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PAGE 3 THEY SAID IT

“I HAD ASSUMED IT WOULD BE A SHARK TANK, AND IT HASN’T BEEN THAT. IT’S BEEN VERY FRIENDLY.” Megan Wilson, who works as a colorist for Marvel Comics, on the comics industry.

Health Events Walk with a Doc Sat., April 22 • 9 a.m. • Caine Halter YMCA Join GHS doctors for a walk on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail in honor of Minority Health Awareness Month. Free; registration required. Please visit ghs.org/walkwithadoc. Understanding the ‘High’ in High Blood Pressure Tues., April 25 • Noon • Caine Halter YMCA Join Joanna Serieno, NP, of Cypress Internal Medicine-Patewood as she discusses the importance of controlling high blood pressure to prevent a heart attack or stroke. Free; registration required. Photo by Will Crooks

“I can guarantee you — the bears are back, the deer are back, everything is back, and they’re thriving.” Poll Knowland, manager of Table Rock State Park, on the park’s recovery after last year’s wildfires.

“I don’t know what the heck I’m doing. I hire what I don’t know.”

GHS Swamp Rabbit 5K Fri., May 5 • 6:30 p.m. • Gateway Park This annual run/walk takes place in Travelers Rest. Fee: $6 through April 29. Includes a free T-shirt and block party! Visit ghs.org/swamprabbit5k. Men’s Health Seminar: Treating Erectile Dysfunction Thurs., May 18 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Learn about treatment options for erectile dysfunction from William Flanagan, MD, of GHS Regional Urology Men’s Health Center. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/healthevents.

Jonathan Willis, who is opening Farm Fresh Fast, a farm-to-table restaurant, on Church Street.

NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND

60

Decibel level that might be reached by ReWa’s underground sewer tunnel project — about the volume of an air conditioning unit. The city’s noise ordinance limits nighttime decibels to 55.

ghs.org 17-0495GJ


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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

All of us are to blame for the rise of Trumplandia By P.L. Thomas

As an avid reader, writer, and former English teacher, I am drawn to symbolism, especially when it concerns the American character and who we are as a people. Celebrating our American Dream “from sea to shining sea,” then, represents polar differences in how we define ourselves: the Statue of Liberty, our towering commitment to democracy and a steadfast belief in “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” is to the east, and then there’s the Hollywood sign, the blinding allure of glamour and everything in excess, to the west. More than a year ago, I viewed Donald J. Trump running for president as little more than a sideshow, a joke. He was a clown, full of bombast, and everything that could be wrong about capitalism and reality TV. Then Trump was elected. Since that election, I have returned often to American novelist John Gardner’s essay written for the bicentennial, written just four years before Ronald Reagan became president. Gardner argued that the American Dream was not dead, as some people claimed: “That idea — humankind’s inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness — coupled with a system for protecting human rights — was and is the quintessential American Dream. The rest is greed and pompous foolishness — at worst, a cruel and sentimental myth, at best, cheap streamers in the rain.” I struggle to share Gardner’s optimism, because in 2016 the U.S. chose “cheap stream-

ers in the rain” by electing Trump. As an academic, I have tried to come to terms with both what happened and what this means. First, having rechristened the U.S.A. “Trumplandia,” I have decided that this moment in history is far more about us as a people than about Trump as an individual. Trump was elected by 26 percent of the eligible voters, only 19 percent of the U.S. population. This significant minority of support, however, has inordinate power in our country. If some wish to shout that Trump is destroying the country, I would caution these paltry percentages are where our concerns should lie. And if we dig deeper, despite disturbing audio exposing Trump’s crass language and sexist attitudes, 51 percent of white women voted for him. Research also suggests that a fear of diversity lurked beneath his base’s concerns about jobs and the economy. If democracy is dead in the U.S., this is our negligence, not the caveat of a sideshow barker. And, yes, I share grave concerns about Trump the person: his serial adultery and predatory behavior toward women, recurring bankruptcy, racist and xenophobic inflammatory language, and cavalier to pathological lying. Trump appears to suffer almost no negative effects for who he is, and I am suspicious it is because some, maybe many, people have decided the ends justify the means. The rise of Trumplandia is not just about an election; it is about policy — and political rhetoric that is “a cruel and sentimental myth,” to return to Gardner. If we set aside reality TV Trump and his distracting Twitter rants, we find threads of enduring, and flawed, politics regularly in the Republican agenda, but also in Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. The Trump administration has already called for choice and individual responsibility in education and health care. Domestic and international policy is grounded in traditional fear mongering about “bad dudes” — misleading code for those who we should fear as we walk our streets and those who we should be afraid of from afar. Trump in essence, although not in manner, and his administration are mainstream politics beneath the veneer of reality TV, his outrageous hair, and more lies than we can count. The evidence that Trumplandia is about us and not Trump himself has already arrived with the bombing of Syria, which prompted national and media claims that Trump has finally acted presidential. Sword rattling and glamourizing war are the echoes of hundreds of films from Hollywood drowning out Trump’s campaign trail attacks on veterans. If you wish to point a finger at Trump, be my guest, but remember the cliché about more fingers pointing back at you. Welcome to Trumplandia, where “the rockets’ red glare” announces exactly who we are regardless of what we say. P.L. Thomas, former high school English teacher and current professor of education at Furman University, has most recently published “Trumplandia: Unmasking Post-Truth America” (Garn Press, 2017), blogs at radical eyes for equity, and tweets under @plthomasEdD.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS Open Cut Construction Tunnel Construction Open Cut Construction

The $46 million sewer tunnel project calls for a 1.3 mile-long tunnel through granite rock that will run from Cleveland Park near the zoo to Hudson Street.

CITY

Noise ordinance variance requested for sewer tunnel construction Allowing contractors to work around the clock would cut six months off Renewable Water Resources’ largest-ever underground sewer tunnel project, but it will take a variance from the city’s noise ordinance to put that plan in place. ReWa engineer Greg Wright said the city’s noise ordinance allows construction from 7 a.m.– 9 p.m., but nighttime limits are 55 decibels, about the volume of a conversation. But ReWa said the noise could reach 60 decibels, about the volume of an open office or an air conditioning unit 15 feet away. While Wright said ReWa anticipates meeting the noise limitations at all residences, he said a variance will be requested because the anticipated noise level nears allowed levels. While the tunnel boring itself won’t be able to be heard, the train cars that will transport the bored rock out of the tunnel will have to be dumped once an hour. Acoustical barriers could be used during construction to mitigate noise if there are concerns, Wright said. The $46 million project calls for a 1.3 mile-long tunnel through granite rock 100 feet underground for a new sewer line that will run from Cleveland Park near the Greenville Zoo to near Hudson Street. The project is expected to meet the sewer needs in the Reedy River basin for the next century. The underground tunnel will be 10 feet in diameter and house a 7-foot diameter pipe. Construction is expected to begin in January. Access shafts will have to be constructed at each end of the tunnel. Rock blasting will occur at each end of the tunnel. The tunnel itself is constructed without blasting by utilizing a tunnelboring machine that cuts the rock as it moves along the tunnel alignment. Wright said the location of the access shaft at the Hudson Street end of the project had to be moved because of the lack of rock in the area where the shaft was originally planned. “Normally, finding no rock is good for a construction project. In our case, we need the rock,” he said. Part of the parking lot off Cleveland Park Drive in Cleveland Park will be used as a construction staging area during the project. ReWa will add parking spots on the Washington Street side of

the Cleveland Park playground to make up for the loss of those spaces during construction. After the project is completed, ReWa will restore the parking area used for construction, resulting in 146 additional parking spaces for Cleveland Park and the Greenville Zoo. A community meeting will be held May 2 from 4 5–7 p.m. at the Kroc Center. ­—Cindy Landrum

VisitGreenvilleSC asks city for more money If all the new hotels planned for downtown are built, the number of rooms available in downtown Greenville in 2019 will be more than double the supply in 2015. In order to attract travelers to fill those rooms, VisitGreenvilleSC told Greenville City Council that it wants an additional $1.2 million a year. VisitGreenvilleSC now gets $2.2 million from the city and county for marketing and has asked for $827,000 in accommodations tax money. It wants another $1.2 million in recurring funds for a total of $4.227 million, said President Chris Stone. The additional money would bring VisitGreenvilleSC up to half of what Asheville and Charleston spend on advertising to lure leisure travelers, he said. The Yeah, THAT Greenville campaign started in 2012. Since 2011, the year before the marketing effort started, accommodations tax revenue collected on hotel rooms and other lodging has increased by 65 percent in the city of Greenville. Hospitality tax revenue, a tax added to bills for prepared food and beverages, has increased from $6.85 million in 2011 to $9.67 million in 2015. Thirty percent of restaurant sales come from visitors. During that time, hotel occupancy has risen from 61 percent to 73 percent during the week and from 59 percent to 74 percent on the weekends. Coupled with that, Greenville’s increase in hotel occupancy, average daily rate, and hotel revenue per available room has outpaced state and national numbers. But in 2019, Greenville County will have 765,000 hotel rooms for sale per year (2,097 rooms times 365 days), up from 313,000 a year (857 rooms per day times 365) in 2015. Right now, 70 percent of the VisitGreenvilleSC’s media advertising is aimed at nearby markets, while 30 percent is spent in distant travel markets such as Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.

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NEWS

Will Crooks / Staff

The rezoning request from the Salvation Army will provide more living space in its shelter, capping the number of beds for the homeless at 143.

«

VisitGreenvilleSC wants to reverse those percentages, because travelers from distant markets tend to stay longer and spend more. Stone said that with the proposed media investment plan, he expects a $494 million economic impact from visitor spending. —Cindy Landrum

Salvation Army rezoning a step closer to approval Greenville City Council gave initial approval to rezoning a half-acre of the Salvation Army’s campus. The Salvation Army said changing the zoning

for the land at the corner of Stall and Stratham streets was needed to provide more living space in its shelter. The plans would cap the number of beds for the homeless at 143. To increase the number, the Salvation Army would have to go before the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals for approval, said Salvation Army Major Pete Costas, who said he didn’t anticipate that. The rest of the Salvation Army’s property is already zoned RDV. Some residents who live near the Salvation Army protested the change, saying that it is part of a “homeless triangle,” in which too many nonprofits feed, house, and serve criminals and

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Advanced Improves Lasik Outcomes Reading Technology Vision Correction is Here! ADVERTORIAL ADVERTORIAL

LASIK uses lasers to correct vision problems like nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. It is the most popular refractive surgery performed in the United States and considered the safest elective procedure in all of medicine. Laser vision correction gives you great vision, generally restoring 20/20 vision and eliminating or reducing reliance on glasses and contacts.

better thanis others, depending many including The inlay a tiny porous ring on placed infactors, the cornea. It works the and technique used. In 2016, Clemson like equipment a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients. Eye purchased a topography laser systemwith called Almost 114 million people inguided America struggle ageContoura Topography-Guided LASIK. It is the most related near vision loss (presbyopia). The inlay is designed advanced vision correction in the nation. to reduce laser or eliminate the need for reading glasses in people

lens from a recent studya¹ exceeded expectations. The wear. inlay Results offers presbyopia patients safe reading vision When treated with aand topography system, of all correction solution freedomguided from the hassle92.7% of readers,” patients an uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), that is says Dr. achieved Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical vision without glasses,Eye. of 20/20 or better, and 68.8% achieved Director at Clemson ² aThUCVA of 20/16 three months after15 surgery. e elective procedure takes about minutes and is

Clemson Eye is a well respected leader in laser vision correction, having treated more than 15,000 Upstate patients to freedom from glasses and contacts. Not all Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution. LASIK procedures are created equal. Some outcomes are Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate to offer patients reading vision correction through the KamraTM corneal inlay.

Recently Contoura is a step vision, into thebut future. generallyFDA over approved, 40 who have good distance The systemwith usesnear advanced technology to incorporate a problems vision. patient’s and corneal irregularities intodependent a highly With theprescription Kamra procedure, patients previously customized map of their eye. It plots approximately 22,000 on readers can see things up close again – menus, text points of curvature on the cornea (front part of eye) messages, food labels, computers, books, magazinesversus – and 168 pointsclear through traditional still have distance vision.topographers, allowing for greater customization and accuracy in treating the prescription It received in April 2015. Since then, more or refractiveFDA error.approval While these advancements improve surgical than 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. Note planning and visual outcomes for all LASIK patients, they are that more than 37,000 have been implanted worldwide over particularly beneficial to patients with irregular corneas caused thepast pastsurgery, 10 years. by eye disease or corneal scarring due to contact “We are proud to be first in the Upstate to offer patients this procedure. The Kamra is a great solution for people in their 40s and 50s who are frustrated with blurry near vision.

Symptoms associated withpatients LASIK,who suchhave as reversible iftraditionally the patient chooses. Even glare, halos, difficulty driving light sensitivity and had previous eye surgery, suchatasnight, cataract patients, or who eye afterfor topography guided LASIK weardryness, bifocalsalso canimproved be candidates the Kamra. treatment. There hasfree never been avision better correction time to have laser Clemson Eye offers reading vision correction. consultations. To find out if you’re a candidate, call

Understanding Cataracts A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of the eye. Changes in the lens proteins and increased water content cause the lens to become cloudy and take on a darker yellow color, so that light can no longer be easily transmitted to the retina. This results Cataracts are a common eye condition where the natural lens in a painless, often insidious blurring of vision as well as glare and becomes clouded, impairing a patient’s vision. According to the washed-out colors. National Eye Institute, more than 20 percent of Americans will Cataracts are usually result aging, butincreases may alsowith have cataracts by the the age natural of 65, and theofprevalence be caused by trauma, medications, systemic or ocular age. In cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is disease or genetic factors. Left untreated, cataracts can lead to blindness. removed and replaced with an IOL. They are the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S. For many patients, cataract surgery freed them Cataract surgery is one of the safest and most commonly from prescription glasses, but sometimes replaced performed ophthalmologic procedures in the United States.1 The them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) surgery involves removing the clouded lens and replacing it with a that provides a full range of vision for cataract permanent artificial one. patients, even those with astigmatism, is now an Innovations in Replacement Lenses option for many patients. Today, patients can choose the intraocular lens (IOL) replacement Clemson Eye surgeon Dr. Brian Johnson The Eye patients that best suits their lifestyle. A full 85% ofcalls Clemson Symfony lens a “game changer.” In September, never wear glasses again after their full focus lens implant.2 Note Dr. Johnson became onebasic of the first surgeons patients can still opt for cataract surgery in using a traditional Greenville tolens implant the new lens, which wasthat just they will still “monofocal” replacement, understanding approved by the FDA July for usetheir in the U.S. surgery. Note likely be dependent onin glasses after cataract also that basic cataract surgery is still performed using manual, bladed incisions.

Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery Mike Chandler, Wood Turner and Former Engineer “When I moved to Seneca, SC, one of the things Approved for use in cataract surgery by the FDA I took up was wood turning,” says Mike. “I’d been in 2010, and introduced in 2011, the advanced wearing reading glasses since I was 45 years old. I femtosecond laser is now used by a number of select found for the extremely small work I do, I needed surgeons world-wide. It is used to make the initial The Symfony has been in use in 49 countries for several years, but Until the Symfony, cataract patients with significant astigmatism increasingly higher-powered lenses, which caused me incisions in the cornea, to create the incision in the were limited to monofocal lens implants that would correct either the FDA approval afterinacloser randomized clinical of 148 to havecame to move to be able to see.trial Now, after lens capsule, to soften up the cloudedis the first –extended Mike Chandler, Clemson distance or near vision,and butbreak not both. Symfony patients. In that trial, 77 surgery percentwith of Symfony patients hadI can 20/25 laser cataract the ReSTOR® lens, sit lens forofextraction, make incisions within the Eye Cataract Patient depth focus lensand withtoastigmatism correction. back comfortably to do what I used to have to do close vision at intermediate distances, compared with 34 percent who peripheral cornea to correct pre-existing astigmatism. This allows excellent night vision up. When I left surgery, my vision thewas next had a traditional mono-focal lens. Near visionwas for 20/20 reading sharpness of vision (visual The patient benefits include moreand consistent and day! You would not believe the difference in your vision improved and patients were able to read two levels of smaller acuity) at near,are intermediate and stable incisions, which facilitate faster healing, once you’ve had this done. It is just amazing,” says Mike. lines than their mono-focal counterparts. distances. more secure and have less risk of far leaks and infection.3 Eye Exam is Best Way to Know This improves the position of theNew lens technology implant in innovations, like “Patients who havethink received have abeen very excited and If you youthese may have cataract, we encourage the eye and the surgeon’s ability to calculate the pleased withyou howtotheir have improved,” Johnson booklifestyles an eye exam promptly. InDr. terms of costs the Symfony, continue to improve refractive power of the implant. With the astigmatism payment, basic is covered by most the IOLs and the visual outcomes notes. “Theseand lenses are ideal forcataract patientssurgery who have an active correcting incisions, this all adds up to improved insurance plans. Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery and for patients with a variety of lifestyle. They meet the needs of our patients who like to golf, visual outcomes.4 advanced lens implants require an additional payment. conditions. The two most use a computer or tablet, shop, use a smartphone, and drive Nagy Z, Takacs A, Filkorn T, Sarayba M. Initial clinical evaluation of an intraocular At Clemson Eye, patients who opt for Laser Assisted signifi cant improvements are vastly at night.” 1.femtosecond laser in cataract surgery. J Refract Surg. 2009; 25(12):1053-1060. Cataract Surgery (LACS) with animproved advancedintermediate lens 2. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, vision and 2013. implant are generally achieving 20/20 vision without an extended range of vision acuity 3. “Laser Pretreatment Softens Cataracts, Allows for Safer, Easier Removal, Chandler, wood glasses, regardless of their age.2 Mike Researchers Say”, Charlene Laino, WebMD Health News, (Reviewed by Laura J. for patients with astigmatism. Martin, MD), Oct. 25, 2011. turner and former optical engineer, is one 4. Palanker DV, Blumenkranz MS, Andersen D, et al. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with integrated optical coherence tomography. Sci Transl Med 2010; 2:58ra85. such patient.

today to book your appointment. 1. Results from FDA T-CAT-001 clinical

study for topography-guided vision correction Clemson Eye’s new Greenville location is 360 Pelham (with the 400 Hz ALLEGRETTO WAVE® Eye-Q Excimer Laser). Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading 2. Post hoc of analysis postoperative to preoperative provider eyeofcare in theUCVA area compared for 40 years. BSCVA of 230 eyes contained in the FDA T-CAT pivotal trial at 12 months. The primary end point evaluated changes in BSCVA.

Former Optical Engineer Tells His Cataract Story New Technology for Cataract Patients “When I left surgery, my vision was 20/20 the next day!”


04.21.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

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NEWS

NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 7

addicts, and that causes problems for the familyoriented neighborhood. Bruce Forbes, special projects manager at Sunbelt Human Advancement Resources and a member of the coalition of organizations that serve the homeless in Greenville, said he arranged Upstate Mediation to facilitate conversations between the residents and the homeless organizations to better the relationship between the two. “We all have to be good neighbors, and that includes the city,” said Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle. She said the city’s role could be providing more community police patrol, well-lit streets, and code enforcement. —Cindy Landrum

Council approves $19.2M for capital improvements Greenville City Council has given initial approval to appropriating nearly $19.2 million for capital improvement projects in 2017–18. Parks — from the city’s new signature park west of downtown to neighborhood parks scattered throughout the city to Cleveland Park — are the big winners in the proposed capital improvement plan for the budget year that starts in July. The Council is expected to give final approval to the CIP and its 2017–18 operating budget on May 22. A public hearing about the budget at CIP is set for May 15. The only debt issuance the city is considering for the CIP is a sewer revenue bond that would finance approximately $3 million of the $3.35 million in wastewater system improvements planned for fiscal year 2018. If the current version of the CIP is adopted, the city will pay for a master plan for Cleveland Park, use $500,000 to develop the Cleveland Park Stables that was donated to the city by a benefactor after neighborhood residents successfully fought a proposal to build apartments there, and $2.04 million for a laundry list of needs at the city’s 34 neighborhood parks. The CIP also includes $2 million for the first phase of City Park, a park that is expected to transform the western side of downtown, much

like Falls Park and subsequent projects transformed the West End. —Cindy Landrum

EDUCATION

Clemson earns public college honor Clemson University is the top public college in South Carolina, according to a study conducted by Business First. Nationally, Clemson was ranked 38th out of 499 four-year public colleges and universities based on 22 factors ranging from academic excellence, affordability, diversity, and the economic strength of the communities in which they are located. Data used in the study came from the National Center for Education Statistics and five-year statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey. The University of South Carolina was ranked 47th, The Citadel 64th, the College of Charleston 130th, and Winthrop University 213th. Seven colleges and universities in South Carolina were ranked in the lower echelon, 251st or lower. They are Coastal Carolina University, Francis Marion University, Lander University, S.C. State University, USC Beaufort, USC Aiken, and USC Upstate. The Top 10 schools nationwide are the University of Michigan, University of North Carolina, University of California-Berkeley, University of Virginia, University of California-Los Angeles, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Washington, University of Illinois, University of Maryland, and College of William and Mary. — Cindy Landrum

ENVIRONMENT

Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve to expand The S.C. Department of Natural Resources plans to purchase 48 acres of private property in northern Greenville County that will expand the state’s Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area. NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 10

Run (or walk) the nature trails with your dog!

SATURDAY, MAY 6 8:30 AM at Conestee Park $25 entry $30 after April 24 $15 per person for teams of 6+

REGISTER AT GREENVILLEPETS.ORG All proceeds go directly toward building a NO KILL community in Greenville County. For more information contact Paula Church at pchurch@greenvillecounty.org.

Thank you to our 2017 Sponsors:

GREENVILLE COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT

The Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area currently comprises about 1,800 acres off Highway 11 in northern Greenville County.


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 9

Last week, the Greenville County Legislative Delegation approved the sale. Now SCDNR plans to use the last portion of a $240,000 grant from the U.S. Forest Service to purchase the land, according to agency spokesperson Greg Lucas. The state’s purchase of the 48 acres, if successful, would connect the Greenville Watershed and a piece of SCDNR land on the northern side of the Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve, providing a corridor of protected properties from the North Carolina state line to Oak Grove Road. The Chestnut Ridge Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area currently comprises about 1,800 acres off Highway 11 in northern Greenville County. It’s currently used for hunting, fishing, hiking, and other recreational activities. Tom Swayngham, SCDNR assistant chief of wildlife and fisheries, said the purchase would “protect an area with rare plants, straighten our property line, and remove an inholding to the property.” ­—Andrew Moore

Students donate canoe for Reedy River conservation Since September, five students and two mentors from the Greenville Woodworkers Guild have met once a week to shape a large piece of cypress wood into a canoe. Now that the craft is completed, the students have decided to

donate it to Greenville’s Friends of the Reedy River, a conservation organization dedicated to promoting, protecting, and restoring the river. “Our boat building program is inherently about building community; every person feels personal pride and ownership, yet it belongs to the no one person. That is community. Everyone working with personal pride towards a common goal. I can’t think of a better group that this applies to than the youth and mentors of the guild,” said Anthony Archino, a Greenville Woodworkers Guild mentor. The Reedy River, which flows through downtown Greenville, has experienced severe pollution since the early 1900s because of nearby textile mills, sewage discharges, and runoff from urbanization. Various conservation groups throughout the Upstate have worked through the years to improve the river’s water quality by assisting with education and outreach events and implementing cleanup and pollution prevention programs. Friends of the Reedy River, for example, currently holds two cleanup events each year. “We are grateful to be the recipient of this beautiful canoe and are awed by the work and effort put into this project,” said Patricia Carson, executive director of Friends of the Reedy River. “We plan to raffle the boat later this year as a fundraiser, which will help us to do more work protecting the Reedy River.” ­—Andrew Moore

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« HEALTH Greenville Memorial unveils $2M blood, marrow unit The Greenville Health System’s newly expanded McCrary Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit officially opened April 11 at Greenville Memorial Hospital. The $2 million expansion features eight large patient rooms, music therapy, and a wellness suite. The new unit has an up-to-99-percent purified air system. The new addition makes it possible for more local patients to receive cancer treatments in Greenville. The expansion was funded by community donations, including a seed gift from Bill and Esta McCrary. “There’s probably not a single person in the Upstate who hasn’t had some contact with cancer — if not in their own family, then in their friends,” Bill McCrary said in a news release. “We are thrilled that we can help provide this wonderful option for families to be able to stay local and still get the great care they need.” Patients with blood-borne diseases like sickle cell anemia and cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, can receive blood and marrow transplantation as an aggressive therapy. Thanks to cutting-edge research, increasing numbers of people are able to donate blood and marrow cells to family members. They might only need to be a half-match for the donation to work.

The GHS Cancer Institute is South Carolina’s collection site for the National Marrow Donwr Program. ­—Melinda Young

GHS to donate $80M to nonprofits in grants over 20 years Over the next 20 years, Greenville Health System (GHS) will fund programs that aim to make the county’s population healthier, and it all begins with the launch of their new grants program, Healthy Greenville 2036. Starting in September, the first of Healthy Greenville’s initial $4 million in grants will go to the organizations that have the best ideas of how to fix the county’s worst health problems. “We do not have a predetermined number of grants, and these are open to any nonprofit serving Greenville County,” said Lisa Stevens, chair of the Greenville Health Authority board of trustees. “Our recommendation is there is a minimum request of $250,000, which they can spread over two to three years.” The board overseeing the requests for funding has decided to distribute the money based on the county’s top priorities in health. An example of a grant application could involve a program that will help county residents stop smoking. Another one might address premature births and lowbirth-weight babies by helping pregnant young women improve their eating and exercising hab-

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its, Stevens suggests. To apply for a grant, organizations must submit a letter of intent by May 15. “We want Greenville to be the healthiest county in America. That’s our goal, a big goal,” Stevens said. “We look at this as a rare opportunity in funding projects that would impact public health.” Organizations applying for funds will need to show what they plan to do that will help move the needle on the county’s overall health. GHS is donating a total of $80 million over 20 years to 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations, health care providers, academic institutions, coalitions or collaboratives, and government agencies. Programs must directly benefit Greenville County residents through health-related care, health research, or health-education initiatives. For information about how to apply, visit ghs. org/healthygreenville2036. —Melinda Young

MUSIC

The Boo Jays release trippy live-inthe-studio video session Typically, the Boo Jays, the Upstate band led by singer, multi-instrumentalist, and songwriter Cinco Sanders, play abrasive, chaotic garage rock that gnaws on some basic chords over a churning beat while Sanders layers echo, distortion, and all manner of ghoulish effects over the top.

That’s what makes their new project so surprising. They’ve filmed a seven-song live-in-thestudio session and released it on YouTube, and though the effects are still there (both in the music and the video), the songs are a lot more mature than anything Sanders has done before. Channeling late ’60s psychedelia and moody, post-punk dread, songs like “Cigarettes” and “Neurotoxxxins” are sonic exercises in dark, foreboding atmosphere as much as they are rock songs. The band’s rhythm section, bassist Matt McCulloch and drummer Brandon Gallagher, provides a sinister propulsion while Sanders thrashes his voice and guitar over the top. It’s a startling transition from the Boo Jays’ older material, and Sanders says there’s a reason for that. “Basically, the Boo Jays has always been just a moniker for music I make myself where I play all of the instruments and present it as a real band on the internet,” he says. “The concept started as bedroom recordings of psychedelic, experimental pop music or whatever genre or audio production aesthetic I felt like doing at the moment.” But now, after honing the material live with McCulloch and Gallagher, Sanders says it’s taken on a different shape. “This recording is us playing songs that definitely worked at shows and were much better realized with the whole band, which I give 100 percent credit to Matt and Brandon for,” he says. The session, titled “Live On KOXP 96.9”

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(a fictional radio station) and recorded at a warehouse in Travelers Rest, is not just a straightforward performance. Sanders manipulates video like he does his vocals, layering images and multiple camera shots on top of one another to create a woozy, dreamlike feel. “I would consider myself to be a much better musician than visual artist,” he says, “because I just haven’t done video nearly as long. I’m not quite there yet executing ideas visually, but there are definitely songs here that started as visual ideas.” ­—Vincent Harris

Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready leaving Horizon Records with his purchase.

Horizon hosts their annual Record Store Day On a Friday night last April, Gene Berger, owner of Greenville’s Horizon Records, was sitting in the audience at the Peace Center, watching Rosanne Cash perform. About halfway through her show, Cash told the audience of nearly 2,000 people that the next day was Record Store Day, and she was planning on stopping by Horizon to sign albums and do a little shopping. The next day Cash packed out the store with fans. She wasn’t the only member of music royalty to swing by. Mike McCready from Pearl Jam (pictured), who were playing Bon Secours Wellness Arena that night, also stopped by unannounced and picked up a box of records. Berger was stunned. When Record Store Day was started 10 years ago by a group of independent record-store owners to bring more attention to their businesses, downloading had severely wounded the music industry, and indie record stores were disappearing from the map all over the country. “In April of 2008, they reached out to stores like us and said, ‘We’re going to try this,’” Berger says. “All you have to do to participate is put up some signage and carry these few special releases. We had a bigger than usual day, a few people were aware of it, and I thought, ‘Not bad!’” Since then, Record Store Day has only grown. In 2015, Jason Isbell played an in-store show at Horizon to celebrate RSD, and 2016’s edition, which featured releases by David Bowie, Bob Dylan, Patti Smith, and Frank Zappa, was the biggest sales day in the 40-year history of the Stone Avenue store. This year’s Record Store Day that will take place on Saturday, April 22, includes two more Bowie releases and albums by the Drive-By Truckers, Johnny Cash, Alice in Chains, and Thelonious Monk.

“There’s something about when those loads of records arrive and we start sorting through them,” Berger says. “It’s like being a kid in a candy store for me and a lot of people who shop here.” ­—Vincent Harris

ARTS

TR Town & Art Crawl artist application open TR Town & Art Crawl, a series of six themed events in Travelers Rest that brings together the area’s art scene, community, and local businesses, is looking for exhibiting artists. The events will be held from 5–9 p.m. on the following Fridays: May 19: Celebrating mountain life, bicycle ride, series kick-off June 16: Summer fun, sidewalk chalk event, Towns Best ice cream competition Aug. 11: Gearing up for game day, Towns Best barbecue competition Sept. 8: Tractors and harvest, pumpkin chucking contest Nov. 3: Classic cars and drive-in movies, Towns Best burger competition Dec. 11: Together for the holidays, carolers The events will also feature live music in The Grove at Upcountry Provisions, a kids’ area with crafts and games, and bicycle rickshaw rides from Reedy River Rickshaw. Artists interested in applying must present and sell their own handcrafted items or items “classified as vintage,” which organizers define as over 20 years old. Prohibited items include “craft kit creations, imports, or resale items that are not vintage.” The application deadline is Friday, April 28, at midnight. Artists will be chosen by a juried panel. Accepted artists will be notified May 5. Booth space is $20 per event or $96 for all events, and payment is due at the time of application. Refunds will be issued for applicants not selected, minus a $5 entry fee. Visit bit.ly/2pqykp8 to access the application. — ­ Emily Pietras

Retailers unveil Artisphere window displays

West End retailers are going to get their Artisphere on this week with a New York-inspired window display contest in which the public will decide the winner. More than 30 retailers are participating in the contest with guidelines that told them to envision New York City windows at Christmas. The retailers will incorporate elements of the festival weekend. Beginning April 24, the public will be able to vote for the Top 3 as chosen by Artisphere staff. The window displays will be up through the festival weekend, May 12–14, and organizers believe the window display contest may become an annual event. ­—Cindy Landrum


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS The ground level will contain retail, an art gallery, restaurant and bar space, a ballroom, and a terrace overlooking the Liberty Bridge.

Rendering provided by Sottile & Sottile

ONE FOR THE AGES

More details emerge about the new Grand Bohemian hotel on the banks of the Reedy CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Plans for the Grand Bohemian Greenville, a hotel that the Orlando, Fla.-based The Kessler Collection plans to build on the banks of the Reedy River on the property now occupied by the Wyche P.A. law firm, could go before the city’s Design Review Board in May. On April 11, the Greenville City Council looked at the footprint of the proposed building during a work session tour of the site with Christian Sottile, the dean of the Savannah College of Art and Design’s School of Building Arts and a principal in the architecture firm of Sottile & Sottile of Savannah, and engineers working on the project. “It’s refreshing to see a design that is truly unique and addresses the special location so well,” Mayor Knox White said after the tour. “It’s intended to last for the ages.” Sottile said the 160-room hotel is inspired by the look and feel of a national park lodge. “[The lodges] are commercial, but they’re not glass and steel. They fit in,” he said. “We’re working with the footprint of the Wyche building, but, obviously, the hotel will be a different kind of use.” The project would be part of the East Gateway Master Plan that includes the Wyche property, as well as Camperdown, the redevelopment of the former Greenville News building. The plan calls for part of a concrete parking lot between the Wyche law firm and Bowater buildings on Camperdown Way to be turned into a flat green lawn that would lead to the Liberty Bridge and could be set up for concerts and public events, Sottile said.

Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle said flat green space is scarce in Falls Park and the lawn could serve that purpose. Sottile said construction materials on the Camperdown side of the hotel would be natural wood and shakes, while the river side would incorporate stone and brick to complement the river. “Some of the inspiration for that comes from the foundation of the Camperdown Mill [which can be seen from the back of the Wyche building] and the Peace Center,” he said. “The building will feel very rooted into the park setting,” he said. The hotel will have simple rooflines, Sottile said. On the Camperdown side, the hotel will be five stories tall at its highest point. The ground level floor of the hotel will contain “active mixed uses” such as retail, an art gallery, restaurant and bar space, a ballroom, and a terrace overlooking the Liberty Bridge and the Reedy River Falls. Guest rooms will be on floors above and below. The entire building is outside the 50-foot buffer to the river required by the city, Sottile said. The council’s reception to the plans differed greatly from its reaction to a proposal by Centennial American Properties to build a four-story office building at 55 Camperdown, mere steps from the historic Main Street bridge and on the banks of the Reedy River. In order to build the office building on the small piece of wooded land that sits between the river, the Bowater parking garage, and Japanese Dogwood Lane, the developer had asked for an exemption to the city’s minimum 50-foot buffer from the river that would use a buffer average, meaning part of

the development could be inside the buffer zone but other parts would be outside it. Buffer averages had been applied to other river developments. But the proposal came under fire. White called the site “sacred ground” and promised the building would not go there. The city signed a non-binding letter of intent to buy the property for $4 million. The land will be placed into a conservation easement so it cannot be developed. “It’s still closer to the river than I would have liked, but there’s a big difference be-

tween this and 55 Camperdown. That was an abomination,” said Nikki Grumbine, president of the Friends of the Reedy River. The new hotel would use an underground filtering system for stormwater runoff that would eventually discharge the treated water into the river. Currently, stormwater goes off the pavement right into the river, Grumbine said. Ground could be broken for the new hotel the beginning of next year if the project is approved.

Mayor Knox White, left, looks at renderings for the East Gateway Master Plan, which includes the Grand Bohemian hotel and Camperdown development.


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ENGINEER BY DAY, COLORIST BY NIGHT Megan Wilson’s accidental journey from studying jellyfish to working for Marvel Comics WORDS BY EMILY PIETRAS * PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS hen Megan Wilson began reading comic books in early 2012, she never imagined that one day she would be working behind the scenes to help bring stories to life. But in the years since she first visited a comic book shop with a co-worker out of curiosity, Wilson has become a part-time colorist for Marvel Comics, adding the colors to a book’s black-and-white illustrations. To date, her major credits include work on “Patsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat” (December 2015–present) and “The Unstoppable Wasp” (January 2017–present). And Wilson, a Clemson native, describes her involvement in the industry as “sort of accidental.” “It was never something I meant to pursue. It just sort of happened, but it happened very fast, so it’s been kind of a whirlwind,” she says. It all started at a convention in Charlotte in May 2012 when Wilson met Nick Pitarra, a comic book artist and co-creator of Image Comics’ “The Manhattan Projects,” one of her favorite books. The series, as Wilson describes it, presents “an alt-history of the Manhattan Project” at the end of World War II, with notable figures like Albert

Just a few years after Megan Wilson, a Clemson graduate and engineer at GE, first started reading comics, she became a part-time colorist for Marvel Comics.


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NEWS Einstein and Richard Feynman working on the atomic bomb while also “doing these crazy science adventures.” When Wilson raved to Pitarra about how much she enjoyed his book, the two kept in touch, and he later suggested that she give coloring a try. Most of Wilson’s early work, including through Marvel, was coloring Pitarra’s drawings. “It wasn’t easy. It was a lot of time figuring out how to do all of the stuff, but it’s been fun,” she says. “I will say that I don’t always get things right the first time. I make a guess, and then I’ll look at it and try to figure out what’s wrong with it and then work from there. A lot of what I do is guess and check.” Creating comic books is a multistep process that resembles an assembly line. A book’s illustrations are first penciled based on the script and then inked to add greater depth. When Wilson receives pages from the artist, they resemble a coloring book with just black-and-white line art. But before the coloring process can actually begin, Wilson sends the files to a flatter, who separates the line art into different solid blocks of color so that the distinct features on the pages can be “grabbed,” or selected, together at once. “They aren’t setting up the underlying color,” Wilson explains. “The basic gist of that role is they’re making different things so that you can grab a shirt or whatever it may be. The rule of thumb is that if you’ve got six panels and someone appears in every panel, the shirt needs to be the same color. So you can grab a shirt, and it grabs all of the shirts on that one person.”

When the flatter sends back the prepared files, Wilson can start coloring. She works almost exclusively in Adobe Photoshop and uses a tablet with a stylus. Her first step is to evaluate what the book as a whole should look like, and she also needs to ensure that colors change between different scenes to indicate transitions. The scene’s time of day is a main factor in determining colors. “An easy way to handle that is to use cooler colors for nights and warmer colors for days,” Wilson says. As far as the more creative side is concerned, Wilson says, “You take into account what’s happening and mood and is it an action scene, does it need bright colors.” She continues, “I don’t really preplan things. I very much just go by feel and start dropping stuff in and then move and shift colors around until it looks what I was intending it to look like.” Lately, Wilson has been favoring a palette of “orange-y peach and greens and teals.” She uses primary colors sparingly for a specific reason: They are often the colors of superhero costumes, and a colorist will want those characters to clearly stand out on a page. In listening to Wilson discuss coloring — and considering she’s working for one of the most well-known comic book publishers in the world — it may come as a surprise that she lacks any sort of art background. Instead, her exper“The Unstoppab le Wasp.” Artist, tise is in engineering. Wilson Elsa Charretier. Colorist, Megan Wilson. Images pr graduated from Clemson ovided by Marvel Comics. University with a B.S. in mechanical engineering in 2006 and earned her master’s from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2009. In graduate school, her concentration was fluid mechanics, and within that specialty she studied jellyfish swimming, which she says made for “some awkward job interviews.” “It’s not really what you’d think of when you think mechanical engineer, but it was awesome,” Wilson says. “But when you go into an interview, they’re like, ‘Wait, why is this relevant?’ … It’s the same physics. It’s the same principles. You’re just looking at a different subject.” Some companies she interviewed with weren’t receptive to her research background, but General Electric (GE) in Greenville was an exception. “They were actually asking questions about it and seemed engaged and interested,” she says. Wilson has worked at GE since June 2010 Megan Wilson as a lead engineer in aerodynamics and acoustics within the company’s renewable energy sector. Her specific focus is on wind turbines. “My group does stuff from design- male-dominated fields, although opportunities for women ing blades for new products to working on in both areas have been expanding in recent years. When new technology development to field test- asked about her experience, she says, “In engineering, I ing or wind-tunnel testing existing things,” haven’t personally felt like it’s really been a hard thing. I also she explains. wonder what happened, because I think everybody starts off It’s not lost on Wilson that her profes- — when you think about kids — everybody’s curious in the Charretier. Comics. sa El t, is rt A l ” ve p. ar as M W by le ppab sional life exists within two traditionally provided “The Unsto on. Images

“I don’t really preplan things. I very much just go by feel and start dropping stuff in and then move and shift colors around until it looks what I was intending it to look like.”

an Wils

eg Colorist, M

WILSON continued on PAGE 18


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NEWS WILSON continued from PAGE 17

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Wilson’s major credits include coloring “Patsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat” and “The Unstoppable Wasp.” “Patsy Walker, A.K.A. Hellcat” cover art by Brittney Williams. “The Unstoppable Wasp” cover art by Elsa Charretier.

world around them. That’s how we develop. That’s how everybody kind of grows. And then something is happening, I think, to discourage girls from continuing that path, because that curiosity is exactly what makes a good engineer or a good scientist.” “Everyone’s path is different,” she continues, “but I guess I’ve been lucky in that everybody along the way has been really encouraging, both professors in undergrad and my advisors in grad school and my managers and co-workers at GE.” As for the recent trend in the comic book industry to produce more books featuring female and diverse characters, Wilson says, “I’d like to think what happened is a publisher started realizing, ‘Hey, we’re really only gearing our books toward a portion of the population, and there’s this whole other readership that’s starting to be interested in this stuff.’” And it seems that the decision to appeal to a broader demographic has been paying off. A September 2015 article from The Guardian, titled “Kapow! The unstoppable rise of female comic readers,” notes that the influx of female characters from Marvel and DC Comics, including “the all-female Avengers A-Force, Captain Marvel, Ms. Marvel, Harley Quinn, Batgirl, Catwoman, [and] Spider-Woman,” has led to a boost in female interest and readership, as has a greater presence of women within the industry. And a survey conducted by Publishers Weekly for the first quarter of 2015 reported that out of 13 retailers located in major markets, most said women ages 17 to 30 were the fastest-growing segment of comic readership, in addition to boys and girls ages 6 to 17. “It’s not like the lighthearted, fun books are going to be beating out ‘The Avengers’ in terms of sales, but these aren’t sales that are being traded,” Wilson says. “These are readers that wouldn’t


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have bought the other book anyway. So I really hope that’s something that continues to pick up.” Wilson explains that, on a personal level, being asked to color “The Unstoppable Wasp” was “too perfect of a fit,” because the book’s teenaged hero, Nadia Pym, is “off recruiting girls to make a lab, because she’s very into STEM.” Additionally, the book’s letter column, where letters to the publisher are displayed, highlights everyday women who are working in various science fields. “The book is basically set up to be like, ‘Hey, women in science — this is awesome, look at all the cool stuff they do,’ both in terms of the fiction within the story and the way we’ve converted the letter pages,” she says. For Wilson, the biggest challenge of being a colorist is not necessarily the work itself but rather a common foe for many professionals: deadlines, especially when she has to manage them alongside her full-time work schedule. There is also the potential for “head-butting” within a team when there are disagreements regarding the creative direction of a book, but Wilson adds that she has not personally encountered that type of situation. In fact, she’s been pleasantly surprised by the general work environment within the industry. “In my mind, I thought everyone in comics would be highly competitive and fighting over jobs, and it’s actually funny that, for the most part at least, it seems more community-driven and that there really isn’t that level of everyone’s competing against everyone else. “I had assumed it would be a shark tank, and it hasn’t been that. It’s been very friendly,” she says. And as for the rewarding experiences, Wilson says it is exciting to be able to walk into a comic book shop and see a book she has worked on sitting on the shelves. “And then to see at a convention or somewhere — seeing someone that is excited about something you worked on, that’s also really cool,” she adds. “You can read reviews online. … But it’s not the same as seeing someone that’s excited about your book. A sense of having accomplished something comes from seeing the book, but [what’s] rewarding is seeing how people respond.”

Women In Comics

The increase of female creatives within the comic book industry, as well as the influx of female characters, is helping to diversify books and draw in new readership.

Becky Cloonan,

Christina Strain

Amanda Conner

Margaret Stohl

Erica Henderson

Babs Tarr

Creator, DC Comics, “Gotham Academy” (2014); First woman to draw Batman on a main title Series writer, DC Comics, “Harley Quinn” (2013) Cover artist and penciller, Marvel Comics, “The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl” (2015)

Nicola Scott

Colorist, DC Comics, “Wonder Woman” (2016)

Gail Simone

Writer, DC Comics, “Batgirl” (2011), “Birds of Prey” (2010), “Secret Six” (2008), “Wonder Woman” (2007)

Colorist, Marvel Comics, “Spider-Man Loves Mary Jane” (2005–2007) and “Runaways” (2003) Writer, Marvel Comics, “The Mighty Captain Marvel” (2016) Artist, DC Comics, “Batgirl” (2011)

Kelly Thompson

Writer, Marvel Comics, “Hawkeye” (2016)

Elizabeth Torque

Cover artist, Marvel Comics, “Captain America: Steve Rogers” (2016) and “Mighty Captain Marvel” (2016)

G. Willow Wilson

Creator and writer, Marvel Comics, “Ms. Marvel” (2014)

I am a visual learner who benefits from using hands-on materials. I receive one-on-one lessons in a classroom with a 12:1 student to teacher ratio.

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Hummingbirds Have Arrived. Atttract Them to Your Yard!

COMMUNITY

AFTER THE FIRE

Last fall’s fire gives birth to a spring transformation for Table Rock

WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE * PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

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Hiking along a trail at the base of Pinnacle Mountain, biologist Joe Lemeris points at a sea of mountain laurels. Their green leaves will soon transform from a cluster of dark pink buds to a white flower as they blossom this spring, offering a stark contrast to the charred remains of oak and hickory trees that lie nearby. Last year, a raging wildfire scorched the upper reaches of Table Rock State Park. The fire started at the base of Pinnacle Mountain in November as a campfire and continued to grow, fueled by historic drought conditions.

The blaze, which was contained in December, cost more than $5 million and burned 10,263 acres. Today, evidence of the wildfire is scarce. The forest floor, once scorched and barren, is now covered in leaves that provide erosion control and nutrients, according to Lemeris, a natural resource management biologist for the state Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. “People forget that wildfire is natural. It’s nature’s way of clearing out the old undergrowth to make room for the new,” said Lem-

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A topographical map details the extent of the Pinnacle Mountain wildfire that scorched more than 10,000 acres.

eris. “The fire is already providing countless ecological benefits for the mountain.” For instance, the tree canopy is opening up and allowing more sunlight in the mountain’s understory, spawning grasses and wildflowers. That same vegetation has created a prime research opportunity for Lemeris and other scientists throughout the state, who can now study the mountain’s forest as it recovers. “The fire has pushed a lot of mountain laurels and rhododendrons up the mountain that are usually found alongside creeks. They’re definitely out of place,” said Lemeris. “It’s just one of many changes we’re going to be studying.” Lemeris has partnered with researchers from Clemson University and other schools to establish photo-monitoring stations throughout Table Rock State Park and across Pinnacle Mountain. They plan to record changes to the mountain’s landscape over the next year and study footage from the cameras. The new vegetation has already attracted a variety of birds usually found in the upper reaches of Pinnacle Mountain, where the trees were completely scorched, according to Poll Knowland, manager of Table Rock State Park. For 19 years, Knowland and his rangers have tried, yet failed, to spot the park’s population of ruffed grouse, a bird that’s found in the northwestern part of the state in elevations above 2,000 feet. But one of the elusive birds, Knowland said, recently emerged

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“People forget that wildfire is natural. It’s nature’s way of clearing out the old undergrowth to make room for the new.” Joe Lemeris, biologist

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on a trail in front of him and flew away. “Where he came from, I don’t have a clue,” he said. “But I can guarantee you — the bears are back, the deer are back, everything is back, and they’re thriving.” The park’s hiking trails have since reopened, and it seems as if more people than usual are swarming to the park with their dogs and families, according to Knowland. “It’s good to see people coming out here,” he said. “I think most of our visitors are surprised to see the park doing so well after the fire.” Surprisingly, the Pinnacle Mountain fire didn’t cause any deaths or damage homes, which were protected by controlled burns and other techniques to guard against the approaching flames. Knowland, for instance, helped residents clear flammable materials from the perimeter and clean the roofs and gutters of their homes.

For about three weeks, persistent drought and high winds fueled the Pinnacle Mountain fire, which closed the hiking trails at Table Rock State Park and sent a smoky haze over much of the Upstate that caused the state Department of Health and Environmental Control to issue several air quality alerts. The blaze required nighttime flights to measure the fire’s hot spots with infrared technology, and the Forest Commission used Black Hawk helicopters to drop water on the fire from nearby Lake Oolenoy in Table Rock State Park. The state is now awaiting federal money to aid in the cost of the fire, which could take another year. The S.C. House recently approved a budget proviso that would appropriate $1.25 million for a federal match, according to Darryl Jones, the state Forestry Commission’s chief of forest protection.

Poll Knowland, manager of Table Rock State Park, helped nearby residents removed brush from around their homes during the Pinnacle Mountain wildfire.

FIGHTING FIRE WITH FIRE Jones is currently working with state and federal agencies to prevent future fires. Their weapon of choice: controlled burns, a practice that involves using fire to reduce understory brush that can go up in flames during drought. But the state only burns half of the acreage it should burn each year to balance the ecosystem, said Kristen Austin, Southern Blue Ridge program director for the Nature Conservancy of South Carolina. “We need to bring fire back to the mountains in a controlled way to really bring the forest back into balance,” Austin said. “We’re looking at an out-of-whack environment.” The Nature Conservancy has partnered with the Forestry Commission and other agencies to form the Southern Blue Ridge Fire Learning Network, which aim to “develop, share, and apply the best available science to restore fire across a vast, diverse region.” But the coalition faces many challenges, including the fact that 80 percent of the state’s forested land is privately owned. “We are concentrating our efforts on educating private landowners about the benefits of prescribed fire and providing training through our certified prescribed fire manager course,” Jones said. The coalition also plans to conduct controlled burns at state parks. The Beautiful Places Alliance, for instance, was recently awarded $35,000 from the Duke Energy Foundation to help the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism conduct controlled burns at several state parks across the Upstate.

The burns will be conducted sometime this spring by state fire crews at Table Rock, Paris Mountain, Devils Fork, and Oconee state parks, according to Lemeris, who is going to oversee the operation alongside Jones. “These parks have seen 75 years of fire suppression with years of accumulated combustible fuels,” said Duane Parrish, SCPRT director. “Controlled burns help us remain committed to the stewardship of our natural communities and the service we provide to park visitors.” During the burns, Lemeris and other specialists plan to closely monitor wind, temperature, and humidity, and reschedule the burns if the conditions could enhance the fire or spread smoke to nearby cities. Before igniting the burns, crews plan to construct firebreaks that ensure the fire doesn’t leave the designated areas. The burns should mimic natural wildfires, Lemeris said. That means the trails and roads in or around the state parks could be temporarily closed to the public. Any closures will be clearly posted for the public. However, because the scheduling of controlled burns is dependent on weather conditions, advance notice will only be provided to local fire and law enforcement officials. Once the burns are completed, the affected areas will look barren. However, the areas should recover within a few days or weeks as nutrients from the dead trees and brush will act as fertilizer, according to Lemeris.

Darryl Jones, the state Forestry Commission’s chief of forest protection, plans to help crews conduct controlled burns throughout Table Rock State Park this spring.


feast

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FRESH AND THE FAST

Jonathan Willis, who has familial roots in coal mining and tobacco farming, is learning about the restaurant business as he goes while preparing to open Farm Fresh Fast.

HEALTHY FARM-TO-TABLE DRIVETHRU FARE SOUNDS CRAZY, BUT IT’S ABOUT TO BECOME A REALITY WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Jonathan Willis doesn’t have any prior experience in food service or running a restaurant. While he’s the first to admit his qualifications to run a hyper-local, farm-to-table neighborhood spot aren’t exactly orthodox, he’s doing it anyway with Farm Fresh Fast, set to open within the next few weeks at 860 S. Church St. “I don’t know what the heck I’m doing,” jokes Willis, 30, a certified personal trainer and nutritionist. “I hire what I don’t know.” Despite that lack of experience, what he does have is a long line of coal miners and tobacco farmers in his family from whom he learned how to work and make something out of nothing. “I like to say I have a blue-collar mentality in a white-collar world,” he says. “The farming part? I got that. But the making this work? That’s the challenge.” For instance, Willis and his father laid 5,000 pounds of concrete in one day for the restaurant’s countertops without any prior experience. He also dismantled sections of a 100-year-old barn to reclaim the materials for use in the dining area. At Farm Fresh today, an enormous barn door is hung on its original tracks as a decorative feature inside, while framing from the barn creates an interior awning over the drive-thru area. Previously named Elev8, Farm Fresh Fast grew out of Willis’ Elev8 Next Level Nutrition meal delivery service, which he began in 2015. The name change is strategic to position the company for franchising. Willis and his fiancée, Kaylee Gonzalez, with a team of half a dozen chefs, have run the meal delivery service from an offsite commercial kitchen. It’s marketed as a quick and easy way to eat healthy without requiring any prep time. The pre-made, pre-ordered meals are delivered to various gyms and drop-off locations around the Greenville area. Willis

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plans to continue that service, with meals also being available in open coolers in the 32-seat restaurant. The concept for Farm Fresh Fast was inspired by Willis’ passion for health and fitness with a goal to help nurture and grow a more health-focused community. He believes good nutrition to be the health care of the future. To help accomplish that, he wants to provide quick meals made with locally sourced grass-fed beef, pastured eggs, and heirloom pork, for instance, to consumers at an affordable cost. “I saw a need in the market,” Willis says, explaining that his goal is for entrees to remain less than $10. “We want to be a community place.” He also has a desire to better the community through supporting local farms. “Everything you eat here is coming from a local farm and made locally,” Willis says. Farm Fresh Fast has a rotating list of more than a dozen farms and suppliers, many of them smaller farms that will benefit from a regular buyer rather than selling only at local farmers markets. “Being just part farm-to-table doesn’t fully benefit farms,” Willis says. “I want

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tion. Gill’s work at Clemson has included promoting deeper dialogue among students, meeting with faith-based community leaders, and spearheading Clemson’s first Men of Color National Summit.

Our Schools Activities, awards, and accomplishments GREEN CHARTER SCHOOL

Green Charter School students raise money for the Meyer Center Middle and high school students at Green Charter School recently hosted their spirit week, raising $2,150 for the Meyer Center for Special Children. The student council hosted a variety of activities, including a two-day bake sale and themed dress up days, where students could wear pajamas or their favorite sports team’s T-shirt in exchange for a donation. Staff members and parents also participated by making contributions of their own. The generous support will directly impact the education, therapy, guidance, and care of Meyer Center students so they can grow developmentally and reach their maximum potential.

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Clemson’s chief diversity officer to receive Peace and Dialogue Award The South Carolina branch of the Atlantic Institute will honor Clemson University Chief Diversity Officer Lee Gill during its annual awards and friendship dinner at 6:30 p.m. April 20 at Furman University’s Younts Conference Center. Gill joined Clemson in April 2016 as a nationally recognized leader for his work of strategically implementing programs to promote and sustain inclusivity and equality for underrepresented groups on university campuses across the na-

adopted by hotel guests and locals. Together Aloft and Let’em Live Upstate have found forever homes for more than 30 dogs in need since the program launch in April 2016.

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Clemson University’s athletic training staff to receive annual Golden Scissors Award from Henry Schein Medical Danny Poole, director of sports medicine at Clemson University, recently accepted the annual Henry Schein Golden Scissors Award on behalf of the University’s athletic training staff. The award was presented in recognition of the staff’s dedicated work to keep Clemson’s football team healthy during the 2016 NCAA championship season. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

DONATION

Our Community

United Way’s Be a Book Bunny program donates books for more than 1,800 children

Community news, events, and happenings ANNIVERSARY

Aloft Greenville Downtown celebrates one-year anniversary of foster dog program Aloft Greenville Downtown recently celebrated the one-year anniversary of its foster dog program with local partner Let’em Live Upstate. Through the program, Aloft has fostered dogs in need of a forever home, housing one dog at a time who can be

Need More Space? Now is the Time to Grow!

United Way of Greenville County’s Be a Book Bunny project put new books in the hands of more than 1,800 children this spring. Employees at 51 companies and organizations, as well as members of United Way’s Young Philanthropists, volunteered to fill tote bags with new books and other small treats for children served by United Way partner programs. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

Susan McMillen REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

UPSTATE REGION REALTOR OF THE YEAR

672B Fairview Rd., Simpsonville, SC W NE ING! T LIS

WEATHERSTONE 5BR/6BA (MSTR+1 ON MAIN), CUSTOM W/BSMNT, >4600SF. #1337846 • $549,900

TUXEDO PARK 5BR/4BA BRICK/STONE HOME, .LARGE LOT, ~4700SF, 3 YRS OLD, 3-CAR! #1340923 • $509,900

TROLLINGWOOD 4BR/3.5BA BRICK RANCH, W/BSMNT, 2.9 ACRES ON LAKE. #1339258 • $439,900

COACHWOOD FOREST 3BR/3BA CUSTOM RANCH, 1.5 ACRES W/3 CAR GAR IN 5-FORKS AREA! REDUCED & READY! #1334306 • $334,900

WHITEHALL PLANTATION 5BR/3BA-SPACIOUS HOME IN FIVE FORKS AREA, GOURMET KITCHEN! #1341525 • $290,000

GILDER CREEK FARM 4BR/3.5BA W/MASTER ON MAIN, UPDATED, SUNROOM, WONDERFUL! #1340502 • $289,900

NEELY FARM 4BR/3.5BA (MASTER ON MAIN) OFFICE, SCN PRCH, NEW ROOF! #1338299 • $279,500

TWO RESIDENTIAL LOTS IN TROLLINGWOOD 2.5 TO 5 AC OPTION • $74,900-149,900 BRING YOUR BUILDER!


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HOME

Featured Home

Spaulding Farm 10 Ryedale Court, SC 29615

Home Info Price: $765,000 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4.5 Acres: 0.70 Approx.

MLS: 1338282 Sq. Ft: 4600-4799

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and J. L. Mann High Agent: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Vmiller@MarchantCo.com

An exquisite 3 story home situated on a pristine quiet culde-sac in the highly desirable community of Spaulding Farm awaits you! With landscaping designed by Graham Kimak, the professional and well-manicured lawn only adds to its curb appeal. Upon entering the home you will be delighted by the fine details; gleaming hardwood floors throughout, plantation shutters, heavy custom architectural moldings, and more. The gourmet kitchen suite is the true heart of this home and is open to the breakfast area and great room creating a gracious

ambiance for family and guests. An incredible master suite will WOW you with its custom his and her vanities, large walk-in shower, and show stopping closet! The outdoor retreat is a perfect getaway as it offers a covered porch, over sized twotiered deck area with hot tub, and a kitchen bar with stainless gas grill and sink. Enjoy your evenings by the stone fire pit (w/ gas starter) and listen to the tranquil sounds of your own lighted water fountain. Conveniently located to shopping, award winning schools, and the interstate.

Real Estate News

Allen Tate Remains Top Carolinas-Based Real Estate Firm Once again,  Allen Tate Company is the top real estate firm based in the Carolinas. That’s according to the  REAL Trends 500 report, now in its 30th year. The report, which is independently verified, ranks the performance of the nation’s top 500 residential real estate brokerage firms by transaction sides and sales volume for the previous year. Allen Tate has also retained its  REAL Trends 500 rankings as #5 among the country’s largest independently owned, non-

franchised brokers, and #12 among all brokers, based on closed transactions sides for 2016. Allen Tate Company closed 22,194 transaction sides in 2016 to earn the rankings. “For the past 30 years that REAL Trends 500 has published, Allen Tate has led the Carolinas and had a strong finish among brokerages nationwide. We’re proud to be in the company of other strong independent real estate companies,”  said Pat Riley, president  and CEO, Allen Tate Companies.

Gary Cherrett Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

In addition to his real estate license, Gary holds an associate degree in hospitality management from Miami Dade College. Coldwell Banker Caine Gary is a board member of Greenville recently welcomed Gary Sports Council and an event volunteer for Cherrett as a residential the City of Greenville special events. He sales agent to its Greenalso enjoys cycling, kayaking, hiking, and exville office. Gary joins ploring the beautiful Upstate. Gary is marCaine with extensive exried and has two children and two grandperience in management, children. previously working as the Cherrett “We are excited to have Gary’s unique executive director for Noskills set now part of our Greenville team,” tus Sports, a sports and event management said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO company. He was also the director of new business development for Miles Hospitality. REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 26


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HOME : On the market Ridgeland At The Park • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Alta Vista • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

River Shoals • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

172 Ridgeland Dr Unit 301 · $699,000 · MLS# 1338632

4 Cromwell Avenue · $699,000 · MLS# 1323934

8 W Prentiss Ave · $649,000 · MLS# 1340492

205 Rio Grande Place · $375,000 · MLS# 1341371

3BR/3BA The only Penthouse unit available with a 2-car garage! Priced under 700K! Beautiful views, master suite, come see today! McDaniel to Ridgeland Dr, right on Hope, building 172

5BR/3.5BA Wonderful brick new build! Open floorplan with master on main. 4 bedrooms plus bonus room upstairs. 2-car attached garage. Augusta Street to Left on Lupo Street. Right on Cromwell.

3BR/3.5BA Classic home in heart of Augusta Road, features high ceilings, crown moulding, hardwoods, renovated kitchen. Beautiful, tree-lined street with sidewalks. Augusta Rd to W. Prentiss. #8 is on right.

5BR/4.5BA Don’t miss this “like-new” home with amazing in-ground pool, Jacuzzi spa, three car garage, and over 3300 square feet. 385south to Right on Georgia Rd. Right into River Shoals.

Contact: Jacob Mann 325-6266 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Heidi Putnam 380-6747 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Tracey Cappio 567-8887 Coldwell Banker Caine

Tuscany Falls • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 217 Dante Lane · $340,000 · MLS# 1341766 4BR/2.5BA Don’t miss this beautiful home -Tuscany Falls with all the upgrades! Hardwood floors, gourmet kitchen, covered patio, side-entry garage, etc! Scuffletown Rd to Tuscany Falls Dr, Rt. Versilia, Rt Dante

Contact: Tracey Cappio 567-8887 Coldwell Banker Caine

alangston@communityjournals.com

Real Estate News continued of Coldwell Banker Caine. “His management experience and proficiency in the hospitality and sports industries are the perfect complement to his new career in real estate.”

Past, present and future Allen Tate customers can expect to see the new branding on print, digital, social media, outdoor and radio advertising throughout the company’s footprint beginning in April.

Allen Tate Company Celebrates 60th Anniversary, Launches “We are home” Branding Campaign

Erin Colman Joins Blackstream | Christie’s International Real Estate

Sixty years ago, H. Allen Tate, Jr, had a dream: to own a successful real estate business. On April 1, 1957, Tate opened the doors on a one-man, one-location real estate and insurance company near today’s uptown Charlotte, N.C. Since then, the Allen Tate Companies  has grown to a full-service, homeownership company, serving customers from 45 local offices with more than 1,500 Realtors®, across four regional markets in North and South Carolina. This month, Allen Tate celebrates its 60th anniversary by launching a new branding campaign focused on Tate’s dream and the core foundation of the company: We are home.™ “The Allen Tate Companies has always been about providing exceptional service to provide and protect quality of life in the communities we serve,” said Pat Riley, president and CEO, Allen Tate Companies. “Home is a place where we feel comfortable, a place where you are pushed to do your best, to share with the ones you love the most. Quality of life begins at home,” said Riley. “At Allen Tate, we’re all things home. Sure, we’re real estate. We help buyers and sellers. But we’re also mortgage. We’re insurance. We’re a complete Family of Companies that are there for you. We’re the expert you expect in every home situation,” said Riley. “We’re also community. We believe it’s our responsibility – and our privilege – to give back to the local communities in the Carolinas where our Realtors and employees live, work and play.”

Erin has always had a love for real estate so deciding to make a career out of that passion was a wise decision. With a reputation built on honesty and trust, Erin will work with you hand in Colman hand all the way to the closing table, no matter if it is your first home or a luxury property. Hardworking and a strong believer in communication tied with her passion for helping her clients achieve their goals is what drives Erin’s positive professional attitude. She always puts her clients first to provide an unforgettable experience throughout the entire home buying or selling process. Erin is excited to be joining the BlackStream Christie’s International team and ready to assist you with all your real estate needs. As a native to the Greenville area, Erin enjoys all that the area has to offer, especially downtown and in the state parks. There is always plenty to do for every age. Erin and her husband can often be found exploring the outdoors with their dog.

Coldwell Banker Caine Names March Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from March through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and


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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Breckenridge Travelers Rest SC

Home Info Price: $204,900-$300,000’s Amenities: Close to Swamp Rabbit Trail and Downtown Travelers Rest. Mountain Views and Large Home Sites. Schools: Gateway Elementary, Northwest Middle, and Travelers Rest High Contact Information: Stan McAlister | 864.292.0400 stan@builderpeople.com

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Upstate. SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, we understand residential construction which enables us to anticipate your concerns during the build. From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make home construction an enjoyable process. We’re not just building homes – We’re Building a Way of Life. Hwy 25 to Tigerville Rd (Spinx). Turn right on Tigerville Rd. Approx 1 mile and Breckenridge is on the right. OR from Taylors: Jackson Grove Rd to Tigerville, left on Tigerville, 0.5 miles and Breckenridge is on the left.

WAY SKY

DEL

Beautiful mountain views and large home sites, Breckenridge is the newest SK Builders community in Travelers Rest. Only a few miles from the Swamp Rabbit Trail this community is a uniquely beautiful place to live. SK Builders, Craftsman Signature Series Collection, ensures both exceptional craftsmanship and outstanding value. Standard Upgrades in this Community include: 9 foot ceilings on first level, granite countertop, rounded corners, arched doorways, double sinks with garden tub and separate shower in master bathroom, cultured marble vanities, fireplace with gas logs, fiber cement siding, and many more features that distinguish an SK Builders’ home. Choose to build your home with the largest local builder in the

33 55 0.46 0.46 Acres Acres

9

40

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4 00

3 6 0.45 Acres

9 0.48 Acres

27

2 7 0.46 Acres

L EGEND Model Home

Spec Home

FUTURE DEVELOPEMENT

Sold

Revised 3/31/2017 The information contained on this page is reliable, but not guaranteed. Subject to change without notice.

Real Estate News continued Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s Team efforts listed below.

• Donna Morrow • Eva Sandfort • Faith Ross • Felicia Griggs • Francie Little • Lori Thompson Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 • Evon and Steve Hammett million in listing/closing volume or four list- • Heidi Putnam ed/closed units include: • Ivey Jacops • Andrew Little • Jacob Mann • Annette Starnes • Spencer Ashby • Pat Loftis & Brett Smagala • Joye Lanahan • Charlianne Nestlen • Kiersten Bell • Chris Stroble • Lindsay Blanton • David Seaver • Lori Bayne

• Marshall Jordan • Mike Dassel • Rhonda Porter • Shelbie Dunn • Sherry Sponseller • Susan Gallion • Suzanne Cook • Tracey Cappio • Tracy Bogie • Victor Lester • Virginia Abrams • Virginia Hayes • Wanda Stewart Circle of Excellence Groups (2-3 agents)

achieving $1.5 million in listing/closing volume or six units listed/closed include: • Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group • Lewis & Company

Wilson Associates Real Estate welcomes Karen McCue Wilson Associates Real Estate recently welcomed Karen McCue as a Realtor Associate to their ever growing Greenville company. Karen brings with her over 25-years experience in sales and marketing for major REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 28


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OPEN HOUSE & COMMUNITY TOUR!

ARPIL 16

TH

& APRIL 30

TH

FROM 2-4PM

1797 Altamount Road | Greenville, SC 29609

HOME Real Estate News continued corporations, including Gannett and Verizon Information Services. “We are delighted to have agents of such a high caliber and experience as Karen. She exemplifies professional- McCue ism in every aspect of the real estate transaction. We know that Karen will exceed our clients’ expectations in real estate,” said Sharon Wilson, President/Broker in Charge of Wilson Associates. Karen relocated to Greenville from Upstate New York in July, 2016. Born in New York, she grew up just outside of Philadelphia in Wayne, Pennsylvania. She received her education at Penn State University.

Steven Smith Attends 2017 National Land Conference Steven Smith, of Cross Creek Realty, LLC, attended the most prestigious conference in the industry for land real estate professionals last month in Charlotte, NC, for the 2017 National Land Conference. The annual confer-

ence is an opportunity for the most elite and successful land professionals in the business to gather, share ideas, build relationships, and make deals. As the premier educational and networking event for land real estate professionals, the conference hosts a full line-up of renowned industry speakers that shared tips and revealed insights into best practices. The 2017 conference drew over 220 other real estate agents and another 50 expert presenters and industry service providers for attendees to engage with and learn from during the event.

“What a great opportunity to learn from the best minds in the land business from all over the country at this year’s conference. Choosing the correct agent is important in any real estate transaction but choosing a specialized land agent to sell your property can and will make all the difference” said Smith.

Let Me Make Your Move Easier

522 Eventide Drive, Moore, 29369 4 BR, 3.5 BA ~ $206,500

SALES BY CALL CONSERVUS REALTY TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS EXCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT

864.608.4608

Best Value in Tyger Shoals and move-in ready! Just under 3000 sq. ft., this home has inviting arched doorways, hardwood floors in the formal living & dining. Spacious great room with gas log fireplace opens to well-designed Chef’s dream kitchen with granite countertops, stainless appliances, smooth cook top stove, built-in microwave, island/breakfast bar, endless counterspace, recessed lighting, music port with two ceiling speakers and large pantry. The spacious master suite is located on the second floor with sitting area, his and her closets, dual vanities, garden tub, separate shower, linen and water closet. So much more to see! Greenville MLS#1340097 • Spartanburg MLS#241933

Exceptional Service Beyond Compare

Elizabeth S. Cox REALTOR

864-525-5523

theridgesatparismountain.com Conservus Realty provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetics. In addition to federal law requirements, [Company Name] complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.

111 Williams Street, Greenville, SC 29601 864-250-2850


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FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

Move-In Ready Homes Available NOW! Enjoy the maintenance-free townhome lifestyle at The Townes at Thornblade. This gated community is located just off I-85 in Greer, and has a variety of homes available for immediate occupancy. There are three unique two-story floorplans, ranging from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an owner’s suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2.5 baths. Cothran homes are designed to maximize usable space, and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, a fourth bedroom or a third full bath Incentives are available on move-in ready homes for a limited time only. Available Homes: The Primrose 2,449 sq. ft. 3 BR / 2.5 BA Starting at $276,700

GREER The Townes at Thornblade 864-214-3024 Single family townhomes from the $270’s

The Barberry 2,742 sq. ft. 3 BR / 2.5 BA Starting at $296,700

SIMPSONVILLE The Reserve at Asheton Lakes 864-884-1244 Single family townhomes from the $250’s

The Heather 2,672 sq. ft. 4 BR / 3.5 BA Starting at $304,700

The Townes at Brookwood 864-214-3022 Single family townhomes from the $160’s

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO The Townes at Thornblade 107 Meadow Clary Drive, Greer, SC 29650 Community Size: Approximately 60 homes Amenities: Private gated access, landscaped yards, irrigated grounds, street lights, community pool & cabana Schools: Buena Vista Elementary, North Wood Middle and Riverside High Contact Info: Cothran Homes CothranHomes.com | 864-214-3024

Real Estate News continued Cross Creek Realty, LLC is the sister company to Cross Creek Timber, a local timber procurement and forestry services company. Cross Creek Realty, LLC was formed to provide professional land brokerage services to our clients in the upstate of South Carolina.  The company will represent both buyers and sellers of timber tracts, farms, recreational and commercial properties.  If you are considering selling your property or need assistance in finding the ideal piece of property to purchase call Cross Creek Realty, LLC today at  864-5173621  or visitwww.crosscreekre.com.  If

you are a landowner interested in selling timber or have questions regarding forest management please contact Cross Creek Timber at 864-517-3620  or visitwww. crosscreektimber.com.

Allen Tate CEO Pat Riley offers advice about home pricing in today’s market As a seller, you want to know how to price your home to sell quickly, but still make a profit. As a buyer, you’re hoping to make a reasonable offer that will win you the home you desire. And as a home-

owner, you want to keep tabs on how the value of your home compares to others in your area. For these reasons and many more, Allen Tate President and CEO Pat Riley has some advice: Get to know the elephant in the living room – price. “Your home is one of the largest – if not the largest – financial investment you will ever make,” said Riley in the April edition of Carolinas Market Update. Yet price is a topic that buyers and sellers alike are unsure how to address head-on. To understand price, you must start with market dynamics, said Riley.

Historically, homes in the Carolinas have appreciated about 3 percent annually for the past 40 years. But for the past two years, homes in North and South Carolina have appreciated about 6 to 7 percent annually, outpacing the national average of about 4.5 percent during the same period. That’s because of the low inventory market, said Riley. “Buyer demand is outpacing available inventory. As a seller, you can expect to get good market value for your home – assuming certain conditions,” said Riley. REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 31


!

YS A 2D

OPEN HOUSE COLLINS PLACE

“New Construction” In Parkins Mill

SATURDAY, APRIL 22

|

SUNDAY, APRIL 23

|

2 - 4PM

Welcome to Collins Place, a community with small town southern charm, located in the heart of Greenville’s Parkins Mill Area. These magnificently constructed estate homes are situated on approximately 1 acre each and have timeless appeal. Built by Scott Lynch of Hollison Homes, every detail is crafted with uncompromising quality with an effort to save the original integrity of the Collins property. • 8 Parkins Oak - Available Now • 16 Parkins Oak - Under Construction • 1 Homesite Remaining - For Your Custom Home

Hollison Custom Homes We build on your Ideas. Lisa Antonelli-McDowell

864-421-3072

www.WOWLisa.com LisaAMcDowell@allentate.com

Hollison Custom Homes www.HollisonHomes.com

Hollison Homes is a select builder for Hartness, The South’s Next Great Village. Model and Spec Home coming soon. Contact Lisa for more information.


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HOME Featured Home

Bruce Farm

208 Bruce Farm Road, Simpsonville, SC 29681

Home Info Price: $1,450,000 MLS: 1338849 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 5.5 Sq. Ft: 7.915 Lot Size: 12.3 Acres Schools: Bells Crossing Elementary, Hillcrest Middle, and Hillcrest High Agent: Tammy Kingsley 864.561.2811 tkingsley@greenvillemoves.com

From the moment you enter the beautiful mahogany front doors, you will be stunned by the breathtaking beauty of this awe inspiring estate situated on a little over 12 acres - perfectly fit for the equestrian enthusiast, but certainly so much more. The attention to each and every detail is obvious from the grand spiral staircase to the multiple French doors leading to the resort style pool area. The Master suite on the first floor is all that you need in the way of seclusion and includes an oversized sitting area with a gas log fireplace, coffee/wet bar, and French doors that lead out to the massive deck. If you enjoy cooking, this gourmet kitchen has it all, featuring commercial grade top

of the line built-in Kitchen Aid appliances, alder wood cabinets, Cambia quartz countertops and extensive custom stonework that is incasing the oversized range hood. In the eating area just off the kitchen you will find a wall of windows viewing the deck and outdoor resort area. Next to the kitchen is a warm and cozy family room with vaulted wood ceiling, stone gas log fireplace and French doors leading to the deck. Every bedroom has its own private bath. Other features are bonus room, and finished basement with a billiard room, a game room, a family room with a gas log fireplace , a bedroom with a private bath and a workout room. This estate is indescribable and a must see!

Real Estate News continued If you are looking to sell: • Your home must be current and in good condition. • Your home must be priced correctly and competitively for the market. “Many sellers believe their home is worth more than what it will appraise for. That’s understandable – we love our homes and believe they are worth the same to someone else. But you can’t put a price on emotional value,” said Riley. In fact, if your home is overpriced, it will actually result in decreased buyer activity, according to the National Association of Realtors®. If a home is priced correctly for the

market, 60 percent of potential buyers will look at it. When a home is priced 10 percent above market value, the interested buyer pool drops to 30 percent. Some sellers might be tempted to initially offer their home at a higher price, with the idea that they can always reduce the price later. Not a good strategy, says Riley. “Your home will receive the most interest and foot traffic within the first few days of listing. If it’s priced too high, buyers won’t come back later for a second look.” If you are a buyer in today’s market: • You must be prepared to act quickly.

• You must present a good offer. • You must be  pre-approved for a mortgage. While buyers are more in control when inventory is low, Riley cautions against making a low-ball offer or asking for a contingency. “The market is simply moving too quickly. The only homes likely to sell for a low offer or with concessions are ones that need work or are less desirable for some other reason,” said Riley. “Buying or selling a home is a business transaction. But it’s also very personal. You need an Allen Tate Realtor to help you get to

know the elephant in the living room,” said Riley. Carolinas Market Update is targeted to consumers in the Charlotte, Triad, Research Triangle and Upstate S.C. regions. It is produced quarterly by the Allen Tate Companies and features information, statistics, trends and predictions about the real estate market in North and South Carolina.   To access the latest Carolinas Market Update, go to the Allen Tate YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/theallentatecompany) or contact any Allen Tate Realtor®. REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 33


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of March 20 – 24, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$13,153,153 $12,148,523 $11,296,973 $1,800,000 $1,333,333 $1,200,000 $870,000 BLACKSTONE $829,000 CHATSWORTH $800,000 $715,900 STONE CROFT $685,000 GRIFFITH FARM $620,000 $599,000 TUXEDO PARK $575,531 $545,000 TERRA WOODS $530,000 ACADIA $470,984 ALEXANDER FARMS $449,900 FOREST HEIGHTS $448,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $432,952 TRAILSIDE $420,000 $405,000 WATKINS ESTATES $405,000 CLIFFS VALLEY LAKE RIDGE CROSS $400,000 KILGORE FARMS $395,000 SILVER MEADOWS $387,316 ROCKWOOD PARK $382,700 CLEAR SPRINGS $381,663 IDLEWILD $375,000 $375,000 $365,000 LIBERTY PARK $350,500 KINGS CROSSING $347,180 $347,000 ASHETON $334,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH PK $325,000 $320,000 VERDMONT $319,900 LOST RIVER $313,277 THORNHILL PLANTATION $313,000 SUGAR MILL $313,000 DREXEL TERRACE $313,000 MAGGIES MEADOW $307,250 HERITAGE POINT $307,000 SUGAR CREEK $305,500 WOODLAND RIDGE $304,600 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $302,187 ASHFORD $300,000 $300,000 $299,000 W.J. RIDDLE $298,500 $295,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $293,250 WEST FARM II $292,500 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $289,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $288,935 MORTON GROVE $284,229 ONEAL VILLAGE $282,780 COVENTRY $278,220 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $275,860 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $271,740 SHADY FORD $271,625

TWISTER 115 LLC TWISTER 113 LLC TWISTER 5371 LLC CRH 288 RIVER LLC SPIXON ENTERPRISES LLC PATRIOT NATIONAL INC HIPP THOMAS A JR CLEMONS SONDRA W (JTWROS LANE JAMES G JR RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC KOSLOW MICHAEL PEARSE SUZANNE V SATTERFIELD MARY LOIS MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH JAMES WHITE ENTERPRISES SHARP MICHAEL A & LINDA ACADIA TOWNHOMES LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WILLINGHAM JUSTIN M (JTW NVR INC ADDISON CORPORATION PAK GROCERS INC XERAS MARIE C 813 HKW LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC MERRIAM SCOTT J MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WAGSTAFF DANIEL R M H A S PROPERTIES LLC HOFFMAN KENNETH JR CREASMAN BENJAMIN NATHAN D R HORTON-CROWN LLC GENDLIN HOMES LLC MORROW DOROTHY G SHF VERDAE LLC CURETON PHYLLIS M WHISENANT MICHAEL RYAN MERITAGE HOMES OF S C LL NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WATSON SARAH M DOUGHTY MICHAEL W (JTWRO PALMETTO TRUST OF SC LLC KATES JEFF A HENDERSON RICHARD D JR D R HORTON INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC MONAHAN JOHN J SMITH RANDY L STROUD THOMAS F FORESMITH INC MASTERS MARK S RAINA AMARDEEP HOWARD DRIVE PROPERTIES GONZALEZ JOSE R ESTEVEZ MUNGO HOMES INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH NVR INC NVR INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

REALTY INCOME PROPERTIES REALTY INCOME PROPERTIES REALTY INCOME PROPERTIES LAUREL LAKE FARMS LLC BREWSTER SUSAN AND CLYDE 715 LLC GHARTEY-TAGOE KODWO P (J HILLABRAND BRENT L (SURV PASTORE ASHLEY LONG (JTW LAZARUS ALLISON LANDAU ( OWEN CALEB J (SURV) GREGG JUSTIN WAYNE (JTWR KROSCHEL ALMAZA HAN DIANA HUDSON EDWARD WAYNE (JTW DONALDSON DAVID JOHNSON KATHRYN G (JTWRO TALBOTT KEVIN H (JTWROS) BUTLER EMILY (JTWROS) DOTSON CYNTHIA (JTWROS) CLIFFORD KHADINE (JTWROS SNM FOODS LLC LAW BRITTANY HASTO (JTWR SMITH RANDY L (JTWROS) BAKER JONATHON PAUL (JTW APPLEWHITE BRIAN K WILLINGHAM JUSTIN MATHIE EBERHART CHERYL L (JTWRO SEVEN COLORS GSC LLC CITY OF GREENVILLE THE HUDGENS ASHLEY C (JTWROS DABBS DIXON H MULLIGAN JOHN (JTWROS) SMITH MARIA L (JTWROS) GROOM CASSADY LEIGH COGG NVR INC BLICKLE RAINER C GRINDAL ASHLEY GERBODE FOWLER BARRY DWAINE JR ( TRAUTNER CHRISTIAN MCCLELLAN CAROLINE I E ( HAAKER ARTHUR C AUST ANN H (JTWROS) BLANTON LAUREN AMANDA (J CRANDALL LYNDSEY (JTWROS HUANG FEN (JTWROS) ALOMAR ANGEL M SR (JTWRO DI IULIO ANDREW JOHN KAUFFMAN GARTH L (JTWROS HAWKINS DALE L (JTWROS) 34 MELVILLE LLC ZOCH JOHNATHAN N NGUYEN NHA (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC HULTS CLIFFORD T JR RAVANI PANKAJKUMAR D (JT STEWART CAMERON R CORIGLIANO DEBRA J (JTWR KARASEK LARRY A (JTWROS) WALSH THOMAS M NANCE CHANCENEY (JTWROS) ANDERSON CLEOPATRA A (JT

11995 EL CAMINO REAL 11995 EL CAMINO REAL 11995 EL CAMINO REAL 400 E STONE AVE 7056 VALLEY TRAILS DR 7056 RIVERS AVE 1 FAIRVIEW AVE 608 LANCASHIRE CT 120 PENTLAND CT 105 PHILLIPS LN 2374 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 15 GRIFFITH HILL WAY 205 LOG SHOALS RD 321 TUXEDO LN 800 RHETT ST 201 TERRA WOODS LN 6 VILLAGE MEWS RD 6 ALEXANDER MANOR WAY 311 LONGVIEW TER 218 VERLIN DR 1 TRAILS EDGE CT 1630 E NORTH ST 176 BERRY DR 117 E MAIN ST 139 FORT DR 304 WAKE HILL CT 400 MEYERS DR 300 ANGEL FALLS DR 812 GRAND ST APT 318 PO BOX 2207 495 WOODSIDE RD 12 VALERIE DR 600 ROSE ARBOR LN 604 SUMMIT DR 100 BRANDON WAY 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 628 S MAIN ST 100 MARTELE CT 19 WINGED BOURNE CT 102 N STAGHORN LN 308 WATER MILL RD 16 KIMBERLY LN 104 GIANNAS CT 381 HERITAGE POINT DR 110 SILVER CREEK CT 99 WOOD HOLLOW CIR 525 ASHLER DR 822 KNOLLWOOD DR PO BOX 273 2752 HIGHWAY 414 2607 WOODRUFF RD STE E #424 212 HOLLAND FORD RD 26 RIVANNA LN 441 WESTERN LN 252 RAVEN FALLS LN 22 BURGE CT 15 MORTON GROVE LN 127 NOBLE ST 100 LONGFELLOW WAY 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 236 SANDUSKY LN 112 WINESPRING PL

MORNING MIST $271,500 NORTHWOOD $270,000 VERDMONT $265,500 PELHAM FALLS $262,500 PARK LANE $260,000 $260,000 $260,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $256,900 CLEARVIEW ACRES $255,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $254,900 EDWARD SPRINGS $254,692 AUTUMN TRACE $252,000 LONGLEAF $250,000 MOSS CREEK $248,900 ST MARK COTTAGES $248,185 $247,500 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $246,035 COVENTRY $245,600 PELHAM ESTATES $241,200 LIBERTY PARK $240,000 LAKE CUNNINGHAM $240,000 LOST RIVER $235,343 FOX TRACE $235,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $232,025 LAUREL OAKS $231,500 SQUIRES CREEK $231,000 BROOKRIDGE HILLS $230,000 THE RICHLAND $230,000 HALF MILE LAKE $229,500 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $228,000 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $226,500 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II $226,000 $225,000 TOWNS@WOODRUFF CROSSING $225,000 SHOALLY RIDGE $224,000 STONELEDGES $221,690 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $220,968 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $220,873 $220,000 VICTORIA PARK TOWNHOMES $218,954 BRYSON CROSSING $216,000 CHESTNUT HILL PLANTATION $215,000 $215,000 JENKINS ESTATES SOUTHWEST $215,000 $215,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $214,940 WESTCLIFFE $210,000 SADDLEHORN $210,000 $208,000 $207,000 WATERTON $206,500 PARKER’S PLACE $206,500 $205,675 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $203,206 $200,000 FOX TRACE $200,000 $200,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $198,948 HUNTERS WOODS $193,900 BAYWOOD PLACE $193,500 SHELBURNE FARMS $193,000 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $193,000

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON-CROWN LLC CLINE WADE SPENCER BROWN-WADLEIGH SUSAN M ( ANDERSON KERRY L ANJARWALLA AKIL BLACKSHAW SCOTT R CANDLER JANIE RUTH DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL TRADEMARK CONTRACTORS LL HUDGENS JONATHAN SK BUILDERS INC MEAGHER KRISTINA B D R HORTON INC MULLIGAN JOHN M ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L SLING AND STONE LLC NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC DANNAR GARY REYNOLDS TOBY S DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH RAYO CLARIBELL DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SLOCUM JEFFREY C DEAN MORGAN M (JTWROS) REID JOHN A KELLEY J DON SMITH DONALD WAYNE (JTWR NVR INC ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC LE CLEREQ FREDERIC S COOLEY AVERY JAMES JR MITCHELL MILES B HERROLD J DENNIS (JTWROS SK BUILDERS INC NVR INC NVR INC JAT INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH CHRISTOPHER G MAJOR AND WELLMON CHRISTOPHER BUFO BARNES LINDA NIRO LAURA A NEWELL LOIS SEIDEL (L-ES NVR INC DEMAS EFROSINI MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE FOUST VICKIE T GILLS CHARLES A ELLIOTT JUANITA E STRATTON HOLLY (JTWROS) ROCKWELL GREENVILLE LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MANFREDI EUGENE (IRA) WORKMAN JOHN R (JTWROS) GREGORY LYNN E NVR INC WENTZKY TAMMY M T M PROPERTIES LLC WATSON ANGELA J SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND

BUYER

ADDRESS

BERRY CANDICE D SWAFFORD WHITNEY LAUREN BERGGREN ANDREA P (JTWRO PITTS NANCY A (SURV) DAMBROSIO DANIEL AUFDENCAMP ERIC J (JTWRO MONTOTO SHADID FOURNIER FAMILY TRUST DORN MATTHEW B (JTWROS) HOBBS AARON RAY FRAZIER DIANE (JTWROS) MEYERS NANCY H LAMBES JASON GROSEK GAIL (JTWROS) MANN MARILYN JOYCE SHANKS ELIZABETH A (JTWR ALVAREZ BABETTE CARTER MARK D FIRST FRANKLIN MORTG LOA CREASMAN BENJAMIN N (JTW PACI STEVEN D SR ROBERTS RANDY DITREN ELIANA I (JTWROS) BASSETT DARIN H (JTWROS) COLEMAN CHRISTINA (SURV) MOUGHON EMILY (JTWROS) BAKER LINDA L (JTWROS) MCBRIDE GWEN B LIVING TR JENSEN SOPHIA RIISBERG ( DANIEL NEENA (JTWROS) CREWS JEFFREY A (JTWROS) GENTRY CAROL K MCGREGOR GAMBRELL PROPER ALSOP MARY E (JTWROS) EFERDINGER MARKUS RHOADS GARY AND JEANNE R CHAVA RAMANJANEYULU (JTW NAGABHYRU RAJESH INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA WASHINGTON TERRY BARNES BRITTANY A (JTWRO BROWN KELLY MARIE BARNES JASON C (JTWROS) GRUENWALD MATTHIAS (SURV READMOND BRYCE W FULGENCIO RUSSELL PETER JONES TYRONE M (JTWROS) KRUG ANDRE RIDGEWAY MATTHEW A DUNNING DAVID A SR (JTWR BARNES BRANDI OLIVIER (J KASER DEAN E BLAIR ANNE B REVOCABLE T RAMIREZ ALEXANDER PROVIDENTIAL PROPERTIES ALBUQUERQUE SAVANNA AMAD CATHCART VICTORIA M ALLA RAVINDER R (JTWROS) LOWE CLARENCE D (JTWROS) KELLY STEPHANIE M SNOW SHELLY K STAGGERS CHRISTOPHER EDW

308 COBURG LN 207 PASCAL DR 14 MARTELE CT 129 RIVER WAY DR 110 SENTINEL CT 339 BATES CROSSING RD 1610 HIGHWAY 14 5 NOVELTY DR 4724 STATE PARK RD 15 CARTECAY CT 205 CONWAY HILL LN 526 KINGSMOOR DR 509 BELLGREEN AVE 132 WHITE BARK WAY 102 RED ROCK LN 305 N FRANKLIN RD 127 MIDDLEBY WAY 1004 ANGLIAN PL 3815 S WEST TEMPLE 14 VALERIE DR 18 BUTLER CT 405 WINDWOOD ST 132 SCOTTISH AVE 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 16 OVERCUP CT 204 BUCKLER CT 316 WINDING BROOK CT 4501 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 4 1203 HALF MILE WAY 113 MIDDLEBY WAY 109 ROCKLEDGE DR 723 ELMBROOK DR 203 E AUGUSTA PL 222 LOUISVILLE DR 18 CANYON CT PO BOX 561 104 MIDDLEBY WAY 4 IRVINGTON DR 500 E WASHINGTON ST 404 KINDLETREE WAY 103 TWILIGHT PL 806 OAK HAVEN CT 450 BATES CROSSING RD 206 BEAUCLAIR DR 310 HOLMES DR 129 MIDDLEBY WAY 108 S FOLKSHIRE CT 207 SADDLEBRED DR 112 WHITEHALL ST 77 OLD MCELHANEY RD 329 WATERTON WAY 121 EAGLE PASS DR 9 SLIPPERY ROCK DR 121 VAUBUREN CT 544 MEECE BRIDGE RD 239 SCOTTISH AVE 3614 ALEXIA PL 125 MIDDLEBY WAY 409 DAVENPORT RD 233 REDCOAT CT 40 BELLOWS FALLS DR 10 RED JONATHAN CT


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The Arbors

3 Germander Court, Greenville, SC 29615

Home Info Price: $274,900 MLS: 1340994 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2 Sq. Ft: 1,875 Lot Size: 0.15 Acres Built: 1997 Schools: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and J.L.Mann High Agent: Kate Anderson | 864.363.3634 kateanderson@cdanjoyner.com

Welcome Home to this ALL ONE LEVEL patio home in prestigious The Arbors community. Custom built, single owner, all brick patio home features 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths with attached 2 car garage & LEVEL LOT. Open and airy floor plan combines the kitchen, living room & breakfast nook. Kitchen features a plentiful amount of cabinet & countertop space featuring a built-in china cabinet with glass doors, pull-out serving drawers & even more storage down below. Great room features a gas fireplace with mantle and brick surround.

French doors lead you out to the fantastic 18x24 ft. screened in porch and deck which beckons you to come, relax and enjoy the great outdoors. Entry through the wrought iron gate leads you into your private, level, fenced-in backyard. Master suite includes a spacious bedroom with bay window, walk-in closet, relaxing garden tub & stand alone shower. Split floor plan has two additional bedrooms with a lovely hall/guest bath. Kick back and enjoy living since this community offers lawn and shrub maintenance, trash service, lights & fence maintenance.

Real Estate News continued

Blackstream International Real Estate Congratulates Holly May

and Marketing Council of the Upstate and the Professional Women in Building,” said May. Holly May, REALTOR The Rookie of the Year Award is awarded at BlackStream| Christies to a member company who has made an International Real Estate, outstanding contribution to the association received the Rookie of the through participation, support and particiYear Award from Home pation. Builders Association of “I’ve had the pleasure of developing Greenville and the Sales professional relationships with the cliand Marketing Council of May ents I work with in my industry as a real the Upstate. estate professional with BlackStream | “It’s been a rewarding experience to serve Christies International Real Estate, ” said on several boards at the Homebuilders As- May. sociation of Greenville, including the Sales With over 14 years of experience in the

real estate industry, Holly May brings unparalleled enthusiasm and energy to her work. Her passion and dedication ensures that clients locally and those relocating to the area benefit from her depth of knowledge and industry experience. With an outstanding sales history combined with exemplary business ethics and marketing intelligence, she has a proven record for success. Whether a client or customer is looking to buy, sell, lease or invest in a first home or a luxury estate, Holly’s commitment and effort are the same – her only goal is to achieve her clients’ goals and provide

an unforgettable level of service in the process. Clients can trust her character and discretion in all transactions. Holly’s expertise and knowledge of the market coupled with her tenacious negotiating skills and insight make her the go-to agent for all individuals. Holly is active with all 3 boards of the home builders association. During her spare time Holly enjoys volunteering with Meals on Wheels, fostering shelter animals and teaching Sunday School at her local church. REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 34


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Real Estate News continued

Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Top Producers for March Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® announces  the top producers from each of its residential sales offices for the month of March. These agents and teams  earned  the highest gross commission incomes (GCI) based on closingscompleted  March 1 – 31, 2017. March Top Producers Listed By Office: Anderson Office  Top Teams: 1. Theresa Nation & Associates 2. The Clever People 3. Foronda Hall & Associates Top Individuals: 1. Mike Stroud 2. Johnathan Lower 3. Hannah Johnson Augusta Road Office                       1. Keith Boling 2. Amy Ray Thomas 3. Annie Adams 4. Charee Mcconchie 5. Stacey Bradshaw 6. Ginger Sherman

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ARTS & CULTURE THE GSO TAKES A DETOUR page

37

GOV’T MULE STARTS A REVOLUTION page

38

GREENVILLE CHORALE BAKES AN AMERICAN PIE page

36

Gov’t Mule’s Warren Haynes Anna Webber

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017

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SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

CULTURE

Pieces of the Pie Greenville Chorale tackles 200 years of American standards ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

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The Greenville Chorale is going all-American with its latest show. Titled “A Slice of American Pie,” the program will feature American standards and favorites. Conductor Bingham Vick says he deliberately planned this program to represent the best parts of America. “During this time of political unrest, it’s something possibly we all can agree upon,” Vick says. The program includes old favorites, newer pieces, and show tunes Vick says are more upbeat and seldom done in the chorale’s regular concerts. “America is the newest kid on the block at only 200 years old,” Vick says, referring to Europe’s musical tradition, often viewed as the gold standard. “American composers are the beneficiaries of a lot of music history and influence.” The sections of the program are designed to ease listeners in, using more lyrical tunes initially and gradually working into more raucous pieces. Opening the program is a setting of “America (My Country, ‘Tis of Thee)” by Robert Edgerton, while the second set begins with arrangements of forgotten folksongs by Greenville-based composer Dan Forrest inspired by the different regions of our nation. The orchestration calls for four hands on one piano (or two pianos) and violin as well as some portions unaccompanied. Vick describes these as more laid back, legato in feeling, and introverted, while the second half of the set — choral works by Aaron Copland — is more forward, in your face, and aggressive. Recognizable tunes from this section will likely be the majestic “Simple Gifts” (a Shaker song for women) and the foot-stomping “Ching-A-RingChaw.” The program progresses to a series of hymn-tunes, spirituals, and a gospel song, including “The Road Home” (from 1835’s Southern Harmony), “What Wondrous Love Is This” (from the 1811’s Sacred Harp), the spirituals “Deep River” and “God’s Gonna Set This World on Fire,” and contemporary gospel composer Keith Hampton’s “True Light.” The early gospel hymns come from European immigrants while spirituals, of course, come from African slaves, but they have been adapted to represent American music

Photo provided by Greenville Chorale

as a whole. “Slaves brought their own sound,” Vick says. “They set the stage for American jazz, which is a unique American musical form.” The fourth set features barbershop harmony. “God’s Bottles,” a Prohibition period song Vick describes as “very self-righteous,” will be performed by the women of the chorale, and “Lida Rose” will be sung by the men. Lastly, in a set called The Great American Songbook, Broadway tunes will be featured. “The old operatic tradition moved into a popular style,” Vick says, describing the development of the Broadway show. The set will include Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone” (from “Carousel”), “Georgia On My Mind” by Hoagy Carmichael, “Someone to Watch Over Me” by George and Ira Gershwin, and “Blue Skies” by Irving Berlin. The concert will close with Berlin’s “God Bless America.” “Everybody will enjoy the program,” Vick says. “There’s nothing too intellectually demanding. People can relax a little bit.”

“A SLICE OF AMERICAN PIE” DATE & VENUE April 23, 3 p.m., First Baptist Church, Greenville April 30, 3 p.m., Taylors First Baptist Church TICKETS $30 adult, $15 student INFO Peace Center Box Office, 864-467-3000


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Fascination Streets The GSO takes the road not taken with ‘Myths & Detours’ VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

With an 11-piece ensemble taking on classical works in different configurations, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s Spotlight Series offers a more informal and personal side of the GSO than audience members might expect. Under the programming guidance of Phil Elkins, the GSO’s principal trumpet player and personnel director, the most recent Spotlight series has also been the most artistically adventurous of the orchestra’s permutations. Elkins grouped each of the three shows on the 2016–17 Spotlight schedule under one theme. The first show, called “Trinkets, Jewels, and Rarities,” focused on lesser-known but no less beautiful pieces and featured Mozart’s rarely heard “Quintet for Clarinet and String Quartet.” The second was January’s “Levity and Tears” performance, which featured works that went to the extremes of joy and sorrow, with the centerpiece being Schubert’s mournful “Death and the Maiden.” But the final show of the 2016-17 season, which will take place this Saturday, might have the most intriguing theme: “Myths and Detours.” “It’s really a collection of works that there are errors or myths associated with,” Elkins says, “and folks don’t necessarily realize that the information might be wrong.” At least that’s the “Myths” part of the equation, which covers the first two pieces on the program: Josef Haydn’s Divertimento No. 1 in B-flat Major for Woodwind Quintet and Dmitri Shostakovich’s “Adagio for Solo Bass and Piano.” The myths about the Haydn piece revolve around its current performance configuration and the origin of the piece’s second movement. Elkins says, “It was written in the early 1780s for two oboes, two French horns, three bassoons, and a serpent [a bass wind instrument descended from the cornett]. It was later condensed for the woodwind quintet.” The mystery of the second movement of the piece, called “St. Anthony Chorale,” is more difficult to solve. “That melody in the second movement was used in a piece by Brahms, which is titled ‘Variations on a Theme by Josef Haydn,’” Elkins says, “which of course suggests that the melody was written by Haydn himself and Brahms used that as a source. But it’s possible that Haydn borrowed it from an existing tune, which was very common at the time. There’s no clear evidence as to who composed the ‘St. Anthony Chorale.’” The origin of the Shostakovich piece is also

where its myth comes in, thought in a slightly different context. “The adagio was originally from a ballet suite,” he says. “But some sources reference it incorrectly as coming from a ballet in one act, and there have even been suggestions that it comes from a film called ‘The Unforgettable Year of 1919,’ but that’s wrong because the theme doesn’t appear anywhere in the soundtrack for the film.” The “Detours” section of the performance centers around Antonín Dvorak’s “Piano Quintet in A-major” and a more contemporary piece by Arne Running, “Quodlibet for Woodwind Quintet.” “Dvorak took a detour from this piece that spanned the course of about 15 years,” Elkins says. “In the late 1870s, he composed a piano quintet in A major called Opus No. 5. Shortly after it was premiered, Dvorak decided he was very dissatisfied with it, to the extent that he destroyed the manuscript. Fifteen years later, he reconsidered the decision and got a copy of the score from a friend of his and started making revisions. Even then, he decided that he couldn’t make the music into something that was appealing to him so he abandoned it once again and started writing a new work in four movements called Opus No. 81.” Running’s detour had more to do with being busy than being dissatisfied. “Running was a very accomplished and successful musician at a very young age,” Elkins says. “He started playing clarinet at the age of 11, and by the age of 17 he was performing as a featured soloist. As a teenager, he composed a number of works, but his composing stopped for many years as he developed his proficiency as a performer. He didn’t get back to composing till he was 33 years old.” Elkins is looking forward to the Running piece because it’s not performed often and because it takes the listener on a journey through the genre’s history. “I think the audience will enjoy it greatly because there are 30 classical music excerpts that are crammed together in about 3 minutes and 30 seconds,” he says.

“MYTHS & DETOURS” EVENT Nachman Norwood and Parrott Wealth Management Consultancy presents The Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s Spotlight Series: “Myths & Detours” VENUE Centre Stage Theatre, 501 River St. DATE Saturday, April 22, 2 and 7 p.m. TICKETS $15 INFO centrestage.org, 864-233-6733

04.21.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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The Way of the Mule Warren Haynes and Gov’t Mule get back to their roots while exploring new territory VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

For over 20 years, Gov’t Mule has been blurring the lines between Southern rock and jam, mixing a heavy muscularity and an exploratory spirit into some truly boundarybreaking music. Led by singer, guitarist, and

songwriter Warren Haynes, the band has carried the tradition of Haynes’ old day job, the Allman Brothers Band, into new territory, working the instrumental mastery of jazz and the lyrical sophistication of folk music into their riff-heavy rock. Haynes’ gruff but surprisingly agile voice and his bee-stung guitar tone are instantly recognizable, but on the Mule’s last studio album, “Shout!,” Haynes added some new voices to the mix, bringing in 11 different vocalists (including Steve Winwood, Elvis Costello, Grace Potter, Dr. John, and Dave Matthews) to interpret 11 new songs. This time out, on the band’s just-announced “Revolution Come, Revolution Go” album (due out in June), the band has gone

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CULTURE “I think we’ve all felt things getting strange for the last few years in our country. There’s been a divide. And the title track is kind of a humorous, tongue-incheek look at it.”

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back to basics — to with Gov’t Mule. an extent. “When I made ‘AshThe album is chockes & Dust,’ it was befull of the expected cause I found myself heavy jam-rock (“Stone writing a lot of songs Cold Rage”) and Hamthat were a departure mond organ-drenched from Mule, so it was roadhouse blues (“Prestime to make a solo sure Under Fire”), but record,” Haynes says. the band moves into “And on the new Gov’t some unexpected terMule record, I think ritory this time out, there are a lot of deincluding a haunting, partures that could’ve stretched-out workout been saved for a solo on Blind Willie Johnalbum, but it’s always son’s classic “Dark Was fun to see how the Warren Haynes the Night, Cold Was the songs get interpreted Ground,” and the eightby the band. Mule has minute, swamp-funk-soaked title track, which its own personality, collectively, so I was cutakes our current political climate and pokes a rious to see where things were going to wind little fun at it. “I ain’t sayin’ I got a better plan,” up once Mule took the reins.” Haynes sings in his smoky growl, “But I ain’t One of the projects that Haynes took on askin’ nobody to follow me.” in between Mule albums was signing Green“I think we’ve all felt things getting ville’s own Marcus King Band to his managestrange for the last few years in our coun- ment company, Hard Head, and producing try,” Haynes says. “There’s been a divide. the band’s self-titled album, which came out And the title track is kind of a humorous, last year. tongue-in-cheek look at it. We’ve been in “When I first heard Marcus, he was 17,” kind of a time warp where things don’t get Haynes says. “He was great then, and mudone, and there’s a big buildup to all this sically mature beyond his years. And I’ve change that never happens.” watched over the last three or four years as After the multi-vocalist blowout on he’s gotten better and better in leaps and “Shout!” and the passing of the band’s bounds. Everywhere I go, people are talking 20th anniversary, Haynes says that Gov’t about them, and it’s good to hear it, because Mule wanted to get back their roots, while they’re one of the bands that’s the future of still working into new territory. “What we the music that I love.” wanted was to kind of go back to our first few records, but go places we’ve never gone before,” he says. “We wanted to bring inGOV’T MULE fluences that have always been with us but somehow never made it into a Mule record. VENUE The intent was to put one foot in the past Peace Center, 101 W. Broad St. and one in the future.” DATE It’s been three years since “Shout!” came Sunday, April 23 at 7 p.m. out, but Haynes seemed to be perpetually working, playing a final tour with the AllTICKETS man Bros. before their 2014 retirement and $35–$45 releasing a dazzling solo album called “AshINFO es & Dust,” which explored more acoustic peacecenter.org, 864-467-3000 blues and country territory than Haynes had

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

APR. 22

APR. 27

AWARENESS

Yeah THAT Cure! Three years ago, Emily McSherry formed Cannabis Forward, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about the medical uses of cannabis. The group was formed after she organized a rally to discuss the use of cannabis to treat autoimmune diseases, seizures, and PTSD, among other illnesses. Even though the most recent cannabis-legalization bill introduced to the S.C. General Assembly has been tabled until next year, she’s pleased people are having the conversation and that 28 other states have some form of cannabis legalization on the books. “The more people discover that the Legislature is talking about it, the more confident they feel discussing it out in the open,” McSherry says. “We’re seeing double, triple, quadruple the presence at our events, and a lot more people asking how they can get involved and where can they find a doctor that’s educated on the subject. People are gaining confidence in their ability to speak out, and that’s encouraging.” This Saturday, Cannabis Forward will host their third annual Yeah THAT Cure! medical cannabis awareness event. There will be educational materials on hand about the different treatment uses for cannabis. The public is also encouraged to step up to the mic and share their own stories of how cannabis might be useful for their conditions, or how it already has been. “We’re not looking to try to persuade anyone,” says McSherry, who’s expecting around 150 people to attend. “Our goal is to have people come together and voice their opinions on the need for access to medical cannabis. We do that in a public setting to encourage people to put aside the stigma that’s associated with cannabis use and be able to say, ‘I believe in this enough to share my support.’ Reducing the stigma starts right there.”—Vincent Harris

WHERE Graham Plaza WHEN Saturday, April 22, 11 a.m. INFO cannabisforward.org

HUMOR

David Sedaris There’s something about David Sedaris’ voice, both on the page and in person. Although his sardonic wit and wry selfdeprecating anecdotes comes across nicely in his bestselling collections, from 1994’s “Barrel Fever” to 2013’s “Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls,” they are given fresh life with his speaking voice — which he himself describes as having an “excitable tone and high, girlish pitch.” Although the genre of “comedic exaggerated memoirs of family life” goes back at least as far as James Thurber, Sedaris, who first caught America’s attention reading his comic semi-autobiographical essays on NPR, has expanded on it considerably. He is unflinching when broaching potentially cringe-worthy subjects like his own past drug abuse and compulsive tendencies, fitting in while living abroad, his highly eccentric family, and growing up gay in the suburban South. While his personal histories are not guaranteed to be 100 percent accurate, they remain viciously funny, keenly insightful, and often downright heartwarming. —Jerry Salley HughHamrick

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04.21.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

THRU MAY 31

VISUAL HISTORY

Doughboy

Special Archives | Furman University

“Over Here, Over There”

After the U.S. entered World War I, Greenvillians felt compelled to do their part. Local citizens and students at Furman University and the Greenville Woman’s College invested time, energy, and resources to the war effort domestically and overseas. The latest exhibit at Furman’s Duke Library looks at the war’s effect on Greenville and its mixed legacy of progress. “This exhibit explores Greenville’s contributions to World War I and the ways the war modernized the city of Greenville,” said Dr. Courtney Tollison of Furman’s history department and one of the exhibit’s curators. With the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into World War I having taken place earlier this month, Tollison says, “This exhibit is especially timely.” Helen Mistler, a member of Furman’s Class of 2019, also helped curate the exhibit. — Cindy Landrum

WHAT “Over Here, Over There: Greenville in the Great War” WHEN through May 31

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2 pm Sundays at 2: Music in the Galleries Welcome back Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble for a joyful musical program featuring a blend of folk music, light jazz, and original songs. Come early to the Theater for the best seat!

Apr 30

2 pm Sundays at 2: Artist Demonstration Join South Carolina artist Russell Jewel for a demonstration of watercolor painting techniques inspired by the various methods of Andrew Wyeth.

All Sundays at 2 programs are free and presented by

May 6

10 am - 5 pm Figure Drawing Workshop with Visiting Artist Susan Vecsey This workshop, offered for artists with previous drawing experience, explores the fundamentals of figure drawing from a model. Cost of this workshop is $90, which includes a catered lunch. Space is limited to 15Â students. Adults only. Register at gcma.org.

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Centre Stage Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 7 p.m. | $125 Heavy hors d’oeuvres, drinks, dancing, and a 1920sthemed cabaret. The evening will be spectacular as you are transported to the beautiful and romantic city of Paris. bit.ly/2kQG1mm

MUSIC

Edge of Paradise w/ Black River Rebels, Silver Tongue Devils, & Osara Soundbox Tavern 507 West Georgia Road, Simpsonville, SC 9 p.m. | FREE A great sampling of hard-rock and heavy metal here, but the real band to watch is Black River Rebels, a no-BS Social Distortion-style punk-metal band that pumps like a freight train and puts on a hell of a show. 864-228-7763 | bit.ly/2lmqBL8

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Orchestra and the Furman Singers and Chorales. They close this academic year with a dramatic program including W.A. Mozart’s Coronation Mass in C major, K. 317, and “Death and Transfiguration” by Richard Strauss. Conductors are Furman Music faculty members Thomas Joiner and William Thomas. Furman senior Kevin Edens provides organ accompaniment. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2dSO2qr furmanmusic@furman.edu

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International Ballet Gunter Theater 101 W Broad St. 7:30 p.m. | $35 Artistic director Vlada Kysselova brings a mixed bill of classical and contemporary works to the Gunter Theatre stage, featuring the dramatic third act of the iconic classic “Swan Lake.” International Ballet artist-in-residence Sarah Jung stars alongside returning former National Ballet of Cuba’s Adri‡n Masvidal. Other works will include the classical “Markitenka Pas de Six” and two premier works from International Ballet resident choreographers Alexander Tressor and Juliana Jordan. Tressor’s work features a quirky and entertaining take on the everyday amusements of New York City’s beloved Central Park, while Jordan’s work “Biography” will feature live and original music by local cellist Sharon Gerber. bit.ly/2pi0O5c

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Furman University McAlister Auditorum 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. $12/adults, $10/seniors, $5/students The Furman Department of Music presents the Spring Oratorio, comprised of the Furman Symphony

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Spartanburg Soaring! International Kite Festival

Children’s Playhouse

Chapman Cultural Center Barnet Park 248 E Saint John St., Spartanburg, SC 29603 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE The Chapman Cultural Center is organizing the fourth annual Spartanburg Soaring! This free, family-friendly festival has quickly become a much-anticipated event. Hundreds of kites fill the sky above Barnet Park in downtown Spartanburg complemented by live music, food, and children’s activities. 864-542-1787 | bit.ly/2mJTii7

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Embassy Suites Golf Resort Weekend Package

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Maybird, w/ Sparrows Point & Serotonal Radio Room | 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive 9 p.m. | $7

2017 REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY SUPPORTED BY2017 REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY SUP

The key word for the music of the Brooklyn band Maybird is “atmosphere,” in an almost literal sense. Over simple, folk-style song structures, the band layers billowing clouds of guitars, pierced by bright vocal harmonies that seem to echo off into the distance. It’s a blend of Americana with blissful psychedelia, a heavier version of the euphoric pop of Robyn Hitchcock. And that’s exactly the way the band’s founder, singer/guitarist Josh Netsky, planned it. “What I wanted to do was follow the more traditional song structures of folk and Americana music and add psychedelic elements to that,” he says. “And the band setup that we ended up with lent itself really well to that sound.” In order to create that massive effect over a more skeletal folk song, the band, who released an EP last year on Dangermouse’s 30th Century label, concentrates on finding the right sounds. “After the songs are written, we like to take them to the studio and build as much as we can,” Netsky says. “The layering is the fun part.” —Vincent Harris

2017 REEDY RIVER DUCK DERBY SUP ORTED BY


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MUSIC

Joe’s Place | 640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 7 p.m. | FREE Together S.O.U.L. is a folk duet from the heart of the Blue Ridge composed of Ryan Garst and Emily Kresky. Dreamy harmonies meet sweet guitar lines. Free-spirited musicians with great ambition for the art of songwriting and connection with those who enjoy music and lyrics. 864-558-0828 | bit.ly/2oGurvR

APR. 26 CONCERT

CULTURE « Together S.O.U.L. at Joe’s Place

CHILDREN

Kids’ Festival at Heritage Green

Heritage Green | 420 College St. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. | FREE Kid’s Fest is an annual celebration to kick off the Week of the Young Child. This festival is geared toward our youngest learners and is filled with age-appropriate activities for kids 1-5 years old. Each Heritage Green organization will have a booth on the lawn with opportunities for families to experience what their museum or entity provides our community every day. bit.ly/2oyJGe3

FUNDRAISER

Strike Out Parkinson’s

Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-noon | FREE Mark your calendar this spring for the Fourth Annual Strike Out Parkinson’s community walk. Fundraising teams, corporate sponsors, GAPS members, and the Greenville community are invited to attend this event, which aims to celebrate and support people living with PD in the upstate. Come take a lap around the warning track at Fluor Field, enjoy music and food, and participate in exercise and therapy demonstrations from local partners while learning more about how GAPS supports its members. 905-2574 strikeoutparkinsons2017.myevent.com

COMMUNITY

March for Science Rally

One City Plaza 103 N. Main St. noon-2 p.m. FREE The rally will feature main-stage speakers and will offer an opportunity for participants to interact with scientists and science communicators from several fields as they share their research and discuss their work and its impact on our everyday lives. marchforscience.com

COMMUNITY

Goodstock

The Corey James Memorial Good Time Benefit, Inc. The Wild Ace | 103 Depot St., Greer noon-10 p.m. | FREE The ninth annual free event to raise money for local families in need. The day is filled with family-friendly fun including live music, games, inflatables, food and drink, and prizes that include an HDTV and week at Myrtle Beach condo. All proceeds go directly to local families suffering from life threatening diseases and circumstances. goodtimebenefit.com

COMMUNITY

GCGOP Pre-Convention Breakfast with Reps. Jeff Duncan and Jim Bridenstine

TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive 8-9 a.m. | $10 Make plans to join us at the Greenville County Republican Party Pre-Convention Breakfast. Our special guest speakers will be Congressman Jeff Duncan and Congressman Jim Bridenstine of Oklahoma. conta.cc/2pn8CCA

April B. & The Cool (EP release show)

Vine Nightclub | 21 E. Coffee St. 8 p.m. | $10 (includes copy of EP) Never let it be said that singer/songwriter/guitarist April Bennett doesn’t take risks, artistic and otherwise. Her new EP bears the title “The Sidechick Chronicles: Thanks A Lot, Mr. Scott,” and it’s a concept album about Bennett’s affair with an already-taken man. “It was a bit of a precarious situation,” she says with a laugh (and some understatement). “And it did not go well.” But when the results are as good as this album, the risk might well be worth it. A stripped-down mix of languorous neo-soul and confessional folk with Bennett’s powerful, jazzy voice teasing out the lyrics and stretching the tempos, the album is like a suite of interconnected pieces. It’s a deceptively laid-back, exceptionally produced collection that’s ripe with love, lust, guilt, anger, and recrimination. “Once I started writing it, I knew it all had to be part of a larger work,” she says. “It just had to happen like that.” The EP is a brave artistic statement, from the nakedly emotional lyrics to the partially blacked-out real life Facebook and Instagram messages on the album’s cover. “Everything on the cover is from when the sh*t really hit the fan and his girlfriend went crazy on me. I probably shouldn’t have done that, but I do things I probably shouldn’t all the time..” —Vincent Harris

MUSIC

Greater Clemson Music Festival

Greater Clemson Music Festival Hagood Mill 138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens 11 a.m.-4 p.m. free admission; parking $5 Join us at Hagood Mill on Saturday, April 22, as we host the Greater Clemson Music Festival. This year’s concert on the Hagood Mill stage will feature Donna Kay & The Carousers, along with the Catfish Po’ Boys and the Lions of Zion (LOZ) Band. The event will also include Greater Clemson Music Festival Chairman Vince Jackson presenting tales from his book, “Littlejohn’s Grill,” which gives an insider’s look into the “Chitlin’ Circuit,” the musical underground railroad black musicians traveled during the time of segregation. Some of the greatest musicians from the 1940s to the ‘70s spent time traveling

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AY M LE L I V EN E R G TO G IN M CO

7 & 6

AMAZING. BREATHTAKING. AWE-INSPIRING.

CIRQUE de la SYMPHONIE May 6 at 8:00 pm • May 7 at 3:00 pm Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor THE PEACE CENTER This spectacular and mesmerizing program marries symphonic hits with live, heart-pounding acrobatic feats by some of the world’s greatest cirque artists. Each performance is perfectly choreographed to popular orchestral masterpieces and will astonish and captivate in this incredible, once-in-a-lifetime event. Reserve your seats now before it sells out. For tickets call (864) 467-3000 or purchase online at greenvillesymphony.org.


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017

CULTURE «

and playing this circuit and visited Littlejohn’s Grill as they traveled from New Orleans to New York. Food will be provided on site by Tom’s Tasty Café and Meat’n in the Middle food truck. 864-898-2936 | BillyC@co.pickens.sc.us

SUN

23

COMMUNITY

Roast & Toast: Picnic at the Pavilion

Euphoria | Wyche Pavilion 300 S. Main St. 2-5 p.m. | $65 Join the Euphoria team at the Wyche Pavilion as they kick off the 2017 festival season. They will release their September schedule for the first time and also launch ticket sales for the Euphoria 2017 festival. This kick-off event will feature steamed oysters by Rappahannock Oyster Co., barbecue from one of the South’s best pitmasters, Elliott Moss, and an array of cuisine from local Greenville restaurants. Sit back and relax to the soothing currents of the Reedy River while you sip away on mimosas, refreshing cocktails, crisp wine, or a cold beer. Dance the afternoon away with modern bluegrass tunes by The West End String Band. Sunday Funday never sounded and tasted so good.

MON

24

COMMUNITY

Trappe Door Dinner

Birds Fly South Ale Project 1320 Hampton Avenue 6:309 p.m. | $67.26 Join us for the second annual Pairing Experience with a four-course meal from The Trappe Door and specially crafted brews from Birds Fly South Ale Project. Limited tickets are available for this Monday night collaboration as we kick off Greenville Craft Beer Week in style.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

THU

27

COMMUNITY

BYOB to Joe’s Place

640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 6:30-8:30 p.m. | $10 Do you have a favorite bottle of wine that you’ve been wanting to share? Bring it to our first BYOB event. This is a great opportunity to expand your palate and see what others are recommending. We will provide a couple bottles of wine as well as corkscrews and glassware. There will also be door prizes. Space is limited to 15 people. Call or stop by the store today to reserve your spot. Payment is required at the time of reservation. 864-558-0828 | bit.ly/2oGurvR

MUSIC

Local Green Family Band

NOMA Square | 220 N. Main St. 5:30 p.m. | FREE Less a band than a musical collective, Local Green combines members of the LOZ Band and Soul Service with solo performers like Darby Wilcox and Kelly Jo. For the Family Band performances, the group becomes a human jukebox, cranking out rock, pop, and R&B favorites. bit.ly/2oCpc31

THRU FRI

28

ARTS EVENT

A bold new season at the Brooks Center in 2016-2017

Brooks Center | 141 Jersey Lane, Clemson Admission varies by production Musicians from the Nile region of Africa, dancers from the heart of New York, and theater from the streets of Ireland are among the season’s entertainment at Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. bit.ly/BrooksCenterSchedule

FRI

28

COMMUNITY

“Mutually Exclusive: A One-Act Musical”

The Spinning Jenny | 107 Cannon St., Greer 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. | $7 Come enjoy a staged reading of the premiere of “Mutually Exclusive: A One-Act Musical” by Colton Beach with an optional Q&A with the creative team and talent following each performance. bit.ly/2oyxqtM

MUSIC

Jazz Revolution

NOMA Square | 220 N. Main St. 5:30 p.m. | FREE Moving away from the Southern rock and R&B heavy bands that have populated Main Street Fridays to this point, Jazz Revolution specializes in, you guessed it, jazz and swing music, with occasional dips into Jimmy Smith-style soul jazz. bit.ly/2oepvP7

FRI-SAT

28-29

COMMUNITY

Southern Dreaming

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Road $15-$150 IASD and Hosts Benjamin Whitehurst (Durham, N.C.) and Deborah Armstrong (Greenville) lead this two-day conference on discovering the meaning behind your dreams. Keynotes and symposium topics include the science and psychology of dreaming, lucid dreaming, dreaming as an ‘experience in being,’ dreamwork in spiritual organizations, and dreamwork in southern U.S. culture. The conference also includes a full line of experiential dreamwork and art workshops. Activities include a short-film festival, a visual art exhibition, a live theatrical performance, and a special drumming circle/ ecstatic dance event on Friday night. asdreams.org/regionals/southcarolina2017/

THRU SAT

29

ART

Kelly King Ceramics Exhibit

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Lipscomb Gallery | 15 University St. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | FREE Kelly King is a faculty member at the Fine Arts Center in Greenville, where she teaches sculptural and functional ceramics. Her hand-built ceramics fuse drawing, painting, sculptural elements, and narrative ways in which we shape the natural landscape around us. She takes interest in how suburban ideals organize nature and how the natural world imprints itself upon these manmade constructs.

EDUCATION

Story Time & More

- MAY 11, 2017 -

doors open at 7pm

at revel next to universal joint - STARRING -

Billy Strings for more information call 864-467-3458

greenvilleliteracy.org/lyrics

- SUPPORTING BANDS -

- my gil, my whikey & me - vilai harringto -

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free with admission Join us at Story Time & More for a month of Laura Numeroff ’s stories. 864-233-7755 | info@tcmupstate.org

SAT

29

COMMUNITY

Greenville Humane Society Mutt Strut

Falls Park | 601 S. Main St. 8:30-11:30 a.m. | $25 The Greenville Humane Society has announced the date for the sixth annual Mutt Strut, presented by Papa John’s. The event will take place on Saturday, April 29, from 8:30-11 a.m. on a 2-mile walk/run course through downtown Greenville. The event is a family-friendly, fun, and easy outing for participants and their dogs. This year’s event features a Mutt Market and an after-party throughout Falls Park. Participants will enjoy complimentary refreshments, live entertainment, and plenty of dog-friendly fun. All

proceeds from the Mutt Strut benefit the Greenville Humane Society and the homeless pets in their care. To register for the race as an individual or a team, please visit ghsmuttstrut.com. Registration ends April 26. To inquire about sponsorship or volunteer opportunities, call 864-235-8330. bit.ly/2ngHXbz

COMMUNITY

Community Tap Craft Beer Festival

Flour Field at the West End | 945 S Main St. 2-6 p.m. | $55 Come enjoy this 12th annual festival featuring smallbatch beers, funky seasonals, and one-off selections from over 50 featured breweries along with live music, food, and fun. VIP tickets are limited. bit.ly/2phWTFC

ART

Artist Workshop: Jewelry Cuttlefish Casting

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $89 Learn to cast jewelry or small-scale objects in sterling silver with Athens, Ga., jeweler and wearable art exhibiting artist Barbara Mann. Using the ancient technique of cuttlefish bone casting, students will learn to make molds into which molten metal will be poured. Within minutes after casting, the molds are opened and the metal objects are ready for finishing. Students will learn how to use a jeweler’s saw, hand files, abrasive paper, and how to patina metal and use a rotary tumbler for polishing. Register by Wednesday, April 26. Following the workshop will be a free Meet the Artist with Barbara Mann from 4-5 p.m. bit.ly/2p3olK7

SAT-SUN

29-30

ART

Weaving the Colors of Nature: Intro to Natural Dyes and Tapestry

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. 1-4 p.m. $225 Learn from Charleston-based fiber artist Kristy Bishop how to extract color from natural sources like onion skins and goldenrod to create dye that is lightfast, permanent, and brilliant. Bishop will also introduce several tapestry weaving techniques such as hatching, supplemental weft, Rya knots, and more on hand-built wooden table top looms. All materials, including looms for each student, are included in class fee. Register by Wednesday, April 26. bit.ly/2p3olK7

SAT-SUN

29-07

THEATER

“Seussical”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center 300 S. Main St. various times $27 (adults), $18 (children) Rhyme, dance, and sing with this fantastical, magical, musical extravaganza. The mischievous Cat in the Hat is the master of ceremonies as Dr. Seuss’ beloved tales are brought to life. This fast-paced musical features Horton the Elephant, Gertrude McFuzz, Lazy Mayzie, and all of the Whos in Whoville. So let your toes tap, your fingers snap, and your imagination run wild. See website for performance times. 864-467-3000 scchildrenstheatre.org

THRU SUN

30

ART

Classes at The Art Cellar

223 N. Main St., Suite 12B Check out their website or Facebook for full class descriptions and registration links. 864-520-1653 | bit.ly/2lL1LVL

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APR. 26 https://andrewscotchieandtheriverrats.bandcamp.com/album/live-from-highland-brewing

Sudoku puzzle: page 50

Andrew Scotchie & The River Rats Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 9:30 p.m.| Free

When you hear that Andrew Scotchie & the River Rats are from Asheville, N.C., you might think they’re just another jam-band. But the band creates tight, concise, funky-but-riff-happy songs that are heavy on catchy hooks and singalong choruses. It’s a skill that singer, songwriter, and guitarist Scotchie had to learn before the band formed six years ago. “In 2011, I’d just left a punk band and I wanted to take my music back to the roots, so to speak,” he says. “I’d always written on acoustic instruments, so I took to the streets and started busking with a harmonica player.” With only an instant to capture an audience that was literally passing him by, Scotchie learned how to get people’s attention with catchy songs and keep it with showmanship. “Performing on the street, we had to have a sense of urgency,” he says. “We had to be able to capture people’s attention pretty quickly.” Scotchie recently released a live album with the River Rats called “Live From Highland Brewing.” —Vincent Harris

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SUN

30

MUSIC

Swannanoa Festival Trio

Temple of Israel 400 Spring Forest Road 3 p.m. adults $20, students $5 This distinguished trio featuring pianist Inessa Zaretsky, violinist J Frievogel, and cellist Rachel Frievogel will perform a program that will include the Rachmaninoff Elegiac Trio and other ensemble works. This is the final concert in the Music on Sunday Series and is a prelude to the Swannanoa Festival five-concert series coming this July to the Fine Arts Center. 864-292-1782

ART

Sundays at 2: Artist Demonstration

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2 p.m. Join South Carolina artist Russel Jewel for a demonstration of watercolor painting techniques inspired by the various methods of Andrew Wyeth. 864-271-7570 gcma.org

MAY TUE

02

THEATER

Cesar Chavez, Chautauqua Talk led by Vera Gomez

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Discuss Cesar Chavez’s message of non-violence, protest, and hope with Vera Gomez, workshop facilitator, performance poet, SmartArts’ teaching poet, founding member of Greenville Poetry Slam, president

of Emrys, and author of “Barrio Voices.” For Vera Gomez, the story of Cesar Chavez is not just history. It’s personal. Vera was born to immigrant parents and raised in Lubbock, Texas. Cesar Chavez was the voice that spoke for her family. Vera is a bilingual poet and a firm believer in the power of words. 864-244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

FRI

05

COMMUNITY

La Fiesta

Hispanic Alliance The Old Cigar Warehouse | 912 S. Main St. 6:30 p.m. $90 (early bird ticket, available through March 15); $100 (single ticket) The Hispanic Alliance will host La Fiesta, an evening celebrating Latin cultures in the Upstate. This year’s theme focuses on the blend of Hispanic-American cultures, food, music, and dance. bit.ly/2m1WQzt

SAT

06

SPORTS

Insane Inflatable 5k

Insane Inflatable 5k Heritage Park | 861 SE Main St., Simpsonville $49, $75, $100 Be part of the fun fitness experience. The Insane Inflatable 5K, a run series made up of inflatable objects, will be taking place in more than 120 cities across the U.S. and Canada. The event is coming to Greenville on May 6. The event is a new take on fitness that will challenge everyone from seasoned marathon runners to weekend warriors. The course features a dozen extreme inflatable obstacles and is over 3 miles long. Participants and spectators have access to games, food, beverages, merchandise, and swag from local vendors and sponsors. No matter where you are in your fitness journey, you’ll be sure to have a blast at this event. bit.ly/2lfRaR9

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Crossword puzzle: page 50


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NOW OPEN!

CULTURE « Eric Church CONCERT

Bon Secours Wellness Arena | 650 N. Academy St.

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covers boat handling, anchoring, finding directions, adverse condition, and using the marine radio. This course has been approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators and reecognized by SCDNR and many major insurance carriers and the U.S. Coast Guard. The cost of the course is $50 and $10 for each additional family member. 864-567-1394 bit.ly/2n1vXZD

COMMUNITY

Responsible Dog Owner Day

32 craft taps for pints and growler fills plus hundreds of bottles from craft breweries near and far away!

Greenville Kennel Club Astro Kennels 418 Scuffletown Road, Simpsonville 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE Join the Greenville Kennel Club at Astro Kennels for a Responsible Dog Owner Day celebration. Events include “My Dog Can Do That,” a training and companion sports demonstration; dog dock diving; “Meet the Breeds” learning session; a fun dog show; and more. There will also be Upstate vendors and food trucks. The event is free and open to the public. All leashed and well-behaved dogs are welcome. (Proof of rabies, DHPP, and bordetella vaccination is required for dog entry.) bit.ly/2mfGUGS

1818 AUGUSTA ST., GREENVILLE, SC 29605 | 864 236 8170

COMMUNITY

Reedy River Duck Derby John Peets

See two Eric Church sets in one night on his upcoming Holdin’ My Own Tour. 241-3800 | 800-745-3000 | ticketmaster.com

CHARITY, RECREATION, COMMUNITY

Tails & Trails 5k

Greenville County Animal Care Conestee Park | 601 Fork Shoals Rd. 8:30 a.m. $25/entry+$15 per person for teams of six or more/$30 entry after April 24 This is your chance to help save lives. By starting a team or individual fundraiser for Tails & Trails, you can ask your friends and family to help you reach your goal of raising funds to help build a no-kill community in Greenville County. pchurch@greenvillecounty.org

EDUCATION

America’s Boating Course

Lake Hartwell Sail & Power Squadron Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, #H101 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. | $50 America’s Boating Course, developed by the United States Power Squadron, will be presented by Lake Hartwell Sail & Power Squadron on Saturday, May 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The course will be at Cabela’s on Woodruff Road. The eight-hour course

New course through downtown greenville!

Greenville Rotary Club Falls Park 601 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE Come spend the day in Falls Park and cheer your little yellow duck across the finish line. The day is filled with entertainment from Tim TV and the Secret Cirkus, My Girl Whiskey and Me, Vilai Harrington and the Hamptones, and Morgan Riley. There will be food, face painting, balloon artists, games, and more. bit.ly/2oD2WGQ

SAT-SUN

06-07

CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Cirque de la Symphonie”

Peace Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 3 p.m. $20-80 Our final Masterworks of the 69th concert season comes to a breathtaking conclusion in this spectacular and unique program marrying classical symphonic hits with live, heart-pounding acrobatics. Each performance is perfectly choreographed to popular masterpieces and is sure to astonish and mesmerize in this incredible, once-in-a-lifetime event. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

register online at www.ghsmuttstrut.com

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CULTURE SUN

07

ART

Sundays at 2: Artist Talk with Susan Vescey

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. | 2 p.m. Join us as Susan Vescey shares the inspiration and techniques behind her unconventional landscapes. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org

SUN-SAT

07-13

the Fair”

CONCERT

Greenville Concert Band presents “The Fairest of

May 7 at 3 p.m. at the Cascades at Verdae May 13 at 3:30 p.m. at Rolling Green Village FREE You are invited to take a musical journey with the band as it performs outstanding selections from an eclectic assortment of genres. greenvilleconcertband.org

MON

08

CHARITY

Second Annual Rotary Charities Cup

Pebble Creek, Links Golf Course 101 Pebble Creek Drive, Taylors 8 a.m. | $95 for single player The proceeds from the Second Annual Rotary Charities Cup Golf Tournament, presented by Rush Wilson, will benefit Rotary Charities, a not-for-profit entity affiliated with Rotary Club of Greenville. This captain’s choice tournament will be held at Pebble Creek, Links Golf Course. Breakfast will begin at 8 a.m. with a “shotgun” start at 9 a.m. An awards luncheon will follow the tournament. greenvillerotary.org

TUE

09

CONCERT

Steve Winwood

Peace Concert Hall at the Peace Center 7:30 p.m. | $45-$75

mandolin lessons. Classes are grouped by skill level and will begin on Thursday, May 11, at Trinity UMC. Beginners are welcome. Lessons are open to children (at least 9 years old) and adults. The total fee for six weeks of lessons is $60. Rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. This program supports the nonprofit Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music. 864 979-9188 | susu9196@gmail.com

THU-SUN

11-21

THEATER

“DelikateSSen”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m. | $15-30 When a landmark New York City delicatessen falls on hard times in 1972, the Jewish owners, both concentration camp survivors, are stunned to discover a new German delicatessen preparing to open its doors across the street 233-6733 | centrestage.org

FRI-SUN

12-14

FESTIVAL

Artisphere

Downtown Greenville | FREE Artisphere will present some of the country’s most promising performers and veteran entertainers. After GE Artist Row closes on Main Street, the GSP Airport After Hours Concert Series begins Friday night at 8 p.m. when Southern rock-soul artist Marc Broussard (Carencro, La.) takes the WYFF-4 Main Stage. Opening for Broussard at 6:30 p.m. is rhythm & blues duo Smooth Hound Smith (Nashville, Tenn.). Saturday’s 8 p.m. concert on the Main Stage will feature Gulf Coast soul band The Suffers (Houston, Texas). The Suffers are currently touring Europe leading up to their Artisphere performance. The Suffers’ 6:30 p.m. opening act is neo-folk trio The Ballroom Thieves (Boston). Artisphere will also feature a variety of local culinary delights and rising musicians. bit.ly/2mkeom2

WED

17

COMMUNITY

Book Talk and Signing: Mary Kay Andrews

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road 2 p.m. | $40 You don’t have to own a beach house to enjoy New York Times bestselling author Mary Kay Andrews’ recipes. Meet the author and enjoy some nibbles from her new cookbook, “The Beach House Cookbook,” at her book talk and signing at Fiction Addiction, where Mary Kay will give a talk about her new book, take questions from the audience, and then sign books. Tickets, available online, include one copy of “The Beach House Cookbook” as well as samples to taste. 864-675-0540 bit.ly/2p5G5os

SAT

20

Photo provided by The Peace Center

For more than five decades, Steve Winwood has remained a primary figure in rock ’n’ roll. Bursting into prominence in 1963 with the Spencer Davis Group, Winwood also co-founded Traffic and Blind Faith. His solo career has yielded a rich catalog of popular songs, including “When You See a Chance,” “Valerie,” and “Higher Love.” Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004 and listed among Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Singers of All Time, Winwood remains one of the most influential artists in popular music. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

THU

11

MUSIC

Learn to Play Appalachian Music

Trinity United Methodist Church 2703 Augusta St. | $60 Registration begins April 24 for banjo, guitar, fiddle, or

THEATER PRODUCTION

Centre Stage Series

The Academy of Arts Ministries The LOGOS Theatre | 80 Schools St., Taylors 2-5 p.m. | FREE This exciting recital given by the Academy of Arts Christian Conservatory students will include several cuttings from some of your favorite books and stories of all time. Don’t miss this opportunity to get a glimpse into our unique, hands-on conservatory program and show your support to each student for their hard work. 268-9342 | theAcademyOfArts.org information@theAcademyOfArts.org

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864.679.1205 COMPLAINT NOTICE A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 202 Sunshine Avenue, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0171.00-02-004.00, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before April 27, 2017.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Replacement of 60 Ton HVAC Unit, May 10, 2017, 3:00 P.M., EDT. A pre-bid meeting and site visit will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, April 26, 2017 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. A copy of the solicitation can be obtained from Greenville County’s website at http:// www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling the Procurement Services Division at 864-467-7200.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED FY 2017-2018 OPERATING BUDGET • LAKE CUNNINGHAM FIRE DISTRICT, GREER, SC The Lake Cunningham Fire District hereby gives notice of a public hearing to be held on its proposed operating budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June 30, 2018. The public hearing shall be held on Thursday, May 11, 2017. Location of meeting: Lake Cunningham Fire Department, 2802 N McElhaney Rd, Greer, at 7:00 p.m. REVENUES Current FY-16/17 2,316,670 EXPENDITURES Current FY-16/17 2,316,670

REVENUES Proposed FY-17/18 2,402,700 EXPENDITURES Proposed FY-17/18 2,402,700

% Change 4% % Change 4%

The Mileage for the current Fiscal Year is 32.3 Mills the proposed FY 17-18 is 32.3 Mills. Anyone wishing to be placed on the agenda for public comment should sign up at the LCFD Headquarters five days prior to the meeting. Comments will be limited to 5 (five) minutes per person.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it. PUBLIC NOTICE Powdersville Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact number: 864295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in the Anderson County Summary Court, South Carolina. This mobile home is a 1997 Oakwood mobile home, Model: HONC with serial number HONC02231709A&B and is located at 209 Lois Dr., Anderson, SC 29624. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is Jones Franklin Greer, Jr. and Tammie Taylor Greer, 3533 Keys St., Anderson, SC 29624-4948. The lien holder of record at the SC DMV is Oakwood Acceptance Corp., LLC, 2225 S Holden Rd., Greensboro, NC 27407-4605. Powdersville Holdings, LLC has attempted to contact both Richard Morgan Reese and The Peoples Bank by regular mail and certified letters to inform them of the matter.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greenville Pool Club intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 600 S. Main Street Suite 700, Greenville SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 23, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that AG Holdings, LLC /DBA Golden Brown and Delicious intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1269 Pendleton Street, Greenville SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 23, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2016-CP-23-02959 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the benefit of the Certificate holders of Equity One ABS, Inc. Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Christopher Harrell; Greenville County DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 12, 2016; and the Amended Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina on January 14, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

PUBLIC HEARING There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 10, 2017 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-17-12 APPLICANT: WINDWARD PARTNERS IV, LP/ADC Engineering TAX MAP#: 0538.13-01-001.03 & 0538.13-01-001.05 LOCATION: 5000 & 5008 Old Spartanburg Rd, Taylors SC REQUEST: Rehearing of Appeal to the Zoning Administrator’s decision that use of the Planned Development for Gas Sales would be a Major Change of Use. CB-17-19 APPLICANT: FEW PROPERTIES, LLC/Erik Horton, P.E. TAX MAP#: 0538.01-01-025.14 & 0538.01-01-025.03 LOCATION: 4501 Old Spartanburg Road #9, Taylors SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow expansion of an existing nonconforming use. CB-17-20 APPLICANT: JOE SCOTA/GARY HUGHEY TAX MAP#: 0538.03-01-006.01 LOCATION: 607 Brushy Creek Road, Taylors SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow expansion of an existing nonconforming use. CB-17-21 APPLICANT: RICK QUINN/ SLLIM, LLC TAX MAP#: 0106.00-05-011.00 LOCATION: 10 Mission Street, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from FRONT Setback requirement for construction of a singlefamily residence on site CB-17-22 APPLICANT: RICK QUINN TAX MAP#: 0106.00-05-002.00 LOCATION: 2 Mission Street, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from FRONT Setback requirement for construction of a singlefamily residence on site CB-17-23 APPLICANT: MILESTONE COMMUNICATIONS/VERIZON WIRELESS/Jonathan Yates TAX MAP#: 0538.02-01-002.06 LOCATION: 4806 Old Spartanburg Road, Taylors SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow installation of a 120-ft Monopole communications facility on R-12 CB-17-24 APPLICANT: HAMPTON STATION./Alex Acree TAX MAP#: 0139.00-01-001.00 LOCATION: 1320 Hampton Avenue Ext., Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from the FRONT Setback requirement for construction of a deck on site CB-17-25 APPLICANT: CAMPBELL YOUNG LEADERS/William Brown TAX MAP#: B007.00-01001.00/B007.00-01-018.00/ B007.00-01-017.00/B007.0001-019.00/ B007.00-01020.00/007.00-01-013.01/ B007.00-01-073.00 LOCATION: 104 Farrs Bridge Road; 113, 115 & 121 Hunts Bridge Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for construction/ operation of a “School, Primary/ Secondary” on O-D/C-1.


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.21.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Odd Musical Couple ACROSS

1 Travel aimlessly 5 Sport- — (vehicle) 8 Marsh fuel 12 See 124-Down 15 “Well, this — surprise!” 18 Extents of estates 20 Enjoying an African trek 22 Biscotti tidbit 23 Start of a riddle 25 Swaying to and — 26 “Heaven Can Wait” director Lubitsch 27 “... — will!” 28 Diplomatic agent 29 Do injury to 30 Keeps hold of 33 Brit’s 26th letter 35 Religious recluse 37 Riddle, part 2 42 Little guys 46 Socratic “T” 47 Inch or mile 48 Garden flowers, informally 49 Riddle, part 3 55 Part of a list 56 Thing pulled by a milker 57 Prefix with flooey 58 Mexican moola 59 Desertlike 60 Little tyke 62 Animal pen 66 “— a loss for words”

68 Bar drink 69 Riddle, part 4 73 To the — power 76 Replay mode, briefly 77 Sandy color 78 Crotchety 80 Runaway GI 83 Seized auto, e.g. 85 Ending for count 88 Made less harsh 89 Good score in diving 90 Riddle, part 5 95 Lauder of fragrances 97 James of “Slither” 98 “How pretty!” 99 “On the subject of ...” 100 End of the riddle 106 Inhale 107 “— Bravo” 108 50-50 chances 113 Barren 114 Pottery, e.g. 117 Trident, e.g. 119 The Evil One 120 Pig — poke 121 Riddle’s answer 125 VIP on the Hill: Abbr. 126 Move to a new post 127 Iffy issue 128 Equine critter 129 Get a total 130 Hefty volume 131 Put in words 132 Got hold of

By Frank Longo

DOWN

1 Less cooked 2 Colour in a landscape 3 “Looks — everything” 4 High-IQ organization 5 “I hate this!” 6 Driver’s prop 7 Gas brand up north 8 Forks over 9 Many an MIT grad 10 “Even — speak ...” 11 Little mountain lake 12 Spiritual goal of Zen Buddhism 13 Hunted, with “on” 14 Lung-filling stuff 15 Inspire with foolish passion 16 Cry uncle 17 The “H” or “O” of H2O 19 Stuffy room 21 Footrace a little over 3.1 mi. long 24 Rice-sized pasta 29 Hatchet man’s roster 31 — one (zip) 32 Kiss noise 34 Chinese statesman — Xiaoping 36 Chow mein additive, for short 38 Immaculate 39 Co. board member 40 At the apex

41 J.D. Salinger heroine Maple — 115 Lickety-split 42 Actress Innes 104 Time piece? 116 The Magi, e.g. 43 Vocalist Paula 105 Optional SAT part 118 Fanzines, say 44 Evade slyly 109 Egypt’s Anwar 121 Musical syllable 45 Litigious one 110 In — (as yet unborn) 122 “Grand Hotel” studio 50 Fishing net 111 — diet (trendy 123 Big inits. for hunters 51 Black-and-white whale regimen) 124 With 12-Across, mud 52 Figure skater Johnny 112 Act stealthily wrap locale 53 Morales of “NYPD Blue” 113 Big name in credit 54 Lover of Juliet cards Crossword answers: page 47 61 “American Beauty” actress Birch 63 Ending for Gator 64 Big name in SUVs by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 65 Cochlea locale 67 Madison Ave. solicitor 70 Future sign 71 Ray of — 72 Feels regret over 73 Ibis’ homes 74 Fido’s prize 75 Prefix with carbon 76 Rained pellets of ice 79 Probe org. 80 From the top 81 Pulled chicken leftovers? 82 Ottawa natives 84 Start of a fairy tale 86 Clog, for one 87 Oilcan part 91 Rove 92 Lion’s home 93 Native resident 94 Extremely, informally 96 Greek vowel 101 Hankered 102 Bobbin stuff Sudoku answers: page 47 103 NHL’s Toronto Medium

Sudoku


04.21.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Past and Present with Courtney L. Tollison Hartness, Ph.D.

Interns are shaping their own future — and ours Every April, college students across the country wind down classes and endure grueling final exams. They move out of their residence halls and often embark on a summer job or internship. It is an intense and exciting time. Over the past several decades, college students who strive to distinguish themselves increasingly seek real-world experiences. Nowadays, graduate programs and many employers expect young applicants to not only have performed well in their college courses, but to also have enhanced their undergraduate careers with several internships and nontraditional learning experiences. Though most colleges and universities now fully embrace and fervently encourage students to partake in internships during the summer and throughout the academic year, higher education didn’t always prioritize such experiences, as the marketplace didn’t demand them to the extent they do today. In the late 1990s under then-President David Shi, Furman University became a national leader in what Shi termed “engaged learning,” described as a “problem-solving, projectoriented, and research-based educational philosophy that encourages students to put into practice the theories and methods learned from texts or lectures.” Engaged learning experiences include nontraditional educational experiences that go beyond that of classroom lectures, such as independent study courses between a professor and a student, study away experiences around the world, summer research projects, service learning in the community and beyond, and internships. When I interned at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History after my junior year in college, my decision to go to Washington, D.C., for the summer to engage in curatorial research was somewhat unusual. Today, college students compete for experiences locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. My internship at the Smithsonian was incredibly affirming, and solidified my career path. Nontraditional learning experiences have the power to inspire, motivate, and mold lives, which is why Furman, in an effort to best prepare our graduates for life beyond college and ensure that the quality of the Furman experience remains among the best, announced The Furman Advantage last year.

This initiative builds upon Furman’s strong foundation of engaged learning and includes a commitment to each student that he or she will graduate having had at least one engaged learning experience. In preparation for the centennial of U.S. entry into World War I, commemorated on Thursday, April 6, five Furman students and one recent graduate have worked in

University to earn joint degrees in the history of medicine and in public health. Another student is working alongside a physician at Vanderbilt University Hospital this summer and hopes to attend medical school when she graduates. This summer, one more student will join the team. She is a political science major who aspires to a career in city government and is already a member of the National Guard.

Nowadays, graduate programs and many employers expect young applicants to not only have performed well in their college courses, but to also have enhanced their undergraduate careers with several internships and nontraditional learning experiences. collaborative, engaged learning endeavors with me over the course of this past academic year. Together, we have researched the war’s impact on Greenville and the contributions of this area to the war effort. We have also studied how the war brought in federal dollars, generating an economic boom that brought significant progress to this area during the war and continuing through the 1920s. We curated an exhibit titled “Over Here, Over There: Greenville and the Great War.” We worked with three community organizations, gave several lectures off and on campus, and engaged in interviews with local media. We continue to research and contribute to a lengthier written study of Greenville and World War I as well. The work of these students has been organized through various means. Some participated through an independent study, in which a student receives academic credit for researching alongside a faculty member. Two of the students have been supported by a Furman program that pays students to work with professors during the summer months. Another two have been recipients of a fellowship that supports joint student-faculty projects. These students bring a diversity of talents and interests to this project. One is working toward a Ph.D. in Chinese history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Two are graduating: One hopes to study Native American history and become a museum curator, while the other plans to attend graduate school at Johns Hopkins

Through this experience, these students have improved their public speaking skills. They have learned to write and speak to different audiences and have gained the confidence that comes with representing their university off campus and engaging with professionals in the field. They have learned to prioritize and manage their time. Historical research is a lot like detective work; some paths yield results, some don’t. To that end, each of them has become more resourceful in their efforts to creatively problem-solve. As a result of these experiences, they have gained confidence and intellectual maturity. They have learned what it means to truly invest one’s self in a project that matters beyond the grade. They will be able to reflect on their college years and know that they contributed something lasting and meaningful to the community they called home for four years. Internships and other forms of engaged learning can be highly influential and compelling. Inherent in them is the potential for young people to grow independently in ways that will help them throughout their lives and their careers, to learn their preferences and inclinations, and to become more confident in their abilities to contribute positively and productively to our society as they progress through their lives. Dr. Courtney L. Tollison Hartness teaches history at Furman University. She can be reached at courtney.tollison@furman.edu.


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D

April 21, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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