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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, March 17, 2017 • Vol.19, No.11

A HAND UP

When Evelyn McLeod and her family were temporarily homeless, the YMCA was there page 16

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03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

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THE BIG SHOW

THEY SAID IT

“One thing I’ve told our players: Don’t just be happy to be there.

BE PREPARED TO MAKE A RUN.” Frank Martin, coach of the USC Gamecocks basketball team, on their appearance in the NCAA Tournament.

March 23 Ann Wilson

“If someone is drunk and passed out at a bus stop, they did not get drunk at 417 Rutherford Street.”

“One of the greatest vocalists in rock for more than 40 years, Wilson will deliver classic-rock hits from Heart as well as a few choice covers.”

Lauren Stephens, director of social ministries for the Salvation Army, responding to complaints about the facility’s clients.

Photo Courtesy of the University of South Carolina Athletics Department

“It’s going to get loud.”

See our interview on page 25.

Jason Sholz, chef and co-owner of Stella’s Southern Brasserie, on the intentional “fun” atmosphere of the new Verdae restaurant.

SPACE AGE Photo courtesy of NASA

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION Views from your community

Come Together

The Youth and Law Enforcement Forum will help create a more just Greenville IN MY OWN WORDS

By Jalen Elrod

This is not a time when the American people have a lot of trust in their political institutions. I’ve learned this working on various political campaigns in Greenville through the years. I saw it in my fight to try to stop the ravages of gentrification in our city. And I saw it again working with organizations like the Greenville NAACP and others in the constant struggle to register people to vote. “Y’all only come around when you want a vote. Never when we need you.” That phrase, the phrase I hear far too often, lingered in my mind as I took over the Greenville Young Democrats last fall. It should be the goal of those involved in politics not to be self-serving but to serve the people and to make life better for future generations. That is why it has been the goal of the Greenville Young Democrats to be less of a political organization and more of a grass-roots community organization, dedicated to making Greenville the great place we know it can be.

It is why we host fish-fry fundraisers for groups like the Phillis Wheatley Community Center. It is why we hold toy drives for the children of Frazee Dream Center during the Christmas season. It is why we held food drives for St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church so they can continue feeding the poor of our community. It is in that spirit of bettering Greenville that Greenville Young Democrats is hosting an event for young Greenvillians called the Youth and Law Enforcement Forum, featuring Police Chief Ken Miller and Sheriff Will Lewis. The history of law enforcement, not only in Greenville but also throughout the United States, has too often been perilous. Black Americans who marched in the civil rights movement knew this when they were beaten by police batons for taking rides for freedom throughout the South in the early 1960s. They learned this when they faced Bull Connor in the streets of Birmingham, Ala., and Jim Clark on that sacred bridge in Selma, Ala. Our Latino community has seen it as they’ve faced the stigma of racial profiling and the slur of being deemed “illegal,” with many law-abiding immi-

Drawn Out Loud

grants of that community facing deportation and demagoguery. Our Muslim community has seen it, as they’ve contended with the rise of Islamophobia in the aftermath of 9/11; confronted with constant vilification and distortions of their faith, they have had to remain ever vigilant, lest they suffer the generalization others have sought to put on them. Our LGBT community is still facing discrimination and even the threat of violence simply for being who they are. These are a few of the many reasons why this forum with Greenville law enforcement is so pivotal. We will make a mistake if we think Greenville isn’t susceptible to the precarious dynamics we see playing out between police and many historically disadvantaged communities nationally. That is why I am so thankful to Chief Miller and Sheriff Lewis for agreeing to participate. I’m thankful that grass-roots organizations like Greenville BlackLivesMatter, the Hispanic Alliance, the Islamic Society, Rehinge, and GenderBenders have agreed to participate, representing the youth of so many of our communities. The mistrust in many of these communities toward law enforcement runs deep. For the police chief and the sheriff to be willing to join this effort and build these bridges gives me hope for improving relations and making Greenville a shining city on a hill, an example for the nation. That is the purpose of the Greenville Young Democrats and what we strive to do. From the BlackLivesMatter protests in downtown Greenville last summer to the more recent protests we’ve seen on behalf of immigrants and refugees, historic injustices have come to the forefront of the conversation here in town. This forum is the beginning of making Greenville a more just place. A place that recognizes the sins of the past and seeks to overcome them. The beginning of building a community we can be proud of. So we can finally be #yeahTHATGreenville. The Greenville Young Democrats Youth and Law Enforcement Forum will be held at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church on March 23, 6–7:30pm. It will be moderated by Eryn Rogers of 7 News. Jalen Elrod is the president of the Greenville Young Democrats.

by Steve Stegelin

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

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NEWS

EMERGENCY POWER

FOR HOME SWEET HOME

The gamma rays from the newly discovered blazars traveled at the speed of light for at least 1.2 billion years before reaching Earth. Photo by NASA.

CLEMSON

CITY

Scientists discover super-black holes

QuikTrip drops Nicholtown store plan

Clemson University scientists have identified five of the oldest and largest gamma-ray blazars yet known, a discovery that may unlock the mysteries of deep space.

While QuikTrip has dropped its plan to build a convenience store in the Nicholtown community on Laurens Road, construction has started on a new store on another one of the gateways to downtown.

A blazar is a type of active galactic nuclei — a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy with a large disk of matter whirling around it. As matter falls into the supermassive black hole, it emits powerful jets of gamma radiation that move close to the speed of light. “The discovery of these supermassive black holes, which launch jets that emit more energy in one second than our sun will produce in its entire lifetime, was the culmination of a yearlong research project,” said Clemson University astrophysicist Marco Ajello. Ajello and his team sifted through a catalog of about 1.4 million quasars, which are galaxies with active supermassive black holes at their core, and identified the five undiscovered blazars. As with many discoveries, the findings present more questions. That includes the mystery of how the newly discovered black holes grew to be at least 1 billion solar masses in just 1.4 billion years — barely enough time for a black hole to reach such monstrous proportions. “Is it because one black hole ate a lot all the time for a very long time? Or maybe because it bumped into other black holes and merged into one?” Ajello said. “There are mechanisms at work that we have yet to unravel. Puzzles that we have yet to solve,” he continued. “When we do eventually solve them, we will learn amazing things about how the universe was born, how it grew into what it has become, and what the distant future might hold as the universe continues to progress toward old age.” —Andrew Moore

QuikTrip had planned to build a store on Laurens Road between Underwood and McAdoo avenues but decided not to pursue it because the company believed there was not enough support from city officials, said Mike Thornbrugh, the company’s manager of public and government affairs. He also said it appeared some of the potential requirements would make the site uneconomical. The company filed an application with the city to rezone two houses that were behind the parcel of land that fronted Laurens Road. The application was withdrawn before it got to the Greenville Planning Commission after neighborhood residents came out against the project.

Financing Available!

But the company has started work on a new store on Academy Street and Markley Avenue. Grading is underway and the store should open sometime in September, Thornbrugh said. That location was controversial, too, but an attempt to stop the construction was unsuccessful. Opponents had argued that the store was not what Greenville needed on one of its gateways to downtown and did not comply with the city’s comprehensive plan. Tulsa, Okla.-based QuikTrip first entered the Upstate market in 2011 and now has 31 stores in Greenville, Spartanburg, and Anderson counties. The company plans to build a store at Laurens Road and Fairforest Way, near I-85. QuikTrip plans to demolish the MacShore manufacturing NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 6

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NEWS

Registration Form

A Day Retreat For Women Who Have Experienced The Death of a Child

Name:

Schedule for the Day

Please join us for a day of encouragement, pampering, loving support, comfort food, authentic presenters, and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Healer and Comforter.

8:15 8:45 9:30 9:45 10:45 11:35 12:20 1:05 2:00

We welcome mothers at all points along their journey of healing regardless of the age of the child or the length of time since the death.

Registration Opening Session - Kathy Schultz Break Circle of Friends (Share our Stories) First Small Group Session Second Small Group Session Lunch Third Group Session Ending Session - Dr. Frank Page

To honor the memory of our children, those who wish may bring a picture of her child to Our Guest Presenters display on our Memory Wall for the day. Kathy Schultz - Mother and Bible Teacher The pictures will be returned at the end of the retreat. Frank Page - President CEO, Chiefcomfort Please join us for a day of encouragement,Dr.pampering, lovingand support,

Address:

Phone #:

NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 5

plant currently on the site. Construction is expected to begin in late April.

The proposed Nicholtown QuikTrip was to be two blocks away from the headquarters of Spinx, a Greenville-based convenience Name of Child: (For Memory Wall)store chain. Spinx’s recently rebuilt store on Pendleton Avenue and Academy Street is less • Please circle 4than sessions from the first list on a half-mile from QuikTrip’s Academy Street the back. You may number them in order of site. —Cindy Landrum Email:

interest and we will do our best to select 2 classes from your choices for Session 1 & 2 Small Groups...then select only 1 from Session 3 Choices.

food, • Please return this form with the $10 authentic presenters, and sharing of registration all fee to: faiths and at all points along their journey of healing regardless of the age FBC Simpsonville Foundational Scripture: Music Provided by 3 Hedge Street of the child or the length of time since the death. Laura Boehm, Rebecca Ferguson Ruth Green, Susan Jones

Saturday, April 1, 2017 Lunch Menu 9:00 am - 3:30 pm

that I am God.” Psalms 46:10

Salad Plate

Homemade Desserts First Baptist Church, Simpsonville Coffee, Tea, and Water will be available 101 Church Street (Directional signs on site) throughout the day.

Simpsonville, SC 29681

EDUCATION

Checks may be made to FBC Simpsonville. Deadline to register is April 5th.

Camp to give teens STEAM job experience

Please understand the seating capacity of the facility determines the size of our group. The retreat is limited to the first 150 women who register.

Jonathan Shanin knows as well as anyone how a young person’s sport or avocation can wind up becoming a successful career path. It happened to Shanin when he pursued his love of kayaking.

Registration: 8:30 am Registration Cost - $10.00 (Includes lunch)

He joined a national kayaking team and also earned naval architecture and marine engineering degrees.

Our Guest Presenters

Maria Venezia......................... Keynote Speaker/Opening Session Jan James............................Closing Session/Devotion

~ Class Choices ~

Art to Heal the Heart Prayer – God is There When It Hurts Understanding Grief Taking Care of You - Strategies to Relieve Stress How Our Personality Type Can Affect the Way WePsalms Grieve46:10 that I am God.” Maintaining Connections “ Be still and know

Katie Salley Palmer

Standing Strong With Those Who Grieve POLITICS Mindful Eating – throughout day. Nutrition Nurturethe through Gowdy: No evidence Obama 150 women who register. Coffee, Tea, and Water will be available Ashes to Blessings group. Thewiretapped retreat is limited to theTrump first Homemade Desserts of the facility determines the size of our Trusting During Tragedy U.S. Rep. Trey capacity Gowdy of Spartanburg told Fox Please understand the seating Salad Plate News last week he has seen no evidence to Grieving Together Deadlinesupport to registerPresident is April 5th.Donald J. Trump’s claim that Lunch Menu Remembering My Child When Checks may be made to FBC Simpsonville. former President Barack Obama wiretapped his are Celebrating RuthOthers Green, Susan Jones Simpsonville, SC 29681 phone lines during the 2016 election. Laura Boehm, Rebecca Ferguson 3 Hedge Street “I don’t think the FBI is the Obama team, and I FBC Simpsonville

Music Provided by

Foundational Scripture:

Convention To RSVP & receive registration brochure, please contact:

Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist aadholman@gmail.com • 864-979-3198 Dr. Frank Page - President and CEO, Chief

don’t think the men and women who are career

registration feeprosecutors to: at DOJ belong to any team other • Please return this form with the $10

than a blindfolded woman holding a pair of

the retreat. jan@pdtm.us • 864-963-3543 Session 3 Choices. scales,” said Gowdy, a member of the House The pictures will be returned at the end of Kathy Schultz - Mother and Bible Teacher Small Groups...then select only 1 from Intelligence Committee. display on our Memory Wall for the day. Our Guest Presenters classes from your choices for Session 1 & 2 who wish may bring a picture of her child to Last week, President Trump accused the Obama Brochures andofSmall Group descriptions can be found at: www.fbcsimpsonville.org interest and we will do our best to select 2 To honor the memory our children, those Administration of wiretapping Trump Tower, 2:00 Ending Session - Dr. Frank Page the back. You may number them in order of 1:05 Third Group Session it to Nixon and Watergate, without death. • Please circle 4comparing sessions from the first list on 12:20 Lunch of the child or the length of time since the providing evidence. An Obama spokesman 11:35 Second Small Group Session (For Memory Wall)denied the accusation. their journey of healing regardless of the age 10:45 First Small Group Session We welcome mothers at all points along Name of Child: Gowdy said if what Trump says is true, there 9:45 Circle of Friends (Share our Stories) Christ, our Great Healer and Comforter. Email: should be evidence to corroborate his 9:30 Break authentic presenters, and sharing the love of 8:45 Opening Session - Kathy Schultz accusation. “We have the tools to keep us safe Phone #: pampering, loving support, comfort food, 8:15 Registration and it’s prudent for those tools to be used Please join us for a day of encouragement,

Deadline to register is March 20.

Child Have Experienced The Death of a A Day Retreat For Women Who

the Day Schedule for

Gowdy said it was “hard to cross-examine tweets,” and that the Trump Administration would have access to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant that the Obama Administration reportedly used to tap the Trump Tower phones. “The Obama team is no longer in charge,” Gowdy said, “so any information the current Department of Justice has that suggests the previous Department of Justice acted inappropriately, they are welcome to release it.” —Andrew Moore

Committee of the Southern Baptist the Executive love of Christ. We welcome mothers Convention

“ Be still and know

the president firmly believes the allegations he made on Twitter last weekend. Conway also said Trump has obtained classified information corroborating his claim. So far, there is no public evidence to support the accusation.

Address: Name:

lawfully and appropriately,” Gowdy said. “If they’re not used lawfully and appropriately, there’s a paper trail and we’ll be able to find it out.” In televised interviews, senior Trump

Registration Form Conway and White House adviser Kellyanne

spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said

For some people, this happens naturally. But what about those kids who never figure out how to connect the dots between what they like to do now and what they can do as a career? Shanin now has an answer for them: the Benjamin Franklin Experience (BFE). The nonprofit BFE camp gives teenagers, ages 14-18, an introduction to 10 different career fields in science, technology, arts, and engineering. Each day an expert leads the class. “There’s always a need for programs that immerse students in career experiences guided by experts and mentors,” says John M. Moore, chief executive officer of NEXT Upstate. “The more programs there are, the more likely young people will be able to envision and create a more fulfilling life for themselves.” The camp is scheduled for two sessions in June and two in July. Each session is for two weeks with 10 days of work exposure, facilitated by instructors, experts, and mentors. Teens turn in a writing assignment at the end of each day. They also learn speaking skills, which will be useful when they later interview for professional jobs. The camp costs $2,370 per session. Fees pay for the instruction, equipment, transportation, lunch, and other costs. Through grants and contributions, an estimated 65 percent of attendees will receive academic or need-based scholarships, Shanin says. Prospective campers can apply for the estimated 100 slots online and submit nomination forms completed by their

«


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

«

NEWS

03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

teacher, pastor, coach, or counselor. The deadline is March 31, 2017. —Melinda Young

Furman forums tackle top US issues A group of Furman University professors will be holding six free public forums this spring to address the heightened political climate that many Americans are grappling with. The series, “Our Republic… For Which It Stands,” focuses on everything from the basics of American law to the complexities of morality and ethics. “There is widespread concern today about the state of American democracy and democratic culture,” says Akan Malici, a professor of politics and international affairs at Furman University and one of the organizers of the series. “There is also much concern about our morals and our ethics and whether we are distancing ourselves from our ideals and our responsibilities as citizens.” Furman University historians, for example, were scheduled to discuss “American Laws and American Values” on Tuesday, March 14, at Greenville’s Triune Mercy Center. And the university’s political science professors planned to present “Aspects of Domestic and International Politics” on Wednesday, March 15. Professors from the university’s religion, philosophy, and English departments will discuss “Biblical and Theological Perspectives on Deference and Respect for Authority” on March 26 at 3 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Greenville. They will also present “Symbolic Violence and Civil Disobedience” on March 30 at 7:30 p.m. at Furman University. That includes a segment about whether it’s “OK to Punch a Nazi,” a reference to Richard Spencer, a prominent figure in the “alt-right” movement, who was punched in the face during a televised interview in January. —Andrew Moore

Randall Bramblett

months, she’s been booking shows. “Mac told me he wanted a place like B.B. King and Buddy Guy have,” she says. “So I said, ‘Let me book your bar. I’ve done 27 of my own festivals and special events.’ I told him he had to let me have complete control of the stage, and he said OK.” Pulling from nearly three decades of networking, Luley has booked a full slate of national blues artists at the restaurant all the way into September. The next few months will feature shows by Biscuit Miller, Geoff Achison, Randall Bramblett, JL Fulks, and Tru South. “I just started calling my friends and saying, ‘I’m booking Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant and I’d like you to come play,’” she says. “And of course, a lot of them being blues fans, they wanted to help a blues legend get his place off the ground. He’s been known as a restaurant for the last few years, and now they’re really trying to turn it into a blues concert venue, to where every Friday and Saturday night you’re going to see some of the best national blues artists that you can.” —Vince Harris

bonsecours.com

MUSIC

Mac Arnold’s gets a blues booker By the time Sue Luley moved to Greenville from Florida last July, she’d been booking and promoting blues bands for more than 20 years. She handled the Legendary Rhythm & Blues Cruise for the Jack Link & Association production company, bringing in legendary artists like Irma Thomas, Taj Mahal, and Johnny Winter. It was through that cruise that she met Greenville’s own legendary beloved bluesman, Dr. Mac Arnold, in 2010, and his blues restaurant was one of her first stops when she got to town. But she noticed that the live music at Mac’s restaurant didn’t quite match the man himself, and when she heard they had an opening for a concert booker, she stepped in. For the past six

Scars may be a reminder of where we’ve been, but they’re not a map to where we’re going.

Downtown Alive, Main Street announce musical lineups It’s spring — and time for the city’s two outdoor music series. Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive opens on Thursday, March 16, with a performance by a rock band and last year’s Gimme the Gig Contest winner, Brooks Dixon Band. Greenville Heritage Main Street Fridays opens one night later with Zataban, a blues/funk/soul band. Both concert series are held at NOMA Square. Downtown Alive runs from 5:30–8:30 p.m. NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 8


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 7

Paul Simon

Thursdays through Aug. 31, culminating for the third year with the winner of the Gimme the Gig contest for local bands. Local visual arts organizations and individual artists will be spotlighted each week through the Arts Do Downtown Alive program. Main Street Fridays runs weekly from 5:30–9:30 p.m. through Sept. 29.

For more information, visit greenvillejournal.com. —Cindy Landrum

SPORTS

Two Upstate First Tee orgs merge Simon will swing through the Upstate on Sunday, June 4, in support of his latest disc, “Stranger to Stranger.” If you’ve gotten a chance to give the LP a spin, or have simply heard the disc’s single, “Wristband,” you know that the one-time folk rocker is continuing his decades-long exploration of rhythm, an exploration that led Simon to his critical and commercial peak with 1986’s “Graceland.” But unlike “Graceland,” which was inspired by African music and featured acts such as Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Youssou N’Dour, “Stranger to Stranger” pulls from more contemporary electronic fare. Tickets for the June 4 Heritage Park show go on sale Friday, March 17, at 10 a.m. To buy tickets, visit ASX.com. —Chris Haire

Italo and the Passions in the studio For the past five years, Greenville’s Italo and the Passions have been playing a gritty blend of New York Dolls-style garage rock, soulful heartbroken piano ballads, and even the occasional doowop number.

“The Upstate of South Carolina continues to be one of the fastest growing regions in the country, and as our area continues its population growth, we made the strategic decision that by merging both of our organizations’ resources we are better positioned to serve the youth of the Upstate now and in the future,” said Ron Rasmussen, board president of The First Tee of the Upstate, in a press release.

ROADS

County wants new Batesville Road I-85 ARTS

Upstate Shakespeare Fest sets dates

“You have unlimited time you can spend on it,” he says. “It means you can just wake up and start recording. You can take breaks whenever you want. You can have a whole life and still be recording. It’s a beautiful thing.”

Friends, Greenvillians, Shakespeare lovers... lend us your ears. The 2017 Upstate Shakespeare Festival is set to kick off in two months with “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (May 25–June 25) followed by “Titus Andronicus” (July 13–July 30). And the crew behind the festivities is looking for Bard-ready thespians.

In the past, the band’s songs were heavy on the trials and tribulations of love, but Taylor says that this time out, they’re taking a different tone. “We’re not as sentimental and tender as we used to be,” he says. “These songs are about other aspects of our lives.”

The Upstate Shakespeare Fest, hosted by the Warehouse Theatre, will be holding open auditions for the two shows on Saturday, April 8, by appointment. Sign up by calling 864-787-4016. The fest is looking for the person’s best Shakespearean monologue of no longer than one minute.

Apparently those aspects either involve a day job or some serious single-life woes. “One of the new songs is called ‘Pizza Man Blues,’” Taylor says with a laugh. —Vince Harris

According USF’s John Fagan, “Experience helps, but having a desire to perform, a love for Shakespeare, and wanting to have a blast entertaining the public is as much a qualification as any.”

Paul Simon announces Upstate date

The Warehouse crew last performed “Midsummer” in 2009, but details for this year’s production are still being worked out. “You can bet it is going to be a very funny, spirited production,” Fagan says. “It remains one of the most popular titles we have done.”

One of the all-time rock greats, Paul Simon, is coming to Simpsonville’s Heritage Park Amphitheater this summer, but if you want to go, chances are you’re going to need to get your tickets early. Few performers have the type of cross-generational appeal that Simon has.

The First Tee is a national outreach organization that uses the game of golf to “instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy choices” in young people. Founded in 1997, The First Tee has 165 chapters in the U.S. and two in Canada and Japan.

In Greenville County, spring programming will be held at Carolina Golf Club at Botany Woods, Legacy Pines Golf Club, Carolina Springs Golf Club, and Green Valley Country Club. —Emily Pietras

Led by singer Mike Granata’s ecstatic crooning and Casey Taylor’s bare-knuckle riffs, the band is a can’t-miss bet live. Granata throws himself into the music while the band (Taylor, bassist Drew Pack, and drummer Brandon Gallagher) keeps it raw and ragged.

Taylor says that there are some serious advantages to recording at home, other than just the economics.

The First Tee of Greenville and The First Tee of Spartanburg & Cherokee Counties have combined their efforts to form The First Tee of the Upstate.

The First Tee of the Upstate will offer in-school and out-of-school programs to children ages 6–18 in Greenville, Spartanburg, and Cherokee counties at eight locations. The organization’s National Schools Program, which integrates golf instruction for elementary school students during physical education classes, is available at 93 schools across the three counties. First Tee of the Upstate has also partnered with local organizations, including Greenville Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club and Greenville YMCA, among others, to increase program accessibility.

Italo and the Passions

Last week, Italo and the Passions began recording a new as-yetto-be-titled EP in their home studio, with plans to release it by the time their next tour kicks off in June.

“We have set a goal for ourselves to produce every Shakespeare play and we get to check off another title with this play,” Fagan says. “It also brings to a close the four-play Roman cycle of plays written by Shakespeare. In the past four seasons we have staged ‘Antony and Cleopatra,’ ‘Coriolanus,’ and ‘Julius Caesar.’” Fagan adds, “‘Titus’ is one of Shakespeare’s earliest and wildest dramas. It tells the story of two rival families and the utter destruction the two bring on the other.” —Chris Haire

The March lineup at Downtown Alive also includes the James Radford Band on March 23 and Ashes of Old Ways on March 30. Main Street Fridays includes a concert by Southern classic rock band Fortunate Sons on March 24. Blues and classic rock band Blues Revival take to the stage on March 31.

has tackled this bloody story.

But as much as “Midsummer” is a crowd-pleaser, “Titus” is, um, not actually known as a rollicking good time. (Psst... lots of people die.) 2017 marks the first time the fest — now in its 23rd year —

Greenville County has applied for nearly $168 million to help pay for five major road projects. The State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) funds major highway and bridge projects that cost at least $25 million through bond issues. State tax dollars are used to repay the bonds. The biggest chunk of the money Greenville County is asking for comes from two projects: a parallel road that would relieve congestion on the most traffic-clogged part of Woodruff Road near Interstates 85 and 385 and a new I-85 interchange at Batesville Road. The Woodruff Road parallel would run between Miller and Mall Connector roads. Current funding only provides for a portion of the project to be under construction by 2021, but other portions will likely not receive any funding for 10 to 15 years, said Keith Brockington, transportation manager for the Greenville-Pickens Area Transportation Study. The Woodruff Road stretch from I-85 to S.C. 14 had a daily traffic count of 34,400 cars in 2015, according to state Department of Transportation data. The new I-85 interchange at Batesville Road would have collector and distributor lanes with S.C. 14 and Pelham Road, much like the Augusta Road, Pleasantburg Drive, and Mauldin Road exits are now. The new interchange is needed to relieve chronic congestion, Brockington said. I-85 between Pelham Road and S.C. 14 had a daily traffic count of 113,000 in 2015, according to the DOT. The new


Advanced Treatment for Dry Eye Dry Eye affects an estimated 25 million Americans and is the most common reason for a visit to an eye specialist. It is a complex disease involving the tear quantity, quality, inflammation, and eyelid oil or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD). Causes include age, medications, health and environmental conditions, and contact lenses. It is more common in women than men. Dry Eye occurs when there are insufficient tears to provide adequate moisture or when the tear film over the eye is of poor quality. “If left untreated, dry eyes become uncomfortable with symptoms of scratchiness, stinging, itching, burning, light sensitivity, fluctuating vision, and tired eyes,” says Dr. Joes Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist at Clemson Eye. Traditional treatment includes artificial tear drops and lifestyle changes, but there are some advanced therapies.

Over the past 15 years, research has revealed that Meibomian Gland Dysfunction is the leading cause of eye discomfort for over 86% of patients with Dry Eye. It occurs when the eyelid oil glands become blocked due to inflammation and thick secretions and can no longer produce normal lipids or oils needed for a sustained healthy tear film. Then more rapid evaporation of your tears leads to inflammation and results in a gradual, progressive loss of the Meibomian glands. During a Dry Eye exam, the doctor will check to see if the glands are releasing oil during the blinking process. The Lipiview® test provides an accurate digital image of the Meibomian glands and blink function. If the test shows the gland function has dropped off and there is ‘Evaporative Dry Eye’, then the doctor will recommend cutting edge treatment either with a LipiFlow® or other therapies like artificial tears, Restasis, omega-3 supplements or punctal plugs.

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Basic vs. Laser Cataract Surgery Life expectancy in the United States has been increasing steadily over the past century. Americans who reached 65 in 2011 are projected to live another 21 years to age 86.1 As a result, many Americans are working longer than expected. Visual health is important to being able to work at any age. But as we age, vision becomes more of a challenge for a greater number of us. Cataracts are often the culprit. Cataracts, a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, affect about 22 million Americans over age 40. By age 80, more than 90% of Americans will have a cataract.2 Left untreated, cataracts can lead to blindness. They are the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S. Surgery is the only known treatment for cataracts. Cataract surgery, a 15-minute out-patient procedure, is one of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in the U.S.3 People with cataracts can opt for basic or laser cataract surgery. Basic Cataract Surgery Basic cataract surgery involves removing the diseased lens and implanting a monofocal lens. The monofocal intraocular lens clears your vision at a single focal point. This manual, bladed surgical procedure is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, if you wore eye glasses before your basic cataract surgery, you will still need them after the surgery.

Laser Cataract Surgery Laser cataract surgery involves using a laser and computer-guided software system to create incisions that are up to 10 times more precise than manual incisions. Here, patients have the option of advanced lenses that can correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or astigmatism.

“Laser surgery with the multifocal lens has changed my life.”

“Through laser cataract surgery with advanced lenses, we can deliver the best possible visual outcomes for our cataract patients,” says Dr. Don Glaser, the eye surgeon at Clemson Eye’s Anderson clinic. “Regardless of their age, Clemson Eye patients enjoy excellent restored vision, whereby they are entirely free of or much less dependent on eye glasses.”4 A portion of the cost of laser cataract surgery and advanced lens implants is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, an additional payment is required. If you’re a Clemson Eye patient, you have the option of 24-month, 0% payment plans.

Carol’s Cataract Story Carol Bridges opted for laser cataract surgery. Bridges is a youngat-heart American who chose to forgo retirement and continue working part-time. She is a dental hygienist in Pickens, SC, and very much depends on good vision to perform her work. When she started to notice colors diming and driving becoming more difficult, she booked an eye exam. At her exam, her eye doctor, Dr. Joe Parisi, confirmed she had cataracts. After discussing all the options with him, Bridges chose laser cataract surgery with an advanced multifocal lens implant. “I work at close range all day long. The laser surgery with the multifocal lens has changed my life. It’s made my work so much easier. I don’t have to bother with glasses anymore. It’s wonderful,” says Bridges.

– Carol Bridges, Dental Hygienist and Clemson Eye Cataract Patient

Eye Exams for All Seniors If you think you have a cataract, a dilated eye exam is the only way to confirm it. An annual eye exam is recommended for all seniors to help ensure your visual health, quality of life, and ability to continue working, should you so desire. Call Clemson Eye today to book your appointment. 1. “Retirement now requires those living longer to work longer,” Jill Schlesinger, Chicago Tribune, Oct. 16, 2013. 2. The Givan Herbert Eye Institute. University of California, Irvine. Cataract Surgery. http://www.eye.uci.edu/cataract.html. [Accessed March 29, 2013]. 3. http://www.aao.org/publications/ eyenet/200609/pearls.cfm 4. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, 2015.


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

A TRIFECTA OF TEAMS South Carolina joins North Carolina and Duke at the NCAA tourney in Greenville

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

North Carolina. Duke. South Carolina. Greenville couldn’t have asked for a better roster of teams when the Bon Secours Wellness Arena hosts the first and second rounds of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament, the first time the city has hosted the event since 2004. The NCAA selection committee decided Tobacco Road basketball perennial powerhouses Duke and North Carolina would play in Greenville even though they were put in two different divisions, the Blue Devils in the East and the Heels in the South. Duke, this year’s Atlantic Coast Conference tournament champions, bested UNC in that tourney’s semifinals. Last year, the Tar Heels made it all the way to the national championship game but lost at the buzzer when Villanova’s Kris Jenkins hit a three-pointer. But Duke and UNC aren’t the only two Carolina teams playing at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The selection committee decided South Carolina should have a shot at playing at the very same site where the USC women’s basketball team won the Southeastern Conference championship two weeks earlier. Those two strokes of good luck could help Greenville land more conference — and more NCAA — tournaments.

SELLING THE CITY

Photo provided by USC Athletic Department

South Carolina senior guard Duane Notice drives for the basket. The Gamecocks are the No. 7 seed in the East region of the NCAA tournament.

“Certainly, one of the factors in winning subsequent tournaments is a conference and an organization’s ability to sell in certain markets,” said Beth Paul, Bon Secours Wellness Arena’s general manager. Greenville landed the tournament after the NCAA pulled championships from North Carolina because of House Bill 2, known as the “bathroom bill,” that banned transgender people from using a bathroom corresponding with the gender with which

they identify. The city has experienced the other side of a NCAA ban, too, after it was prevented from hosting tournaments because of the athletic association’s support of an NAACP boycott of South Carolina that centered around the flying of the Confederate flag on Statehouse grounds. That ban ended when the flag was removed from a capital memorial shortly after Dylann Roof killed nine African-Americans at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. While the tournament is expected to pump $3.6 million into Greenville’s economy, the real economic boost comes when a city regularly gets those events back, said Tom Regan, associate professor of sport and entertainment at USC. Regan points to Greensboro, N.C., which regularly hosts NCAA basketball tournament games. “When people start associating an event with a place, that’s when it really has an impact,” he said. “They start looking forward to going to that city because they know it and know what to expect.” Greenville could become that city. The Well, Furman University, the Southern Conference, and VisitGreenvilleSC have already submitted bids for 2020, 2021, and 2022. Winners will be announced in midApril.

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THE HOME TEAM

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That makes Greenville’s support of the tournament this weekend even more important, Paul said. So far, local residents are stepping up. Of the tournament tickets sold via Ticketmaster by Sunday before the participating teams were announced, 50 percent were bought from residents of the Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, and Asheville, N.C. region, she said. The rest came from other markets, including Charlotte and Columbia. Before the teams were announced, there were only a few hundred ticket books left, she said. “Given where we are with ticket sales, we think the teams we have will get us to the finish line,” Paul said. Landing South Carolina certainly will help. Last year, the Gamecocks got a text that erroneously said the team had been selected for the tournament. The text, which was quickly rescinded, was meant for Southern Cal. The Gamecocks had won a school-record 24 games last season and tied for third place in the SEC. This year, the Gamecocks won two fewer games but recorded some big wins over nonconference teams that also got into the tournament, including Michigan, where they held the Wolverines to a paltry 19 percent shooting. “We didn’t lose to teams that cost you credibility,” Coach Frank Martin said during a press conference after the Gamecocks were selected. “I was not nervous one bit. I’ve coached NCAA Tournament teams. I know when I’ve got a NCAA Tournament team.” But while South Carolina is making its first NCAA tournament appearance since 2004, don’t expect that to be enough. “One thing I’ve told our players: Don’t just be happy to be there,” he said. “Be prepared to make a run.”

THE GAMES East Region South Carolina vs. Marquette Friday, 9:45 p.m. South Carolina | Record: 22-10

How they got here: After getting left out of last year’s tournament, the Gamecocks earned big wins over Michigan, Syracuse, and Vermont early and went 12-6 in Southeastern Conference play. Players to watch: Senior guard and SEC Player of the Year Sindarius Thornwell, who averages 21.2 points, 7.3 rebounds, and 2.9 assists per game; guard PJ Dozier, a sophomore averaging 13.6 points per game. Interesting fact: The Gamecocks last appeared in the NCAA tournament in 2004. USC last won a tournament game in 1973.

Marquette | Record: 19-12

How they got here: A balanced offensive attack features five players who average double-digit points per game. The Golden Eagles lead the nation in 3-point shooting at 43 percent. Players to watch: Leading scorer Markus Howard hits 55

percent of his 3-point attempts. Luke Fischer leads the team in rebounds. Interesting fact: This is the 100th year of men’s basketball at Marquette and the program’s 32nd NCAA tournament appearance.

Duke vs. Troy Friday, 7:20 p.m. Duke | Record: 27-8

How they got here: Duke finished fifth in the ACC regular season but won four games in four days to win the conference tournament. Players to watch: Guard Luke Kennard, a 6-foot-6 sophomore averaging 20.1 points per game; forward Jayson Tatum, a 6-foot-8 freshman averaging 16 points per game and 7.3 rebounds per game. Interesting fact: This is Duke’s 22nd consecutive NCAA tournament appearances and 33rd overall under coach Mike Krzyzewski.

Troy | Record: 22-14

How they got here: Troy won the Sunbelt Conference championship to make the NCAA tournament for the first time in 14 years. The Trojans overcame a 15-point deficit in the conference semifinals against Georgia State. Players to watch: Jordan Varnado leads the team in scoring, rebounds, and blocks. Wesley Person Jr. has hit 92 3-pointers. Interesting fact: Troy won four games in five days to clinch an automatic bid to make its second NCAA tournament appearance.

South Region North Carolina vs. Texas Southern Friday, 4 p.m. North Carolina | Record: 27-7

How they got here: Rebounding has been a strength of the Tar Heels and offensive rebounding has propelled the squad to be basketball statistician Ken Pomeroy’s fourth-most efficient team. Players to watch: Justin Jackson, the ACC Player of the Year, and Kennedy Meeks, who averages 12.6 points and 9.1 rebounds per game. Interesting fact: North Carolina is making its 48th NCAA tournament appearance, second most behind Kentucky’s 56, and is a No. 1 seed for an NCAA-record 16th time.

Texas Southern | Record: 23-11

How they got here: Texas Southern has won nine in a row and went 16-2 in conference play. Players to watch: Point guard Zach Lofton, who leads the team with a 17.4 points per game average, and Demontrae Jefferson, who averages 14.9 points and 3.3 assists. Interesting fact: Texas Southern won the SWAC tournament, but would have gotten a NCAA bid even if it lost because Alcorn State, the other team in the final, was ineligible for the tournament.

Arkansas vs. Seton Hall Friday, 1:30 p.m. Arkansas | Record: 25-9

How they got here: Arkansas reached the SEC tournament final, falling to Kentucky. The Razorbacks won eight of their last 10 games. Players to watch: Dusty Hannahs leads the team with 14.6 points per game. Three other Razorbacks average double figures in points: Daryl Macon, Jaylen Barford, and Moses Kingsley. Interesting fact: The last time Arkansas played in an NCAA tournament, it defeated 12-seeded Wofford by three points.

Seton Hall | Record: 21-11

How they got here: Seton Hall was dominant at home with a 12-2 record. Players to watch: Angel Delgado leads the nation with 13.1 rebounds per game. Khadeen Carrington is the team’s leading scorer at 16.9 points per game. Interesting fact: The Pirates are back in the tournament for the second straight season, the first time the program has gone to back-to-back tournaments since it made four straight appearances from 1991 to 1994.

FANFEST The NCAA tournament takes a break in Greenville on Saturday, but that doesn’t mean basketball-related activities stop. GVL Fan Fest will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on Main Street from Broad to Court streets. The Village Green in front of the Courtyard by Marriott on Main Street next to City Hall will be turned into a basketball court where the Greenville Parks and Recreation Department and the YMCA will lead basketball games and contests. Fans will be able to watch the Saturday NCAA tournament games on big-screen televisions and ESPN Radio will be there. Food will be available for purchase from three food trucks — Highway 301, Automatic Taco, and Ellada Koudzina — and the Bud Bar will be open. The Children’s Museum of the Upstate and other vendors will also take part.

STILL NEED TICKETS?

The best way to get tickets at this point is through the NCAA Ticket Exchange, says Lisa Crawford, marketing manager for Bon Secours Wellness Arena. The exchange allows fans to buy and sell official tickets online in an NCAA-approved, safe, and 100 percent guaranteed environment. Visit ncaa.com/exchange.


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03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

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Big Fences North Main neighbors complain about ‘homeless triangle,’ Salvation Army MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

Sometimes a small zoning change can mean two very different things. This disconnect was fully on display during a recent community meeting at the Salvation Army’s chapel on Rutherford Street. From the faith-based community organization’s perspective, the meeting was all about a small zoning change that would help it better serve the area’s homeless population. Residents saw something very different. To some of the 50 people who attended the March 7 meeting, the pertinent issue was whether the Salvation Army should even be housing men in the North Main area. “My suggestion is this campus stop pulling men into the facility. Put men in a facility 2 or 3 miles from here,” said John Michael McCauley of nearby James Street. McCauley and a few other residents said the Salvation Army is part of a “homeless triangle,” in which too many nonprofits feed, house, and coddle criminals and addicts. They believe the Salvation Army encourages troublemakers to overstay their welcome in a family-oriented neighborhood. The purpose of the meeting was to reboot the Salvation Army’s renovation and expansion plans. The organization would rezone one small piece of its property from R-6 to RDV (redevelopment district). A zoning change request was applied for and withdrawn last year because of the community’s concerns. Now the Salvation Army has reapplied for the same change, and the planning commission will hear the request at the meeting on March 16 at 4 p.m. The organization needs the change to add more living space in its shelter, which is dated and crowded. The plans would permanently cap the organization’s total homeless beds at 143 beds, said the project’s architect, W. Barry Agnew of Adeptus Architecture. “We’d like this back corner rezoned to the same as the rest of our property. That sounds simple, doesn’t it? It’s not, and I don’t know why it’s not,” said Major Pete Costas Jr., Salvation Army area commander, who moved to Greenville in June 2016. Costas had appealed to his neighbors with the story about the Good Samaritan. Residents quickly explained why it wasn’t that simple: “Inmates sent from the S.C.

Department of Corrections are here. That’s my biggest concern,” said Wanda Fisher, who lives near the facility. “They get their beer and crack pipes,” Fisher said. “I saw this man walk up and down the street. He stole a car here and was a big man, dealing drugs, and he had a gun.” Local HVAC business owner Bradley Ward volunteered himself as an example of how the men Fisher and others described are not representative of Salvation Army men. Ward talked about how his own mistake in hanging around with the wrong person led to a first-time drug arrest. If it weren’t for the Salvation Army accepting him into a six-month sobriety program, he would have had to spend a year in prison. Instead, he was able to stay clean and return to running his business. “Because I got a second chance, it was wiped off my record,” Ward said, adding that at least half of the men have stories like his. People who have been arrested for minor offenses can request help from the Salvation Army, but the organization is not forced by any corrections department to accept them, said Lt. Joshua Keaton, a Salvation Army pastor. Fisher described walking her dog down the street and seeing a man urinate in front of her. “It was one of these people here,” Fisher said, indicating the chairs on the side where some Salvation Army staff and residents were seated. People from that side of the room objected loudly and for a few minutes the chapel was loud and chaotic. Fisher held up a paper with a small photo of the man she saw. Salvation Army’s director of social ministries, Lauren Stephens, said she knew about someone causing problems in the area, and this person was never housed at the Salvation Army. The faith-based organization does not take in people who are drunk, on crack, and then toss them into neighboring streets, Stephens says. “If someone is drunk and passed out at a bus stop, they did not get drunk at 417 Rutherford Street.” From the perspective of the Earle Street community, the rezoning request is reasonable, said Mike Mecklenburg of East Earle Street. “Homeless people are our neighbors, too. Nobody is looking down on them, and you don’t have to convince us of the good work the Salvation Army does. We get that,” Mecklenburg said. “And our neighborhood organization has donated thousands of dollars to your organization over the years,” he said. “But what we ask in return is that our homeless neighbors

Lauren Stephens

and our neighbors here be good neighbors.” Everyone, including the city, needs to work on being better neighbors, says City Councilwoman Amy Doyle, who represents the North Main area. “The city can focus on more community police patrol, clean and well-lit streets, and code enforcement,” Doyle says.

Major Pete Costas Jr.

“We have tremendous success in Greenville. We’re on Top 10 lists everywhere,” Doyle says. “You know what we also have? Rehab. Women and children in shelters. AA. Soup kitchens. Mental health facilities. Food and clothing pantries. Vets living on the street. We’re a city with a lot of different people.”

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Force of Nature After 12 years, environmentalist and community educator Nancy Fitzer leaves Greenville’s Upstate Forever ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

For more than a decade, Nancy Fitzer has been the voice of Greenville’s Upstate Forever, one of South Carolina’s most recognized and influential environmental groups. As communications director, she’s taught residents about various threats to the region’s natural resources, completed countless neighborhood projects, and more. However, Fitzer, 47, recently stepped down from her post at the environmental advocacy group to join the Greenville County School District, where she’s now assisting the superintendent and school board. “It’s hard to leave, because the team at Upstate Forever is a second family, but I’m at that point in my life and career where it’s good to shake things up a bit,” Fitzer says. “I’m grateful that I had the opportunity to impact the community.” A Harvard University graduate, Fitzer moved to South Carolina in 1993 to work at City Year, a program that focuses on classroom support for impoverished schools in the Columbia area. She relocated to the Upstate in 1996, and earned a graduate degree in city and regional planning from Clemson University. About a decade later, Fitzer joined the staff at Upstate Forever, where she produced monthly newsletters to educate residents about regional conservation efforts, wrote grant applications for state and federal funding, monitored

state legislation pertaining to environmental issues, and completed various community projects. “Nancy’s role as communications director at Upstate Forever was to help better educate the public about the importance of balancing the region’s growth with the protection of our natural resources to maintain the unique character of the region,” says Andrea Cooper, executive director of Upstate Forever. “She did this beautifully in writing newsletters, op-eds, and articles for various publications, making presentations, and in digital communications. Nancy is a top-notch person with the utmost integrity,” Cooper says. In 2013, for example, Fitzer was able to secure a $39,000 grant from the State Farm Youth Advisory Board to improve pedestrian and cycling infrastructure in Nicholtown, the city’s first black community. Fitzer spent roughly two years teaching elementary and middle school students from Greenville’s Sterling School about safe and unsafe pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, followed by field trips through the neighborhood to measure and catalog safe routes and other areas needing improvement. She then partnered with the city of Greenville and others to implement various infrastructure improvements throughout Nicholtown, including a protected pedestrian

lane on Clark Street, a popular route for students. Shortly after, Fitzer worked with the Nicholtown Neighborhood Association to install a nature trail from Clark Street to Sliding Rock Creek Park, allowing various science classes from Sterling School to access and monitor the water quality of Sliding Rock Creek, which has experienced alarming levels of bacteria for years. “Nancy was instrumental in creating a safer Nicholtown,” says Yvonne Reeder, education chair for the Nicholtown Neighborhood Association. “Her project not only created safer routes, but fostered great relationships within our community. And it’s just really refreshing to have someone like her around, someone who is concerned for a neighborhood that’s not her own. She’s a true leader, and we’re grateful.” Fitzer, who was also a member of Upstate Forever’s statewide steering committee, used her knowledge of urban planning to occasionally lobby, a skill that drew praise from others who worked with her to protect the environment. Shelly Robbins, energy and state policy manager for Upstate Forever, says her own efforts relied heavily on Fitzer’s ability to clearly communicate proposed pieces of legislation to residents, staff, and state lawmakers. “I’ve never encountered a better editor in my life,” Robbins says. “We actually worked together on several pieces of legislation through the years, and Nancy was able to encapsulate the most important information and convey it in a way that was easy for people to understand. She was essential to many of our successes.” Dave Hargett, founder and director of Greenville’s Conestee Foundation, agrees. In 2000, Hargett hired Fitzer to oversee grant applications and education efforts for his Conestee Foundation, which oversaw the development of the 500-acre Lake Conestee Nature Park in Greenville. She actually managed the foundation’s first education grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. That grant enabled the Conestee Foundation to provide nature education field trips to more than 10 high schools throughout Greenville County. The field trips taught students about Lake Conestee’s natural and human history, a curriculum that was developed by several county teachers through the grant. “Nancy was the spearhead for that entire project and made it a huge outreach opportunity with every high school in the county,” Hargett says. “It was an amazing project that established relationships that we still enjoy through our Lake Conestee Nature Park Nature Education programs to this day.” “These early accomplishments were all the more remarkable in that we were a new nonprofit conservation organization in the Upstate, needing to develop new relationships and trust from throughout the community. Nancy made that happen,” Hargett says. Fitzer’s more recent efforts focused on the continuation of the S.C. Conservation Bank, the state’s public-private funding effort to conserve land. It has protected more than 300,000 acres since its start in 2004, including property at Lake Conestee Nature Park and Paris Mountain State Park. Greenville attorney and S.C. House Majority Leader Bruce Bannister recently introduced a piece of legislation to keep the agency open for another 10 years. The bank, which provides easements to protect land and natural resources, is set to close in 2018 unless lawmakers request an extension before June. “There is a struggle to maintain the Conservation Bank every year, but that entire conflict illustrates why we need organizations like Upstate Forever. They are the ones who are going to continue fighting for our natural resources,” Fitzer says. “While I’m no longer on the team, I’m going to continue on as a member.”


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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Love Your Carpet…

Again!

IKE’S

128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

864-232-9015 www.ikescarpet.com

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Evelyn MacLeod (center) with her son, Ryan, and daughter, Ave Will Crooks / Staff

A Lifetime Journey For many Greenvillians, the YMCA is more than a place to play — it’s a lifeline for the whole family Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

When Evelyn MacLeod first visited the Eastside Family YMCA for a tour of the facility, she quickly knew it would be an ideal fit. “I was looking for a place that was familyfriendly and also would help me reach my health fitness goals, and the Y was just that perfect place. It had everything,” she says. “You step in the door, and you’re welcomed with this great, friendly smile. And the people here really get to know you.” MacLeod and her two children — Ryan, 9, and Ave, 7 — have been members of the YMCA of Greenville’s Eastside branch since 2012. At the time they joined, the family was living in Section 8 housing, and MacLeod didn’t feel comfortable with her kids being outside in their neighborhood. But the

YMCA “was a nice place for them to do those kid-friendly things they wanted to do,” she says. Last year was a challenge for the MacLeod family. After a “series of unfortunate events,” the family became temporarily homeless and didn’t have a car. “All I had was a part-time job, and everything just hit the fan,” MacLeod says. “I had hit rock bottom.” When MacLeod confided in a YMCA staff member about her situation, “I was worried they were going to judge me,” she recalls. But she was quickly reassured that wouldn’t be the case. One YMCA member let MacLeod borrow a car until she had one again, and a staff member from another branch invited the family to stay at their house. MacLeod later found a full-time job and was in need of reliable child care for the summer. Through the YMCA of Greenville’s

sliding-scale scholarship program, she was able to send her children to the Eastside day camp at no cost. Ensuring that an inability to pay does not impede anyone from accessing the YMCA of Greenville’s services is crucial to the organization’s mission — to “follow the example of Christ and build healthy spirit, mind, and body for all.” Greenville County residents who have a demonstrated need can be granted a sliding-scale scholarship to afford YMCA membership and other programs. The eligibility process requires an application, interview, and documentation of one’s current financial situation. The YMCA will then work on a case-by-case basis to determine the scholarship amount provided. Every three or four months, staff will check in with recipients to

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COMMUNITY

evaluate if the scholarship is still meeting their needs. “We don’t want their inability to pay for whatever reason to be their barrier,” says Jamie Inman, chair of mission advancement. “We have people who come in who are in situations where it’s likely they’re going to need long-term assistance by way of the sliding-scale scholarship program. And then we have other people who come in who may have just lost a job and they’re in the middle of their job search and they’re just looking

for a place to release stress, to build their health and wellness. The YMCA wants to be available for them during situations like that.” That level of support is financially feasible mainly through the contributions raised during the YMCA of Greenville’s annual capital campaign, which will end May 4. The campaign “really is focusing on the last two words of [our] mission statement: ‘for all,’” says Dan Eller, volunteer annual campaign chairman. The money raised will enable the

‘‘ I’ve been able to do a lot of things in my life, but it was because one person decided it was worth the trouble.

‘‘

Hear my story at: thebloodconnection.org -- John, Marietta, SC --

organization to provide 8,000 sliding-scale scholarships. MacLeod, who is now back on her feet, emphasizes that without the scholarship the YMCA provided, the summer day camp would not have been a viable option. And she raves about the experience her kids had. “One of the day camp counselors was a great mentor for my son. For him to have that outlet — that mentor and positive role model — that’s what I feel has been our Y community,” she says.

In addition to ensuring the availability of sliding-scale scholarships, the annual campaign also helps underwrite YMCA programs that are offered at no cost outside of the facility. This includes the Teen Achievers mentoring program for students at Southside and J.L. Mann high schools and Star Academy. Volunteer adult mentors help students map out a plan to graduate high school and then determine their next YMCA continued on PAGE 18


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

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COMMUNITY YMCA continued from PAGE 17

Run (or walk) the nature trails with your dog!

steps, whether it’s a two-year or four-year college or a vocational program. Currently, Teen Achievers reaches 450 students. The program focuses on ensuring a successful transition from eighth to ninth grade and then later from ninth to 10th grade. “If a young person is successful in ninth grade and they move to 10th grade on time — and they’re feeling like, okay, they’ve got this — the chances of that young person dropping out have dropped to almost nothing. But it’s the most difficult transition,” explains Mary Bledsoe, branch executive of teen services. The Teen Achievers program helps teach freshmen vital skills that will help ensure long-term academic achievement, such as effective study habits and time management. All freshman students at Southside High School participate in the Teen Achievers program. In addition to the adult mentors who visit the school two or three times each month to hold a special class, senior student mentors are also selected. Senior mentors assist adult mentors during the classes, and they provide support to their peers in a day-to-day role “of being that upperclassman that [freshmen] look up to and know,” Bledsoe says. Kamera Gamble, a student at Southside, says she enjoyed Teen Achievers so much

as a freshman that she applied to become a mentor as a senior. “Being in the program as a ninth-grader, I learned about study skills, being able to build my confidence. As a ninth-grader, I was able to find myself,” she says. “And then as a 12th-grader helping them, it helps me be able to talk in front of people and has built my confidence even more.” Gamble hopes to attend Spelman College in Atlanta and become a physical therapist. She became interested in the profession when she participated in a Teen Achievers workshop as a freshman to learn about prospective careers. “That’s kind of what really made me want to do physical therapy, so I did more research into it,” she says. Whether it’s through fitness classes, camp, youth sports, or outreach like Teen Achievers, the core of the YMCA’s mission is to build stronger communities, Inman says. “We want to provide a variety of entry points for people to come in and begin their YMCA journey. Then our hope is it becomes a lifetime journey for them and that we can be a support to them and they can be part of the cause, part of the movement,” she adds.

Learn more about Evelyn’s story and others’ at bit.ly/2017YMCAcampaign.

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COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

School of Nursing receives scholarship from CVS Health Foundation The CVS Health Foundation has gifted the Clemson University School of Nursing a $5,000 scholarship to assist students as they complete their studies to become family nurse practitioners. The grant is part of the CVS Health Foundation Advance Practice Nurse and Physician Assistant Scholarship program, which launched this year. The program is aimed at reducing the nationwide shortage of family nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL

Medical Warriors win at Winterfest Three students participated in the Greenville County Emergency Medical Services’ Explorer Post 466 team that recently competed at the Boy Scout’s Winterfest. Emily Hasenau, Kayla Hasenau, Samantha Jones, and their team placed second in the advanced medicine competition. Winterfest, sponsored by the Boy Scouts, is an event in which youth participate in various competitions. More than 3,000 participants were at this year’s event.

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

ⴀ 一漀 氀愀爀最攀Ⰰ 甀瀀昀爀漀渀琀 攀渀琀爀愀渀挀攀 昀攀攀猀 ⴀ 匀瀀愀挀椀漀甀猀 ㄀ ☀ ㈀ⴀ戀攀搀爀漀漀洀 愀瀀愀爀琀洀攀渀琀猀 ⴀ 䴀愀椀渀琀攀渀愀渀挀攀ⴀ昀爀攀攀 氀椀瘀椀渀最 ☀ 眀攀攀欀氀礀 栀漀甀猀攀欀攀攀瀀椀渀最 ⴀ 䐀愀椀氀礀 昀愀爀洀ⴀ琀漀ⴀ琀愀戀氀攀 洀攀愀氀 漀瀀琀椀漀渀猀 ⴀ ㈀㐀ⴀ栀漀甀爀 挀漀渀挀椀攀爀最攀 猀攀爀瘀椀挀攀

Cinema graduates place in national competition Three 2016 cinema graduates recently placed in the Intercollegiate National Religious Broadcasters (iNRB) Student Production Awards Competition. These awards are presented to undergraduate or graduate student members of iNRB for outstanding examples of radio, TV, and film productions. Entries are judged by media professionals in their field. Rachel Madeira Ledbetter received first place in narrative film for “Going Back.” Ryan Holmes received second place in narrative film for “Silence.” Danielle Wunker received first place for her documentary film, “A Girl Like Me.”

GREER HIGH SCHOOL

GHS Virtual Enterprise wins state competition for second year

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The high school’s Virtual Enterprise class, led by teacher Brad Redd, won the SC State Business Plan Competition for the second year in a row. They will travel to New York in April, where they will compete against 175 schools from seven different countries in an array of business competitions. Students in the Virtual Enterprise class include Noah Hannon, Cassey Freeman, Houston Osborne, Kristin Thomas, Carley Blackwell, Emma Durfee, Laura Brown, Chris Quinn, and Brady Henderson. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

ANIMAL WELFARE

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Greenville Humane Society receives $70,000 donation PetSmart Charities has granted $70,000 to the Greenville Humane Society that will be used to provide at least 2,600 low-cost spay and neuter surgeries in the Greenville community in 2017. Beneficiaries of this grant will enjoy a reduced price of $20 for alteration surgeries. This is a 60 percent reduction in their already reduced prices. All residents of the greater Greenville area are eligible for the discounted rate. The “Beat the Heat” initiative is running now until the end of March and focuses on female cat spay surgeries.

DONATION

Junior League of Greenville awards more than $50,000 in grant money This year, the Junior League of Greenville Inc. awarded $53,000 to four nonprofit agencies in the Greenville community in early January during a general membership meeting. Beneficiaries include Greenville Literacy Association, Julie Valentine Center, Thrive Upstate, and United Ministries. The Junior League of Greenville is an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

䴀攀洀漀爀礀 䌀愀爀攀

EVENT

Greenville Literacy Association to host adult spelling bee The Greenville Literacy Association (GLA) announces Bee a Better Greenville, an adult spelling competition, at Larkin’s Sawmill on March 30 from 6–9 p.m. The event is a revival of the popular Corporate Spelling Bee dating back to the ’90s. Expect a rollicking good time fueled by friendly competition and the guidance of an emcee, local celebrity JDew. There will be heavy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, and raffles to benefit GLA. For registration information, contact Eleanor Vaughn at vaughn@greenvilleliteracy.org. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

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㠀㘀㐀⸀㐀㄀㈀⸀㐀㜀   簀 吀䠀䔀䌀刀伀匀匀䤀一䜀匀䄀吀䘀䤀嘀䔀䘀伀刀䬀匀⸀䌀伀䴀


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

The sold-out Character Breakfast, presented by the South Carolina Children’s Theatre, was held last Sunday at the Poinsett Club. Children and families were greeted by characters, including Disney princesses, and enjoyed a hearty breakfast.

Photos by Katie Fenske / Contributing Photographer

Last Sunday, The Ancient Order of Hibernians presented an Irish parade down Main Street, followed by a festival at NOMA Square with Irish music and dancing, food and beer, and children’s activities.

Photos by Katie Fenske / Contributing Photographer


feast

‘UNDERSTATED ELEGANCE’ STELLAʼS SOUTHERN BRASSERIE SET TO OPEN MARCH 28 IN VERDAE ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com Chef and co-owner Jason Sholz describes his new restaurant, Stella’s Southern Brasserie, as a little black dress — it’s versatile, appropriate for almost any occasion, can move from day to night with ease, and classically alluring. “It’s understated elegance,” Sholz says of the space with neutral grays, dark wood tones, white subway tile, traditional brasserie tile flooring, and windows around the entire exterior that give the space an open airy feel. The eye-catching, black-and-white stenciled walls of the private dining room provide a hint of whimsy with a modern edge. “We want people to have fun here,” Sholz says. Versatility is evident in all aspects of the restaurant, set to open March 28 at 340 Rocky Slope Road in the Verdae development’s master-planned neighborhood overlooking Legacy Park. The restaurant will serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner, as well as weekend brunch. Stella’s Brasserie, Parkside Provisions, and Café is part coffee shop, a breakfast spot, a lunch café with grab-and-go prepared foods, and a French-influenced dinner destination with an ever-changing menu. “It’s a lot,” Sholz says. “But it’s a cool opportunity.” Versatility was also a major factor in securing the executive chef that will oversee operations of the new Stella’s while Sholz and his wife and business partner Julia spend the majority of their time at Stella’s Southern Bistro in Simpsonville. “I needed somebody who could not just cook but could come in from day one and manage people and train them,” Sholz says. Sholz found such a leader in chef Jeff

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Kelly, who is no stranger to the Greenville culinary scene, Kelly worked as a sous chef at the former Liberty 33, a saucier at Devereaux’s, and most recently as the Peace Center executive chef. “It was love at first sight,” Sholz says, describing the first and only interview he held for the position. “Jeff’s a great asset to the dining scene in Greenville.” In between the Greenville-area stints, Kelly ventured north in 2009 to gain experience working in Washington, D.C., kitchens when his wife landed a position as a curator for the White House. Along with working in the White House under chef Cris Comeford, Kelly also worked his way up from chef de partie at Vidalia to executive sous chef at Bistro Bis to chef de cuisine at Cure Bar and Bistro in the Grand Hyatt. Working in a large metropolitan area allowed Kelly to not only broaden his skill set — he began using a sous vide and experimenting with molecular gastronomy — but also build his managerial capabilities. In July 2014, Kelly ended up back with his Devereaux’s boss, chef Steven Greene, who had moved on to AN New World Cuisine in Cary, N.C. There, Kelly added Asian cuisine to his resume, a skill he will bring to Stella’s Brasserie.“We’re going to have a lot of fun during brunch,” he says. “Vietnamese cooking is all based on French cuisine.” In August 2015, Kelly moved back to Greenville with his family, which now includes two girls, to be near his in-laws, and took a Peace Center job overseeing all food-related aspects. But he jumped at the chance to work with the Sholzes when the opportunity arose. While the new concept will have similarities to the original Simpsonville restaurant — it’ll focus on sourcing all of its

Jason Sholz (left) and Jeff Kelly Photos by Will Crooks

Subway tile flooring ingredients locally and regionally — Stella’s Southern Brasserie will have its own identity. “We say it’s like two different siblings from the same parents,” Sholz says. “The restaurants would be too similar if I was the chef at both.” Kelly says he and Sholz have filled scads of legal pads with recipes. Some have made the cut, while others will get tossed or reworked. As for an actual menu, Kelly has a general idea: There will be a large fromage program that will pull cheeses from local and regional sources; features will change daily, including a pot du jour;

Black-and-white stenciled walls house-made jams and pickles will be a mainstay; and seafood, including fresh oysters, and likely a fruits de mer, will be prevalent. The daily changing menu will have ingredients listed with each dish but not an extensive explanation. “I want it to be a little unexpected when the food shows up,” Kelly says. “I want people to be surprised.” Stellaʼs Southern Brasserie Legacy Square within Verdae 340 Rocky Slope Road, Suite 100 864-626-6900

03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21


MARCH AT THE GCMA! Best-selling author Christina Baker Kline Tuesday, March 21 6 pm - 9 pm The New York Times best-selling author of The Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline will speak about her latest novel, A Piece of the World at the GCMA. Based on the Andrew Wyeth painting Christina’s World, Kline’s book tells a fictional story about one of Wyeth’s dearest friends and subjects, Christina Olson. This event is co-presented with independent Greenville bookstore Fiction Addiction. Cost of the event is $30, which includes a copy of A Piece of the World. GCMA members enjoy their usual discount. Register at gcma.org or call 864.546.4066. Seating is limited.

Award-winning silhouette artist Clay Rice Saturday, March 25 10:30 am - 1:30 pm The grandson of renowned Lowcountry silhouettist Carew Rice (the subject of a current GCMA exhibition), Clay Rice, an award-winning children’s book author and artist in his own right, carries on his grandfather’s tradition, capturing silhouette portraits with a flash of his scissors. Register now and enjoy a keepsake of your children or grandchildren that you will treasure for years to come. Cost is $42 for two silhouettes of the same subject. GCMA members enjoy their usual discount. Register at gcma.org or call 864.271.7570 x1021. Space is limited.

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570

gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Kline, C Rice.indd 4

Free Admission

2/28/17 10:37 AM


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

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CULTURE

From ‘Beauty and the Beast’ to Holmes and Watson, the 2017-18 GLT season is anything but elementary CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Greenville Little Theatre Executive Artistic Director Allen McCalla knew he had to go big in the 2017-18 season — the theater’s 50th year on Heritage Green and the 25th year McCalla and his wife, Suzanne, who serves as GLT’s producing director, have been at the helm. “I knew we had to have a big year with the milestones, and I think we have it,” Allen McCalla said. From “Beauty and the Beast” to “Ragtime” to an expanded rock ’n’ roll show, the theater’s main stage season features a diverse offering, something that has become a signature of McCalla’s seasons.

Agatha Christie’s “The Mousetrap,” Sept. 8–Oct. 1 When a local woman is murdered and a note left at the crime scene indicates the murderer intends to visit Monkswell Manor next, the question becomes not only who is the murderer but also who is the next victim. Why they picked it: “This is one of Agatha Christie’s best. It’s genius.”

“Over the River and Through the Woods,” Oct. 27–Nov. 12 Nick has been offered a dream job in Seattle. But there’s a downside: It will take him away from his lovable but annoying Italian-American grandparents in Jersey. Why they picked it: “It’s funny in a sitcom way.”

“Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Goose,” Dec. 7–17 Holmes and Watson must unravel the mystery of the Shropshire Slasher and a missing diamond. While they do, they learn the true meaning of Christmas. Why they picked it: “Our audience has been asking for new things for Christmas.”

“Ragtime: The Musical,” March 9–25, 2018 This musical chronicles the lives of three groups in turn-of-the-century America: African-Americans,

upper-class suburbanites, and Eastern European immigrants. The characters cross paths with historic figures such as Harry Houdini, Henry Ford, and Booker T. Washington. Why they picked it: “It’s just a great American story. It’s definitely a singer’s piece.”

“Perfect Wedding,” April 13–19, 2018 Pulling off the perfect wedding is difficult. But it’s even harder when the groom can’t remember what happened at the bachelor party, there’s a stranger hiding in his bathroom, and the bride is on her way to his room. Why they picked it: “I love working on a door-slamming farce.”

Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast,” June 1–24, 2018 This Disney classic has been an animated film, a Broadway musical, and now a live-action movie. Why they picked it: “We’ve wanted to do this for a long time. It’s a big challenge and a massive production.” The schedule also includes two special shows.

“I Feel the Earth Move,” Aug. 4–13, 2017 GLT’s annual rock ’n’ roll show features local talent singing some of the greatest hits from the 1970s. Why they picked it: “The 1970s were incredible for music. It started with Carole King and the Beatles all the way through heavy metal, rock, disco, and punk.”

“The Return,” Jan. 25-28, 2018 The Beatles tribute band The Return returns with a song list ranging from the Fab Four’s beginnings in the Cavern Club to their farewell performance at Candlestick Park. Why they picked it: “Our audience loved it when ‘The Return’ was here two years ago.”


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

NEW SEASON...NEW HOURS! Passerelle Bistro welcomes the return of Spring with a return to our regular hours: Lunch & Dinner: Monday - Friday Brunch & Dinner: Saturday & Sunday 601 South Main Street * 864.509.0142 PasserelleinthePark.com

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

Worlds Apart Thanks to ‘Orphan Train’ author, the story behind Andrew Wyeth’s most iconic painting gets told CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

At first glance, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of similarities between Andrew Wyeth and Christina Olson, the subject of the painter’s most signature work, “Christina’s World.” Wyeth came from a wealthy family; his father, N.C. Wyeth, was the famous illustrator of “Treasure Island.” Andrew grew up cultured. He was movie-star handsome, self-assured, and charismatic. Olson was a spinster, suffered from a debilitating condition that made it difficult for her to walk, and seemed destined for a small life. When they met, he was 22; she was 46. But they were similar in many ways, leading to their unlikely friendship, said Christine Baker Kline, the New York Times bestselling author of “A Piece of the World,” a historic novel based on the painting. Both Olson and Wyeth had their

educations cut short by tyrannical fathers — she at age 12 when she was pulled out of school to work on the family farm; he was kept out of public school and homeschooled in his father’s studio. They both had physical problems. Olson suffered from a debilitating degenerative muscular disease; a bad hip and a twisted

right leg left Wyeth with an unusual gait caused by having one leg that was shorter than the other. Both were quite creative and neither cared about what people thought, says Kline, whose novel “Orphan Train” spent more than two years on national bestseller lists. “She was a complicated woman,” the author adds. “I think Christina Olson felt understood by Andrew Wyeth. I think she was content with her life, especially when he came into it. I think he did a beautiful job of capturing how she viewed herself and the way she saw herself.” Kline grew up in Maine,

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Cover Girl

CULTURE

You know Heart’s big hits, but did you know Ann Wilson loves a good cover song? VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Without question, Ann Wilson is one of the greatest vocalists that rock has ever produced. With a range that covers three octaves, she can belt out a full-on hard-rock aria or lay back on an acoustic ballad. She’s spent over 40 years leading Heart alongside her guitarist/singer sister Nancy, and they’ve sold more than 35 million records and been voted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Songs like “Barracuda,” “Magic Man,” and “Crazy on You” are still classic-rock radio staples, but next week’s Peace Center show is going to be a lot more than a stroll through Heart’s history. And that’s because

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not far from where Olson lived. “My name is Christina, as is my mother’s and grandmother’s. My grandmother had a similar childhood as Christina Olson,” Kline said. “Both took care of their families. Both grew up in rural farmhouses without any modern conveniences.” When she was a child, her family visited the Olson farm and had a picnic in the field depicted in the famous painting. Kline said her book could be considered a “fictional biography.”

alongside her strengths as a songwriter and bandleader, Ann Wilson is also a first-rate interpreter of other people’s songs. Check out Heart’s covers of Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll” or Little Richard’s “Long Tall Sally” on 1980’s “Greatest Hits Live,” or her incredible performance of Zeppelin’s “The Battle of Evermore” as part of an acoustic group called The Lovemongers. Wilson says she plans to bring some unexpected material to her show next week, by some of her favorite writers, along with the expected Heart showstoppers and songs from her solo EPs, “Ann Wilson’s Thing Vols. 1 & 2.” “The whole purpose of doing this tour is to allow me to stretch out and do some unusual things, both as a person as a singer,” she says. “We’ve designed a really cool little show that goes all kinds of places, and it’ll be a great trip for people. There’s a really cool song by Peter Gabriel and a couple of Who songs, just all kinds of things that all have messages to them. It’s a really cool thing to be able to reach into my soul and bring all of that out, to bring out the feelings and speak

to people directly.” When it comes to choosing songs to sing from outside her catalog, Wilson says it comes down to the words. “I’ve always loved beautiful lyrics,” she says. “They have to be well-written. They have to sound great and they have to carry a message. I get bored singing, ‘I love you; you love me. Oh how happy we could be.’” Wilson has been covering other people’s material for a while now, even on albums where people might not have realized she was doing it. Many of the songs on the band’s multiplatinum 1980s albums “Heart” and “Bad Animals” came from outside writers, and she’s expressed ambivalence about some of those songs in the past. But the ones that hit home with both Wilson and her audience have remained special to her. “A song like ‘Alone’ that we didn’t write — the audience just completely dug it and they responded hugely to it,” she says. “And if it hadn’t gotten that reaction, I probably wouldn’t be too interested in carrying on year after year with it.” Another lesser-known fact about Wilson

“I stuck to the facts as much as I could. I knew that people would be reading the novel to learn more about their relationship and I wanted to be as accurate as I could,” she said. But that led to challenges for her as an author, making “A Piece of the World” the most difficult of Kline’s six books to write. “Many of the things that happened in Christina Olson’s life, I wouldn’t have chosen. I had to make sense of things in her life that if I had been writing all fiction, I would have

made up instead.” Kline said that during her book tour, she’s talked to people who have been surprised that they could identify with Christina Olson or came to understand her in a new way. But Kline said it’s not necessary for people to be familiar with the painting or even to have seen the painting to enjoy the book. “It’s a story of an American woman trying her best to make the most of her life,” she said.

is that offstage, she tends to be painfully shy and introspective. In fact, she says that onstage is where she’s able to express herself most freely. “It’s where I’m most comfortable, she says. “I’ve always felt more at home talking to a lot of people than just one. It’s where I can be me. I can dance, I can sing, and I can bring out the very deepest stuff that’s inside of me.”

ANN WILSON WHEN Thursday, March 23, 7:30 p.m. WHERE Peace Center TICKETS $45-$65 INFO peacecenter.org, 864-467-3000

CHRISTINE BAKER KLINE WHEN March 21, 6 p.m. WHERE Greenville County Museum of Art TICKETS $30, includes a copy of “A Piece of the World”


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

21 Pilots

Warehouse stages Arthur Miller’s tale about family secrets, lies, and war profiteering

CHRIS HAIRE | EDITOR

chaire@communityjournals.com

The Keller family has something to hide — that much is evident early on in Arthur Miller’s 1947 classic, “All My Sons.” On the surface, the Kellers — family patriarch and business giant Joe, his loving wife, Kate, and his dutiful son, Chris — are a picture-perfect bunch, leaders in the community, beloved by many. But something’s rotten in the Keller house. Each one is withholding a secret. Chris has invited his dead brother’s sweetheart to the Keller home to ask her to marry him, but his parents don’t know. Kate suffers under the delusion that her dead son is in fact alive, even though his plane crashed three years before. As for Joe, his lie, if indeed he is lying, is the most destructive one of all. During World War II, Joe was accused of manufacturing defective plane parts and then selling them to the U.S. military. These parts later caused 21 young fighter pilots to lose their lives. Joe maintains his innocence, his son believes him wholeheartedly, and the courts cleared him of any wrongdoing.

“Joe Keller makes the point that if he’s bad by profiting off of war, even with an inferior product,  then everyone is bad. But Arthur Miller makes a deliberate choice in the use of the word ‘if,’ which is my kind of theatre,”

says Blake White, the director of Warehouse’s latest production. “We are not here to tell you what to think. We are here to offer slices of humanity that might ask you to take a different look at the world.” At the core of “All of My Sons” is the inability of otherwise good but flawed people to come to terms with their actions, and the actions of their loved ones. It’s about people who choose to see the world not as it actually is, but as they need it to be to survive. “As a society we are now drawn to news that fits our personal view of the world. That view may not necessarily be untrue, but it has become more and more challenging to find facts, and  therefore it  is now easy to lose the forest of truth for the trees of facts,” White adds. “There is no villain in this play. You could argue that every character is well-intentioned, but the best intentioned of all of us can fail, sometimes with crippling results.” For Warehouse’s producing artistic director, Mike Sablone, “All My Sons” is still as relevant today as it was during the immediate postwar years. “One of the many amazing things about Arthur Miller is how all of his work still resonates today,” Sa-

blone says. “The main reason being he approaches his art from the human perspective first, so it’s about how this family deals with their individual decisions for intensely personal reasons.” Sablone adds, “Miller is an expert at getting us in the heads and hearts of his characters to think about why they did what they did. The beauty of the play (or any good drama) is that once the curtain falls you re-examine everything you’ve seen up until that point, and then on the drive home it hits you on a whole other level when you start to think about history through the years.”

“ALL MY SONS” WHEN March 24–April 15 WHERE Warehouse Theatre TICKETS $30 INFO 864-235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

S usan McMillen It is Your Lucky Day! REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

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TROLLINGWOOD 4BR/3.5BA BRICK RANCH, W/BSMNT, 2.9 ACRES ON LAKE. #1339258 • $439,900

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TWO RESIDENTIAL LOTS HUDDERS CREEK IN TROLLINGWOOD • 2.5 TO 5 AC 3BR/2.5BA W/BONUS RM, OPTION • $74,900-149,900 ALL BRICK, NICELY UPDATED, BRING YOUR BUILDER! CONVENIENT! #1332158 • $223,900


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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HOME

Featured Home

Spaulding Farm 10 Ryedale Court, SC 29615

Home Info Price: $765,000 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4.5 Acres: 0.70 Approx.

MLS: 1338282 Sq. Ft: 4600-4799

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and J. L. Mann High Agent: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Vmiller@MarchantCo.com

An exquisite 3 story home situated on a pristine quiet culde-sac in the highly desirable community of Spaulding Farm awaits you! With landscaping designed by Graham Kimak, the professional and well-manicured lawn only adds to its curb appeal. Upon entering the home you will be delighted by the fine details; gleaming hardwood floors throughout, plantation shutters, heavy custom architectural moldings, and more. The gourmet kitchen suite is the true heart of this home and is open to the breakfast area and great room creating a gracious

ambiance for family and guests. An incredible master suite will WOW you with its custom his and her vanities, large walk-in shower, and show stopping closet! The outdoor retreat is a perfect getaway as it offers a covered porch, over sized twotiered deck area with hot tub, and a kitchen bar with stainless gas grill and sink. Enjoy your evenings by the stone fire pit (w/ gas starter) and listen to the tranquil sounds of your own lighted water fountain. Conveniently located to shopping, award winning schools, and the interstate.

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Kilgore Farms • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Pelham Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

6 Westminster Dr · $759,000 · MLS# 1330831

122 Meyers Drive · $549,000 · MLS# 1339011

6 Meadow Field Court · $449,950 · MLS# 1339023

1415 Pelham Road · $399,000 · MLS# 1336239

4BR/3BA Classic Bungalow in the heart of the Augusta Circle neighborhood. High ceilings, great light. Location! Location! Location! Augusta Rd to Augusta Dr. L on Westminster.

4BR/3BA Wonderful location! This home sits on a large, level corner lot. Spacious living room, den and breakfast area. Must see! Augusta Drive to Westminster. Right on Waccamaw. Left on Meyers.

5BR/4BA 4,321 sf, home located in a culdesac with hardwoods and granite throughout! Master with sitting area with fireplace. Must SEE! 385 to Woodruff road. Left into entrance. L, R, L

5BR/4BA Wonderful ranch home situated on approximately 2 acres and just minutes from Downtown Greenville. Several updates and ample storage throughout! Haywood Road to Pelham Rd. Home on left.

Contact: Heidi Putnam 380-6747 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: HILARY HURST 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Whitehall Plantation • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Five Forks • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Townes@Cardinal Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Cherokee Park

203 Wynterhall Drive · $315,000 · MLS# 1338390

516 S Bennetts Bridge Rd · $275,000 · MLS# 1333944

445 Christiane Way · $193,000 · MLS# 1338126

14 Keowee Avenue · $798,000 · MLS# 1338491

4BR/2.5BA Stunning, open floor plan, updated kitchen. Lovely sun room overlooking the beautiful backyard with deck, pergola and patio. Storage galore. Woodruff Road past Five Forks. Turn Right onto Wynterhall Drive.

3BR/2BA Almost and acre lot! 3 bedrooms, 2 + baths. Formal dining room. Sunroom. Bonus. Master on main. Woodruff Road towards Woodruff, left on Bennetts Bridge

3BR/2.5BA Move in ready! Open floorplan and hardwoods throughout first floor. Large MBR with walk-in closet. Fenced in patio. Convenient location! Woodruff Rd to Smith Hines. Left into Cardinal Creek.

4BR/3.5BA Brand new construction! Beautiful open floorplan with gourmet chefs kitchen and spacious great room. Master on main. Separate bonus area, flex space, covered deck and large two car carport.

Contact: Kennie Norris 608-0865 BlackStream | Christie’s Real Estate

Contact: Stephanie Towe 270-5919 Blackstream Christie’s International Real Estate

Contact: Angela Rodriguez-Sawyer 609-7219 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Downtown Greenville

Windsor Forest

Real Estate News

Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Top Producers for January

7 Rowley Street · $360,000 · MLS# 1336771

11 Renforth Road · $175,000 · MLS# 1339193

3BR/2BA Beautiful bungalow, walking distance to downtown! 10 ft ceilings, refinished hardwoods, updated kitchen, courtyard patio, ample storage. Detached garage/workshop.

3BR/2BA Patio-home-open floor plan. Newer carpet/new paint/new ceramic tile in kitchen. Large/fenced yard. Dual vanities, garden-tub, separate shower, walk-in closet. Large dining room used as library/separate living space.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner Real Estate

IMMACULATE NEW LISTING on 2.80 ACRES

104 HUNT CLUB DRIVE, SIMPSONVILLE

3BR/2.5BA • One owner custom built • MLS# 1339345 • $354,500

Marcia Hancock ABR, CRS, GRI, Broker Associate

864-270-1878 | mhancock@cbcaine.com 111 WILLIAMS STREET, GREENVILLE, SC 29601

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® announces the top producers from each of its residential sales offices for the month of January. These agents and teams earned the highest gross commission incomes (GCI) based on closings completed between January 1 – 31, 2017. 3. The Gillis Group 2. Donna Stegall Anderson Top Individuals: 3. Twila Kingsmore Top Teams: 1. Robbie Haney 1. The Clever People Garlington Road 2. Jeffrey Meister 2. Amy Tippitt Team Top Teams: 3. Jennifer JD Davis 3. Gia & Company 1. Donna O. Smith & Partners Top Individuals: Pelham Road 2. Ronda & Chris Holder 1. Johnathan Lower Top Teams: Top Individuals: 2. Deenise Parrett 1. The Toates Team 1. John Rathbun 3. Kathy Caldwell 2. Pam McCurry Team 2. Christine Kurta 3. Spaulding Group 3. Bob Moffatt Augusta Road Top Individuals: Top Individuals: Greer 1. Jennifer Van Gieson 1. Beth Joyner Crigler Top Teams: 2. Cate Thompson 2. Vicki Galloway Roark 1. Jan Walker Team 3. Sam Hankins 3. Ginger Sherman 2. The Shepherd Team 4. Jill Norman Simpsonville Top Individuals: 5. Annie Adams Top Team: 1. Regina Kaminski 6. Amy Ray Thomas 1. Bob & Linda Brown Group 2. Paige Haney 2. Cousins & Associates Easley/Powdersville Top 3. Jill Chapman 3. Sandra Palmer & Associates Team: N. Pleasantburg Top Individuals: 1. Sheri Sanders/Gary 1. Bob Schmidt Thompson/Dara Lynn Ratliff Top Teams: 1. Chet & Beth Smith Group 2. Amy Hart Top Individuals: 2. The Keagy Team 3. Diane Dix Shapuite 1. Carol Houston REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 34


OPEN SUNDAY, MARCH 19 from 2-4PM GLEN MEADOWS upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/GCX7WY/5-Bellspring-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1338740

STONEHAVEN

STONEHAVEN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/M7P2Y7/23-English-Oak-Road-Simpsonville-SC-1331241

5 Bellspring Ct • 4BR/3.5BA

23 English Oak Rd • 4BR/4BA

RIVER SHOALS

CHESTNUT HILL PLANTATION

$515,000 · MLS# 1338740 Ted Green · 684-8789 CODE 4190994

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/YY9QYV/10-Alcovy-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1339178

10 Alcovy Court • 5BR/4BA $385,000 · MLS# 1339178 Tim Keagy · 905-3304 CODE 4200591

$489,900 · MLS# 1331241 Debbie Levato · 380-9150 CODE 3936988

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/GAVNHU/407-Chestnut-Woods-Court-Greer-SC-1338569

407 Chestnut Woods Ct. • 5BR/3.5BA $339,900 · MLS# 1338569 Karen North · 350-4887 CODE 4185890

KENSINGTON CREEK upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/CNG8RY/630-Cub-Branch-Drive-Spartanburg-SC-241013

PARIS MTN/FURMAN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/FNZHFA/6-Linfield-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1336967

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/J3X38M/150-Club-View-Drive-Greenville-SC-1338470

6 Linfield Ct. • 4BR/3.5BA

150 Club View Dr. • 4BR/3.5BA

PARIS MTN/FURMAN

OAKS AT WOODFIN RIDGE

$459,900 · MLS# 1336967 Stephanie Miller · 915-6076 CODE 4133622

$429,000 · MLS# 1338470 John Paul Gillis · 252-5180 CODE 4181566

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/QN2KBN/9-Belle-Terre-Court-Greenville-SC-1338663

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HAPBF2/112-Southern-Oaks-Drive-Inman-SC-240983

9 Belle Terre Ct. • 5BR/4BA

112 Southern Oaks Dr. • BR/BA

$329,000 · MLS# 1338663 Robyn Gillis · 915-5723 CODE 4186912

$274,900 · MLS# 240983 Don Hazzard · 909-0141 CODE 4165177 Also open Sat. 1-6 p.m.

ALSO OPEN OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/85JU93/216-Garlington-Oak-Lane-Greenville-SC-1331535

216 Garlington Oak Lane • 4BR/4BA $665,000 · MLS# 1331535 CODE 3944714 Cynthia Rehberg · 488-49953

PALAZZO DI MONTEBELLO

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/EJ7SRG/701-Montebello-Drive-Unit-103-Greenville-SC-1336538

CLEAR SPRINGS

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/3A556J/104-Angel-Falls-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1338272

701 Montebello Dr Unit 103 • 2BR/2.5BA $440,000 · MLS# 1336538 CODE 4122201 Norm MacDonald · 313-7353

104 Angel Falls Drive • 6BR/5BA $435,000 · MLS# 1338272 CODE 4175964 Jeffrey Meister · 979-4633

OPEN NEW COMMUNITIES 630 Cub Branch Road • BR/BA

$243,200 · MLS# 241013 Don Hazzard · 909-0141 CODE 4165183 Also open Sat. 1-6 p.m.

NOW IN THE WEEKEND UPDATE

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

Alta Vista Place upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/VFMPCU

Oaks at Roper Mountain

Cureton Place

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/85JU93/216-Garlington-Oak-Lane-Greenville-SC-1331535

Tues.-Sat. 11 am-5pm, Sun. 2-4 pm Units starting @ $949,000 CODE 2931606 AltaVistaPlace.com 622-5253

Oaks at Woodfin Ridge

Mon.-Sat. 1-6 pm, Sun. 2-4 pm Homes starting @ $247,900 112 Southern Oaks Dr. Don Hazzard 909-0141

Open Sunday 2-4pm MLS 1331535 $665,000 CODE 3944714 Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953

Open Sunday 2-4pm Units starting @ $400,000 15 Cureton St. • CODE 3418021 Becky Orders 270-0743 Leigh Irwin 380-7755 curetonplace.com

Kensington Creek

Mon.-Sat. 1-6 pm, Sun. 2-4 pm Homes starting @ $233,100 603 Cub Branch Road Don Hazzard 909-0141

The Upstate’s #1 Real Estate Company Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ®

Jon Ferguson 616-7651 Garlington Road

Jerry Ross 421-2205 Easley

Beverly Little 430-8409 Simpsonville

Leslie Provence 414-0747 Augusta Road

Dale Hawkins 901-1027 N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Will Smith 879-4239 Greer

Becca Gaines 270-3296 Prop. Mgmt.

Debbie Levato 380-9150 Pelham Road

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME The Abstract Art of Grateful Living

with Paula Angermeier

Magically Delicious Irish Soda Bread

(864) 325-6266 • AugustaWalk.com

When I was in third grade, our teacher, Mrs. Cormany, assigned the class a “country of origin” project. As an 8-year-old, I had the basic understanding that my grandparents were my parents’ parents, but the idea of ancestors and descendants was new and somewhat intriguing. I went home and began asking questions about my forebears. My mom replied that our family was, as far as she knew, English with maybe a little Scottish in the mix. My dad said the same, adding that there was some French “way back.” To my 8-year-old ears, it was as if they said, “boringboringblahblahblah.” So I decided to make up some ancestors. (This was back in the day when kids did their own homework.) And because the most glamorous girl in my class was Lydia with flowing auburn hair and sparkling green eyes, I decided that my ancestors would be, like hers, from Ireland, the land of rainbows and leprechauns, a place I believed to be truly magical. The good news is that on St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish. And so, to add a little magic to this not-quitespring time of year, I’ve planned an

Irish dinner. Despite my once yearning to be Irish, it turns out I don’t have a lot of green in the tableware department. I made do with plates shaped like cabbage leaves, green bottle tumblers, and my favorite Belgian linen napkins with a faded green, blue, and red plaid. For a weeknight centerpiece, I added a few preserved boxwood topiaries. The menu is simple: shepherd’s pie, soda bread with Irish butter, and mint brownies. Easy peasy, except that I am not a bread baker. Most of my efforts, except for biscuits and rolls, have not ended well. On more than one occasion I have had to throw out the bread — and the pan it was baked in. I wish I were kidding. Still, I kept returning to a recipe called “Mrs. Callahan’s Irish Soda Bread.” It didn’t require yeast to rise, so I figured I might have a shot. It turned out great! It’s a tasty peasant bread — the texture was even, and the bread is slightly sweet, perfect for next morning’s toast. Best of all, it makes two rounds, so you can share the Irish goodness with a neighbor.

«


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

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HOME « Mrs. Callahan’s Irish Soda Bread

Do the same with the second half of the dough. Cut a deep X or cross into the top of the rounds. This is known as “blessing the bread.” Bake for 40 minutes or until the round sounds hollow when tapped. Cut into wedges and serve warm with butter.

• 3 cups all-purpose flour • 3 cups whole-wheat flour • 1/2 cup brown sugar • 1 teaspoon baking soda

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

• 1/2 stick cold butter (1/4 cup), cut into 1/2inch cubes • 2 cups buttermilk Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Mix together the dry ingredients on the lowest speed of your mixer. Add the cubes of butter and continue mixing at a low speed.

A Maga zine for Upsta te Living

Pour the buttermilk in a very slow, thin, steady stream. When the milk is added, turn off the mixer. The dough will be shaggy. Remove half the dough from the mixing bowl

and turn out onto a floured surface. (I used the parchment paper-lined baking sheet.) Gently knead the dough about four or five turns and shape the dough into a round.

LOOK FOR THE SPRING ISSUE OF AT HOME ON NEWSTANDS NOW!

Spring 2017

THE MOST RECOGNIZED, NATIONALLY AWARD WINNING, LOCALLY FOCUSED, HOME MAGAZINE IN THE UPSTATE.

The Idea s Is sue

Tips on home staging, hacks for space saving, and inspiration for the color-crav ing 00_Spring2017_atHomeCover_hcw.indd

By day, Paula Angermeier is the head of communications for the Greenville County Museum of Art. By night, she writes about the art of living at TownandCountryHouse.com.

2 2/23/17 10:08 AM

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32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of February 13 – 17, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$1,600,000 $1,225,000 COBBLESTONE $925,000 $875,000 THE ATRIUM AT ORCHARD PARK $825,000 $825,000 $750,000 $700,000 $675,000 COBBLESTONE $630,350 COLLINS CREEK $625,000 $620,000 MAXWELL FARM $600,000 $585,000 $567,500 $560,000 $560,000 LAUREL LAKE $510,000 $500,000 STONEHAVEN $480,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $475,000 CURETON TOWNHOMES $459,900 CURETON TOWNHOMES $444,700 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $438,042 $437,500 BRECKENRIDGE $435,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $407,850 RIVER WALK $380,000 SILVER MEADOWS $370,377 CARISBROOKE $355,000 SHADOWOOD $355,000 ALTAMONT TERRACE $350,000 GLEN MEADOWS $350,000 CHEROKEE PARK $335,750 ELLETSON ACRES $329,900 COPPER CREEK $327,352 $325,000 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $324,500 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $315,000 LOST RIVER $312,232 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $311,563 KING’S CROSSING $302,000 BELSHIRE $301,940 BOTANY WOODS $300,000 GRAYSON PARK $299,050 GLENBROOKE TOWNHOUSES $286,000 PLANTATION GREENE $285,000 ALTAMONT TERRACE $284,900 WATERS RUN $284,397 $282,000 KILGORE FARMS $276,000 HOLLY TRACE $275,000 PLANTATION GREENE $273,000 CARILION $266,500 NEELY FARM-HAWTHORNE RIDGE $266,000 RAVENWOOD $265,000 GOODWIN FARMS $264,243 HUDDERS CREEK $262,500 $262,000 GOODWIN FARMS $260,363 RIDGEFIELD $259,000 TWIN CREEKS $257,000

S C DEPT OF PUBLIC SAFET WADE HAMPTON PLAZA BLANKESTIJN RUDI (JTWROS KIM AND SUH LLC FOUR SEASONS PROPERTIES GAC DEVELOPMENT LLC EVANS JOHN W OLIVER BRADLEY T KELLY MARK L ESCUDE MARK WHERRY NANCY C REVOCABLE KIM’S TAE KWON DO LLC SADLER COMPANY INC OF GR ASPIRE ENTERPRISES LLC NBT PROPERTIES LLC REGIONAL MANAGEMENT CORP BALLARD DAVID A SAXENA NAVEEN RAJ ELLIOTT FRANCES BARNES SCHEMITSCH ELIZABETH A ( CEDARS LIVING TRUST THE SCR GREENVILLE CURETON L SCR GREENVILLE CURETON L NVR INC 360 CONSTRUCTION INC TIGERVILLE ROAD VENTURE NVR INC BRODSKY BRITTANY (JTWROS COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC SICORA CAROL C JOLLEY DAVID DEAN (JTWRO JAHRMARKT RICHARD C JR PUGLIA NICHOLAS F BUCKNER ANNE CREEN (JTWR LAWSON MINDY BETH MUNGO HOMES INC PANTRY INC THE MARK III PROPERTIES INC BORGMEYER KATHERINE E (J MERITAGE HOMES OF S C LL ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC NVR INC JOLLY DONNA L EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL GILLESPIE F HAROLD TRUST TARAWNEH OMAR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC TURNER MICHAEL A BRYAN AMY O (JTWROS) FOREMAN JENNIFER LYNN (J TRIPLE B COMPANY INC SHEILS CHARLES J (JTWROS DRAKE RACHAEL M NIEMITALO INC LOPRESTI DONNA L HERRERA JULIO (JTWROS) NIEMITALO INC SIMPSON ALLISON LEIGH CHELLAPPA MUTHU N

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SUBD.

ENCLAVE LAURENS LLC JDG PROPERTIES LLC RUCINSKI LAWRENCE PAUL ( M & J OF GREENVILLE INC WS GREENVILLE LLC ONE LIFE FITNESS HOLDING LIBBEY ISAAC (JTWROS) BLAKE MARTIN C (JTWROS) OLIVER BRADLEY T (JTWROS HOGAN CYNTHIA R (JTWROS) PANAGAKOS WALTER MADRIAGA MARTIAL ARTS LL ZUREICH BARBARA A DELL SHEILA D FREEMON PROPERTIES LLC JTB LLC OF GREENVILLE MILLARD DONNA H REVOCABL FELDER JESSE T (JTWROS) WED STONE HOLDINGS LLC PROUTY SEAN M (JTWROS) BERGMANN BRIAN S (JTWROS DAVIS JAMES WILLIAM JR SAURET THOMAS J (JTWROS) YOUNT BOBBY D (JTWROS) BOWER AMY SK BUILDERS INC EBERT MATTHEW (JTWROS) KNIGHT RANDOLPH ERIC (JT FAZIO FRANK M CHAPMAN AMY ALDREDGE (JT RITTENHOUSE BRIAN A (JTW KENDALL JOHN E (JTWROS) KNIGHT IVEY M (SURV) BLACK BENJAMIN WALKER MCKINNEY CATHERINE D (JT WEAVER DANIEL BRIAN (JTW KCP C-STORES LLC NVR INC BIGGS BRITTANY LAYNE ALEXANDER MICHAEL R LEWIS PENELOPE H VANDER TOORN DARRIN M (J ENGELMANN ALFRED P REVOC CORMEY JASON JOHNSON DEMOND L (JTWROS SMITH CLARENCE A HIEN NGOC PHAN THE (JTWR KENNEY BETSY G SAYLOR LISA J MANNHEIMER MAXX R HOWIE JORDAN BOLICK (JTW JONES MATTHEW P (JTWROS) BRYAN ALICIA BETH CHRIST JOHN H CARPENTER TAMRA K (JTWRO BROCK MICHAEL DALTON CAMPBELL JOSHUA G (JTWRO SHEPHERD JASON TREVOR (J ALLEN BRIAN W STINE CHRISTOPHER R (SUR GAMBRELL DEBRA A HERNANDEZ GEORGE (JTWROS

531 S MAIN ST STE 207 106 PONDERS RAY LN 121 RAMSFORD LN 4306 AUGUSTA RD 372 ABBY CIR 905 N MAIN ST 1724 BANCROFT RD 318 JONES AVE 219 FAIRVIEW AVE 100 PUTNEY BRIDGE LN PO BOX 25187 N/O/D 5 MAXWELL FARM DR 24 MAXWELL RD 117 MANLY ST PO BOX 17859 235 GERALD DR 20 JUNEBERRY CT 13 N IRVINE ST 208 WINTER BROOK LN 23 RIVERBANKS CT 15 CURETON ST UNIT H 15 CURETON PLACE UNIT I 307 ALGONQUIN TRL 113 HILLCREST CIR 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 204 VERLIN DR 216 RIVER WALK DR 132 ACUSHNET LN 400 LADYKIRK LN 105 SHADOWOOD DR 52 ALTAMONT TERRACE LN 2 GLEN MEADOWS DR 15 KEOWEE AVE 9 ARBUTUS TRL 6 BROMLEY WAY 41 CROMWELL CT 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 205 W FARIS RD 23 WINGED BOURNE CT 647 PONDEN DR 105 FOXHILL DR 140 BELSHIRE DR 108 HIAWATHA DR 15 FOXBOURNE WAY 238 GLENBROOKE WAY 5 WESTON BROOK WAY 32 ALTAMONT TERRACE LN 205 WATERS RUN LN 514 HAMMETT BRIDGE RD 4 ASHBY GROVE DR 140 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 11 WESTON BROOK WAY 57 PALLADIO DR 616 NEELY FARM DR 6 RAVEN FALLS LN 65 GOODWIN BRIDGE RD 506 HUDDERS CREEK WAY 360 FORRESTER DR 45 GOODWIN BRIDGE RD 136 NEW HARRISON BRIDGE RD 15 BRENAU PL

COTTAGES AT NEELY $255,013 HALF MILE LAKE $255,000 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $254,000 SOUTHBROOK $249,900 $247,740 HAWK CREST $246,525 ONEAL VILLAGE $246,525 LISMORE PARK $245,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $244,000 CROFTSTONE ACRES $242,900 THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL $242,311 CAMILLA PARK $239,000 $230,000 BRADLEY STATION $230,000 EDWARD SPRINGS $225,940 MOSS CREEK $224,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $223,000 EDGEBROOK $222,760 SHARON RIDGE $221,900 $220,000 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $217,572 TOWNES AT PELHAM $216,500 TANNER’S MILL $215,000 SUGAR CREEK $215,000 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $205,500 TWIN CREEKS $203,000 AUTUMN WOODS $199,500 PELHAM FALLS $199,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $198,500 VICTORIA PARK TOWNHOMES $196,000 THE RESERVE AT RIVERSIDE $193,000 COUNTRY HAVEN $192,000 $190,000 $190,000 $189,900 FORRESTER WOODS $187,900 MEADOWS@BLUE RIDGE PLNTN $187,000 ORCHARD CREST $186,000 MORNINGSIDE ROLLING GREEN $185,000 RIVER BIRCH VILLAS $185,000 BUTLER STATION $184,900 WHISPERING OAKS $184,000 PEBBLECREEK $180,000 WHITE OAK HILLS $176,900 SPARROWS POINT $175,500 LOCKELAND PARK $174,500 LOCKELAND PARK $174,000 CASTLETON $172,500 ALLEN WEST $167,000 WEDGEWOOD PLACE $166,000 COOPERS LAKE $165,500 CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE $164,000 TERRACE GARDENS $162,500 $159,900 SCOTTSWOOD $156,500 $156,000 $155,000 SUMMERSIDE@ROLLING GREEN $154,900 CRESCENT CREEK $149,000 COUNTRY CHASE $149,000 COUNTRY GARDENS $149,000 HADLEY PARK $147,000

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON INC REYNOLDS HENRY S RHODES TERRY L LAVOIE DEBORAH J HRO DEVELOPERS LLC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL MCCRARY NORMAN FISHER LENNY E (JTWROS) DACUS SANDRA R EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL NEWLEAFE WHITE HORSE LLC HOLSENBACK TERRIE LYNN CHASTEEN JONATHAN R (JTW SK BUILDERS INC YOUNG ALICE D MAEDERER JOSHUA (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC TRADITIONAL HOMES CORPOR STONE WARD S JR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL DREVETS LUKE A PATE ELIZABETH C (JTWROS BRANDENBURG JOE T STEADHAM JOYCE ANNETTE FRALEY JUDITH L ALEXANDER MICHAEL RAYMON WILEY HELENA BETT KUCKEL HOPE K MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SHANNON STEVE FEW RUSSELL J EASTMAN DAVID WI SHILOH LANDFILL LLC MCWHORTER RICHARD W JOHNSON DANIEL E LENNON CHRISTOPHER MARK III PROPERTIES INC SHARPE LINDA V TRUST FISHER SHAREINA TRUSTEE FISHER GLORIA BARRETT GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC KEASLER COLTON E (JTWROS NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING COR PREVIS KENNETH R SUNCREST HOMES LLC SUNCREST HOMES LLC WANG STEVEN SK BUILDERS INC MILLS JOY M (JTWROS) EDWARDS JILES P (JTWROS) MWAI ANNE N KENDALL JOHN EVERETT JASSO JUAN MANUEL YAP CHENG HAI CARPENTER TAMRA A LYERLY JAMES MILTON SR MAXWELL C WILTON BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL JAMES & COMPANY BUILDERS ARIAS DIANA E CORY DIANE (JTWROS)

BUYER

ADDRESS

HAKIMI MARIAM (JTWROS) MCCOY RONALD DRAKE (JTWR MCPHERSON CHRISTOPHER SC ANDERSON JENNIFER BOLIEK LUTHER RICE JOSEPH M (JTWROS) AWTREY JACK L III (JTWRO SHANNON MEREDITH A (JTWR SCHULTZ ROBERT J (JTWROS 915 + MAIN LLC WONG CATALINA (JTWROS) RIVER STREET MANAGEMENT DE PERIERA FLOR DE MARIA SMITH EZELL ALLEN (JTWRO MORGANO MICHELE M ELLIS ELLEN E (JTWROS) ST JOHN GRACE K TETOR JAMES M (JTWROS) MAZZA DEBORAH R CHRIST CHURCH ALI MAHDI S (JTWROS) ST JOHN GRACE K REEVES MATTHEW E (JTWROS MOODY TYLER W (JTWROS) LOVELL-SWAN ANNE (SURV) EDWARDS EMILY JANE BEARD CURTIS ANDREW (JTWROS) BEAMAN JOSEPH BROWN (SUR AKERS ZACHARY L RAMOS MICHAEL A AGUIRRE LISA ALEXANDER CHRISTOPHER W WI SHILOH LANDFILL LLC EASTMAN DAVID G LEMOINE AMANDA A (JTWROS WHITE SARAH C BROOME KALENE C (JTWROS) ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L STRANDEMO DIANNE C (JTWR MACKEY JAMES R (JTWROS) JENKE ANDREW R (JTWROS) MOSS-DAMMONS CECILE RUIZ CARLOS A BARBER JUSTIN L REDMON FRED EDWARD JR (J MCCRACKEN BRITTANY M (JT MILLER RACHAEL M KING JAYNE (JTWROS) REID BERTRAM T GREER DANIEL J WIGGIN STEVEN A MARTIN CORBIN MICHAEL KLIMEK DANIEL Z (JTWROS) GILLESPIE KADIE J L (SUR LYNN BARRY OSBORNE GARY H (JTWROS) COTTER ROBERT W (JTWROS) CULLIN-PAYNE CANDICE (JT CHISOLM KOWANA D GOLDSMITH JOY IVORY DAVIS ASHLEY (JTWROS) LONGYEAR HEATHER L (JTWR

256 EVANSDALE WAY 5 LAUREL FORK CT 26 SMOKEHOUSE DR 125 SELDEN WAY PO BOX 26957 201 HAWK VALLEY DR 209 NOBLE ST 59 KILLARNEY LN 15 CHALICE HILL LN 4022 NORHILL BLVD 2857 WESTPORT RD PO BOX 186 1518 CEDAR LANE RD 416 BRADLEY CT 209 CONWAY HILL LN 308 BELGRAY CT 342 ASCOT RIDGE LN 401 TRILLIUM CREEK CT 201 CAPERTON WAY 10 N CHURCH ST 100 VAUBUREN CT 342 ASCOT RIDGE LN 225 STAPLEFORD PARK DR 108 SUGAR CREEK RD 222 EDGEWOOD DR 1 MONTREAT LN 4 KINGSDALE CT 10 WOODWAY DR 307 LONDONDERRY CT 402 KINDLETREE WAY 3 SCOFIELD CT 304 BROCKWAY LN 3301 BENSON DR STE 601 4768 STATE PARK RD 210 YORKSHIRE DR 113 COLD SPRINGS RD 102 HOLLANDER DR 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 4 W00DCOVE CT 11 NORMAN PL 204 HYDE PARK LN 60 ENDEAVOR CIR 412 ROBERTS RD 1240 GREEN FERN DR 6 GAINEY CT 412 PEAKSVIEW DR 404 PEAKSVIEW DR 110 WHILEAWAY CT 111 HUFF DR 115 MONARCH PL 307 DOVE HAVEN DR 102 FORSYTHIA DR 212 BARRY DR 604 LAUREL MEADOWS PKWY 40 WOOD POINTE DR UNIT 22 324 POLLARD RD 402 W ARLINGTON AVE 305 MILSTEAD WAY 217 CRESCENT CREEK CT 310 CATTERICK WAY 1909 COUNTRY APPLE CT 322 MOONSTONE DR

ANOTHER SATISFIED CLIENT ”Experience, professionalism, and knowledge of the Greenville area were the driving factor for us in choosing an agent to help us with our RELOCATION process. Jill helped us find the perfect home in a very short period of time. She worked with us over the phone, went out of her way to send live videos of homes, and answered questions at all hours of the day. Highly recommend!” ~ Christina Payne

Brian and Jill norman realtor®

864.380.2252 Jill | 864.979.4874 Brian | NormanGroupSC.com


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME Featured Neighborhood

The Enclave at River Reserve Piedmont SC

Home Info Price: $345,900-$500,000s Amenities: Gated community with customizable, luxury Craftsman-style homes. Exclusive access to river house and walking trails. Riverfront and basement homesites available. Minutes to Downtown Greenville and I-85. Schools: Concrete Elementary, Powdersville Middle, and Powdersville High Contact Information: Stan McAlister | 864.292.0400 stan@builderpeople.com

$20,000 Buyer Incentive on MOVE-IN ready homes! This beautiful natural refuge is nestled along the Saluda River, with nature trails and a river house open to all residents. The homes in this gated community are drawn exclusively from the SK Heritage Collection—which ensures both exceptional craftsmanship and outstanding value. Choose to build your home with the largest local builder in the Upstate. SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, we understand residential construction

which enables us to anticipate your concerns during the build. From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make home construction an enjoyable process. We’re not just building homes – We’re Building a Way of Life. From Greenville: I-85 to exit 42 stay left onto 185 bypass (no toll) to exit 12 Easley HWY 153. Turn right, come over Saluda River bridge, the Enclave at River Reserve is next right. From Anderson: I-85 to exit 40, HWY 153, turn right, 1/2 mile on left.

Not all agents are created equal.

GO BEYOND THE EXPECTED.

Tim Keagy 864-905-3304

Ted Green 864-684-8789

Ray Bergey 757-409-4900

864.295.2846 | www.CTKteam.com

Angela Harmon 864-508-4462

Andrew Van 864-905-3737

Jennifer Kephart 864-991-6732


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Real Estate News continued “On behalf of all of our associates, I congratulate these agents on a tremendous start to 2017,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “These results are a testament to our commitment to doing what is right for each and every client, day after day.”

Jodie Grace Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Jodie Grace as an Experience Manager to its Spartanburg office. Jodie joins Coldwell Banker Caine with both a BA and MA from ConGrace verse College. Previously, she was a teacher in Spartanburg County School District 2, where she was a long time veteran. Jodie will help facilitate agent needs for the Spartanburg branch and assist in all office functions. In her spare time, Jodie enjoys playing tennis, reading, and spending time with her two sons. “We are thrilled to welcome Jodie to our Spartanburg office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell

Banker Caine. “Her friendly personality and provide employment opportunities. to interpret the visions of her clients will will go hand in hand with our mission to The Allen Tate Greenville-Downtown of- help them reach their real estate dreams.” provide excellent service to our clients fice is located at 323 Buncombe Street and and agents.” is home to more than 35 agents and staff. To Pelham Road Office of C. Dan reach the office, call 864-297-1953.

Allen Tate Realtors GreenvilleDowntown Hosts Clothing Drive

Allen Tate Realtors in the GreenvilleDowntown office recently held a clothing drive to collect coats and business attire for local residents. More than 30 coats and business suits were collected, which were donated to the Support Outreach Services (SOS) Thrift Store in Greenville. “Part of Allen Tate’s mission is to give back to its local communities. Our Realtors and staff wanted to help those less fortunate, and help provide job seekers with professional attire. I’m humbled by the generosity of my team,” said Martha Hayhurst, regional vice president, Allen Tate Realtors Upstate. The SOS Thrift Stores partner with other non-profit agencies to provide clothing, household, and personal care items free of charge to clients of other non-profit organizations using a voucher system. The stores also offer quality merchandise for sale at a low cost

Joyner, Realtors Announces Two Associates

Susan Murphree Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Susan Murphree as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. Previously a self-employed interior decorator, Susan joins the firm with immense experience Murphree making a house a home. Susan is an active member of Boiling Springs First Baptist Church where she volunteers in childcare activities. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, sports events, and spending time with her growing family. Susan has been married to her husband, Paul, for 10 years and they share seven children and eight grandchildren together. “Susan is a marvelous addition to our Spartanburg office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her decorating expertise and ability

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce the recent addition of Faith Brunson and Kelly Faram as residential sales associates. Both have joined the Toates Team at the company’s Pelham Road office. Born and raised in Brazil, Faith Brunson attended college in San Diego, California where she earned a bachelor’s degree in secondary education. Brunson and her husband, Mark, lived in Brunson Australia before returning to the US and settling in the Upstate over 30 years ago. She is fluent in Portuguese and conversational in Spanish. Prior to joining The Toates Team, Kelly Faram worked with another brokerage company in the Greenville area handling residential sales and property manage-

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Read about all 55 Reasons to buy from us at 55reaso nsto buy.co m 9 Layken Lane | Simpsonville, SC NewStyleCommunities.com AN EPCON COMMUNITIES FRANCHISE.

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03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME Featured Home

The Courtyards on West Georgia Road 350 Laguna Lane, Simpsonville

Community Info Price: $449,500 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4 Lot Size: 0.18

MLS#: 1337909 Sq. Ft: 3150

Contact: Virani Homes viranicustom.com | 864-634-5203– Annell Bailey A&D Properties | 864-346-0598

Opportunity of a Lifetime . . . Custom Builder’s Model Home is now for Sale!!! The best possible way to buy a new custom house is purchasing the builders’ model house.

Several of the most expensive

wall, stone fireplace, zero entry shower with real ¾ red oak wood floors in all common areas on main level, custom master closets, grown trees in the backyard and much more make this home a dream come true.

upgrades are already included at no additional cost. Some of

If you are looking for mainly main floor living with an open

the upgrades include a side entry garage that backs up to green

floor plan stop by 350 Laguna Lane In Simpsonville this weekend

space providing seclusion and privacy for the new homeowners.

and check out this amazing deal.

Rounded corner walls, coffered ceilings, exposed brick accent

Real Estate News continued

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ment. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University & College of DuPage where she earned two degrees and three certifications. A native of Chicago, Faram has called Greenville home for the Faram past 12 years and currently lives in the Simpsonville area with her husband and daughter. “I am honored to welcome Kelly and Faith to our office, as well as the Toates Team. Their enthusiasm and knowledge of the area will certainly give them a great foundation,”

said Duane Bargar, Broker-In-Charge of the Pelham Road Office.

Kelly and Staggers Join the North Pleasantburg Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS announces the recent addition of Chris Kelly and Alvin Staggers to the North Pleasantburg office. They join the company as residential sales associates. Chris Kelly, a native of the low country of South Carolina, graduated from the Uni-

Kelly

versity of South Carolina with a degree in Journalism. After graduating, she held roles in public relations and advertising for United Way of Greenville County and Myers Arnold. She currently resides in Greer with her

husband, Ron. Alvin Staggers joins the company as an experienced sales associate, bringing 15 years of real estate experience serving buyers and sellers in a neighboring county. In addition to his industry experience, Staggers has also

amassed over 25 years of residential homebuilding, remodeling and electrical experience. A native of Westminster, he lives in the Upstate with his wife, Kamilah. “Chris and Alvin are Staggers tremendous additions to our talented group of agents. Their knowledge of the area, combined with a commitment to integrity, will certainly be beneficial to each of their clients,” said Fritzi Barbour, Broker-In-Charge of the N. Pleasantburg office.


EQUESTRIAN PROPERTY

120 E Round Hill Road, Greenville $2,495,000 MLS#1335830 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

REDUCED PRICE

502 Crescent Avenue, Greenville $1,095,000 MLS#1335053 Steven DeLisle 864-757-4970

6 Monet Drive, Greenville $899,000 MLS#1336098 Stephanie Towe 864-270-5919

UNDER CONTRACT

303 Saint Helena Court, Greenville $549,000 MLS#1332743 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345 UNDER CONTRACT

420 Packs Mtn. Ridge Rd., Taylors $450,000 MLS#1336503 Steven DeLisle 864-757-4970

350 Laguna Lane, Simpsonville $449,500 MLS#1337909 Holly May 864-640-1959

51 Meadow Rose Drive, Travelers Rest $330,000 MLS#1337960 Steven DeLisle 864-757-4970

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4

0.92 ACRES

➘

REDUCED PRICE

203 Wynterhall Drive, Simpsonville $315,000 MLS#1338390 Steven DeLisle 864-757-4970

205 Dante Lane, Simpsonville $309,900 MLS#1338214 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

208 Briarwood Drive, Simpsonville $285,000 MLS#1331783 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

516 S Bennetts Bridge Rd., Simpsonville $275,000 MLS#1333944 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

blackstreaminternational.com

133 Reserve Drive, Piedmont $125,000 MLS#1334160 Lana Smith 864-608-8313


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CONCERT

MAR. 17

https://soundcloud.com/pierce-edens Pierce Edens & The Dirty Work

Independent Public Ale House | 9 p.m. | $10

Pierce Edens’ songs are bathed in a haunting, backwoods mood that soaks through his mournful vocals and shivery acoustic guitar playing. It’s a sound steeped in Appalachian folk, from the creeping menace in his melodies to his imagistic lyrics that seem to revolve more around places than people. “A lot of my songs are very rooted to this part of the country in their descriptions of place,” he says. “It’s important to create a setting for a song, and to create an atmosphere for it to inhabit. When you do that, a lot of the work of the song is done for you.” Edens is currently touring that music as part of a duo, alternating between acoustic and electric guitars and occasionally adding drums. “With a larger group, all the songs would set into single forms,” he says of the stripped-down lineup. “With the duo, there’s a lot more flexibility to play with the songs and let them get to where everybody in the crowd is feeling it.” —Vincent Harris

FRI-SAT

17-18

THEATER PRODUCTION

Celtic Sounds

The Academy of Arts Ministries The LOGOS Theatre | 80 Schools St., Taylors 7 p.m. | $15-$20 This amazing concert has quickly become a favorite at the Logos Theatre, and we are delighted to bring it to you once again this coming spring. If you enjoy live Celtic music, singing, and dancing then you will not want to miss this incredible concert that celebrates the many seasons of life though music and song. 268-9342 | theAcademyOfArts.org information@theAcademyOfArts.org

FRI-SAT

17-25 Music”

CONCERT

Greenville Concert Band presents “A World of

Mar 17 at 7:30 p.m. at Greenville Tech Auditorium, 506 S. Pleasantburg Drive Mar 25 at 3 p.m. at Greenville County Hughes Main Library FREE Original and transcribed works for the concert band, many with an international connection, will be presented. greenvilleconcertband.org

SAT

18

CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

Hagood Mills Kids Fest

Visit Pickens Hagood Mills | 137 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens 10 a.m.4 p.m. | $5 The 10th annual Kids Fest concert and the YAMS talent show will be held on Saturday, March 18, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on the historic grounds of Hagood Mill in Pickens. 864-898-5963 | bit.ly/2kc0DJP

COMMUNITY

Annual Spring Cleanup

Friends of the Reedy River St. Matthew Methodist Church and Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery 701 Cleveland Street and 205 Cedar Lane Road

8:30 a.m.-noon FREE Help protect our hometown river by joining Friends of the Reedy River at their annual Spring Cleanup. There will be two check-in points: St. Matthew Methodist Church and Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery. Check-in is 8:30-9 a.m., and clean up begins at 9 a.m. Make sure to bring gloves, and also consider bringing old shoes or boots that can get wet, long pants, hat, sunscreen, and yard clippers or extension arms. bit.ly/2lrMbKW pcarson@friendsofthereedyriver.org

VOLUNTEER

Foreign Object Debris (FOD) Walk

Greenville Downtown Airport Terminal Lobby 100 Tower Drive 7:15-9 a.m. | FREE Upstate aviation enthusiasts are meeting at the Greenville Downtown Airport Terminal Lobby at 7:15 a.m. on March 18 to do a FOD walk. FOD (foreign objects debris) is small objects found on the airport runway and taxiways which can be ingested by airplane engines and cause serious damage. Even small objects such as pen caps, screws, and badges can be dangerous for aviation. Anyone is invited to volunteer at this event and no aviation background is required. The group will walk all runways and taxiways to search for FOD. The walk is expected to end at 9 a.m. and the group will meet for donuts and coffee. Please bring a flashlight. 864-270-6660 | mississippiwildcat@excite.com

MUSIC

Drake White & The Big Fire

Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 7 p.m. | $12 adv/$15 door Fresh off a Top 5 album on the Billboard Country Charts, Drake White rolls into the Blind Horse, bringing a mix of country twang, pop polish, and rock & roll grit. 864-233-1381 | bit.ly/2lCo1Mu

SUN

19

CONCERT

Chicago

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $65-95 Hailed as one of the “most important bands in music since the dawn of the rock and roll era” by former President Bill Clinton, the legendary rock and roll band with horns, Chicago, came in at No. 9, the highest charting American band in Billboard Magazine’s Hot 200 All-Time Top Artists. Chicago is the first American rock band to chart Top 40 albums across six decades. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

MON

20

03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

COMMUNITY

Upstate Republican Women’s March Luncheon

Upstate Republican Women Poinsett Club | 807 East Washington St. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | $18/members, $20/nonmembers The Upstate Republican Women’s luncheon will welcome South Carolina’s new lieutenant governor,

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Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Lizzy

Tails & Trails 5K: Chasing NO KILL

Naomi Gaffey / Contributing

Left to right: Tara McNeill, Susan McFadden, Mairéad Carlin, and Éabha McMahon

CONCERT

Celtic Woman

Call it the luck of the Irish: Celtic Woman’s 84city spring tour brings them to the Peace Center right on St. Patrick’s Day. The current quartet — singers Máiréad Carlin, Susan McFadden, and Éabha McMahon, and violinist Tara McNeill — is the latest iteration of the musical ensemble that has included 14 women since 2004. Joined by a full complement of musicians and dancers, Celtic Woman will feature several songs from their latest album, “Voices of Angels” (No. 1 on Billboard’s World Music chart), showcasing a repertoire that ranges from traditional Irish tunes to modern classics like “My Heart Will Go On.” “Fans can expect a brand-new energy, new music, new arrangements, old favorites, all together with a huge orchestral sound,” says McNeill. “The cast have changed over the years, but the mantra of the group has always remained the same,” adds McMahon. “Support, encourage, and inspire each other. Stand together and lift each other.” —Jerry Salley

WHAT Celtic Woman: “Voices of Angels” WHERE Peace Center Concert Hall WHEN Friday, March 17, 8 p.m. TICKETS Tickets start at $55 INFO 864-467-3000, peacecenter.org

It’s about that time again - time to get ready for Tails & Trails 5K Walk/Run to benefit Animal Care! This race is a dog’s dream. Whether you’re competitive or you just want to take a casual stroll in nature with your pup, you’re still going to be helping to build a NO KILL community in Greenville County. There’s even a way to raise extra money for animals by starting your own fundraising mission. Every dollar donated goes directly to the Second Chance Fund to help homeless pets get the care they need so they can be adopted into loving homes. You’ve got to get in on the fun and the life saving! Register for the best event of the year for only $25 or $15 if you have a team of 6 or more. Tell your friends! Register online at GreenvillePets.org.

GreenvillePets.org


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MAR. 17 CONCERT

THE BEST IN ROCK, JAZZ, & DANCE

CALENDAR

M A RCH 23

Motel Radio, w/ The High Divers https://soundcloud.com/motelradiomusic Gottrocks | 9 p.m. | $10

Usually, when a band is from New Orleans, you can hear it in their music in one way or another. But the blurred, atmospheric rock of Motel Radio is far different from the jazz, funk, or blues you expect from a Big Easy band. On their new EP, “Desert Surf Films,” the band favors insinuation over brute force, conjuring a hazy field of guitars and layered vocals that seems to spiral off into the heavens. It’s an interesting turn for a band that essentially started out as a folk act. “In the beginning, we were playing a lot of acoustic guitar with simple bass and drums,” says singer/guitarist Ian Wellman. “But as soon as we moved down to New Orleans from Baton Rouge and picked up [bassist] Andrew Pancamo, it started progressing into a different sound. We’ve shifted into more of an atmospheric, spacy sound with more of a rock ‘n’ roll influence.” —Vincent Harris

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The Honorable Kevin Bryant. Bryant previously served as a S.C. senator from District 3 and is one of the most conservative voices in Columbia. Bryant was elected to the South Carolina Senate in 2004 to represent Anderson County’s 3rd District. He was re-elected in 2008, 2012, and 2016. In January 2017, Bryant was elected President Pro Tempore of the Senate. When Gov. Nikki Haley was chosen to be the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, elevating Lt. Gov. Henry McMaster to governor, Bryant was chosen to replace McMaster as lieutenant governor. 864-878-8100 bit.ly/2naZzD1 upstaterepublicanwomen@gmail.com

MON-MAY

20-25

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FAMILY

Biltmore Blooms

Biltmore 1 North Pack Square, Asheville Biltmore’s gardens - designed by renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted - come to life with immense floral displays featuring nearly 100,000 tulips across the estate. Biltmore’s restaurants will include special menu items, with the winery offering specialty tours. 800-411-3812 biltmore.com

TUE

21

MUSICAL

“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day”

THEATER

Walter Cronkite, Chautauqua Talk led by Larry Bounds

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. FREE Discuss Walter Cronkite, “the most trusted man in America,” with Larry Bounds, assistant artistic director of Chautauqua who will perform as Walter Cronkite, in the June Festival. This event is NOT a costumed performance. How did a man from Missouri and Texas, plain spoken, thoughtful, and with a twinkle in his eye, become the voice of truth to all America and an icon of journalistic integrity? How has journalism changed since Cronkite covered World War II, Vietnam, JFK’s assassination, and the Space Race? How does the way we report our news affect the making of our history? Larry Bounds is an AP English teacher at award-winning Wade Hampton High School and has taught broadcast journalism. He has performed in Chautauqua as Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Harry Houdini, Walt Disney, Davy Crockett, and Wernher von Braun. 864-244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

«

Turn a kid’s terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day into a good one with the Greenville Little Theatre’s production of “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, the Musical.” The musical is based on the popular Judith Viorst children’s book. “If you have kids elementary school-aged and a bit younger, odds are they’ve read the book many times,” said Allen McCalla, GLT’s executive artistic director. “This brings it to life in a joyous, fun production.” GLT has been touring the show to schools across the Upstate and to North Carolina and Georgia since September. By the end of the school year, the seven-member acting troupe will have performed the show 100 times. But don’t let that stop you, parents. “All people tend to get more out of a production when they see it a second time, especially children,” McCalla said. —Cindy Landrum

WHAT “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” WHERE Greenville Little Theatre WHEN Friday, March 17, 10:30 a.m. Saturday, March 18, 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. TICKETS Tickets $15 INFO 864-233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org


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AUTHOR TALK

All Year Young 22 ReadUp Adult & Middle Grade Author Events

USC Upstate Olin B. Sansbury, Jr. Campus Life Center Ballroom 5:30 p.m. Join New York Times bestselling author Ellen Hopkins as she discusses her latest young adult novel, “The You I’ve Never Known.” Your book receipt from Fiction Addiction or M. Judson for a copy of the book is your ticket to this event. We are also offering a buy one, donate one ticket priced at $36.23, which will include one copy of “The You I’ve Never Known” for the attendee, as well as one additional copy of the book to be signed by Hopkins and donated to the Greenville Juvenile Detention Center and teens in need. Ticketholders age 17 and under may be accompanied by a parent for free. 864-675-0540 | 864-603-2412 fiction-addiction.com | mjudsonbooks.com info@fiction-addiction.com

Day in Blue

SC Democratic Legislative Women’s Caucus Solomon Platt Building 1105 Pendleton St., Columbia 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | FREE The SC Democratic Legislative Women’s Caucus is sponsoring the fifth annual Day in Blue. Democratic women from across the state will unite to gain valuable insight and strategies to navigate as our struggle continues. The hostess is The Honorable Rep. CobbHunter and the theme for this year is #RESISTANCE. Guests will be recognized from House Chambers, participate in empowering workshops, and conclude the day with a catered luncheon. There is no charge for this event, but registration is required for lunch. Registration will begin promptly at 8:30 a.m. If you have any questions, contact Terris Riley at terris. riley@gmail.com or 803-734-2809. bit.ly/2m7YqLD

THU

23

COMMUNITY

Pop-up Supper

POLITICS

M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 South Main St., Suite 200 6-7 p.m. | $10 We’re celebrating some great chefs in our area. Giving these chefs a homebase in downtown Greenville gives you a chance to stop by and savor their creative fare. The rules are simple: one dish, one price, and only available while it lasts. No reservations necessary but remember, it’s first come, first served. The menu: chicken & wild rice soup, sour cherry salad-mixed greens, lemon pepper pound cake croutons, candied nuts, red onions, feta cheese, and apple cider vinaigrette. 864-603-2412 | bit.ly/2mJMt0e

MUSIC

Furman Lyric Theatre presents: “H.M.S. Pinafore”

Furman Lyric Theatre Furman University McAlister Auditorium 3303 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $20 adult/ $15 senior/ $10 student Furman Lyric Theatre under the direction of Grant Knox offers two performances of Gilbert and Sulivan’s comic opera, “H.M.S Pinafore.” For more than a century, the comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan have delighted audiences all around the world. “H.M.S. Pinafore,” the fourth collaboration between Gilbert & Sullivan, was their first blockbuster hit. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2mDaR2r furmanmusic@furman.edu

MAR. 17 CONCERT

«

https://thepinx.bandcamp.com/ The Pinx, w/ Silver Tongue Devils, Groove Matter, and Dirty Soul Revival

Radio Room | 9 p.m. | $5

When people ask singer/guitarist Adam McIntyre what kind of music his band The Pinx plays, the answer is simple: rock ’n’ roll. People’s typical reaction is a little less simple. “They get this blank look on their faces when I tell them that, and I say, ‘It’ll make sense later when you see us,” McIntyre says with a laugh. It’s hard to fault him on the description, but if you need something more specific, imagine the tight guitars-to-the-front assault of The Hives melded to a brutally efficient rhythm section a la AC/DC. It’s relentless and simple and as addictive as pure sugar. It’s also a band that was happy to be a trio since their formation in 2007, until they recently added guitarist Chance McColl. “I’ve always been in power trios,” McIntyre says. “It’s my default lineup when I arrange music. But after working with Chance on some of his solo stuff, I realized that I agreed with every decision this guy made musically. He knows how to both get out of the way and get in the way.” —Vincent Harris

THU

23

CHARITY

BSA Friends of Scouting Banquet

Boy Scouts of America Easley Presbyterian Church 200 South 1st St., Easley 6:30 p.m. FREE The Boy Scouts of America will hold their Annual Friends of Scouting Banquet on Thursday, March 23,

School’s out —

Registration Now Open!

spring break day camps are in!

April 10-14, 2017 9am-4pm K5-Grade 4 Learn about art history and explore different art techniques! Spaces fill up fast!

To register visit TCMUpstate.org, or call 864-233-7755.

®

300 College Street • Downtown Greenville

at 6:30 p.m. at Easley Presbyterian Church. This year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Ronnie Booth, president of Tri-County Technical College. Funds raised at the annual banquet support scouting programs in Anderson, Greenville, Oconee, and Pickens counties. There is no cost to attend the event, but the Boy Scouts ask for a contribution. To RSVP, contact Eric Black at eric. black@scouting.org 864-233-8363 eric.black@scouting.org

«


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

CALENDAR « Art by Anna Kell THRU FRI

EXHIBITION

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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24

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery Roe Art Building | 3300 Poinsett Highway FREE Anna Kell’s “Escape from Cultivation” is motivated by a desire to understand cultural attitudes toward nature and the environment, which she attempts to highlight through the appropriation and critique of massproduced representations of idealized nature and floral decorations imprinted on the many domestic artifacts that she uses. On display are paintings and a sculptural installation composed of cast-off furniture. 864-569-5424 | bit.ly/2lNJ6nJ Tina.underwood@furman.edu

24

MUSIC

Pre-College Student Recital

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall 3305 Poinsett Highway 6 p.m. | FREE Danielle Jackson directs the Piano for Young People program at Furman University. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2mDaR2r furmanmusic@furman.edu

SAT

25

CONCERT

Earth, Wind & Fire

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $65-95 Earth, Wind & Fire, America’s seventh top-selling musical group of all-time, was born in Chicago in 1969. They have released a total of 23 albums and have recorded

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eight No. 1 R&B singles and eight Double Platinum Top 10 Pop Albums. They have earned more than 50 Gold and Platinum albums and sold more than 90 million albums worldwide, earning them a solid spot on the list of all-time best selling music artists. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

FUNDRAISER

15th Annual Lights, Camera, Cure! JDRF Gala

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 6 p.m. | $175 The official honorees, Cindy and Joe Brothers and the Greenville Health System, will be recognized for their outstanding commitment to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s passion and goal of curing Type 1 diabetes. The black-tie event will include a cocktail reception; a multicourse dinner; silent and live auctions; JDRF’s signature Fund-A-Cure program, during which contributions may be made directly to research; and an after-party featuring DJ Paul Hoke. Proceeds from the event will go towards research and treatments of Type 1 diabetes. 864-770-0276 | bit.ly/2iodqX3 westerncarolinas@jdrf.org

SUN

26

EWGA Tee-Off

The Preserve at Verdae Club House and Golf Shop | 650 Verdae Blvd. 5-7 p.m. | $15/adv member, $20/door The Executive Women’s Golf Association is holding their Annual Tee-Off to introduce prospective new members to the organization. The social will provide information about the organization, appetizers, a silent auction, and a putting contest. Guests are free.

60

Save $ ON A

NETWORKING

Attendees are encouraged to bring a putter and participate in the putting activities. bit.ly/2niJFX5

MUSIC

Guest Artist Recital: Third Coast Percussion

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall 3306 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | FREE Third Coast Percussion explores and expands the extraordinary sonic possibilities of the percussion repertoire through performances, teaching, and the creation of new works. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2mDaR2r furmanmusic@furman.edu

MON

27

MUSIC

Guest Artist Recital: Sandra Wright Shen

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall 3307 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | FREE Sandra Wright Shen has been described as a classical “pianist of the first order” and a “heartstopping beauty”. With her passion, musicality, and inspiration, she aims to move hearts through music. 864-294-2086 | bit.ly/2mDaR2r furmanmusic@furman.edu

THU

30

AUTHOR TALK

Girls’ Night Out – Drink, Dish, & Do Good with Troylyn Ball at Fiction Addiction

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, Ste. 5 7 p.m. | $10 Bring your girlfriends to Fiction Addiction to have a margarita made with Troy & Sons Platinum Moon-

BILTMORE ANNUAL PASS Your Annual Pass provides unlimited daytime admission, children 16 and under admitted free, exclusive savings, and special upcoming events including: S Designed for Drama: Fashion from the Classics Exhibition S Biltmore Blooms OFFER VALID NOW–MARCH 31

Purchase your new Biltmore Annual Pass for $99 + tax at BILTMORE.COM/PASSOFFER or call 800-742-6150 and mention PASS OFFER.

Savings based on regular $159 Biltmore Annual Pass. Some restrictions may apply.

Asheville, NC

Downtown Market Join the ever-growing roster of local vendors for our market in the heart of the Upstate.

mauldinculturalcenter.org

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shine and hear a talk by Troylyn Ball, author of the memoir “Pure Heart: A Spirited Tale of Grace, Grit, and Whiskey.” A perfect talk to celebrate Women’s History Month. Purchase a copy of “Pure Heart,” and we’ll donate a portion of the proceeds to Thrive Upstate. Each ticket admits one and includes one margarita. Tickets and books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. bit.ly/2m8IF8z | info@fiction-addiction.com

EDUCATION

Henry Louis Gates

The Riley Institute | Furman University Shaw Hall 3300 Poinsett Highway 5:30 p.m. | FREE Join The Riley Insitute to view a 30-minute highlight reel of Dr. Henry Louis Gates’ documentary “Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise,” followed by a conversation with Dr. Gates, the Alphonse Fletcher University professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University and an Emmy award-winning filmmaker, journalist, and cultural critic. 864-294-3546 | bit.ly/2mKdZgO

THRU FRI

31

VISUAL ARTS

“A Layered View” by Bethany Mabee

Metropolitan Arts Council Art & Light | 16 Aiken St. FREE Bethany Mabee hails from Peoria, Ill. She relates her painting process to our own human experience and the layers that form it. Her process is guided by improvisation as each layer evolves upon the next. Once enough layers have formed, a more intentional process begins of deciding which layers to reveal and which to con-

ceal, until she has eliminated any unrest in the piece. Join the artist for an opening reception on Friday, March 10, from 6-8 p.m. View from Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. untill 5 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. 864-363-8172 bit.ly/2mB541h

FRI-SUN

31-02

SPORTS

Clemson Invitational

The Reserve at Lake Keowee For the second consecutive year, Clemson University’s women’s golf team will host the Clemson Invitational at The Reserve at Lake Keowee. The Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course will provide the backdrop for a practice round on March 30 followed by competitive play among participating collegiate women’s golf teams from across the country. Seventeen women’s golf teams will participate. Spectators are welcome, as this event is open to the general public and there is no charge to watch.

APR THRU SAT

01

TICKET ALERT

Ticket Alert: Sarah Jarosz

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $35 Celebrated singer-songwriter Sarah Jarosz is coming to the Peace Center for the Performing Arts. Jarosz is only 25 years old. By the time she signed a record deal with Sugar Hill in her senior year of high school, she’d learned to play clawhammer banjo, guitar, and mandolin. And around the same time that her first album came out in 2009, she enrolled in the New England Conservatory of Music, graduating with honors in 2013 with a degree in contemporary improvisation. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

SAT

01

SPORTS

Harlem Globetrotters

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 2 p.m. The Original Harlem Globetrotters are preparing for their action-packed tour. A star-studded roster will have fans on the edge of their seats to witness the ball handling wizardry, basketball artistry, and oneof-a-kind family entertainment that thrills fans of all ages. Join Globetrotter stars after the game where they will stay for an autograph, photograph, and high five session for fans (subject to availability). 800-745-3000 | bit.ly/2n23nKt

COMMUNITY

Cornhole Derby

The Center for Developmental Services Trailblazer Park 235 Wilhelm Winter St., Travelers Rest 1 p.m. | FREE The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) is proud to announce the 2017 Cornhole Derby at Trailblazer Park in Travelers Rest on Saturday, April 1. Registration is at 1 p.m. and the games begin at 2 p.m. Teams of two players may sign up for a corporate or individual team. Corporate sponsorships are available. Henry’s BBQ, Liquid Catering, and Snohut will be onsite selling food, drinks, and shaved ice to participants and observers. All will enjoy a fun day of tailgating, barbecue, and competition. 864-331-1314 | bit.ly/2kPb1pB

CHARITY

Zoom Through the Zoo 5K

Immediate Care Pelham | Cleveland Park E. Washington and Cleveland Park Drive 8:30 a.m. | $35 Registration is now open for the Immediate Care

Pelham Zoom Through the Zoo 5K, the Upstate’s only 5K with a loop through the Greenville Zoo. The race starts at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 1. Registration is $35 and proceeds benefit the Greenville Zoo Foundation. The race will begin in Cleveland Park and will continue through the zoo. A celebration with food, games, and prizes for the top male and female runners will be held in Cleveland Park after the race. 864-627-4200 | bit.ly/2mJCyHJ

CHARITY

Cribbs Kitchen Burger Cook-off

Children’s Security Blanket Cribbs Kitchen | 226 B West Main St., Spartanburg noon-5 p.m. All community members are invited to eat or compete at Downtown Spartanburg’s Fourth Annual Cribbs Kitchen Burger Cook-off. All proceeds will benefit The Children’s Security Blanket and help to provide support for local children who are battling cancer. Team registrations are accepted through March 20, on Cribbs Kitchen’s Facebook page or by emailing cribbsmanager@gmail. com. Sponsorships are still being accepted. Interested companies should contact Laura Allen, executive director of The Children’s Security Blanket, at laura@ childrenssecurityblanket.org or 615-417-2151. 864-582-0673 | bit.ly/2lYwwCC laura@childrenssecurityblanket.org

SUN

02

COMMUNITY

Taste of the Upstate

Tessa May, Loaves & Fish Zen | 924 S. Main St. noon-3 p.m. | $35 Help us celebrate Taste of the Upstate with a New Orleans-style gospel brunch. Enjoy tastes from eight of Greenville’s most celebrated restaurants,

«


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

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IT’S PLANE SIMPLE MORE NONSTOPS • CONVENIENT PARKING LESS HASSLE • LOW FARES

CALENDAR « TUE

04

CONCERT

Toby Mac

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 651 N. Academy St. 6:30 p.m. Toby Mac Hits Deep tour will make a stop at The Well. Guests include Matt Maher, Mandisa, Mac Powell, Capital Kings, Ryan Stevenson, and Hollyn. 864-241-3800 | bit.ly/2mEKJYd

TUE-SUN

04-23

OVER

EDUCATION

Story Time & More

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | Free with admission Join us at Story Time & More as we kick off our month of Laura Numeroff ’s stories. 864-233-7755 | info@tcmupstate.org

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THU

06

Detroit

Chicago (O’Hare)

NYC (LaGuardia) Newark

Philadelphia

Washington (Dulles & Reagan)

GREENVILLE/SPARTANBURG

Charlotte

1 ST CONNE OP CTIONS

TO OVE R 200 CIT I E WORLD S WIDE

Atlanta Dallas/Fort Worth

Orlando/Sanford Tampa/St. Petersburg

Houston (Intercontinental)

has been seen over 7 million times online. A former poetry teacher in maximum security prisons, Phil’s work has been viewed over 5 million times online and featured in media outlets ranging from Upworthy. com to NPR. 864-467-3000 | bit.ly/2mxjfnx

as well as jazz and gospel music inspired by the Big Easy. Specialty bloody marys and mimosas will be served to complement the savory and sweet creations. Tickets are available online. 232-3593 | bit.ly/2jUWPbp

Fort Myers/Punta Gorda

COMMUNITY

Poetic Conversation: Origin Stories

The Peace Center | Huguenot Mill 7 p.m. | FREE Led by Peace Center poet-in-residence Glenis Redmond, Poetic Conversations brings together different guest poets to share their work on a common topic and to start a poetic dialogue with audiences. Sarah Kay and Phil Kaye are co-founders of Project VOICE, a team of highly accomplished writers, performers, and educators. Sarah is perhaps best known for her 2011 TED talk “If I Should Have A Daughter,” which

FRI

07

COMMUNITY

Merideth Piper Opening

Textile Hall | 582 Perry Ave. 5-8 p.m. | FREE The Village of West Greenville’s Textile Hall co-op space will serve as the venue for a special exhibition of local artist Meredith Piper’s work. The Louisiana native is known for her contemporary, creative approaches to a variety of mixed media, including textile designs, oils, and pastels. The evening’s reception will also feature cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and the opportunity to take home a unique piece of Piper’s art. bit.ly/2nawzfA

FRI-SUN

07-23

THEATRE

“Lying in State”

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. 3 and 8 p.m. | $28 (discounts available) The Greenville Little Theatre is overjoyed to present “Lying in State.” A state senator has died in a ridiculous gun accident, and it has made him a national hero. Everyone is searching for something: The local political leaders are looking for someone to fill his seat, his exwife is looking for a bugler to play for his funeral, and a host of other zany characters are looking for love, votes, the right casket, and a purple squirrel named Mel. In this madcap comedy, love, politics, and, well… everything are not what they seem. 864-233-6238 | bit.ly/2l7PtS2

«

M A I N S T A G E P L AY P R E S E N T E D B Y S O U T H

C A R O L I N A

Generously sponsored by Harry & Sheila Bolick and Sharon & Greg DeFelice

A Hilariously Divine Comedy

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03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

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THRU SAT

08

THEATER

“Sister Act: The Musical”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m. $20-35 “Sister Act” will give you a reason to rejoice. Based on the popular 1992 film, this heavenly smash hit musical tells the story of disco diva Deloris Van Cartier who, after witnessing a murder, is put into protective custody in the one place the cops are sure she won’t be a found: a convent. See online for tickets. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org

SAT-SUN

08-09

CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Triumph of the Human Spirit”

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. $18-69 A tribute to the GSO’s late executive director and former principal timpanist, Sherwood Mobley, the orchestra premieres Mahler’s 6th Symphony. Full of contrasting emotions, this epic piece, known as Mahler’s “Tragic Symphony,” is coupled with Mozart’s exquisite Overture to “Don Giovanni” and his timeless and beautiful “Eine kleine Nachtmusik.” Tickets are available online. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

TUE-SUN

11-16

THEATER

“Something Rotten!”

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. various times | $25+ Set in the ‘90s (the 1590s), this hilarious performance tells the story of Nick and Nigel Bottom (Tony nominee Rob McClure and Broadway’s Josh Grisetti),

two brothers who are desperate to write their own hit play while the “rock star” Shakespeare (Tony nominee Adam Pascal) keeps getting all the hits. When a local soothsayer foretells that the future of theatre promises singing, dancing and acting simultaneously, Nick and Nigel set out to write the world’s very first musical. Tickets are available online. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

SAT

15

COMMUNITY

Greenbrier Farms’ 8th Annual Organic Plant Sale

Greenbrier Farms | 766 Hester Store Road, Easley 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE Greenbrier Farms will be open to the public selling organic starter plants such as heirloom tomatoes, pepper varieties, squash, cucumbers, okra, eggplant, herbs, flowers, and more – all from the farm. Greenbrier’s sustainably and humanely raised pasture and grass-fed meats will also be available for sale. In addition, there will be other local vendors selling locally raised landscaping plants. It’s a perfect day to visit the farm and see where your food comes from. 864-855-9782 | bit.ly/2lSUyhn chad@greenbrierfarms.com

SUN

16

FAMILY

Easter Egg Hunt

Biltmore 1 North Pack Square, Asheville The Easter Rabbit makes his annual appearance on Biltmore’s Front Lawn on Easter Sunday. Highlighting the day are the grand Easter Egg Hunts at 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. Children 9 and younger may attend the hunt for free when accompanied by an estate pass holder or a ticketed adult. 800-411-3812 | biltmore.com

TUE

18

EDUCATION

Friends & Fundraising Banquet

Christian Learning Centers of Greenville County TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 6:30-8:30 p.m. | $60 Unite with fellow warriors for Christ at the 20th Anniversary Friends & Fundraising Banquet featuring keynote speaker Josh McDowell. This year’s banquet is a celebration of the amazing work God has done with this organization for the past 20 years and will motivate and inspire us to continue sharing His word with urgency to the youth in Greenville 864-242-2326 | bit.ly/2niXDIK

THEATER

Maya Angelou, Chautauqua Talk led by Glenis Redmond

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library | 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Discuss the inspiring words and life of poet Maya Angleou with Glenis Redmond, poet-in-residence at the Peace Center and State Theatre New Jersey, Kennedy Center teaching artist, founder of Peace Voices and Greenville Poetry Slam and author of “Backbone,” “Under the Sun,” and “What the Hand Knows.” 244-1499 | greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

AUTHOR TALK

Book Talk & Signing with David Baldacci

Thornblade Club 1275 Thornblade Blvd., Greer 6 p.m. | $55 Join us for drinks and hors d’oeuvres and meet the bestselling suspense author as he celebrates the

launch of his new book, “The Fix.” His remarkable detective Amos Decker — the man who can forget nothing — was first introduced in the sensational No.1 New York Times bestseller “Memory Man.” Now Decker returns in a stunning new novel. Each ticket admits one and includes a copy of “The Fix” as well as a drink ticket (for beer, wine, or a soft drink) and hors d’oeuvres. Thornblade Club will also offer a cash bar. 675-0540 | bit.ly/2jBGusp info@fiction-addiction.com

WED

19

CONCERT

Home Free

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $25-40 The five-man band has become known for their show-stopping performances that mix their signature no-instrument, all-vocal music with their quick-witted humor. In the past three years, Home Free has crashed the world music scene, selling 250,000 albums, gathering more than 100-million YouTube views and entertaining more than 150,000 people live in concert. Tickets and VIP package are available online. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

FRI

21

COMMUNITY

Rendezvous In Paris

Centre Stage Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 7 p.m. | $125 Join us for heavy hors d’oeuvres, drinks, dancing, and a 1920s-themed cabaret. The evening will be spectacular as we transport you to the beautiful and romantic city of Paris. bit.ly/2kQG1mm

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44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR « 21-22 “Swan Lake, Act 3” FRI-SAT

MAY

THEATER

& Other Works

International Ballet Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. $35 This spring will feature the dramatic third act of the iconic classic “Swan Lake,” best known for the “Black Swan Pas de deux” showcasing the crafty swan Odile, who tricks Prince Siegfred from saving the fated white swan, Odette. Other works will include “La Viviandére,” or “Markitenka,” and new choreography from International Ballet. Tickets are available at the Peace Center Box Office or by phone. 864-467-3000 internationalballetsc.org

SAT

22

FUNDRAISER

Strike Out Parkinson’s

Fluor Field 945 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-noon FREE Mark your calendar this spring for the Fourth Annual Strike Out Parkinson’s community walk. Fundraising teams, corporate sponsors, GAPS members, and the Greenville community are invited to attend this event, which aims to celebrate and support people living with PD in the upstate. Come take a lap around the warning track at Fluor Field, enjoy music and food, and participate in exercise and therapy demonstrations from local partners while learning more about how GAPS supports its members. 905-2574 strikeoutparkinsons2017.myevent.com

FRI-SUN

12-14

ARTS

Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams is best known for his iconic black-and-white photographs of large encompassing landscapes in the American West, including Yosemite National Park. But as “Ansel Adams: Distance and Detail,” an exhibit running at the Upcountry History Museum through June 4, shows, the master photographer also captured close-ups that highlighted the intimacy of nature. The exhibit features over two dozen photographs from the Bank of America Collection, from the iconic “Moonrise over Hernandez” to a close-up of a leaf taken at the Glacier Bay National Monument in Alaska. “Ansel Adams is an American icon who always hoped that his work would inspire an appreciation of the American landscape,” says Elizabeth A. Gunter, director of programs and marketing for the Upcountry History Museum. “The Upcountry is full of its own natural wonders, and perhaps this exhibition will encourage the next great American photographer to pick up a camera and head outdoors.” —Cindy Landrum

WHAT “Ansel Adams: Distance and Detail” WHERE Upcountry History Museum WHEN through June 4 THRU SUN

30

ART

Classes at The Art Cellar 223 N. Main St., Suite 12B

TICKETS $6 (adults), $5 seniors/college students with ID, $4 (children 4-18), free (3 and under) INFO 864-467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

Check out their website or Facebook for full class descriptions and registration links. 864-520-1653 | bit.ly/2lL1LVL

Friends make things better, and that includes your YMCA! The YMCA of Greenville Better Together Program encourages you to share the Y with your friends — and when you do, you both receive a 20% savings on your membership!

YMCA OF GREENVILLE ymcagreenville.org/bettertogether (864) 412-0288

FESTIVAL

Artisphere

Downtown Greenville FREE Artisphere will present some of the country’s most promising performers and veteran entertainers. After GE Artist Row closes on Main Street, the GSP Airport After Hours Concert Seires begins Friday night at 8 p.m. when Southern rock-soul artist Marc Broussard (Carencro, La.) takes the WYFF-4 Main Stage. Opening for Broussard at 6:30 p.m. is rhythm & blues duo Smooth Hound Smith (Nashville, Tenn.). Saturday’s 8 p.m. concert on the Main Stage will feature Gulf Coast soul band The Suffers (Houston, Texas). The Suffers are currently touring Europe leading up to their Artisphere performance. The Suffers’ 6:30 p.m. opening act is neo-folk trio The Ballroom Thieves (Boston). Artisphere will also feature a variety of local culinary delights and rising musicians. bit.ly/2mkeom2

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

LEGAL NOTICE RATES

ABC Notices $165 | All others $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 email: aharley@communityjournals.com PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 4/8/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A200, Kelvin Hunter, Misc household & Alum wheels 2. Unit: B130, Jonathan Carter, Misc hand & air tools; & Misc household 3. Unit: B235, Jun Li, Misc Teahola Business Inventory (Cups, etc) 4. Unit: B236, Jun Li, Misc Teahola Business Inventory (Cups, etc) 5. Unit: C036, Matt Spaulding, Misc. small tools & toolbox; household items 6. Unit: D026, Traci Bruce, Mountain Bike; Misc household items SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 61-04/18/17, Engineering Services for Solid Waste Division, April 18, 2017, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. RFP# 62-04/18/17, Real Estate Title Searches, April 18, 2017, 3:30P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement or by calling (864) 467-7200.

NOTICE Powdersville Holdings, LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact Number 864-295-2011, is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in the Magistrate Office of Anderson County, SC. This mobile home is a 1991 Bell mobile home, Model GBHME with serial number GBHME13081 and is located at 1014 Little Mountain Rd., Anderson, SC 29626. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is Troy Leroy Black, 1014 Little Mountain Rd., Anderson, SC 29626.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Collection and Processing of Residential Recycled Materials for the County of Greenville, RFP #5704/11/17, 3:00 P.M. Field Cutting and Brush Hogging at Greenville County Landfills for Greenville County Landfill, RFP #58- 4/13/17, 3:00 P.M. Towing Services for Sheriff’s Office, RFP #59-04/12/17, 3:00 P.M. Towing Services for Vehicle Service Center, RFP #6004/12/17, 3:30 P.M. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/apps/procurementpdf/ projects.aspx?type=RFP or by calling (864) 467-7200.

ESTADO DE CAROLINA DEL SUR CONDADO DE GREENVILLE EN LA CORTE DE FAMILIA C.A. No.:2016-DR-23-4431 NOTA DE ACTOS A: JESSICA CENTENO Usted ha sido notificado de acuerdo al Código de Carolina del Sur Ann Sec. 15-9-710. Que actos de divorcio han sido iniciados bajo el caso arriba mencionado por Katia Odalis Maradiaga. USTED HA SIDO NOTIFICADO COMO SIGUE : 1. Que dentro de treinta (30) días de haber recibido la notificación usted responderá la clasificación por escrito a nuestra oficina localizada en 201 W. Stone Ave., Greenville, SC 29609 o con la Corte del Tribunal que se encuentra localizada en el 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29602 la nota y las razones para refutar intervenir ó de otro modo responder: 2. Que el Tribunal debe ser informado de su dirección actual y cualquier cambio de domicilio durante el proceso legal de divorcio. 3. Que si no presenta una respuesta dentro de (30) días de recivir el edicto constituye juicio de manera predeterminada rendido contra usted para el alivio demandado en el reclamo. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) Nathalie M. Morgan, LLC 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile)

SUMMONS NOTICE 2017-CP-42-00475 STATE OF SC SPARTANBURG COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS ERN PROPERTIES, LLC, et al. v. RIVERVIEW LAND, INC., et al., including G.A. ROBERTS and GWENDOLYN B. ROBERTS and any UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF G.A. ROBERTS and any UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF GWENDOLYN B. ROBERTS TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Spartanburg County, SC court in action number 2017-CP-42-00475. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. S. Lindsay Carrington Bell Carrington & Price, LLC 408 East North Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-272-0556

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE GREENVILLE COUNTY PROPERTY MAINTENANCE CODE, HEARING OFFICER ON THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2017 AT 10:00AM, IN CONFERENCE ROOM A, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, FOR THE PURPOSE OF HEARING THOSE PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE CASES PERTAINING TO THE HABITABILITY OF STRUCTURE(S) ON THE PROPERTY. A. CASE NO: 15-2164 PROPERTY OWNER: STEVE PITTMAN AND RENA D WOODSON PROPERTY LOCATION: 123 COTHRAN ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: 0606.03-01-021.10 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 19 B. CASE NO: 14-1903 PROPERTY OWNER: CARL D BURTON AND PAMELA ANN BURTON PROPERTY LOCATION: 14 LIBERTY STREET TAX MAP NUMBER: 0616.03-01-111.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 26 COMPLAINT NOTICES A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 123 Cothran Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0606.03-01-021.10, Greenville County, SC. 14 Liberty Street, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0616.03-01-111.00, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before March 30, 2017.

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that that Great Events, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 531 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 26, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Lois Marie Hodges DBA At The Depot LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1702 Rutherford Road, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 26, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Noble-Interstate Management Group, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 40 W. Orchard Park Drive, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 19, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE PROBATE COURT Case No. 2013-ES-23-00562 IN THE MATTER OF: WARREN DAVID COLLINS, JR., DECEASED. SUMMONS Catherine Y. Collins, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Warren David Collins, Jr., Petitioner, vs. Sylvia N. Blassengale, Danny R. Collins, George B. Collins, Benny R. Collins, Catherine Y. Collins, individually, Warnkia Mansell, Quantarius Mansell (a/k/a Quantario Mansell), Davon Laquan Horne, and all persons known and unknown claiming any right, title, estate, interest in or lien upon the Real Estate described in the Petition, including, without limitation, any known or unborn heirs-atlaw of Warren David Collins, Jr., any unknown adults being designated as a class of John Doe, and any unknown or unborn infants or persons under disability claiming any interest in or lien upon the Real Estate described in the Petition, being designated as a class of Richard Roe, Respondents. TO: THE RESPONDENTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Petition for Sale of Real Property by Partition in the Estate of Warren David Collins, Jr., which property is located at 117 and 123 Old Dacusville Road, Marietta, SC 29661, having Tax Map Nos. 0512010104600 and 0512010103808, a copy of which Petition is on file with the Probate Court and which may be obtained from the undersigned, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Petition upon the subscriber, at the address below, within thirty (30) after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Amended Petition, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Amended Petition. TO MINOR(S) OVER THE AGE OF FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND/OR MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES AND/OR TO PERSON(S) UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian Ad Litem to represent said minor(s) and/or person(s) under some disability within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff herein. THIS SHALL ALSO SERVE AS NOTICE of hearing set for April 24, 2017, 9:00 a.m., at the Greenville County Probate Court, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1200, Greenville SC 29601. Evelyn M. Angeletti Attorney for Petitioner PO Box 3764 Greenville SC 29608 Physical Address: 512 Pettigru Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 271-1389 (O) (864) 271-0128 (Fax)

PUBLIC NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS PUBLISHED PURSUANT TO SECTION 6-11470 OF THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, AS AMENDED. ON TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2017, GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL ADOPTED A RESOLUTION, WHICH ENLARGED THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT BY INCLUDING CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED ON MONTAGUE CIRCLE: 0430000300100 0430000200712 0430000401103 0430000200100 0430000300108 0430000200706 0430000100100 0430000100800 0430000200200 0430000401900 0430000100200 0430000100300 0430000200300 0430000200600 0430000400500 0430000400502 0430000100400 0430000200701 0430000200714 0430000400102 0430000200400 0430000300103 0430000401800 0430000401600 0430000401100 0430000402000 0430000401500 0430000400101 0430000100500 0430000200705 0430000200707 0430000200710 0430000200709 0430000300105 0430000200702 0430000401200 0430000402100 0430000401101 0430000300102 0430000100604 0430000300101 0430000401400 0430000401300 0430000300110 0430000200715 0430000400501 0430000200713 0430000200703 0430000300109 0430000300106 0430000200601 0430000200704 0430000300107 0430000100601 0430000401102 THE REASON FOR THE INCLUSION OF THE AFORESAID PROPERTIES IS DUE TO THE PROPERTY OWNERS HAVING PETITIONED THE COUNTY TO BE ANNEXED INTO THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT IN ORDER THAT THEY MAY RECEIVE SANITATION SERVICE FOR THOSE RESIDENCES. THE RESULT OF THIS ACTION IS THE NEW BOUNDARY LINE WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE AREA AND TAX MAP NUMBERS LISTED ABOVE. MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARY AND A LEGAL DESCRIPTION ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. NO BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, AS A RESULT OF THIS ACTION, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION NOR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL AUCTION SALE NOTICE Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in United States vs. Ellason and Sons, Inc, Ellason, Inc and Ellason Tree and Lawn Care Service LLC, defendants, Civil Action No. C.A. No. 6:16051-HMH, United States District Court for the District of South Carolina, Greenville Division, the United States will offer to sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, according to law and pursuant to the terms and conditions set in herein, the property described below: Date: April 12, 2017 Time: 3:00 pm with 2:30 registration Place of Sale: 119 Hipps Road, Simpsonville, SC 29681 Title Offered: The property shall be offered for sale at public auction, free and clear of all liens and interests of the parties to this action. Description of Property: Approximately 3.4 acres with a wood frame house of 936 sq ft and a metal shop building approximately 30’x40’. Minimum Bid $7,500.00 Legal Description: Greenville County APN#0560030103309 Property may be inspected at: via drive by at any time prior to the sale. The Terms of Payment: No bid (except for bids made by the United States) shall be accepted by the IRS, unless the same is accompanied by a certified check or cashier’s check, in the minimum amount of $1,500.00 made payable to the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina, Greenville Division. Before being permitted to bid at the sale, all bidders shall display to the IRS proof that they are able comply with this requirement. No bids will be received from any person who has not presented proof that, if he or she is the successful bidder, he or she can make the deposit required by the Order. The successful bidder shall tender the balance of the purchase price, in certified funds payable to the United States District Court, District of South Carolina, Greenville Division, at the office of the IRS on or before 3:30 P.M., sixty (60) days from the date of the sale. In the event the successful bidder defaults on any of the terms contained in the Order, the deposit shall be forfeited and retained by the IRS as part of the proceeds of sale, and the real property shall again be offered for sale, without further permission of the Court, under the terms and conditions of the Order, or, in the alternative the real property shall be sold to the second highest bidder. The United States may bid as a creditor against its judgments without tender of cash. The sale of the real property shall be subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon confirmation of the sale and receipt of the entire purchase price, the Court shall issue and the IRS shall deliver to the purchaser, a deed conveying the real property to the purchaser. Upon confirmation of the sale, all interests in, liens against, or claims to, the real property that are or may be asserted by any of the parties to this action are discharged and extinguished. The United States reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to withdraw the property form sale. Form of Payment: All payments must be by cash, certified check, cashiers or treasurer’s check or by a United States postal, bank, express, or telegraph money order. Make check or money order payable to the United States District Court. IMPORTANT INFORMATION This is not and advertisement of a sale of seized property. This is and information notice only regarding a sale being conducted by the Internal Revenue Service as a result of the foreclosure of an Internal Revenue Service Federal Tax Lien by the Department of Justice.


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 03.17.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Be Aware ACROSS

1 Goof (up) 5 Gland near a kidney 12 NASCAR units 16 ER skill 19 Vocal quality 20 On the dot 21 Jai — 22 “... boy — girl?” 23 “This shop sells every fruity frozen dessert flavor”? 26 Ryan of films 27 Hot peppers 28 Bank charge 29 In — (bored) 30 Three or four 31 Segway inventor Dean 32 Broncos’ gp. 33 “John Brown’s Body” poet’s wages? 36 Mexico Mrs. 37 Long cut 38 TV’s Swenson 39 Lofty nest 40 Flying disc that toy spaniels love to fetch? 44 Was a blowhard 46 Big name among cello virtuosos 47 Label for Elton John 48 Bric-a- — (trinkets) 49 Ship’s trail 51 Thorough search of an Apple computer?

By Frank Longo 59 Pierre’s “here” 62 Virile type 65 Inferior to 66 Mixed in with 67 Lots of sun-dried brick surrounding an empty space? 72 Former Navaho foes 73 Toy with 74 Massive mammal, for short 75 K’ung Fu- — (Confucius) 76 Political group turns against one of its own members? 80 This, in Argentina 82 Dinghy pair 83 — polloi (the masses) 86 Some electric cars 90 Early-flowering leguminous trees 94 Flemish painter being violent? 98 Love, in Paris 99 Slacken 100 Beard, e.g. 101 Ming of basketball 102 “The Zoo Story” playwright with red hair? 105 — Jima 106 “— de Lune” 108 Momentous time periods 109 Omanis, e.g. 110 D.C. ballplayer

111 Milano of “Charmed” 112 Was idle 113 Enter a sea between Siberia and Alaska? 117 Broke bread 118 Years on end 119 Put in place 120 Tony winner Adams 121 Danson of “Dad” 122 Player’s fee 123 Mutinied ship of 1839 124 Mems. of the upper house DOWN

1 Is loyal to 2 Romeo type 3 Closeness 4 Norman Vincent — 5 Big goons 6 ER figures 7 Assert again 8 Drawing from many styles 9 Aswan Dam’s river 10 Obstinate animal 11 Astral feline 12 Noted locale of tar pits 13 Alaskan language 14 Singer LuPone 15 She’s part of the fam 16 Solace 17 Early baby, informally 18 Pollen-count plant 24 15-Down, e.g. 25 Scope

30 Tennis zingers 92 Gave away tickers 32 ’80s sitcom 93 Pesters 107 U-shaped instruments 33 Highchair neckwear 94 Shul head 110 Terse denial 34 Atlanta-to-Charlotte dir. 95 Spend 111 Undercover? 35 Racial rights gp. 96 Stinging flier 113 Viking realm 37 Twisted and turned 97 Brazilian port city, in brief 114 Intel org. 41 “— goes it?” 99 Pass by 115 Senator Kaine 42 Largest city of Nebraska 103 Expose by blabbing 116 Hellenic “H” 43 Walton of Wal-Mart 104 “— you clever!” 44 Chocolate treat 106 The Indians, on sports Crossword answers: page 16 45 Sturdy wood 48 Kiosk, e.g. 50 Stage hams by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 52 Nuns’ home 53 Co. honcho 54 Hazy image 55 Rally yell 56 Skip over 57 Boxes for recycling 58 Ax feature 59 “It’s my turn” 60 — rug (dance) 61 Cake froster 63 Helps illicitly 64 Approaching 68 Pres. before DDE 69 White — ghost 70 GM security service 71 Clan symbol 77 “— one to talk!” 78 Severe 79 The lady 81 Nile slitherer 84 Away for an extended break 85 Cry after catching someone in the act 87 Save for later 88 “Little Birds” author 89 Warehouse charges 90 Directs fury toward Sudoku answers: page 16 91 Dubai, e.g. Easy

Sudoku


03.17.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Life Without Parole with Christopher Myers

Fight or Flight I recently flew out of Atlanta — home of the Braves and Falcons, the Jimmy Carter Library, and decades of disappointment (not to be redundant). The Atlanta airport is the busiest in the world, a multinational panic attack prologued by bumper cars at 80 miles an hour. The airport is named after two former mayors. There’s no need to record them here; they’ve suffered enough. Not that I have anything against eponyms; to the contrary, in my flights of fancy (which don’t leave from Atlanta), I dream of having something named after me, like a cocktail or a nonfatal disease (one marked by clumsiness and logorrhea). My first plane trip was to New York. The stewardess — in those primitive times they were called stewardesses — gave me a deck of cards and a pair of wings. I was 7 years old and flew alone, adorable in a plaid blazer and Buster Browns. Upon arriving in New York, the stewardess escorted me to my aunt, who was waiting at the gate. This was before body scanners, three-in-one bags, and shoe bombers. Again, primitive times. Five decades older and back in Atlanta, I found myself standing in the security line (which is like a Harry Potter ride line but without the butterbeer). TSA consists of placing your remaining possessions (your car and luggage are already history) on a conveyor belt so that the guy who used to cheat off of you in math class can X-ray your pajamas. Another man perp-walks you behind a screen and gives you a physical that includes everything but a copay. Joking, I asked for his phone number. Travel tip: Don’t do this. Gathering the remains of my dignity, along with a carry-on, belt, computer, and wallet (one of which was mine), I headed for the concourse. The modern airport is a dystopian shopping mall, one that charges an entrance fee to browse merchandise that wouldn’t survive a trip around the luggage carousel encased in Bubble Wrap. I observed a couple fighting between a Scarlett O’Hara bobblehead doll and a Blu-ray of “My Cousin Vinny.” Other travelers played cellphone roulette, a game in which one roams from gate to gate in search of a working power outlet. For those both desperate and hungry, there are restaurants. The saving grace of airport food is that few people can afford to eat enough of it to be seriously poisoned. More dangerous are the shuttles, electric oldstermobiles driven by myopic sociopaths. Every

so often an average Joe gets run over. I watched the aftermath of one such accident — the idealists stopped to help while veteran travelers sifted through the debris for frequent flyer miles. Nature isn’t pretty. On the PA system, a woman sounding like Siri with a hangover welcomed us to Atlanta and reminded us not to leave our bags unattended. She did this every three minutes. They should hire her at Gitmo.

I was once on a flight late for departure. We had not yet pulled away from the terminal when an attendant came down the aisle, rolling a piece of luggage and asking, “Is this anyone’s bag? It was left in the terminal.” After a few tense moments, the man next to me wondered aloud if the bag should be on the plane. The flight attendant laughed derisively. “You think it could be a bomb?” she said. These are the people in charge of our safety.

EXPECTED CELEBRITIES

Marty Bauwens / Thad Daber / David Carpenter / Justin Wheelon / Art Culbreath MCDONALD’S CORPORATION

PROFESSIONAL GOLFER, 4-TIME WORLD ONE CLUB CHAMPION

Christopher Myers lives in Greenville, worships at First Presbyterian Church, gardens poorly, and golfs even worse. His nest is empty except for a neurotic dog and an understanding wife. Email him for more details about his life and to feel better about yours — cbmyers32004@yahoo.com.

ACTOR, DIRECTOR, WRITER AND PRODUCER

OLYMPIAN USA NATIONAL HANDBALL TEAM MEMBER

Leonard Black / Ashlan Ramsey / Rick Seratte / Mickey Plyer FORMER NFL WASHINGTON REDSKIN

I found my gate and checked the time. Two hours until my flight. Good grief. I raced back up the concourse, hoping they still had “My Cousin Vinny.”

EMMY NOMINATED ACTOR LONESOME DOVE

LPGA TOP RANKED AMATEUR IN THE WORLD

RECORDING ARTIST, WHITESNAKE

BLOGGER AND HOST OF 105.5 THE ROAR

PRESENTED BY RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES OF THE CAROLINAS

APRIL 30TH & MAY 1ST / 2017 GREEN VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB · GREENVILLE, SC

READY TO TEE UP THIS SPRING? Join us Sunday, April 30th at 4:30pm for an unforgettable Pairings Party in the Heart of the Foothills – Travelers Rest, SC – noted as one of “America’s Coolest Small Towns” by The Huffington Post. Enjoy local hospitality as we take a Brewery tour the town and end at Swamp Rabbit Brewery for a Southern Spring evening in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Monday May 1st, meet us on the green for your tee time and a great day of golf, Captain’s Choice. Start the morning with a continental breakfast and a signature Mimosa or Bloody Mary. Finally, join us for Grilling on the Green cookout and awards ceremony following the round of golf. SPONSORSHIPS Gold Sponsor*................................... $5,000 Silver Sponsor* ................................. $3,000 Bronze Sponsor* .............................. $1,500 Individual ............................................ $600 Tee Box & Green ................................. $500

SIGN-UP For more sponsorship information and to register your team or purchase individual tickets, please contact our Communications and Events Manager, Samantha Bauer at (864) 272-0197 or sbauer@rmhcarolinas. com.

*Includes additional sponsor appreciation and a custom belt fitting. Visit us online for more details.

www.rmhc-carolinas.org/ronaldcup


LEATHER RECLINER SALE HANCOCK & MOORE WOODBRIDGE RECLINER Retail: $4695 SALE: $1695 Solid Maple Frame • Top Grain Leather • Made in Hickory, NC • In-stock and ready for prompt delivery

Browse our collections online at oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

March 17, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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