them as well. But aside from all of that, I think the music is just so timeless.” — Vincent Harris created within the last three years, and not previously shown at GCCA will be accepted. All artwork must be finished. No wet paintings will be accepted. All 2-D and 3-D mediums will be accepted but should not require installation by the artist. Work must be professionally framed or finished and securely wired for installation. (No clip mountings or saw tooth hangers will be accepted.) Reserve a pedestal in advance, if needed. Work must not exceed 36” in any direction and cannot weigh over 35 lbs.

MUSIC

Rock the River Concert Series

The Peace Center | TD Stage | 300 S Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $25-$60 The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, Rock the River, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage this summer. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge, and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. Thursday, July 20, will feature Kasey Chambers. Tickets are $30 lawn seating, $60 Genevieve’s package. peacecenter.org

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https://oshwa.bandcamp.com/

Future Chord Presents Oshwa w/ Estuarie and April B. & The Cool

CONCERT

JUL. 19

Radio Room 110 Poinsett Highway 9 p.m. | $7 radioroomgreenville.com

The Oshwa project is essentially singer, songwriter, and multiinstrumentalist Alicia Walter, which is difficult to believe, because on her most recent album, “I We You Me,” there are a lot of different things going on. Walter’s songs blend electronic pop, lush string arrangements, and jazzinfluenced vocal gymnastics, and there’s no way she would’ve been able to take the 13 musicians credited on the album on the road with her, so she’s created a different concept for her live show. “It’s largely based around synths, drum machines, and samplers,” she says, “and I augment that with choreography and narration during and in between the songs. The live show has a whole different feel than the album does.” Despite the heavy amount of pre-programmed beats and instrumentation going on, Walter likes to make sure she’s triggering everything herself, rather than using a laptop. “I like things to have an element of chance,” she says. “I know that if something gets messed up, I’m the one who messed it up.” —Vincent Harris

«Lakeside Summer COMMUNITY

Concert Series

Furman University Amphitheater 3300 Poinsett Highway 7:30 p.m. | Thursdays through August 3 | FREE Furman University’s Music by the Lake Summer Concert Series, a Greenville tradition since 1968, celebrates the sounds of summer. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2oVHWsT furmanmusic@furman.edu

LITERATURE

Storytime Thursdays

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | Thursdays through July 27 FREE Local independent bookstore Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime at the shop at 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 every Thursday morning at 10:30 a.m. July’s storytime titles are as follows: July 20, “Toad on the Road: A Cautionary Tale” by Stephen Shaskan; July 27, “Little Excavator” by Anna Dewdney. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

THU-FRI

20-21

COMMUNITY

Greenville Youth Summit

Greenville Family Partnership Bob Jones University | 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Greenville Family Partnership, in conjunction with Beyond Differences Inc., will hold its 10th annual youth summit at Bob Jones University on July 20 and 21. Youth between the ages of 14 and 17 will spend two days engaging in conversations and in-depth dialogues regarding various topics about the Greenville community. The youth summit is the only summit in the Upstate that seeks a cross-cultural selection of youth; all youth of every race, background, and ethnicity are encouraged to participate. 864-467-4099 | gfpdrugfree.org

THU-SUN

20-23

EDUCATION

Peace Chamber Summer Workshop

Campbell Young Leaders Peace Center, Huguenot Mill | 101 W. Broad St. $325 Catering to talented amateurs, accomplished musicians, and everyone in between, the Peace Chamber summer workshop provides invaluable experience to chamber musicians looking to hone their craft. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

SAT

22

ART

Acrylic Pet Portraits

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | $69 Learn to paint unique and charming portraits of your pet. Working from photographs, this workshop will cover a range of techniques, putting it all together in a painting full of personality and charm. Work with acrylic paint to mix neutral hues that are ideal for animal features and fur, and practice painting expressive eyes with realistic warmth. Learn to use loose, fluid brushstrokes for developing fur and whiskers and layer colors for a dimensional effect. Students should have some experience with acrylics, but beyond that, all levels are welcome.

SUN

23

LITERATURE

Book Signing: Patti Callahan Henry

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 2 p.m. | $17 (includes copy of book); $10 (includes $10 voucher redeemable at event) New York Times best-selling Southern women’s fiction author Patti Callahan Henry will discuss her new book, “The Bookshop at Water’s End” (Berkley, paperback, $16, on sale July 11), followed by a Q&A session and a book signing, at Fiction Addiction on Sunday, July 23, at 2 p.m. In this summer novel, the women who spent their childhood summers in a small Southern town discover it harbors secrets as lush as the marshes that surround it. There are two ticket options for this event: The $17 ticket admits one and includes one copy of “The Bookshop at Water’s End.” The $10 ticket admits one and includes a $10 voucher that can be redeemed at the event. fiction-addiction.com

MON

24

COMMUNITY

Parents’ Night Out, Kids’ PJ Party

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 6-8:30 p.m. $25 first child, $15 each additional child Take a well-deserved break. Drop the kids off at Fiction Addiction so you can enjoy a night out. Kids through age 12 are welcome to wear their PJs and bring a stuffed friend for a PJ Party. The store will have fun activities for all ages. Registration is $25 per child and $15 for each additional sibling. Children must be potty trained. Dinner for children is included (Jimmy John’s sandwich, chips, cookie, and drink). All participants must be registered in advance. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

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MON-SAT

24-29

VISUAL ART

Art Camp for Teens

Laura K. Aiken Studio 10 Central Ave. | 2-4 p.m. | $150 Campers (ages 12-18) will gain skills in painting, drawing, printmaking, mosaics, different mediums and substrates, introduction to famous artists, varied painting techniques, and different uses of brushes. All materials are included.

THRU WED

26

ART

Insight Exhibit

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. | FREE Greenville Center for Creative Arts exhibit featuring the work of artists Dorothy Shain, Kiah Bellows, and Glory Day Loflin.

THRU THU

27

VISUAL ARTS

“Masterworks of Color: African-American Art from the Greenville Collection”

Greenville County Museum of Art | 420 College St. Wednesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. | FREE Consider American and world history from the viewpoint of such accomplished African-American artists as William H. Johnson, Merton Simpson, and Kara Walker, among others. 271-7570 | gcma.org

THU

27

MUSIC

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates | 1 Lodge St., Asheville

7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Kool & The Gang kicks off the series on July 27 on the South Terrace of Biltmore House. 866-336-1255 | biltmore.com/concerts

THU-SUN

27-30

COMMUNITY

Carolina Foothills Dog Show Cluster

Greenville Kennel Club TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 8 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE An all-breed dog show open to the public that typically brings in 2,000 entries into the Greenville area. There will be a kids’ event for ages 5 to 9 on Friday, July 28. 440-525-1125 | Greenvillekc.org jhootman113@yahoo.com

THRU SAT

29

THEATER

“A Concern of Some Kind” Playhouse at Furman University

3300 Poinsett Highway | 8 p.m. | FREE The following episodes will be performed on consecutive Saturdays in July. July 15: Episode 5, “Lead By The Knows.” July 22: Episode 6, “Better To Give, Than To Deceive.” Guest artist: Marjorie Wentworth, S.C. state poet laureate, Charleston S.C. July 29: Season Finale, “A Gain In The Neck.”

aconcernofsomekind.com

SAT

29

COMMUNITY

Gravity Dodgeball Tournament

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N Academy St. | 3-6 p.m. By becoming a GPD Dodgeball Tournament sponsor or by registering a team, you are helping to bring important programs to Greenville’s youth to help prevent involvement in gangs and violence. bit.ly/2rNgDnK

THRU SUN

30

THEATER

Upstate Shakespeare Festival: “Titus Andronicus”

Warehouse Theatre Falls Park on the Reedy | 601 S. Main St. FREE Shows begin at 7 p.m. Thursday through Sunday each week during the run of shows. warehousetheatre.com

COMMUNITY

THRU MON

TCMU July Events

31

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | FREE Visit The Children’s Museum of the Upstate for reccuring events like Random Acts of Science, Off the Wall, and Storytime, as well as special one-time events. All events and activites are free with museum admission. tcmupstate.org

MON

31

COMMUNITY

Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering at Fluor Field

Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 6 p.m. | K-12 students free The Greenville Drive and partners BMW, Hubbell, and Greenville Technical College will host the second annual celebration of Advanced Manufacturing & Engineering at Fluor Field on July 31. Manufacturing and engineering exhibits, special activities in the ballpark, and the evening’s programming and entertainment are designed to open the eyes of the young people in attendance who represent the workforce of the future. To encourage students to enjoy this important learning experience, the Drive is providing tickets to all K-12 students at no cost. A portion of the proceeds from group tickets sold will be used to support the Center for Manufacturing Innovation Scholarship Fund.

Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

AUG TUE

01

COMMUNITY

Sooie BBQ Cook-off Registration Deadline

Carolina BBQ Association Mauldin Cultural Center | 101 E Butler Road 5 p.m. | $100 Sooie Mauldin’s Seventh Annual BBQ Cook-off will take place on Friday, Sept. 22, from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 23, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Only 20 team slots are open this year, though more may be added if space allows. The event is sanctioned and judged by the SC BBQ Association and will award cash prizes to first through fifth places. mauldinbbq.com | mparks@mauldinrecreation.com

TUE-THU

01-31

COMMUNITY

TCMU August Events

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Free with museum admission Visit The Children’s Museum of the Upstate for reccurring events like Random Acts of Science, Off the Wall, and Storytime, as well as special one-time events. This month’s events center around the theme of space, with special emphasis on the solar eclipse occuring in August. All events and activites are free with museum admission. tcmupstate.org

FRI-SUN

04-13

THEATER

“I Feel The Earth Move”

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. | $35 Get ready to travel back to the 1970s with GLT’s latest rockin’ musical review. Show dates are Aug. 4-5 and 10-12 at 8 p.m. and Aug. 6 and 13 at 3 p.m. 864-233-6238 | greenvillelittletheatre.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

Vitamins Herbal Supplements Skin & Body Holistic Pet Care C.N.H.P Certified Staff Gift Cards Available

www.garnersnaturallife.com


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 07.14.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Scraping for a Meal ACROSS 1 Letters with twists 6 “For want of — the horse was lost” 11 “Fernando” quartet 15 Tax-deferred svgs. plans 19 Not express, as a train 20 Daring feat 21 Briny expanses 22 Roman historian 23 Start of a riddle 25 Back talk 26 Caustic compounds 27 “Silkwood” star Meryl 28 Hail, mostly 29 Papier- — 30 IPod option 31 Riddle, part 2 35 700, to 22-Across 38 — -Julie, Que. 39 Morays and congers 40 Lays away 41 Momentous stretches 43 “Silence!” 46 Skinny 48 Six-pt. scores 49 Riddle, part 3 53 One of Isaac’s twins 57 Prenatal exam, briefly 58 “I’m so hungry I could — horse!” 59 J.D. Salinger title girl 60 Old Russian overlords 61 Movie house, in Spanish

63 65 67 68 74 76 77 78 81 83 87 89 90 91 94 96 97 98 99

Moreno of movies Moo — pork Rural tract Riddle, part 4 Jackie O’s Onassis Feel lousy — Alto, California Old — (Disney dog) Ridge on a fingerprint — mater Gilbert of “Roseanne” Go away Individual Riddle, part 5 Sothern of “Blind Date” “Nuts!” “Scat, cat!” Email button Flashy keyboard composition 103 Ruess of the band Fun 105 German city where Einstein was born 107 Real mess 108 End of the riddle 113 Prefix with presence 114 Shutter parts 115 — de plume 116 Privy to the plot 120 City in Texas 121 El — (city in Texas) 122 Riddle’s answer 124 “Son of —!” 125 Kuwaiti, e.g.

By Frank Longo

126 — Lodge motels 127 Fashion’s Oscar de la — 128 Deep wishes 129 Parcel (out) 130 Halt 131 Bar seat DOWN 1 Students at Yale 2 Cushiony 3 Injury vestige 4 Loosens up 5 Rains down cold pellets 6 Stubborn quadruped 7 Unemotional 8 Intuitive feeling 9 Cyclops’ facial feature 10 Sched. guess 11 Lee Harvey Oswald and others 12 Shore area 13 Big parties 14 Approve 15 Infirmities 16 Capital of Saudi Arabia 17 Broad road 18 B-board admins 24 Indifference 29 “Thoroughly Modern —” 32 Don’t throw away, maybe 33 Study fixture 34 The old man

35 36 37 42 44 45 47 50 51 52 54 55 56 60 62 64 66 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 79 80 82 84 85 86 88 91 92 93 95

Trim, as meat Perjury, e.g. Pink flower Actress Jaclyn Initiate “Begin the tune!” “Get Shorty” studio Parent of Maybelline Roman orator Musician John Habitats for brine shrimp Live USSR’s Cold War rival Mississippi city Far Eastern sash Gig gear “Over here!” Kingly name in Norway Oven for drying hops Weak spots Shul text Butter alternatives Piercing tool Pi-sigma link Occurrence “Angie Baby” singer Helen Knee jerks, e.g. British “Inc.” Destined Orderly groupings Nary — (no one) Serving to block junk email Obsessed by Sheltie relative Hanoi’s home, briefly

99 Having give-and-take 100 Measure of resistance 101 Mexican resort on the Yucatán 102 Blindingly bright 104 One of JFK’s sisters 106 Coal diggers 109 Tears into 110 Chocolate quaff 111 Church cries

Sudoku

Medium

112 Flat rental sign 117 Taboo deed 118 “... as — say ...” 119 Popular cookware brand 122 “Parks and —” (NBC series, for short) 123 “The Raven” poet Crossword answers: page 41

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 41


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

NGS

MENTS

SARIES

cement to the ville Area

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165

Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line 864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com

INVITATION TO BID: MILLER PLACE COURT DUPLEX DEVELOPMENT, MAULDIN NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR BIDS for new construction of nine (9) duplex homes for a total of eighteen (18) dwelling units within the City of Mauldin SC. The Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) is the developer and federal requirements will apply. Bids are due to GCRA c/o LS3P Associates, Ltd. / 110 West North Street / Greenville, SC 29601 by 2:00PM on July 31, 2017. For information and to request an electronic bid package, contact John Edwards at LS3P Associates, Ltd. 864-272-1228 or johnedwards@LS3P.com. Electronic transmitted bids will be accepted. GCRA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Local residents, Women & Minority Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in the bidding process. EOE, EHO.

NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that on July 28, 2017 at 1:00 PM, an auction will be held for the purpose of satisfying a landlord lien. B1- Jamie Fowler- power tools, stereo equipment, flat screen TV, 28-inch chrome wheel & tire set, dirt bike, shoes, bags of clothes. C4- Travis Klimek- futon set, couch, stereo equipment, furniture, clothing. D4- Litza Renero- boxes of clothes, housewares. D9Joann Yurko- furniture, boxes of household goods, clothing. LOCATION OF AUCTION: Galaxy Storage, 79 Salters Road, Greenville, SC 29607 (864-6889454). Ohlinger Auctions, LLC, 864-918-7572, SCAL3200

WEDDINGS

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION IN THE FAMILY COURT OF GREENVILLE JENNIFER N. BOLTA v. MARLON A. GUITAN 2017-DR-23-2240 TO: MARLON A. GUITAN 3410 A. WHITE HORSE RD. GREENVILLE, SC 29611 TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above-entitled action. The nature of the relief sought is as follows: The Plaintiff/Wife, Jennifer N. Bolta is seeking a divorce on the grounds of one year separation from you. You are required to answer such pleading no later than July 25, 2017, and upon failure to do so, the party seeking service against you will apply to the court for relief. This 7th day of July, 2017. RYAN M. JAMES, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 802 AUGUSTA ST. PO BOX 2995 (29602) GREENVILLE, SC 29605 864-335-9888

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 STATE page - $245, OF SOUTH CAROLINA Word Count 140 IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2016-DR-23-2228 Complaint Date filed: May 23, 2016 Time filed: 11:12 AM Iesha D. Jeter, Plaintiff, -vs.Channon A. Goodjion, Rashad Forward and John Doe, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint and Amended Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 522 N. Church Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff (s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) 467-0999

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that V A & D LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 6008 Whitehorse Road, Greenville SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 30, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C.A. NO: 2016-DR-23-3229 Teddy Doyal Bullock, Plaintiff, vs. Erica Lynn Melton (f/k/a Erica Melton Maloney) and Matthew J. Maloney, Defendants. TYOU ARE HEREBY summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service thereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs(s) shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. s/Lisa Richardson Mobley Lisa Richardson Mobley (10424) MOBLEY LAW FIRM 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 233-1657 (864) 235-7581 (fax) Attorney for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that RAIL LINE BREWING, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of WINE & LIQUOR AND ON & OFF premises consumption of BEER at 301 N. Main Street., Simpsonville, SC 29681. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 16, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that WINGS ON THE RUN intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3010 B EAST NORTH STREET, Greenville SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 30, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

AMENDED SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-00521 United Housing Connections, a South Carolina Non—Profit Corporation, Plaintiff, Vs. Jessie Arnold, Charles Lee, William Wooten, all unknown heirs of Gennette Lee, all unknown heirs of Shirley Chancellor and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0176.00-01-086.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply for the Court the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. AMENDED LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land, with all improvements thereon, situate, lying and being in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, being known and designated as Lot 13 and a portion of Lot 14 of Block F, Washington Heights, as shown on the plat thereof, dated December 1944 and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Greenville County, S. C. In Plat Book M at Page 107, and having, according to said plat, the following metes and bounds, to – wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin on the southeast side of Washington Loop at the joint corner of Lots Nos. 13 and 14, Block F, and running thence on a new line across Lot 14, S. 34 – 27 E. 90 feet to an iron pin in Lot No. 14; thence continuing across Lot No. 14, S. 3 – 40 W. 112 feet to an iron pin on the northern side of the right – of – way of the Southern Railroad Company; thence along the line of said right – of – way, S. 69 – 10 W. 50 feet to an iron pin at the rear corner of Lots Nos. 12 and 13; thence along the line of Lot No. 12, of Block F, N. 16 – 23 W. 186.8 feet to an iron pin on the southeast side of Washington Loop; thence along the southeast side of Washington Loop, N. 56 – 49 E. 47.8 feet to the beginning corner. TAX MAP #0176.00-01-086.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC State Bar No.: 5346

AMENDED SUMMONS (NON-JURY) NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Upstate Custom Builders, Inc., Plaintiffs, Vs. Jeremy Cason, Jonathan Cador, all unknown heirs of Erling Edward Fairfax, Jr., and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #M006.02-01-281.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon amended complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the Town of Mauldin, County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, and known and designated as Lot 24 Meadow Wood Subdivision as shown on plat recorded at Plat Book 4 –N at Page 25 in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County, South Carolina. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Greenville, SC Tax Map #M006.02-01-281.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

MISSING HEIR NOTICE The estate of the late James Edward SanSouci, Case Number: 2016ES08939, has been opened in the Berkeley County Probate Court. Anyone having any knowledge or information on the whereabouts of Brittany SanSouci, is to contact the Berkeley County Probate Court at 300-B California Avenue, Moncks Corner, SC 29461 or call 843-719-4512 or contact the Personal Representative, Becky L. SanSouci, at 799 Coral Acres Drive, Moncks Corner, SC 29461 or call 843-860-6870.


ALL-IN at Laurens rreennss Electric EEle lecct trric ic Cooperative’s Cooooopppeerraattiv iivvvee s 2017 22001177 Annual Annnua nua ctr

and • Best H $2000 Hand • Worst $250 rize P r o o D • Drawings

• Regist ratio

n

8 A.M.

Saturday, Satturrdaay, July 22, 2017 Dual Starting S tarting Locations: Locationn s: Laurens aurens Electric Ellectric Cooperative, 2254 Hwy. Hwyy. 14, Laurens, Laureens, SC or Harley-Davidson of Greenville, 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC

• First B ike out 9 A.M.

• Last B ike out 10 A.M.

Registra

(include

tion fee

s a FREE

$25

t-shirt)

Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube

Benefitting

Cooperative Care

Rain Date August 5

Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 • PO Box 700 • Laurens, SC 29360 • LaurensElectric.com

July 14, 2017 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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