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IN THIS ISSUE

SNO HUT CELEBRATES 30 YEARS • DOGS HELP VETERANS WITH PTSD • FDR’S FORGOTTEN ‘CHIEF OF STAFF’

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THEY SAID IT

“THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT THE ICE THAT PREGNANT LADIES LOVE. I DON’T UNDERSTAND IT, BUT MY WIFE DOES.” David Bishop, owner of Sno Hut in Taylors, on the popularity of his shaved ice.

“Nay, nay! We beg pardon of South Carolina women for such a suggestion.” James Furman, former Furman University president and son of its founder, after noting in a letter that interracial marriages could result from the freeing of slaves.

“I was a zombie. Cooper saved my life, my home, my family.” Tony Swett, an Army veteran whose Doberman helps him cope with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017

OPINION

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Views from your community

The dialogue that could bring America together on climate change By Bob Inglis

There’s a way around the wreckage that President Donald J. Trump has caused by withdrawing America from the Paris climate accord. His single-car accident put us in the ditch on the do-less side of the road with only one other country — Syria. Nicaragua is in the ditch on the do-more side of the road, having refused to join the accord because it didn’t go far enough. As America comes to recognize the wreckage that is populist nationalism, we’re expecting conservatives to spot a smoother ride up on the pavement and out of the ditch. On climate change, we may just find our progressive compatriots ready to pull along that solid road with us. U.S. Reps. John Faso (R-N.Y.) and John Delaney (D-Md.) recognize the need to get on that road. They’re advancing a bill to create a commission to study climate change solutions. At republicEn.org, we’re thinking that such a commission might find consensus at surprising speed. Democratic appointees to such a commission might be expected to say, “We’ve got to move quickly to curb emissions.” Republicans on the commission would likely say, “Right, and the fastest way to get innovation is through free enterprise.” “OK,” the progressives may say, “we’ve got a bevy of economists who would agree. And, conservatives, can you agree to a simple pricing of carbon dioxide if we agree to scrap a

regulatory approach?” “Can do,” the conservatives may respond. “The idea of a price signal is exactly what Milton Friedman would have told us to do and it fits with our bedrock principle of accountability.” A libertarian on the commission may well interject, “I’m glad you see the value of transparent, accountable marketplaces where all costs are in on all the fuels. Now, can we agree to eliminate all subsidies for all fuels and simply make them all accountable for all of their costs?” Progressives, aware of the opportunity cost of surrendering the environment as a political wedge issue, might insist, “If you mean all subsidies, including the implicit subsidy of dumping into the trash dump of the sky for free, and including the tax subsidies for the fossil fuels, then, yes, progressives could go along with eliminating all subsidies.” A conservative on the commission with a new constituency in wind may feel the need to dial the wind energy association for a side bar, “Is it OK to eliminate the production tax credit if carbon dioxide emissions are priced-in to fossil fuels?” Within minutes the conservative would be back in the room with the answer, “Wind is in.” An effective chair of the commission would seize the moment: “So we could all be in on a simple pricing of carbon dioxide. Steady, now — that means a carbon tax.” The conservatives on the commission speaking as actual conservatives — the kind who like to operate on data and precautionary principles — would say, “Give us a corresponding, dollar-for-dollar tax cut, making the new carbon tax revenue-neutral, and we’re in.” The progressives in the room might ask, “Are you willing to make that a payroll tax cut so as not to hurt poor people with a regressive carbon tax?” “We could go with that,” the conservatives might answer. “And, consistent with the president’s insistence that we not disadvantage manufacturing, can we make importers pay the same carbon tax?” “Yep,” the progressives would say, “A border-adjustment would suit us just fine. Labor would be happy with that. Besides, that’s the way to get the whole world in on a similar pricing of carbon dioxide. After China challenges our border adjustment and loses in the World Trade Organization, they’d enact the same carbon tax in China.” The conversation might deepen a bit when someone suggests a dividend of the money back rather than a tax cut. “Not a problem,” a consensus-minded chair could conclude. “Let’s let the Congress decide. Let’s report back the idea of a simple carbon tax on fossil fuels, applied to imports as well, and suggest that Congress either recycle the carbon tax revenue through a corresponding tax cut or through a dividend.” The only people left out of this conversation would be the disputers of climate science. But many of them really haven’t been disputing the science. They’ve been disputing the solutions. Once they see the commission reporting back with a solution that doesn’t harm the economy, even some of them might join in. The possibility of a dialogue like this makes us very glad about the prospect of a climate change commission. When America steps up to lead the world to action on climate change, we’ll look back and wonder why it took us so long to come together. Bob Inglis is the executive director of republicEn.org, a group of conservatives engaging conservatives on climate change. A Republican, he represented Greenville-Spartanburg in the U.S. Congress from 1993 to 1999 and 2005 to 2011.

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All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

THE PIANO MAN

Tom Strange has 37 pianos and thinks he’s finally found a place to put them

Photos by Paul Mehaffey Tom Strange has been assembling his collection of antique pianos since 1997.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Tom Strange has been working for nearly three years to find a permanent home in Greenville for his collection of early pianos, the oldest dating back to the 1770s. It appears he’s found it: the Greenville County-owned Coke building in Heritage Green that Bob Jones University’s Museum and Gallery vacated in February. Strange is working with the recently formed Carolina Music Foundation to start a music museum built on his Carolina Cavlier Collection. The collection features 37 working pianos from mostly the 18th century, as well harpsichords, the piano’s precursor. Strange said the groups are considering a proposed lease from the county, something he called “largely a lease we can live with” and one he hopes can be finalized next month. If all goes as planned, Strange hopes to open by Christmas or early 2018. Strange and his collection, featured in TOWN magazine

in 2015, encountered his first early keyboard while a physics student at the University of South Carolina. He built his own harpsichord in 1980 at the age of 24. Strange started collecting antique pianos in earnest in 1997, aided by the advent of the internet, which made it easier to find pianos he wanted to restore. While he invites students and world-renowned musicians to his home to play the pianos he has painstakingly restored, he knew it was important to get his collection in a more public setting. “It needs to be in a metro center,” he said. If the lease is worked out, Strange said the new facility will operate as a real music museum that strikes a balance between having everything behind ropes and glass and a place where anybody can come in and play. He says it’s likely that a short application will be required of those who want to play the instruments. “We’ll keep a log of how often an instrument is played,” Strange said. “They can be worn out.”

Last weekend, Strange traveled to Williamsburg, Va., to talk to conservator and curator John Watson about the how the Museums of Colonial Williamsburg strikes that balance with its “Changing Keys” exhibit. Duke University and the Frederick Historic Piano Collection is housed in Ashburnham, Mass. Plans call for the new museum to hold small acoustic concerts that feature the instruments as well. Strange hosts six to seven concerts a year at his home. The Heritage Green facility would allow a slightly larger attendance, somewhere in the vicinity of 80, he said. “For Greenville, it’s big,” he said. “It will help tell the story of music in the Upcountry.” While the Carolina Music Foundation waits for a lease to be finalized, Strange said work will continue on exhibit design. “We have an idea of the story we want to tell and how we want to tell it,” he said. “The story will be bigger than the early keyboard. We want to pull in roots music, too.”


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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FACING THE PAST

Furman is the latest university to address its historical connection to slave owners and white supremacists CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Richard Furman, Furman University’s namesake, believed slavery was justified by God. His son, James C. Furman, the man responsible for the school locating in Greenville and one of its presidents, was a slave owner and ardent secessionist. Today, the Upstate university is taking steps to address both these men and the school’s past. Recently, the school announced that it has created a Task Force on Slavery and Justice to examine the university’s historical connections to slavery and create educational programming that can help Furman better understand this part of its past. “The Furman community has a deep respect for its founders and we are looking for proactive ways to connect their legacies with our vision for the future, which is to prepare students for lives of purpose, fulfillment, and community impact in a diverse and global world,” said Furman Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost George Shields. “This is a step taken by many universities, and it’s in line with our principles as an academic institution that holds human value, reflection, and innovation in high regard.”

Furman was founded in 1826 in Edgefield as the Furman Academy and Theological Institution. It was named in honor of Richard Furman, a prominent minister who served as Richard Furman pastor of First Baptist Church of Charleston. The school moved to Sumter County and then to Winnsboro before moving to Greenville in 1850. In the letter “Exposition of the Views of the Baptists Relative to the Coloured Population,” Furman wrote, “The result of this inquiry and reasoning, on the subject of slavery, brings us, sir, if I mistake not, very regularly to the following conclusions: That the holding of slaves is justifiable by the doctrine and example contained in Holy writ; and is, therefore consistent with Christian uprightness, both in sentiment and conduct.” He added, “That slavery, when tempered with humanity and justice, is a state of

«


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tolerable happiness; equal, if not superior, to that which many poor enjoy in countries reputed free.” Furman’s son James maintained his father’s beliefs. In a “Letter to the Citizens of the Greenville District,” he wrote, “Every Negro in South Carolina, and in every other Southern States, will be his own master; nay, more than that, will be the equal of every one of you. If you are tame enough to submit, abolition preachers will be at hand to consummate the marriage of your daughters to black husbands. Nay, nay! We beg pardon of South Carolina women for such a suggestion.” The former Furman president also wrote that those Northerners opposed to slavery had “a false opinion, which contradicts common sense, contradicts all history, contradicts the Bible. … That false opinion is that every man is born free and equal.” Furman is one of a number of schools across the nation, including those in both former slave-owning and free states, who’ve been compelled to address the now-odious beliefs and practices of its founders and leaders. Last year, Clemson University students and faculty pushed the school to rename

Tillman Hall because the man for which it was named, former S.C. Gov. Ben Tillman, was an unapologetic racist, virulent white supremacist, and domestic terrorist. Instead of renaming the building, Clemson decided to erect three historic markers on campus commemorating the roles of African-Americans and Native Americans in Clemson’s history, a story that up until the last several years went mostly untold. At the groundbreaking for the first marker, Clemson President Jim Clements said, “The story of Clemson University’s founding is one of great vision and perseverance, but, as is the case with many great institutions founded when we were, it is also a story marked by oppression and human suffering.” Furman has joined the Universities Studying Slavery Consortium headquartered at the University of Virginia. Clemson and the University of South Carolina are among the 28 members. The consortium allows participating institutions to work together as they address historical and contemporary issues dealing with race and inequality in higher education, as well as the complicated legacies of slavery in modern society. The group will hold a symposium in Charlottesville, Va., in October.

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Reading Vision Correction is Here! Thee inlay ringring placed in the It works like Th inlayisisa atiny tinyporous porous placed incornea. the cornea. It works a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients. like a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients. Almost 114 million people in America struggle with age-related

Almost 114 million peopleTh ine America struggletowith agenear vision loss (presbyopia). inlay is designed reduce or related (presbyopia). The inlay is designed eliminatenear the vision need forloss reading glasses in people generally over 40 to reduce or eliminate the need reading glasses in people who have good distance vision, but for problems with near vision. generally over 40 who have good distance vision, but With the Kamra procedure, patients previously dependent on problems near up vision. readers canwith see things close again – menus, text messages,

Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution. Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate to offer patients reading vision correction through the KamraTM corneal inlay.

food labels, computers, books, magazines – and still have clear With the Kamra procedure, patients previously dependent distance vision. on readers can see things up close again – menus, text It received FDA in April 2015. Since magazines then, more than messages, foodapproval labels, computers, books, – and 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. Note that more still have clear distance vision.

than 37,000 have been implanted worldwide over the past 10 years.

Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution.

It received FDA approval in April 2015. then,this more “We are proud to be first in the Upstate to offSince er patients than 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. Note procedure. The Kamra is a great solution for people in their 40s that more than 37,000 have been implanted worldwide over the past 10 years.

Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate to offer patients reading vision correction through the KamraTM corneal inlay.

“We are proud to be first in the Upstate to offer patients this procedure. The Kamra is a great solution for people in their 40s and 50s who are frustrated with blurry near vision.

What is a cataract? Currently more than 24 million Americans have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness worldwide1 and many people don’t treat them due to fear of eye surgery. A cataract is a clouding of your eye’s natural lens. Cataracts slowly develop over time as the proteins in the lens start to clump and obscure vision. As the cataract grows, it blocks light causing blurry and dull vision. Typically, cataracts start to develop by age 60, but one in six people over age 40 are affected by cataracts.2 Because notcondition cause pain, redness or tears,lens people Cataractsthey are agenerally commondoeye where the natural often don’t even recognize they are developing a cataract. Here becomes clouded, impairing a patient’s vision. According to theare the signs Eye to beInstitute, aware of:more than 20 percent of Americans will National • Blurred have cataractsvision, by thedouble age ofvision, 65, and the prevalence increases with ghost images, or you sense a age. In cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is “film” over your eyes. removed and replaced with an IOL. • Lights seem too dim to see close For up, many cataract surgery or patients, night driving is diffi cult. freed them from prescription glasses, sometimes replaced • New prescriptions for but eyeglasses vision. themdon’t withimprove readers.your A new intraocular lens (IOL) that provides a fulldiffi range visionabout for cataract If you are having cultyofgoing your daily activities because ofeven blurred you may have cataract patients, thosevision, with astigmatism, is anow an and should book anforeyemany exampatients. with your eye doctor immediately. Cataracts are option highly treatable, and cataract surgery is one of the most common, Clemson Eyeand surgeon Brian in Johnson calls The you are at comfortable safestDr. surgeries the U.S. While your appointment, askchanger.” your doctor if you are a candidate for laser Symfony lens a “game In September, cataract surgery. Dr. Johnson became one of the first surgeons in Greenville to implant the new lens, which was just What is Astigmatism? approved by the in July for use in the U.S.or lens that leads to Astigmatism is a FDA common defect in the cornea blurry vision, trouble reading, squinting, eye strain, headaches and tired eyes. It is common, often present from birth and interferes with us having perfect vision.

“Most of the focusing power of the eye happens along the front clear window surface, called the cornea, and through the lens. A normal cornea is rounded like a soccer ball. But a cornea with astigmatism is shaped more like a football,” explains Dr. Brian Johnson of Clemson Eye. The cause of the astigmatism is unknown. While all degrees of astigmatism may be treated with eyeglasses or contact lenses, this is a compromise because there is resulting distortion of your peripheral vision. If you require cataract surgery and have astigmatism, you cancataract get superior visual your Until the Symfony, patients withquality signifiby canthaving astigmatism astigmatism corrected during your laser cataract surgery. were limited to monofocal lens implants that would correct either distance or near vision, but Laser not both. Symfony is the first extended Modern Cataract Surgery laser cataract surgery involves a tiny 2.2 depth of focus lensModern with astigmatism correction. mm stitch-lessTh laser incision and thenight replacement is allows excellent vision of the diseased,and cloudy lens with a clear(visual lens sharpness of vision implant. During the 15-minute procedure, acuity) at near, intermediate and patients are comfortably awake and experience far distances. clear vision during a prompt recovery.

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and who withpatients blurry near vision. The vision inlay The 50s inlay offare ersfrustrated presbyopia a safe reading offers presbyopia patients a safe reading vision correction solution correction solution and freedom from the hassle of readers,” and freedom from the hassle of readers,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical Director at Clemson Eye. Director at Clemson Eye. The elective procedure takes about 15 minutes and is reversible Ththe e elective procedure takes about 15have minutes and is eye if patient chooses. Even patients who had previous surgery, such as cataract or Even who wear bifocals canhave be reversible if the patientpatients, chooses. patients who candidates for the had previous eyeKamra. surgery, such as cataract patients, or who Clemson Eye off ersbe free reading vision correction wear bifocals can candidates for the Kamra. consultations. To find out if you’re a candidate, call today to Clemson Eye offers free reading vision correction book your appointment. consultations. To find out if you’re a candidate, call Clemson Eye’s new Greenville location is 360 Pelham Road, today to book your appointment. just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading provider of Clemson new eye care in Eye’s the area forGreenville 40 years. location is 360 Pelham

Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading provider of eye care in the area for 40 years.

June is Cataract Awareness Month “Now, the same laser used for laser vision correction can also precisely treat astigmatism, make incisions and chop the cataract,” says Dr. Parisi. With recent LenSx® laser FDA approval, surgeons now create incisions that are up to 10 times more precise than manual incisions.4 “The laser is customized for each unique eye and creates a superior relaxing incision inside the cornea, sparing the delicate nerves while fixing the astigmatism. We have definitely seen laser cataract surgery result in more precise incisions, less eye stress and better outcomes ourin patients,” Dr. Parisi. The Symfony hasforbeen use in 49adds countries for several years, but the FDA approval came after a randomized clinical trial of 148 Local Leaders in Eye Surgery “A new eraInhas patients,” says Dr. Don patients. thatbegun trial, for 77 cataract percent of Symfony patients hadGlaser, 20/25 also a surgeon with Clemson Eye. “We were the first in the Upstate vision at intermediate distances, compared with 34 percent who to offer laser cataract surgery and we have the most experience with had a traditional mono-focal lens. Near vision forCarolina, reading was it. Clemson eye has four offices in Upstate South and we offer many solutions including visionofcorrection improved and visual patients were able to read laser two levels smaller for both and near vision, implantable contact lenses, lens lines thandistance their mono-focal counterparts. exchanges and laser cataract surgery. “Patients whoParisi have and received have beenBoard very excited and Drs. Johnson, Glaserthese are American and LenSx® Certifi edwith Ophthalmologists. They have have improved,” performed over pleased how their lifestyles Dr. 50,000 Johnson cataract and refractive procedures. They are leaders in the Upstate notes. “These lenses are ideal for patients who have an active with implanting advanced lenses such as TECNIS® Symfony, lifestyle. Th ey now meetthe theReSTOR-Toric® needs of our patients to golf, ReSTOR® and 3.0 for who theirlike cataract patients. Also, Clemson Eye now off ers “topography-guided” use a computer or tablet, shop, use a smartphone, and driveLasik with Contoura Vision; the most advanced modern lasik in the nation. at night.” Their legacy of innovation continues with modern eye surgery.

New Technology for Cataract Patients “Until a few short years ago, cataract required the use oflike a Newsurgery technology innovations, manual surgical blade to open thethe eyeSymfony, and capsule supporting the continue to improve lens. This increased the chance of variable outcomes. Laser cataract the IOLs and the visual outcomes surgery benefits patients because it causes less variability and tissue patients with a variety of damage than the bladed method,”forsays Dr. Johnson. conditions. The two most Better Clarity after Laser Cataract Surgery signifi cant improvements are vastly Perfect vision is the goal in most cataract surgeries. Unfortunately, improved intermediate vision 3and it is reached in only 55 percent of traditional cataract surgeries an extended range vision acuity due to the uncorrected astigmatism left behind and of possible measurement prediction errors. for patients with astigmatism. “My partners and I always put intense effort into our surgical planning with the best technology, testing and analysis to treat astigmatism,” says Dr. Joe Parisi, medical director at Clemson Eye.

1. IDK 2. NEI.neh.gov Vision Problems in the U.S.: Prevalence of Adult Vision Impairment and Age-Related Eye Disease in America. Prevent Blindness America and he National Eye Institute, 2008 3. Aiming for emmetropia after cataract surgery: Swedish National Cataract Register study. Behndig A; Montan P; Stenevi U; Kugelberg M; Zetterstom C; Lundstrom M 4. Nagy Z Takacs A, Filkorn T, Sarayba M. Initial clinical evaluation of an intraocular femtosecond laser in cataract surgery. J Refract Surg. 2009;25(12): 1053-1060


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City Park could become home to Veterans Park Greenville’s planned City Park on the west side of town could become the home of a proposed Veterans Park. Doug Greenlaw, chairman and co-founder of the Community Journals and founder of the Upstate Chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, told Greenville County Council that City Park would be the best site from among all of the current parks studied by the Veterans Park Committee he chairs. Greenville County Council has endorsed the idea. The City Council has not addressed the proposal. Groundbreaking for City Park could be held as early as spring 2018. The City of Greenville plans to select a new, yet-to-bedetermined name for the proposed park, possibly something that would tap into the site’s history. City Council has earmarked up to $2 million a year for 10 years out of hospitality tax revenue for the public improvements associated with the park. The city is constructing a new public works complex on Fairforest Way. Public Works will be relocated from its current site, with City Park taking the place and adjoining land. Currently, Greenville County doesn’t have a park dedicated to veterans; however, there is a memorial at County Square. Once County Square is redeveloped, the veterans memorial will no longer have a home. The County Square veterans memorial was erected in 1996 by the Greenville County Veterans Affairs department and honors those who fought in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf Wars, and undeclared wars. It also honors Medal of Honor recipients, prisoners of war, and those who are missing in action. There are several other veteran memorials in the county. There’s a Vietnam Veterans Memorial honoring 14,000 Greenvillians in Cleveland Park. A Korean War Memorial is located at Lake Conestee Nature Park on Mauldin Road. Cleveland Park is also home to the Rudolf Anderson Jr. Memorial. Anderson, a Greenville native, was the only casualty of the Cuban Missile Crisis. A Confederate War monument, erected in 1891, is located in Springwood Cemetery. —Cindy Landrum

POLITICS

Trey Gowdy to head Michael Flynn investigation Former Spartanburg solicitor and current U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy will take over as the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. A steering committee selected Gowdy to lead the Oversight Committee formerly headed by Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz. On Tuesday, Gowdy was confirmed as the Oversight chair.

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As chair of the House Oversight Committee, Gowdy will lead the investigation into whether or not former Trump administration national security advisor Michael Flynn broke any laws. At issue are charges that Flynn violated the emoluments clause, which prevents a member of the U.S. government from receiving payment from foreign governments. Flynn failed to state he had been paid by the Russian government-backed news agency RT to speak. The amount he reportedly pocketed: $45,000. Gowdy’s committee is not investigating the Trump administration’s alleged ties to Russia. The House Intelligence Committee is looking into that, as is the Senate Intelligence Committee, the body before which recently ousted FBI director James Comey testified before last week. Special counsel Robert Mueller, meanwhile, is also investigating Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, which America’s intelligence community agrees happened. In addition, Mueller will look at charges that Trump administration officials coordinated with Russia and other matters related to this investigation, like Comey’s accusations that Trump urged him to drop the Flynn investigation. Although Democrats have blasted Gowdy for his perceived hyper-partisan leadership of the Benghazi committee, the Spartanburg representative has been both a Trump supporter and a critic, although he has more often favored the president’s actions than opposed. Gowdy has previously supported Trump’s travel ban, but argued it needed more clarity, dismissed calls that Obama had wiretapped Trump as the president tweeted, and criticized Comey for not doing more to investigate White House leaks. —Chris Haire

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Furman University is hosting a variety of public events on campus on the day of the Aug. 21 total eclipse, including a guided viewing presentation at Paladin Stadium. The event, called Eclipse@Furman, runs from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. A festival will be held at the stadium entrance between noon and 2 p.m. It will include thematic activities, concessions, special music, free Furman cups, and water stations. Furman physics professor David Moffett will narrate a discussion as the eclipse unfolds between 2 and 2:45 p.m. The university will provide special glasses to all attendees. In the event of inclement weather that day, Eclipse@Furman will be held at Bon Secours Wellness Arena and will feature live streaming of the eclipse from NASA. While Greenville and other South Carolina counties will be in the path of totality, much of the eastern United States will see only a partial eclipse. The solar eclipse will begin in Greenville at 1:09 p.m. and end at 4:02 p.m. The city will be engulfed in near darkness for 2 minutes and 8 seconds beginning at approximately 2:38 p.m. Furman has created a website, furman.edu/eclipse, with details. —Cindy Landrum NEWS continued from PAGE 11

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Governor’s School sets record for scholarship offers One hundred and two students graduated from the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities last month. They pulled in a collective $36 million in scholarship offers, setting a new school record by $7 million. The Washington Post named the Governor’s School one of this year’s “America’s Most Challenging High Schools,” measured by the number of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and Advanced International Certificate of Education tests given at a school each year divided by the number of seniors who graduated that year. About 12 percent of America’s high schools qualified for the list. Members of the class of 2017 will attend schools and conservatories across the nation. The Governor’s School will accept applications for the 2018-19 school year and summer programs beginning Sept. 1. Any 10th-grade student living in South Carolina can apply and audition to attend the high school program their junior and senior years. The music and dance programs also accept exceptionally talented sophomores.

The Governor’s School has a maximum capacity of 242 students and gets about 1,000 students applying each year. —Cindy Landrum

TRANSPORTATION

Group to protest proposed Trump cuts to Amtrak lines

Greenville would be among the 220 cities that would lose rail passenger service if President Donald J. Trump’s proposed budget is adopted. On Friday, June 23, Greenville will be one of at least 20 cities where Rally for Trains rallies will be held in protest of Trump’s measure. The White House’s proposed budget eliminates all federal funding for Amtrak’s national network trains and cuts $499 million from TIGER grants, a program that Greenville and Greenville County have unsuccessfully applied for twice to expand the Greenlink bus system. Other cities and regions have used TIGER grants to expand passenger rail

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and transit projects. The Crescent line that runs from New York City to New Orleans, with stops in Greenville, Spartanburg, and Clemson, is one of 15 long-distance rail routes threatened by Trump’s proposal, according to the National Association of Railroad Passengers. The Palmetto route that serves Charleston and Columbia is also threatened, according to the association. If the national network routes were cut, South Carolina would be one of 23 states without access to passenger trains. — Cindy Landrum

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MUSIC

New composition by Dan Forrest highlights Greenville Chorale’s ’17-’18 season The Greenville Chorale announces its 20172018 season, which features a variety of new and old choral and choral-orchestral works, including a commissioned work by Greenville resident and nationally acclaimed composer Dan Forrest. Forrest’s latest major work, “Lux,” will premiere at the Peace Center during the Oct. 28 fall concert, titled “The Music of Dan Forrest.” The new work was commissioned by Gordon and Sarah Herring for the chorale. Conductor Bingham Vick Jr. says “Lux,”

The Greenville Chorale will premiere Dan Forrest’s “Lux.”

meaning “light,” should be completed in July. Preliminary viewings of the texts Forrest is working with indicate the composition, which is for chorale, vocal soloists, and orchestra, will have broader appeal and not be limited to a specific time in the religious calendar, Vick says. “He takes a lot of time to consider and digest the text before he gets into the music,” Vick says of Forrest’s process. For the annual Christmas concert, Dec. 8 at McAlister Auditorium, Furman University, the NEWS continued on PAGE 14

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chorale will be joined by the Blue Ridge High School concert choir and a brass ensemble of local professional musicians. Various local high school choirs have joined the chorale in years past for this concert. “They always add a special spark,” Vick says. The February concert will feature the Herring Chamber Ensemble, a select group of performers from the chorale. It’s set for Feb. 18 at Buncombe Street United Methodist Church and Feb. 25 at First Baptist Church, Greenwood. The program is titled “Music that Consoles, Celebrates, and Is Just Plain Fun” and features sacred works as well as works made popular by The King Singers, a male acapella group which will be celebrating their 50th anniversary. “The King Singers spurred a major choral trend,” Vick says. “We want to celebrate their contribution.” In collaboration with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, the chorale will perform “Requiem” by Giuseppi Verdi May 5-6, as part of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra Masterworks Series with Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel at the Peace Center. This concert is not a part of the chorale season ticket. Closing out the season, the chorale will perform with The Lakeside Summer Band, conducted by Les Hicken, as it has for 14 seasons in a free outdoor concert at the Furman

University amphitheater. Tickets are available through the Peace Center Box Office at 864-467-3000. —Ariel Turner

Sit-N-Spin Studios finds a new home For years, Matt Morgan’s Sit-N-Spin Studios operated out of a small space off Pleasantburg Drive. It was a place where big names like Darius Rucker and Yonrico Scott recorded along with Upstate favorites like Jef Chandler and Donnie Blackwell. But a little over a month ago, Sit-N-Spin vacated their old digs and moved to a new spot at 31-B Augusta St., just behind the Warehouse Theatre. Morgan says the new studio is superior in every way to his old spot. “This is a million-dollar studio, without me having to spend a million dollars,” says Morgan of the studio, which originally began as Edwin McCain’s personal recording space. “The room is professionally tuned. In terms of soundproofing, I had a quarter of this at my old place. I’ve doubled the amount of tracks I can record. You can walk out of here with a product on par with any other place in the world.” While Morgan intends to continue working with as many local bands as possible, he has several new goals at the new studio, goals that the facility upgrade has made possible. For one, he’s moved into film scoring, working with the Falls Park Entertainment production company and writing the entire soundtrack

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to one of their films, Chris White’s “Unbecoming.” “I’ve dabbled in film before,” Morgan says, “but this was my first full-length film, and that was such a rewarding thing.” He adds, “I’ll always produce local bands, but it’s hard to make money that way. Bands will call me up and say, ‘We’ve got $300; we need to make a record.’ And for a film or commercial, $300 is a down payment for the first couple of hours. So I’m trying to do both.” Morgan is also hoping to let other engineers and producers use the studio to build strong word-of-mouth. “That’s the goal, is to tie some high-end producers to this place and gain regional clients,” he says. “We’ve got everything they need.” —Vincent Harris

Dance fest coming to Saluda River Yacht Club Yes, it’s called the Lazy River Fest, and yes, it takes place at the Saluda River Yacht Club, a camping and river-tubing site about five minutes from Greenville’s West End, but don’t assume that the three-day event is a mecca for jam-bands or Americana. Under the aegis of the Upstate DJ collective known as the Shadow Council, the Lazy River Fest, which kicks off on Friday, June 16, at 10 a.m., has grown over the last few years into an electronic dance music

blowout that brings some of the best regional and national DJs to town for a nonstop dance party by the Saluda River. This year’s version is the biggest the Shadow Council has yet put on, featuring headliners Dimension (Friday night), Calyx & Teebee (Saturday night), and Legion and Logam (Sunday night), along with nearly 30 other performers on the main stage and a second stage indoors, including Metatron, Devious, and Soul Candy. Virtually all of the performers specialize in drum and bass music, a style of EDM that sends frenzied, light-speed beats skittering across ambient, heavily synthesized soundscapes, creating a hypnotic contrast between the relentless rhythms and spacy melodies. “The Lazy River Fest is about introducing people to new music and new culture, and if you make a few dollars along the way, that’s great,” says Andrew Peek of the Shadow Council. “If we can give people a taste of this music they may not be accustomed to, I feel like nine out of 10 of them will fall in love with it.” Peek speaks about drum and bass with the passion of a longtime fan rather than simply a concert promoter. “For me, there’s no better feeling than taking two styles that don’t go together and finding something that makes them fit together beautifully,” he says. “It can convey any type of emotion; it can create and destroy at the same time.” —Vincent Harris

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Summer is a time of adventure. Whether you’re a kid wandering the creeks and woods of the neighborhood or Mom and Dad taking a much-needed week off at a mountain cabin, chances are summer’s when it happens. With this in mind, this week the Greenville Journal has put together a handy-dandy guide to some of our favorite nearby attractions. Spoiler alert: We love the great outdoors.

Pearl’s Topiary Garden Bishopville, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 150 miles pearlfryar.com

Photo by Dustin Shores

When Pearl Fryar tried to buy his first home in an all-white neighborhood in Bishopville back in 1976, the owner wouldn’t sell it to him because of the stereotype that blacks didn’t keep up their yards. So Fryar bought another home and set out to prove the man wrong by becoming the first African-American to win “Yard of the Month” in the local paper. Armed with a load of shrubs that were discarded by nurseries because they were unattractive and a threeminute lesson at a local nursery, Fryar started what has become a world-renowned topiary garden. It’s truly an astounding site. Even if you can’t make the trek, check out the 2006 documentary about Fryar and his garden, “A Man Named Pearl.” —Cindy Landrum

Photo by Mac Stone

Francis Beidler Forest Harleyville, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 175 miles sc.audubon.org/chapters-centers/beidler-forest-visitor-information

While many tourist attractions bill themselves as a place like no other, it’s a claim Francis Beidler Forest can truly make. Located outside of Harleyville and 40 miles from Charleston, Francis Beidler is the largest remaining virgin tupelo and cypress swamp forest in the world. The swamp drains into the Edisto River, which happens to be the world’s largest free-flowing blackwater river. Listed as one of the nation’s most important birding sites and owned by the National Audubon Society, Beidler is a magnet for birders, nature photographers, and outdoor lovers. Prime attractions are the prothonotary warblers that nest in the cypress knees and barred owls. In addition to several species of birds, visitors may also see deer, turtles, and snakes. A boardwalk guides visitors along a 1.75-mile loop through the heart of the forest and swamp, and an app is available to serve as a guide. When there’s enough water, canoe and kayak trips are available. —Cindy Landrum

Hilton Head and Daufuskie Islands Distance from Greenville: 240 miles hiltonheadisland.com

Photo by Hilton Head Tourism

Hilton Head Island is probably best known for its award-winning golf courses. Tennis is a major sports draw as well. And of course, it’s also a favorite vacation spot for its quiet beaches and non-party vibe – the closest thing to a “strip” for cruising is Coligny Plaza, a spot teeming with vacationers on balmy nights looking for souvenirs and Rita’s Italian Ice. But the shoe-shaped island and its neighbor Daufuskie Island are also home to a significant amount of Gullah history, culture, and arts dating back to 1663. The Gullah Museum of Hilton Head Island is the hub of it all, maintaining Gullah customs, traditions, language, stories, songs, and structures on the island. Restaurants Ruby Lee’s North and Ruby Lee’s South provide authentic Gullah cuisine and experiences on HHI, while boat tours run daily between the two islands. Tours of Daufuskie, which can be reached by boat or helicopter only, can be either as spontaneous as a self-guided golf cart tour through the rustic, historic sites or as formal as a custom tour led by sixth-generation Gullah chef Sallie Ann Robinson. —Ariel Turner

Photo by Jeffry DuPre

Edisto River Treehouses Carolina Heritage Outfitters Canadys, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 180 miles If you’re like us here at the Greenville Journal, you spend a good portion of your week wired in. Whether it’s through your smartphone or laptop, you are constantly connected to the rest of the world. There’s the texts from your friends, pings from your favorite news organizations, and tweets from President Donald J. Trump himself. All of that is exhausting. Which is why we have to go off the grid from time to time. And there are few places that are more tech-free than Carolina Heritage Outfitters’ Edisto River cabins. Located 13 miles up the river, in an area accessible by canoe or kayak but not by car or foot, you’ll find CHO’s cabins rising above the blackwater below. There’s no AC, no Wi-Fi, no cellphone coverage, and no power. The cabins sleep anywhere from two to eight, and feature few amenities beyond some futons, a screened-in sleep area, and an outdoor grill. Of course, if you’re averse to the heat and humidity — not to mention Mr. Alligator and all his friends — this might not be the place for you. —Chris Haire


06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM New Belgium Brewing Company Asheville, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 60.7 miles newbelgium.com/brewery/asheville

Wild Horses Crystal Coast, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 400 miles portal.ncdenr.org/web/crp/ rachel-carson#naturalfeaturesrc

Green Man Brewery Distance from Greenville: 61.8 miles greenmanbrewery.com Wicked Weed Brewing Pub Distance from Greenville: 62.9 miles wickedweedbrewing.com

Photo by Emily Pietras

With mainstays like Thomas Creek Brewery, Brewery 85, Quest Brewing Co., and newer arrivals, including Birds Fly South Ale Project and 13 Stripes Brewery, the Upstate’s beer scene certainly isn’t something to scoff at. Nevertheless, Asheville remains the brewery capital of the Carolinas, with the city claiming the most breweries per capita in the entire country. Luckily for us here in Greenville, we’re a mere daytrip away from this little slice of heaven. Green Man Brewery, one of the original breweries in the Asheville area, just celebrated its 20th anniversary and in March 2016 opened the three-story, 20,000-square-foot Greenmansion, which includes a packaging hall, retail center, and an 18-tap tasting room on the top floor that also offers spectacular views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Wicked Weed Brewing may have ruffled the feathers of some craft beer purists when they were acquired by Anheuser-Busch InBev in May, but they still remain a pillar of Asheville’s beer scene. Wicked Weed’s pub, conveniently located right next to the Orange Peel and within one of the city’s main restaurant hubs, houses its own restaurant, along with a downstairs 25-tap bar with plenty of outdoor seating. Their nearby rustic-style Funkatorium will appeal to fans of aged sours and farmhouse ales. Perhaps the biggest recent splash that has further bolstered Asheville’s reputation as a brewery paradise was the arrival of Fort Collins, Colo.-based New Belgium Brewing in the River Arts District. The 6,000-square-foot tasting room (referred to as the “liquid center”), which opened in May 2016, has more than 20 beers on tap and outdoor views of the French Broad River, where you can watch tourists and locals paddleboard as you sip on some suds. And for those who are willing to venture outside of Asheville, big-name breweries Sierra Nevada and Oskar Blues are located in Fletcher and Brevard, respectively. —Emily Pietras Hunting Island State Park Beaufort, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 254.5 miles southcarolinaparks.com/huntingisland Hunting Island State Park is the most popular park in South Carolina, welcoming over 1 million visitors each year. But the park had been closed since Hurricane Matthew inflicted $5 million in property damage across the 5,000-acre seaside haven last year. After a shutdown lasting nearly eight months, Hunting Island State Park reopened earlier this month to the delight of many, with both the North Beach and South Beach areas Photo by Bill Fitzpatrick and saltwater lagoon accessible once again. Parts of the park, however, will look unfamiliar to past visitors. Matthew wiped out camping areas, a couple hundred parking spaces, and dunes. An estimated 2,500 forest trees were lost after being exposed to saltwater. But many of the park’s picturesque features that make it a must-see destination for state residents and out-of-towners remain. In addition to the restored pristine beaches, visitors can still enjoy most of the 8-mile-long network of hiking and biking trails that wind across the park. And perhaps most significant of all, Hunting Island’s historic lighthouse, the only publicly accessible structure of its kind in our state, is still standing tall. Visitors can pay $2 to walk up the 167 steps that lead to an observation deck — a small price to pay to see spectacular views of the ocean and a beloved park restored. —Emily Pietras

Wild horses make their home on the barrier islands along North Carolina’s Crystal Coast. Both are accessible only by boat. A herd of about 30 horses live at the Rachel Carson Reserve, a series of small islands Photo by Cindy Landrum located between the mouths of the Newport and North Rivers. The horses can sometimes be seen across Taylor’s Creek from the historic waterfront in Beaufort (pronounced BOW-fert, not BEW-fert like in South Carolina). A local physician first introduced horses at Rachel Carson in the 1940s. They were allowed to roam and eventually became feral. The reserve, which is three miles long and less than a mile wide, is named after environmentalist and writer Rachel Carson. You can also find wild horses at Shackleford Banks, a barrier island within Cape Lookout National Seashore. Local legend has it that the horses there are descendants of Spanish mustangs that survived a shipwreck. An added benefit of going to Shackleford Banks is Cape Lookout Lighthouse. The lighthouse is open for tours from the third week of May to the third weekend in September. — Cindy Landrum

South of the Border Hamer, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 216 miles thesouthoftheborder.com We’re not saying you have to warmly embrace them, but every South Carolinian must eventually come to terms with the fact that their state contains two nationally infamous pieces of mimetic architecture. One is here in the Upstate: Gaffney’s 135-foot water tower in the shape of a peach — or, as some frankly think, a butt. The other is in the Pee Dee Photo by Leonard J. DeFrancisci region, just south of the North Carolina border. His name is Pedro, he’s a 104-foot caricature of a Mexican bandito, and he’d like to welcome you to South of the Border. If you’ve spent any time on I-95, you’ve seen the billboards pointing you to exit 1. There used to be a lot more of them — all the way up to Philadelphia — and they used to be a lot worse. Written by Alan Schafer, who started South of the Border as a roadside beer joint in 1949 and died in 2001, the offensive parodies of Spanish dialect (e.g., “Sommtheeng Deeferent!” and “Too Moch Tequila!”) were finally removed after public pressure in the mid-’90s. What remains is a hotel (with attached “pleasure dome,” which anticlimactically houses just a swimming pool), restaurants, campground, a reptile lagoon, Pedroland’s kiddie rides, and the Sombrero Tower, which proffers a view of South of the Border’s 135 acres. Souvenirs abound, of course, and everywhere you look is a photo op. Whether you see him as harmless campy kitsch or horrifying cultural stereotype, Pedro has been waiting smilingly for generations of travelers, and he’ll be waiting for you this summer, too, on your journey out of the South. —Jerry Salley

Museum of York County Rock Hill, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 90 miles chmuseums.org Few people outside of Rock Hill know that the creator of Kellogg’s Snap, Crackle, and Pop called the Charlotte, N.C., suburb his home. And even fewer perhaps are aware of his name, Vernon Grant. But at the Museum of York County in Rock Hill, you can learn all about Mr. Grant, his successful Photo by Cultural Heritage Museums career as an illustrator and ad man, and his lifelong love affair with creating cute elfish creatures. Oddly enough, the Grant exhibit isn’t even the real draw of the museum. Nope. That would be the facility’s Smithsonian Natural History Museum-esque offerings, a taxidermy collection of scores of African and North American animals, from elephants and giraffes to bears and big cats. Yes, it’s a little creepy, but the sheer number of animals is something to behold. —Chris Haire


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

THE ROAD TO WEIRDO-VILLE

Kazoo Museum Beaufort, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 235 miles kazoomuseum.org

Out of the ordinary. Off-the-wall. It doesn’t matter what words are used to describe it. From becoming a pinball wizard in Asheville and crushing cars with an Army tank in the Georgia mountains to following the Yellow Brick Road in Boone to a voodoo village in South Carolina’s Lowcountry, there are plenty of destinations in the Carolinas and Georgia when the usual same ol’ places won’t do. —Cindy Landrum Photo by Kazoobie Kazoos

Oyotunji African Village Sheldon, S.C. Distance from Greenville: 220 miles oyotunji.org

Photo by Susan Kellum, Wilson Downtown Development Corporation

There’s a sign on the gate that reads “Notice: You are leaving the U.S. You are Entering the Yoruba Kingdom.” Visitors are welcome at this voodoo village in Beaufort County. Oba Oseijeman Adefunmi I founded the traditional West African village in 1970 after he abandoned his life in Detroit and traveled the world learning the history of his people. The village has residential compounds, a café and marketplace, small garden plots, ancestral altars, temples, and a palace. The village has a yearly festival, and Oba conducts African naming ceremonies, as well as rites of passage ceremonies.

Photo by Land of Oz

Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park and Museum Wilson, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 314 miles wilsonwhirligigpark.org

Land of Oz Beech Mountain, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 136 miles landofoznc.com

Urban legend has it that Vollis Simpson began creating his massive whirligigs in Wilson, N.C., after his daughter was killed in a wreck as she was driving home late one night after taking LSD and he had dreams of what she saw that night. But it’s not true. Simpson had a daughter but she did not die in a wreck, and the kinetic sculptures weren’t created as a memorial but as something for Simpson to do in retirement besides watch TV. Simpson’s farm became one of the county’s top tourist attractions. Some of his whirligigs were relocated to a park in downtown Wilson and others will be installed there after they are restored. Simpson’s whirligigs were designed in 2013 as North Carolina’s official state folk art.

Every September, Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion stroll down the Yellow Brick Road at the Land of Oz, a Beech Mountain, N.C., Wizard of Oz theme park that operated from 1970 to 1980. The privately owned facility is reopened every year for the three-day Autumn at Oz Festival that claims to be the largest Wizard of Oz event in the world. When the park was operational, it contained 44,000 glazed yellow bricks and had only one ride: a hot air balloon-esque ride.

Tank Town Morganton, Ga. Distance from Greenville: 130 tanktownusa.com Drive tanks. Crush cars. The tag line tells you all you need to know about this Morganton, Ga., attraction. Actually, there are no tanks at Tank Town. They’re armored personnel carriers formerly used by the British Army. Not that it matters much. They both can crush cars — something customers can pay extra to do. If military vehicles aren’t your thing, Tank Town USA has heavy construction equipment, too.

Asheville Pinball Museum Asheville, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 64 miles ashevillepinball.com

Photo by the Asheville Pinball Museum

In the music world, the kazoo is not exactly held in the same regard as strings or woodwinds. But the instrument, which can be had for a couple of bucks from a cheap toy bin in some five-and-dimes, has its own museum. Founded in 2007, the Kazoo Museum in Beaufort features a collection of nearly 200 kazoo-related items. But the best part could be that the museum now houses a kazoo factory that offers tours.

OK, Boomers. Imagine walking into an arcade filled with the pinball machines and video games of your youth and not needing a pocketful of quarters. Welcome to the Asheville Pinball Museum. You’ll see vintage machines dating back to the 1930s, including Gottlieb’s Humpty Dumpty, the first pinball machine to feature flippers, on display. But the main attraction is the 75 machines you can play for a flat entry fee of $15 for adults and $12 for kids 10 and younger. The number of people allowed in at a time is limited; if you’re one of the unlucky few to not get in, you can get on a waiting list.

Cryptozoology & Paranormal Museum Littleton, N.C. Distance from Greenville: 310 miles crypto-para.org They say there’s an app for everything. Maybe there’s a museum for everything, too. If you’re talking about creatures and phenomena not recognized by traditional science, check out the Cryptozoology & Paranormal Museum in Littleton, N.C. Stephen Barcelo is the founder of the museum, and he’s collected enough blurry photos and plaster Bigfoot footprints to open a museum in a old clapboard house that he thinks is haunted. Photo by Stephen Barcelo


06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY “I was a zombie. Cooper saved my life, my marriage, my family.” Tony Swett

Photo provided

Tony Swett, his wife Jen, and Cooper.

MAN’S BEST THERAPIST

Service Dogs for Veterans help vets suffering from PTSD LAURA HAIGHT | CONTRIBUTOR

Twenty-two veterans a day commit suicide. Tony Swett of Spartanburg easily could have been one of them. He tried to be one of them. And he thought about it. A lot. The 16-year Army veteran served two combat tours — one in Afghanistan and one in Bosnia. When his last commitment was up, he decided to return to civilian life. At 36, he brought the same things home that he had left with as a fresh-faced high school grad from Pickens. Except for the isolation and the inability to be around crowds. Those were new. They came with the PTSD. It was not love at first sight for Swett and his son’s Doberman, Cooper. “I hated that dog,” Swett says, remembering that he was actively campaigning to find a new home for the 6-month-old puppy. Enter Bill Brightman, the founder and executive director of Service Dogs for Veterans (sd4v.org), a Greenville nonprofit that connects vets suffering from PTSD with service dogs. At Brightman’s urging, Swett brought Cooper to an introductory meeting, although he held little hope for a positive outcome. The

group of vets started talking and sharing experiences; Cooper “chilled out” in a corner. “I started talking about stuff — things that happened over there, things I did,” Swett remembers, “and Cooper got up, came over to me, and put his head in my lap.” It might have shocked Swett, but it did not surprise Brightman. “These dogs are meant to work,” he says. “They sense in these veterans a great need for companionship and security. That’s their job. Cooper saw the need in Tony and he had to find a way to connect to that.”

‘HE SAVED MY LIFE’

This unbreakable bond is the subject of a new film, “Megan Leavey,” which opened last week. The film tells the true story of a Marine corporal who fights the government to save the life of the dog that saved her life in combat. It’s not the first film or book to explore this bond. But there is hope among the dog training and veteran advocacy communities that the bond can be a sustaining treatment for vets with PTSD. To date, the VA has not accepted that dogs offering emotional support are of any definable “service” to a suffering veteran. The VA

does contribute financial support for service dogs to help disabled vets who need physical assistance, but not emotional support. Legislation was introduced last month — in both the House and Senate — that would fund a VA pilot program to provide grants for qualified dog trainers to provide assistance dogs to veterans with PTSD and study the results. While this may sound promising, it is the third year this legislation has been introduced and it has yet to even have a hearing. Swett, however, does not need a VA study. Since the day Cooper laid his head in Swett’s lap, he says, “My life has changed in so many ways.” He got a job with Lowes, where he and Cooper go to work together. He no longer contemplates suicide. And although he still is on medication prescribed for PTSD by the VA, he is taking “half of what I used to.” “I was a zombie,” Swett admits. “He [Cooper] saved my life, my marriage, my family.” Swett and Cooper have become ambassadors for the need for service dogs for vets with PTSD, not just those with physical disabilities.

FORGING BONDS

There are a lot of Tonys in Brightman’s world. Using the Veterans Administration’s PTSD characteristics, Brightman asks veterans in his program to self-assess the degree that their symptoms impact their lives. Across the board, he says, “They report a 50 percent or greater reduction in life-limiting symptoms.” The Service Dogs for Vets program is unique in its approach. Most programs train the dog and then present it to the vet with a

list of commands to work with. Not SD4V. Working in partnership with top dog trainer Connie Cleveland, dogs are carefully paired with vets. They attend weekly sessions together where they get a “tablespoon full” of commands or exercises to drill on over the next week. This goes on for six to eight weeks. But, Brightman says, by the three-month mark, “the dog knows them far better than they know themselves.” Business is brisk for the Service Dogs for Vets program. From 2014 through 2016, the group graduated 16 vet-dog teams. So far in 2017, there have been eight successful completions, 11 in process, and 23 waiting for a spot. The average cost: $1,400 to $1,800 supported fully by donations from individuals and a few grants. The bond between dog and owner is not limited to veterans or those with disabilities. Dog training — for work or fun — is a way to develop a deeper bond with your dog. Says Cleveland, “We hope if we can teach people how dogs learn, we can enhance their relationship with their dogs and save dogs’ lives.” Across the Upstate, dog training has been unleashed. Increasingly, training is designed not to keep dogs from barking and chewing up the sofa, but to help them reach their potential, follow their instincts, and do a job. And from agility to field trials to medical alert, it is gaining in popularity and demand.

Read more about dog training with a purpose and its growth in the Upstate at greenvillejournal.com.

RESOURCES TO LEARN MORE ABOUT PTSD ASSISTANCE DOGS Dogs and PTSD, Veterans Administration goo.gl/ohyQnW Veterans struggle with VA over PTSD dogs, NPR goo.gl/f3W8r0 VA survey of dogs and PTSD goo.gl/tMX24t Service Dogs for Veterans, Greenville goo.gl/7eVGys


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SAIL JUNE 8, 2017

FORRESTER WOODS VS PELHAM FALLS

Addison Sherrill

FOR MORE MEET RESULTS, OVERALL RESULTS, AND RANKINGS,

GO TO GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM/SAIL.

Photos by Stacey Krause

Genevieve Darst

POINSETTIA VS WELLINGTON GREEN/BC

Rylann Cooper and Luke Warriner

Photos by Christy Deliberto

Caroline Williams

RIVER WALK VS. DEVENGER

Emmalyn Babinicz and Teagan Estrada

Karsen Sturkey

Photos by Liz Allison

Everett Ponton

Graham Mathias


THINK YOU YOU CAN’T BE FOOLED BY A SELLER OR A BUYER? Think again -- read that text over slowly.

“Helping buyers and sellers navigate Greenville’s competitive market is my passion.” Get Greenville’s Hometown Agent, Jackson Herlong, on your side. (864) 313-2520 | Jackson@AugustaRoad.com

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC


feast

ICE, ICE, Ph

BABY Sno Hut, a Taylors summer tradition, turns 30 ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017

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uring one of the recent hail storms that hit Taylors, Sno Hut owner David Bishop waited it out in his wife’s car in a nearby bank drive-thru, the overhang providing just enough protection to keep the windshields from being pelted. Meanwhile, he watched two customers holding cushions over their heads standing outside at the completely unprotected Sno Hut pickup window to order their shaved ice. He almost couldn’t believe it. Almost. But over the course of Bishop’s seven years as the owner of the Sno Hut at Edwards Forest Plaza on Wade Hampton Boulevard, he has seen the lengths some people will go for the perfectly packed ice shavings saturated in cherry, grape, blue raspberry, or tiger’s blood.

Take for instance the time a woman in labor stopped by on the way to the hospital. Three days later, she returned with her new baby to pick up some shaved ice for the ride home. “There’s something about the ice that pregnant ladies love,” Bishop says. “I don’t understand it, but my wife does.” Then there was the time a wedding party was en route to the reception when the bride and groom got a hankering for ice and pulled over. “Of course, they cut to the front of the line,” Bishop says. And the time Bishop’s wife, Lisa, was asked by a young man to write, “Will you marry me?” on a white Styrofoam cup, which he then handed to his girlfriend. She said, “Yes,” naturally. After 30 years in Taylors, the anecdotes about Sno Hut’s Taylors tradition

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast are seemingly unending. Some are silly, while others are more serious and meaningful. “We have a lot of families who pick up shaved ice for those who are going through chemotherapy,” Bishop says. “That little bit of shaved ice makes a difference for a little while.” Creating those memories is what Sno Hut’s original owner, Yvonne Simpson, says made the hard work and long hours worth it. “I made hundreds of friends,” she says. “I still see people I haven’t seen for 15 years and they say, ‘You’re the Sno Hut lady.’” Simpson bought and renamed the former Hawaiian shaved ice stand in 1987 when she was looking for a summer job for her teenage son. At the time she was working as an analyst for Greenville County, so she viewed Sno Hut primarily as a means of meeting people. “You can attract customers of all types if you have a good product,” she says. “You get to talk to people and learn about what’s going on with them.” Many of those customers were local, including some neighborhood boys who would offer to take the trash out in exchange for an ice.

Bishop was one of those boys. His fond memories motivated him to purchase the hut from Simpson in 2010 when her husband was no longer physically able to help with the store. Bishop says his regular customers drive from all over the Upstate, including a family of regulars from North Carolina. Simpson recalls one family from Utah stopping by while they were on vacation. They liked it so much, they asked her to teach them how to open their own back home. A year later, they did just that. Today, Sno Hut has a van with the original 30-year-old ice shaver inside that the Bishops take to various day cares, school events, and food trucks. Even though Simpson no longer owns the hut, she brings her two grandchildren back now and then. If there’s a long line at the pickup window when she arrives, she’ll knock on the door for them to let her in to help. “It’s my baby,” she says.

WANT TO GO?

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Sno Hut 30th anniversary celebration June 17, 1 p.m.-until 3243 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors snohut.com

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Sno-Hut’s original owner, Yvonne Simpson, bought the former Hawaiian shaved ice store in 1987 when she was looking for a summer job for her teenage son.

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

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TING S I L NEW

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114 Woodland Way Cleveland Forest • $974,601

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240 Byrd Blvd. GCC Area • $597,605 Katherine Hall 678-0820

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17 Chanticleer Drive • Chanticleer $680,605

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219 Boxwood Lane Cleveland Forest • $589,601

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16 Old Augusta Road Augusta Road Area • $459,605

100 Sand Castle Drive Simpsonville • $345,681 Matt Crider 444-1689

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC

Joan Herlong*Owner, BIC 864-325-2112

joan@augustaroad.com *Greenville’s NUMBER ONE REALTOR, for YEARS! Source: MLS sales volume: 2012-15. AND #4 REALTOR in the ENTIRE state of South Carolina! Source: REAL Trends 7/16.

110 Fudora Circle The Ravines at Creekside $239,681

172 Ridgeland Drive, Unit 100 Ridgeland at the Park • $698,601 Alex Boyd 706-825-8975

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42 W Hillcrest Drive North Main • $415,609 Reid Hipp 864-449-1779

12 Lawson Way Chanticleer Section 9 • $1,149,605

111 Rockingham Road Parkins Mill Area • $1,700,607

215 E Seven Oaks Dr Chanticleer • $549,605

2 Greenwood Ave Hudson Acres • $329,615

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53 Forest Lane • Meyers Park • $1,399,605 107 Collins Creek Road • Collins Creek • $999,607 154 Riverplace, Unit 202 • Riverhouse Condos • $650,601 223 E Seven Oaks Dr • Chanticleer • $649,605 27 Arthur Ave • Augusta Road • $624,605 12 Jenkinson Ct • Augusta Circle Area • $579,605 138 Sun Meadow Rd • Sugar Creek • $499,650 205 E Faris Road • Augusta Road • $438,605 3 Hidden Hills Dr • Chanticleer • $424,605 118 S Calhoun St. • Downtown • $365,601 209 Frank Street • Downtown • $359,601 1031 Summit Dr. • Croftstone • $279,609 30 Lockwood Ave • Overbrook • $249,607 118 Jordan Crest Ct • Jonesville Landing • $224,681 701 Spring Meadow Way • Foxwood • $193,680

HENIGAN LANE • Lot 2 • North Main • $295,609 HENIGAN LANE • Lot 4 • North Main • $180,609 EASLEY • 329 Price Perry Rd. $2,600,640 • Lila Gray 615-415-5307 7 SALUDA DAM ROAD • Land Zoned R15, 65 Acres $595,611 • Matt Crider 444-1689 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 27 • $239,605 AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA • Melville Ave. • Lot 26 • $209,605 ACADIA • 229 Saluda Run Dr. • $99,673


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COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

GRANTS

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate receives $50,000 grant from Duke Energy Foundation The Children’s Museum of the Upstate (TCMU) recently received a $50,000 grant from the Duke Energy Foundation that will allow it to deliver technology and engineering-based lessons and materials to schools and community facilities across the Upstate. The grant will be allocated to the Museum’s outreach program, TCMU on the Go, a mobile version of TCMU designed to meet students where they are, whether it be in classrooms, afterschool programs, or community events.

RECREATION

Spirit of Survivorship Bridge opens at Cancer Survivors Park Cancer Survivors Park recently celebrated the Spirit of Survivorship Bridge with a private ribbon-cutting ceremony and donor walk across the bridge. Included in the walk were J.L. Mann and Greenville High School student leaders, principals, and school-related donors for their combined 2013 Spirit Week Contribution of Tyler Smith / Contributing over $500,000 to name the bridge. Attendees carried a “Stand Up to Cancer” sign with names of survivors they celebrate as they crossed the bridge. The bridge and trail will be open to the public on weekends only.

BENEFIT

Hartness announces half marathon and 5K to benefit A Child’s Haven Hartness recently announced they will be hosting an inaugural cross-country style half marathon and 5K race on Oct. 7, 2017. The race will be held to benefit A Child’s Haven, an organization that provides care and education to children with developmental delays due to limited resources, abuse, or neglect. The race will be held on the grounds of the Hartness Property, where an iconic community is being built only 15 minutes from downtown Greenville. The race will be conducted on private roads, off-road pathways, and grass trails throughout the property.

EDUCATION

McDonald’s helps local employee earn high school diploma Alicia Boatwright recently received her high school diploma through the Archways to Opportunity Career Online High School program. Archways to Opportunity is a comprehensive education strategy with multiple programs that give McDonald’s employees opportunities that range from finishing high school to earning an associate or bachelor’s degree or even learning English. Since the launch in April 2015, more than 5,000 restaurant employees in the U.S. have enrolled in the program. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

THE CHANDLER SCHOOL

SOUTH CAROLINA GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Students’ community service celebrated

The Chandler School is proud of their four eighth-grade graduates this year. From left to right: Will Cobb, Brooke Moore, and James Daughtry. (Not pictured: Matthew Parcell.)

Students in the Connecting Arts Through Service Club at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities were honored in a service recognition program for volunteering more than 700 hours with more than 20 nonprofit groups and organizations this school year. The C.A.T.S. Club was developed to provide opportunities for students to use their skills and knowledge in real-life situations while developing a sense of social awareness, responsibility, and leadership. Students have taken on projects and partnerships that address the environment, at-risk children, the elderly, homelessness, hunger, disaster relief, and literacy. 

WOFFORD COLLEGE

Three honorary degrees awarded at graduation J. Harold Chandler, president and CEO of Spartanburg-based Milliken & Co., delivered Wofford College’s commencement address. Honorary degrees were presented to Chandler as well as to South Carolina poet Nikky Finney and Spartanburg philanthropist Susan Phifer “Susu” Johnson. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Susan McMillen REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

672B Fairview Rd., Simpsonville, SC

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06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

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HOME

Featured Home

Augusta Road

45 Douglas Drive, Greenville, SC 29605

Home Info Price: $428,000 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5

MLS: 1343824 Sq. Ft: 2200-2399

Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Vmiller@MarchantCo.com

10 minutes from Downtown Greenville, discover this delightful Augusta Road gem. Enjoy peace and tranquility from the Charleston style porches, a respite for hammock naps and blissful reading. This very special home is located on a quaint street that is walking distance to the Greenville Country Club, schools, shopping and restaurants. The southern charm will impress you! The home features hardwood floors on main, plantation shutters throughout, a gas fireplace and three amazing covered verandas. On the main level you will find the Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen with an island, and a picturesque sunroom bringing the outside in by overlooking a gorgeous backyard full of ambiance.

“We are never too busy for your referrals!” 864.430.6602

The owner has invested many years in creating the Charleston Style Garden complete with a fountain, statuary, and garden bench to enjoy all year long. This pristine yard showcases beautiful oak trees, Japanese maple tree, Daphne shrubs and a delightful pergola. On the second floor, you will find the Master Bedroom with a walk in closet and private bath. Walk out on the upper porch overlooking beautiful garden views, a wonderful place to enjoy morning coffee or late afternoon tea or wine. The top floor is complete with two additional bedrooms with ample closet space and a hall bath to share. You must come and experience the charm and ambiance in one of Downtown Greenville’s most desired communities!

Signature Team of the Year 2016 Volume Sales Team of the Year 2016 Highest Average Sales Price Team of the Year 2016 Unit Sales Team of the Year 2016 Award Winning Agent 2007-2016


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Real Estate News

Mark Cooper Joins the Pelham Road Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors

From Fluor Field & Friday Night Fireworks ld 5 So

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6 Augusta Walk Avenue Greenville

Open Saturday • 10:00 - 12:00 PM Open Sunday • 2:00 - 4:00 PM 3 Beds • 3.5 Baths • $899,000

Jacob Mann, Virginia Hayes & Misty Hardaway (864) 406-WALK

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Mark Cooper has joined the company’s Pelham Road office as a sales associate. Cooper A new member of The Toates Team, Cooper is a native of Greenville, SC. He is a graduate of Clemson University with a Bachelor of Science in Accounting and has accrued over 11 years of experience in the home appliance industry. He now lives in Simpsonville, SC where he is an active member at Brookwood Church and  an avid golf player.  “I am very excited to have Mark join our Pelham Road location. His experience with customer service will be a great addition to our office.” said Duane Bargar, Broker-In-Charge of the Pelham Road office.

Sandy Shen Joins the Garlington Road Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Sandy Shen has joined the company’s Garlington Road office as a sales associate. Shen Shen was born in China and reared in Taiwan. She has lived in the United States for more than 43 years, including 40 years in South Carolina. Shen owned and operated Aloha Restaurant in Greenville, Easley and Spartanburg for 35 years. She has also taught Chinese classes to 4K to 2nd grade children for three years and served as a translator for over 30 years providing translation services for factory machinery training programs. “I am delighted to welcome Sandy to our office. Her knowledge of the area will certainly serve as an advantage to her home buying and selling clients,” commented Donna O. Smith, Broker-In-Charge of the Garlington Road Office.

«


06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

The Enclave at River Reserve Piedmont SC

Home Info Price: $345,900-$500,000s Amenities: Gated community with customizable, luxury Craftsman-style homes. Exclusive access to river house and walking trails. Riverfront and basement homesites available. Minutes to Downtown Greenville and I-85. Schools: Concrete Elementary, Powdersville Middle, and Powdersville High Contact Information: Stan McAlister | 864.292.0400 stan@builderpeople.com

This beautiful natural refuge is nestled along the Saluda River, with nature trails and a river house open to all residents. The homes in this gated community are drawn exclusively from the SK Heritage Collection—which ensures both exceptional craftsmanship and outstanding value. Choose to build your home with the largest local builder in the Upstate. SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, we understand residential construction which enables us to anticipate your concerns during the build.

Real Estate News cont.

Nikki Martin Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Nikki Martin as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. Nikki joins Coldwell Banker Caine with marketing and engineering experience from Martin OMNOVA Solutions, Inc., a specialty chemical company, where she received the 2013 Technology Award for Innovative Solutions. Nikki holds a bachelor of

From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make home construction an enjoyable process. We’re not just building homes – We’re Building a Way of Life. From Greenville: I-85 to exit 42 stay left onto 185 bypass (no toll) to exit 12 Easley HWY 153. Turn right, come over Saluda River bridge, the Enclave at River Reserve is next right. From Anderson: I-85 to exit 40, HWY 153, turn right, 1/2 mile on left.

science degree in biology from North Carolina Wesleyan College and is currently completing her master’s degree in international marketing management from Boston University. Nikki participates in many local philanthropies as a spokesperson for a local pregnancy care center and encourages STEM education by conducting science labs for local elementary schools. She also shares her expertise to build websites and social media marketing strategies for non-profits and to volunteer for Read to Me Day, a reading initiative for children. In her free time, she enjoys reading all types of non-fiction, writing, blogging, and creating inspirational crafts. Nikki is thrilled to apply her

marketing acumen and passion for helping others to the field of real estate. “We are delighted to have Nikki join our Spartanburg office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her unique experience and unmatched creativity will be a driving force for superior service to her clients and community.”

Ginnie Freeman Joins the Garlington Road Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Ginnie Freeman has joined the com-

pany’s Garlington Road office as a sales associate. Originally from Winston-Salem, N. C., Freeman came to Greenville in 1994 to attend Furman University where she earned a Bachelor Freeman of Science in Health and Exercise Science. For the next five years, she served as a Physical Education teacher in the Greenville County Schools District, where she was recognized as Teacher of the Year in 2003. In 2008, Freeman became a buyer’s agent with Remax Realty Professionals. REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 33


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Move-In Ready Homes Available NOW! You’ll love the low maintenance, high-style townhomes at The Reserve at Asheton Lakes. This gated community is located just off Hwy 14 in Simpsonville, and has a variety of homes available for immediate occupancy. There are three unique two-story floorplans, ranging from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an owner’s suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2.5 baths. Cothran homes are designed to maximize usable space, and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, a fourth bedroom or a third full bath. Incentives are available on move-in ready homes for a limited time only. Available Homes:

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NEIGHBORHOOD INFO The Reserve at Asheton Lakes 804 Asheton Commons Lane Simpsonville, SC 29681 Amenities: Private gated access, landscaped yards, irrigated grounds, street lights, community pool & cabana Schools: Oak View Elementary, Beck Middle, & J.L. Mann High Contact Info: Cothran Homes CothranHomes.com | 864-844-1244

Real Estate News cont. Freeman and her husband, Scott, have three children ages twelve, eleven and seven. “The Garlington Road office is delighted to welcome Ginnie. Her real estate experience and knowledge of the area will certainly serve her home buying and selling clients well,” said Donna O. Smith, BrokerIn-Charge of the Garlington Road office.

Jeffrey Szubinski Joins the Simpsonville Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce

that Jeffrey Szubinski has joined the company’s Simpsonville office as a sales associate. With 20 years of experience in the automotive industry before joining the real estate Szubinski sector, Szubinski is an expert in customer service. He began his real estate career in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 2015 and relocated to Simpsonville, South Carolina in 2016. “Jeff comes to C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS with real estate experience in Michigan. He is “hands on” and ready to go here in the

Upstate. Well mannered and poised, I look forward to great things from him,” said Matthew Thrift, Broker-In-Charge of the company’s Simpsonville office.

AugustaRoad.com Realty welcomes to new agents

Boyd

AugustaRoad.com Realty would like to welcome the newest agent, Alex Boyd.  After finding success on the PGA Tour, Alex  has decided  to transition into real estate to satisfy his desires to be more pres-

ent in the community and to assist others in finding their dream home.  Au g u s t a R o a d . c o m Realty would like to welcome Katherine Hall.  She  is back in the business and going strong to become Greenville’s overnight real estate success. Hall With over 20 years of experience, Katherine was a top producing realtor for over 17 years in her hometown of Memphis, Tennessee. 


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of May 15 – 19, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$5,700,000 CHANTICLEER $1,427,000 $975,000 MONTEBELLO $960,000 GREYWOOD AT HAMMETT $749,000 TRAXLER PARK $740,000 NATURE’S WATCH $705,000 WEST PARK AND TOWNES $598,834 CRESCENT TERRACE $588,000 MEADOWS OF CAMPBELL CREEK $557,000 GRIFFITH FARM $532,500 MAC’S FOREST $478,000 WELLINGTON $473,000 CARRONBRIDGE $462,315 PARK HILL $447,500 POINSETT CORNERS $445,000 STONERIDGE $404,146 $400,000 PELHAM ESTATES $399,900 CLEAR SPRINGS $390,007 TUSCANY FALLS $387,000 STONEHAVEN $385,000 STONEHAVEN $385,000 $382,500 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $375,712 STONEHAVEN $370,000 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $366,301 HALLORAN HEIGHTS $365,000 $365,000 WEST FARM $365,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $358,000 RIDGEWATER $357,470 WATERS RUN $351,070 WESTHAVEN $347,888 HAMMETT POND $342,000 IVEY SQUARE HORIZONTAL PROP REGIME $335,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $328,750 MATTESON BROOK $327,500 KILGORE FARMS $327,036 COPPER CREEK $326,245 GOWER ESTATES $325,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $324,500 $321,800 WOODFORET $317,900 TUSCAN WOODS $313,500 COVENTRY $312,051 MARES HEAD FARM $310,955 BEECHWOOD FARMS $310,000 $308,763 $307,500 CARRINGTON GREEN $305,000 BELSHIRE $297,980 $290,000 $288,301 PELHAM FALLS $287,500 TUSCANY FALLS $287,000 CREEKWOOD $283,000 KIRKWOOD HEIGHTS $280,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $280,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $279,470 LONGLEAF $276,575 CUNNINGHAM ACRES $270,000

BROAD STREET OFFICE LLC STRINGER NATALYA A FRANK MARGARET A HAMILTON RONALD WOODLAND BUILDERS INC KNIGHT ADAM M (JTWROS) KLOTZ ELIZABETH J NEASHAM CORPORATION MARION ELIZATEH M HODGE CHARLES R (JTWROS) HARTLINE KERRY G WHITE SAM C YOUNG LARRY M JR (SURV) NVR INC ELLINGTON MARY FULBRIGHT ELAINE L LINK MARY JO POLLARD FRED LEES DONALD E MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH TURNER KIMBERLY COBRANCHI KIMBERLY R (JT NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO PRUITT CHARLES E ROMANA LLC GILLESPIE CYNTHIA J D R HORTON INC COX PHYLLIS L HUNT EDITH L MUNGO HOMES INC JUMPER WAYNE S SR MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH NVR INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC DOBIAC ALICIA L DAVIS FAMILY PROPERTIES KNOPP RICHARD L JAMISON TIMOTHY M MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN MUNGO HOMES INC CUNNINGHAM CHRISTINE A FOX BRADLEY DANIEL JACKMAN CHRISTOPHER WILL POWELL FRANCES C GRIM HARRY J JR DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL TATE JOHN L JR LPT ASSOCIATES A SC GEN GENDLIN HOMES LLC LEWIS JOHANNA H NVR INC WERNER GILBERT (JTWROS) GRACE CATHEDRAL CHRISTIA CAMPANELLI ANITA NAGY WANDA K O’DOWD WALTER JONES CARRICK F (JTWROS) MOORE ALBERT SABAL HOMES AT ONEAL VIL D R HORTON INC BROOKS J DANIEL

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UNITED COMMUNITY BANK BOYD DARLENE S (SURV) DONALDSON CENTER SELF ST FORREST ADELYN E (JTWROS JONES AMBER M (JTWROS) MILLSAP JESSICA LAUREN FRANKEL MARY J (JTWROS) MCNAMARA DANIEL T (JTWRO DANIELS ROBERT DAVIS GLASS MARK (JTWROS) WILSON CAITLIN ELLIOTT SPOTTS JILL F DOBSON ANDREW P (JTWROS) SANDFORD MARIA A (JTWROS ELLINGTON CURTIS R REVOC UNDERWOOD CARL RICHARD ADAMS DOUGLAS D (JTWROS) POWELL WILLIAM MADISON TEMPLETON ELIZABETH A (J DOOLITTLE STACEY B (JTWR CRIMI CHRISTOPHER (JTWRO NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO DETWILER DANIEL M ELLINGTON MARY HOLCOMB FRANKLIN DARRELL FITZMORRIS BRADLEY (JTWR HOLMAN ROBERT B (JTWROS) HAMILTON RONALD A REVOC CAROLINA CRAFTED CONSTRU SOUTHWELL JOSEPH C (JTWR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATIO MERRITT DUSTIN B (JTWROS KELTON MICHAEL E (JTWROS SPINK MEREDITH M (JTWROS RICE LINDSAY M (JTWROS) MORRIS ANDREA C NEES JOSEPH W (SURV) FILLMORE LAURIE (JTWROS) FAULKENBERRY IAN B (JTWR SEILER-SHEHAB LAUREN (JT SHARP BRIAN THOMAS (JTWR CURTIN KAITLYN D BORGES ALEX GREGORY SHINKO DESIREE M ROBINSON BARBARA S LIVIN FONTENLA JOHN M (JTWROS) LILLY LAURA T (JTWROS) BOITER TIMOTHY R WRIGHT WAY HOLDINGS LLC HOOD SARAH M (JTWROS) SHEALY LAURIE PRESTON HALEY GREGORY SR WIESNER ROBERT A JR (JTW CAROLINA ASSET MANAGEMEN COOKE ANNA J (JTWROS) KNACKSTEDT STEPHAN KENNEDY DIANE C KAMMAN AMANDA (JTWROS) TURNER COURTNEY G (JTWRO GILBERT DIANE L (JTWROS) COTTO EFRAIN (JTWROS) GRIFFITH DAVID A (JTWROS

550 S MAIN ST STE 550 509 HIDDEN HILLS DR 126 MILLPORT CIR STE 200 12 MONET DR 32 RILEY HILL CT 36 MOUNT VISTA AVE 10 MOSSY BROOK TRL 102 W PARK AVE APT B 326 JONES AVE 68 STONE COTTAGE LN 9 REDWING CT 8 MOORE LN 105 CHANBURY CT 120 BRENNAN PL 109 SEVIER ST 112 W BROAD ST UNIT 401B 3 OLD ALTAMONT RIDGE RD 6506 STATE PARK RD 18 ASHBURN PL 6 SUNRAY LN 116 TUSCANY FALLS DR 208 CRICKEN TREE DR 208 CRICKEN TREE DR 1415 PELHAM RD 421 SANTA CRUZ WAY 111 GLENBRIAR CT 204 MERITTA TRL 100 WOODHAVEN DR PO BOX 391 213 HEREFORD WAY 6 SARAZEN WAY # D 22 KNOTTY PINE CT 834 SILVERWOOD WAY 504 SOUTHINGTON CT 207 CLARITY CT 165 GREEN VALLEY RD 2 STARFISH CT 18 MATTESON BROOK LN 218 PETERS GLENN CT 441 WESTERN LN 900 WEMBLEY RD 385 STASBURG DR 11 CHARLOTTE ST 520 TRACY TRL 127 APPLEWOOD DR 720 LOCKHURST DR 224 CORONET LN 8 GROVE CREEK DR 101 DEVENHOLLOW DR 17 LADSON ST 4 AVALON CT 160 BELSHIRE DR 9 BELAIR TERR PO BOX 5719 14 BRIARBERRY CT 201 MONTALCINO WAY PO BOX 706 1 BROCK DR 107 WHIFFLETREE DR 208 NOBLE ST 309 HILBURN WAY 16 CUNNINGHAM CIR

NORTHCLIFF $270,000 LAKE CUNNINGHAM $269,900 BELSHIRE $260,000 $259,462 BELSHIRE $256,475 COVENTRY $256,078 NORTHGATE TRACE $255,000 SOUTHBROOK $255,000 COTTAGES AT NEELY $253,549 MORNING MIST $253,480 TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $250,000 BONNIE VISTA $249,900 $248,000 FOWLER FIELDS $247,500 GRIFFIN PARK $245,460 FORRESTER WOODS $245,000 MORNING MIST $244,900 $240,000 BRICK STREET LOFTS $240,000 1200 PELHAM $239,900 STRATFORD POINTE $239,000 MORNING MIST FARM $237,400 ONEAL VILLAGE $237,000 LONGLEAF $233,000 KELSEY GLEN $233,000 VICTORIA PARK $232,500 CROFTSTONE ACRES $232,500 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $232,454 ST MARK COTTAGES $231,387 SHADOW MOSS $227,000 VICTORIA PARK $225,902 MERRIFIELD PARK $225,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $225,000 HAWK CREST $225,000 CROFTSTONE COMMONS $225,000 ST JAMES PLACE $223,000 $223,000 HOLLYTON $222,500 WOODRUFF LAKE $218,000 RAVINES AT CREEKSIDE $217,500 MORNING MIST FARM $217,500 $217,425 $217,000 MORNING MIST FARM $217,000 RIVER RIDGE $216,320 SWANSGATE $212,500 $212,000 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $210,000 $210,000 $210,000 CARDO ACRES $210,000 RIVER RIDGE $208,840 TIMBERWALK $207,000 LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS $206,000 COACH HILLS $205,000 HAMPTON FARMS $204,500 $200,000 BROOKHAVEN $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 LOCKELAND PARK $199,900 $199,900

PRICE SELLER LEACH RALPH WEY DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC WHELCHEL MALLORY KATE WOODBERRY CHRISTINE R NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC CARDILLO AMANDA M (JTWRO SAUVOLA MERLE W D R HORTON INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC YAMASAKI CATHERINE M ELLIS NANCY L TRUSTEE DUBOSE GEORGE DIAL JR REID CHERYL S (SURV) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MORTON ZEB MAXZ PALMER NICHOLAS BERNAT LIVING TRUST DUNCAN DONN E II TREMBLY PHILIP PETROPOULOS MARK JAMES TIDMARSH CHRISTOPHER W ( SABAL HOMES AT ONEAL VIL D R HORTON INC ALLISON JOYCE C VICTORIA PROPERTIES LLC FOSTER ADRIENNE V D R HORTON INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L MURPHY THOMAS V REVOC TR GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC GRUMBOS DEMETRA KEESE ANN M MUSSAY DORIS L SANDERS LEE T (JTWROS) PALMERTON MICHAEL JAMES SHAFFER DOUGLAS R SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND SALDANA NEPTHALI F SKINNER ANDREW R JR MEHALL BERNARD F GREEN CREEK DEVELOPMENT HENSON HEATHER NICOLE SAED MOHAMAD SK BUILDERS INC AVERA HELEN S GENDLIN HOMES LLC ARMSTRONG LARRY J JR MIDA PROPERTIES LLC BLANDINE WILLIAM LORENZ JASON R SK BUILDERS INC ANKLAM JOAN K HOWARD PATRICIA GLORIA MCATTEE GORDON W DAY JONATHAN (SURVIVOR) ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT T BOUDREAUX RONALD P COLLINS ROY E III GROGAN JOSHUA S SUNCREST HOMES LLC JOY PROPERTY INVESTMENTS

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ARTS & CULTURE

‘MISS NELSON IS MISSING!’ TEACHES UNRULY KIDS A LESSON page 37 THEY’LL NEVER FORGET

JEFF SUMEREL CRAFTS A HEAD TRIP page

40

READ THIS IF YOU HATE POP-COUNTRY page

41

Lauren Wilson stars as Miss Viola Swamp and Miss Nelson Photo by Will Crooks

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06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

FORGOTTEN HISTORY

‘The Gatekeeper’ sheds new light on the most powerful woman in FDR’s White House EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

en’s m o W

Health

Iss u

es

Specialize We in

For most, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand isn’t a well-recognized name from American history. But as former President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s private secretary for 21 years, LeHand was one of the most influential players in the Roosevelt White House, serving as both a confidant and trusted advisor. However, in the decades since FDR held power, LeHand’s place in political history has largely been forgotten. Many contemporary historians have cast her aside as a lovelorn secretary or even a mistress to Roosevelt, consequently overlooking her role in his administration. Kathryn Smith, a former editor at the Anderson Independent-Mail and author of “The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand, FDR, and the Untold Story of the Partnership That Defined a Presidency,” is trying to rectify that oversight. Published in September 2016 and soon available in paperback, “The Gatekeeper” is the first book to closely examine LeHand’s life and work. In reading about Roosevelt over the years — an interest that Smith says stemmed from her grandfather’s fascination with FDR — the writer’s curiosity was piqued when she noticed how LeHand’s name kept appearing in books. “I thought, ‘She must have had such an interesting life, working for one of the most important political figures of the 20th century,’” Smith says. After discovering that a contemporary work on LeHand had never been written, Smith took on the project herself. What she found was that LeHand had not only been a treasured companion to Roosevelt for years but she exercised significant power.

Before writing “The Gatekeeper,” Kathryn Smith was an editor at the Anderson Independent-Mail.

“The only other women — besides first ladies — who have wielded as much influence over a president since Missy were Condoleezza Rice, national security adviser and secretary of state for George W. Bush, and Barack Obama’s senior adviser, Valerie Jarrett,” writes Smith. “In everything but name, she was FDR’s chief of staff — for the job title was not used by a president until Dwight Eisenhower adopted it to suit his sense of military structure.” Throughout her research, Smith unearthed new information about LeHand’s professional and personal relationship with Roosevelt, her friendly rapport with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and the scope of her vast responsibilities and sway in the White House.

Among several significant discoveries in Smith’s research were medical records that provided further insight into the severity and long-term effects of chronic heart damage LeHand had sustained from a bout of rheumatic fever as a teenager. The debilitating condition helped shape her bond with Roosevelt, who was permanently paralyzed from the waist down after contracting polio, and later contributed to a severe stroke in 1941 that ended her time in the White House. Additionally, Smith found a series of letters between LeHand and William Christian Bullitt Jr., an American diplomat with whom she had a romantic relationship throughout the Roosevelt administration, though the two never married. “The letters are interesting because they

helped me know her voice,” Smith says. “By the time I got to the letters, I knew the timeline of her life, so I could plug in the date and understand what was going on in her life.” The extensive correspondence between the pair also poked holes in the long-held belief that LeHand and Roosevelt were romantically involved. Smith remains unconvinced this was the case. Smith also connected with two of LeHand’s great-nieces, Barbara Jacques and Jane Scarbrough, who had saved many relics from LeHand’s life, including “photos, letters, scrapbooks, and memorabilia” — sources that proved to be invaluable. “Finding her family opened a new vista of research that hadn’t been opened before,” she says. Smith hopes “The Gatekeeper” will lead to a more nuanced view of LeHand as a significant figure in the history of American politics. “She really broke a lot of glass ceilings, as we call them now, in the ’30s. And she needs to have credit for that,” Smith says. “She did it in a quiet, unobtrusive way, but she needs to be recognized.”

KATHRYN SMITH: SUNDAY SIT DOWN SUPPER WHEN Sunday, June 25, 7–10 p.m. WHERE M. Judson Booksellers TICKETS $75 INFO mjudsonbooks.com/sunday-suppers

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06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

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SPLIT PERSONALITIES

Actress plays polar opposites in SCCT’s ‘Miss Nelson Is Missing!’

Will Crooks / Staff

Lila Smith, Lauren Wilson, and Jonah Bishop-Pirrone in SCCT’s “Miss Nelson Is Missing!”

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Room 207’s Miss Nelson is kind and loving, the kind of teacher every kid wants. Miss Viola Swamp, her substitute, is the exact opposite — mean, a strict disciplinarian, and an assigner of more homework than any grade-schooler could ever get done. Lauren Wilson, a teacher at the South Carolina Children’s Theatre, will play them both in the theater’s production of “Miss Nelson Is Missing!,” opening at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre on Saturday. “Miss Nelson Is Missing!” is a musical based on the book of the same name written by Harry Allard. The book tells the story of the students in Room 207, the worst behaved in the entire school. Spitballs are stuck to the ceiling. Paper airplanes whiz through the air. And despite Miss Nelson’s best efforts, the students refuse to learn. One morning, the class is told Miss Nelson isn’t coming to school and they will have a substitute. While the students rejoice, in walks yardstick-carrying Miss Viola Swamp. “She’s about as close to that witchy vibe as you can get,” says Betsy Bisson, SCCT’s artistic and education director. Bisson is directing the production. The students soon realize how good they had it with Miss Nelson and set out to find her, even enlisting the police to start a search. They recognize they’ve done Miss Nelson wrong and pledge to do better. At the end of the musical, it is revealed that Miss Viola Swamp is really Miss Nelson in disguise. So, how does Wilson go about changing from Miss Nelson to Viola Swamp and back again? “I try to pick an animal that represents each character,” she says. Miss Nelson reminds her of a gentle blue-

bird, flitting back and forth. Viola Swamp, on the other hand, is an alligator. She moves purposely. She’s slow, wide, and heavy. Vocally, Miss Nelson has a high, nasally voice, while Viola Swamp is throaty and chesty. The costumes chosen by Bisson also help. Miss Nelson has a bleach-blonde wig, a hot pink and tangerine dress, and lime green socks. “It’s like Easter just threw up,” Bisson says. Viola Swamp is dressed in black, from her flared shirt to her big sturdy shoes. “A costume’s job is to augment and support what the actor’s doing,” Bisson says. The costumes had to allow for quick changes, too. Glasses and a nose help Wilson change characters, as do some minor changes in make-up. Wilson, who was a student in SCCT’s acting program when she was a teenager, also relies on her experience as a teacher. She’s the director of SCCT’s 3rd Stage, acts at Café and Then Some, and starred in the short film “The Wrong Girl.” She also played in the Warehouse Theatre’s recent production of “Urinetown.” Being a teacher at SCCT puts a bit more pressure on Wilson to nail the roles. “I know [my students] are watching me,” she said. “I’ve got to be on.”

FINAL WEEK! Best Availability: Tues – Thurs evenings

Must end June 25

MISS NELSON IS MISSING!

PeaceCenter.org

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WHERE Peace Center Gunter Theatre TICKETS $18–$27 INFO scchildrenstheatre.org

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CULTURE

AND THAT’S THE WAY IT IS — OR IS IT? In the era of fake news, Chautauqua examines the power of words Crossword puzzle: page 50

Sudoku puzzle: page 50

Smile More. Live More. Will Crooks / Staff

Larry Bounds, English teacher at Wade Hampton High, portrays revered news anchor Walter Cronkite in a Greenville Chautauqua event.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Whether routine dental care or a full smile makeover our state of the art technology and years of experience offer you exceptional results. Helping you to maintain or create a smile you love to share is why we are here! ALSO OFFERING CROWNS • WHITENING • VENEERS • ORTHODONTICS

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W W W. M E Y E R D E N T I S T R Y. C O M

The organizers of the Greenville Chautauqua had no way of knowing that fake news would be an issue during this year’s Chautauqua season when they picked “The Power of Words” as their theme. Themes are selected more than a year in advance. “Fake news wasn’t on our radar then,” says Larry Bounds, a Wade Hampton High English teacher who will portray beloved CBS newsman Walter Cronkite at this year’s festival. “It became very topical.” One thing that struck Bounds during his yearlong research on Cronkite was how the newsman saw the dangers of unedited information when the internet was still in its infancy. “He foresaw the internet as a dangerous, unedited, uncontrolled rumor mill where it was impossible to check sources,” Bounds said. “He warned us well in advance of the dangers of fake news.” Cronkite even lobbied for schools to train students how to identify good sources of information. “He was the most trusted man in America, and he valued speaking the truth and using the right words,” says Bounds. From 1962 to 1981, Cronkite anchored “CBS Evening News.” He delivered newspapers in the 1920s, was a copy boy in the 1930s, and was on the air in the golden age of radio. As the face and voice of CBS News,

Cronkite reported some of the nation’s most important events, from telling the nation that President John F. Kennedy had been killed to being at a loss for words when NASA astronauts landed on the moon. Bounds said because there are so many recording of Cronkite, he was able to soak up the newsman’s personality. But with more than 60 years of journalistic experience covering events around the globe, Cronkite is a challenging character to portray. “He had a massive web of names and connections I’m still in the process of learning,” he said. For Bounds, the real obstacle in becoming Cronkite comes not in his prepared monologue, but in the audience questions that follow. There’s no way to rehearse that. “Sometimes you have to answer the question you wished they had asked, not the question they did ask,” Bounds said.

“THE POWER OF WORDS” WHO 2017 Chautauqua History Alive Festival WHEN June 16-25 TICKETS Free INFO greenvillechautauqua.org


TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE

CHAUTAUQUA 2017 What is Chautauqua? It’s history brought to life through interactive theater. Scholars perform monologues in character and then answer questions from the audience. WALTER CRONKITE

Saturday, June 24, 7:30 p.m., Tent at Greenville Tech

Friday, June 23, 9 a.m., Upcountry History Museum

RACHEL CARSON

Saturday, June 24, Pelzer Auditorium

Saturday, June 17, 2 p.m., Greenville Tech TRC Auditorium

Sunday, June 25, 7:30 p.m., Under the Tent at Greenville Tech

Tuesday, June 20, 9 a.m., Upcountry History Museum; Falls Park

Wednesday, June 21, 8 p.m., Trailblazer Amphitheatre, Travelers Rest

CESAR CHAVEZ

Sunday, June 25, Greenville Tech TRC Auditorium

Thursday, June 22, 9 a.m., Upcountry History Museum

Sunday, June 18, 7:30 p.m., Under the Tent at Greenville Tech

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Wednesday, June 21, 9 a.m., Upcountry History Museum

Friday, June 16, 7:30 p.m., Under the Tent at Greenville Tech Monday, June 19, 11:30 a.m., Younts Center for Performing Arts, Fountain Inn

MAYA ANGELOU Saturday, June 17, 2 p.m., Greenville Tech TRC Auditorium Tuesday, June 20, 11:30 a.m., Kroc Center Friday, June 23, 11:30 a.m., Phillis Wheatley Community Center

Sunday, June 18, 2 p.m., Greenville Tech TRC Auditorium Wednesday, June 21, 11:30 a.m., Kroc Center

Thursday, June 22, 11:30 a.m., Centre Stage Friday, June 23, 7:30 p.m., Under the Tent at Greenville Tech

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CULTURE

OFF THE TOP OF HIS HEAD Jeff Sumerel thinks inside the box for ‘A Concern of Some Kind’ VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

On a stage at Furman’s Playhouse Theatre before an audience of 65 people or so and five cameras, a man’s disembodied head stares back at the crowd from his place inside a Lucite box on a table. Occasionally, lab technicians in white coats come onstage to move things around or position things more conveniently within the sight range of said head. Once in awhile, a screen flickers to life and the head conducts an interview with a person on the screen, who could be anyone from South Carolina poet laureate Marjorie Wentworth to the owner of Charleston’s High Wire distillery, Scott Blackwell. Every once in a while, the lab director emerges to make adjustments or tend to the head’s needs. For example, if the head itches, the director will acquire some itching cream to help him out. Did we mention the lab director is a puppet, operated and voiced by actor and puppeteer Phil Davis? There, in a nutshell, is the setup for “A Concern of Some Kind,” an episodic 30-minute absurdist sitcom created by Upstate actor, comedian, performance artist, and writer Jeff Sumerel. Sounds like your typical run-of-the-mill sitcom, right? In some ways, the show, which is being produced by Upstate musician and actor Sam Reynolds and written by Sumerel and Missy Vaughan-Kleppel, is a culmination of different projects Sumerel’s been working on all of his life. Sumerel has studied avant-garde and experimental filmmaking at the San Francisco Art Institute, performed with the comedyand-improv group that eventually evolved into Café & Then Some years after his departure, toured the country as standup comedian, conducted performance-art pieces for museums, and created multimedia presentations for corporate events. He’s even worked in advertising. Between all of those professions, Sumerel has learned to mix the comedic and the macabre, and juxtapose the bizarre and the polished. In fact, he’s already done a version of “A Concern of Some Kind” as a solo artist. “I did this show in 1990 right after I stopped doing standup,” he says. “I wanted to get into performance art, so I spoke with a gallery owner about standing in the gallery with a plexiglass box over my head and doing my standup, but no one could hear

Katie Fenske / Contributing

The concept for Jeff Sumerel’s “A Concern of Some Kind” dates back to a performance art piece he performed in 1990.

it. That evolved into a theater show that I booked for five weeks. I realized that there was something to that show.” By the time the memory of that concept came back to him, Sumerel had already booked The Playhouse in collaboration with Reynolds. They were interested in creating a live-streaming show that would be, in Sumerel’s words, “a South Carolina version of ‘A Prairie Home Companion.’” But ultimately, he decided against that plan. “A month into it, I realized I couldn’t do it,” he says. “I realized I was doing that because I wanted to do something popular, not because it was something I wanted to do. So I thought, ‘What if we could do a series of 10 half-hour shows with a live audience, five cameras, and polished graphics? That way if it sucks, we’ll know it’s not because it didn’t look good.” The show, which will premiere on Saturday, June 17, with a live stream on YouTube and on the aconcernofsomekind.com site, ditches the typical character-arc structure for something a little more surreal. Think Cartoon Network’s “Tim & Eric Awesome Show Great Job.” “A conflict for this guy is, ‘I have an itch on the top of my head,’” Sumerel says with a laugh. “That’s the opening episode. So his little puppet has to go buy him itching cream. There’s a conflict, they solve it, and they learn from it. So the scenarios are pretty traditional in that sense.”

“A CONCERN OF SOME KIND” WHERE The Playhouse, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway WHEN Saturday, June 17, 7 p.m. TICKETS Free INFO 864-294-2125, aconcernofsomekind.com


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CULTURE

MELLOW YELLER

The mainstream finally embraces alt-country singer Robbie Fulks, but he still has beefs with Nashville VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

For four years, alt-country singer/songwriter Robbie Fulks toiled away in Nashville at Songwriters Ink, a music publishing company that provided songs for Tim McGraw and Joe Diffie, among others. Eventually, Fulks tired of what he calls the “softrock feminist crap” he was surrounded by while trying to advance his own smartass honky-tonk sound. And what a sound it is. Fulks is one of those rare birds who can burn down a bad-boy tale like “I Told Her Lies” or a kiss-off like “Busy Not Cryin’” while also creating barroom heartbreak classics like “Heart, I Wish You Were Here.” He even penned a venomous goodbye to Music City with his 1997 song “F**k This Town.” But over the years, Fulks has mellowed. At least musically. His last two albums, “Gone Away Back-

Robbie Fulks

ward” and “Upland Stories,” are subdued ventures into bluegrass and folk balladry, leaning less on Fulks’ skill with sarcasm and more on his incisive storytelling and haunting way with a melody. “Upland Stories,” released in 2016, even garnered two Grammy nominations, the ultimate mainstream show of respect.

And Nashville has changed, too. Once a haven for country music and little else, Music City has become a diverse mecca, culturally and musically. With a milesdeep community of session musicians and state-of-the-art studios, Nashville has become home for all kinds of artists from rock to soul to jazz and beyond. So has Fulks, who will play at The Spinning Jenny in Greer this Tuesday, mellowed at all when it comes to his arch-nemesis town? “I’m still an outsider,” Fulks says, “but the city’s changed radically since 1997. When I go down there to play and hang around, it seems to me that it’s changed for the better culturally. You go to east Nashville and there are these vegan restaurants and hipster ice cream places and these craft brewery places, and that’s reflected in the club scene, too. The old bluegrass place I’ve been playing for years is owned by Whole Foods. It’s insane compared to what it used to be.” That sounds like a mixed, but honest, opinion. And how about the music? “As far as the industry, going by what I hear on the radio stations, lyrically it’s gotten more permissive,” he says. “Stuff that I wasn’t able to get away with, like referring to a woman’s body parts or something slightly erotic, it’s a lot easier to get away with now. People have really opened up the

realm of what you’re allowed to say.” Wait for it, though: Fulks has more to say. “At the same time, though, the awfulness of the music seems to have gotten worse,” he says. “The performance quality of it and the level of intelligence at which it’s aimed is kind of depressing to me.” As for Fulks’ own career, how did his first-ever Grammy nominations (for Best Folk Album and Best Americana Roots Song) help his bottom line? He probably started selling a few more concert tickets at least, right? “You’d really wish that, wouldn’t you? But no,” Fulks says with a laugh. “Of course, it’s the first time it’s ever happened to me, so I don’t know if I’m exploiting it as expertly as I should be. I’m discovering it as I go along.”

ROBBIE FULKS WHERE The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer WHEN Tuesday, June 20, 7 p.m. TICKETS $15 in advance/$18 door INFO 864-469-6416, thespinningjennygreer.com

APPLY

now! FOR SUMMER & FALL CLASSES

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42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JUNE 15-18

COMMUNITY

Summer on Augusta Summer on Augusta is a community festival created by the Augusta Road Business Association to celebrate one of Greenville’s most historic business districts. During the three-day festival, Augusta Road will be bustling with live music, great food, and festivities. Favorite returning events include the Tomato Pie Contest, Block Party at Capers Place, Grillin’ and Chillin’ at Augusta Commons, Hound Dog Social at Augusta Village, Shaggin’ on Augusta and the Second Annual Shag Contest. New this year are the SOA After Hours at The Common Cure as well as the South End Father’s Day Luau. Festival sponsor Virginia Hayes of Coldwell Banker Caine said, “A key aspect of my business is giving back. Having grown up in a small town where I witnessed unique shops and restaurants dwindle, I know the importance of supporting local businesses, which is why I have served as the presenting sponsor of Summer on Augusta since its inception. These Augusta Road businesses are key to maintaining our neighborhood charm and thriving real estate market.” —Kristen Ferris

WHEN Thursday, June 15–Sunday, June 18 WHERE Augusta Street ADMISSION Free INFO onlyonaugusta.com/summer-on-augusta

JUNE 16-18

FAMILY

Sesame Street Live: Make A New Friend

“Sesame Street Live: Make a New Friend” will bring one of the most beloved children’s programs from the television screen to the stage. “Make a New Friend” will follow characters including Elmo, Grover, Abby Cadabby, and others as they welcome a new arrival to Sesame Street — Grover’s friend Chamki from India. Together, they’ll discover the fun in forming new friendships and the importance of learning about different cultures. The theatrical experience, intended for children ages 1–6 will include music, singing, dancing, special lighting effects, and audience participation. The production will last 90 minutes, with a 15-minute intermission. —Emily Pietras

WHEN June 16, 10:30 a.m.; June 17, 10:30 a.m.; June 17, 2 p.m.; June 18, 3 p.m. WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena ADMISSION $18–55 INFO bonsecoursarena.com

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06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JUNE 17

JUNE 24

HISTORY

Over the Top: American Posters from WWI This year marks the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I, and a new exhibit at the Upcountry History Museum, in partnership with the Norman Rockwell Museum, will provide valuable insight into the era’s social and cultural context. “Over The Top: American Posters from WWI” gives visitors an opportunity to view 44 rare wartime posters that were deployed to drum up public support for purchasing war bonds and funding international aid projects. The posters, designed by noted illustrators such as J.C. Leyendecker and James Montgomery Flagg, often incorporated distinctly American icons such as the flag, Uncle Sam, and the Statue of Liberty to intertwine patriotism and support for the war effort — a tactic used to try to unite a populace that was divided over the country’s involvement abroad. —Emily Pietras

WHEN June 17–Sept. 24 WHERE Upcountry History Museum ADMISSION $8, adults; $7, seniors; $6, ages 4–18; children 3 and under free INFO upcountryhistory.org

Sail Away! Get a Loan of $30,000+, and We’ll Give you a Cruise Vacation for Two!

RECREATION

Black Rodeo The Southeastern Rodeo Association Black Rodeo is coming to Greenville. The rodeo has been a favorite pastime of families for decades. This one will feature professional cowboys performing phenomenal feats as they compete for $10,500 in prize money in categories such as bull riding, steer wrestling, bareback riding, calf roping, team roping, and barrel racing. Special performance categories are offered, such as steer undecorating for cowgirls and junior barrel racing and junior breakaway calf roping for the kids. Alie O’Murphy, former rodeo contestant said, “We had the best time! This was our first Southeastern Black Rodeo, and it was one of the best rodeos we have been to.” —Kristen Ferris

WHEN June 24, 7:30 p.m. WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena ADMISSION $19.50 INFO bonsecoursarena.com/events/detail/black-rodeo

Perfect Fit Pillow Event Wednesday, June 14th - Sunday, July 16th

$25 OFF ALL PILLOWS*

A PILLOW TO FIT EVERY BODY To sleep your best, you need a properly fitted pillow.

Call 370.5670 to take advantage of this offer!

NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN! Call 467.4160 or visit our website at www.greenvilleheritage.com for information on this promotion or how to join.

Cooling Pillows

Side Pillows

Back Pillows

COME IN. GET FIT. SLEEP BETTER. *Promotion dates: May 1 to July 31, 2017. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined with any other promotion. **Certificate recipient is responsible for: 1) a one-time registration fee of $19 per person (certificate is transferable prior to registration, during registration period), 2) port charges, taxes, customs and fulfillment fees of $39.60 per day/per person, 3) transportation to and from the port, 4) any applicable incidental/gratuity charges and/or fees. Visit your nearest branch or our website for full promotion details.

DOWNTOWN

COUNTY SQUARE

SCTAC

SIMPSONVILLE

Greenville The Shops at Greenridge (Behind P.F. Chang’s) 1129A Woodruff Rd. 864.987.0555 *Can not be combined with any other offers. Excludes Travel pillows. One per customer. See store for more details. Offer ends 7/16/17.

www.relaxtheback.com/stores/greenville


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

JUNE 16

MUSIC

“The Simon & Garfunkel Story”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. $25-45 The internationally acclaimed hit theater show “The Simon & Garfunkel Story” will play the Peace Center on Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7:30 p.m. as part of its tour of more than 45 U.S. and Canadian cities from coast to coast. The immersive concert-style show chronicles the amazing journey shared by the folk-rock duo Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel. It tells the story from their humble beginnings as Tom & Jerry to their incredible success as one of the best-selling music groups of the ’60s to their dramatic split in 1970. It culminates with the famous The Concert in Central Park reunion in 1981 with more than half a million fans in attendance. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35i0DxNB4u8 Carpoolparty & Stereo Reform (double EP-release show)

Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9 p.m. | $10 | gottrocksgreenville.com

Carpoolparty is not a band that likes taking things easy. The husband-and-wife duo of Danny and Mary Olguin’s debut full-length album, “Hot Tapes,” is barely a year old, and they’ve had a new video clip or snippet of music out on social media seemingly every week since its release. Now they’ve got a new EP of radiant, blissfully melodic electronic dance music coming out called “Internauts.” “It’s a ’90s term for people who are internet-savvy,” Danny Olguin says. “But it’s also what we call our fans, our fellow ‘internauts.’” The band plays a technicolor brand of electronic music called “vapordance,” a genre that blends disco, vaporwave, funk, and hip-hop into a soundtrack for the band’s playful visual aesthetic, and Olguin says that the new EP represents a new level of refinement to their sound. “‘Hot Tapes’ was our opening statement,” he says. “‘Internauts’ is like the first paragraph that comes after that opening statement. It will stick to the theme but expound on what is already there. We took a lot of the spacial groove theory, drum machine beats, and nostalgic samples to this new EP while bringing a new flare and polish to our sound.” —Vincent Harris

CONCERT

ON SALE NOW

MUSIC

RAIN Concert

FRI

16

COMMUNITY

Beachin’ Fridays Concerts

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 7 p.m. | Fridays | FREE Beachin’ Fridays started in 2015, bringing the beach music scene to Mauldin. People come from all over the Upstate to converge on the Mauldin Cultural Center’s outdoor amphitheater for evenings of shag dancing, food trucks, and craft beverages. The final night always features a special performance and fireworks. All shows are free of charge, so grab your dancing shoes and bring your energy! The lineup is as follows: June 16 - Carolina Coast Band featuring Rhonda McDaniel, June 23 - The Holiday Band, June 30 - The Sand Band featuring Terri Gore, July 7 - Squeeze Play, and July 14 - The Tams featuring 14 Karat Gold Band.

ART

Staining Papers for Collage

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $89 This water media workshop with Jane Todd Butcher is day one of a two-part series, but you may register for only one day if you choose. In part one, participants will dye and stain art tissue and rice papers with acrylic inks and acrylic paints, and learn how to adhere the papers to various surfaces for later finishing. Create colored art tissues and rice papers to compose a collage painting, book covers, or even home decor. Materials will be provided.

MUSIC

Villive Concert Series 2017

The Village of West Greenville 1288 Pendleton St. 6-9 p.m. | Fridays FREE Enjoy an outdoor, pet-friendly summer concert series that benefits Safe Harbor domestic shelter. Come every Friday evening to enjoy great music, food trucks, draft beer, and artisan vendors. See schedule of performers and food trucks online. villivemusic.com

JUN 17 CONCERT

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m. | $45-65 A Tribute to The Beatles celebrates the 50th anniversary of the release of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” The celebration comes to Greenville when RAIN plays the Peace Center. As “the next best thing to seeing The Beatles!” (Associated Press), RAIN performs the full range of The Beatles’ discography live onstage, including the most complex and challenging songs that The Beatles themselves recorded in the studio but never performed for an audience. In addition to the updated sets that include brand new LED, high-definition screens and multimedia content, RAIN will bring “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” to life in its entirety with the launch of the 2017 tour. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

SAT

17

COMMUNITY

Bob Dylan Tribute at Americana & Folk Tribute Festival

Hagood Mill | 138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE Each year, as past of the Americana & Folk Tribute Festival, Hagood Mill selects and showcases one of the greatest Americana and folk musicians of all time, paying homage to their life and musical career. This year they honor 2017 Nobel Peace Prize recipient and American music icon, Bob Dylan. In addition, the festival will host a variety of folk life and traditional arts demonstrations. There will be blacksmithing, bowl-digging, flint knapping, chair-caning, moonshining, broom-making, basket-making, pottery, quilting, spinning, knitting, weaving, woodcarving, bee keeping, hearth cooking, metal-smithing, leather-working, and more. You can ask questions of the artists and make a purchase of their traditional arts to take home. The centerpiece of the Hagood Mill historic site is the water-powered 1845 gristmill. It is one of the finest examples of 19th century technology in the Upcountry and operates just as it has for the last century and a half. The mill will be running throughout the day. In the old mill, fresh stone-ground corn meal, grits, and wheat flour will be available. 864-898-2936 | BillyC@co.pickens.sc.us

https://aprilbandthecool.bandcamp.com

«

Daniel Casasanta Presents: The Show II, feat. Brainblind, Row 22, April B & The Cool, and Sly Sparrow Soundbox Tavern, 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville 7 p.m. | $10 | 864-228-7763

When Daniel Casasanta, bassist for the Upstate trio Sly Sparrow, organized an eight-band blowout at the Soundbox Tavern a few months back, it was a huge success, drawing around 200 people to the club and showing off some of the most talented groups in town. It was also something of a nightmare, logistically. “When you have that many bands, you’re going to have a lot of surprises,” Casasanta says with a laugh. “Musicians have a tendency to be unpredictable, and we only allowed 15 minutes to transition in between groups.” This time out, Casasanta has given the groups a little more time in between sets, and cut the number of bands in half. “Brainchild is just great rock and roll,” Casasanta says. “They’re going to hit you hard. Row 22 has these really interesting experimental improvisational sections, but they’ve got these really melodic vocals over the top. And April B & The Cool are gonna put on a great set. They’re an incredibly soulful, funky band. And then Sly Sparrow will close it out with some original instrumentals and maybe some classic, familiar stuff that will have people singing along and dancing to. I’m really excited about it.” —Vincent Harris


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE « BeWell Mauldin Market

JUN 18

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin 8 a.m. | Saturdays | FREE The 2017 BeWell Mauldin Market, sponsored by Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, will run June 3 to Aug. 26 at the Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater. The market will be held Saturdays, 8 a.m. to noon. Most vendors accept cash and/or credit cards. The market features a variety of vendors from around the Upstate selling locally sourced and produced items including produce, dairy, eggs, honey, gifts, clothing, accessories, treats, pastries, and more. The market will also feature free healthy activities such as small-group fitness, health screenings, and cooking demos.

VISUAL ARTS

The Pole Academy Student Showcase

The Younts Performing Arts Center 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn 7:30-11:30 p.m. | $20 The Pole Academy is celebrating their third year anniversary with our second annual student showcase. The show will include 15+ performances (single and double performances) vendors, a bar, and one epic way to spend your Saturday evening. Join the community, share, bring your friends, and check out what a pole show is. Show is hosted by Xpole and a handful of snazzy vendors to meet all your needs. Show is 18+, 21 to drink. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Showtime at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at Younts Box office or online. 864-520-2834 | thepoleacademy.com info@thepoleacademy.com

SUN

18

ART

Sundays at 2: Family Art Adventure

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE Drawing our inspiration from South Carolina’s beautiful beaches, we’ll create a fun work of art exploring what lies beneath the ocean’s surface. It’s the perfect Father’s Day activity for the whole family. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org

MON

19

GOVERNMENT/POLITICS

Upstate Republican Women June Luncheon

Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. In accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, Mother Teresa observed that abortion is the greatest threat to world peace, because “if you can break the bond between a mother and her child, you can break every other bond.” The Republican platform stands for the sanctity of life, both born and unborn. At its June meeting, Upstate Republican Women will host a panel facilitated by SC Citizens for Life President, Lisa Van Riper, entitled “Women Speaking for Women - the Born and Unborn.” The panel will include Lenna Smith and Jeannie Stoner of the Piedmont Women’s Center, Holly Gatling of SC Citizens for Life, and Alexia Newman of Carolina Pregnancy Counseling Center. upstaterepublicanwomen@gmail.com

TUE-WED

20-28

THEATER

“Death and the Maiden”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. 7 p.m. | $10-15 This explosive, award-winning drama is set in a country that has only recently returned to democracy. When a good Samaritan picks up Gerardo Escobar and takes him home, Escobar’s wife thinks she recognizes the military doctor who raped and tortured her years before. He is now her prisoner. Does she let him go? This Olivier Award-winning piece written by Ariel

Animal Care’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpMuRO_oDUc

Slightly Stoopid w/ IRAtion

CONCERT

COMMUNITY

Correspondent

Heritage Park Amphitheatre, 861 SE Main St., Simpsonville 6 p.m. | $35

As an example of the wide stylistic range that reggae music can have, the summer-tour pairing of Slightly Stoopid and IRAtion makes a lot of sense. San Diego’s Slightly Stoopid blend a California-punk energy level and a ska-style horn section into their skanking grooves, while IRAtion takes a more expansive approach, blending heavy-rock riffs, smooth pop vocals, and even the occasional electronic touches to their songs. And IRAtion singer/guitarist Micah Pueschel sees some other differences as well. “They play a very roots style of reggae, a traditional style, with that Southern California mixed-in,” he says. “It’s a kind of hybrid. And they have a lot of musicianship that makes the songs flow together. I think we’re more of a crossbreed of alternative rock and cleaner, pop-song structures. They’ll extend songs and play with a lot of jamming, and we write songs that fit more of a short form format.” Regardless of the stylistic differences, IRAtion is happy to be on tour with a band that inspired them to get together in the first place. “They were a band we looked up to coming up,” Pueschel says. —Vincent Harris

Dorfman is directed by Aaron Brakefield. Centre Stage will be partnering with SC Hispanic Alliance during this production. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org

WED

21

Social

MUSIC

National Make Music Day Celebration and Ice Cream

Mauldin Cultural Center | 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 5:30-8 p.m. | FREE Join people from over 850 cities in 110 countries for a host of activities for families and children of all ages celebrating the joy of making music. The highlight of the day will be a ukelele circle held at the Cultural Center amphitheater. The circle is open to people of all ages; no experience is necessary. Musical Innovations will provide ukuleles for those who do not own their own to use. For the first 30 people that join the circle, Alfred Publishing will provide free ukulele method books. The event is co-sponsored by the Mauldin Chamber of Commerce, Mauldin City, the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM), and Musical Innovations. Also planned for the evening are ice cream, food trucks, and performances by members of the Yesterukes, a ukulele band made up of “well-seasoned adults” who entertain audiences by singing and playing great music from Tin Pan Alley and the Great American Songbook through rock ‘n’ roll from the ’50s to some groovin’ songs of the ’60s.

LITERATURE

Book Talk and Signing: J.C. Sasser and Rose Senehi

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 6 p.m. | $10 Meet Southern authors J.C. Sasser (author of “Gradle Bird” [Koehler Books, paperback, $17.95]) and Rose Senehi (author of “Carolina Belle” [KIM Publications, paperback, $15.95]) as they talk about their latest books then take questions from the audience and sign books at a panel talk and signing at Fiction Addiction. *Note: Tickets are $10 each. Each ticket admits one and can be redeemed for $10 off the featured authors’ books prior to or at the event. Books and tickets can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling 864-675-0540. Those who cannot make the event may order signed books from Fiction Addiction to be picked up afterward or directly shipped. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Bobby

FOOD

Davis Family Wine Summer Soiree

Canyon Kitchen at Lonesome Valley 150 Lonesome Valley Road, Sapphire, NC 6-9 p.m. | $175 Executive chef Adam Hayes welcomes sonoma vintner Guy Davis of the Davis Family Vineyards to Canyon Kitchen for a lively summer soiree. Complete with hors d’oeuvres and cocktails, live music, a seasonal feast, and a plethora of wine pairings, the evening will celebrate the summer release of Canyon Cuvee, a rosé collaboration between Hayes and Guy Davis that highlights Canyon Kitchen’s hyper-seasonal menus and ingredients. Starting at 6 p.m., guests will gather and enjoy live music by local party band, The Business, who will set the tone for a festive evening. Chef Hayes and his culinary team will prepare a special meal, complete with five different food stations for guests to explore; each station will include a selection of wine pairings by Guy Davis. 828-743-7967 lonesomevalley.com canyonkitchen@lonesomevalley.com

COMMUNITY

Coffee and Conversation

Upstate SC Alliance Office 124 Verdae Blvd., Suite 202 8-9 a.m. FREE Join Beth Crews, director of Furman University undergraduate evening studies, and a panel of Furman colleagues to learn how the University partners with businesses in promoting Purple & White (collar) talent development in the Upstate. Whether it’s employee talent development or student interns or graduates to fill employment needs, Furman contributes to community well-being by producing engaged citizens, prepared professionals, and talented leaders. No matter your business concern, there’s an educational connection Furman can help facilitate. RSVP online. bit.ly/2rdC9DC

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06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITY

Lakeside Summer Concert Series

Furman University Amphitheater 3300 Poinsett Highway 7:30 p.m. | Thursdays through August 3 FREE Furman University’s Music by the Lake Summer Concert Series, a Greenville tradition since 1968,

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Why Bigger Dogs Are Better

You know how they say “bigger is better?” Well, it’s totally true. I’ve heard so many stories of people wanting to adopt small dogs or puppies because they’ll fit in better with their lifestyle. I’ve also heard a LOT of stories about those “small dog people” adopting a large dog and now their lives are changed forever - for the better! I’m here today to set “small dog people” straight. Large dogs are lovers, swimmers, play mates, protectors, and loyal to a fault. You can do so much more with a large dog than you can with a small one, and the love is multiplied by 1,000! Take it from me, and the hundreds who have tried the switch - large dogs are truly the best.

GreenvillePets.org


AS SEEN IN – THE 2017

BTC BEHIND THE COUNTER

EMILY AUSTIN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

“Every day is like Christmas,” said Emily Austin Fowler of running her gift sometimes,” she said. shop, Emily Austin. Surrounded by beloved co-workers, customers that have “Plus, people get tired of parking far away, waiting in line, and not being become friends, and boxes of treasures, it’s no wonder Fowler keeps coming treated personably,” she said. “That’s where we come in. We provide a lot of back to the retail business. service. We’ll carry it to the car if you’d like.” She got her start in 1981 in Spartanburg, and then opened While Emily and Chelsea are the faces of the store, her I try to get things that a shop in Greenville in 1988. By 2002, she had sold both husband Randy Fowler is the “brains behind it, the financial guy are one-of-a-kind, or locations, but she couldn’t stay away for too long. In June who does all the work we don’t want to do,” Emily said, laughing. made locally. 2016, she opened her newest venture on Pelham Road and Emily was working in New York City in the 1970s when she has loved the location, the space, and her ability to add more decided to move South to be closer to family. Before opening home decor selections to the gift-shop mix. the original Emily Austin, she became the first person in South And her favorite “bright spot” at her new shop? Working alongside her Carolina to apply for and receive a business loan designed for minorities – in daughter Chelsea Daniels. “She has a marketing degree from Elon, and her case, a business owned by a single woman. she brings different things to the table,” Fowler said. “It’s been a lot of fun.” Now, she’s enjoying her work more than ever, with her family by her side. Chelsea often brings her miniature golden doodle, Brady, who has developed “I’ve been so blessed to do something I like doing,” she said. “My concern is a following by greeting customers. to entertain you and make you smile. Whether someone buys or not, if they It’s easy to find a gift for anyone at Emily Austin, with cards, jewelry, smiled, that makes me happy.” wedding gifts, serving pieces, wall art, books, pillows, clothes and much Come celebrate our one year anniversary June 22, 2017. more. Smaller shops can have many advantages over department or big box stores, she said, because the selection has been narrowed for you. “Everything has been hand-picked,” she said. “I try to get things that are oneof-a-kind, or made locally.” She also prides herself on stocking the store with laughter-inducing 3604 Pelham Rd., Ste. C, Greenville towels, plaques and other items. “Everyone needs something humorous 864.568.5124 | Facebook: @EmilyAustinInc


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE «

celebrates the sounds of summer. Relax on the grounds of the spacious amphitheater by the Furman Lake and enjoy a cross-section of big band, jazz, bluegrass, Latin, contemporary, marches, and orchestral favorites. Each Thursday during the series, a concert basket filled with goodies will be given away to a lucky concert goer. Thanks to generous sponsors, all concerts are free. 864-294-2086 bit.ly/2oVHWsT furmanmusic@furman.edu

VISUAL ARTS

GCCA Call for Instructors Fall 2017

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. GCCA is currently seeking proposals from teaching artists for the fall 2017 class sessions (Fall Session I: Sept. 11-Oct. 20, 2017 / Fall Session II: Oct. 23Nov. 31, 2017). We are looking for artists doing interesting work who are also excellent teachers. Day and evening class proposals can range from one-day and two-day workshops to six-week classes. Teaching proposals should be submitted by Thursday, June 22. Contact art school director Liz Rundorff Smith at liz@artcentergreenville.org with questions. liz@artcentergreenville.org

THU-JUL

22-27

MUSIC

Learn to Play Appalachian Music

Trinity United Methodist Church 2703 Augusta St. $60 Registration is now open for lessons learning to play guitar, fiddle, or mandolin. Classes are grouped by skill level and will begin on Thursday, June 22, at Trinity UMC (2703 Augusta St.). Beginners are welcome. These lessons are open to children and adults (children must be at least 9 years old). The total fee for 6 weeks of lessons is $60. Also, rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. This program supports the nonprofit Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music (yamupstate.com). 864-979-9188 yamupstate.com susu9196@gmail.com

FRI

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MUSIC

Earsight

Chicora Alley 608 S. Main St. 9:30 p.m. | FREE Greenville’s own high-energy funk ensemble, Earsight, will be returning to Chicora Alley on June 23. Earsight is Adam Knight (guitar), Tim Blackwell (drums), and David Katilius (bass). Earsight released an EP in 2015, and have since performed at Artisphere and received radio play on WNCW. 404-992-9917 earsightband.com aknight76@yahoo.com

SAT

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MUSIC

The Upstate Music Collectors Show

Greg Neal Shows Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium 385 N. Church St., Spartanburg 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $3 Announcing the third edition of the Upstate Music Collectors Show. This event features music dealers from all over the South selling rare vintage vinyl LPs and 45s, plus CDs, music DVDs, memorabilia, and much more. 704-996-9945 facebook.com/GregNealShows

COMMUNITY

Free Dental Care for Greenville Veterans

Aspen Dental FREE Nearly 450 Aspen Dental practices will open their doors to provide free dental care for thousands of veterans across the nation. Local veterans can call 1-844-AspenHMM to schedule an appointment at a participating office in the Greenville area. Appointments are required and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Of the more than 21 million veterans across the U.S., fewer than 10 million are enrolled for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health benefits, which for many do not include dental care benefits, and more than 1.2 million lack health insurance altogether. The June 24 Day of Service will be Aspen Dental’s fourth annual, and is the largest single-day oral health initiative targeted at veterans. It’s part of Aspen Dental’s Healthy Mouth Movement, a community-giving initiative to deliver free dental care to veterans. aspendental.com

THRU SUN

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ART

“Away, Away Down South” Riverworks Gallery 300 River St. #202

FREE This exhibition features printmaker Andrew Blanchard and photographer Eliot Dudik, both members of the elite Oxford American Magazine’s 100 New Superstars of Southern Art. Each offer images of Southern Gothic stories of lost and suppressed ideals with sinister, violent overtones. gvltec.edu/riverworks

THEATER

Disney’s “The Lion King”

The Peace Center 101 W. Broad St. $35 and up “The Lion King” will play on the Peace Center stage from Wednesday, May 31, to Sunday, June 25, Tuesdays through Thursdays at 7:30 p.m., Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sundays at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. There will also be 2 p.m. matinees on Thursday, June 1, and Thursday, June 22. Premium ticket packages, which include a prime seat location, a commemorative souvenir program, and an exclusive merchandise item, are also available. 864-467-3000 peacecenter.org. groups@peacecenter.org

06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

We are seeking the BEST

to serve the BEST!

Do you want to know more about Cascades? We have hiring managers and fellow caregivers to meet with you and discuss your interests in a job. Mark your calendar and we’ll see you next Wednesday!

Cascades Career Sessions Wednesday of each week 3:00 – 5:30 pm 267 Old Sulphur Springs Road Greenville SC 29607

Now accepting applications for: • CNA/Certified Nursing Assistants • Maintenance Technicians/HVAC • PRN RNs & LPNs

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Upstate Shakespeare Festival

Falls Park on the Reedy River 601 S. Main St. 7 p.m. FREE Our most requested work of Shakespeare is back again, with Puck and Bottom, donkey heads and fairies, marriage, and people running to and from love! Join us for another night in Falls Park with one of the most beloved works in all of theatre. Presented by the Upstate Shakespeare Festival Thursday through Sunday on the above dates in beautiful Falls Park on the Reedy. Showtimes are at 7 p.m. Seating begins at 6 p.m.

THEATER

“Hairspray: The Musical”

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. $35 The Greenville Little Theatre is excited to present “Hairspray: The Musical.” In 1962 Baltimore, plump teenager Tracy Turnblad dreams to dance

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864-528-5501 • Cascades-Verdae.com


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-02409 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Morgan Stanley Capital I Inc. Trust 2006-HE1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE1, PLAINTIFF, vs. Bette J. Sorgee f/k/a Bette J. Rakestraw; Bennie L. Sorgee and if Bennie L. Sorgee be deceased then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of Bennie L. Sorgee distributees and devisees at law to the Estate of Bennie L. Sorgee and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; Kim Duncan; DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute

and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on April 18, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. NOTICE TO APPOINT ATTORNEY FOR DEFENANT(S) IN MILITARY SERVICE TO UNKNOWN OR KNOWN DEFENDANTS THAT MAY BE

IN THE MILITARY SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ALL BEING A CLASS DESIGNATED AS RICHARD ROE: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED that Plaintiff’s attorney has applied for the appointment of an attorney to represent you. If you fail to apply for the appointment of an attorney to represent you within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you Plaintiff’s appointment will be made absolute with no further action from Plaintiff.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-01421 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-RZ4, PLAINTIFF, vs. Doyle W. Wright, III; Michael Beeler; Randall Evitt DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such

appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on March 2, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-02637 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank, as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 2004-RS3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Hae Jung Ko; Thornblade Property Owners Association, Inc. DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer

the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on April 25, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO

COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 13TH JUDICIAL COUNTY OF GREENVILLE C.A. NO.: 2017-CP-23-01299 Megan Hope Lauritzen, Plaintiff, Vs. Isaac N. Gomez and Rick Pleau d/b/a Ricky’s Pools, Defendant TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVENAMED: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at 850 Wade Hampton Boulevard, Greenville, South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. RANDALL S. HILLER, P.A. S/Randall S. Hiller Randall S. Hiller (2513) 850 B Wade Hampton Blvd. P.O. Box 1716 Greenville, SC 29602-1716 (864) 232-0026 (864) 242-4692 Fax

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that David and Goliath, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 25, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT C. A. NO.: 2017-DR-23-2345 Joshua Ryland Dillard, Plaintiff, vs. Tabitha Ann Dillard, Defendant. To: The Defendant abovenamed: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscribers at their offices Woodruff Road Corporate Center, 112 Lovett Drive, Greenville, South Carolina, 29607 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, except as to the United States of America (if a named party), which shall have sixty (60) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for a default judgment for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC Amy Richmond Callaway 112 Lovett Drive Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 234-7304 Attorney for Plaintiff

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices

$165

Summons, Notices , Foreclosures, etc.

$1.20 per line

864.679.1205

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that KPE & SGE, LLC dba The Unleashed Dog Bar intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 69 Rocky Slope Rd., Greenville, SC, 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 25, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!


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on “The Corny Collins Show.” When Tracy wins a role on the show, she becomes a celebrity overnight and meets a colorful array of characters as she launches a campaign to integrate the show. Based on the John Waters 1998 film of the same name, “Hairspray” is a family-friendly show piled bouffant high with laughter, romance, and deliriously tuneful songs. 864-233-6238 greenvillelittletheatre.org

WED

28

LITERATURE

Book Signing with Lauren Allbright

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 6 p.m. | FREE Twelve-year-old Ross tries to discover the formula for being funny and getting his new classmates to like him in “Exit Strategy” (Aladdin Books, hardcover, $16.99), Lauren Allbright’s laugh-out-loud debut novel. Meet the middle-grade author as she discusses her new book, answers questions from the audience, and signs books. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

THU

29

COMMUNITY

Documentary Screening: “Homeless in The South”

Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center 101 W. Broad St. 6:30 p.m. | $10 You are cordially invited to be informed and enlightened by Director Jeff Akers, yet again, with a second public screening of his emotionally-charged documentary, “Homeless in The South,” a detailed biopic of the lives of our city’s homeless citizens and what is being done to aid their plight. Please join us as we host this screening to benefit Integrity Village, as well as other service providers in our state to improve Greenville’s vagrancy statistics. bit.ly/2t7LdGp

JUL SAT

01

COMMUNITY

Accepting Nominations for Liberty Fellows

Liberty Fellowship Nominations are being accepted through July 1 for the Liberty Fellowship Class of 2019. Eligible candidates must meet the following criteria: 1. South Carolina resident 2. Age 30-45 3. Leader with history of significant community engagement 4. Potential to have an impact at the state level 5. Successful in their chosen field 6. Willing to make a serious time commitment. Each year individuals across the state identify high-impact leaders who are ready to apply their talents and expertise to making a positive contribution to South Carolina. Though leaders cannot self-nominate, nominations can come from peers, friends, family members, or anyone who knows the individual well. For more information and to nominate someone, visit libertyfellowshipsc.org/nominate. Fellows selected for the Class of 2019 will be announced later this year. libertyfellowshipsc.org/nominate

LITERATURE

Love Your Indie Author Booksigning

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 FREE Come celebrate the underdog writers, the mavericks and the believers and meet these brave scribe warriors who are putting themselves out there, sometimes at their own expense, because they’ve got a story to tell. Signing schedule is as follows: 10:30-

11:30 a.m., Terry Barr, signing “Don’t Date Baptists and Other Warnings from My Alabama Mother;” 10:30-11:30 a.m., Cesar Perez, signing “The Great Pretender;” 1:30-2:30 p.m., James McCallister, signing “Let the Glory Pass Away;” 1:30-2:30 p.m., Paul D. Houle, signing “The Crash of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22;” and 3-4 p.m., Brittany Morgan, signing “Finding the Good in Goodbye” (paperback, $12.99). 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

THU

06

LITERATURE

Storytime Thursdays

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | Thursdays through July 27 FREE Local independent bookstore Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime at the shop at 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 every Thursday morning at 10:30 a.m. July’s storytime titles are as follows: July 6, “Rodzilla” by Rob Sanders; July 13, “Did You Take the B from My _ook?” by Beck & Matt Stanton; July 20, “Toad on the Road: A Cautionary Tale” by Stephen Shaskan; July 27, “Little Excavator” by Anna Dewdney. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

TUE-SEP

11-12

COMMUNITY

Grief Support Class

Century at Keith Office Park 5 Century Drive, Suite 220 5:30-7 p.m. | FREE Are you struggling with loss of your cherished loved one? Are you having difficulty finding companions who really understand? Are you looking for practical tools to help you cope? These 10 weekly sessions will help you cope and adjust with the painful reality of deep loss in the presence of those who are or have been where you are. The sessions focus on basic principles and tools using Alan Wolfelt’s five-star book, “Understanding Your Grief: Ten Essential Touchstones for Finding Hope and Healing.” Classes available at varying times in Greenville, Easley, and Spartanburg. Visit hospicegriefsupport.com for more info. 864-627-7049 hospicegriefsupport.com Tonya.Taylor@interimcares.com

TUE-OCT

11-10

COMMUNITY

Truck Inn Tuesdays

Swamp Rabbit Inn | 1 Logan St. 6-9 p.m. Enjoy Automatic Taco food truck, live music, and local beer each month on the following dates: July 11, Doug Jones with local Green family band; Aug. 8, Darby Wilcox and the Peep Show; Sept. 9, Swamp Rabbit Music Fest; Oct. 10, Randimonium.

SAT

29

COMMUNITY

Gravity Dodgeball Tournament

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N Academy St. 3-6 p.m. By becoming a GPD Dodgeball Tournament sponsor or by registering a team, you are helping to bring important programs to Greenville’s youth to help prevent involvement in gangs and violence. bit.ly/2rNgDnK

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

OPEN 7 DAYS a week

For details and locations visit:

GreenvilleRec.com


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 06.16.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Quite a complement ACROSS

1 Like whisked eggs 7 11th U.S. president 11 Two — kind 14 OshKosh — (clothing brand) 19 Rio Grande city 20 Turn about an axis 21 Hoop part 22 Supply (with) 23 Reach 24 Back in the day 26 Gird one’s — 27 Elena Kagan and others 30 Govt. ecology org. 31 Biblical verb ending 32 Suffix with front or cloth 33 — hall (U. hangout) 34 Limbo and others 44 Vast quantity 45 Motel cousin 46 “Alley- —” (1960 #1 hit) 47 “So it is!” 48 Euterpe and others 56 Cleveland NBAer 57 Actor Sacha Baron — 58 Post-it initialism 59 Up until now 60 Prior to, in poetry 62 Parisian pal 63 Italy’s loc. 64 Way of carrying oneself 66 Wooded region in France

68 Kitchen and others 73 Still a bit firm, as cooked pasta 75 Russian city or region 76 Barrett of Pink Floyd 77 ThinkPad maker, once 80 Spy novelist John le — 81 “Boy, — ever!” 82 Inits. on a battleship 83 Delhi’s home 85 Noted time 86 Shortstop and others 92 Tire trappers 94 Wall-to-wall, e.g. 95 Water in une fontaine 96 With 61-Down, request 97 “Eroica” and others 104 Sleep cycle acronym 105 Lead-in to natal 106 Texter’s “Holy moly!” 107 33rd U.S. pres. 110 Fact about 27-, 34-, 48-, 68-, 86- and 97-Across 118 Out in front 119 Cocky 120 New Zealand indigenes 121 “The Trial” novelist Franz 122 Onetime GI 123 White cheese 124 Bewitched 125 Fidgety 126 Prefix with thermal

By Frank Longo

127 “And there you have it!” 128 Late actress Gabor DOWN

1 Oh-so-bored 2 Scarf down 3 Sketcher’s tablet 4 Put a rip in 5 Pop singer Brickell 6 Nitrogen or carbon, e.g. 7 Intimidates, with “out” 8 Margarine 9 Maui feast 10 Deborah of old films 11 Mouth pain relief brand 12 Solve 13 Singer Tori 14 Ism 15 Dumplings in an Italian restaurant 16 Dog of comics 17 Phoenix NBA team 18 “— a Rebel” (1962 hit) 25 Bic Clic — 28 Summer, in France 29 Overused theme 35 Arthur with a racket 36 Gas in glass 37 103, to Nero 38 Mag for an entrepreneur 39 It’s stranded in cells 40 “Help!” from a helmsman 41 City north of San Diego 42 Hear (of) 98 Prime period 43 Flood control structure 99 Not far from 48 Longtime record label 100 Fly alone 49 — Kippur 101 Age-old flu-fighting 50 Very inferior drink 51 Valuable 102 Yoga chants 52 Lamb-in-pita treat 103 Iranian city 53 Geologist Sir Charles — 108 Quick cuts 54 Bistro list 109 Seed coating 55 Chronicle 110 More — likely 61 See 96-Across 63 Pro trained in trauma 64 Callas of opera 65 Cola cubes 66 Large chasm 67 Angling need 69 Atop, in verse 70 Certain groundfloor apartment 71 Tyro PC gamer, say 72 Petro-Canada rival 73 Sour in taste 74 Actor Lash of Westerns 78 Post office container 79 Mothers 81 TV host Ellen 82 “—, and away!” 83 Possible reply to “Who’s there?” 84 Shoe brand 87 Scent 88 Toyota Sequoia, e.g. 89 ESPN anchor Bob 90 Flee quickly 91 He played Andy Torres on “Cougar Town” 93 Spells, as of luck Hard

Sudoku

111 Test by lifting 112 Sitar player Shankar 113 Pride parade initialism 114 — Lee (food brand) 115 Camelot wife 116 Big admirers 117 Comic Dunn 118 Alias abbr. Crossword answers: page 38

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 38


06.16.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Dad M.D. with Joe Maurer

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

Whose problem is addiction? Everyone’s A family friend is currently recovering from a coma after an accidental drug overdose. She was two years sober and doing a wonderful job raising her young twins. She is a Godfearing, intelligent, strong woman. She’s not a crack-headed, selfish, lazy, trailer park person. Sadly, I sense that our societal perception continues to stereotype those affected by our growing drug problem. But like it or not, this is clearly no longer a problem for “some other lesser country folk.” This is a middle-class problem. This is a Greenville problem. Last month, several news sources highlighted the recent death of 22-year-old Greenville native Reghan Berry. Reghan attended Riverside Middle and High schools. She was a good child entrapped by an unexpected evil. Or there’s Steve Grant, who oversees the Chris and Kelly’s Hope Foundation to honor his two (and only) sons that died of overdoses. Both children attended Christ Church Episcopal School and college. They, too, were good kids. Tragically, more and more examples pop up too frequently in the news. The American Society of Addiction Medicine shows that over 20 million Americans have a substance abuse disorder (an average of 1 out of 7 Americans), with 2 million of them involving prescription pain medication. Overdoses have quadrupled in the past 10 years. Last year in Greenville County, there were close to 100 overdose deaths. We lead South Carolina in opioid-related deaths. Nationally and locally, lawmakers and health specialists are working feverishly to create solutions. But for me, as a pediatrician, I don’t want to lose sight of the future as we attempt to fix the present. Current data suggests that more than 20 percent of children 12 to 17 have used prescription medications for nonmedical uses. By the time they are seniors, almost 70 percent of high school students will have used alcohol, 50 percent will have tried an illegal drug, and nearly 40 percent will have smoked a cigarette. Research shows that because of critical brain growth during adolescence, stronger habits are formed and, as a result, prove harder to break. Addiction is a complicated problem, including behavioral, emotional, and neurochemical (medical) components. When these aspects become hardwired during such a significant time of maturation, those habits will be more difficult to change. Addressing addiction needs to start well before adulthood. Parents should intentionally

JUNE 29

take several proactive steps.

GUNTER THEATRE

• Talk to our children early. It will feel weird at first. We shouldn’t need to talk to our 12-yearolds about drugs and addiction, but we do. • Know our children’s friends and what is happening in their lives. Peer pressure is a strong motivator. Inevitably, even in the purest of circles and with the best of friends, each of us will need to speak into our child’s life. The only way to do that is if we have a relationship with them. • Model good behavior. If we cannot control our own liquor, smoking, or pain medication usage, how can we expect our own children to do so? Children watch everything that we do. Even if it’s not heroin, they can still learn what addiction looks like if we’re not self-aware (Facebook, shopping, work, gaming, etc.). • Set clear guidelines. If a child is not clear on what is expected, it will be difficult to follow guidance. Furthermore, once expectations are known, we must stick firmly to the important rules. This creates a safe space for growth and maturation. As parents, it is incredibly difficult to watch a child suffer, and it is our natural inclination to fix things. In my office, I frequently work with parents who want to treat pain in the quickest and, seemingly, easiest way, without considering the potential repercussions. This often means instantly jumping to medication as the answer. But drugs always need to be our last resort. Certainly there are times when prescription medications are necessary, but we should search elsewhere for other solutions, give problems sufficient time for natural healing, and positively encourage other avenues of pain and emotional control. It is very infrequent that a child (or adult) needs a narcotic for pain. Both providers and parents need to consider the potential long-term consequences of short-term decisions.

NOVEMBER 16

FEBRUARY 16

No one wakes up one morning and decides to get hooked on drugs. Drug addiction is an insidious, unexpected path that starts with subtle, seemingly innocuous and appropriate decisions. We need to be more intentional about protecting our children. Addiction knows no boundaries. Dr. Joe Maurer is a pediatrician with The Children’s Clinic, a nine-doctor practice that is part of the Children’s Hospital of the Greenville Health System. He and his wife, Kristen, are blessed with three rowdy kids.

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Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 • PO Box 700 • Laurens, SC 29360 • LaurensElectric.com

June 16, 2017 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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