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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 19, 2016 • Vol.18, No.8

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Greenville County has the highest number of uninsured in the state, as health care leaders try to close the gap - p. 8

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | NEWS

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NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3 THEY SAID IT

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Chris Cillizza, who writes “The Fix” political blog for the Washington Post, on Gov. Nikki Haley’s Wednesday endorsement of GOP presidential candidate Marco Rubio.

Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller, on the need for more training after a recent court ruling limiting the use of Tasers.

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“Hopefully she’ll beat all the other nuts on the other side that are running.” Henry Bellew of Greenville, on why he supports Hillary Clinton for president.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | NEWS The Lead This week’s top story

Primary expected to winnow the GOP field South Carolina one of 4 ‘carve out’ states in GOP path to nomination BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com South Carolina voters go to the polls Saturday to select a Republican presidential nominee, and while polls still indicate front-runner Donald Trump should easily prevail, the first-in-the-South primary will offer a clearer picture of how close the second- and third-place candidates have managed to come.

CHRIS USHER/CBS © 2016 CBS TELEVISION NETWORK

An average of the most recent polls gives Texas Sen. Ted Cruz about a twopoint advantage over Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, according Real Clear Politics. Clemson University political science professor Dave Woodard said the race between Cruz and Rubio could be tighter than the polls show. Rubio picked up the coveted endorsement of Gov. Nikki Haley on Wednesday. He also has the endorsement of high-profile South Carolina poli-

ticians U.S. Sen. Tim Scott and U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy. “I think [Rubio] did best in the debate, so he has a lot of things going for him,” Woodard said. Cruz has the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan and has been campaigning in the state with him. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush is fourth in the poll average and only leads Gov. John Kasich of Ohio by less than 1 percent.

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See more of what happened in and around the Peace Center during last Saturday’s GOP Debate on greenvillejournal.com.

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NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

Bill Clinton campaigns in Greenville for Hillary BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com Former President Bill Clinton stumped for his wife, Hillary, in Greenville Tuesday and spoke about her ability to create change. “From the first time I met her to yesterday, she’s the best ‘changemaker’ I’ve ever known,” Clinton told a crowd of several hundred at the West End Community Development Center. Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont square off Feb. 27 in South Carolina’s Democratic primary, a week after the Nevada Democratic caucuses. Bill Clinton talked about his wife’s plan to make education affordable and allow students to refinance college loans. “A lot of these young millennials are mad,” Clinton said. “I think they made a mistake, but they’re supporting her opponent because he’s promising free college.” The former president said Hillary Clinton supports free community college. He also highlighted her plan for free tuition to historically black universities and colleges for low- and middleincome students. Hillary Clinton’s plan differs some-

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what from Sanders’, who called for all public colleges and universities to be tuition-free. Hillary Clinton supported the Affordable Care Act to expand health insurance coverage to all Americans, but didn’t support a single-payer system like Sanders proposes, the former president said. “The reason Hillary is running for president is to make sure the American dream is available to 100 percent of the American people,” Clinton said. He cited her time in the Senate as proof that she could work with politicians on both sides of the aisle to accomplish objectives. Robert Abdalla of Greenville, who attended the rally, said he supports Hillary Clinton because “I think she’ll be able to get things done that I want done,” like raising the minimum wage, and he said she was strong on foreign policy. Although Abdalla said he liked Sanders, he though Sanders was “too far left” to be elected. Henry Bellew of Greenville agreed that electability was a major reason he supports Hillary Clinton. “Hopefully she’ll beat all the other nuts on the other side that are running,” he said.

winners of each of the state’s seven congres17 sional districts. Each district awards three 11 delegates. Therefore, if a Repub10 lican candidate wins 5 statewide, he could still lose delegates in con4 gressional districts. In Iowa, New Hamp3 shire and Nevada, delegates are awarded proportionally to the vote. To win the nomination at the Republican National Convention this July in Cleveland, a candidate must win at least 1,237 of the 2,472 total delegates.

“If Bush falls behind Kasich, it’s time to quit,” Woodard said.

Delegate count so far

The delegate numbers game

Cruz

Trump

Rubio

South Carolina has 50 delegates up for grabs in Kasich Saturday’s primary. The Palmetto State is part Bush of what’s referred to as Carson the “carve out” states. The four early voting states – Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada – help winnow the field of candidates. Of the four early states, South Carolina awards the most delegates, but it also awards them differently than the other three states. The statewide winner in South Carolina will automatically get 29 delegates. The other 21 delegates are awarded to the

Find your polling place at bit.ly/sc-vote2016.

Health Events Meet the Midwives Tues., Feb. 23 • 6 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Heart of Every Woman Tues., Feb. 23 • Noon-1 p.m. • Crowne Plaza Hotel Join GHS internal medicine physician Pam Yanoviak, MD, to discuss women and heart disease. Free; registration required. Heart of Every Man Wed., Feb. 24 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Family YMCA Men are encouraged to learn their risk factors for heart disease from GHS internal medicine physician Mitchell McClure, MD. Free; registration required. Screenings for Uninsured Women Wed., March 2 • Appointment only • Hillcrest Memorial Hospital Uninsured women ages 40-64 who meet certain income guidelines can receive free clinical breast exams, pelvic exams, Pap smears and mammograms. Call 656-3076. Oh, What a Relief It Is: Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) Thurs., March 17 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter YMCA Join GHS gastroenterologist Steven Clayton, MD, to learn about acid reflux. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | VIEWS

OPINION: VIEWS FROM YOUR COMMUNITY DRAWN OUT LOUD BY KATE SALLEY PALMER

Out-of-state drivers should pay fair share for roads IN MY OWN WORDS

By Bill Ross

The Senate Finance Committee met recently to discuss the status of a bill to improve South Carolina’s roads. The committee is also considering cutting nearly $400 million in income and business taxes. The funding amendment currently being discussed would raise the motor fuel user fee/gas tax by 12 cents over three years. At full implementation, the motor fuel user fee would raise $442 million in year 2018-19. The Department of Revenue recently confirmed that out-of-state residents pay one-third of our motor fuel user fee/gas tax, which would equal $133 million of the $442 million in new funding. Also, an additional provision would increase out-of-state revenues by $13 million in year 2018-19. The total amount derived from out-of-state motorists would equal $146 million in additional revenue.

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Politics and citizenry: co-authors in democracy IN MY OWN WORDS

By Akan Malici

I am a political science professor and I moved here from overseas. My father is from what used to be Yugoslavia and is now Macedonia. Ethnically he’s Albanian. My mother was from Turkey. I spent most of my life in Germany. Yugoslavia and Albania were communist countries. Turkey is a democracy, albeit one that needs much maturing. Germany is a mature democracy. In my personal and scholarly life I have experienced lots of countries and have found that citizenry means different things in different places. In democracies like Germany and the United States it means critical co-authorship. I need to explain this. As citizens of our democracy we are not relegated to being readers of politics, but we are also to be authors of it. We’re fortunate in this regard, but this democratic citizenry, this authorship, comes

also with a large responsibility attached to it. The foremost responsibility is that it occurs in a constructive, not destructive, way; it must be guided by reason, not anger. It must be underlined by the seeking of knowledge and the rejection of ignorance. It must be rational, not emotional. Our authorship must also be critical. That means we must position ourselves critically towards the aspirants and holders of power. We should counter them with question marks and not salute them with exclamation marks. Question marks are the path to true patriotism; exclamation marks are the path to authoritarianism. It is such a positioning that will make us fulfill our proper role in in a system of checks and balances. Finally, our authorship must be collaborative. We must be willing to work with people who are different from ourselves, in their political or ideological orientation, their race, religion, ethnicity or in other regards. This is exactly what makes

the American idea beautiful: that everyone can have authorship, that no one is to be a mere reader. I’m afraid too many of us are falling short in our tasks of critical co-authorship. Our public debates are marked by reactionary attitudes, by too much anger, and by ignorance. The presidential race is taking advantage of this mood and propelling it. Instead of bringing to the American people debates of substance, it has presented empty slogans and has played to peoples’ fears and lower instincts. If we truly care about America, we will neither partake in this mood nor stand by. Instead, we will reject and counter it through our critical co-authorship. Through my experiences with many countries, I’ve come to understand that democracy is not an accomplishment, but a process. This process requires our critical co-authorship – and it is with this authorship that we’re to engage in

politics generally and in the elections specifically. The task of critical co-authorship is important because the ideals of America, whether they be racial equality, economic or social justice, or a foreign policy for the good, are not always the reality of America. We must co-author the next chapter in the book of America. It shall always be our aspiration that our next chapter is better than the preceding one; that in the next chapter, our realities are evermore aligned with our ideals. Are you up to coauthoring this next chapter? Dr. Akan Malici teaches at Furman University. He can be contacted at akan. malici@furman.edu

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@communityjournals.com.


NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

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Even with this reality, a small group of senators are adamantly opposed to increasing any fees and are demanding the General Assembly use funds from the projected $1.3 billion surplus revenue to fund road repair. Their approach would put the entire burden on South Carolinians, rather than allowing out-of-state motorists to share it. Worse, their proposal to use surplus revenue is not guaranteed to address the state’s long-term road needs estimated to cost upwards to $1 billion annually for the next 30 years. This past year’s budget growth was 6.5 percent – twice the average growth rate of the last 25 years. So, that rate is historically considered unsustainable. When analyzing our infrastructure needs, it is impossible to both fund and plan these hugely expensive projects without certified recurring revenue. The majority of the state’s revenue growth is coming from South Carolinians in the form of sales tax, income tax and corporate income tax. These funds finance core government services: education, health care, public safety and social services. However, roads and bridges are funded through motor fuel user fees/gas tax, and do not receive substantial funding from the General Fund. Road funding is simple: The more you drive, the more you pay. If you don’t drive

at all, you don’t pay at all – same goes for out-of-state motorists. Once the proposed higher gas taxes and fees that would be paid by out-ofstate residents are factored out, the increased cost to South Carolinians would be nearly balanced out from proposed tax reductions. Essentially, the proposal before the Senate Finance Committee would fund roads directly by increasing user fees. And also make use of recurring surplus money to support tax reductions. This is better budgeting and long-term fiscal policy. The political game being waged by some legislators opposing an increase in our motor fuel user fee/gas tax hurts the people of South Carolina. South Carolina citizens must encourage their legislators to act fiscally responsible and follow Ronald Reagan’s principles: general taxes for general services, user fees for specific uses. Bill Ross is executive director of the South Carolina Alliance to Fix Our Roads. He is a lifelong S.C. native and active in the industry and highway-user Coalition for Road and Bridge Improvements.

SPORTS TD Bank Reedy River Run announces new spring date After many years of taking place the first weekend in March, the TD Bank Reedy River Run will be moved to April, as it was first conducted. The 39th annual run will be held Saturday, April 23, in downtown Greenville. The Reedy River Run, established in 1977 to highlight the revitalization of downtown Greenville, is one of the oldest road races in the South and continues to be one of the Upstate’s premier running events, according to a release. “TD Bank is proud to be involved in such a longstanding tradition that showcases Greenville’s attractive downtown and our community’s quality of life,” said Cal Hurst, regional VP for TD Bank. “We believe that supporting community initiatives like this allows Greenville’s economic growth and development to continue to thrive.” This year’s race will feature enhanced routes for the 10K and 5K races, which will begin and end on Main Street. A post-race festival, which will take place in Falls Park, will include an awards presentation, music, food and vendors. The 5K race begins at 7:25 a.m. and the 10K race begins at 7:55 a.m. The Youth Mile will also take place on Saturday and will begin at 7:20 a.m. For more information, visit tdbankreedyriverrun.com and to register, visit gogreenevents.com/event/id/4784.

What’s Right in Health Care February Is Heart Month Heart disease is the leading cause of death in adults. Men and women alike can reduce their risk of heart disease by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, reducing stress and not smoking. It’s also important to know the warning signs and what to do if you think you’re having a heart attack. GHS invites you to learn more about your risk for heart disease by taking a free heart health assessment online at ghs.org/heart. First Phase of New ICU Opens GHS recently unveiled the first phase of its new intensive care unit (ICU) at Greenville Memorial Hospital. The 75,000-square-foot ICU is undergoing a $32 million renovation to meet patient care needs and accommodate new technologies. Several evidence-based design elements proven to enhance outcomes also have been incorporated. Learn more at ghs.org/newsroom. GHS Oncologist Elected to State Board Suzanne Fanning, DO, a GHS medical oncologist/hematologist, has been elected to the South Carolina Oncology Society (SCOS) Board of Directors. The mission of SCOS is to promote advocacy for cancer patients and foster standards of excellence of high-quality cancer care. One-on-One Recreational Therapy for Veterans GHS’ Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital offers one-on-one recreational therapy for veterans with disabilities. For an assessment, call 455-7012.

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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | NEWS

More than 70,000 Greenvillians caught in health care gap

Why are so many people uninsured in Greenville?

Part 1 of 2

Six years after ACA, thousands still can’t afford care or insurance, as local leaders seek solutions MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com HIGHLIGHTS • Six years after ACA, many Greenville adults cannot afford medical care or health insurance, visiting ERs instead of seeing doctors • 350,000 uninsured in S.C., 73,359 in Greenville County • Many don’t qualify for subsidies, Medicaid or Medicare • Medicaid expansion, waivers are options

Caught in the gap In Greenville County, at least 25,000 people, or one-third of the uninsured, fall into the health care coverage “gap.” These Greenville residents are too poor to receive subsidies for insurance on the ACA’s Federal Health Insurance Marketplace; they don’t qualify for Medicaid and are too young for Medicare, said Rozalynn Goodwin, SCHA vice president

ALAN FRANCIS/GHS

The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) promised to provide health insurance to everyone at a price they could pay. But nearly six years after it became law, many Greenville County and South Carolina adults are left behind – they cannot afford medical care or health insurance, so they often put off seeing doctors until they are rushed to the emergency room. An estimated 350,000 residents are uninsured in South Carolina, including 73,359 in Greenville County, according to data from the South Carolina Hospital Association (SCHA) and the Greenville Health System’s 2013 community health survey. “If you’re a childless adult and below 100 percent of the federal poverty level, then you’re not eligible for any kind of health care subsidy,” said Allan Stalvey, SCHA spokesman.

Ponja Beck of Greenville receives oxygen and takes many medications to maintain stable health.

for community engagement. The nonprofit Greenville Free Medical Clinic uses volunteer physicians and donated medication to provide primary care for about 4,000 low-income, uninsured people each year at its four locations in Greenville County, said Suzie Foley, executive director. When untreated, this population often ends up hospitalized with high medical bills that they cannot pay without help, Foley said.

One person’s story Fifty-year-old Ponja Beck was one of the left behind. When the college graduate was downsized in 2008 from a managerial job, she also lost health insurance.

Beck had been receiving expensive, specialized medical care, but without employer-sponsored insurance she stopped seeing her specialists. Then, her health problems exacerbated and landed her in the hospital multiple times. She racked up medical bills she could not afford to pay. Chronic illnesses that she had kept in check when she was working worsened. “I received my unemployment [checks] during the recession, and I was still applying for jobs, thinking I could work,” Beck said. “But my health started to deteriorate even more.” By 2010, Beck had to face facts: Her rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, hypertension and fibromyalgia were out of

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With close to half a million residents, Greenville County is home to South Carolina’s largest population of people, which is one reason why the county also has the greatest number of people without health insurance. Greenvillians who are uninsured include adults who live in childless households, young people who choose not to buy insurance, those who work part-time or are self-employed without health care coverage, undocumented workers, and people whose income is too low to afford insurance and who do not qualify for subsidies, said Suzie Foley, executive director of the Greenville Free Medical Clinic. But those are just the general characteristics of uninsured adults. In Greenville County, Foley said she saw a dramatic impact on health coverage as the area transitioned away from textile manufacturing. “As fewer people worked in a mill setting where they had access to a full-time job with insurance and benefits, the workplace model shifted,” Foley said. “People were retrained and had new employment, but those jobs didn’t necessarily provide benefits because they were in smallbusiness settings or involved contract or part-time labor.” As a result, many former mill workers ended up without medical insurance and didn’t qualify for Medicaid or Medicare, she said. Greenville Free Medical Clinic saw its own patient census rise dramatically, about 40 percent, after the 2008 recession began – while at the same time the clinic’s charity support dropped 20 percent, Foley said. “That has stabilized over the last year or two,” she said. There are multiple other reasons the county has so many uninsured residents, said Jennifer Z. Snow, director of Accountable Communities at the Greenville Health System. “Even with the Affordable Care Act federal exchange product, insurance is fairly expensive, and some individuals don’t qualify for the tax credit,” Snow said. “Had we expanded Medicaid, some of these individuals below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) could have qualified for that program.”


NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

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control, and she could not work. She applied for federal disability so she could receive a small income and have health insurance, and she was approved within just a few months. After her disability qualified her for Medicare and Medicaid coverage, Beck began to see doctors regularly again, but the damage was done. She had developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Neither condition can be cured. Beck receives continuous oxygen. Her main goal now is to live to see her only son graduate from college, she said. “If I ever go on a ventilator, I won’t come off, so I strive to stay healthy, eating right,” Beck said.

Medicaid’s projected role When it became law in 2010, the ACA was billed as the nationwide fix for people like Beck. The idea was to provide Americans who have expensive health problems with portable, affordable insurance that included health education and strategies to prevent people from developing chronic diseases. The Medicaid

expansion portion of the ACA package was designed to help pay for that medical care and prevention, Goodwin said. Gov. Nikki Haley declined that option, saying the program would “ultimately hurt the poor, hurt South Carolina, and hurt the country by doubling down on a system that already delivers some of the lowest value in the world,” according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) website. The state has enrolled more than 1.1 million South Carolinians – nearly one in four residents – in the standard Medicaid at a cost of $6.7 billion (including $2 billion in state money) in fiscal year 2015, said Colleen Mullis, DHHS spokeswoman. Under the ACA package, states pay only administrative costs for the first three years (2014 through 2016) of the envisioned Medicaid expansion. In South Carolina, the cost for 2016 would amount to $16 million, Goodwin said. In exchange, South Carolina would have received an additional $1.4 billion in federal money this year. UNINSURED continued on PAGE 11

Who qualifies for Medicaid expansion when a state accepts the funds? About 282,600 South Carolinians would be eligible for Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act if the state accepted the $1.4 billion in additional federal Medicaid funding, according to data from the S.C. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Medicaid provides health insurance to children, adults with disabilities and very low-income parents of Medicaid-eligible children. Under Medicaid expansion, this same insurance is provided to any adults whose incomes are below 139 percent of federal poverty level, which was $16,242 for an individual in 2015.

Adults who make more money than that are eligible for subsidies or financial assistance to buy insurance on the Federal Health Insurance Marketplace, previously called the health insurance exchange. In 2017, the state would pay $104 million for Medicaid expansion and receive about $1.7 billion in federal funds. By 2020, the state would pay $223 million, and the federal government would provide $1.9 billion in funding to insure an additional 350,000 people, said Rozalynn Goodwin, South Carolina Hospital Association vice president for community engagement.

Provider & Practice Update GHS welcomes these new team members! Family Medicine Stanley Coleman, MD Travelers Rest Family Medicine Travelers Rest, 834-3192 Hand Surgery Maggie Smith, PA-C The Hand Center Greenville, 242-HAND (4263) Internal Medicine Ronak Desai, MD Cypress Internal Medicine–Greer Greenville, 797-9550 Katherine Gettys, MD GHS Family & Internal Medicine– Simpsonville Simpsonville, 522-1170

WELCOME, FAMILY MEDICINE! GHS welcomes Hillcrest Family Practice and its 5 doctors: Robert Broker, MD Jennifer Ellis, MD Francis Heidt, MD Katherine Lewis, MD David Silkiner, MD 717 S.E. Main St. Simpsonville, 963-1548 GHS PHYSICIAN FINDER Call 1-844-GHS-DOCS (447-3627) weekdays 8 a.m.-8 p.m., and a trained operator will schedule a visit for you.

Mitchell McClure, MD Pamela Wenger Yanoviak, MD Erin Farr, FNP-C GHS Internal Medicine–Maxwell Pte. Greenville, 522-1300 Pediatrics Leigh Bragg, MD Pediatric Associates–Easley Easley, 855-0001

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Popular alternative for some GOP governors

The expansion promised economic benefits throughout the state, as well, Goodwin said, citing a 2012 study by the University of South Carolina that estimated an $11.2 billion net federal funding benefit from 2014 to 2020 if the state had accepted Medicaid expansion funds. The increased funding’s ripple effect would add 44,000 jobs and $3.3 billion to the state’s economy, the study said. Goodwin offers this example of a current state expense that would decrease under Medicaid expansion: “Medicaid doesn’t cover state prisoners, so if a prisoner gets sick and has to go to a hospital, the state picks up that tab,” she explains. “That prisoner, in most cases, would be eligible for Medicaid expansion, and instead of the state paying 100 percent of that inpatient care, the state would only pay 10 percent of inpatient care for that prisoner.” But in a conservative state, skepticism about expanding a federal social safety net program runs deep. “I agree with the point that just handing a person a Medicaid card and expanding that coverage does not guarantee there is access for that patient to have care,” Foley said.

An alternative and increasingly popular solution among Republican governors is a Medicaid expansion waiver in which a state can accept the federal money, but provide an alternative, more marketbased solution to expanding health insurance to the poor, Goodwin said. For example, Indiana accepted additional Medicaid funding to run its own program, called the Healthy Indiana Plan. The Indiana plan requires enrollees to make a minimal monthly contribution to their coverage, based on their income. Arkansas also obtained a waiver to provide a plan that has its residents contributing through monthly payments or cost-sharing. A Medicaid waiver program could work for South Carolina, Goodwin said. “We are committed to working with all kinds of policy makers to make a South Carolina-specific solution that covers our working poor and reclaims federal dollars to bring jobs and economic growth to South Carolina,” Goodwin said.

Next week: Local health systems offer solutions

Who foots the bill for Greenville’s uninsured? Individual donors, nonprofit free medical clinics, foundations, community health centers, public hospitals and health systems, and South Carolina taxpayers all help pay for medical treatment of sick people who have no insurance and cannot pay out of pocket. * The Greenville Health System (GHS) provided $72.4 million in at-cost charity care in 2015. The amount has more than doubled since 2006. * Bon Secours St. Francis provided $16 million in charity care in 2015. Its 10year total in charity care was more than $182 million. *South Carolina paid $62.4 million to Greenville Health System hospitals and about $10.3 million to Bon Secours St. Francis Greenville in the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2015, in Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payments. A requirement under federal law, DSH funds are sent to hospitals that serve a large number of uninsured and Medicaid individuals to help defray the costs of treating uninsured patients. The statewide cost for DSH is about $500 million. * The Greenville Free Clinic’s annual budget is nearly $1.3 million. The estimated value of medications donated by pharmaceutical companies and services provided by the clinic’s nearly 200 vol-

unteer physician, 70 volunteer dentists, and more than 300 other volunteers is $12 million. The biggest contributors to its services include the Greenville Health System, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, United Way of Greenville County, Hollingsworth Funds, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of SC Foundation. * South Carolina pays $35 million each year for the Healthy Outcomes Program (HOP). Hospitals receiving HOP funds provide care management for about 13,000 South Carolinians, including 2,182 served by GHS, who are uninsured and high utilizers of emergency rooms due to having chronic illnesses. The goal of the program, initiated in 2013, is to help them maintain their health without emergency room visits. Uninsured people in the HOP sometimes qualify for Medicaid. “Through HOP, we were able to increase Medicaid enrollment by 7 percent by checking eligibility,” said Jennifer Z. Snow, director of Accountable Communities at the Greenville Health System. Sources: The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Bon Secours St. Francis, the South Carolina Hospital Association, and the Greenville Health System.

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NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13 ZOO

MEDIA

Another baby for the Greenville Zoo

Greenville takes spotlight again – on C-SPAN

Days after baby giraffe Tatu’s addition to the zoo family, the Greenville Zoo has welcomed a newborn Angolan Colobus monkey. Animal care staff discovered the baby early Tuesday morning, according to a news release. Medical staff reported that the newborn is nursing and appears well. The gender is not yet known. The baby is the offspring of Valentino (male) and Nuru (female), whose pairing was a Species Survival Plan recommendation last summer. The newborn is Valentino’s fourth offspring and Nuru’s first. Valentino was born at Jungle Island in Miami in 2002. He arrived at the Greenville Zoo in 2004. Nuru was born at the San Diego Zoo in 2006 and was transferred to the Greenville Zoo last year where she was introduced to Valentino on June 23. “With the weather expected to improve this week, we hope the community will make plans to visit us to see both of our new additions,” said Jeff Bullock, Greenville Zoo administrator. “Tatu’s birth was already cause for excitement, and [today’s] birth marks another success for the Greenville Zoo and its commitment to conservation efforts for animals around the world.”

Fresh off the national spotlight with last weekend’s GOP Presidential Debate, Greenville will be featured on national television again, this time on C-SPAN’s “2016 Cities Tour.” C-SPAN, in partnership with Charter Communications and the City of Greenville, will feature the literary life of Greenville on the network’s Book TV on CSPAN-2 and American History TV on CSPAN-3. Various segments will be aired on Feb. 20 and 21, and will be available online thereafter. C-SPAN spent a week in Greenville in January. The broadcast will include coverage of the civil rights movement and its impact on Greenville, history on Bob Jones University and several library collections at Furman University. C-SPAN2 is Channel 131 on Charter. C-SPAN3 is Charter channel 134. For more information on the “Cities Tour,” go to c-span.org.

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | NEWS Front Row

Reports from inside municipal meetings

Your Backyard Bird Feeding Anti-Taser ruling makes police Specialists! training vital, police chief says GREENVILLE CITY COUNCIL

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Communication and incident de-escalation training will be more important than ever for Greenville police officers after a recent court ruling limiting the use of Tasers, Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller said. “Right now, we train the most on what we do the least – shoot people – and train the least on what we do the most – communicate,” he told members of the Greenville City Council during a public safety update at Tuesday’s council work session. The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last month that police should not use stun guns on people who try to evade custody but do not pose a safety risk to officers or others. The case centered on a North Carolina man with bipolar disorder and paranoid schizophrenia who clung tightly

to a signpost to avoid being taken to a hospital. Police used a Taser to try to make him let go. Minutes later, the man was dead. In a ruling that affects South Carolina, North Carolina, West Virginia, Virginia and Maryland, the court ruled police used excessive force in that case. Miller said his department has rewritten its use-of-force policy to conform to the ruling. Officers will receive training in communication and how to de-escalate and calm situations rather than escalate them, he said. “The court case will result in greater injuries to officers and citizens alike, but it’s the law,” he said. Miller said the department’s policy on Tasers is to deploy it no more than three times and officers must re-evaluate the subject’s resistance each time. Use of Tasers became an issue in Greenville after an autistic man was chased and tased on Christmas Eve 2014.

Officers heard gunshots and went to investigate. They spotted Tario Anderson in the vicinity and used a Taser after he didn’t comply with commands to stop. Miller said officers would not have been allowed to use a Taser in that case if the new policy was in place. Miller said departmental policy now requires all officers to intervene when they think force being used is excessive and report it to their superiors. He said complaints of excessive use of force fell from five in 2014 to three in 2015, according to GPD preliminary numbers. He said use of force declined as well, falling from 77 incidences in 2014 to 44 in 2015.

GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

Olympic-style games coming to Greenville County in 2017 BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com

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Olympic-style sports are coming to Greenville as part of the South Carolina State Games, to be held annually starting in the summer of 2017. Notus Sports, which will host the games, will begin with 12 events with plans to expand the number over succeeding years, Notus executive director Gary Cherrett told Greenville County Council at a Committee of the Whole meeting. All the events will be held annually in Greenville County, Cherrett said, adding he anticipates 900 South Carolina athletes will participate the first year. In five years, Cherrett said he hopes that 5,000 athletes of a range of ages will participate annually in the events. In 2015, 600 South Carolina athletes participated in the North Carolina and Georgia State Games.

“The great thing about these games, those who medal in the State Games will then be invited to represent the state of South Carolina at the State Games of America competition,” Cherrett said. Sports are open to all ages from youth to senior citizens, he said. “We hope that we’re going to get all types of residents to participate in the games. It’s not just for superior athletes.” Cherrett said in the future the organization intends to raise funds for underprivileged youth to participate in the games.

Greenco fee-in-lieu of taxes Council members unanimously approved final reading of a fee-in-lieu of tax agreement with Greenco Beverage Co., which announced this month that it plans to build its flagship 130,000-square-foot distribution center on Poinsett Highway. The facility is expected to be operational by the end of the year.

South Carolina State Games events offered in 2017 Archery (3-D) Baseball Cycling (MTB) Disc Golf Lacrosse Soccer Softball Swimming Tennis Track and field Ultimate Frisbee Volleyball


NEWS | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

Parking lot/ trolley stop opens The first City of Greenville parking lot that is also a trolley stop opened at 106 Augusta St. across from Smiley’s Acoustic CafÊ. The lot has 69 spaces and a shelter where people can sit and wait for the downtown trolley. The shelter also has a map of the city and the trolley routes.

Pictured below: Greenville City Councilwoman Lillian Brock Flemming

BENJAMIN JEFFERS/STAFF

Rates for the lot are $1 per hour with a daily maximum of $7. Parking lot users are required to pay in advance at a pay station.

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | NEWS

GHS board votes to move forward on governance change MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

The Greenville Health System (GHS) Board of Trustees voted Wednesday to approve the charter members nominated for the two new boards associated with its pending governance change, as well as six members for its longtime Board of Trustees. Previously, GHS approved the creation of two new boards and made plans for operationalizing a new private, not-for-profit, multi-regional health system. GHS will remain a public entity that will lease its facilities to one of the new entities. “We are a $2.2 billion health system, and all of our studies tell us that to be viable in the future we need to be larger – a $3.5 billion system or greater,” said GHS Board of Trustees Chair Jim Morton. The new structure will make it possible for the health system to become a multi-regional system, engaging in joint ventures that were not possible under its previous structure, Morton said. The board voted 13 to 1 in favor of a resolution that names the first board of directors’ members for the new Upstate Affiliate Organization (UAO) and Strategic Coordinating Organization (SCO). Marguerite R. Wyche, president of Marguerite

Wyche & Associates real estate company, will be the UAO’s first board chair for a one-year term. Frances DeLoache Ellison, former Greenville attorney, will be the first SCO board chair. Ellison’s term is for two years. Lisa H. Stevens, who was a city planner and served on the South Carolina State Board of Education, was approved to be the new GHS chair. After they are approved by the Greenville Legislative Delegation, the other new GHS Board of Trustees members will be Peter B. Waldschmidt, Leah D. Garrett, Rev. Sean D. Dogan, Scot L. Baddley, W. Michael Ellison and C. Michael Smith. By early summer, the new governance structure likely will be finalized, Morton said. Once that happens, the state Supreme Court may agree to review and determine the appropriateness of the creation of the new system. In October, 2015, three former GHS trustees filed a suit with the state Supreme Court, asking for a ruling on whether GHS could legally develop a private, nonprofit system. In late January, the court refused to hear the case, saying that GHS’ actions were not final enough for them to render a verdict. The GHS board’s vote on Feb. 17 was another step toward the goal of restructuring the health system.

What the new GHS boards will do The Upstate Affiliate Organization (UAO) will lease Greenville Health System (GHS) health care properties from GHS for $1 per year and take over operational costs and all name, trademarks, and other intellectual property, according to a draft user agreement. UAO’s board members, approved on Wednesday, will include: • Serving one-year terms: Chair Marguerite R. Wyche, David M. Lominack, Ruth M. Richburg and Timothy J. Reed; • Serving two-year terms: Benjamin B. Waters III, Robert T. Nitto, C. Michael Smith, and Michelle B. Seaver; • Serving three-year terms: Charles E. Dalton, W. Michael Ellison, Rev. Thomas E. Simmons, and Richard A. Phillips. The Strategic Coordinating Organization (SCO) is a private, nonprofit organization that qualifies as a 501(c)(3) public charity that will provide strategic direction for the entire health system, as well as centralized corporate, support, and compliance services, according to a draft agreement. SCO’s board members, approved on Wednesday, will include: • Serving one-year terms: Benjamin B. Waters III, Craig Brown, James C. Morton Jr., Prashant Prabhu, and Lisa H. Stevens; • Serving two-year terms: Chair Frances DeLoache Ellison, Andrew J. White Jr., Margaret L. Jenkins, Michael Cumby, and Richard “Dick” Wilkerson; • Serving three-year terms: Annmarie Higgins, Anna Kate Hipp, Dwayne Wilson, Jennie M. Johnson, and William M. Webster IV.

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Saturday, March5,2016 • 6:00 p.m. • Fluor Centre 1 Cafe • Reception • Dinner • Science Fun • Spirit of Einstein Awards

Proceeds benefit over 50,000 children from our public, private and home schools for hands-on, real-world learning in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) and more.

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | COMMUNITY

State-of-the-arts

New Hartness Performing Arts Center signifies CCES’ commitment to the arts CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Christ Church Episcopal School is showing its commitment to the arts in a big way – the $11 million Hartness Performing Arts Center, which will house the school’s music and drama programs and opens to the public this weekend with the upper school’s musical “Kiss Me Kate.” “Christ Church has always excelled across the board from academics to athletics to community service to its religious offerings. The arts program needed to rise to that level as well,” said Bruce Halverson, the school’s director of the arts. The new 37,000-square-foot facility includes a 524-seat theater with an orchestra pit, practice rooms, a music room for Lower School students, a “drum pad,” classrooms for band and orchestra,

a workshop for the drama program to build sets and a costume shop. Halverson said the new facility and new faculty members who will come on board next year mark the next step in the school’s performing arts program. In addition to the hiring of Halverson last year, the school hired a technical producer and manager. Music teacher Molly Aiken is retiring at the end of this year and the school is also losing David Sims, who has led the upper school’s drama program for 15 years. Guest artists will be brought in as well. “I think the combination of a new facility and new people will bring a new excitement,” Halverson said. “We’re making a very significant commitment to the arts. I think our program will grow in numbers and scope.” Kathryn Norwood, who headed the capital campaign for the performing arts center, said the facility named after her parents “is a symbol that the arts matter.” “Particularly for those kids who are not good in sports, the opportunity to be involved in the arts, especially music, is important,” she said. “It teaches them many

CAROL STEWART / CONTRIBUTING

of the same things – determination, teamwork, discipline, decision-making.” The drive for a new performing arts center started four years ago. Norwood said last Friday’s dedication and blessing, the first time there were people in the seats in the theater, was

very emotional. “So many people worked so hard on it for so long,” she said. “So many people came together on this project. It surpassed my expectations in every way. It was a real team effort.”


COMMUNITY | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

Aiken’s last show is first in new Performing Art Center clandrum@communityjournals.com During the three decades she’s directed school musicals at Christ Church Episcopal, music teacher Molly Aiken has endeavored to give her students a taste of what a professional production is like. This weekend’s production of “Kiss Me Kate,” Aiken’s last before she retires at the end of the school year, takes that to a new level with the opening of the Hart-

ness Performing Arts Center, CCES’s new $11 million facility for the arts. “It’s wonderful on every level,” she said. “It’s one of the best theaters in the state. It’s really a jewel.” “Kiss Me Kate” is one of Aiken’s favorites because of its storyline, humor and Cole Porter score. “It’s hard to beat those kind of songs,” she said. This is the third time CCES has staged “Kiss Me Kate,” the last coming in 1998. Sophomore Karl Schmidt, who played

Danny in last year’s production of “Grease,” plays the male lead, Fred Graham. Junior Marisa McGrady, who has played roles in CCES past dramas, is the female lead. In all, about three dozen students are in the cast. Another 10 are on the technical crew. A 13-piece pit orchestra will also perform.

WHERE: Hartness Performing Arts Center Christ Church Episcopal School WHEN: Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday, 2:30 p.m. TICKETS: $15 each INFORMATION: 331-4289 or boxoffice@cces.org

‘‘ It’s an awesome feeling, being able to do that kind of thing for another human being.

‘‘

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

Kiss Me Kate

Hear my story at: thebloodconnection.org -- Harold, Mauldin, SC --


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | COMMUNITY

Birth of an environmental activist: One word, one click at a time MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

Local students win national boxing titles LETY GOOD | STAFF

lgood@communityjournals.com Two students from the Greenville Boxing and Fitness Club won national titles at the 2016 Silver Gloves competition held in Independence, Mo. N’cyus Morrison, from Blythe Academy, and K’rajus Mansel, from Cedar Grove Elementary, won national titles in different weight classes and age divisions at the advancing amateur boxing tournament.

mission lines project, the more they coalesced in opposition. They would read Schager’s opinion pieces and forward them via email and social media. “I’d publish this stuff and give it to the groups, and it kind of went viral,” Schager says. “Upstate Forever would publicize these articles I was writing.” Interest in stopping the proposed transmission lines project grew organically, he says. “It really fired people up.” The opposition prevailed: Duke decided in November 2015 to end the project and form a revised modernization plan for the Foothills region. UPSTATE FOREVER

Upstate Forever’s volunteer of the year, Gowensville resident Terry Schager, became an environmental activist entirely by chance. But his huge success was not accidental. Schager led the effort that stopped Duke Energy from building a new Foothills transmission line and substation through Upstate horse pasture and mountain land. The role came to a man who had precisely the right combination of time and skills as a recently retired information technology project manager. Schager says his grass-roots activism career began when a neighbor in distress asked for help after learning that Duke Energy had proposed a transmission line route through her property. It would cut through her barn and pasture and destroy her plans to build a dream house, she told Schager. “When one of my neighbors got the letter from Duke, it got me ticked off,” Schager said. “So I mobilized a lot of people to let them know what was going on.” Schager began by writing opinion pieces about the proposed substation project for the Tryon Daily Bulletin. People in the Tryon, Gowensville and Landrum area read what he wrote, stopping him in town to talk.

Schager knew from experience and from studying Duke Energy’s proposed routes that any effort to fight the giant utility company would not work if he made this a not-in-mybackyard (NIMBY) fight. Duke’s plans had dozens of Schager proposed routes, meaning that if any one neighborhood fought against transmission lines in their area, Duke could go through someone else’s backyard, dividing and conquering, he says. “We were a united front,” Schager said. “We wanted no lines whatsoever and no substation, and the idea of pushing it on to Spartanburg County simply was not going to be our strategy.” So Schager began to contact local organizations, such as area equestrian clubs, to get information about the transmission lines sent to their members. He contacted Greenville outdoors groups and environmental organizations, including Upstate Forever, which is honoring Schager on Tuesday, Feb. 23, with a volunteer of the year award. The more people learned about Duke Energy’s proposed substation and trans-

Upstate Forever’s 2016 ForeverGreen annual awards luncheon WHO: Dr. J. Drew Lanham, an alumni distinguished professor of wildlife ecology at Clemson University, is keynote speaker WHEN: Tuesday, Feb. 23, at 11 a.m. WHERE: Embassy Suites, 670 Verdae Blvd., Greenville TICKETS: $50 MORE INFO: upstateforever.org/ forevergreenluncheon

The Greenville Boxing and Fitness Club program is part of the Center for Education Equity, a nonprofit organization aimed at providing opportunities to underprivileged students in areas such as academic assistance and fitness, among others. The boxing program is offered to students up to age 18. Other winners from the CEE Boxing Club include Tahjay Fuller, Ernie Cuevas, Sir Cuevas, Khaliid Johnson, Quan Arnold and Gauge Pier. “It’s an example of what CEE represents,” said Shakir Robinson, founder and coach of CEE Greenville Boxing and Fitness Club. “We expect 110 percent, which is everything and then some, which equals success whether in academics, fitness and boxing, but over all shows a glimpse of the Greenville community.” For more information, visit ceegreenvilleboxing.org. Back row: Tim Rosemond, Shakir Robinson, Vaughn Williams. Front row: Tahjay Fuller, N’cyus Morrison, K’rajus Mansell.

Who are the ForeverGreen Award winners? * Sustainable Communities Champion: Taylors TownSquare, a nonprofit community gardening project in Taylors * Tommy Wyche Land Conservation Champion: Paris Mountain State Park Friends * Clear Skies Champion: Bruce Wood, whose visionary work has promoted and advanced solar power in South Carolina * Public Servant of the Year: Mark Schell has helped to make river recreation accessible to all by installing the first Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) floating kayak launch on the Upper Saluda River * Clean Water Champion: Clemson University Professor Gene Eidson helped to develop new technology that could revolutionize water resources management across the world * Volunteer of the Year: Terry Schager started a grass-roots effort to stop Duke Energy’s proposed substation and transmission line project * Three Rs Champion (Reuse, Reduction, Recycling): Clemson University Recycling Services also was the winner of the Game Day Recycling Challenge


COMMUNITY | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21 Inside the Outside Environmental issues facing the region by Erin Knight

Conference dates

Your land, your legacy

MARCH 1 9 a.m.-noon, Wade’s Restaurant, Spartanburg

There’s no better time to learn about conservation agreements We in the Upstate are all the lucky recipients of incredible conservation legacies that ensure the protection of critical natural resources and rural lands of our region. Through the visionary work of conservation leaders like Tommy Wyche and the state agencies that own and manage our public parks, well over 100,000 acres of protected public land are ours to enjoy in the Upstate.

At the end of 2015, a major budget and tax compromise bill passed by Congress enhanced the tax incentives for land protection. Under this bill, up to 50 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI) is deductible in any one year. If most of a landowner’s income is from farming, ranching or forestry, this increases to 100 percent of AGI. If the value of the donation exceeds these limits in the year of the gift, the deduction can be carried forward for up to 15 years.

There is also a second, critical kind of conservation legacy in our region. Though often overlooked, the benefits for us all are tremendous. Hundreds of landowners of privately owned forests and farms across our region have chosen to permanently protect their properties though conservation agreements. In exchange for voluntarily relinquishing some undesirable development rights, they help preserve the rural culture of our region, keep our air and water clean, provide local sources of food, maintain habitat for wildlife and native plant species, protect scenic views, and sometimes preserve important historic lands and structures. We all owe deep gratitude to these landowners, who quietly and faithfully manage these protected private lands that benefit us all. A conservation agreement (also called a conservation easement) is a contract between a landowner and a qualified land trust, like Upstate Forever, which allows the owner to permanently restrict certain undesirable uses on their property. It is also a useful tool for landowners who plan to gift or sell their land, but want to ensure it remains a farm or forest. This agreement is permanent and remains with the land even after it has been sold, gifted, or willed to heirs. Conservation agreements typically prevent land uses such as residential subdivisions, commercial or industrial operations, and mining, while allowing traditional rural land uses, such as farming, grazing, hunting and timbering.

3-6 p.m., Tommy’s Ham House, Greenville

These changes ensure that more landowners from every economic level can enjoy the full benefit of their gift of a conservation agreement. There is also a state tax credit and an estate tax benefit, both of which can be significant factors in a landowner’s estate plans. Anyone considering a conservation agreement should speak to a professional financial advisor. Upstate Forever is presenting a conference in four regional locations March 1 and March 3 to provide a comprehensive overview of conservation agreements and their benefits. The cost is only $20 for The terms of a conservation agreement are negotiable, and vary greatly depending on the landowner’s intentions for their property and the conservation values being protected. A conservation agreement never allows public access unless it is the express desire of the landowner. If you own a farm or forest in the Upstate of South Carolina, the time has never been better to learn about your conservation options and the tax benefits they may include. Significant federal, state and estate tax benefits exist for qualifying landowners who enter into a conservation agreement. These benefits help offset the loss in value between the most profitable use of the property (such as selling the farm for industrial development) and the value under the terms of the conservation agreement, which keeps the land essentially as it is today.

2016 CHRISTIAN VOTERS GUIDE Get the information you need for The 2016 Presidential Primary at www.2016ChristianVotersGuide.com (Paid for by 2016 Christian Voters Guide)

MARCH 3 9 a.m.-noon, Lighthouse Restaurant, Seneca 3-6 p.m., Lee’s Barbecue, Waterloo

COST: $20 - landowners $75 - professionals seeking continuing education credits Includes a meal.

landowners and $75 for professionals seeking continuing education credits, and includes a meal. Visit upstateforever.org/your-land-yourlegacy for more information or to register. We encourage anyone with questions about conservation agreements to contact us at 864-250-0500 ext. 26 or landtrust@upstateforever. org. Learn how you can create your own land legacy. Erin Jordan Knight is Land Trust Director for Upstate Forever.


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY: Community news, events and happenings HISTORY

frey.makala@furman.edu.

Exhibition about post-WWII Furman student life now open at James B. Duke Library A new exhibition, “A Return to Normalcy? Growing Pains, Furmanville and Life at PostWorld War II Furman,” is now open on the second-floor gallery of Furman University’s James B. Duke Library through May 31. The exhibition is free and open to the public from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, contact Jeffrey Makala at 864-294-2714 or jef-

p.m. The reception and show is open to the public. The featured artists are Geoffrey Carson, Faith Hudgens and Anthony Milan.

ART Greenville Tech to celebrate African-American History Month As part of African-American History Month, the Greenville Technical College library is hosting a celebration of young visual artists from Greenville. The artists’ work was put on display on Monday, Feb. 15, and will stay up until Monday, Feb. 29, during regular library hours. An opening reception will be held on Monday, Feb. 25, from 6-8

CIVIL RIGHTS Library hosts civil rights movement panel

Milan’s project asked people to finish the sentence: “If black lives matter, we should…”

The Atlantic Institute, in partnership with the Greenville County Library System, hosted an interactive panel discussion, “Experiencing the Civil Rights Movement in Greenville,” on Thursday, Feb. 18, at the Hughes Main Library. Chase Garrett and Kendal “Drew” Samuel, two

students on the Southside High School speech and debate team, performed “A Piece: Strands by Eric Wilson.” Mack Lockhart, Jimmy Carter and Lillian BrockFleming told their stories of the Greenville civil rights movement, moderated by Richard Walton. For more information about the Atlantic Institute, visit theatlanticinstitute.org, and to learn more about the Greenville County Library, visit greenvillelibrary.org.

Submit entries at community@ communityjournals.com.

OUR SCHOOLS: Activities, awards and accomplishments ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL Whitten and Thompson win volleyball honors Two SJCS students, sophomore Allison Whitten and junior Kaely Thompson, were

recently named to the PrepVolleyball.com lists of honored volleyball players. Whitten was named 2015 High School All-American, one of 150 players nationwide, and

Thompson received High Honorable Mention. Whitten and Thompson helped lead St. Joseph’s to their fifth consecutive Class A State Volleyball Championship this year.

CAMP 30 seniors to attend Academic Outreach Camp Thirty rising high school seniors will have the opportunity to apply both science and math principles to manufacturing and healthcare situations during a two-week Academic Outreach

Camp led by the University of South Carolina Upstate, BMW Manufacturing Co. and Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System. The camp will be held June 13-17 and June 20-24 at USC Upstate’s George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics in downtown

«

I am a scientist. I am curious. I Iam amaaMonstessori Montessori student. I am Five Oaks Academy. Erin Sosebee’s class at Washington Center studied Super Bowl 50. The class read about the Super Bowl during their News 2You lesson and answered multiple-choice content questions, using picture symbols and objects. Washington Center student Benjamin Panten and his Sosebee created a Super Bowl snack to share with classmates.

Lydia Jane, age 5, observes while performing an experiment in the outdoor classroom.

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Christ Church Episcopal School fifth-graders Ladds Goldsmith, Teddy Cobb and Ambrose Ehlers visited Project Host, working hard in the kitchen preparing and serving meals to almost 100 people in need of a warm meal.

Christ Church Episcopal School Primer students Trey Davis and JD Abercrombie dress as if they were 100 years old to celebrate the 100th day of school.


COMMUNITY | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

OUR SCHOOLS: Activities, awards and accomplishments

«

Spartanburg. Applicants must attend both weeks of camp. A drop-in information session will be held on Feb. 23, 2016, from 5-7 p.m. in the first floor lobby of George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics. Applications are available online at uscupstate.edu/aocamp and will be accepted through March 1. 

FURMAN UNIVERSITY Education professor publishes book on Japanese writer Furman University education professor Paul Thomas has published a new book about renowned Japanese writer Haruki Murakami. The 158-page volume, “Challenging Authors: Haruki Murakami” (Sense Publishers), is co-

WASHINGTON CENTER Students make Cards for Kids Washington Center students practice compassion by giving back to their community. The students participated in Radio 98.9’s Cards for Kids campaign to furnish Valentine cards for children in local Greenville Health System hospitals. Art teacher Amanda Wakely coordinated the activity. Students used a variety of techniques from finger painting to stencil coloring to decorate the cards.

edited by Matthew C. Strecher of Sophia University (Tokyo). Furman English major Kristen Marakoff (Class of 2016) and future secondary English teacher assisted with proofreading. The book is the seventh title in the “Critical Literacy Teaching Series: Challenging Authors and Genres.” Before joining the Furman faculty in 2002, Thomas taught high school English in rural South Carolina. He earned undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degrees in education from the University of South Carolina.

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY Event will assist financial aid applicants

Washington Center student Kenny Diaz creates cards for hospitalized children through the “Cards for Kids” project. He is assisted by staff member Josh Kirksey.

Bob Jones University will host College Goal South Carolina on Feb. 27. High school seniors from the Upstate are invited. The event is designed to assist the students in filling out the free application for student financial aid. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the J.S. Mack

Library on the BJU campus. The library is located near the Wade Hampton Boulevard entrance to BJU.

CHRIST CHURCH Athletes sign Letters of Intent Several CCES athletes signed Letters of Intent with colleges on National Signing Day. Pictured are Kendal Kipper,

softball, Pomona College; Abbie Posta, basketball, Swarthmore College; Maria Varat, field hockey, Rhodes College; Hayes Sherman, tennis, Furman University; Zack Epting, football, Charleston Southern; and Braxton Westfield, football, James Madison University.

Submit entries at bit.ly/ GJEducation.

The curtain is up and the Arts are in the spotlight. Announcing the Hartness Performing Arts Center at CHRIST

CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL.


COMMUNITY | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

THE GOOD: Events that make our community better FUNDRAISER

DONATION

Meals on Wheels event provides over 49,500 meals for the homebound

Laurens Electric pays it forward

Greenville Meals on Wheels annual Sweetheart Charity Ball was hosted on Saturday, Feb. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Downtown. Through corporate sponsorships, auctions and Fund-a-Need donations, the event raised enough funds to provide over 49,500 meals to the homebound in Greenville County.

Meals on Wheels volunteers provide meals, personal contact and related services in Greenville. Volunteers serve nearly 1,500 meals a day. For more information call 864-233-6565 or visit MealsonWheelsGreenville.org.

Laurens Electric Cooperative Inc. is continuing the Pay-itForward employee program first launched in 2015. Each month, every Laurens Electric Cooperative employee is entered into a random drawing to receive $500 to pay forward in any way they choose. The funds are raised at various Laurens Electric charity events staffed by

PRESENTS THE 2016

ANNUAL AWARDS LUNCHEON

11AM TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon honors individuals and organizations for significant contributions in the fields of EMBASSY SUITES land conservation, sustainable development, water quality, air quality, waste reduction and recycling, public service and volunteer work.SC 670 VERDAE BLVD. GREENVILLE,

FEATURING KEYNOTE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 SPEAKER | 11:00 AM

employee volunteers, enabling the initiative to be budget-neutral. Esperanza Sanchez-Bautista, a customer service representative at the Mauldin office, was the first employee to receive the funds in February 2015. Sanchez-Bautista gave $100 to the Greenville Humane Society, and donated the rest to help pay for medical bills for local infant Savannah Bluford, who was born premature and faces surgery and a lengthy healing process.

In December 2015, engineering and operations administrative assistant Abby Bagwell received the funds, and donated them in the form of a $500 gift card to a local single mother of three, Genik Brewster. Brewster used the gift to take her three daughters shopping for clothes and shoes. The Pay-it-Forward program will continue indefinitely.

Some things just get better with age.

Visit UpstateForever.org for 2015 Ticket and Sponsorship Information Guest Speaker

James Gustave “Gus” Speth

Dr. J. Drew Lanham Program begins at 11:30 am Clemson University

EMBASSY SUITES AWARD RECIPIENTS

670 VerdaeCommunities Blvd | Greenville, SC Sustainable Champion: Taylors TownSquare Tommy Wyche Land RECIPIENTS Conservation Champion: AWARDS Paris Mountain State Park Friends Tommy Wyche Land Conservation Champion ClearBen Skies Champion: Geer Keys Wood Champion Sustainable Bruce Communities Public Servantand of Anderson the Year:University Rocky River Conservancy Matt Schell Clean Water Champion CleanDr. Water Champion: Jack Turner Dr. Gene Eidson Clear Skies Champion Volunteer of the Year: Dan Powell Terry Schager Three Rs Champion (Reuse, Reduction, Recycling) Three Rs Champion (Reuse, Reduction, Recycling): Joseph McMillin Clemson University Recycling Services Public Servant of the Year

Cathy Reas Foster

upstateforever.org/forevergreenluncheon Volunteer of the Year

Cary Hall

A South Carolina native, Speth is the former dean of the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, founder and president of the World Resources Institute, and cofounder of the Natural Resources Defense Council. He has also served as chair of the U.S. Council for Environmental Quality and as chair of the United Nations Development Group.

Celebrating our 30th birthday!

He currently teaches at the Independent Living Patio and Apartment Homes University of Vermont Law School and isAssisted a Distinguished Senior Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing Fellow at Demos, a nonpartisan Contact Ruth Wood at 987-4612 for more information. public policy research and advocacy organization. Speth is www.RollingGreenVillage.com the recipient of numerous awards and has authored several books, including his most recent, Angels by the River: A Memoir.

1 HOKE SMITH BLVD., GREENVILLE • 864.987.4612


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | COMMUNITY

LOOK Happy times PHOTOS PROVIDED

The Miniature World of Trains hosted an evening to benefit Camp Happy Days. Since 1982, more than 1,500 children with cancer and their families have benefitted from Camp Happy Days’ cost-free, yearround programs.

Frank Underwood, the fictional character from the popular Netflix series “House of Cards,” has opened a “campaign headquarters” in downtown Greenville. Although the show will not be filming in Greenville, it will be available on Netflix starting March 4. CAROL STEWART / CONTRIBUTING

PHOTOS BY CAROL STEWART / CONTRIBUTING

As the GOP candidates headed into the Peace Center for last weekend’s debate, downtown Greenville was filled with supporters and protesters alike.

Before last Saturday’s GOP debate, candidate John Kasich, governor of Ohio, held a campaign rally at Mutts BBQ in Mauldin.


COMMUNITY | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

CAROL STEWART / CONTRIBUTING

South Carolina fast-food cooks and cashiers walked off the job Saturday morning, calling for $15 an hour and union rights, and were joined for the first time by fast-food workers in Greenville. The strike kicked off a daylong series of protests culminating in a march on the GOP debate Saturday night at the Peace Center downtown, with workers from across the state “challenging candidates to come get their votes,� according to a statement from Fight for 15.


HOME

On The Market • Open Houses • Design • Trends

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OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 PM Price: $718,900 | MLS: #1306736 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4.5 Location: Only 2.5 miles to Greenville Memorial Hospital, 3 miles to Augusta Road Shopping and Dining Located on the award-winning Greenville Country Club Chanticleer course. Walking distance to neighborhood pool and tennis. Contact: Tom Marchant | 864.449.1658 Tom@TomMarchant.com The Marchant Company

112 Hidden Hills Dr., Greenville, SC 29605 A fabulous find and must-see home with two master suites on one of the largest lots in Chanticleer Townes with a Jack Thacker (Traditional Concepts) expansion in 1995. Situated with golf course views, this one-owner home has been lovingly cared for, updated and expanded with loads of daylight. The main level offers a guest bedroom with attached bath, a beautiful master suite with cozy sitting room, luxurious master bath, and large walkin closet. Lovely dining room, formal living room with masonry gas fireplace (or wood), breakfast room and sunroom with masonry gas fireplace (or wood) and handsome brick flooring. The kitchen is a dream (renovated in 2011) with a secondary prep area (bar, sink, 2nd dishwasher) tile flooring, gorgeous premium granite countertops, marble subway tile backsplash, high-end stainless appliances to include: new Electrolux fridge (2015), Danby wine fridge, Thermador convection oven, range with gas cooktop, separate wall oven and dishwasher. The den is located off the kitchen with masonry gas fireplace (or wood) with patio doors that access the courtyard garden. Above the den with private stairwell access is a fabulous second master suite or guest retreat with loads of closet space and a wellappointed master bath with skylight. Upstairs are two large bedrooms with a shared bath. The bathrooms have recently been updated with new, distinct granite countertops. This home is sunny and bright with great windows and views of the golf course and gardens. The outdoor living offers a private courtyard-style patio space with beautiful, lush surroundings. A built-in gas grill is located on the opposite side of the house from the patio. BONUS - All installed TVs will convey with the house. This home is in excellent condition! Wonderful family home, zoned for the award-winning Augusta Circle Elementary.

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HOME | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

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219 N Orchard Farms • 5BR/3BA $239,900 · MLS# 1311159 Sharon Gillespie · 553-9975 CODE 3172320

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Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | HOME

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S GGAR MARKET OVERVIEW

Existing-home sales in December were higher across the country as delayed November closings were pushed into the year’s end. Lenders needed a little extra time to adjust new regulations required by the “Know Before You Owe” initiative.

We list homes, we sell homes, and we get results.

Total existing-home sales grew nearly 15 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.46 million. It was the largest month over month increase ever recorded. Sales volume is almost eight percent higher than last year.

LIST. SELL. RESULTS.

With a total of 5.26 million homes sold, the year 2015 was the best year for existing home sales since 2006 when existing sales totaled 6.48 million. The median existing-home price for all housing types in December was $224,100, up 7.6 percent from the year before when the median price was $208,200. Last month’s price increase marks the 46th consecutive month of year-over-year gains.

Total housing inventory dropped over 12 percent to 1.79 million which is nearly four percent lower than last year. National unsold inventory is now under a fourth-month supply at the current sales price.

In Greater Greenville, housing sales are more robust than the national median.Year-over-year sales volume in 2015 was higher than they were in 2014. Just five years ago, there were about 6,400 homes sold in 2011. In 2015, that number nearly doubled to over 11,300. Home prices continue to climb. Between 2011 and 2015, the median price of sold homes grew from $142,000 to $172,000, an increase in equity for homeowners of about $6,000 per year. More first-time homebuyers are getting into the market. Nine percent more buyers purchased homes in December than the year before. The median priced home that was sold was $169,500, up nearly four percent over December 2014.

Housing inventories are selling faster. In 2015, homes sold nearly 12 percent faster than they did the previous year. As of January 10th, 2016, there are nearly 10 percent fewer listings available for sale. Of the 900 plus homes that sold in December, the average days on market was 76. At the current sales pace, Greater Greenville has less than a five month supply of available listings. It’s a great time to sell a home, and a great time to buy.

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HOME | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD Move-In Ready Homes Available NOW! Enjoy the maintenance-free townhome lifestyle at The Townes at Thornblade. This gated community is located just off I-85 in Greer, and has a variety of homes available for immediate occupancy. There are three unique two-story floorplans, ranging from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an owner’s suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2.5 baths. Cothran homes are designed to maximize usable space, and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, a fourth bedroom or a third full bath Incentives are available on move-in ready homes for a limited time only. Available Homes: The Primrose 2,449 sq. ft. 3 BR / 2.5 BA Starting at $266,900

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NEIGHBORHOOD INFO The Townes at Thornblade 201 Elmshorn Road, Greer, SC 29650 Community Size: Approximately 60 homes Amenities: Private gated access, landscaped yards, irrigated grounds, street lights, community pool & cabana Schools: Buena Vista Elementary, North Wood Middle and Riverside High Contact Info: Cothran Homes CothranHomes.com | 864-214-3024

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property management across the Carolinas. Her love of people has always been her motivation in both her business and personal life. Julie is one that builds bonds easily and will go above and beyond to help meet the needs of her clients. She is a wife and mother of 4, ranging in age of 13 - 25 who transitioned back to the Greenville area three years ago. Julie is a strong supporter of her children’s schools, their athletic programs, her church and is also secretary of her homeowner’s association. Julie’s attention to detail, listening skills and knowledge of the industry will produce great results for her clients.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | HOME

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T I O N S

FO R T H E W E E K O F JA N. 1 8 – 2 2 , 2 0 1 6 TOP TRANSFERS OF THE WEEK

ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE – $1,300,000 101 Tuscany Way, Greer

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SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$18,000,000 $2,700,000 ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE $1,300,000 SOUTHAMPTON $849,900 HUNTINGTON $805,000 OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $676,500 OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $550,000 CLIFF RIDGE COLONY $525,000 ROCKWOOD PARK $505,000 $471,000 CHANTICLEER $460,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $446,745 $400,000 $360,000 $355,000 $350,000 CONGAREE CORNERS $350,000 FAIRWAY VIEW $340,000 BOTANY WOODS $339,900 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $334,630 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $327,239 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $327,000 HIGHLAND TERRACE $322,000 WOODLAND CREEK $320,000 SUGAR CREEK $318,000 SWANSGATE $311,000 ASCOT $296,000 GROVE PARK $290,000 TUSCANY FALLS $284,768 CAMDEN COURT $282,000 $275,000 SWANSGATE $270,000 ABBEYHILL PARK $268,000 TRAXLER PARK $267,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $266,910 WOODLAND CREEK $264,000 STRATFORD POINTE $256,000 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $255,299 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE MANOR $255,000 1200 PELHAM $237,900 ADAMS RUN $237,000 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $232,633 PEBBLECREEK $230,000 WOODLAND CREEK $229,000 LINKS OF TRYON $225,900 WOODLANDS@WALNUT COVE $225,000 CREEK VILLAS $222,400 $213,500 $213,451 HAWK POINTE $209,000 REMINGTON $206,500 BRYSON MEADOWS $205,843 SUMMERWALK $197,000 BUTLER FOREST $196,000 FOX TRACE $192,424 IVY GLEN $183,403 LAKE LANIER $180,000 $180,000 RIVERDALE $179,900 CLEARVIEW ACRES $177,500 PENNINGTON POINTE $175,000 SPRING RIDGE $173,276 BAYWOOD PLACE $173,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $170,000 MULBERRY AT PINCKNEY $167,000 WATERMILL $165,983

BUYER

INLAND SOUTHEAST GREER N NORTH HAMPTON MARKET SOU SUPERTEL LIMITED PARTNER HARE KRISHNA GREENVILLE SIACHOS MARSHA MOFFIT THOMAS H JR GLIATTA DANIEL L (JTWROS LINDSEY TOMMY GRAYSON II KOERNER JERRY ANN SINGH HARISHYAM DUNN CUSTOM BUILDERS LLC TRICE ANDREA L AYERS FRANCES NORENE SIACHOS MARSHA ERWIN ROBERT M JR HALL SUSAN PLATT (JTWROS HUGHES ROBERT E III MAYHER HOLLIS W HAYS ARTHUR HAYDEN MCNALLY SEAN M ROGERS ROBERT L (JTWROS) MONTGOMERY JOHN J NVR INC VAN BEEK BETH ANN (JTWRO GRACE CHRISTIAN CHURCH MARK III PROPERTIES INC NORRIS KATHERINE MARY FLATRON LLC MCCALL ARTHUR C JR TR JONES LORI G BOB JONES UNIVERSITY JDP GREENVILLE LLC P B ASSOCIATES L L C KOUMOUSTIOTIS LLC STRAUB PETER J GEER ELIZABETH L SMITH JOHN LAURN MALTER HENRY E (JTWROS) ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC THREET CHARLES L JR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC RAYOT JAMES (JTWROS) ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GAMBLE VALERIA R (JTWROS TURNER DAVID E STEPHENS CAROLINE M (JTW BARKETT MERRILL J SR (SU MURRAY WALLACE E (JTWROS WHITAKER MELISSA W MYERS ANN C JORDAN JAMES A STERLING ELIZABETH H NASH CHRISTY S DE WET JACOBUS (JTWROS) PROWSE KEVIN J ARAN USA INC D R HORTON - CROWN LLC HOFFER CARL L (JTWROS) MARANGONI RAFAEL STUDART FRACHISSE CHRISTINE ALFO GREGG REBECCA BAUMBERGER YONG P BUTLER WILLIAM A PAXTON LILLIAN WARD JAN R REVOCABLE TRU GROOMS DAVID COUNTRYMAN BRUCE ALAN FIELDSTONE DEVELOPMENT G MUNGO HOMES INC KOCH JACQUELYN M CAMPES CHARISSA (JTWROS) KERR KAITLIN JEANETTE (S GILSTRAP ANGELA R ACKERMAN DAVID D (JTWROS DWELLING GROUP LLC PETERSON CHLOE A (JTWROS VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC DOUT JAMES E REVOCABLE T FOSTER ANDREW (JTWROS) WEST ROBERT J (JTWROS) VAUGHN JENNIFER B YOUNG DANICE P (JTWROS) ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L EACHUS REVOCABLE TRUST GMAT LEGAL TITLE TRUST 2 BATSON NATALIE ANNE (JTW COOK JOSHUA K LEE ANTHONY R (JTWROS) SPORTS RITA E DOWERS JERALD WAYNE (JTW HALL MICHAEL P STYLES LYNNE M (JTWROS) RICE CORPORATION BAGHERI SOLO 401K TRUST POLLACK GARY B MCKINNON MELISSA MAREE ( PUTNAM WILLIAM K HENKELS BETHANY J (JTWRO BAYLIS JAMES R (JTWROS) FIELDS JAMES D (JTWROS) CARLSON JONATHAN C (JTWR COOK KORINNE A MUNGO HOMES INC COATS BRADLEY C (JTWROS) HOGAN PATRICK PARMELEE SHAWN M (JTWROS WALDREP ELIZABETH GAY DREW KATHERINE L (JTWROS ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC MOONEY GERARD J EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL PHEILS STEPHEN J RITTERHOFF ROBERT C CHALKER BRIAN M (JTWROS) MCDONALD DEBORAH K MCCOLLUM ROBERT S VICARS CONSTRUCTION LLC HORNADAY BYRON COLEMAN HAYES AVIS I CHINIGO CHERYL E (JTWROS MAYS DEBORAH LYNN WALKER ALAN (JTWROS) LEWIS GRANT A LOPEZ ANGEL T M PROPERTIES LLC BENNETT LEROY L CANNON ALISON CORDELL FLORES RUBI M ARANA (JTW SELVAGGIO CHRISTINE E JANICZ AARON PETER EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL GLENN JUNE L

ADDRESS 222 CENTRAL PARK AVE STE 2100 285 COUNTRY CLUB DR 101 TUSCANY WAY 504 PARKVIEW DR 5 HUNTINGTON CT 217 GARLINGTON OAK CT 5 CHARLESTON OAK LN 305 MAIN ST 141 ROCKWOOD DR 2 WILLIAMS ST PO BOX 3625 5 WAGRAM WAY PO BOX 170248 106 HOLBROOK TRL N/O/D 217 HIDDEN HILLS DR 2 WELSH COBB CT 10 LOOKOUT LN 110 BRIDGEWATER DR 309 GANTRY CT 205 GANTRY CT 201 GANTRY CT 111 W HILLCREST DR 108 MEADOW ROSE DR 201 WOODY CREEK RD 110 WREN WAY 103 ASCOT RIDGE LN 104 OLD PROVINCE WAY 225 MONTALCINO WAY 204 LANDING FERRY WAY 400 ALTAMONT RD 119 WREN WAY 614 HEATHERCREST CT PO BOX 9790 201 ODIE DR 225 MEADOW ROSE DR 121 DEERPATH CT 319 BELLE OAKS DR PO BOX 7581 1272 SHADOW WAY 1 LAKE PARK VW 73 LEBANON RD 207 SASSAFRAS DR 50 MEADOW ROSE DR 7 15TH VANTAGE 208 WATERCOURSE WAY 321 ROBERTS CIR 2460 SUDDETH RD 115 SPROUSE LN 140 HAWKCREST CT 11 CALGARY CT 26 REMUS WAY 21 SUMMER GLEN DR 30 WOODHEDGE CT 242 SCOTTISH AVE 2 ALLAMANDA WAY 1975 RICHARD LN 1150 BEECH SPRINGS RD 103 S VALLEY LN 605 CHURCH ST 131 WILLIAM O WENS WAY 306 LILY POND LN 212 REDCOAT CT 7 LITTLE FOX CT 11 JAY ST 46 HAWKSBILL LN


HOME | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

FEATURED HOME

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34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | HOME Put Your Apron On with Emily Yepes

Mayo is for lovers (and haters gonna hate) Mayonnaise is unique among condiments for its divisive nature. It’s either loved or hated; neutral opinions are rare. The Haters call it disgusting, stomach-turning. I suspect many of them cultivated the aversion during childhood and have not bothered to try it since becoming a grown-up. But that’s probably just me hating on The Haters. I fall firmly in The Lovers camp. While I have my own preferences about food just like anyone else, blanket hostility of mayonnaise is a reaction I have never been able to understand. When used properly, mayo enhances the food it dresses. It’s mellow, creamy and adds luster to the star of the dish, which is almost never the mayonnaise itself. Take, for example, my favorite brunch sandwich (which I ate while writing this ode to mayo) – a griddled peanut butter and banana sandwich. In its usual form, this sandwich is simply bread, peanut butter, banana and honey. Put together, all these sweet flavors have more of a dessert quality than something that can pass as a “meal.” But by spreading a thin layer of mayo on the sandwich and griddling it in salted butter, the sweet is balanced by the savory. I assure you if I made this sandwich for one of The Haters (unknowingly to The Hater, of course), the mayonnaise would grace his or her tongue unrecognized. In this application, it simply adds a savory dimension.

Caesar Dressing from epicurious.com

Directions: Using a small food processor, puree 2 small garlic coves, 1 tsp. anchovy paste (or 1 anchovy filet), 2 tbsp. fresh lemon juice, 1 tsp. Dijon, 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce, 1 cup mayo, 1/2 cup grated parmesan. If anchovies aren’t your thing, I once heard Damaris Phillips (Food Network star) mention that you can sub capers for the anchovies, but I haven’t tried it. Needs a sturdy green like romaine or kale.

Alabama White Barbecue Sauce Modified from Paula Deen

Directions: Whisk together 1/2 cup mayo, 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar, 1/2 tsp. lemon juice, 1/2 tsp. prepared horseradish (or more, to taste), 1/2 tsp. salt, 1/2 tsp. black pepper, 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper, 1 tbsp. sugar. For a thinner sauce, add a bit of water (up to 1/4 cup).

Remoulade

I realize even some mayo eaters may hesitate to mix mayo with their peanut butter. But what about deviled eggs? Chicken salad? Potato salad? Tartar sauce? Pimento cheese? A whole heck of a lot of party dips? Mayonnaise is ubiquitous in American food culture, especially in the South. Being a Hater must be hard.

I don’t remember where I found this recipe and whether or not I’ve modified it over the years. My deepest apologies to its originator.

But I’ll stop hating on The Haters now and focus on providing The Lovers with three recipes for mayonnaise-based sauces that I make frequently in our home. (Luckily, my husband is one of The Lovers.)

Directions: In a small food processor, puree 1 cup mayo, 2 tbsp. dijon, 1 tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, 2 tsp. whole grain mustard, 2 garlic cloves, 2 tsp. capers (drained and rinsed), 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce, 1 tsp. paprika, 1 green onion (or 1/4 small shallot), 1/4 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper. Use with seafood. Specifically: fried seafood sandwiches, as a dip for fried seafood, as a condiment for fish cakes, as a spread on salmon burgers, instead of plain mayo for cold shrimp or seafood salad.

Each of these recipes uses mayonnaise as the neutral base to carry and unite smaller quantities of much bolder flavors. It’s the peacemaker when, for example in the Caesar dressing recipe, the raw garlic and anchovies want to fight over who is more intense. It tames the feral horseradish in the white barbecue sauce and transforms it into something approachable. And it’s the conductor of the 10-ingredient choir of ingredients in the remoulade, leading them to perfect harmony. Mayo is extraordinarily skilled. Emily Yepes is an advertising representative at Community Journals and a fitness instructor at Barre Evolution and RevUp Indoor Cycling. She is “just” a home cook whose favorite hobby is to test and perfect recipes for her annual family cookbook.


HOME | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO

315 Riverside Drive, Greenville, SC 29605 Fall in love with this Greenville Country Club area golf course home. The open floor plan is perfect for any type of family. The gourmet kitchen has large working marble center island, high end appliances, including the largest gas range available, custom tile backsplash, ample custom built cabinetry with lots of storage. The kitchen opens to the dining area with custom painted, tongue and groove wood ceilings You will love the dual covered entertainment and dining porches adjacent to the kitchen and foyer. The master suite on main level and has soaring vaulted ceilings, enormous bathroom suite with custom subway tiled walls, soaking tub, separate walk-in custom tiled shower and huge walk-in closet! Private guest suite with a full bath and its own private den area on lower level as well as additional bonus room, perfect for kids or that “man-cave” you have always dreamed of! There is ample walk in storage on the lower level, and two separate garages. A nice covered patio leads to the well landscaped, private back yard, complete with custom wood burning fire place. The upper level, currently used as a music room and bonus room, could easily be the fourth or a fifth bedroom. The walk in tongue and groove walled storage or bonus room in the upper level could be used as a guest suite as well! Come take a personal tour of this beautiful, fully renovated home and make it your own.

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | HOME CHANTICLEER

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HOME | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37 Eyes on birds with Abbie Pressley

Bird feeding makes a difference - for birds and for you Backyard bird feeding is a popular hobby in our country that can be enjoyed by the beginner and the longtime bird watchers. Much of our wildlife habitat is rapidly vanishing and our efforts are rewarded with a backyard of color, activity, song and a sense of giving back to our natural environment. Backyard bird feeding allows us to learn more about how birds behave, interact and raise their young. They entertain us and can bring a sense of calm. Feeding birds is also an easy way to get our children outside, teach them about nature, and show them a way to focus on our world of green, not on a screen. While birds are able to withstand some winter conditions, you can help make survival easier for your backyard birds by offering highfat, high-calorie foods and an open source of water. More than 100 North American bird species supplement their natural diets with various types of birdseed, suet, nuts and fruit. Seeds consumed at feeders by backyard birds are primarily black oil sunflower, sunflower chips, safflower, nyger and white millet. Avoid milo, flax, wheat, rye and red millet as these are seeds preferred by field birds such as doves. Much of those seeds are scratched to the ground while birds look for the seeds they do eat. Feeders such as tubes feeders and hoppers may be elevated, or ground tray feeders may be used. Elevated feeders are preferred by more birds. As birds find their food by sight, it may take time for them to find new feeders and begin regular use of them. There are feeders designed to deter squirrel activity if that is an issue. It is also important to place feeders so they are protected from cats. If you prefer no shells in flowerbeds and on your lawn and less mess around bird feeders, consider using foods that have had the shell removed.

Birds with access to backyard feeders benefit greatly from their ability to spend less time foraging for food and more time engaging in activities that enhance their health and safety. Those include: Vulnerability to predators, which is increased as birds concentrate on food hunting. Access to feeders reduces that time and risk. Molting takes place in spring and fall and requires tremendous energy and nutrient resources for birds. Lack of abundant and healthy food may result in impaired ability to obtain proper pigmentation for molting feathers and can lead to defects in feather formation. Preening is not only for looking pretty but allows birds to keep their feathers in top condition for flight to avoid predators and insulation to protect against the elements. Access to quality food allows birds more time to select better nesting sites, construct higher quality nests, and protect nests, eggs and young from predators. Abundant food for parents means more food to provide to their chicks. Extra nutrition can increase nestling’s rate of growth and reduce feeding aggression among next siblings. Easily accessible food supplies also allow breeding females to spend less time foraging, which leads to better protection of eggs from predators, earlier fledging of the nestlings and higher survival rates of the brood. Foods containing calcium enhance the strength of the eggs and mother bird and chick’s bones. Bird feeding is fun, relaxing and a great way to connect with nature. It gives us all a chance to create spaces in our own backyard that contribute to preserving wildlife. Abbie Pressley is co-owner of Wild Birds Unlimited in Greenville.

WELCOME! AMY BRIDWELL

Teaming Up With Marcia Hancock

Proud supporters of the American dream www.cbcaine.com


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | HOME

Muscadine grapes CLEMSON COOPERATIVE EXTENSION

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Mahiveera 2 LLC/ D/b/a: Like's Liquor, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of WINE & LIQUOR at 524 Mills Avenue, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 6, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Emerald City Community Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1308 Cedar Lane Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 6, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that ASADA, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON & OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE, at 903 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609 To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 28, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that El Matador Restaurant, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR, at 2919 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 21, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 58-03/01/16, Toughbooks and Equipment, March 1, 2016, 3:00PM IFB# 59-03/09/16, Detention Center Upfit, March 9, 2016, 3:00PM, A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site visit will be held at 10:00 AM, February 25, 2016 at Greenville County Detention Center, 20 McGee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept or by calling (864) 467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2016 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-16-05 APPLICANT: LEGACY CHARTER SCHOOL/CAMPBELL YOUNG LEADERS TAX MAP#: 0137.00-11001.01/0137.00-10-001.00 LOCATION: E. Bramlett Street/521 E. Bramlett Street, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to Allow Construction/ Operation of a School Gymnasium on Lot A; and, Construction/Operation of School Kindergarten on Lot B. CB-16-06 APPLICANT: BEREA HEIGHTS, LLC/MARK AMICK TAX MAP#: B015.00-01-002.03 LOCATION: 15 Leslie Oak Drive, Greenville SC REQUEST: 6’ Variance from Right Side Setback requirement for existing apartment building. CB-16-07 APPLICANT: NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY CHURCH/RONALD GEYER TAX MAP#: T031.00-02-003.00 LOCATION: 4952 Edwards Road, Taylors SC Greenville SC REQUEST: 20’ Variance from Rear Setback requirement and Use by Special Exception for construction of a new office/ administrative building on existing church property. CB-16-08 APPLICANT: McDONALD’S USA, LLC/JOHN CONNELLY TAX MAP#: 0237.03-02-010.02 LOCATION: 6103 White Horse Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: 14’ Variance from Rear Setback requirement on existing parcel for construction of a new building.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF ANDERSON IN THE FAMILY COURT TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT TIMOTHY JOSEPH REDDEN and KIMBERLY ANNE REDDEN, PLAINTIFF(S), -vs- LAWRENCE BRUCE CHEATHAM, DEFENDANT(S). IN RE: A. D. C., A Minor Under the Age of 18 Years. CASE NUMBER: 2015-DR-04-2164 TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: LAWRENCE BRUCE CHEATHAM YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint on the subscribers at their office, 514 S. McDuffie Street, Post Office Box 1965, Anderson, South Carolina 29622, within thirty days after the service hereof; exclusive the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff(s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in said Complaint. IN THE EVENT THAT YOU ARE AN INFANT OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE OR AN IMPRISONED PERSON, you are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. IN THE EVENT THAT YOU ARE AN INFANT UNDER THE AGE OF FOURTEEN YEARS OR ARE INCOMPETENT OR INSANE, you are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under the age of fourteen years of age, or said incompetent or insane person, within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. DUNAWAY LAW FIRM Tom W. Dunaway, III Attorney for Plaintiffs Post Office Box 1965 Anderson, SC 29622 (864) 224-1144

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING On Tuesday, March 15, 2016, Greenville County Council will hold third reading and a public hearing on a Greenville County Ordinance entitled: AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AN AGREEMENT FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A JOINT COUNTY INDUSTRIAL AND BUSINESS PARK (2010 PARK) OF ANDERSON AND GREENVILLE COUNTIES SO AS TO ENLARGE THE PARK. The Ordinance enlarges the Park to include projects known as Greenco Beverage Co., Inc. in Greenville County. A copy of the Ordinance may be obtained from the Greenville County Clerk to County Council at County Square, Suite 2400, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, South Carolina. The public hearing will occur at a meeting of Greenville County Council on Tuesday, March 15, 2016, at 6:00 p.m. at the Council Chambers of Greenville County Council, County Square, Suite 100, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, South Carolina. STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2015-DR-23-3699 Date filed: August 26, 2015 Time filed: 4:23 P.M. James David Gilmer and Jessica Keller Gilmer, Plaintiffs, -vs.Brandy Rae Reigle, Carlos King, John Doe, and Baby Boy Reigle, TO THE Defendants. DEFENDANTS ABOVE-NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 304 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff (s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) 467-0999

Perhaps no other fruit is better adapted to South Carolina’s climate than muscadine grapes (Muscadinia rotundifolia). A cousin of table and wine grapes, muscadines are much more tolerant of our heat, humidity and pests. These vining plants are native to the Southeast and can be found growing abundantly in S.C. forests. Muscadines come in two fruit colors, bronze and black, each valued for its own distinct eating and winemaking qualities. The bronze fruited varieties are commonly called scuppernongs, but that name should be reserved for horticultural descendents of the first named cultivar. Black muscadines are sometimes referred to as bullaces by old timers. Today, many named selections of each fruit color have been made and are commercially available. The health benefits of muscadines have been widely publicized in recent years. The fruits have 40 times the antioxidants, chemicals that may help protect against cancer, heart disease and high cholesterol, than any other grape. They are a deliciously sweet treat and are COURTESY OF USDA great when eaten fresh, made into jelly or wine, or used in the old Southern “waste nothing” recipe, grape hull pie. The best news though is that you don’t have to plant a vineyard to enjoy this fruit in the home garden. Muscadine vines are vigorous and will climb almost any structure they can wrap their tendrils around. This means you can train them onto a trellis, arbor, banister, or fence. Since they are deciduous, a good use is for casting shadow on shade loving perennials like hosta. They could also be trellised on the south side of a structure to shield it from sun in summer but not in winter. Used this way, the vines can help conserve energy by keeping the structure cooler in summer and warmer in winter. Although they do cast excellent shade, it is best not to plant them over a deck or patio as falling fruit will create a mess. Planting a single vine will yield fruit IF you plant a self-fruitful variety. Carlos is a versatile, self-fruitful bronze variety, and Cowart is a high-quality, self-fruitful black cultivar. Vines are available from nurseries as either containerized or bareroot (more common for mail ordered plants), and either option will establish well when planted properly. Fall is the best season for planting container-grown muscadines, while bareroot plants should be set out during winter. Make sure whatever structure you intend to grow a muscadine on is permanent! The “Mother Vine”, the original Scuppernong vine that is considered the oldest cultivated grapevine in the US, has been growing on Roanoke Island, NC for over 400 years. Establishing a good framework for the vine early in its life is critical to longterm success. From the beginning you should plan on developing the main trunk and 1 to 4 branches (known as cordons) to become the vine’s permanent scaffold. Fruiting spurs will be established off of that scaffold. All other vine growth can be essentially considered temporary. Annual pruning will be the biggest challenge to your multifunctional landscape feature. As the fact sheet HGIC 1403, Muscadine states, “Annual pruning must be severe to prevent vines from becoming tangled masses of unproductive wood.” This basically means removing all of the previous season’s growth back to the fruiting spurs during winter. Besides pruning, muscadines are very low maintenance and well worth the effort. So, consider adding this edible ornamental to your landscape.


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40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE

Heart of the arts Artisphere’s bigger Artists Row will feature 17 local artists

“Artisphere has a great reputation, and the caliber of art is amazing.” Kate Furman, a Greenville-based artist who will be showing her work at Artisphere for the first time

Local Artists (Left to right, top to bottom) Lynn Greer – watercolor; Ray Mosteller – photography; Jacki Newell – oil/acrylic painting; Judy Verhoeven – 2D mixed media; Darin Gerhrke – ceramics; Marie Gruber – photography; Danielle Miller-Gilliam – precious jewelry; Janina Ellis – oil/acrylic painting; Joseph Bradley – oil/acrylic painting; Hallie Bertling – watercolor; Katie Poterala – semi-precious jewelry; Llyn Strong – precious jewelry; Kate Furman – jewelry; Kent Ambler – printmaking; Evangelos Courpas – furniture; Jennifer Janeiro – drawing; Jerry Maxey – fiber

HIGHLIGHTS • Artisphere, only 12 years old, is ranked ninth in Art Fair Sourcebook, placing it in esteemed company among wellestablished arts festivals in much-larger cities. • Seventeen local artists selected for spots on Artists Row for 2016 festival. • Expanded festival is May 13-15

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Artisphere is once again ranked as one of the Top 10 arts festivals in the nation

and this year’s version of Greenville’s celebration of the visual arts will have a distinctively local flavor. Seventeen local artists were among the 135 artists selected for Artists Row for the 12th annual event to be held in downtown Greenville May 13-15. Nearly 1,100 artists from 45 states, Canada, Israel and Portugal applied to be part of Artists Row, a record number. “Having 13 percent of the artists selected being local speaks volumes about the works they’re producing,” said Kerry Murphy, Artisphere’s executive director. Three of the local artists are new to Artisphere. Kate Furman’s art jewelry has been juried into gallery exhibitions nationally

and internationally, but she has not participated in an outdoor booth show like Artisphere before. “Artisphere has a great reputation, and the caliber of art is amazing,” she said. She’ll use the opportunity as one of two of the festival’s emerging artists to continue to expose Greenville to her art jewelry that is inspired by nature. Wearing one of her pieces to the artist announcement Tuesday morning, Furman said people usually have one of two reactions when they see her art jewelry – which she equates to the difference between high fashion and fashion – for the first time. “Some people are blown away. Others are very confused and they wonder why I’m wearing a piece of wood,” she said.

“I feel like I’m starting to be known in Greenville, and I want to continue that.” While Furman’s goal is to become more known locally, Artisphere has already earned a reputation nationally. Artisphere placed No. 9 in Greg Lawler’s Art Fair Sourcebook, a respected resources for artists and arts patrons. It’s the fourth year in a row that Artisphere ranked in the top 10 spots among 600 festivals ranked in the book. “The caliber of artists who are attracted to the Artisphere Festival keeps getting better and better,” said Tod Tappert, Artisphere visual arts committee member and a 2016 Visual Arts juror. “We selected the very best of the best for the 2016 festival.”

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The 2016 festival will feature 55 artists who have never before exhibited at Artisphere. A complete list is available at artisphere.org. This year’s Artisphere will be expanded – both in number of artists on Artists Row and in footprint. The festival for the first time will cross over Augusta Street on Main Street. Artisphere officials expanded the site because they thought construction plans at the Greenville News property on South Main would impact the festival more this year, Murphy said.

The extra space will allow Artisphere to expand Artists Row to 135, 10 more than the previous high two years ago, and to add an acoustic stage. The outdoor festival, which brings thousands of people to downtown Greenville, set records for artists’ sales last year with average sales of $7,300, up from $6,800 the year before. Last year’s artists sold more than $920,000 of art and a Clemson University study put the festival’s economic impact at $5.5 million. In addition to art in a variety of media, Artisphere features food, music, street performances and activities for children.

Upstate representation over Artisphere’s history Year 1, 2005 17% local

17

100

Year 5, 2009 14% local

14

100

Year 10, 2014 12.5%

15

This year, 2016 12.6%

17

Total Artists Local Artists

UP TO

75% OFF

Friday, February 19 – Wednesday, February 24 120

135

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42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE

From stone to storm Greenville’s Brooks Dixon beefs up with new EP ‘Weather the Storm’ VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

When Greenville’s Brooks Dixon releases his new six-song EP, “Weather the Storm,” this Friday, it’s probably going to be a surprise to some of his fans. The singer/songwriter/guitarist’s previous release, 2014’s “Stone Pile,” was a largely acoustic album that leaned heavily on melodic folk and country music. The new EP announces that things are going to be different this time around right from

the top, with the ragged, bouncy “Blue Ridge,” a rocker buoyed by Dixon’s harmony vocals with singer Sara Giffin. Folk elements are still there in the songs,

but they’re less overt; there’s an acoustic story-song at the core of the second track, “Carolina,” but it’s also a warm, mid-tempo shuffle with glowing Hammond

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CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

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organ and a propulsive but gentle rhythm. Even the slower songs, like the almost waltz-like ballad “I’ve Got You,” have unexpected flourishes like sax solos and crunchy riffs. You can credit Dixon’s new seven-piece band, Noble Sound, with a lot of the new direction. Dixon and Giffin formed the band last spring to compete in the City of Greenville’s “Gimme the Gig” competition, which they won. “With ‘Stone Pile,’ the tracks were mostly just acoustic guitar with me singing,” Dixon says. “For this one, there was more meat to the songs because I’m playing with a band now. So it was about trying to capture a little bit more of that new direction we’re headed in. I hadn’t had that much instrumentation to arrange before. It definitely changed my writing. There’s a lot more energy now; it’s more upbeat.” When Dixon was beginning work on a new release, he spent a day with needtobreathe producer Rick Beato working on material, but neither was happy with the result. “I’d reached out to him about working on a song called ‘Blue Ridge,’” he says, “and really, we came up with a pretty good track, but we had a different vision on what we wanted the songs to be.” Dixon, who will play an EP release show with the Noble Sound at Independent Public Ale House on Saturday, then reached out to a friend from his time at Clemson University, Ryan Youmans, now an engineer and producer at Forty-One Fifteen Studios in Nashville. “Ryan used to play bass with me,” Dixon says. “I sent him songs and he really wanted to work with me and produce the EP.” The band was ultimately unable to make the trip, however, so they got together before Dixon’s three-day recording stint and recorded demos of how they wanted the songs to sound, and Youmans found local session musicians who he felt fit the songs. Among the musicians Youmans recruited were guitarist Curtis McDonald, keyboard player Micah Snow, saxophonist Tristan Gordon, drummer Matthew Heller and cellist Sarah Clanton, who herself is from the Upstate. “Because Ryan and I had played music together, I knew he had a good feel for the musical direction,” Dixon says. “It’s nice to have someone you can trust and wants the best for the track.”

BROOKS DIXON & THE NOBLE SOUND WHERE: Independent Public Ale House, 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 20, 8 p.m. INFO: 552-1265; ipagreenville.com


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE HUANGRY Sensual and Not-So-Sensual Meals with Andrew Huang

Colombian connection If I have one concern about the ethnic food scene in Greenville, it’s that delicious little mom-and-pop joints will get overlooked in favor of the polished glitz of Main Street restaurants or familiar fast-casual chains.

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One look into Sacha’s Café is enough to assuage my fears for a little while. The Colombian restaurant is packed – at all times of day, it seems – and there’s a healthy mix of people, from Hispanics craving the familiarity of Sacha’s Latin flavors to hip couples burnishing their hipness. I know very little about Colombian cuisine, so it’s probably a good thing I’ve ordered the cazuelita montañera. It’s about as good of a primer on Colombian food as you can get, as the dish is a variation on the Colombian national dish, bandeja montañera (more commonly known as bandeja paisa). There is one notable exception: Sacha’s variation is served in a little pot, or a cazuelita, instead of a platter (bandeja). Accordingly, the portions are smaller and more manageable. Still, it’s not like Sacha’s is skimping. In this deceptively diminutive metal pot, you’ll find rice, beans, shredded beef, chorizo, chicharrón, fried sweet plantains, a fried egg and an avocado. Oh, and there’s a little side dish of cabbage salad that reminds me of slaw, but that’s really kind of an afterthought.

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Based on the constituent parts, it’s obvious this meal is calorically dense, super-filling, and super-satisfying. It’s hardy food for sturdy folks, the kind of hard-hitting sustenance that fuels a day’s work in the fields, much like any home-style Southern meal. As with most peasant foods, cazuelita montañera isn’t designed to be the most aesthetically pleasing meal you’ve ever had. The abundance of brown-colored items can make it tough to tell between sausage and fried plantain, and the textures from the beans, avocado, egg, beef and rice can mush together. But these soft textures just set a stage against which abundant chunks of chicharrón can shine even brighter. For me, these thick hunks of fried pork belly transcend. They’re crispy and crackly, translucent in the light, crunchy to the bite, and delivered in bite-size morsels that, to me, are far more satisfying than anemic

ANDREW HUANG

BEST REVIVAL

I’ve got nothing against those places – who doesn’t love Chipotle (except for those who got dosed with E. coli, of course). And part of the appeal of finding a hole-in-thewall is that it feels like a secret too good to be true. Still, I’m always a bit concerned about the staying power of places that provide depth and variety to Greenville’s burgeoning food scene.

slices. They are everything you like about bacon turned up seven notches. I suppose the only unfortunate thing is I cannot justify eating like this every day. I mean, I could – the fact that I ate a dozen donuts a couple of weeks ago shows just how irresponsible I am with my diet. But as is the case with heavy, satisfying comfort food, it’s best to leave these dishes for the times that I actually need comfort. PROS + Oh my God, chicharrón is pretty much the best thing ever. + You’ll either go into a food coma or feel like you can take on the world after eating this. Both are pretty acceptable in my book. + It comes in a cute little pot. CONS - Probably detrimental to your cardiovascular health if you eat this on a regular basis. - Why is there even a salad?

SACHA’S CAFE 1001 N Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville 864-232-3232 sachascafe.com Cazuelita montañera, $7.89 Andrew Huang is the senior editor of TOWN Magazine. Follow his food misadventures on Twitter and Instagram at @rooftoptales and #huangry.


CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

The ultimate musical instrument Vocalosity highlights human voice through a cappella CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

JEREMY DANIEL

FUNKY MUSIC See Tigeroar’s version of “Uptown Funk” at bit.ly/tigeroar.

PROVIDED

Nattalyee Randall was named Broadway’s Next Big Star 2011. Christian Brumme is a mechanical engineering major at Clemson University. While their backgrounds differ, they have two things in common – they use their voices as instruments while singing in a cappella groups, and they’ll both be performing at the Peace Center next week. Randall is one of a dozen singers in “Vocalosity,” a live concert created by Deke Sharon, the music director and arranger for “Pitch Perfect” and “Pitch Perfect 2” and a consultant and coach on the reality a cappella television show “The Sing-Off.” Brumme is a member of Tigeroar, an all-male a cappella group at Clemson University that won the right to open the Feb. 25 concert. “A cappella is a tool for people to get together,” Brumme said. “It doesn’t require anything but voices.” A cappella has been riding a wave of popularity, a trend both Randall and Brumme credit to movies such as “Pitch Perfect,” television shows such as “The Sing-Off” and “Glee” and a cappella groups incorporating more popular music. “A cappella used to be choral music and barbershop,” Randall said. “Now it’s Motown, pop music, rock, the standards and gospel. There’s really something for everyone.”

Above: A dozen singers a cappella singers appear in “Vocalosity.” Below: Tigeroar, an all-male a cappella group at Clemson, won an opening slot in the Greenville appearance of “Vocalosity.”

Tigeroar submitted a One Direction song, “Story of My Life,” for its audition. “It’s been one of our powerhouse songs,” Brumme said. When arranging a pop song, Tigeroar tries to break out the melodies and

chords by instrument and then figure out how the group can replicate the sound, he said. “Sometimes voices can do a lot more than instruments. We actually play a bunch of instruments with our voices.”

Vocalosity w/ Tigeroar WHEN: Thursday, Feb. 25, 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Peace Center COST: $15-$35 INFO: 467-3000 or peacecenter.org

‘This Is My Brave’ focuses on mental illness Performers will present essays, poetry and music about their experiences CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Rebecca Shafer is looking for a few brave men and women who want to use art to help erase the stigma of mental illness. Shafer is bringing to Greenville “This Is My Brave,” a production featuring

stories of overcoming mental illness through monologues, poetry, essays and music. “We want people to tell their stories of bravery through art, whether they have been diagnosed with mental illness themselves or support somebody who has,” said Shafer, who calls herself a mental health advocate. “Mental illness is so stigmatized. It needs to be talked about.” The arts are a perfect venue for that, Shafer said. “Art is a universal language. I’m hoping through this show that the community can become more educated

exceed five minutes and the show has a PG-13 rating due to the nature of the topics covered. “This Is My Brave” will be held May 5 at 7 p.m. at the Kroc Center. about mental illness. “When somebody says they have cancer, everybody rallies around them. But if you say you have schizophrenia, they step away. We want to provide a sense of community and hope.” Auditions are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at the Hughes Main Library. Each essay, music or poem must not

Auditions FOR: “This Is My Brave” WHEN: Sunday, Feb. 21, 2 to 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 22, 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 24, 6 to 8:30 p.m. WHERE: Hughes Main Library INFO: thisismybrave.org/auditions


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE Page Turners

Dystopia with a humorous touch Debut urban fantasy novel sets up epic battle between science and magic My husband always laughs at me when I say that I like urban fantasy. However, I like my books the same way I like to think about life: mostly ordinary but with a little bit of magic. And sometimes a leather-clad vampire hunter to spice things up. With a Hugo award and Nebula nomination under her belt, Charlie Jane Anders is not a novice author. She is a co-founder and head editor of io9, which is a Gawker Media blog that covers science fiction, technology, fantasy and futurism-related areas. However, “All The Birds in the Sky” is her debut novel. It is science fiction for adults, but the first half reads rather like a young-adult work. This is because the main characters, Laurence and Patricia, are children when the story first begins. However, it sees them through a childhood full of bullying and adversity into adulthood where they both reside in San Francisco. Being bullied is inevitable for them, because these two are just not going to get along in any normal school. Patricia is a misfit who can talk to animals, and Laurence is a geek who has built a time machine that can only move ahead two seconds into the future. Throw in the fact

that their guidance counselor is an assassin who bingeeats ice cream while trying to plot their deaths and you can see they never had a chance at normality. As adults, they are the opposite sides of a battle between science and magic. While this dystopian story line is full of the world being on the brink of destruction, it’s also full of humor as well. One of my favorite lines in the book is: “My biggest fear about the apocalypse isn’t being eaten by cannibals. It’s the fact that in every other post-apocalyptic movie you see someone with an acoustic guitar by the campfire.” Reviewed by Laura Chabotß of Poor Richard’s Booksellers, 107 West Main Street, Easley, 859-0687.

Must-See Movies By Eric Rogers

Word power –

3 films that examine the power of persuasion

Last Saturday the six remaining GOP candidates squared off in a fierce battle at the Peace Center. Tomorrow is the South Carolina Republican primary and next Saturday is the Democratic primary, so this week I offer you some political fare to keep your blood boiling.

“Triumph of the Will” Directed by Leni Riefenstahl | 1935 Leni Riefenstahl was a German director who became notable in part for a documentary she made about the 1936 Olympics called “Olympia.” It’s a beautiful and powerful film enhanced by Riefenstahl’s camera and editing techniques. For instance, she did things like turning the camera upside down to make divers appear as if they were floating in air and placed the camera on a dolly to follow the runners. But Riefenstahl is mostly known for what ultimately became one of the most famous propaganda films of all time, “Triumph of the Will.” She was hired by Adolf Hitler to make this featurelength documentary that highlights a Nazi Party rally. It has since been used to demonstrate the power of propaganda.

Given some of the rhetoric from current presidential candidates, it might be a good idea for all voters to view this film as an example of just how easily people can be manipulated by empty slogans. It’s available on Amazon, or you can watch it for free on YouTube.

“The Great Dictator” Directed by Charlie Chaplin | 1940 You’ll appreciate this film much more if you watch “Triumph of the Will” first. In 1940, before the United States had gotten into World War II, Chaplin released this film where he plays the part of both a Jewish barber and a Hitler-inspired character named Adenoid Hynkel. Even today this stands as one of the funniest films on record, but between the laughs Chaplin was making very serious commentary on the dangers of abusive power. After he’s learned the error of his ways, Chaplin, as the barber impersonating Hynkel, gives an impassioned speech that applies as much today as it did then. You can watch that speech here: bit.ly/GreatDictatorSpeech

BENEFIT

and her work will be displayed through the end of April. The event is open to the public. To learn more about Aloft Greenville Downtown, visit aloftgreenvilledowntown.com.

Aloft to host ‘Meet the Artist’ event benefit Aloft Greenville Downtown will host its first “Meet the Artist” event on Monday, Feb. 22, from 5:30-7 p.m. at its W XYZ bar. Ten percent of sales from the event will benefit the Greenville Humane Society, and dogs will be up for adoption. Angie Carrier will be the local featured artist. Her mixed-media

HOUSING art, acrylic paintings and decorative accessories will be available for purchase in Aloft’s Re:mix lounge during the evening

Greenville Tech and Michelin partner on Habitat build Greenville Technical College (GTC) and Michelin North America Inc. are partnering to build a

“Best of Enemies” Directed by Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville | 2015 While the current presidential debates may seem contentious, and often a bit childish, they pale in comparison to the debates held in 1968 between liberal Gore Vidal and conservative William F. Buckley. This documentary showcases the contempt these two distinguished writers had for one another, which was played out week after week on the ABC network. Although the debates lasted only 10 weeks, their feud continued for decades. The film is currently available on Netflix. Eric Rogers has been teaching filmmaking at The Greenville Fine Arts Center since 1994.

house for a local family with Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County. More than 350 GTC faculty, staff and students will volunteer and raise money for the project to be completed by late April. The build has also been supported by hundreds of Michelin volunteers and is serving as a teambuilding exercise for many departments. For more information about Habitat for Humanity in Greenville, visit habitatgreenville.org.


NOT ALL STORIES ARE FOUND IN BOOKS. © Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) In The Orchard, 1973

Helen DuPre Moseley (1887-1984) untitled, 1964

Lynne Drexler (1928-1999) Gotterdammerung, 1959

A WORLD OF STORIES AWAITS AT THE GCMA.

LAST WEEKEND TO SEE: Andy and Helga: This Whole World Helga Testorf posed for Andrew Wyeth for 15 years. Comprised of one major tempera painting and 20 works on paper, some of which have never before been exhibited publicly, Andy and Helga: This Whole World explores the artist’s creative process as he refines and recombines composition and narrative into a compellingly holistic world view. Ooh, Baby, It’s a Wild World Discover a few of the wild animals that lurk at the GCMA. Ranging from breathtaking realism to fantastical imaginary creatures, this exhibition invites you to explore your wild side. Wonderful World of Color Whether bold and brilliant or subtle and subdued, color serves as both a stimulus and a deterrent throughout the natural world. This exhibition welcomes viewers to consider the power of color and their own responses.

GCMA 1608 Journal not all stories Revised.indd 4

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570

gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Free Admission

2/16/16 11:55 AM


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE

MOVIES, MUSIC AND MORE

SOUND CHECK Notes on the Music Scene with Vincent Harris

Son of a bluesman With an all-new band and album in the works, Marcus King hits the stage in his hometown The Marcus King Band w/ Dead 27’s WHERE: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Ave., Greenville WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 20th 8 p.m. TICKETS: $9 ADV/$12 DOS INFO:  235-5519; gottrocks greenville.com/ When I last spoke with Marcus King, the young, incredibly talented blues guitarist from right here in Greenville, we were talking about the reissue of his 2014 album, “Soul Insight.” The album, a great sampler of King’s lethal guitar playing, funky rhythms and offbeat humor, was really just a precursor to what was coming, he told me. He had an all-new band, they were recording an album for Allman Bros/Gov’t Mule guitarist Warren Haynes’ label, Evil Teen Records (with Haynes producing), and at the ripe age of 19, King was about to embark on the biggest year of his career. I recently spoke again with Marcus, son of Upstate blues guitar great Marvin King. He and the band are in Stanford, Conn., where he and his band (drummer Jack Ryan, keyboard player Matt Jennings, bassist Stephen Campbell and horn player Justin Johnson) are recording their new album, tentatively set for a late-summer release. “Things are just going great,” King says. “It’s going really smoothly. Warren is a dream to work with and our vision for the record is really meshing.” King says that Haynes as a producer strikes just the right tone. “He offers a lot of great suggestions, but he allows us to have the freedom of creating, and his arrangement skills are incredible,” King says. “He’s taking these ideas and compositions we’re coming up with and turning them into actual songs.” The first Marcus King Band record was made with an almost entirely different group of musicians, and King says that, after a year and a half of playing together, the new group has come into its own as a unit. “The band has really gelled together,” he says. “It feels really good. Things have meshed really well between the guys and myself. It’s good to know that you have guys who are on the same wavelength as you, and that everyone’s on the same page, as far as where we want to be musically. They’re a tight-knit group of musicians, and having that good of a group gives you a real foundation to lean on both as a writer and a player. All that comes with a lot of rehearsal, of course, but a lot of it is natural chemistry between myself and the rest of the guys in the group.” Given that fact that King has been playing guitar since he was 7, it’s understandable that all of this sudden momentum has taken him a bit by surprise. “I don’t think there’s been a moment where I’m not in awe or in shock with everything that’s going on around us,” he says. “We’ve worked really hard, and we’ll always continue to do that, but where we are right now is incredible for me. I have to step back sometimes and remember that this is reality. It’s not a dream.” The band is taking a break from recording to play a hometown show at Gottrocks this weekend, and King says he can hardly wait.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY PEACE CENTER | PEACECENTER.ORG | 864.467.3000

“I love Greenville so much,” he says. “Everyone’s been so supportive of us and they’ve always been there for us to fall back on. There’s nothing like support and love from the hometown. Coming back always feels like coming home. It doesn’t feel like anything’s changed and that’s what I love about it.” Vince Harris covers music and sports for the Greenville Journal.


CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 49

PREVIEW

Like father, like son in ‘And Then There Were None’ LETY GOOD | STAFF

lgood@communityjournals.com Working side by side is nothing unusual for a local father-son acting duo. For Peter Simms, practicing and performing next to his father, Robert Simms, gives him a chance to catch up on family matters and offers a little extra Peter Simms incentive. “You have someone there that you want to impress personally and professionally,” he said. After graduating from Furman University and seeing his father star in a Greenville Little Theatre (GLT) production for the first time, Peter immediately wanted to do the same. With experience performing in operas and musicals at his alma mater, he was cast in his first GLT production alongside his father one year after returning home from college. er, “killing” his dad every night, he said. In his first Agatha Christie play, “Black Later, in 2014, he performed with his Coffee,” he played the role of the murder- father again in his second Christie production, “Spider Web.” Now, he’s working next to his father as a guest at a party gone wrong in the GLT production of “And Then There Were None,” another Agatha Christie play based on her own best-selling mystery novel. For Robert Simms, performing next to his son “isn’t odd at all.” It’s like two professionals working together, he said. The elder Simms discovered the Greenville Little Theatre when he moved to Greenville in 1993. He graduated from Wake Forest University with a degree in theatre and performed in one-man shows, church drama and community theatre for several years.

Feb. 19 CONCERT

Stereo Reform Smiley’s Acoustic Café 111 Augusta St. FREE Duo plays electronica-laced dance-rock. 282-8988 smileysacousticcafe.com

CONCERT

Furman Symphonic Band & Wind Ensemble Present Concert Furman University, McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8-9:30 p.m. $12/adults, $10/seniors and $5/students The Furman University Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble will present a concert Friday, Feb. 19 at 8 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman campus.

PHOTOS PROVIDED

At his day job, Simms serves as a Greenville County magistrate and judge, giving him plenty of experience for his role as Justice Lawrence Wargrave, a British high court judge in “And Then Robert Simms There Were None.” His first appearance in a GLT production was in an earlier incarnation of the Agatha Christie production in the same role of Justice Wargrave. However, this time around he said he has “a little more empathy for the lines” and has developed a better deepening range of expression 18 years later. Conducted by Director of Bands Leslie W. Hicken, and Director of Athletic Bands Jay Bocook, the concert features Furman faculty member and clarinetist Cecilia Kang. The program includes compositions by John Philip Sousa, Norman Dello Joio, Bruce Yurko, Arturo Marquez, Jay Bocook, William Schuman, Scott McAllister, and David R. Gillingham. 294-2086 | newspress.furman.edu/?p=20792 FurmanMusic@furman.edu

And Then There Were None WHEN: Feb. 19-20, 8 p.m. Feb. 25-27, 8 p.m. March 3-5, 8 p.m. Feb. 21, 28, and March 6, 3 p.m. WHERE: Greenville Little Theatre COST: $28 INFO: greenvillelittletheatre.org 233-6238

“And Then There Were None” opens Feb. 19 at the GLT, presenting a murder mystery story that will have the audience asking “whodunit.” When 10 guests arrive on an isolated island to find their host and hostess missing, they discover they are part of a diabolical plot of which none may survive. CONCERT

Garland Trio Blues Boulevard (Greenville) 300 River Street #303 Tickets: $5 (plus $10 food/drink minimum) Blues guitarist leads versatile trio. 242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

3 Hours on the Ridge Feb. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. • Pleasant Ridge Camp and Retreat Center • 4232 Highway 11, Marietta • $25 660-1095 • greenvillerec.com/event/3-hours-on-th-ridge/ • amurray@greenvillecounty.org Do you have what it takes? Test your endurance in a three-hour mountain bike race taking place in Pleasant Ridge County Park. Free Kids Bike Race at 1 p.m. – open to all kids under 12. All bikes welcome.

Keeping the Comforts of HomeTM Thursday, March 10 | 7pm the Old Cigar Warehouse Join us for our inaugural fundraiser, which will transport you “around the world” in celebration of International Month. Enjoy an array of eclectic cuisines, beverages and entertainment that is sure to get you on your feet in the spirit of dance.

Visit InternationalBalletSC.org for tickets AN EVENT TO CELEBRATE

Upstate International Month PROMOTIONS COURTESY OF OUR FRIENDS AT Liquid Catering Independence National Bank

Jerry Finley Photography/Videography World Acceptance Corporation Karl Trump Photography Music by The Erica Berg Collective


CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

FAMILY

Off the Wall: Chinese New Year Art The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | Free with admission 2-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. on weekends For ages 5 and up. Celebrate the Chinese New Year this week by making Chinese New Year crafts in Off the Wall. THEATER PRODUCTION

Heart & Soul Rock Show Centre Stage | 501 River St. 8-10 p.m. | Thursdays-Sundays $35, $30, $25 Centre Stage’s annual hit rock show featuring rhythm, blues & Motown hits. “Heart & Soul” captures those great songs that brought us all together mixed with a dose of rock n’ roll. 233-6733 | centrestage.org FAMILY

Story Time and More: Pete the Cat The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | 10 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Free with admission Ages 5 and under. Come join us as we read “Pete the Cat, I Love My Shoes.” We have fun together making a Pete the Cat puppet and singing his cool song.

Feb. 20 EDUCATION

Lost Confederate Gold Greenville County Library System Hughes Main Library25 Heritage Green Place 2-3 p.m. FREE USC Professor Emerita Dr. Patricia McNeely explores the mysterious history of the Confederacy’s gold--rumored to have gone missing after the Civil War. The assassination of Lincoln, accusations that Sherman accepted bribes to let Jefferson Davis escape through the Carolinas, secret Confederate agents in Canada, questions about the identity of the body of John Wilkes Booth and the continuing search for Confederate gold...explore these topics followed by a book signing. Call 2425000 x2162 to register. 527-9293 | greenvillelibrary.org explore@greenvillelibrary.org FUNDRAISER

CDS Night with the Swamp Rabbits Bon Secours Wellness Arena 7 p.m. | $15 for Red Level, $18 for Blue Level Reach out and bring the stars a little

closer. Make a difference for children with disabilities as you cheer on Greenville’s own Swamp Rabbits. The Center for Developmental Services will receive $2 for every seat that is purchased through the link below. 331-1314 CDShockey.com joy.blue@cdservices.org EDUCATION

Protection Outside the Home Cabela’s 1025 Woodruff Rd. Ste. 101 Feb. 20 from 1-2 p.m.-7:30 p.m. FREE This class will cover conceal and carry options, discuss holster styles and selection, cover how and where to carry, and make sure you have the right tools and gear to carry concealed in the utmost comfort. Our Outfitters will show you different concealed clothing styles and accessories, while revealing how each will improve your concealed carry experience. 516-8100 | cabelas.com tina.furmanek@cabelas.com

Feb. 20-21 CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents Meet the Heroes Peace Center Concert Hall | 300 S Main St. Feb. 20 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 21 at 3 p.m. $17-$60 Award-winning violinist Benjamin Beilman makes his Greenville debut performing Beethovens Violin Concerto. The concert concludes with Beethovens Third Symphony, also known as Eroica in the fourth Masterworks Series concert of the season. 467-3000 | greenvillesymphony.org todd@greenvillesymphony.org FAMILY

Chinese New Year The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. and Feb. 21 at 2 p.m. Happy Chinese New Year. Did you know this is the year of the Monkey? The Chinese New Year begins on the first day of the first lunar month and ends on the fifteenth day of the first lunar month at the Lantern Festival. Join us in Creation Station to receive your own lucky red envelope and to make lanterns. tcmupstate.org

thru Feb. 21 THEATER PRODUCTION

« thru Feb. 20

Furman Theatre to Stage Neil Simon’s ‘Rumors’ Furman University, The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 8-10 p.m. $16/adults, $13/seniors, $8/students

In Simon’s comedy, four couples find themselves at the townhouse of a deputy New York City mayor and his wife to celebrate their anniversary. The party never begins because the host shoots himself in the head (it’s only a flesh wound) and his wife is missing. His lawyer’s cover up gets progressively more difficult to sustain as the other guests arrive and nobody can remember who has been told what about whom. 294-2074 | newspress.furman.edu/?p=20610 mickie.spencer@furman.edu

Feb. 21 CONCERT

Jack Cohan & Friends Temple of Israel | 400 Sppring Forest Road 3-5 p.m. | $20/adult, $5/student A celebration of Broadway, old and new, with soprano Brittany Hogan Alomar and baritone Seph Stanek, with Jack at the piano. Back by popular demand for a third season. Wine and cheese reception follows to meet the artists. Free parking. 292-1782 CONCERT

Herring Chamber Ensemble Winter Concert Westminster Presbyterian Church Sanctuary | 2310 Augusta Road 3-4:30 p.m. | $30 Adult, $15 Student Join the Herring Chamber Ensemble of the Greenville Chorale for their 19th annual performance of great chamber masterworks. The 22-voice ensemble will feature works by Britten, Howell and Brahms. Advance tickets required. Purchase by calling or visiting Pecknel Music. 467-3000 | greenvillechoralecom kelly@greenvillechorale.com

CONCERT

Patty Griffin with Sara Watkins & Anais Mitchell Peace Center | 7:30 p.m. | $15-$35 Grammy-Award winner Patty Griffin joins forces with Sara Watkins and Anais Mitchell in a celebration of American songwriting and performance. This special singers-in-the-round style show features all three artists on stage together. Griffin will be partnering with League of Women Voters of Greenville County for Use Your Voice, a voter engagement drive. For more information on the drive, call 236-9068 or visit greenvilleco.sc.lwvnet.org. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org COMMUNITY

Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon Embassy Suites | 670 Verdae Blvd. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. | Individual Ticket $50 Upstate Forever’s ForeverGreen Annual Awards Luncheon celebrates individuals and organizations for significant contributions in the fields of land conservation, water quality, sustainable development, air quality, public service and volunteer work. 235-8330 | upstateforever.org COMMUNITY MEETING

Book Club Greenville County Library System, Berea (Sarah Dobey Jones) Branch 111 N Highway 25 Bypass | 10-11 a.m. FREE

CONCERT

“Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West” by Dorothy Wickenden. 246-1695 | greenvillelibrary.org berea@greenvillelibrary.org

The Boo Jays w/ Ruckzuck

FAMILY

Feb. 23 Radio Room 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive Dark, guitar-driven indie-spook-rock. 263-7868 radioroomgreenville.com

Couponing Basics Greenville County Library System Anderson Road Branch | 2625 Anderson Road 2-3 p.m. FREE Get shopping tips and learn how

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52 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE

«

to save money with coupons. Call to register. 269-5210 | greenvillelibrary.org andersonroad@greenvillelibrary.org

weekends | Free with admission For ages 5 and up. In anticipation of Maker Fest, children will spend all week making art with recyclables, boxes and more.

Feb. 23 or 27

Feb. 23-March 2

EDUCATION

HEALTH/FITNESS

Home Firearms Safety Cabela’s 1025 Woodruff Rd. Ste. H101 Feb. 23 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. or Feb. 27 from 1-2 p.m. FREE This class will cover conceal and carry options, discuss holster styles and selection, cover how and where to carry, and make sure you have the right tools and gear to carry concealed in the utmost comfort. 516-8100 cabelas.com tina.furmanek@cabelas.com

Feb. 23-27 FAMILY

Off the Wall: Maker Fest Art The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 2-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. on

Finding Myself Furman University Trone Student Center Watkins Room | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 6-9 p.m. FREE To save lives and raise awareness on the danger of eating disorders, Finding Myself: a practice of self-acceptance reception will be held Feb. 23 from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeklong event will highlight eating disorders prevention and education adn will include an art exhibit of expressions of life captured by eatign disorders and life free from eating disorders; keynote speaker Julie Holland Faylor, MHS, CEDS; Befriend your Body Yoga on Feb. 25 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.; Loving Our Bodies workshop on Feb. 28 from 3 to 4:30 p.m.; Inner Dialogues Movement class on March 2 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. and a movement class on March 2 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. (location TBA). Preregistration is required for classes. 346-5222 | associatesatparkavenue@gmail.com nilly.apa@gmail.com

MORTGAGE

Feb. 25

EDUCATION

CONCERT

Greenville Textiles

Vocalosity

Greenville County Library System Augusta Road (Ramsey Family) Branch 100 Lydia Street | 7-8 p.m. FREE

Peace Center 7:30 p.m. | $15-$35

Local author, and Board of Trustees Member of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation, Kelly Odom, revisits a time when Greenville’s economy was driven by textile mills. Learn how Greenville transformed from a small mill town to an international textile force. Signing of Kelly Odom’s Greenville Textiles to follow. Call to register. 277-0161 | greenvillelibrary.org augustaroad@greenvillelibrary.org EDUCATION

Cook Local: Gluten-Free Grub Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road | 6-8 p.m. | $30 Going gluten-free? Come to our kitchen and add a few new recipes to your collection. Note: great efforts are made to prep our kitchen for gluten-free ingredients, but our kitchen is not gluten-free. 255-3385 | swamprabbitcafe.com/cooklocal baker@swamprabbitcafe.com

Deke Sharon, longtime arranger, singer, composer, producer, vocal coach, musical director of Pitch Perfect and The SingOff, had an idea. Sharon saw an opening for a musically-charged, fun-laced tour promoting the art form he holds near and dear - a cappella. Vocalosity brings some of the best voices in the country together for a Pitch Perfect-style night of acaawesome a cappella. The show contains expert arrangements of beloved songs that will definitely delight aca-audiences everywhere. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org

Feb. 25 and 27

Feb. 24-26 FAMILY

MADE SIMPLE

Story Time and More: Terrific Teeth The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | 10 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Free with admission

• Close in as little as 15 Days (excludes USDA) • In-house Processing • First Time Home Buyer Programs • Funded $11 Billion in 2015 • Serving Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, and Easley • Voted the #1 Best Mortgage Company to Work For 2 YEARS IN A ROW by Mortgage Executive Magazine

Ages 5 and under. February is National Children’s Dental Health month. Join us as we have a fun time together learning about teeth and making a terrific tooth craft.

thru Feb. 25 FAMILY

My First Drive-In Movie Greenville County Library System Feb. 17 at Taylors Branch (268-5955) at 10 a.m. Feb. 18 at Pelham Road Branch (288-6688) at 3:30 p.m. Feb. 22 at Simpsonville Branch (963-9031) at 10 a.m. Feb. 25 at Anderson Road Branch (269-5210) at 3:30 p.m. FREE

300 E. Coffee St., Downtown Greenville

864-915-9599

www.carolinamortgageexperts.com Copyright©2016 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS#2289. 4801 S. Biltmore Lane, Madison, WI 53718, 1-877-699-0353. All rights reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates and programs are subject to change without notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Equal Housing Lender.

Feb. 24

Bert Karrer NMLS #546404 Branch Manager

Transform a cardboard box into a pretend car and watch a short movie. Bring a box from home. All other materials provided. Ages 2-6. Call branches to register. greenvillelibrary.org

THEATER PRODUCTION

‘The Magic Flute’ Furman University, McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 8-10 p.m. $20/adults, $15/seniors and $10/students Furman University Lyric Theatre will stage two performances of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” Thursday, Feb. 25 and Saturday, Feb. 27 at 8 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on campus. The performances are presented by the Furman University Department of Music. Furman’s Dr. Grant Knox directs the whimsical opera, sung in English. Suitable for all ages, the opera is accompanied by the Furman Symphony Orchestra, led by Dr. Thomas Joiner. 294-2086 newspress.furman.edu/?p=20886 FurmanMusic@furman.edu

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CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 53

« Feb. 25-28 THEATER PRODUCTION

Furman Theatre to Stage Neil Simon’s ‘Rumors’ Furman University, The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Hwy, | 8-10 p.m. $16/adults, $13/seniors, and $8/students In Simon’s comedy, four couples find themselves at the townhouse of a deputy New York City mayor and his wife to celebrate their anniversary. The party never begins because the host shoots himself in the head (it’s only a flesh wound) and his wife is missing. His lawyer’s cover up gets progressively more difficult to sustain as other guests arrive and nobody can remember who has been told what about whom. Sunday’s show: 3 p.m. 294-2074 | newspress.furman.edu mickie.spencer@furman.edu

Feb. 26 THEATER PRODUCTION

James Gregory Centre Stage | 501 River St. 7 & 9 p.m. | $42, $35 James Gregory creates an evening of non-stop laughter with a wry sense of the absurd, a Southern accent and universal storytelling. The ridiculous, the common and sometimes even the simplest events all become hilarious in the hands of this master storyteller and world-class comedian. 233-6733 | centrestage.org information@centrestage.org CONCERT

2112 w/ Everthrone & The Francis Vertigo Ground Zero | 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg Tickets: $15 Band pays tribute to Rush. 948-1661 | reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2 CONCERT

Earsight w/ Jonathan Scales Fourchestra Gottrocks 200 Eisenhower Drive, Greenville Tickets: $5 in advance/$8 day of show Jazz-soul fusion band led by guitarist Adam Knight. 235-5519 | gottrocksgreenville.com CONCERT

Jef Chandler & Mickey Kriese Moe Joe Coffee (Greenville) 20 S. Main St., Greenville Two great Upstate singer/songwriters team up. 263-3550 | moejoecoffeeandmusic.net

FAMILY

Trivial Pursuit- Pennsylvania The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street 10 a.m. | Free with Admission Let’s learn about electricity. Benjamin Franklin was from Pennsylvania and he helped discover electricity. Explore circuits and more today. tcmupstate.org

tcmupstate.org/maker-fest CONCERT

Nathan Angelo w/ Sam Burchfield Independent Public Ale House 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville Singer/pianist writes melodic, addictive pop. 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com CONCERT

FUNDRAISER

Doc Holiday, Solaire & Psycho Psycho

Upstate International ‘A Timeless Journey’ Gala

Soundbox Tavern 507 W. Georgia Rd., Simpsonville Tickets: $5

City of Greer Events Center 301 E. Poinsett Street, Greer 6:30-10:30 p.m. $75/individual, $125/couple, 10 Tickets for $600 Please join Upstate International as we start the celebration of Upstate International Month 2016 with a Timeless Journey. Enjoy food from 5 continents, international entertainment, imported beer and wine, a silent auction with highlights from adventures to destinations, and an atmosphere from a time when travel was an elegant affair to remember. No passport required. 631-2188 | UpstateInternational.org info@InternationalUpstate.org

Feb. 26-28 CONCERT

Triple-bill promises mashup of rock, blues and punk. 228-7763

Feb. 28 CONCERT

Amy Grant and Steven Curtis Chapman Bon Secours Wellness Arena | 6 p.m. Christian music artists Amy Grant and Steven Curtis Chapman perform Feb. 28 at Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Tickets for An Evening With Amy Grant and Steven Curtis Chapman are $35 to $75. bonsecoursarena.com | ticketmaster.com

March 1

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents Mediterranean Cuisine The Peace Center, Gunter Theatre 300 S Main St. Feb. 26 and 27 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 28 at 3 p.m. $43 The third concert in our Chamber Orchestra Series features GSO principal flute player, Caroline Ulrich. The program includes Ibert’s Flute Concerto, Poulenc’s Sinfonietta and Rossini’s L’Italiana in Algeri Overture. 467-3000 | greenvillesymphony.org todd@greenvillesymphony.org

Feb. 27 FAMILY

Maker Fest The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free with Admission It’s time for our annual Maker Fest event. Join us to observe and participate in demonstrations from talented makers across the upstate.

FAMILY

Little House @ the Library Greenville County Library System, Fountain Inn (Kerry Ann Younts Culp) Branch 311 N Main St., Fountain Inn 3:30-4:30 p.m. FREE Join us for games, crafts and more as we celebrate the Little House on the Prairie series. Ages 6-11. Call to register. 862-2576 | greenvillelibrary.org fountaininn@greenvillelibrary.org

March 2 FAMILY

Gamers FTW Greenville County Library System, Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 4-6 p.m. FREE Bring your favorite card games, board games and role-playing games for the group to play. Ages 11-17. Call 527-9248 to register. 527-9248 greenvillelibrary.org teenlibrarian@greenvillelibrary.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Complete our easy-to-use online form at www.bit.ly/GJCalendar by Monday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in that week’s Journal.

TICKET OFFICE – GOING ON SALE – TRUTV IMPRACTICAL JOKERS “WHERE’S LARRY?” TOUR STARRING THE TENDERLOINS

HEALTH/FITNESS

Introduction to T’ai Chi Greenville County Library System Travelers Rest (Sargent) Branch 17 Center Street, Travelers Rest 9:30-10:30 a.m. FREE T’ai Chi Chih and Siejaku - Accredited Instructor Vicki Schroeder teaches basic T’ai Chi Chih movements. Movements performed slowly and softly. Classes may especially interest seniors and those with limited mobility. Call to register. 834-3650 | greenvillelibrary.org dschatzle@greenvillelibrary.org

May 4; 7 p.m. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Cost: $54.50, VIP $150 and $250 On sale: Feb. 19 To purchase tickets: 800-745-3000; GSP Box Office at The Bon Secours Wellness Arena; ticketmaster.com Info: The Tenderloins, a New York-based comedy troupe, whose four members Joe Gatto, James Murray, Brian Quinn and Sal Vulcano - are the creators, executive producers, and stars of truTV’s hit series, Impractical Jokers. Currently in its fifth season, Impractical Jokers follows the guys as they coerce one another into doing public pranks while being filmed by hidden cameras. Submit your Last Minute Ticket Sales for Upstate Events at bit.ly/LastTicketsGville For Upcoming Ticket Sales, enter them at bit.ly/UpcomingTicketsGJ


54 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.19.2016 | CULTURE FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Secret scouting missions By Frank Longo ACROSS 1 — -Mart (retail giant) 4 Hushed “Hey!” 8 Part of PETA 15 Some snakes 19 Extra refrigerator convenience 21 Pre-euro Greek coin 22 Scrutinize, with “over” 23 Extremely bad weather, e.g. 25 Deep purple 26 Skating great Yamaguchi 27 Canton-born architect I.M. 28 Big cracker brand 30 Drink name suffix 31 Offering at a memorial service 37 Org. for Michelle Wie 40 ’60s psychedelic 41 Nero’s 1,006 42 Apply an oily liquid to 43 Folding art 46 It glances off the bat and counts as a strike 49 A while ago 50 Prevention of a blaze from spreading 53 Madden 54 “Dracula” director Browning 55 “— doin’!” (“Forget it!”) 56 Melt 58 Dunne of movies 60 Slow, tempo-wise

64 Not less than 69 To be, at the Louvre 70 Longtime tech ad slogan (and a hint to this puzzle’s theme) 73 Essence 74 Actress Dawson 76 Hip-hop record label 77 “— suggest that ...?” 78 About 80 African land 83 Some vinyl records 84 Philately item 88 Clash between social groups 93 Beseech 94 Husky-toned 95 Ominous 96 “All of Me” director Carl 98 Little hotel 99 Notable time stretch 101 One writing briefs: Abbr. 102 Efforts to protect ecosystems, say 108 Simile middle 109 — avis 110 Existential declaration 111 How very close games are won 115 Mixed breed 117 Calamitous effects 122 Love god 123 Deep green

124 Repeal 125 Desiccated 126 Late-night flights 127 Draws on 128 Here-there linkup DOWN 1 Laundry detergent brand 2 Aspire PC maker 3 — Strauss jeans 4 Trilogy start 5 Yarn bundle 6 Minute div. 7 Recurring themes 8 Murphy of “48 Hrs.” 9 Prefix with glyceride 10 Toque, e.g. 11 Here, in Arles 12 C minor, say 13 Prenatal test, briefly 14 Track racer’s windup 15 iPhone extra 16 Comforting in sorrow 17 Discretion 18 College term 20 Text or email 24 Dweeby sort 29 Buddhism school 32 Film director Eastwood 33 “Hurry up!” 34 Half of a zygote 35 Cairo’s river 36 When morning ends

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37 More exalted 38 In advance of 39 Bridge parts 44 Skin ailment 45 Dairy sound 46 Conclusion 47 Blowup stuff 48 “— to Be You” 51 “Imagine —!” 52 Helped 53 Saddlery tool 57 Supped 59 School lobby gp. 61 Many a PC image file 62 Bite, break or bruise 63 “August: — County” 65 Mileage rating gp. 66 Send in via helicopter, maybe 67 Diamond-shaping method 68 Abounding in prickly plants 70 Grafton’s “— for Innocent” 71 Saw edge 72 Apple desktop 75 Hip-hop music 77 Stupid 79 “— Day Will Come” 81 Jack Sprat’s dietary rule 82 Genetic cell stuff 84 Family appellations 85 Value highly 86 Rabble-rouser 87 Diner list 89 Beef cut 90 Sunbathes 91 — Reader 92 Tilting

94 One walking 97 Flub up 99 Gabor and Mendes 100 French composer JeanPhilippe — 103 Felon’s deed 104 Competed in a regatta 105 Fruit coats 106 “— hope so!” 107 Butter substitutes

Sudoku

Medium

112 Thom — 113 “Mr. Nobody” star Jared 114 River of Flanders 116 Mao — -tung 118 In advance of 119 Low coral reef 120 Bullring shout 121 Victims of NFL sacks Crossword answers: page 44

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 44


CULTURE | 02.19.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 55 COMMUNITY VOICES Past and present with Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness

Finding the way back to ‘normal’ after World War II z

While the history and evolution of Furman University are inextricably intertwined with the City of Greenville, the school’s past also reflects the impact – both good and bad – of events occurring far from the South Carolina upcountry. After the United States entered the war in 1941, colleges and universities across the nation experienced a drastic decrease in student attendance, as male and female students took it upon themselves to join the war effort. Those remaining on Furman’s campus found themselves in an environment drained of vitality. Social activities such as clubs and sports had abruptly ceased. Once the soldiers returned home after several long years, many assumed that Furman would “return to normalcy,” as one article in the student newspaper described, and life would again resemble the days before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Due to the tuition benefits of the GI Bill, many colleges and universities across the nation boasted the highest enrollments in their institution’s histories, and Furman was no exception. One of the most immediate challenges was a lack of dormitory space. To solve this problem, prefabricated barracks purchased from the government were grouped together on the edge of campus to house veterans and often their spouses and budding families, who affectionately named their living quarters “Vetville.” These soldiers took their studies seriously and exhibited a newfound lust for life. After spending so many years face-to-face with the atrocities of war, veterans relished their battle-tested freedom. Other challenges included a shortage of faculty to educate Furman’s growing student body and the existence of a crowded and increasingly dilapidated campus. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, campus maintenance was not always possible, and during the war, construction materials were used to support the war effort. Many buildings were beginning to show signs of disrepair, and returning students noticed. Furthermore, Furman was still functioning on two campuses: one for men near today’s County Square and another for women on today’s Heritage Green. There was a pressing need to combine the campuses on a space that allowed for growth. Thus, in the late 1940s, Furman’s Board of Trustees began the search for property upon which the institution could build anew. By 1961, all Furman students lived on the new campus, five miles north of downtown Greenville where it thrives today.

Post-WWII Furman did not return to pre-war “normalcy,” but the postwar years did propel the university forward. One of the great joys associated with sharing this story about a chapter in Furman’s past is that the narrative grew out of research undertaken by Furman junior Tyler Edmond in preparation for an exhibit she curated during her internship with Furman’s Special Collections and University Archives this past fall. As she assessed the history of Furman after WWII, a formative period for Furman and our country, she amassed voluminous quantities of information and statistics, developed multiple layers of nuanced conclusions, honed her writing and public speaking skills, scoured the archives for appropriate images, worked closely with a team of researchers, editors, and graphic designers and grew professionally and personally. For decades, Furman has been a national leader in promoting the inclusion of undergraduate students in engaged learning, a “problem-solving, project-oriented and research-based educational philosophy.” Internships provide opportunities for students to discover themselves in real -world environments, analogous to the wisdom found in the counsel often given to parents of young children: One doesn’t rear children; rather, the goal is to rear adults. Similarly, the goal of college or university shouldn’t be limited to developing students who excel on campus, but rather developing adults who excel in life. Internships provide invaluable experience. Students typically learn to work in a team environment. They discover if they are a “bigpicture” strategist or if they excel at completing contributing

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES, DUKE LIBRARY, FURMAN UNIVERSITY

components. (The world needs both.) They gain a sense of responsibility and begin to develop a professional network. Internships effectively serve as a farm team of the real world. Hopefully, the institutional and personal parallels are obvious. Furman’s experiences after WWII set it on a wellgrounded path for its future. Tyler’s internship has done the same for her. Tyler Edmond of Greenville, a junior history and anthropology major at Furman, contributed to this article. Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness teaches history at Furman University. She can be reached at courtney.tollison@furman.edu.

“A RETURN TO NORMALCY?” GROWING PAINS, FURMANVILLE, AND LIFE AT POST-WORLD WAR II FURMAN will be on exhibit on the second floor of Furman James B. Duke Library until May 31.

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February 19, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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