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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, March 27, 2020 • Vol. 23, No. 13

EMPTY TABLES, WORRIED MINDS

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

Small restaurants may face big trouble during dining shutdown

Pictured: The Schweitzer/Ortiz family of Luna Rosa Gelato Cafe | photo by BONFIRE VISUALS

Helping our members prosper since 1968. Here for you then, here for you now. Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Greenville County to join. © 2020, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved.

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Helping our members prosper since 1968. Here for you then, here for you now.

GREENVILLE JOURNAL

WITH, FOR, & ABOUT

GREENVILLE, SC PUBLISHER Mark B. Johnston GENERAL MANAGER Susan Schwartzkopf ACCOUNTING AND HR MANAGER Kristi Fortner

publication

E XECUTIVE EDITOR Sherry Jackson WRITERS Alex Cooper, Anna Lee, Evan Peter Smith DESIGN Michael Allen, Laura Allshouse, Kim Collier, Luke Gonzales DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER John Olson

operations

VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS Holly Hardin DISTRIBUTION Marla Lockaby

sales

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DE VELOPMENT Donna Johnston S ALES OPERATIONS MANAGER Meredith Rice ACCOUNT MANAGER Callie Michalak REL ATIONSHIP MANAGER Anita Harley MARKE TING REPS Heather Propp, Mary Hill, Michelle Fleury CLIENT SERVICES Lizzie Campbell, Georgia Gay CHAIRMAN Douglas J. Greenlaw WE WELCOME RE ADER FEEDBACK!: sherry@communityjournals.com INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US?: info@communityjournals.com POSTMASTER Send address changes to: The Greenville Journal, P.O Box 2266, Greenville, S.C. 29602 or 581 Perry Ave. Greenville, S.C. 29611. All remittances should be made in the form of check, express money orders or personal checks. The Greenville Journal cannot be responsible for currency unless sent by registered mail. © 2020 published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Community Journals. No part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Greenville County to join.

publishers of

581 Perry Ave. Greenville SC, 29611 (864) 679-1200 greenvillejournal.com

800.336.6309 • www.greenvillefcu.com

The Legacy Continues.

© 2020, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Specific services, rates, and fees may vary. Member NCUA.

Since 1913, the McAfee family has been part of the Greenville community. Tommy and John McAfee are proud to introduce the fifth generation of the firm. Downtown Chapel, (864) 232-6733 Northwest Chapel & Cremation Center, (864) 294-6415 Southeast Chapel, (864) 688-1600 Tommy McAfee, Elizabeth McAfee, Jay McAfee and John McAfee

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

thomasmcafee.com


FIRST LOOK

TOUR THESE BEAUTIFUL HOMES FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR OWN HOME

VIRTUAL OPEN HOUSE Sunday, March 29 • 2 - 3 PM For links to tour these properties go to:

facebook.com/joanherlongSIR Look for our social media post at facebook.com/joanherlongSIR

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112 Welling Circle · Hollingsworth Park $3,499,607 · Hosted by Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

14 Bella Citta Court · Montebello $1,569,609 · Hosted by Leah Grabo 864.901.4949

4031 Pennington Road · Greer · $899,651 Hosted by Christy Ross 864.381.2626

1 Hermosa Court · Thornblade · $879,650 Hosted by Laura Campuzano 917.826.8056

19 Woodvale Ave. · GCC Area · $824,605 Hosted by Grace Herlong Loveless 864.660.3925

154 Riverplace, Unit 203 · Downtown · $799,601 Hosted by Alexis Furman 864.630.3952

Greenville restaurants like Luna Rosa look for ways to keep going in spite of the coronavirus pandemic | photo BONFIRE VISUALS

IN THIS ISSUE

4 The Scoop with Amy Doyle: What is the Greenco building on Poinsett Hwy? 9 Meeting your grocery needs in the midst of a pandemic 12 Delve into the Hipp family history and their impact on Greenville 30 When the lights go out in Greenville theaters, what is the financial impact?

WORD OF THE WEEK

Virtuoso:

(noun) a person highly skilled in music or another artistic pursuit. Page 31 49 Paddington Ave. · Avondale West · $759,609 217 Cammer Ave · Augusta Road · $719,605 Hosted by Charee McConchie 864.419.4554 Hosted by Taylor Mitchell and Beth Nichols 864.991.9121 240.538.2721

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This week you'll notice things are a little different. The Upstate Business Journal has been printed as pages within the Greenville Journal instead of a separate publication. In these uncertain times, we are constantly evaluating our print publication to keep costs down, while also providing our readers the best possible experience. Remember, together we can get through this. #CommunityUnited

Each affiliate independently owned and operated.

864.297.3450 www.jha-SothebysRealty.com MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

THERAPY FOR EVERYBODY To our friends, family, and community At Elite Integrated Therapy Centers, we are committed to providing our patients and team members with a safe and healthy clinic environment. While we remain operational, we are closely monitoring updates from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization regarding COVID-19. We are adhering to guidance provided by these agencies and public health officials to keep our patients and team members well informed as new details become available. During this time of new challenges and uncharted territories, Elite Integrated Therapy Centers are providing the following services:

Clinic Availability: For those who are able, our clinics will remain open for appointments. We are taking all the necessary precautions on a daily basis… • We are screening current and new patients, as well as our team members, using a series of questions about the status of their health as well as the health of those that they have come into contact with. • We have intensified our housekeeping and infection control procedures. • We are continuing to sanitize all workspace and patient care spaces on a consistent basis. • We have continued to be diligent about the use of hand sanitizer and antibacterial soap and have asked all patients and staff to wash hands and/or sanitize hands when entering and leaving the clinic.

Home Visits: For those who are at high risk, or those who must discontinue therapy services in the clinic setting, we are offering therapy services in the home: • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Therapy

the with

NEED TO KNOW

SCOOP

Amy Doyle

What is the Greenco building on Poinsett Hwy? Greenco Beverage Co. is a local beverage distributor that has been in operation since 1916. It is now in its sixth location in a newly built warehouse and distribution center on Poinsett Highway.

WHO RUNS THIS COMPANY?

Greenco Beverage has a long Greenville history and remains a family business with its third famGreenco president Russell Farr | PROVIDED ily — the Farrs — as the current owners. Judd Farr purchased the business from second owner Robert Jolley in 1965. When Farr retired, his wife, Betty Farr, stepped in to keep it a family business, and she remains the CEO today. Betty Farr was not new to running a business — she had owned Betty’s School of Dance on Augusta Road. Her first action as Greenco Beverage CEO: installing a board of directors. “I wanted good expert advice before I went to a bank to borrow money,” she says.

AND NOW?

Decades later, Betty Farr’s seven children have grown the business, are all owners and many still work there daily. Current president Russell Farr has a business card with the title “Slinger of Suds.” He carries a flip phone, rattles off industry numbers and proudly shows black-and-white company photos in the employee break room.

WHY POINSETT HIGHWAY?

Betty Farr laughs recalling when she had to pick up her husband from work by boat because their Welborn Street location was underwater (the former location is now the site for Unity Park in West Greenville). Being near a neighborhood was important to the Farrs. Across the country their peer distributorships were relocating to frontage roads near major highways for convenience, but the family wanted the business to remain part of a community. “We wanted to be near a neighborhood and a labor pool,” Russell Farr says, “where an employee could walk to work.”

TRENDING UP?

Resource availability: Over the recent weeks and moving forward, we are providing up-to-date information and resources on our social media pages: Facebook & Instagram. Be sure to “Like” or “Follow” our pages to stay informed! Continuing our patients’ progress in therapy prevents regression or worsened symptoms of pain or injury, which is why we have chosen to remain available to those who need us the most. And as always, we’ve

|

got you covered…

The Farrs have grown the business from $13 million in sales in 2004 to $75 million in 2019. A hundred years ago, the bottling company bottled several colas, including ginger ale. Now, Greenco Beverage Co. sells more than 2,100 different products, with 25% in soda sales (the majority is beer and specialty products). Russell Farr attributes the strong growth to positive population growth and innovation within the industry.

WHAT’S THE NATIONAL FORECAST FOR THIS INDUSTRY?

U.S. hop acreage has doubled since 2012, according to The New Brewer 2019 world harvest report. The three big barley-producing states are Montana, Idaho and North Dakota. The crop production demand continues to grow due largely to a response in the craft beer market.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR GREENCO BEVERAGE?

The Farrs want their business to be part of the growing Greenville community. The majority of their customers are within 17 miles of the warehouse. Similarly, textile mill communities were built on the work-live concept. The warehouse sits in the middle of several communities — the Poe Mill, City Heights and Brutontown neighborhoods. The family is looking to expand the company warehouse size and grow the business. While you can stop and have a quick Duke’s sandwich on Poinsett Highway — a bargain $2.50 pimento cheese sammy — this corridor is becoming a place with a growing number of jobs for the nearby neighborhoods.

With 10 convenient locations | No referral required In the greater Greenville area, call 864-233-5128

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

The Scoop is a biweekly column that keeps you in the know. Amy Ryberg Doyle served for 12 years on Greenville City Council. She is married and has four children. An outdoors enthusiast, she likes to bike, swim and run, but not all in that order. She power-naps daily.


NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

COMMUNITY

Beat the social-distance blues with these local activities Stuck inside during the coronavirus pandemic? Don’t fret. With schools closed, concerts and shows postponed and even March Madness canceled, we’ve compiled a list of things you can mostly do from the safety of your germ-free home.

DID YOU KNOW?

Library card holders can also access free digital subscriptions to The New York Times

Greenville County library branches may be

closed, but the online library is open 24/7. Read an e-book or magazine, download music or movies or check out an audiobook. You can even check out e-books on your mobile device by downloading the (free) Libby app. All you need is a library card. Reading not your thing? Check out Creativebug, which has thousands of award-winning art & craft video classes taught by design experts and artists. Your library card buys you unlimited access. Visit greenvillelibrary.org/your-onlinelibrary.

Bike the Prisma Health Swamp Rabbit Trail. If you live in

Greenville County, chances are you live near a spur off the 22-mile multiuse greenway. From downtown Travelers Rest, it’s roughly a 10-mile ride to Greenville’s Cleveland Park with lots of scenery to take in. A mobile-friendly interactive map shows points of interest along the trail, including access points and parking and the all-important restrooms. Just remember to keep the appropriate distance from your fellow cyclists.

n story by ANNA LEE

Virtual yoga – it’s a thing. Indigo Flow & Art in the Village of West Greenville broadcasts live every day. Registration for Indigo’s online classes is easy peasy – just sign up through their website, indigoflowandart. com, and follow the prompts. The studio has also created a quick tutorial video to walk you through the process. Find them on Facebook at Indigo Flow & Art.

Meet the critters at the Greenville Zoo. The zoo may be closed, but the caretakers have started airing live videos of educational encounters (10:30 a.m. Tuesday-Thursday) and keeper check-ins (2:30 p.m. Monday-Friday) on their Facebook page. Popular videos include a romp with the coatimundi (South American raccoons) and quality time with the giraffes.

Explore the Underground Railroad through the Upcountry History Museum. Like everything else, this exhibit is closed, but you can still learn about Harriet Tubman’s South Carolina connection and other important figures through a collection of documentaries, news articles and Instagram accounts available on the Upcountry History Museum’s website. An online program on the women’s suffrage movement is also available.

Heating & Cooling from the Ground Up A geothermal heat pump is the greenest, most efficient and cost effective heating and cooling system available. With rebates and tax credits available, this may be just the heating/cooling system you need. Let the energy experts answer your questions. Call us at 800-240-3400 or visit blueridge.coop/gogeo.

Geothermal Heat Pumps from WaterFurnace®

A Service of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op * Some products may be available to Blue Ridge Electric Co-op members only. MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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FEATURED

|

FROM THE COVER

Perseverance in the pandemic Local restaurants like Luna Rosa hope for the best but brace for the worst n story by EVAN PETER SMITH | photos by BONFIRE VISUALS

L

auren Ortiz couldn’t sleep. She lay in bed around 3 a.m., her whole body vibrating with anxiety. It had been two days since Gov. Henry McMaster ordered all restaurants to cease dine-in service in an effort to stall the spread of the coronavirus. Ortiz, who runs Luna Rosa Gelato Café & Restaurant in downtown Greenville with her family, now didn’t know how she was going to keep the business afloat. The truth is, she still doesn’t know. “I feel like we’re in a movie,” she said the next morning, seated at the bar inside Luna Rosa, a strong cup of coffee in hand. “I’m so heartbroken. At this point, we’re just hoping we can feed our immediate family.” It’s a key distinction, the fact that she said “immediate family,” because she often talks about her family at Luna Rosa being more than just her husband, her parents and her two school-age children. Some of her employees have been at the restaurant for almost a decade, and within the span of just a few days, she had to lay off all 20 of them.

We’re going to keep going. And to everybody else out there, that’s the only thing I can say to you: Just keep going. -Linda Schweitzer, Luna Rosa

Jose Ortiz mans the phone, taking orders for curbside pickup. Customers should call ahead to place their orders.

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“If I were a bigwig, without question I’d pay my staff until we got through this,” Ortiz said. “But I’m not a bigwig. That’s the honest truth.” Luna Rosa has been open in Greenville since 2007, the passion project of Ortiz and her husband, Jose Ortiz, along with her parents, Richard and Linda Schweitzer. The restaurant spent 10 years on West Washington Street before moving in 2019 to its current location on South Main Street. That move required a significant investment, which is a concern now that two of Luna Rosa’s most lucrative months appear to be wiped away all but entirely. “Everything we have is in here,” said, Richard Schweitzer, as he took a short break from preparing that day’s takeout orders.


FROM THE COVER

There are more than 1 MILLION restaurants across the country

90%

are small businesses

FOOD DELIVERY only accounts for 3% OF SALES across the restaurant industry

For now, that’s all Luna Rosa’s owners can do. They hope customers will keep calling to place orders and keep picking up food from the curbside area they’ve set up outside, but business has nevertheless dried to a trickle. “And I can’t even blame them,” Lauren Ortiz said. “How do you deal with that balance? The news is telling everyone to stay home, so how do I selfishly say, ‘Please come and support our business so we can stay open?’ I’m worried too. My daughter has ulcerative colitis, which means she gets an infusion to suppress her immune system, and I don’t know what happens if she gets sick. That scares the ever-living hell out of me. My parents are healthy, but they’re 68 and 70, and I just worry that something might – ” “Hey, it’s OK. Stop yelling,” Richard Schweitzer said. He smiled at his daughter, then added, “Our family, we have a tendency to be very loud.” Or maybe it was just because voices inside Luna Rosa carried more than ever this morning. After all, the restaurant was empty.

‘WE NEED ACTION’

Luna Rosa is one restaurant, one family. But there are more than 1 million restaurants across the country, employing about 15.6 million people. And 90% of these restaurants are small businesses with fewer than 50 employees, according to the National Restaurant Association. For an industry that is already operating on margins as thin as 3%, according to the point of sale and restaurant analytics company Toast, the impact of widespread closures or limited service due to the coronavirus pandemic is especially brutal. Restaurants are expected to lose upward of $225 billion in sales, or about a quarter of total sales for the year, according to the restaurant trade group. While many restaurants — Luna Rosa included — are still operating with takeout and delivery services, that’s not enough to get by. Deliveries only account for about 3% of sales across the restaurant industry, according to the data analytics

firm NPD Group. Restaurants with bigger pockets or multiple locations might be able to weather the storm, but countless small restaurants, which make up the vast majority of the industry, may be forced to close their doors for good. “It’s devastating,” said David Howard, president of The Neighborhood Dining Group, which operates restaurants across the South, including Husk in Greenville. Howard shut down the group’s restaurants for the foreseeable future, offering employees pay and health care until April, but he said even that amount of staff assistance is impossible for most restaurants.

Luna Rosa has been open in Greenville since 2007 Howard predicts small, independent restaurants like Luna Rosa will be hit the hardest. Despite four decades in the restaurant industry himself, the unprecedented nature of the past few weeks has left Howard at a complete loss for any words of advice to give. “What could I even say to them?” he said. “It sounds hokey, but if I were standing there looking at them, I don’t think I would say anything to them. I would just give them a hug — but no, I can’t even do that anymore. We need help. We need action. We need leaders to step up and make this right.”

istration disaster relief loan form, at one point breaking down in tears as his web browser’s window closed unexpectedly. The maze-like complexities of the SBA loan form only added to his uncertainty. His family was prayed-out and yet still folding their hands, still nodding their heads. He already knows they won’t be able to pay the rent. The family is hoping something happens, some kind of relief is offered, even if they don’t know what that something is. No one else, not the government or industry peers, seems to know what it is either. Meanwhile, the Ortiz’s two children were here as well. Now that schools are closed and the whole family was running the restaurant on their own without staff, this was the only place for them. Luca Ortiz, age 7, played games on his iPad at the empty bar, while 12-year-old Mia Ortiz walked in with her backpack, ready to do some schoolwork in the dining area, where customers once sipped wine and laughed over homemadestyle baked ziti and paninis. Mia Ortiz is old enough to know something is wrong, but her mother tells her not to worry. A few days earlier, the preteen had walked in and asked her mom if they would have to close the restaurant forever. Now, thinking on that, Lauren Ortiz could only sip her coffee and shake her head. “She said to me, ‘Mom, this is our legacy, though,’” she said. “Because Mia was just 4 months old when we opened the place. This has been her whole existence. I told her, ‘It’s not for you to worry about.

employing

|

FEATURED

fewer than 50 people

restaurants are expected to lose $225 BILLION in sales or about 25% of yearly sales

This is only a building.’ I don’t need her losing sleep over this. But that’s what happens when you have a close family. I can only shield her from so much.” For now, the family is taking it day by day. Lauren Ortiz's mother, coming out of the kitchen, stood by the bar with her gloved hands hanging at her sides. “We’re going to keep going,” Linda Schweitzer said. “And to everybody else out there, that’s the only thing I can say to you: Just keep going.”

We need help. We need action. We need leaders to step up and make this right. -David Howard, president, The Neighborhood Dining Group

At that very moment, the quiet restaurant was interrupted by a sudden noise, which echoed over the obsessively sanitized surfaces of the empty tables and chairs. For the family, it was the best sound in the world. The phone was ringing. With a gloved hand, Jose Ortiz was quick to answer it, saying the words he and his family hope more than anything they’ll be able to keep saying: “Luna Rosa Gelato Café & Restaurant. How can we help you?”

‘JUST KEEP GOING’

Inside Luna Rosa, the family was nearly ready to open for takeout orders and delivery, even if they weren’t holding out much hope for an especially busy day. Jose was preparing the front for curbside orders. Lauren Ortiz was working back in the kitchen with her mother, Linda, while her father, Richard, sat at the bar tapping through forms on the computer. He had worked from 3 p.m. until 11 p.m. the night before filling out a Small Business AdminMARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

NEWS

Greenville’s Finance Empowerment Center helps plan a better future n story by ALEX COOPER | photo PROVIDED

2 • 0 • 2 • 0

READER’S

LENS PHOTO CONTEST

The Greenville Journal invites you to share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer. Each month Editor’s Choice winner will win a $50 gift card to an Upstate business. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an Upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal. APRIL 2020 THEME:

FLOWER POWER For details on each month’s contest, or to submit your photo and vote, visit:

GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

Finance can be a stressful subject for many. One program at the Greenville County Human Relations Commission hopes to change that. The Greenville Finance Empowerment Center, created in 2019, is there to help with financial planning. The center organizes outreach programs such as classes on predatory lending and student loan management. While those classes have been canceled for now due to the coronavirus outbreak, the center is hoping to have a class on medical debt in May. But these classes are only “a first step,” says Luke Crumbaker, a program manager at the center. Crumbaker says that their “bread and butter service” is the one-on-one financial counseling they conduct with households — individuals or families.

Financial insecurity is the same across the board.” - Luke Crumbaker, program manager, Greenville Finance Empowerment Center “Finances are very intimate,” Crumbaker says. “Folks feel like there’s some type of stigma around money.” In order to help their clients, the financial counselors at the center paint a positive picture of what could be and help holds clients accountable to their financial goals. Those plans are customized to that household. Counselors help clients track debt, credit, expenses and savings, says Crumbaker. “We help folks improve or decrease as needed,” he says. Standard tips include cooking at home instead of eating out at restaurants and avoiding hefty cable packages and data plans that

Since January 2019 clients have:

REDUCED DEBT BY OVER

$150,000 ADDED TO SAVINGS BY OVER

$116,000

will go unused, says Crumbaker. But each client is different — like one of Crumbaker’s clients, a truck driver, who just can’t possibly eat three or even two meals of his day at home. Since starting up at the end of January 2019, they’ve already made an impact. Their clients have reduced their debt by over $150,000, and they’ve added over $116,000 in savings, according to the center. Those clients run the gamut of low-income folks to those making six figures. “Financial insecurity is the same across the board,” Crumbaker says. “If it’s bothering you, it’s the same feeling of stress.” Now with COVID-19, Crumbaker wants people to know that the center is there when the Upstate needs it. “As soon as the smoke clears a little bit, I think everyone is predicting some major financial disruptions going on in our world,” Crumbaker says. “We’re going to be looking at folks who have either lost a lot of money or who are very short on liquid savings coming out of this.” More information on the services offered by the Greenville Finance Empowerment Center is available at greenvillefec.com or 864-467-7503. Clients must be 18 years or older, and Spanish-speaking counselors are available.


NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

NEWS

Grocery stores change hours, impose restrictions during COVID-19 outbreak n story by ANNA LEE | photo PROVIDED

T H E O N LY FULL CONTINUUM OF CARE IN GREENVILLE.

It’s a familiar sight by now. You walk into a grocery store hoping to pick up a few items on your list only to find row after row of eerily empty shelves. Toilet paper is gone. Chicken, milk, eggs and canned spaghetti — all gone. Hand sanitizer has been gone for weeks.

We are working with our suppliers to source as much additional product as we can to keep our distribution centers stocked.” - statement released by Aldi

U.S. Walmart stores, said in a release. Stores are also hosting an hour-long senior shopping event every Tuesday through April 28 for customers ages 60 and older. The event takes place an hour before stores open.

ALDI

Cascades Verdae is designed with one purpose in mind, to help our residents enjoy their families and friends and remain independent as they age. We do this by providing Greenville with the premier Full Continuum of Care.

Call Us Today • (864) 606-3055

Purchase limits are in place for multiple items, including ibuprofen, liquid bleach, hand soap, all paper products and water, according to a sign posted at the Aldi location on North Pleasantburg Drive. Canned goods are also limited to four per variety. “We are working with our suppliers to source as much additional product as we can to keep our distribution centers stocked,” a release said.

PUBLIX Amid the coronavirus pandemic, grocery stores are getting cleared of essential items as shoppers empty shelves of everything from frozen waffles to dill relish. Facing the surge of demand, many Greenville-area grocery stores are limiting purchases of items to try to tamp down hoarding. Others, including Walmart, Ingles and Publix, have changed their store hours, giving them more time to restock shelves. Here are some of the changes to expect the next time you decide to brave the aisles.

WALMART

Hours have been adjusted to 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. “This will further help associates restock the shelves for customers while continuing to clean and sanitize the store,” Dacona Smith, CEO and executive vice president of

Stores are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The grocery chain said in a release that closing two hours early will give employees time to restock produce and sanitize shelves. The store is also designating 7-8 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday mornings as senior shopping hours for customers age 65 and older. Purchase limits are currently in place for milk, eggs and paper products.

INGLES

Store hours are from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Ingles is dedicating the first shopping hour on Tuesdays and Wednesdays to senior shoppers and “those with compromised immune systems,” according to the chain grocery’s website. “As demand remains high for certain products (like cleaning products, medicine, toilet paper, etc.) we are sending products to our stores as quickly as possible.”

Independent Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Skilled Nursing • Rehab Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

10 Fountainview Terrace, Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

ART IN FOCUS

PARADIGM PATHWAY artist: stephen kishel

WORK SOMEWHERE AWESOME NOW HIRING FOR SUMMER:             Â Â Â?Â?Â?  Â?Â? 

 Â?Â?Â?Â? ­­ € ­ ­Â?‚   

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

COMPLETED 2011 n photo by IRINA RICE

GJ: WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE PIECE? SK: The project started for me in December 2011 when I responded to the request for sculpture proposal. I had spent a week in Greenville a couple years earlier exhibiting my sculptures at the American Institute of Architects Conference and Expo. I was very impressed with the city and the prominence of public art. When I was selected as one of five finalists, it was such an honor. The next day I was in the art studio, and the momentum was contagious. I knew a tall sculpture would be impressive; however, the site was not limited to looking up at a sculpture. The Main Street bridge overlooked the site as well as the upscale hotels across the river from the Peace Center. My mind was telling me “go with the flow� of the river. It was just the inspiration I was looking for, the “big picture.� Greenville is at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the river was flowing and on the surface of the river were the colorful autumn leaves drifting by. [When] I got the call that my design was chosen, it was one of the best days of my life. GJ: HOW LONG DID IT TAKE TO CREATE? SK: It took about three months to build. Located: Near Japanese Dogwood Lane, Greenville

NEWS

SC suspends student assessment testing due to coronavirus

n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM | photo PROVIDED

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the South Carolina Department of Education announced that the United States Department of Education has approved its request to suspend student assessments this spring. As part of the waiver, elementary and middle school students will not have to take the SC READY and SCPASS assessments; endof-course examination programs in English, algebra, biology, U.S. history and the Constitution will not be administered and the requirement that these examinations count 20 percent of a student’s final grade has been waived; and prekindergarten assessments and alternate assessments will not be required at this time. “The suspension of South Carolina’s student assessments will allow educators to focus on meeting the needs of students and relieve undue anxiety faced by parents and students,� said Molly Spearman, state superintendent of education. “Our efforts must be concentrated on addressing this unprece-

dented public health pandemic. I appreciate Secretary DeVos and the U.S. Department of Education recognizing this and swiftly approving our waiver request.� While the assessments are currently suspended, the state Department of Education is working with college entrance, college credit and workforce-readiness assessment vendors to explore other approaches, such as online testing. In addition, to the extent possible, districts may administer advanced placement, SAT, ACT and WIN Ready to Work assessments.


In remembrance of

Dr. Tom Barton

April 27, 1929 – March 18, 2020 President of Greenville Technical College, 1962-2008

Tom Barton once

referred to himself as a catalyst, orchestrating change from a modest office on Pleasantburg Drive. Through his role as leader of Greenville Technical College for 46 years, Barton ensured that the state’s economy could move away from a reliance on textiles to a leadership position in attracting world-class companies such as Michelin, BMW, and other household names. Barton not only built South Carolina’s first technical college from one building to a thriving multi-campus system, he saw to it that Greenville Tech could be a model for institutions across the state and colleges across the country. He cared as much about the big picture of attracting industry with a highly-skilled workforce as he did about the individuals whose lives were forever changed by the education they received in the classrooms he oversaw. At every juncture, Barton’s motivation was to deliver relevant skills to meet the changing needs in the job market while equipping people for success. Six months after the college opened its doors in 1962, he requested permission to expand in order to meet growing enrollment. Those expansion efforts became a near constant of his career as enrollment moved swiftly from hundreds to thousands. Finding new ways of reaching and teaching students became a regular practice. Barton added campuses in the county’s high-growth areas, distance education, a weekend college, charter schools, and many other tools to the institution’s arsenal in order to prepare people for opportunity. He was as committed to learning as those he encouraged, always open to the possibility of a better way, a sound solution, or a new approach. Tom Barton gave more than four decades of his life to the people of his community, building a legacy that will endure for many, many years to come. We recognize the man who created a foundation for every success the technical college system continues to deliver and salute a president who led the college first. He will be remembered, always, as a trailblazer.

________________________________

Greenville Technical College faculty and staff Greenville Technical College Area Commission Greenville Tech Foundation Board

“As a president, I

know of the various pressures ranging from campus academics to funding, politics, and local, state, and federal laws. You are constantly pulled in multiple, and sometimes competing, directions. Dr. Barton was a master at managing these challenges and keeping the college on a visionary track that so many across the community and state benefit from still.”

_____________________ Keith Miller, Ph.D. President Greenville Technical College


NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

From the Hipps, a legacy of Liberty and service Generations of Hipps enrich and energize Greenville through strong businesses and community service n story by STEPHANIE TROTTER

T

he Greenville skyline fills the high-arch windows of Hayne Hipp’s office in the old Liberty Life building at the corner of Main and Court streets. As he looks down from the 10th floor, he reminisces about his first job with the company his grandfather founded. “I was 12 years old,” he recalls. “I worked in the print shop, there where the Peace Center now sits. I would print stuff for the branch offices, and then come here and fill candy machines on each floor, and hitch a ride home with Dad.” That young boy grew up to run The Liberty Corp., a publicly held holding company that included a multimillion-dollar insurance business, broadcast empire and support services. By 2006, all arms of the corporation were gone – successfully separated and sold. Yet today, “Liberty” lives on for thousands to enjoy at the Liberty Bridge in Falls Park, the Liberty Clock on Main Street and the multi-building complex on Wade Hampton Boulevard that now houses Next High School and Concentrix. Those are just fingerprints of the callus-forming work the Hipp family has been engaged in over the years to create a vibrant and diverse community. The 80-year-old patriarch paints the many accomplishments of four generations with a broad brushstroke, saying, “Whether you’re trying to build a neighborhood park, or change the whole state, the important thing is to have a positive impact on making South Carolinians better, South Carolinians happier, more productive and more skilled, so they are in a better place. That’s the joy in doing that.” It’s hard to believe that two-penny insurance policies provided the springboard for that joy.

LIBERTY’S ROOTS

Above: The Liberty Building on South Main Street in Greenville was once the home of Liberty Life Insurance, founded by W. Frank Hipp in 1919. photo provided by COXE COLLECTION, GREENVILLE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Right: Hayne and Anna Kate Hipp photo provided by the HIPP FAMILY

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

Hayne Hipp’s grandfather, W. Frank Hipp, grew up in Newberry, South Carolina. After a two-year bout with tuberculosis, he moved his young family to Greenville and organized Liberty Life Insurance in 1919. The company specialized in selling 2-cent life insurance policies to mill workers. Hipp’s creation survived the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, ranking ninth in the nation in policies written. W. Frank Hipp gobbled up regional insurance companies, bought his first radio station (WIS-TV in Columbia), and moved into new headquarters on Main Street, across from the Poinsett Hotel. The founder died in 1943, leaving his three sons to run the growing conglomerate. During Liberty Life’s Golden Anniversary in 1955, Hayne Hipp’s father, Francis M. Hipp, set the cornerstone for a $2.5 million facility at Wade Hampton Boulevard and Pleasantburg Drive, which became the largest single-office building in the state. By 1969, the brothers created The Liberty Corp., which was one of the first four South Carolina-based companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange. That’s the same year Hayne Hipp joined the company as an executive. “The myth is that Liberty Corporation was a family-owned, familydominated company,” Hipp clarifies. “Once we sold shares, our ownership went from 90% to 40%. The Hipp family did not control Liberty Corporation except through their ability to run a very efficient, profitable business.” Hayne Hipp rose through the ranks, embracing the team culture his dad and uncles had developed. To this day, he remembers the first letter he wrote his dad from school. Francis Hipp sent it back with all of the ‘I’s circled. “He was not an ‘I’ person; he was a ‘we’ person,” Hayne Hipp reveals. “An ‘I’ person can’t really build anything. You can’t build a family, you can’t build a community, you can’t build a company, you can’t build a state. You have to build it on a ‘we,’ because an ‘I’ doesn’t hold up by itself.” The Hipp family worked the “we” way beyond business, starting with Francis M. Hipp. In 1959, Gov. Ernest Hollings appointed Hayne Hipp’s father to chair the state Development Board, where he set the stage for industrial growth across the region. “They all actively participated in the community,” Hayne Hipp recollects of his elders. “You can look at Aunt Dot Gunter with the [Peace Center Gunter] theater down here, or Uncle Herman and Hipp Hall at Furman, or


NEED TO KNOW Uncle Calhoun and the Hipp scholarships at Davidson.” Hayne Hipp also worked to support and strengthen many groups, agencies and nonprofits over the years, including helping start the Greenville Urban League (now the Urban League of the Upstate) and Alliance for Quality Education. Perhaps his farthest-reaching 501(c) (3) effort is the Liberty Fellowship, which he founded with his wife, Anna Kate, and others in 2003. Through intense seminars, the group brings together a cross-section of state leaders from every niche to open lines of communication and trust. Each fellow is then charged to use these new relationships to break barriers, tackle issues and solve problems. “It’s critical,” says Hayne Hipp. “It’s an investment directly into the bloodstream of South Carolina leaders. We’ve got to break down the silos of arrogance and learn to collaborate. Liberty Fellows can make the difference, to show where we’re going and how to get there.”

Whether you’re trying to build a neighborhood park, or change the whole state, the important thing is to have a positive impact on making South Carolinians better, South Carolinians happier, more productive and more skilled, so they are in a better place. That’s the joy in doing that.” -Hayne Hipp

One Liberty Fellow in particular is showing the way, while following in her father’s footsteps.

THE FOURTH GENERATION

Mary Hipp checks her phone with each ping and ding. She’s trying to nail down a lease for new office space for Feed & Seed, the nonprofit she helped found in 2016. “Our mission is to make fresh food affordable to all of South Carolina,” Hayne Hipp’s oldest child explains. “We have the local farmers and we have the end-users, but the structure to connect the two is either broken or nonexistent.” Food has been a passion of Mary Hipp’s since her days at Washington and Lee University when she cooked for friends. Culinary arts called her to jobs from coast to coast. A pit stop home in 2004 turned into a permanent parking spot. “I had no intention of staying,” she admits. “I still had the Greenville I left decades ago in my head, and no appreciation for the Greenville it had become. I got to meet a new Greenville.” The chef stumbled into service and mimicked what her parents modeled. First, she chaired Friends of the Greenville Zoo, then served on boards from the Humane Society and the Greenville Chamber of Commerce to the Peace Center and Project Host. She’s a founding board member of Greenville Women Giving (which has granted $6 million locally) and enhances the downtown vibe through posts with the city’s Accommodations Tax Advisory Committee and Metropolitan Arts Council. “Mary led the organization to its first year of surpassing $1 million in income,” reveals MAC Executive Director Alan Ethridge. “Her experience in fundraising, nonprofit policy and marketing were true assets at a pivotal period in the organization’s history.” Mary Hipp simply sees her work as continuing the family legacy. “There’s never been a conversation from Mom and Dad, but I watched Liberty Insurance sponsor things, and Mom and Dad get involved

with the community,” she shares. “I am not Liberty Corporation. But if I have the time, means or treasure, I do feel a responsibility to engage.” Her father hopes future generations will feel the same. “I consider myself very lucky,” Hayne Hipp reflects. “We were lucky to be here in Greenville, in South Carolina at a time when this state was moving forward aggressively and we were able to build our business. In any community, you will always find individuals and families who are inclined to give. They have been successful, or very lucky. We have the opportunity to move things forward. Let’s continue to find common ground and collaborate.”

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NEWS

Pictured: Mary Hipp photo provided by the HIPP FAMILY

Delving into the Hipp Family History Liberty Life ranks ninth in the nation in number of policies written

1919

W. Frank Hipp organizes Liberty Life Insurance

1929

1930

Liberty Life purchases WIS radio station in Columbia

W. Frank Hipp dies, and the board of directors elects Frances M. Hipp as president and Herman Hipp as vice president and director

1933

Offices move to the corner of Main and Court streets

1943

1953

The company’s first television station, WIS-TV, signs on

Cornerstone set at new offices on Wade Hampton Boulevard 1955

1965

The broadcast arm includes TV stations as far away as Ohio, and is renamed “Cosmos Broadcasting Corp.”

LIBERTY BRIDGE

Many call the towering pedestrian bridge overlooking Reedy River Falls the “crown jewel” of downtown Greenville. One of the community leaders who helped set the glistening gem in place: Anna Kate Hipp. Her efforts started in the 1960s with the Carolina Foothills Garden Club. Once the four-lane Camperdown Bridge fell to reveal the falls in 2002, Hipp and Pedrick Lowrey chaired raising more than $4 million to establish an endowment fund to maintain the park. The bridge’s name honors Liberty Corp. founder W. Frank Hipp, and his children, for their commitment and contribution to the Greenville community. Liberty Bridge has become a symbol of Greenville around the globe.

1967

Liberty Life and Cosmos are positioned under the new umbrella: Liberty Corp. 2000

Royal Bank of Canada purchases Liberty Life Insurance Co. and Liberty Insurance Services for $650 million in cash 2006

Raycom Media purchases Liberty Corp.’s 15 television stations for $987 million FOR MORE: GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

NEWS

Former Greenville Technical College president passes away

n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM

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Former Greenville Technical College president Thomas Barton passed away at home on March 18. He was 90 years old. Barton began his career in education as a public school teacher, coach and superintendent before assuming the role of Greenville Tech president in 1962 and serving through 2008. Under his leadership, the college grew from one campus on Pleasantburg Drive to the Brashier, Northwest and Greer locations. In 2000, the college renamed and dedicated its main campus to Barton. “I think of Tom Barton often when I drive onto the campus that bears his name,” said Greenville Technical College president Keith Miller. “I have enormous respect for him as a person and as a leader. Our mission today is to transform lives through education. Tom Barton lived that mission every day of the 46 years that he served as president.” Before his tenure as Greenville Tech president, Barton played for Clemson University and Coach Frank Howard on the 1951 Orange Bowl and 1952 Gator Bowl teams. During his time on the

Puzzle Solutions

Our mission today is to transform lives through education. Tom Barton lived that mission every day of the 46 years that he served as president.” - Keith Miller, president, Greenville Technical College Clemson football team, he was named Clemson’s Athlete of the Year as well as being named to the All-State, All-South and All-American football teams in 1953. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers but suffered a career-ending knee injury in the All-Star game at Chicago’s Soldier Field. Barton was also was elected to the South Carolina Hall of Fame and the Clemson Hall of Fame, and selected by Coach Frank Howard’s 30-year All-Star Clemson team.

Challenge yourself with the weekly puzzles, see page 32


UPSTATEBUSINESSJOURNAL.COM

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MARCH 27, 2020 | VOL. 10 | ISSUE 7

Is

CBD the new cash crop


THE OPENING BELL IN THIS ISSUE

18

CREW Upstate celebrates 10th anniversary along with award winners. Manufacturing plants in the Upstate experience shutdowns during the pandemic.

23

March Madness is usually an economic slamdunk for the Upstate. As events are canceled nationwide, Greenville feels the effects.

START Surcee.com helps users find the perfect gift. Read more about this new startup on Page 19

20

THE BIG NUMBERS

$150,000 $2.25M

CBD could be South Carolina’s next big cash crop. Read about the growing CBD industry in the Upstate |

photo PROVIDED

initial capital invested in Surcee.com tech startup. Page 19

brought in by the 2020 SEC Women’s Tournament. Page 23

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March 27, 2020

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NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

BUSINESS

New to the Street Recently opened businesses in the Upstate

Gibbs Cancer Center & Research Institute recently held the grand opening of its sevenstory, 191-square-foot expansion. This expanded facility is adjacent to Pelham Medical Center and connected to the Gibbs Cancer Center. A climate-controlled connector bridge allows patients to move between the hospital and cancer center. This medical facility offers centralized registration to allow patients one place to complete paperwork; a 120-seat conference center; a cafe; an outpatient pharmacy; a retail shop featuring wigs, specialty clothing and other items to use during and after treatment; and a chapel. The services available include surgical, medical and radiation oncology, oncology research and rehabilitation services, infusion services, CyberKnife, and genetic counseling. Where: 2759 S. Highway 14, Greer Hours: 8 a.m-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays For more information: Visit www.spartanburgregional.com/locations/gibbscancer-center-research-institute-pelham or call 864-530-6400

Tacos & Bla Bla Bla recently held a ribbon cutting. This Mexican restaurant offers tacos, gorditas, mulitas, burritos and more. Where: 123 Fountain Inn

N.

Main

St.,

Hours: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaysThursdays and 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays For more information: Visit www.tacos-blablabla.com or www.facebook.com/ pg/BlablablaFtInn, call 864-408-9228 or email tacos.blablabla@gmail.com.

Earn your Master of Business Administration degree in a program created specifically for active professionals. Offered fully online, completed in less than a year, and competitively priced under $20k, the 10-Month MBA at Gardner-Webb University is designed to be completed at the speed of life. The 10-Month MBA will strengthen your leadership skills and increase your knowledge in a wide range of key business functions. Fast, affordable, and worldclass the Gardner-Webb University 10-Month MBA will ignite your career.

John Harris Body Shops recently held a ribbon cutting at its second location in the Upstate. This facility offers collision repairs, auto body work, paintless dent repair, auto body painting and rental car service. Where: 240 Greenville

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Hours: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays For more information: Visit www.jhbodyshops.com/locations/greenville-bodyshop/, call 864-469-4148 or email greenville@jhbodyshops.com.

Please note, hours listed are normal operating hours. These may have changed, please check with the business for current information.

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March 27, 2020

upstatebusinessjournal.com page

10MBA-Ad1-Print--AfricanAmericanMale-UBJ-v3-2.indd 1

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BUSINESS

BUSINESS

CREW Upstate celebrates award winners

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH

They were there in spirit, if not in person. CREW Upstate had to cancel its 10th anniversary awards celebration due to restrictions on public gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic, but that didn’t mean the commercial real estate group didn’t celebrate its decade of achievement remotely. The industry networking and advocacy group, which has more than 100 members, continued its mission to advance the achievements of women in real estate through its 2020 CREW Upstate Awards. Winners were announced in lieu of a formal ceremony. The Lifetime Achievement Award went to Debbie McDonough, tax senior manager at Cherry Bekaert and career outreach chair at CREW. Alongside Maurie Lawrence and Meg Scoopmire, McDonough founded CREW Upstate in 2010 and has been a prominent voice in

Upstate manufacturers halt production due to coronavirus n story by ALEX COOPER

CREW commemorative painting | LYNN GREER

the organization ever since. Jennifer Mustar, project manager and Greenville office lead at HDR, received the Distinguished Leader Award. Rounding out the list of winners were: • Mark Cooter, who won the Career Advancement for Women Award. • Chesley White, who won the Rising Star Award. • GSP International Airport air cargo facility, which won the Development Impact Award. In celebration of its 10th anniversary, CREW Upstate commissioned local artist Lynn Greer to create a watercolor print as a commemoration.

Manufacturing in the Upstate has taken a hit as companies work to quell the spread of COVID-19. Late last week, BMW, ZF and Michelin announced they were temporarily suspending production. ZF Transmissions has suspended production at its Gray Court facility due to the COVID-19 pandemic and will likely follow suit at its Duncan facility in light of BMW’s shutdown, the company said on Friday, March 20. “The current situation is of course very dynamic,” said Tony Sapienza, head of communications for ZF North America. “As a just-in-time business, when our auto manufacturer customers shut down, that shuts us down very quickly.” BMW also announced on March 20 that it will temporarily shut down its manufacturing facility in Greer due to the pandemic. In a statement, the company said it expected the suspension of production to last a couple of weeks: “The health and protection of our associates is our

top priority,” the statement said. “At the same time, the dynamic development of the [coronavirus] pandemic is having a major impact on the global demand for cars. BMW Manufacturing is taking a flexible approach and adjusting our production volumes accordingly.” Rounding out the partial shutdown announcements was Michelin, which has its North American headquarters in Greenville. It said on Friday, March 20, that the company would begin a temporary shutdown of its tire manufacturing lines across the U.S. “Michelin has started partial shutdowns at some plants in South Carolina. Each plant will have different partial shutdown situations,” the company said in a statement on Monday, March 23.

CARLTON MERCEDES

March 27, 2020

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START

Surcee gives the gift that keeps on giving

Industry: TECH, SAAS (Software as a Service) Founders: ALLAN SYMONETTE Number of employees: 2 Initial capital invested: $150,000 When Allan Symonette isn’t busy selling medical devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, he’s pouring his heart into his startup. His startup website also deals with issues of the heart: giving unexpected tokens of affection, known in the South as a “surcee.” “A surcee is a gift that says, ‘I’m thinking of you,’ ‘I love you’ or ‘this reminded me of you,’” says Symonette, 57, who launched Surcee.com two years ago to help others — especially, let’s say, guys — who are, as he is, generally lousy gift-givers. The idea, he says, is to “get more smiles than snarls. Like my kids, for example. I struggle, y’know — I’ll get

them a video game, and they’ll go, ‘Dad, I played that six months ago.’” To solve that problem, create a profile on Surcee.com. Then populate your privacy-protected page with anything your heart desires: that little item you’ve always wanted, a preferred charity to donate to or a gift card to a favorite restaurant or retailer. The user then shares the page with only those family, friends and significant others he or she chooses while also sharing additional details, thus filling another need Symonette sees in our hyper-digital world. “I think we confuse connection with being connected,” he says. Then, as he’s if speaking to more to a target of his affection who isn’t in the room, rather than to an interviewer who is, he adds with a whimsical hint: “I want to know the stuff I used to know about you. It’s not just about me telling the world what I want, it’s about my friends telling me what they

want because I don’t know.” Apparently, nobody knows where the term “surcee” comes from. The origin stories of the distinctive Southernism appear as disparate as its spellings, and those thorny issues evidently stump the internet: “Nobody actually knows how to correctly spell the word. Suspected spellings are Sursee, Cercie, Surcie, Circi, Searcy, Sirsee,” a Charlestonian writes. “But since it’s predominantly a spoken tradition, there is no conventional accepted spelling.” “It’s catchy and it has a cool meaning,” Symonette says. “It captures what I’m trying to do.” So far, he has spent about $150,000 trying to capture what he’s trying to make Surcee.com do. He has also chatted with potential investors at VentureSouth, a Greenville-based organization of investor “angels” who venture-capitalize promising earlystage companies.

A surcee is a gift that says, ‘I’m thinking of you,’ ‘I love you’ or ‘this reminded me of you.’ -Allan Symonette, founder, Surcee.com

Stop dreaming the dream. Start driving it.

n story by JOHN JETER | photo PROVIDED

“It certainly saw the need that I face,” Paul Clark, a managing partner at VentureSouth, says of the site. “I think it has some potential. He’s done a good job integrating other platforms to get the products on there, and the platform’s working.” Asked if Surcee.com could help him, say, find just the right surcees, he says, “Pretty much every Christmas. I think it’s kind of a recurring challenge to come up with things that are both thoughtful and appreciated.” Says Symonette, “Gift-giving is a primal connection activity, and you want people to reconnect at that primal level. This gives joy, and it gives a conduit to do that.”

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March 27, 2020

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FEATURED

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FROM THE COVER

Franny Tacy, co-owner of Franny’s Farmacy, on her North Carolina farms. | photo PROVIDED

CBD

O

n any major road in the Upstate there are signs for stores that sell CBD-oil products. Several local businesses, as well as national retailers, have jumped on the CBD bandwagon to sell it, and more than 100 farmers are licensed to grow hemp in the state — and regulators can barely keep up with the growth. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 removed hemp with no more than 0.3% THC concentration from the Schedule 1 controlled substance list, which opened the floodgates for CBD retailers to enter the market. CBD — short for cannabidiol — is a compound found in both hemp and marijuana plants, which are cousins in the Cannabis sativa family. It’s the same compound in both plants, but the legality of it depends on whether it’s derived from hemp, which is legal, or marijuana, which is illegal in South Carolina. Legal CBD must have less than 0.3% of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) component — that’s the compound responsible for psychoactive effect in users. If CBD has more than that amount, it’s an illegal substance in the state. Farmers who grow hemp must abide by the same rules and cannot grow a hemp plant with THC concentration of more than 0.3% on a dried weight basis.

March 27, 2020

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$24.4 BILLION BY 2025

The Brightfield Group, a marketresearch company, estimated the

CBD industry made $4 billion in 2019, a 562% increase over 2018, and is on track to be a $24.4 billion industry by 2025. Only 14% of adults in the U.S. use CBD products, according to Gallup, so the market has plenty of room to grow. In the Gallup Poll, of those who said they use CBD, 40% take the

SC's new cash crop? n story by KRISTINA HERNANDEZ | photos PROVIDED

product for pain relief. This tracks with what local retailers are saying is a big reason for its popularity. “I believe CBD became so popular so quickly because it does work for so many people,” said Christy Britt, owner of CBD Farmacy in Greenville. “We can only inform customers what CBD has done for

CBD Farmacy in Greenville stocks a number of cannabidiol-derived products. | photo PROVIDED

us personally and how customers have received many benefits for a variety of issues they have.” People who have had success with CBD oil claim it helps reduce anxiety and chronic pain, cramps associated with menstrual cycles, insomnia, arthritis, and depression. It has only been proven to be effective in treating severe epilepsy, hence the only FDA-approved drug containing CBD is the seizure-reducing medicine Epidiolex. Federal regulations prohibit CBD retailers from making blanket claims about the effectiveness of treating medical conditions. In November 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent warning letters to 15 companies for illegally selling CBD in ways that violated the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, such as claiming it is a dietary supplement or that it treats certain diseases. Even so, the FDA recognizes that consumer interest is significant in CBD and states that it needs to work together with “the industry to fill in the knowledge gaps about the science, safety and quality of many of these products.”

‘A BETTER ALTERNATIVE’

I believe CBD became so popular so quickly because it does work for so many people. -Christy Britt, owner, CBD Farmacy

Britt and her husband became interested in CBD oil products after using it themselves and seeing positive results with their health. They opened their first store in 2017 in Taylors, which they sold as an affiliate after opening a second store in Greenville and a third in Columbia.


FROM THE COVER

“Our customers are looking for a natural, nonaddictive alternative to their prescription pain medicine,” Britt said. “With the huge opioid epidemic that has a grip on our country, people are looking for answers and a better alternative.”

There are huge differences between people [and] companies that are simply reselling CBD products and those of us who are growing hemp, processing and manufacturing our own products, and providing details throughout distribution. -Franny Tacy, co-owner, Franny's Farmacy

CBD Farmacy isn’t alone in its quick expansion. Purely CBD, a company that opened in the fall of 2018 with a storefront in Arlington, Texas, has exploded in growth. According to a map on the company website, Purely CBD now has 53

stores nationally, including three in the Upstate in Greer, Greenville and Easley. Franny’s Farmacy is an Asheville, North Carolina-based farm and small business that produces seed-to-shelf CBD products. Franny Tacy, who co-owns the farm with her husband, Jeff Tacy, opened Franny’s Farmacy in late 2018 in Asheville, and is currently poised to open her eighth and ninth stores early this year, including one in Clemson. A Greenville location already exists. “[CBD products are] certainly trending, but there will be fallout since so many tried to enter the industry,” Franny Tacy said. “There are huge differences between people [and] companies that are simply reselling CBD products and those of us who are growing hemp, processing and manufacturing our own products, and providing details throughout distribution.”

“Comparatively, growing an acre of strawberries may run a farmer $6,000,” said David DeWitt, hemp program coordinator at the Clemson Cooperative Extension Service. Hemp has the potential to be a cash crop that is not only used for the CBD oil industry. It can also be used to produce textiles, clothes, rope, paper and more, according to the South Carolina Department of Agriculture website. Even though prices for CBD products are holding or ticking up, DeWitt said farmers are struggling with selling their current crops because of the lack of processors in the state and the abundance of hemp. “In 2018, hemp was selling for $40 to $50 a pound, and just in the last couple weeks, I’ve had farmers tell me they were offered less than $10 a pound,” DeWitt said. “If we can grow, process and sell it here, that’s the ticket. It just takes time.” Both farmers and CBD manufactures are looking ahead to potential regulations coming from both state and federal governments as they try to catch up. “The CBD industry continues to grow and will have to become regulated for consumer safety and to establish rules for operating business,” Franny Tacy said. “Big business is waiting for federal regulations to come down by Oct. 31 when the farm bill expires. Expect to see wellknown companies entering the CBD scene next year [and] also buy-outs, consolidation and closings of many existing CBD companies.”

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FEATURED

CBD in SC Epidiolex, which is used to treat severe epilepsy, is the only FDA-approved CBD drug product Sixteen hemp farming permits were issued in 2019 to Upstate farmers Source: South Carolina Department of Agriculture

According to a 2019 Gallup Poll, 13% of Americans in the South say they use CBD products CBD hemp-derived products will not give users a high because of their low THC level Source: Molecules, a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal

A NEW CASH CROP

Helping the boom of the CBD market in South Carolina are the farmers growing hemp plants. In 2017, the state legalized hemp farming and initially gave 20 permits to grow the crop over a total of 256 acres. In 2019, the South Carolina Department of Agriculture granted 114 farmers permits. According to Vanessa Elsalah, outreach specialist at the South Carolina Department of Agriculture, hemp was grown on 3,300 acres in South Carolina. It’s a labor-intensive, expensive crop that can cost upward of $15,000 an acre to grow, yet has the potential to be profitable given the explosion of the CBD oil industry, says the South Carolina Department of Agriculture.

A field on Franny’s Farm in North Carolina is prepared for a new crop. | photo PROVIDED

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NEWS

Our community is our business. Thank you for shopping local for 70 years and counting.

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NEED TO KNOW

BUSINESS

On the Move Some of the Upstate’s most recent hires, promotions, awards and appointments ELECTED: Joanie Martin was recently named to the Community

Foundation of Greenville’s board of directors for a threeyear term. Martin is the chief administrative officer of Michelin North America. She is a graduate of Furman University and the Georgia Institute of Technology.

HIRED: Christine DeMint was recently named development

director for the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. DeMint has previously worked in sales, product management and market management roles. She has also served as the co-chair of the GSO endowment campaign and is a graduate of the University of South Carolina.

HIRED: Echo Bostrom was recently named assistant general

manager of Lakeside Lodge Clemson. Bostrom previously has worked for Southern Resort Group for the last six years and has held front office, group sales and rooms division manager positions at The Residences at Biltmore in Asheville.

NAMED: Carlos Phillips was recently named to the U.S.

Chamber of Commerce Committee of 100. Phillips is the president and CEO of the Greenville Chamber. He is a graduate of the University of Kentucky and Western Kentucky University.

PROMOTED: Tanya Camunas was recently promoted to executive

director of A Child’s Haven. Camunas previously served as director of quality assurance and program evaluation, and senior director of program and strategy at ACH. She holds degrees in human services and business economics.

“Purveyors of Classic American Style”

PROMOTED: Bo Rogers was recently promoted to senior vice

March 27, 2020

Upstate Business Journal page

22

864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com 23 West North St., Downtown Greenville

president of client services at Infinity Marketing. Rogers started at Infinity in 2011 as a media specialist. He is a graduate of the University of South Carolina Upstate.


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

March Madness: Usually a slam-dunk for downtown businesses, merchants n story by JOHN JETER | photo PROVIDED

Things change in just a day.” -Suzanne Coe, owner, Connolly’s Irish Pub Talk about tipping the scales, here’s an even bigger fish: The 2018 Bassmaster Classic reeled in $11.5 million, he said, noting that while the women’s tourney played from March 4-8, the Bassmaster event ran eight days and jammed The Well, as well as a trade show at the TD Convention Center [now the Greenville Convention Center]. By comparison, he said, 2017’s NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament lured the likes of such fan magnets Duke, South Carolina and North Carolina, the latter two of which moved onto the Final Four. “We were a pretty good launching pad for all those schools,” he said, adding that their marquee status also boosted attendance and opened wallets — to the tune of $3.3 million. Then the coronavirus epidemic showed up, putting an end to the

March 24-29 women’s tournament. Up until the NCAA’s nationwide March Madness cancellations, bookings had been brisk at Residence Inn by Marriott Greenville Downtown and SpringHill Suites by Marriott Greenville Downtown, according to Jonathan Brashier, the general manager of the dual-branded properties that served as the host destination for the SEC event. Moments after the NCAA announcement, he texted: “We are allowing cancellations with no penalty.” Suzanne Coe, sole owner of Connolly’s Irish Pub just off Main Street, was busy enough planning for St. Patrick’s Day, also a cash-green machine. At the same time, she said she was keeping an eye on the oncoming pandemic. March is usually when the madness begins there, she said, because people have paid off their holiday credit-card bills and New Year’s temperance resolutions have dried up. “Things change in just a day,” she said, with some omniscience and, at the time, little optimism. Connolly’s prides itself on its location, along with the fact that, at 23, the pub now bills itself as the oldest bar downtown. “We’re an original, old, traditional drinking place.” At the same time, though, she said that while major sporting events and concerts add plenty to other businesses’ coffers, many tend to draw families or, at least, soberer types. “The NCAA crowd doesn’t appear to be as hard-drinking as, like, a Super Bowl crowd would be, so we don’t see an unbelievable crush,” she said, “but we would see a little bit of an up-

REVENUE BROUGHT IN BY THE WELL

Just days before the NCAA sidelined March Madness, Greenville’s hotels, bars and restaurants were looking forward to a full-court press of wallet-wielding crowds flocking to the Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament. Like other such marquee events, the tourney looked to be another easy layup for merchants to net hefty revenues. Were it not for COVID-19 and the subsequent shutdown of public spaces, the games’ economic impact would again have scored big points for downtown businesses, according to the city’s #yeahTHATgreenville office that keeps score of such things. Take the Southeastern Conference women’s basketball games held just two weeks before at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The event hauled in some $2.25 million, according to David Montgomery, vice president of sales at VisitGreenvilleSC.

tick when there’s a big game like that here.” Likewise, Bill Smith, who’s known as “den mother” at the iconoclastically irreverent Café and Then Some, doesn’t see as much of a bump as some of his merchant neighbors do. That’s because folks are coming to see another event, while others know downtown will be packed “Usually big events at The Well affect us in the opposite direction because parking becomes scarce and people hip enough to know that it’s actually going on downtown and who are not going to the event will avoid coming out,” he said. Although Cafe and Then Some does enjoy the city’s rising tourist trade, he said, “If you’re coming to Greenville for a sporting event or a concert, you’re probably not going to take the time to do something that’s an entire evening. You might go somewhere for a quick bite to eat, but you’d be less likely to see us or go to an event at the Peace Center.”

2020 SEC Women’s Basketball Tournament

Above: The winners of the 2019 SEC Women’s Basketball Tournament celebrate at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. photo provided by BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA

$2.25M

2018 Bassmaster Classic 2017 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament

That’s where downtown restaurants such as Trio: A Brick Oven Café would, on any other normal day, fill the bill on Main Street. The eatery in the heart of downtown, open until 10 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, typically generates revenues between $15,000 and $20,000 on an average weekend. The SEC tourney scored an additional $6,000 over a similar time frame, according to general manager Brian Pittman. “We enjoy it,” he said of the bigtime basketball events and shows. “We love that we’re able to prepare for it. We love the fact that we get to meet new people, and it brings a lot of business into town.” The restaurant even sees return business from out-of-town visitors, who often dine there more than once when they’re in town, he said. Giving kudos to the arena, he added, “The Well changing and upgrading and bringing a lot of big names and big concerts and sporting events has really helped a lot.”

$11.5M $3.3M

March 27, 2020

upstatebusinessjournal.com page

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jackson Marketing Group’s 25 Years

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Mary Hill |Michelle Fleury

1997 Jackson Dawson launches motorsports Division 1993

1990 Jackson Dawson acquires therapon marketing Group and moves to Piedmont office Center on Villa.

>>

Chairman larry Jackson, Jackson marketing Group. Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Jackson Marketing Group celebrates 25 years By sherry Jackson | staff | sjackson@communityjournals.com

Solve. Serve. Grow. Those three words summarize Jackson Marketing Group’s guiding principles, and according to owner Larry Jackson, form the motivation that has kept the firm thriving for the past 25 years.

Jackson graduated from Bob Jones University with a degree in video and film production and started his 41-year career in the communications industry with the U.S. Army’s Public Information Office. He served during

Vietnam, where he said he was “luckily” stationed in the middle of Texas at Fort Hood. He left the service and went to work in public affairs and motorsports at Ford Motor Company in Detroit. After a stint at Bell and Howell, where he was responsible for managing Ford’s dealer marketing and training, the entrepreneurial bug hit and he co-founded Jackson-Dawson Marketing Communications, a company specializing in dealer training and product launches for the auto industry in 1980. In 1987, Jackson wanted to move back south and thought Greenville would be a good fit. An avid pilot, he

learned of an opportunity to purchase Cornerstone Aviation, a fixed base operation (FBO) that served as a service station for the Greenville Downtown Airport, providing fuel, maintenance and storage. In fact, when he started the Greenville office of what is now Jackson Marketing Group (JMG) in 1988, the offices were housed on the second floor in an airport hangar. “Clients would get distracted by the airplanes in the hangars and we’d have to corral them to get back upstairs to the meeting,” Jackson said. Jackson sold the FBO in 1993, but says it was a great way to get to know Greenville’s fathers and leaders

>>

with a majority of them utilizing the general aviation airport as a “corporate gateway to the city.” In 1997, Jackson and his son, Darrell, launched Jackson Motorsports Group. The new division was designed to sell race tires and go to racetracks to sell and mount the tires. Darrell Jackson now serves as president of the motorsports group and Larry Jackson has two other children and a son-in-law who work there. Jackson said all his children started at the bottom and “earned their way up.” Jackson kept the Jackson-Dawson branches in Detroit and others in Los Angeles and New York until he sold his portion of that partnership in 2009 as part of his estate planning. The company now operates a small office in Charlotte, but its main headquarters are in Greenville in a large office space off Woodruff Road, complete with a vision gallery that displays local artwork and an auditorium Jackson makes available for non-profit use. The Motorsports Group is housed in an additional 26,000 square feet building just down the street, and the agency is currently looking for another 20,000 square feet. Jackson said JMG has expanded into other verticals such as financial, healthcare, manufacturing and pro-bono work, but still has a strong focus on the auto industry and transportation. It’s

2009 Jackson Dawson changes name to Jackson marketing Group when larry sells his partnership in Detroit and lA

2003 motorsports Division acquires an additional 26,000 sq. ft. of warehouse space

1998 1998 Jackson Dawson moves to task industrial Court

also one of the few marketing companies in South Carolina to handle all aspects of a project in-house, with four suites handling video production, copywriting, media and research and web design. Clients include heavyweights such as BMW, Bob Jones University, the Peace Center, Michelin and Sage Automotive. Recent projects have included an interactive mobile application for Milliken’s arboretum and 600-acre Spartanburg campus and a marketing campaign for the 2013 Big League World Series. “In my opinion, our greatest single achievement is the longevity of our client relationships,” said Darrell Jackson. “Our first client from back in 1988 is still a client today. I can count on one hand the number of clients who have gone elsewhere in the past decade.” Larry Jackson says his Christian faith and belief in service to others, coupled with business values rooted in solving clients’ problems, have kept

2003 2009-2012 Jackson marketing Group named a top BtoB agency by BtoB magazine 4 years running

him going and growing his business over the years. He is passionate about giving back and outreach to non-profits. The company was recently awarded the Community Foundation Spirit Award. The company reaffirmed its commitment to serving the community last week by celebrating its 25th anniversary with a birthday party and a 25-hour Serve-A-Thon partnership with Hands on Greenville and Habitat for Humanity. JMG’s 103 full-time employees worked in shifts around the clock on October 22 and 23 to help construct a house for a deserving family. As Jackson inches towards retirement, he says he hasn’t quite figured out his succession plan yet, but sees the companies staying under the same umbrella. He wants to continue to strategically grow the business. “From the beginning, my father has taught me that this business is all about our people – both our clients and our associates,” said his son, Darrell. “We have created a focus and a culture that strives to solve problems, serve people and grow careers.” Darrell Jackson said he wants to “continue helping lead a culture where we solve, serve and grow. If we are successful, we will continue to grow towards our ultimate goal of becoming the leading integrated marketing communications brand in the Southeast.”

2011 Jackson marketing Group/Jackson motorsports Group employee base reaches 100 people

2008 2012 Jackson marketing Group recognized by Community Foundation with Creative spirit Award

pro-bono/non-proFit Clients American Red Cross of Western Carolinas Metropolitan Arts Council Artisphere Big League World Series The Wilds Advance SC South Carolina Charities, Inc. Aloft Hidden Treasure Christian School

CoMMUnitY inVolVeMent & boarD positions lArry JACkson (ChAirmAn): Bob Jones University Board chairman, The Wilds Christian Camp and Conference Center board member, Gospel Fellowship Association board member, Past Greenville Area Development Corporation board member, Past Chamber of Commerce Headquarters Recruiting Committee member, Past Greenville Tech Foundation board member David Jones (Vice President Client services, Chief marketing officer): Hands on Greenville board chairman mike Zeller (Vice President, Brand marketing): Artisphere Board, Metropolitan Arts Council Board, American Red Cross Board, Greenville Tech Foundation Board, South Carolina Chamber Board eric Jackson (Jackson motorsports Group sales specialist): Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club Advisory Board

November 1, 2013 Upstate bUsiness joUrnal 21

20 Upstate bUsiness joUrnal November 1, 2013

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1988 Jackson Dawson opens in Greenville at Downtown Airport

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HOME

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EASLEY 103 Willow Lake Court, Easley, SC 29642 EASLEY 103 Willow Lake Court, Easley, SC 29642

and REAL ESTATE

Featured Home

HOME INFO PRICE: $799,900 MLS #: 1414278 HOME INFO5 BATHS: 4/1 BEDROOMS: SQ. FT: 5000+ LOT SIZE: 7.46 Acres YEAR BUILT: 1989 PRICE: $799,900 MLS #: 1414278 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHS: 4/1 SQ. FT: 5000+ SCHOOLS: Wren Elementary, Wren Middle, LOT SIZE: 7.46 Acres YEAR BUILT: 1989 and Wren High

SCHOOLS: Wren Elementary, Wren Middle, AGENT: Chet Smith and Wren High 864.458.7653 info@chetandbethsmith.com AGENT: Chet Smith 864.458.7653 info@chetandbethsmith.com

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Come Experience Simpsonville’s Newest Custom Home Neighborhood Come Experience Simpsonville’s Newest Custom Home Neighborhood 125 Large Homesites • Customizable Floorplans Available • Homes Starting in the 400’s J Francis Custom Builders or Available Bring Your• Own Builder 125 Large Homesites • Customizable Floorplans Homes Starting in the 400’s Located Minutes from Downtown Simpsonville, 15 Own minutes to Fairview Road J Francis Custom Builders or Bring Your Builder Jr. Olympic Pool • Cabana and Clubhouse • Walking Trail Road Located Minutes from Downtown Simpsonville, 15 minutes to Fairview Jr. Olympic Pool • Cabana and Clubhouse • Walking Trail

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NIGEL NIGEL MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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THE LIST

119 DIME STREET • $217,500 2

108 9TH STREET • $172,000

NICHOLTOWN: Fully renovated home has a lot to offer. Great front porch & large living space as you enter the home. Spacious kitchen with granite countertops. Awesome back deck for grilling or just relaxing in the evenings. A Must See!

2 MLS 1413095

$ $217,500

TIM KEAGY | 864.905.3304 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®

2 2 MLS 1413883

$ $172,000

JUDSON MILL: Welcome to this beautiful craftsman/bungalo totally updated from head to toes. Upgraded 44" cabinets and granit counter tops. Don't miss on this one 2/2 with beautiful from porch and backyard deck. Minutes from Downtown and easy access to shopping, restaurants and shopping. SILVIA A RODRIGUEZ | 864.908.4458 Blackstream International Real Estate

LOCAL AREA HOMES ON THE MARKET

6|

3| 26

6.5 | MLS 1414235

1 | MLS 1414243

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

120 Cooper Drive $929,000

311 McCarter Avenune $329,900

SIMPSONVILLE: Renovated farm house on 5 Acres with a fenced pasture, 4 stall barn, 40x40 outbuilding, vermiculite in-ground pool, & amazing interior with all the luxury features & space you desire!

LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS: Beautiful 3BR/2BA brick ranch-McCarter! Updated kitchen w/quartz, stainless steel, updated cabinets.Hardwoods throughout main living areas+engineered hardwoods in kitchen. Fenced backyard/.62 acre lot! Master bath w/tile surround shower/updated vanity+ cabinetry+flooring+fixtures. Large laundry/mudroom.

Tracy McAlister Bridges | 864.230.3710 tracy@carolinamoves.com

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Carolina Moves

3|

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Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®

16 Paris Mountain Avenue $199,500

432 North Ivestor Court $194,500

SAN SOUCI AREA: 3 bedroom 1 bath + office in San Souci area. Beautiful original hardwoods refinished (2020)/New paint throughout (2020)/New HVAC (2019). 9ft ceilings. Kitchen w/new oven/built in microwave/flooring (2020). Laundry/mud room+office.

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Maggie Toler | 864.616.4280 mtoler@cdanjoyner.com Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®

3|

2.5 | MLS 1412626

Carolina Moves


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CHELSEA TOWNES

AT HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE Model Homes - The Kensington & The Sloane 114 Danvers Road, Greenville, SC 29607 BEDROOMS:

3

BATHS: 2/1

SCHOOLS: Pelham Road Elementary, Beck Middle, and J. L. Mann High

AGENT:

Hunter Hurst

864.423.3420 hphurst@cbcaine.com The Chelsea Townes community by LS Homes features 78 town homes starting in the mid $300,000s. These maintenance free, all-brick town homes with 2-3 car garages have 3 floorplans, including one with the master suite on the main level. Residents enjoy access to numerous features in Hollingsworth Park: a 20-acre park, paved walkways, an event space, a fitness studio, Stella’s Southern Brasserie restaurant, a dry cleaner, and access to the newly announced Swamp Rabbit Trail connector. Chelsea Townes is conveniently located minutes to downtown Greenville with access along two of Greenville’s major roads (Woodruff and Laurens). Call to schedule your appointment.

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SUBDIVISION MCDANIEL ESTATES CONE HEIGHTS SUNSET HILLS MARKLEY PLACE CLAREMONT CLAREMONT TINDAL PLACE FOREST HILLS BOTANY WOODS MARKLEY PLACE BRAYDON ALLEGHENY MAHAFFEY PLANTATION SYCAMORE RIDGE GLEN MEADOWS RIVER WALK STILLWATERS GOWER ESTATES MALLARD & ARLINGTON WASHINGTON ON MAIN COACHMAN PLANTATION HOLLINGTON RIVERVIEW HARTNESS ASHETON LAKES FOXCROFT ASHMORE LAKES FOX HOLLOW FARMS OAK GROVE ESTATES PARKERS LANDING BRADLEY OAKS BOTANY WOODS ONEAL ACRES EASTON RIDGE STILLWATERS RIVERSTONE STONEWOOD MANOR BRENTWOOD WATERSTONE COTTAGES RIDGESTONE COTTAGES SHANNON FOREST ASHETON SPRINGS GLASTONBURY VILLAGE RIVERSTONE GOWER ESTATES THE RETREAT WOODHEDGE AMBER OAKS FARM BEAUMONT COVENTRY HOLTZCLAW ESTATES ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY RICHWOOD COTTAGES AT OVERBROOK WEST FARM VILLAGE TUSCAN WOODS GLENVIEW PARK MARKET POINT TOWNES ADAMS CREEK ISAQUEENA PARK LINCOLN PARK AUTUMN RIDGE GRAYSON POINTE KELSEY GLEN LOST RIVER KELSEY GLEN BROOKFIELD WEST WATERS RUN CARSON'S POND SHERWOOD FOREST HIGHVIEW TOWNES RAVINES AT CAMILLA VILLAGE LONGLEAF HERITAGE VILLAGE KATHERINES GARDEN AUTUMN TRACE ROPER MEADOW SUDDUTH FARMS EDGEBROOK

28

PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR FEBRUARY 24-28

PRICE SELLER $7,866,647 $7,133,379 $1,600,000 $1,410,000 $1,250,000 $1,160,000 $1,065,000 $867,872 $807,000 $725,000 $699,900 $697,571 $678,000 $650,000 $639,900 $588,000 $565,000 $557,000 $553,800 $537,775 $504,000 $500,000 $500,000 $499,000 $497,500 $491,500 $488,501 $485,000 $470,000 $458,000 $451,802 $450,000 $450,000 $449,900 $445,000 $445,000 $440,400 $440,000 $435,000 $432,000 $426,800 $422,900 $418,640 $418,000 $415,995 $415,460 $411,900 $410,000 $399,000 $390,000 $385,000 $378,000 $375,788 $365,000 $363,000 $354,900 $352,000 $351,000 $349,990 $345,000 $340,012 $339,000 $330,000 $325,000 $315,000 $315,000 $313,825 $311,920 $310,000 $307,000 $306,905 $305,075 $304,951 $304,900 $304,494 $301,000 $300,000 $299,000 $298,000 $290,000 $290,000 $290,000 $288,000 $286,900 $285,375 $284,900 $282,500 $280,000 $278,000 $275,000

625 S OLD PIEDMONT LLC 220 COMMERCE LLC ALLIN SONJA BURNETT 105 LEE STREET LLC MH AND SONS LLC COX TIMOTHY RAY ADAMS KYLE F REVOCABLE T MARKLEY PLACE LLC FOLEY CHRISTOPHER P SR SETZER RICK A LAZAR KYOKO N (SURV) LS RESIDENTIAL LLC CHAPMAN ALVENA M SHORT JACQUELINE H REVOC MARKLEY PLACE LLC REED GARRETT P (JTWROS) PATTERSON-GERAGHTY REVOC MALONE CYNTHIA A KENDRICK SUSAN M PITTS LISA S AKSEL MURAT STYLES ANDREA C (JTWROS) MILLER HAYLEY A (JTWROS) GLENN KERRY ELLETT FAUCETTE TRACY A 1 SOUTH MAIN LLC MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L NARRAMORE ELI M MOORE AMY L (JTWROS) RICHTER ANDREW C HARTNESS CONSTRUCTION LL BANKS RICKY S PETRONI PAULINE C REVOC N & B OF GREENVILLE LLC POORE BROOK (JTWROS) ONEAL CRAIG AND KAREN LI SK BUILDERS INC ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN PENNINGTON JANNA D (JTWR DORITY PETER W ALEXRULES LLC MERCER MELANIE E MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L MIDDLEHOUSE BUILDERS INC NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN D R HORTON INC REYNOLDS CANDICE R ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC PINCKNEY RICHARD D AMOND CHRISTINE M (SURV) STAREK VICKY NVR INC MASSEY CAROLINE PINCKNEY BETHEL BRIDGES PROPERTIE SORENSEN PROPERTIES LLC ANDERSON RONALD L (JTWRO BURR RICHARD A (JTWROS) DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BERRY DANIEL CARR III MUMM JEFFREY W LUDWIG CATHY L (JTWROS) HEIL ASHLEY ALEXANDRA COTTAGES AT OVERBROOK LL MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L MURPH BARBARA F DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL NVR INC BROOKS JUSTIN BLANCHARD CEDAR CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC GEHRMAN RONALD K (JTWROS MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WINECOFF ROBERT M RISER GEORGE M (JTWROS) GILL BARBARA L JOHNSON MERRI ELLEN MARTIN BRIAN L MCATEER JAMES SCOTT (JTW GEORGE CAROLE D R HORTON INC D R HORTON INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH FRAZIER ERICA N CHESERY ANTHONY H (JTWRO HESTER BENJAMIN A (JTWRO D R HORTON INC NASH MICHAEL E (JTWROS)

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ADDRESS 4760 RICHMOND RD STE 200 4760 RICHMOND RD STE 200 502 MCDANIEL AVE 55 MONROE ST 96 BROOKFIELD OAKS DR STE 120 600 INDEPENDENCE BLVD 9A MEYERS DR 110 N MARKLEY ST APT 503 524 CHAMBLEE BLVD 312 MEDFORD DR 22 SCOGIN DR 514 HOUSTON ST 17 E LANNEAU DR 103 STONYBROOK DR 110 N MARKLEY ST UNIT 507 100 CHEDDINGTON DR 5 SARANAC LN 26 GRIFFITH CREEK DR 220 WHITWORTH WAY 5 BAYBORO WAY 209 WALNUT TRACE CT 600 INDEPENDENCE BLVD 702 KINGS HILL ST 813 WEMBLEY RD 306 ARLINGTON AVE 10 VICTORY AVE 232 SCOTTS BLUFF DR 21 OTIS ST 2 SHELDRAKE PL 109 RIVER FOREST LN 5 BRISTOW DR 313 SHELTON RD 603 MOSSY LEDGE LN 8 W RED FOX TRL 343 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 37 KEENAN CREEK WAY 1 GREENBURY LN 214 LAKEWAY PL 29 CAMMER AVE 204 WOODBRIDGE WAY 216 BOTANY RD 235 WANSLEY RD 3 EASTON MEADOW WAY 912 BLUE MOON ST 300 SPOKANE DR 104 STRATHAVEN CT 212 GRANITO DR 115 SHAPTON LN 101 HAVERCROFT LN 7 HAYNES ST 11 ASHBURY DR 7 FEVERSHAM CT 216 SPOKANE DR 20 HIALEAH RD 3 CROMARTY LN 10 ARROWOOD CT 101 AMBER OAKS DR 141 BEAUMONT CREEK LN PO BOX 921 300 WATKINS CIR 2150 E GERMANN RD STE 1 216 CLUB CART RD 40 RICHWOOD DR 118 GREENRIDGE DR 225 HOLSTEIN CT 2 APPLEWOOD DR 14 GLENVIEW PARK PL 12 EAGLE FIELD LN 201 LOVELACE CT 114 OXFORD ST 17 OCTAVIA RD 201 RIDGEFIELD LN 217 GRAYSON DR 331 KELSEY GLEN LN 321 BRISTLE FERN TRL 30 BARLOW CT 3 BRITON WAY 209 WATERS RUN LN 108 CARSONS POND DR 39 LADY MARION LN 37 ITASCA DR 139 HIGH HAT CIR 414 HILBURN WAY 221 RALEIGHWOOD LN 804 ABBERLY TRL 30 WRIGHT RD 15 GOLDEN OAK CT 215 SHEFFIELD RD 107 PRESERVATION DR 105 MOUNTAIN SLOPE CT

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KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS FOREST LAKE TWIN CREEKS NORTHWOOD AUTUMN RIDGE THE RESERVE AT RICHGLEN HIDDEN LAKE PRESERVE REMINGTON SUDDUTH FARMS LONGLEAF TIMBER GLEN MARKET POINT TOWNES HEARTHSTONE RIVER SHOALS HUNTERS GLEN SQUIRES CREEK STONE ESTATES HALF MILE LAKE AUTUMN RIDGE VILLAGE AT GREEN MEADOWS BRENTWOOD BROOKSIDE VILLAS VILLAGE AT GREEN MEADOWS KATHERINES GARDEN JONESVILLE LANDING VILLAS @ WEST GEORGIA SHELBURNE FARMS ROCKBRIDGE TOWNHOMES BRIDGEWATER TRIPLE CREEK REMINGTON KANATENAH VICTORIA PARK MOUNTAIN LAKE COLONIES RIVERSTONE BRADFORD NORTH REEDY SPRINGS BROOKSIDE VILLAS BROOKSIDE VILLAS GRESHAM WOODS CAMILLA PARK TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II ROCKBRIDGE TOWNHOMES CHARTWELL ESTATES PARKER'S PLACE ENOREE POINT CROFTSTONE COMMONS HUDDERS CREEK SOUTH MAIN TOWNES FAIRVIEW MEADOWS WOODHARBOR SEVEN OAKS WEMBERLY WAY BESSINGER SEVEN OAKS LAUREL MEADOWS WESTVIEW FAIRVIEW LAKE THE GLEN GRESHAM WOODS SEVEN OAKS SPARROWS POINT WALKERS CROSSING PANORAMA FARM LOCKELAND PARK THORNWOOD ACRES HOMESTEAD ACRES PARKS GROVE FOXDALE THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL WATERMILL DUNWOODY OAKS COUNTRY CHASE CREEKSIDE PEPPERTREE NEELY FOREST SHELBURNE FARMS TOWNES AT PINE GROVE LENHARDT VILLAGE SOUTH MAIN TOWNES HARTNESS TOWNES AT PINE GROVE MAYFAIR STATION TOWNES AT PINE GROVE

$275,000 $274,500 $274,000 $270,000 $267,480 $266,920 $266,882 $265,000 $265,000 $261,900 $260,402 $260,000 $260,000 $259,000 $255,000 $255,000 $255,000 $252,079 $251,980 $250,000 $249,370 $247,910 $246,990 $245,000 $245,000 $244,990 $244,900 $244,130 $243,000 $242,490 $242,000 $240,000 $240,000 $240,000 $240,000 $239,900 $239,155 $237,500 $235,645 $235,000 $234,990 $234,900 $232,677 $229,700 $229,000 $227,500 $227,500 $227,000 $226,000 $224,000 $222,500 $221,000 $220,000 $220,000 $220,000 $219,533 $219,000 $218,000 $215,000 $215,000 $215,000 $214,000 $210,000 $209,910 $209,710 $209,000 $207,000 $207,000 $205,950 $205,000 $205,000 $205,000 $200,000 $200,000 $196,989 $196,000 $195,000 $194,900 $193,000 $192,000 $191,000 $189,000 $189,000 $188,000 $185,445 $185,000 $184,000 $182,130 $182,000 $180,000

GIESE LEONARD ROBERT III BATES ALBERT DERO (JTWRO NEDS ANN L (JTWROS) NEDS BATSON PEYTON (JTWROS) MENNETTI KEIGAN (JTWROS) ARTUS EMILY RUTH (JTWROS GIBSON DAVID N RICE FRED ALLEN MAVURI SRI D (JTWROS) MA YOUNG HORACE DAILY LISA CAITLIN (JTWR BANDA GOURI PRIYA (JTWRO POND JOSHUA (JTWROS) PON TRONE JOSHUA LYLE KELLEY JOFRANNA T (JTWRO KELLOGG KATHLYNN M STANTON JANICE L HARRIS MICHAEL L SR (JTW PATEL ALKESH RAJANIKANT BRAN PEDRO ANTONIO SANDERS SHARON E (JTWROS ALEXIOU ARIE WINECOFF ROBERT M BREWER DEVIN THOMAS BREW ROBINSON JESSICA N (JTWR STEWART BETTY DELORES PRICE REBECCA MAE KING PAUL W (JTWROS) REN HENDERSON AUDREY (JTWROS SOUSA JESUS A PEREIRA DE WILLIAMS CHRISTOPHER KYL MOOSE PROPERTIES LLC BECK GINA M RICHARD DARR GAMBRELL BRANDON MARTIN FAMILY TRUST MINTEN CHELSEY NICOLE (J THOMPSON BOBBY EDWARD JR STILWELL CAROL CLINE ENGLAND SEAN SAUM JENNIFER ANN YARLETT DEVIN RICHARD (J SHEALY LUTHER A SR (JTWR SOLHTALAB IDEEN BOLINGER AMY LYNN MARTINEZ MARISELA FERNAN LEON HIX REAL ESTATE LLC ENSLEY JASON RICHARD LOVE NICHOLAS LEE DAY ANTRONE HARPER JAMES EDWARD (JTW HAWTHORNE ELIZABETH ANN SHARP HEATHER R (JTWROS) NVR INC HABERMAN DAVID JOHN (JTW HEMBREE LAURA (JTWROS) H THIELE KARL-HERMANN SMITH ANJA (JTWROS) WHIT KNOTTS JEREMY EARL SCHLAUDT ROY A (JTWROS) GUTHRIE KATIE (JTWROS) H HARRISON REBEKAH E (JTWR RINCON MARIE E NUNEZ (JT LUKINOVICH SCOTT S SHULL JEREMY J MENDOZA OSCAR GOMEZ (JTW VELASQUEZ DIANA (JTWROS) ROMAN GONZALO ARNOLD ANDREWS STEVEN (JTWROS) TUMMINIA LILIANA D COTUNA SHERI B SPRINGGATE HANNAH E (JTW HUDSON KATHERINE CARLY WASCHKOWSKI REVOCABLE TR VIVALDO DAMIAN SMITH JAWAAN WESTRY LARSON MICHELLE L BRADY JAMES THOMAS JR (J DAVIDSON MORGHAN BROOKE BAUMGARNER MEAGAN S VAN STEENBURGH CHRISTY C STRAWN JACOB WALTER LOPEZ ANGELA (JTWROS) LO GOSSETT KATHERINE (JTWRO WILLIAMS JASMINE GONICK ROBERT ZACHARY ADAMS GERARD JOHN (JTWRO MCDERMOTT JULIE RED WAGON PROPERTIES LLC CLINARD JUSTIN M CASTELLANO CRISTIAN DAVI

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PRICE $180,000 $179,900 $178,000 177000 $177,000 $176,200 $174,900 $172,900 $172,000 $170,000 $170,000 $170,000 $169,925 $169,500 $168,279 $168,000 $167,000 $165,000 $165,000 $164,000 $163,500 $162,900 $162,500 $162,500 $162,000 $162,000 $160,000 $159,900 $159,000 $158,500 $155,000 $155,000 $155,000 $155,000 $153,450 $152,017 $152,000 $150,038 $150,000 $150,000

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ADDRESS 103 FLEMING DR 16 TAZEWELL DR 3 DOTS DR PO BOX 4068 101 CASTLEBRIDGE CT 24 COUNTRY DALE DR 8 LEE EAST CT 112 KENNEDY DR 434 TIMBERVIEW LN 119 WAVERLY HALL LN 110 CAMDEN DR 129 W LONG CREEK CT 100 MOORLYN LN 408 CRAIG ST 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 55 BIRDSONG LN 128 BECKY GIBSON RD 5 SUNDERLAND DR 237 HADLEY COMMONS DR 400 CANEWOOD PL 108 SWANSGATE PL 115 MANCHESTER DR 8 HILLSIDE CIR 75 STALLINGS RD 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 29 209 TUCSON DR 207 PEAKS CT 73 FOREST LAKE DR 100 BELFREY DR 148 INGLEOAK LN 304 TOLLGATE RD 1610 CEDAR LANE RD 32 THURSTON RD 15 CONWAY DR 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 8950 CYPRESS WATERS BLVD 104 HEATHER LN 419 THE PKWY PMB 214 335 WITTROCK CT 108 PALAMON ST

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$150,000 $150,000 $147,000 LEWIS VILLAGE $147,000 RIVERSIDE TOWNES $145,500 BURBAN CREEK PLANTATION $145,000 THORNWOOD ACRES $145,000 FRANKLIN HEIGHTS $145,000 VILLAGE @ GLENLEA $144,100 1200 PELHAM $140,000 STONE ESTATES $140,000 $138,660 MOUNTAINVIEW ACRES $138,650 WINTERWOOD $137,900 PINE HILL VILLAGE $136,000 CARLTON PLACE $136,000 $135,000 EAGLEWATCH $128,750 MARTINDALE $126,500 MCKENNA COMMONS $126,000 $125,000 YORKTOWN CONDOS $125,000 $124,000 $120,000 THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS $120,000 WESTWOOD $120,000 MARTINDALE $115,500 ABNEY MILLS RENFREW PLANT $115,000 SINKING FUND COMMISSION $110,000 MAXWELL FARM $105,000 $104,000 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $102,000 $101,000 $100,000 $98,500 MCCULLOUGH HEIGHTS $90,000 HORSE CREEK FARMS $89,500 CHESTERFIELD ESTATES $87,000 $85,000 WOODSIDE MILLS $84,900

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PALMETTO INVESTORS LLC LUGO EPHARIM (JTWROS) LAMB PROPERTIES LLC MCELVEEN ELIZABETH LOUIS VAN STEENBURGH CHRISTY C BURNETT PHILLIP STEWERT CONNELL MARK SWEATT ERIN G SCOTT MICHAEL PATRICK FRAMPTON LISA (JTWROS) TOWNSEND KATHERINE 625 S OLD PIEDMONT LLC KNIGHT AMBER R CMH HOMES INC J&R CONSTRUCTION CONTRAC FLOWER DENNIS M (JTWROS) COX RAYMOND MARK BENNETT DELBERT W SIMMONS SHIRLEY FOWLER VESS DAVID GLENN TERRY DAPHNE B GREENLEAF REALTY INC GREENBERG DONNA DOLL ANTHONY LEE MICHAEL EMMA VERNA FERRARO BRIAN KEITH SIMMONS SHIRLEY F 1776LTR LLC LOCKE RICHARD W MAXWELL FARM LLC OTEY JEANNE L GIRARD JAMES W (IRA) SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND SOUTHEASTERN REAL ESTATE WAGNER PROPERTIES LLC ORRELL ANGELA M CHIBBARO CYNTHIA A ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC HUNTER JAMES SE INVESTMENT GROUP LLC

JAVA HOLDINGS LLC O'BRIEN JOANNA HUTCHINSON RACHEL L SRE LEWIS VILLAGE LLC COURTNEY JACKIE WEAVER BRADFORD CONNELL DAVID S BOYD WHITNEY L BLESSED FUTURE LLC FRAMPTON LISA HEARD & SAAD LLC WESTON SCIP LAND COMPANY WEBB EMILY (JTWROS) WEBB BUNNEY JAMES A HADDAD BASSAM ESBER (JTW FADIA PARAG (JTWROS) FAD PINECREEK COTTAGES LLC ASPIRE ENTERPRISES LLC PALMETTO HERITAGE PROPER CRAWFORD KEVIN M (JTWROS WATERS KAY R REECE MORGAN OGLE REINALDO SCOTT RICE ELIZABETH MORTGAGE EQUITY CONVERSI MORTGAGE EQUITY CONVERSI PALMETTO HERITAGE PROPER FREEMAN CRAIG N (JTWROS) JAVA HOLDINGS LLC J FRANCIS BUILDERS LLC PHAM BA HOANG BOLICK CONNOR (JTWROS) B ROACH KATHRYN E SC HOME OFFER LLC ELDRIDGE KAYLA (JTWROS) LAKEVIEW LOAN SERVICING CROWDER JAMES STERLING L & K HOMES LLC SC HOME OFFER LLC 14 E 8TH STREET LLC

1500 WADE HAMPTON BLVD PO BOX 2845 631 OLD HUNTS BRIDGE RD 10 LONGVIEW TER 38 BAILESS CT 17 BIG JAKE PASS 106 BRUSHY CREEK RD 53 VANTROSS LN 1560 WADE HAMPTON BLVD 1267 SHADOW WAY 105 NELSON ST 4760 RICHMOND RD STE 200 102 RASOR DR 14 LANGLEAF WAY 103 CASHMERE DR 4 CEDAR GLENN WAY 6 FAIRLANE DR 204 LOUISVILLE DR PO BOX 1145 21 DAPPLE GRAY CT 1111 ANSEL SCHOOL RD 2530 E NORTH ST UNIT 4A 2300-A STANDING SPRINGS RD 731 FARRS BRIDGE RD 8950 CYPRESS WATERS BLVD 8950 CYPRESS WATERS BLVD PO BOX 1145 206 MILL ST 1500 WADE HAMPTON BLVD 101 LOVETT DR 5 NEW PERRY RD 107 N WOODS DR 104 BRIDGE RD 31 BOLAND CT 535-B S OLD PIEDMONT HWY 3637 SENTARA WAY 341 OLD BETHEL RD 309 CLEARVIEW RD 107 PARK LANE CT 314 LLOYD ST

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

ARTS & CULTURE

when the lights go out... The coronavirus impact on Greenville arts groups could be devastating n story by PAUL HYDE

T

he coronavirus pandemic is already having a major impact on Greenville’s performing arts organizations with expected losses of hundreds of thousands of dollars — or even millions — after temporarily closing their doors. “It’s a substantial impact, and if it keeps going the way it seems like it’s going, it will be devastating,” said Mike Sablone, producing artistic director at the Warehouse Theatre. Arts groups are urging patrons to consider donating the cost of tickets rather than requesting refunds or exchanges.

There’s so much civic pride here in Greenville. I don’t think the community at large is going to let any of our wonderful cultural amenities fail.” -Alan Ethridge, executive director, Metropolitan Arts Council “If it is within your means to donate back that ticket price to any theater, it’s incredibly important and helpful,” Sablone said. The Warehouse Theatre will lose tens of thousands of dollars in revenues after the cancellations of the last weekend of performances of its highly successful “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” and the entire run of “100 Saints You Should Know,” Sablone said. Greenville Theatre, meanwhile, lost about $20,000 in potential revenues when it canceled the last four performances of “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder,” another well-attended show, said Allen McCalla, artistic director of Greenville Theatre.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

“It’s mind-numbing, the impact this is going to have, and the worst of it is that we don’t know when it’s going to end,” McCalla said. Losses for the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, meanwhile, will likely be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars following the cancellation of the rest of its 2019-20 season — 16 performances of 10 programs. “It’s truly unprecedented,” said Julie Fish, executive director of the Greenville Symphony. “We’re all trying to find the path forward.” Among the canceled Greenville Symphony concerts is the season-closer: a performance with the Greenville Chorale of Beethoven’s towering Ninth Symphony, always an important event in a community’s cultural life. “I’ve been alive 60 years, and I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Alan Ethridge, executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council, an umbrella arts organization in Greenville. “There’ll be a significant loss of income.”

SC LOSSES IN THE MILLIONS

Statewide, losses by arts groups will be in the millions of dollars, said David Platts, executive director of the South Carolina Arts Commission. “It’s devastating to our artists and arts organizations,” Platts said. “They didn’t make any of these decisions to cancel performances lightly, and I’m sure they made them with a lot of distress in their hearts, but they had to consider the safety of their artists and their patrons.” Every Upstate performing-arts organization has been affected by the shutdown, with widespread cancellations and postponements of performances. Centre Stage has postponed its big spring musical, Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5,” which was set to open March 19. Its Prisma Health Fringe Series show, “’Night,

Mother,” also has been postponed. International Ballet postponed its production of “Giselle” to June 8-9. Canceled concerts at the Peace Center include legendary violinist Itzhak Perlman and the band America. Postponements include comedian Jay Leno and jazz artists John Pizzarelli and Catherine Russell. Greenville Theatre not only canceled the last weekend’s performances of “Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder,” but postponed its next show, “The Dixie Swim Club,” to Aug. 13-23. Allen McCalla hopes upcoming performances of Rumours (the Fleetwood Mac tribute, May 1-3) and Greenville Theatre’s big summer musical “The Producers,” slated for June, will proceed as planned. “If something happened and we had to change the dates of ‘The Producers,’ that would be truly devastating to the theater,” McCalla said. Despite the hardships, Greenville arts leaders agree that closing their doors temporarily was in the best interest of the community. “It’s tough, but it’s the responsible thing to do,” Fish said. “We want to be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.” Sablone pointed out that arts patrons tend to be older – a demographic group that also is particularly susceptible to the coronavirus. “The health and safety of our community comes first,” he said.

NOT LAYING OFF WORKERS

Upstate arts organizations have staff payrolls to meet, and that becomes a significantly more difficult task without ticket revenues. Greenville Theatre, with a full-time staff of 13 and three part-time workers, relies on tickets sales to fund 70% of its $1.2 mil-

The Ghost Light A ghost light is a single bulb left burning whenever a theater is dark. Some argue that its function is to chase away or calm mischievous spirits. Practically, it's used so that late-night workers don't take a tumble off a dark stage. Regardless, the ghost light means that the lights never truly go out in a theater. The light left burning on the stage has become a "perfect symbol" for the theater during the coronavirus pandemic. Sources: playbill.com | onstageblog.com | artsatl.org

lion budget. Arts organization also face significant upfront costs — from hiring part-time technical and artistic staff to paying royalties and building sets. Greenville arts organizations, however, are not laying off workers but have committed to paying full-time staff. Some are even paying part-time contractors. The Greenville Symphony, for instance,


THINGS TO SEE & DO is not only paying full-time staff but also dozens of orchestral musicians who were contracted to perform in concerts that will not take place. “Our goal and commitment right now is to honor our financial obligations to all of the musicians who perform with the symphony,” Fish said. That commitment contrasts with some high-profile arts groups nationwide that have already laid off staff. New York’s Metropolitan Opera, the largest performing arts organization in the nation by budget, will lay off all of its union employees after March 31.

production photo from Greenville Theatre's "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" photo by ESCOBAR PHOTOGRAPHY

Still, canceled productions mean that some theaters may not be able to hire an array of part-time contractors — from musical directors to choreographers to carpenters, painters and electricians — who might otherwise have been employed.

COMMUNITY RALLYING

Greenville’s world-class arts organizations not only enhance the community’s quality of life but also provide a big financial impact, contributing $225 million to the local economy, Ethridge said. Theaters help boost the bottom line of local restaurants and hotels especially. In South Carolina as a whole, the arts industry pumps $9.7 billion into the state’s economy. Greenville performing arts leaders hope that some financial relief will come in the form of low-interest loans from banks, and federal and state assistance.

If it is within your means to donate back that ticket price to any theater, it’s incredibly important and helpful.” -Mike Sablone, producing artistic director, The Warehouse Theatre

It’s mind-numbing, the impact this is going to have, and the worst of it is that we don’t know when it’s going to end.” -Allen McCalla, artistic director, Greenville Theatre The Warehouse Theatre, meanwhile, paid a dozen actors and others for the final weekend of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” even though those performances were canceled. It also compensated 15 artists who were working on its next show, “100 Saints You Should Know.” The theater hopes its production of “Appropriate” will open, as planned, in late May. “We’re crossing our fingers and toes that we can move forward with that,” Sablone said.

In addition, they’re encouraging patrons who have purchased tickets to turn those into donations. “That would be huge for us,” Fish said. “It would be a significant amount of money.” Many patrons have already donated the value of their tickets to canceled Greenville Symphony concerts, Fish said. Some sponsors of those canceled concerts have converted their gifts into a matching challenge. “We are grateful for this extraordinary support from the community,” Fish said. “Because of it, the music will go on and ensure we can continue to share our musical gift across Greenville.” With the remainder of its season canceled, the Greenville Symphony may not perform again until its 202021 season begins this fall. But Fish hopes there might be an opportunity for a special concert before then. “We’d like to bring the community together and say, ‘We weathered this, and let’s celebrate with the symphony,’” she said. “We feel strongly that music is a force that unites a community.” Ethridge believes the Greenville community will rally around its arts organizations. “There’s so much civic pride here in Greenville,” Ethridge said. “We certainly survived the recession of 2008. I don’t think the community at large is going to let any of our wonderful cultural amenities fail.”

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ARTS & CULTURE

UPSTATE BEAT

The Single File: Guitarist Jacob Johnson charts the highs and lows of an ‘Old Soul’ VINCENT HARRIS Contributor

photo PROVIDED

Guitarist Jacob Johnson’s new single, “Old Soul,” is an instrumental. But the music the virtuoso-level acoustic guitarist wrote is so evocative that words aren’t really required. The song is divided into two very distinct vibes; it’s bookended by a loping, mid-tempo groove that features a melancholy, percussive melody from Johnson’s guitar. But then the mood shifts. In the middle of the song, Johnson picks out a low-down, dirty blues-style solo, but not the kind of blues that’s meant to be sad. This is the kind of playing that gets an audience excited; it’s forceful, gritty picking that you can practically hear people cheering for in the background. And then, after that muscular musical detour, Johnson slides back into the main melody, ending the song on a resigned note. Johnson says that “Old Soul” is explicitly meant to evoke the lows and highs of being a touring musician. “There are these two moments that happen when a musician is on the

One of Johnson’s previous singles was a cover of “Chim Chim Cher-ee” from the film “Mary Poppins” road,” he says. “One of them is when you’re standing onstage, and there are all these smiling faces, and they’re cheering, and you’re the most important person in the world. And there’s another moment where you’re in the car, broke and hungry. And those moments are like 45 minutes apart.”

Johnson says that the song is a sort of search for balance between the euphoria of performing and the hard, lonely work that musicians put in behind the scenes.

In terms of mood and tone, the great thing about instrumental music is that it doesn’t have to be explicit.” -Jacob Johnson, guitarist “There’s something about the feeling of that song that, in my mind, is resolving those two moments,” he says. “I try to put both of those moments in perspective and say, ‘Neither one of these is real; I just have to keep doing what I’m doing.’” Johnson usually performs as a oneman-band more or less, knocking out melodies, bass lines and even percussion on his trusty acoustic and singing, as well. But he says that as the song developed, he knew that “Old Soul,” which he recorded at Greenville’s Sit N’ Spin studios last year, wasn’t going to need any words. “Sometimes I know it’s an instrumental, sometimes I have to play with it for a while before I know what direction it’s going to go in,” he says. “This one took me a while. The musical hook just kind of showed up, and I wasn’t sure where the rest of it was going to go. But eventually I figured out that I wasn’t going to be able to add to this musical idea. In terms of mood and tone, the great thing about instrumental music is that it doesn’t have to be explicit.” MARCH 27 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

31


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

PUZZLES

“7� ACROSS

By Myles Mellor

Across 1. 2nd letter addendum 4. Beautician, at times 8. Kunis of Hollywood 12. Like a lemon 18. Easier than stick-shift 21. Andes' tubers 22. Reno state 23. Stevie Wonder's 7 25. There are seven of them, goes with 44 across 26. Collaborate 27. Bleat of a goat 28. One side of a vote 29. Saxon starter 34. Letter-shaped workbench groove 38. Corp. bigwig 40. Thin paper 44. See 25 across 45. Small fasteners 49. UK TV 50. More infrequent 51. Biblical prophet 53. Tuba note? 54. Chop down 55. Williams of "Ugly Betty" 57. Similar to a web 59. ____ gow poker 61. End of the year month, for short 62. Poorly 64. More than unpopular 65. Page of music 67. Counting calories 71. Greek letters

72. Western remade in 2016 76. Jazzman Saunders 77. Cold symptom 78. Mubarak's predecessor 79. Put together 81. Internet addresses 82. E.R. workers 85. "Murders in the ___Morgue" 86. Onslaught 88. Japanese grill 91. Hair 94. Leafy drink 95. It gets a pedi 98. Spring sound 100. On target 101. Out for the night 103. Short pastoral piece 104. Kind of student 106. Blockhead 107. Marina sights 109. Inventor Nikola 110. "Sorry if ___ you down" 113. Run in front of U 115. Defaulter's comeuppance 119. At sixes and ____ 122. Temporary star 129. Lay it on 130. S.A. ancient 131. Craftiest 132. Maxima makers 133. Attention getting sound 134. Prompts unpleasantly

135. Figures

Down

1. Bribes, with "off" 2. Chop ___ 3. Ollie's partner in old comedy 4. Old German currency 5. Chinese basketball giant 6. Spider is one 7. Thorax protector 8. Dark syrup 9. Hosp. area 10. In perscriptions, milk 11. Pump 12. What's more 13. B follower 14. Chekhov's first play 15. Early 20th-century art movement 16. Futilely 17. Small islands 19. Free Willys 20. NYC transport 24. "Who __?": Saints fans' chant 30. "All Songs Considered" network 31. Substance 32. Old Italian money 33. Incessantly 35. Actress, Minnelli 36. Common tip jar item 37. Sound of reproach 38. Algonquian speaker 39. Serious grime 40. Gov. health org. 41. Berlioz's "Les nuits

d'___" 42. Vane dir. 43. Kind of diagram 46. Defamatory phrase 47. Hire 48. Outbuildings 52. Coastal features 56. Speak derisively 58. Feeding stage of insects 59. Spanish chef's concoction 60. Bank letters 62. Suffix with chlor63. Vietnam War Memorial designer 65. Relating to a word sequence 66. Enkindle 68. Nothing at all 69. Biting 70. Russian empresses 72. Strains 73. Barely beat 74. No ___, ands or buts 75. Dean's e-mail address ender 76. Mazda convertible 80. Stringed musical instruments 83. Catches red-handed 84. Joplin of ragtime fame 87. Beheads 88. "Hey!" 89. Abuse 90. Bring on board 91. Game played in "Crazy Rich Asians",

NEW LOOK.

SAME SOUL. Get 12 issues of TOWN directly in your mailbox. TOWNCAROLINA.COM/SUBSCRIBE 32

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

Crossword Solution: Page 14 ___ Jongg 92. Choose 93. Local fund-raising grp. 96. Parker part 97. Big fuss 99. Grissom's first name, on "CSI" 102. Cafeteria-goers

SUDOKU

105. Decorated, on a French menu 108. Fig. in identity theft 110. "The heat ___!" 111. Pants maker Strauss 112. Nights before 114. N.F.L. stats 116. Pristine plot

117. Coin across the border 118. More scraps 120. Confidentiality agreement, for short 121. Father's pride 122. Not guzzle 123. Low-ranking U.S.N. officer

DIFFICULTY LEVEL: MEDIUM

By Myles Mellor

Sudoku Solution: Page 14

124. Venture capitalists, abbr. 125. Redheaded doll 126. Legislator's cry 127. Jokester 128. Approves


2020

ART FOR GREENVILLE Anne Goldthwaite: Modern Woman

Over the past three decades the Museum’s annual fund-raising campaign, Art for Greenville, has supported the purchase of scores of important works by America’s greatest artists. While operational support from Greenville County taxpayers ensures accessibility and free admission for all, the art collection depends on donors like you and your continuing generosity. Your commitment to the GCMA and support of its collections allows us to bring art to life for a wide range of Upstate audiences, including children and seniors. Please help us continue to grow this extraordinary educational and cultural asset—a world-class collection that’s right at home in Greenville. To learn more or to make a gift, visit gcma.org.

THE EXHIBITION Anne Goldthwaite: Modern Woman OPENS LATE SPRING.

Anne Goldthwaite, 1869-1944 The Green Parrot, circa 1910 oil on canvas 21⅛ x 18 ⅛ inches

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

GCMA Journal Goldthwaite.indd 2

admission free

3/20/20 3:26 PM


LEGAL NOTICES

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GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC NOTICE Notice of abandoned vehicle: 2006 Mazda RX-8, VIN number JM1FE173560205405. Vehicle is located at Squirrel Towing. There is a bill of $4500 on this vehicle. Looking for owner.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS COUNTY OF GREENVILLE THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C. A. NO.: 2019-CP-23-05038 Lori J. Lacourciere, Plaintiff,vs. Kendall Blake Kelley, Defendant. TO: KENDALL BLAKE KELLEY, DEFENDANT: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office at 1209 North Main Street, P.O. Box 2861, Anderson, South Carolina 29622 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. THE ALLEN & ALLEN LAW FIRM Joshua C. B. Allen, SC Bar #80398 Donald L. Chuck Allen, SC Bar #10421 Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 2861 Anderson, SC 29622 864-226-6184 Dated: August 27, 2019 Anderson, South Carolina

LEGAL NOTICE Notification is hereby given that JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, Ohio 43240 has filed an application with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”) on or about March 27, 2020, as specified in 12 CFR Part 5, for permission to establish a domestic branch at the southeast corner of the intersection of Woods Crossing Road and Haywood Road, Greenville, Greenville County, SC 29607. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file comments in writing with the Licensing Manager, Large Banks Licensing Operations, 400 7th Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20219 within 30 days of the date of this publication. The public portion of the filing is available upon request from the OCC. The public may find information about the filing (including the closing date of the comment period) in the OCC’s Weekly Bulletin available at HYPERLINK “http://www.occ.gov” www.occ.gov.

LEGAL NOTICE Notification is hereby given that JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, Ohio 43240 has filed an application with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”) on or about March 27, 2020, as specified in 12 CFR Part 5, for permission to establish a domestic branch at the northwest corner of the intersection of Pelham Road and Old Boiling Springs Road, Greenville, Greenville County, SC 29615. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file comments in writing with the Licensing Manager, Large Banks Licensing Operations, 400 7th Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20219 within 30 days of the date of this publication. The public portion of the filing is available upon request from the OCC. The public may find information about the filing (including the closing date of the comment period) in the OCC’s Weekly Bulletin available at HYPERLINK “http://www.occ.gov” www.occ.gov

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THE GREENVILLE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY 2020 COUNTY CONVENTION Will be held on Monday, March 30, at 6:30 p.m. at the Phillis Wheatley Community Center, 40 John McCarroll Way, Greenville SC 29607. Agenda: Election of county party officers, election of state convention delegates, and adoption of resolutions for submission to the 2020 state convention. Filed candidates for election in 2020 will address the convention. Paid for by the Greenville County Democratic Party, 1300-J East Washington St., Greenville, SC 29607; Phone 864-232-5331, www.greenvilledemocrats.com.

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO. 2019-CP-23-06196 Sawblade, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Black River Investments, LLC as well as their heirs, assigns, personal representatives, and devisees, and all other persons known or unknown who may claim any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described herein; any unknown adults being as a class designated as John Doe whose true name is unknown; and any unborn infants or persons under disability being as a class designated as Richard Roe, whose true name is unknown, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint, in the aboveentitled action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned at 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof upon you, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. BY:/s/ Matthew McCord Matthew McCord, S. C. Bar #79030 Attorney for the Plaintiff 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 593-2292

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // MARCH 27

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2020-CP-23-00428 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Bank of America, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. Mark Callaway a/k/a Mark W. Callaway; Julie Callaway; Bank of America, N.A., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm LLP P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on January 22, 2020. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm LLP, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803-726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm LLP, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

LEGAL NOTICE Notification is hereby given that JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, Ohio 43240 has filed an application with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”) on or about March 27, 2020, as specified in 12 CFR Part 5, for permission to establish a domestic branch at the northwest corner of the intersection of Woodruff Road and Smith Hines Road, Greenville, Greenville County, SC 29607. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file comments in writing with the Licensing Manager, Large Banks Licensing Operations, 400 7th Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20219 within 30 days of the date of this publication. The public portion of the filing is available upon request from the OCC. The public may find information about the filing (including the closing date of the comment period) in the OCC’s Weekly Bulletin available at HYPERLINK “http://www.occ.gov” www.occ.gov

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ABC Notices $165 All others $1.20 per line

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SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO: 2019-CP-23-06812 Renaissance Property Group, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Arthur Littlejohn, Jr., Unlimited Dimensions, LLC, Karl B. Allen, and TD Bank as successor in interest to Carolina First Bank, as well as their heirs, assigns, personal representatives, and devisees, and all other persons known or unknown who may claim any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described herein; any unknown adults being as a class designated as John Doe whose true name is unknown; and any unborn infants or persons under disability being as a class designated as Richard Roe, whose true name is unknown, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint, in the aboveentitled action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned at 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof upon you, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. BY:/s/ Matthew McCord Matthew McCord, S. C. Bar #79030 Attorney for the Plaintiff 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 593-2292

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS FOR THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO. 2019CP2306140 Courageous Enterprises, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Frances Y. Robinson, Antwione Young, and Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as successor in interest to Wachovia Bank N.A., and the State of South Carolina, and The United States of America as well as their heirs, assigns, personal representatives, and devisees, and all other persons known or unknown who may claim any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the real estate described herein; any unknown adults being as a class ) designated as John Doe whose true name is unknown; and any unborn infants or persons under disability being as a class designated as Richard Roe, whose true name is unknown, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint, in the above-entitled action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned at 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof upon you, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. BY:/s/ Matthew McCord Matthew McCord, S. C. Bar #79030 Attorney for the Plaintiff 109 E North St. Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 593-2292

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Tipsy Holdings II LLC dba Tipsy Taco intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 702 Fairview Rd. STE. 104, Simpsonville, SC 29680. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 5, 2020 . For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Kennington Family Winery, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of WINE at 515 Beaver Dam Road, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 12, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that La Barra Mexican Restaurant & Bar LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 1123 Cedar Lane Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 12, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Think Tank Brew Lab, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 101 Airport Road, Greenville, SC 29607 . To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 5, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dolgencorp, LLC DBA Dollar General Store #21264 intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 705 CONESTEE RD., Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 5, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Tipsy Holdings II LLC dba Tipsy Taco intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 215 Pelham Rd , Suite A 206, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 5, 2020 . For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Crab Bag LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 54 Lois Avenue, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 22, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Tipsy Holdings II LLC dba Tipsy Taco intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 15 Conestee Avenue, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 5, 2020 . For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Basil Greenville, Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 9 N. Laurens St., Greenville, SC 2960. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 29, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Purple Rose intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2824 Geer Highway, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 29, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Siyaaram, LLC d/b/a Liquor Fiesta intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 6259 White Horse Road, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 29, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


Greenville Theatre

Artcards purchased now will be valid through July 2021

THE MAC ARTCARD

With a donation of $50 or more to the Metropolitan Arts Council, MAC, you will receive an ArtCard which entitles you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets for one time at each of the following venues for one full year! The ArtCard is a great way to sample the fantastic performing arts in Greenville at a substantial savings. In just two uses the ArtCard pays for itself.

*select shows

Get your ArtCard today!

You can donate through PayPal on our website, over the phone or at our office in downtown Greenville.

*MainStage productions

Metropolitan Arts Council 16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com/donate @macARTScouncil | #gvlARTS


SPRING CLEARANCE SALE SAVINGS of up to 80% OFF

Upholstery/Leather Fairfield Bench SALE: $195 Retail: $805 Sherrill Custom Ottoman SALE: $269 Retail: $786

Hickory Chair Monroe Sofa Retail: $5444 SALE: $1295 Hancock & Moore Claudette Sofa Retail: $8625 SALE: $1895

Bedroom/Dining Cresent Cottage Mirror SALE: $95 Retail: $725 Cresent Nightstand Retail: $1112 SALE: $195

Hancock & Moore Leather Cocktail Ottoman Retail: $2221 SALE: $295

Occasional Johnathan Charles Oyster Veneer Table Retail: $1920 SALE: $295

Hickory Chair Eton Swivel Chair Retail: $4230 SALE: $495

Johnathan Charles Round Table Retail: $1395 SALE: $295

Hancock Twig Dresser Retail: $4050 SALE: $495

Hickory Chair Swivel Chair Retail: $3495 SALE: $495

Jonathan Charles Coffee Table Retail: $2985 SALE: $395

Durham Triple Dresser Retail: $2940 SALE: $795

Motioncraft Power Recliner Retail: $3421 SALE: $495

Theo & Alex Bubinga Flame Table Retail: $1377 SALE: $395

Cresent Cottage Buffett Retail: $2930 SALE: $795

Hickory Chair Willow Chair Retail: $3279 SALE: $495

Hickory Chair Gray Side Table Retail: $2225 SALE: $395

Precedent Leather King Bed Retail: $5175 SALE: $1495

Jessica Charles Sparrow Swivel Chair Retail: $2337 SALE: $495

Hickory Chair Sherry Side Table Retail: $2025 SALE: $395

Mr and Mrs Howard King Bed Retail: $5215 SALE: $1495

Hickory Chair Virginia Chair & Ottoman Retail: $6122 SALE: $795

Hickory Chair West Paces Side Table Retail: $2931 SALE: $695

Cresent 3 Piece Bedroom Group Retail: $6284 SALE : $1895

Fine Furniture 3 Drawer Chest Retail: $2475 SALE: $495

This is just a partial listing of the fantastic items on SALE. Hurry in for the best selection and to see these amazing deals in person. BROWSE OUR COLLECTIONS ONLINE AT OLDCOLONYFURNITURE.COM 3411 AUGUSTA ROAD | GREENVILLE, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

Contemporary & Traditional

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March 27, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

March 27, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

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