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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLE GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 14, 2020 • Vol.23, No. 07

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

R IS ING WATE R How will development impact future flooding & water quality? P.6 Pictured: stretch of river on the South Saluda River in Greenville and Pickens counties photo by MAC STONE/NATURALAND TRUST


Love your lender as much as you love your new home.

GREENVILLE JOURNAL

WITH, FOR, & ABOUT

GREENVILLE, SC PUBLISHER Mark B. Johnston GENERAL MANAGER Susan Schwartzkopf ACCOUNTING AND HR MANAGER Kristi Fortner

publication

E XECUTIVE EDITOR Sherry Jackson WRITERS Vince Harris, Paul Hyde, Anna Lee, Evan Peter Smith DESIGN Michael Allen, Laura Allshouse, Kim Collier DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER John Olson

operations

VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS Holly Hardin DISTRIBUTION Marla Lockaby

sales

The right mortgage from a trusted lender can make all the difference. Greenville

3375 Pelham Rd. Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

As a not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers you access to some of the best mortgage rates and options available–whether you need an ARM or fixed rate, standard, or jumbo. • No PMI up to 90% loan to value • Low down payment • Mortgages up to 97% loan to value • Loans decided and serviced locally

Greenville

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Greer

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Let us help you save more with a mortgage that you can love. Visit www.greenvillefcu.com to get started.

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DE VELOPMENT Donna Johnston S ALES OPERATIONS MANAGER Meredith Rice ACCOUNT MANAGER Callie Michalak ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Anita Harley MARKE TING REPS Heather Propp, Mary Hill, Michelle Fleury CLIENT SERVICES Lizzie Campbell, Georgia Gay CHAIRMAN Douglas J. Greenlaw POSTMASTER Send address changes to The Greenville Journal, P.O Box 2266, Greenville, S.C. 29602 or 581 Perry Ave. Greenville, S.C 29611. All remittances should be made in the form of check, express money orders or personal checks. The Greenville Journal cannot be responsible for currency unless sent by registered mail. © 2020 published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Community Journals. No part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

142 Tanner Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 864.676.9066

800.336.6309 greenvillefcu.com

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Mortgage loans are subject to credit approval. Member NCUA. © 2020 Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved.

SPRING INTO SOMETHING NEW TODAY!

Come check out the fresh new looks at the one and only Nearly New Shop. We are constantly receiving new items so stop by often to see our new inventory! Donations to The Nearly New Shop support the Junior League of Greenville’s mission to give back to our community. Your donation is always tax deductible!

JLGreenville.org | 118 Greenacre Rd | Greenville, SC | 29607 2

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

581 Perry Ave. Greenville SC, 29611 (864) 679-1200 greenvillejournal.com


God’s Healing for a Mother’s Heart “Life After the Storm”

presented by

A Day-Retreat for Women Who Have Experienced the Death of a Child

Banana Manna’s Chancey Lindsey-Peake p.10 Clemson's Chief Diversity Officer Lee Gill p.14

Saturday, March 21, 2020 8:45 am - 4:00 pm First Baptist Simpsonville 3 Hedge Street Simpsonville, SC 29681

Musician & Teacher Shannon Hoover p.24

Check-in: 8:15-8:35 am Registration Cost - $15.00 (Includes lunch)

Our Guest Speaker

Artist Chotsani Dean p.28

Jan Harrison

~ Small Group Choices ~

Pictured: Shannon Hoover DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Each week throughout February the Greenville Journal will celebrate Black History Month with features on African American community leaders, artists and the historical events and locations that made an impact on the Greenville community.

Impermeable:

1. Art to Heal the Heart

7. Praying Prayers as We Grieve

2. The Heart of a Mom When Her Baby Dies

8. Put Grief in Your Pocket

3. The Burden of Guilt

10. Oh ... The Things People Say: “Releasing Offenses”

4. Holding on to Faith During the Storm 5. Ways to Honor Your Child’s Memory

WORD OF THE WEEK

(adjective) not allowing fluid to pass through. Page 7

QUOTED

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Please join us for a day of encouragement, pampering, loving support, comfort food, authentic presenters, and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Healer and Comforter. We welcome all Moms and at all points along their journey of healing regardless of the age of the child.

“I thought it would make an interesting program to combine an old baroque work by Handel with contemporary music.” -Bing Vick, artistic director and conductor, Herring Chamber Ensemble

L I V E

L CAL

6. Sharing Your Umbrella After the Storm

9. Dancing in the Puddles

11. Aiming to Thrive ... Not Just to Survive 12. Let’s Move 13. Dealing with Stigmatized Grief 14. Ideas To Help with Your Grief Journey

Brochures and Small Group descriptions can be found at: www.fbsimpsonville.org/womens-ministry/

Deadline to register is March 16th

For small group topic choices/online registration visit www.fbsimpsonville.org/womens-ministry/ or contact Alice Ann at 864-979-3198 or kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com. Limited to the first 125 people.

the local people, the upstate businesses that you need to know

Reserve your space now. Call 864.679.1242 or email meredith@communityjournals.com FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BY THE NUMBERS

how do we love greenville?

LET US COUNT THE WAYS

200 -

n story by KRISTINA HERNANDEZ

300

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Since Valentine’s Day falls on a Friday this year, couples may be upping their game to plan something spectacular. Romance isn’t lacking in Greenville, either. Last year, Passerelle Bistro, which sits right next to Falls Park overlooking the waterfalls, was named one of CNN Travel’s “World’s Most Romantic Restaurants.” As of this writing, the restaurant still had a couple of reservations open for Valentine’s Day. The National Retail Federation estimates Americans will spend an average of $196 on Valentine’s Day this year, up 21% over last year. Here are some ways to spend that money in Greenville and what local retailers tell us are the most popular items this time of year.

Cost of Table 301 Catering’s Gourmet Valentine’s Day Dinner Basket, which comes filled with a fully cooked meal for two and a bottle of sparkling wine

Average number of pounds of strawberries that Kilwins in Greenville sells every Valentine’s Day Cost of one pound of chocolate-covered strawberries at Kilwins

Number of restaurants in Greenville on Open Table that still have reservations available for Feb. 14

Kilwins.com

$2.95

OpenTable.com

6,000

$135

$24.99

Number of roses sold at Expressions Unlimited florist around Valentine’s Day

Cost of one Chocolate Strawberry Cupcake, the most popular Valentine’s Day treat at The Chocolate Moose

TheChocolateMooseSC.com

Expressions24-7.com

Table301.com

$155

$30 Price per couple for the Valentine’s Day romantic surf & turf cooking class at The Cook’s Station on Feb. 14

Cost per child for the Valentine’s Day Parents’ Survival Night Out at the Little Gym

TheLittleGym.com/Greenville-SC

For More:

Thecooksstation.com

GreenvilleJournal.com

Apply Online Now 2020CENSUS.GOV/JOBS Thousands of jobs are available nationwide. Help support your community — be a census taker.

 Extra income For more information or help applying, please call 1-855-JOB-2020 Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339 TTY/ASCII www.gsa.gov/fedrelay The U.S. Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

 Flexible hours

 Weekly pay

 Paid training


the with

SCOOP

ING LIST W E N

Amy Doyle

What is happening on Poinsett Highway as it enters Greenville? The Poinsett District Revitalization plan includes roadway improvements from Shaw Street to Cherrydale. Greenville County Council Chairman Butch Kirven described this roadway as an “eyesore, especially between the intersection with Rutherford Road and SC 291.” In 2008, stakeholders met at the Duke Sandwich Company shop on Poinsett Highway to discuss improving the entrance to the City of Greenville. (I was on the initial committee.) The goal was “to improve not only the corridor, but also the greater community throughout a circular area from the epicenter — the highway bridge over the railroad tracks,” Kirven further stated.

ING LIST W E N

217 Cammer Avenue · Augusta Road 10 Graystone Road · Watson Orchard $774,605 · Grace Herlong Loveless 864.660.3925 $499,615 · Michael McGreevey 864.704.7566

ING LIST NEW

ING LIST NEW

106 Brazos Lane · River Shoals $299,680 · Michael McGreevey 864.704.7566

1 Manorwood Court · Lennox Lake $269,681 · Matt Crider 864.444.1689

WHO’S IN CHARGE?

This is a Greenville County–led project being managed by the County’s public works and planning team, including Paula Gucker, the Assistant County Administrator for Community Planning, Development and Public Works.

ING LIST NEW

E PRIC NEW

HOW MUCH?

Phase 1 is costing $3.6million of (your!) tax money. This includes improvements such as landscaping, new traffic lights with mast arms, sidewalks on both sides of the four-lane roadway and “street furniture,” including benches.

HOW LONG?

Phase 1 will be finished in late spring 2020. “We are pleased to be at the finish line of this first phase,” said Gucker. “We have had good response from property owners and are already seeing redevelopment along the roadway.”

228 Arbours Commons Court · Spartanburg $259,307 · Lane Robbat 828.817.4663

154 Riverplace Unit 203 · Downtown $799,601

– AY 2 UND S N OPE

E PRIC NEW

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WHY INVEST PUBLIC MONEY?

Public roadway improvement is a catalyst for redevelopment, which is evident as retailers fix up their shops, prepare land for redevelopment and plan zoning hearings. Also, increased traffic growth requires investing in roadways. In 2018, the average daily traffic on Poinsett Highway was 29,800 vehicles, according to the SCDOT. (Want to know traffic counts on your roadway? Visit www.scdot.org and search “traffic counts” to find an interactive map.)

WHAT HAS BEEN THE INITIAL BUSINESS RESPONSE?

The response has been mixed. Several retailers are concerned that construction has disrupted their business; one retailer said her total sales from 2019 to 2018 are down by 50%. The loss of parking has been a significant shift for their customers. And every business owner mentions a growing number of homeless people along the corridor using the new benches. Others, however, see it as an improvement. Maetroy Murry, who runs her son’s detailing car shop, said the landscaping looks nice — “a good facelift for our road.” Steve Spinks, owner of the newest Spinx convenience store, on the corner of Poinsett Highway and Shaw Street, described the landscaped improvements as “helpful” to his business, adding that “the County has been great to work with.”

125 Gascony · Montebello $769,609

2407 Augusta Street · Augusta Road · $589,605 Laura Campuzano 864.826.8056

UILD TOM B S U C D NEW BRAN G N I STUNN

PT EXEM S L M

112 Welling Circle · Hollingsworth Park $3,499,607

RES 12 AC

ND + PO

14 Bella Citta Court · Montebello $1,569,609

Y TO READ

SS! R LE O S Y DA E 60 CLOS

WHAT’S NEXT?

The Poinsett District Phase 2 plan will be presented to County Council upon the completion of this first phase. This important roadway connects downtown Greenville to Travelers Rest, winding between the Poe Mill and Brutontown neighborhoods. More change is coming for the Poinsett District.

650 Hammett Road Greer · $879,650

Augusta Row · 27 Townhomes Starting at $559,601 Development Team 855.476.8553

The Scoop is a bi-weekly column that keeps you in the know. Amy Ryberg Doyle served for 12 years on Greenville City Council. She is married and has four children. An outdoors enthusiast, she likes to bike, swim and run, but not all in that order. She power-naps daily.

Serving the Greater Greenville Area with Local Expertise, Global Reach Each affiliate independently owned and operated.

864.297.3450 www.jha-SothebysRealty.com FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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FEATURED

| FROM THE COVER

R IS ING WATE R How will development impact future flooding & water quality? n story by EVAN PETER SMITH

The alert from the National Weather Service came on the afternoon of Wednesday Feb. 5, the day before the storm was set to hit:

ALERT!

The threat for heavy and/excessive rainfall will be on the increase Thursday morning. *Rapid rises on streams and creeks are likely to occur along with the threat of flooded roads. Flooding is also likely to occur on larger rivers.

By the following day, as a torrent of rainwater pummeled Greenville and the surrounding counties, creeks and river water rose onto roadways. Homes and businesses flooded. The city of Greenville, having already activated its Emergency Operations Center, dispatched firefighters and police officers to handle downed power lines and rescue operations. About 30 workers at Mosaic Color and Additives on Sulphur Springs Road had to be rescued after the high waters of the Reedy River inundated the only road to safety. Meanwhile, in Falls Park, an individual known only as “kayak guy” rode his kayak down the frothing brown rapids of the Reedy River, a feat that earned him accolades on social media, despite the stunt being illegal under city ordinance. Eventually the storm passed, and Friday morning arrived with quiet birdsong. The rain had ceased. Rivers and creeks still ran high but had begun to ease back to normal levels. With nothing but wind trailing behind it, the storm was officially over, with no serious injuries or fatalities reported in Greenville. Things had, it seemed, returned to normal. Until the next storm, that is.

EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED

Pictured: The Middle Saluda River photo by MAC STONE/NATURALAND TRUST 6

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

Frank Holleman, senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, says anyone with open eyes can see how development is proceeding at “an incredibly rapid pace.” “And that’s especially the case in and around Greenville,” Holleman said. As a lawyer focused on environmental issues, Holleman has been working in Greenville since the early 1980s. Back then, Holleman remembers how the Reedy River would turn green and blue from pollutants dumped upstream by manufacturing plants. Since those days, the river has been cleaned up significantly, and Holleman himself has become a national authority on environmental issues, having appeared on 60 Minutes and addressed Congress. Now Holleman sees expanding development as the most significant environmental issue affecting the Upstate today. “Accelerating development near major rivers and lakes, and even in some of those protected headwaters, can adversely affect the quality of our waterways for a generation or even longer,” Holleman said. The problem is not unique to the Upstate. A 2018 report from the University of Maryland noted that nationwide “aging and inadequate infrastruc-


FROM THE COVER ture, coupled with rapid land development, increased the amount of storm runoff to already stressed drainage systems.” The report went on to mention both Hurricane Harvey’s impact on Texas and Louisiana and Hurricane Florence’s impact on the Carolinas, noting that although the storms “will be remembered as hurricanes, in many cases it was the intense rainfall that brought urban areas to a standstill, overwhelming homes and transportation arteries with flood water.”

Accelerating development near major rivers and lakes, and even in some of those protected headwaters, can adversely affect the quality of our waterways for a generation or even longer.” -Frank Holleman, senior attorney, Southern Environmental Law Center Heavy rains are only projected to get worse. In the southeast specifically, the amount of rainfall during heavy storms has increased by 27 percent since 1958, according to an Environmental Protec-

tion Agency report. That same report notes the area is expected to see increases in “humidity, average rainfall, and the frequency of heavy rainstorms” moving forward. Echoing those predictions, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration specifically noted in South Carolina’s state summary that “extreme precipitation is projected to increase.” The increased rainfall comes as South Carolina, and the Upstate in particular, see ever-expanding urban development. That development, by its very existence, destroys an ecosystem’s natural stormwater management system, replacing natural green space with impermeable surfaces like concrete and pavement. The scale of the development is often hard to grasp, according to Erika Hollis, clean water director with Upstate Forever, a Greenville-based conservation nonprofit. For comparison, every single day in the Upstate the amount of land paved over for development is equivalent to all of Haywood Mall — and that’s including the mall’s parking lots as well, according to a report from Upstate Forever. Within the next two decades, the report notes, the development footprint in the Upstate will have doubled, with new paved areas accounting for an area larger than all of Spartanburg County. And the majority of this growth, Hollis said, is projected to be within Greenville County. Beyond the visual impact of trees and nature being paved over, development expansion has far more unseen consequences, which can multiply throughout the

Pictured: Water rushes over Reedy Falls in downtown Greenville during a storm on Feb. 5 | photo by SHERRY JACKSON

|

FEATURED

entirety of the water system. Hollis said even seemingly insignificant waterways, like tiny creeks or streams, are instrumental in enThe amount of land paved over for development is suring a healthy water system. Every- equivalent to all of Haywood Mall thing is connected, she said, and even if one small creek is paved over, the entire natural flow of the water can be interrupted. Because Within the next two decades impermeable surthe development footprint of faces like pavement do not allow rainwathe Upstate will have DOUBLED ter and other fluids to absorb back into Total new paved areas are the soil, stormwater projected to account for an area runs off the land at a larger than Spartanburg County greater volume and higher velocity than it naturally should. natural wooded areas and vegetation The problem is exacerbated by the along waterways on either side — prepollutants present at the development vent banks from caving in and causing itself, like fertilizer, pesticides, pet waste, sediment runoff during heavy rains. heavy metals, litter and sediment — the (The city of Houston, in response to latter of which is especially dangerous, the intense flooding from Hurricane Hollis said, because carcinogenic parHarvey, is in the process of impleticles attach themselves to sediment. menting similar “green stormwater “The water picks up all that stuff, infrastructure” like green roofs, rain washes it into the nearest river, and gardens and permeable pavement.) when it rains heavily you can cause the The city already requires stream bufbanks to cave in, leading to flooding, fers beyond state and federal requirewhile carrying all those pollutants at ments, while the county discussed an the same time,” Hollis said. ordinance in 2018 that would have Given the gushing water of the Reedy mandated all new developments near River during the most recent storm, “kaylarge watersheds leave 100 feet of bufak guy” might have more things to worry fer along waterways. Despite the orabout than just breaking a city ordinance. dinance being tabled due to financial concerns from developers, Hollis is “AN URGENT NEED TO ACT QUICKLY” optimistic the report from the Reedy Despite their concerns, both Hollis and River Water Quality Group will be a Holleman remain hesitantly optimistic. strong argument for increased buffer Holleman can point to many successes zones as a part of the Unified Developin the past few decades: the protection of ment Ordinance process next year. the Table Rock Reservoir and North Sa“I think elected officials are really startluda Reservoir; the devoted efforts by loing to reflect the views of the community cal stakeholders to clean the Reedy Rivresidents who are more and more coner; and the greater public involvement in cerned about environmental quality, environmental issues as a whole. water protection, open green space and “But I also feel there’s an urgent need to overall quality of life,” Holleman said. act quickly,” Holleman said, noting that If he imagines the best-case scenario, unless proper action is taken, unimpeded what Holleman sees is a ribbon of green development could wreak irrevocable snaking through the developed land of havoc on Greenville’s water systems. Greenville. Wherever a river or creek Independent groups are already taking flows, so too grow healthy wooded areas heed of that urgency, according to Hollis. and habitats along with it, he said. The Reedy River Water Quality “Not only would we have that sensible Group, of which Upstate Forever has way to manage our stormwater so we been a participant for the past five don’t have damaging floods every time it years, is finalizing a study focused on rains, but we also have all this protected the economic and environmental benland for people to enjoy,” Holleman said. efits of expanding buffer zones along “That’s the kind of community we want waterways. Those buffer zones — our grandchildren to live in.”

EVERY SINGLE

DAY

IN THE UPSTATE:

FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

GIVING MATTERS

Local family shares its value for education through scholarship fund n story by REBECCA HOWERTON | photos PROVIDED

Before attending Clemson University, Gracie Wells, a freshman in the school’s Calhoun Honors College, had no idea how many classes and clubs were offered that would open new doors for her to meet her goals and enjoy her time on campus. Thanks to the generosity of a local family, she can benefit more from her education with less focus on financial concerns. “I’m grateful to be able to do extracurricular activities and still get the grades I want,” said Wells, 2019 recipient of the Margaret and Jack Paylor Family Scholarship. “The scholarship has allowed me to worry less about money and more about taking advantage of this opportunity.”

Margaret and Jack Paylor Family Scholarship Fund CRITERIA: • Applicant must be a resident of Greenville County, South Carolina • Applicant must have a minimum 2.5 GPA on a 4.0 (un-weighted) scale in high school • First-time applicant must be a rising freshman planning to attend a South Carolina public college/university • Applicant must be accepted to an institution of higher learning prior to applying • Applicant must demonstrate financial need (economically disadvantaged) Majoring in foreign language and international health, Wells said the classes she enjoys most are her health class and a course in American Sign Language. “The health class is a really interesting overview of health care systems; it sounds boring, but it applies to the current situation and what we’re struggling with in the United States,” she said. “The American Sign Language class is so much fun, and so different from learning any other language, because you use your body to express yourself.” Wells participates in Clemson’s Undergraduate Student Government as

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

a member of a committee focused on improving sustainability on campus, speaking to fraternities and sororities about ways to incorporate more sustainable practices. She also participates in Central Spirit, an athletics-oriented club dedicated to representing Clemson at sporting events while upholding the school’s standards and traditions. Service to others has been important to Wells, and she was praised for her leadership and planning skills in her role as a student leader at the Bobby Pearse Community Center. Wells also volunteered at the Meyer Center for Special children. “My time at the Meyer Center showed me that children are all the same — whether they have special needs or not, they still want to be treated as children,” she said. “I’m not sure yet what I will do in the future, but I would like to work with children, or for a nonprofit to help people in whatever way I can.” A similar giving spirit led Margaret Paylor to create The Margaret and Jack Paylor Family Scholarship Fund in 2016 through the Community Foundation of Greenville. The scholarship provides financial assistance for higher education to economically disadvantaged students residing in Greenville County who plan to attend a South Carolina public college or university. Paylor had previously set up a donoradvised fund with the Community Foundation from which she supported organizations that further education, including the Greenville Tech Foundation, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Peace College, among others. Paylor believes, as did her late husband Jack, that higher education is key to success in life. Her parents, both college graduates, taught her the value of education at a young age; Paylor attended Peace College and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and holds a master’s degree from Clemson University. Of Wells’ success at Clemson, Paylor said, “I am very proud of her past record

of great grades and I’m proud that she is continuing that at Clemson. That is not easy and takes commitment.” A number of other individuals, families and organizations have created similar endowments through the Community Foundation of Greenville that disburse scholarship funds according to guidelines set up by the donors. They’ve entrusted the Community Foundation with the management and investment of these funds to be certain their gifts continue to support deserving students for years to come.

I’m not sure yet what I will do in the future, but I would like to work with children, or for a nonprofit to help people in whatever way I can.” -Gracie Wells, recipient, Margaret and Jack Paylor Family Scholarship G iv ing Mat ters is sponsored by t he To learn more about the Margaret and Jack Paylor Family Scholarship and other scholarships offered through the Community Foundation, visit www. cfgreenville.org/scholarships.


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

NEWS BRIEFS

UPSTATE AREA NEWS AND NOTES

Schedule Your Tour Today • (864) 606-3055

BE&K Building Group announces new Greenville regional leader BE&K Building Group, a leader providing construction management and design-build services for more than 50 years in South Carolina and its surrounding markets, announces that Mike Baumbach, executive vice president for the company, has been appointed as Business Unit Leader for its Greenville, South Carolina, operations. With nearly 40 years of construction industry experience and more than 10 years with the company, Baumbach will provide comprehensive oversight and leadership for the company’s local and regional operations. He will be supported by Vice President Kenny Anderson and Operations Director Greg Blinston, who have been with the company 25 years and 20 years, respectively. “BE&K Building Group was founded in Greenville in 1968. Our roots run deep in this local market and region,” said Baumbach. “I’m excited for the opportunity to join and work with our team members in Greenville who have been safely delivering projects and customer service excellence to our existing core clients for many years. Together, we’ll continue this service excellence along with building new relationships with future core clients.” BE&K Building Group is a fully integrated construction company serving advanced manufacturing and distribution, aerospace, pharmaceutical and biotechnology, food and beverage, health care, higher education, hospitality and mission-critical clients. The company operates nationwide with offices in Greenville, Research Triangle Park, Chicago and Houston. A full range of services is offered including construction management, design-build, general contracting, preconstruction and client advisory. Additional information is available at bekbg.com.

Petco Foundation surprises Greenville County Animal Care with $100,000 grant The Petco Foundation surprised Greenville County Animal Care with a $100,000 grant investment as part of its “Love Changes Everything” campaign on Feb. 11. As one of the largest open admission animal shelters in South Carolina, Greenville County Animal Care was selected by the Petco Foundation because of the shelter’s work towards saving animals lives. The facility can house up to 400 cats and dogs. It also has a 91 percent life-saving rate. In addition to the grant, Greenville County Animal Care workers received Petco items and BOBS from Skechers shoes. The surprise presentation is part of more than $10 million in grant investments that the Petco Foundation is committing to animal welfare organizations nationwide. The foundation will also be committing a total of $324,000 to South Carolina animal welfare organizations. These funds will join the $400,000 in support announced in 2019 for the No Kill South Carolina effort, Perez said.

READ MORE ONLINE www.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.com

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10 Fountainview Terrace, Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com

SUBMIT YOUR PRESS RELEASE AT: www.GreenvilleJournal.com/submit FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

CHANCEY LINDSEY-PEAKE:

Sharing baked goods with good spirits n story by JOHN JETER | photo by DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

presented by

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

She doesn’t simply bake bread, she evangelizes it. Chancey Lindsey-Peake even took inspiration for her company’s name, Banana Manna: A Little Piece of Heaven, from the Old Testament food that saved Moses’ people from starvation after escaping slavery in Egypt. “There are many people who don’t know what manna is — it’s an awesome opportunity for both me and my husband to witness,” she says of the business she started after her release from prison for distributing crack cocaine. On a Thursday morning during a deluge of seemingly Biblical proportion, she dances around the commercial kitchen she and Dennis Peake, her husband of 13 years, built in the basement of their Easley home. While two convection ovens heat to 350 degrees for a batch of banana chocolate-chip loaves, she talks about how they would put some of their earnings toward their prison ministry — “to fund gas,” she says, “and we had to stay overnight in hotels, sharing the gospel at different institutions. We stayed faithful. We would not faint.” She mentions their Sunday trip to Camille Griffin Graham Correctional Institution, one of three South Carolina women’s facilities she was imprisoned in from 1991 to 2001. “Not only was I selling crack, I was my best customer,” she says of the addiction that ended her 18 years as a surgical nurse. After her release, she returned to Greenville, where a woman who she says worked for then-President George W. Bush hired her as a babysitter on Thursday nights. The woman, whose name she won’t divulge, gave her a banana bread recipe — which turned out

to be the recipe for success. “It was good, but being from a long list of grandmothers and my mother, and their time-tested recipes, I knew I could make it just a little bit better with that Southern secret spice,” she says. She started off giving away her product. “If you told me you liked it, that was all I needed. I didn’t do it for the money,” she says. Until she did, selling her goods at various flea markets.

There are many people who don’t know what manna is — it’s an awesome opportunity for both me and my husband to witness. -Chancey Lindsey-Peake, owner, Banana Manna

Banana Manna incorporated in 2010, and in 2016, the company got an $1,800 microloan. Finally, she earned a coveted vending spot in the TD Saturday Market. “Chancey’s remarkable talent for baking banana bread is surpassed only by her contagious positivity and joyful personality,” says Cameron Campbell, the city’s market coordinator. During the summer peak season, Banana Manna produces as many as 200 loaves a day in pans 4 inches by 6 inches by 2 inches. More than a dozen varieties include banana bread, cranberry banana bread, blueberry banana bread, banana bread with and without nuts, gluten-free, sugar-free, paleo and more. Several retailers carry her products, including Port City Java on Main Street and Lowes Foods, with three grocery stores in the Midlands and two in Greenville. “We love Chancey’s personal story. She has a strong presence in the local community,” says Julie Jessmon, the chain’s senior bakery category manager. “Lowes Foods loves giving entrepreneurs opportunities to expand their businesses, and we’re looking forward to seeing Chancey continue to grow.”


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Get robot-assisted joint replacement for faster recovery and less pain. As the first to bring robotic arm-assisted technology to Greenville, our hospital performs more joint replacements than anyone else in the state. That means our joint replacement team is here for you from education to recovery so you can get moving again. n story by BRITNEY JONES NUTRITION GROUP, SPORTSCLUB’S NUTRITION PARTNER

Call 864-213-4958 to sign up for a FREE joint replacement seminar on Feb 25.

“If I lose ‘X’ pounds, then I can wear my skinny jeans” “I’m doing all the right things, but I’m not losing weight!” Do any of these statements above sound familiar? We get it: Exchanging old habits for new, health-promoting habits is hard. It’s especially difficult when we feel we aren’t seeing progress! We think it’s time to start looking at different measures of progress and success beyond just the scale. To keep track of progress outside of the scale, start by focusing on sustainable habits. What is one habit that you can easily do every day (or every week) for a long period of time that will help you reach your goals? It should be something simple and realistic like making your own breakfast every day, getting in movement three times a week, or going to the grocery store at least once a week. Focus on habits that are sustainable and, more importantly, enjoyable! Incorporating new habits into your day can be really exciting, especially when you are able to see improvements in your overall health.

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Check out 10 examples of healthy non-scale wins below: 1. Better mood 2. More energized 3. Achieving your fitness goals 4. Improved sleep 5. Everyday tasks (like walking upstairs, house chores, etc.) are easier 6. Improved cooking and meal-planning skills 7. Clothes are fitting more comfortably 8. Higher self-esteem 9. Lab markers have improved 10. Greater self-awareness

STACY BRADSHAW wearing her new

Next time you find yourself discouraged by the number on the scale, try and think about other parts of your life that have made you a healthier version of yourself physically, mentally and socially. The number on the scale is a number — that’s it. It’s your behaviors that define who you are — not the scale.

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11


NEWS

|

NEED TO KNOW

ART IN FOCUS

BRONZE SCULPTURE artist: charles pate jr. LOVE YOUR SUMMER JOB work outdoors

WORK SOMEWHERE AWESOME

Post yo photos in ur of the B front ik sculptur e Walk e using #gvlar tinfocus

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE help your community

SUMMER & PART TIME

JOB FAIR

FEBRUARY 15 9 am - 1 pm

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n photo provided by BIKE WALK GREENVILLE

MEMORIES & FRIENDSHIPS

SUMMER JOBS

12

COMPLETED 2019

GJ: WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE PIECE? C: Frank Mansbach and Bike Walk Greenville came to me with an idea for a sculpture on the trail. Their original vision of a family enjoying the trail was adapted to show a child on a bike and an artistic vision of the trail itself. GJ: HOW LONG DID THE PIECE TAKE TO CREATE? C: The sculpting and bronzing took about six months. GJ: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE PIECE AND WHY? C: The patina (or color) of the sculpture transitions from shiny silver at the base to a dark grey blue at the top. This unique coloring is supposed to look as though the child is drawing her energy or spirit from the trail. Location: Along the Swamp Rabbit Trail near Sulpher Springs Rd.

NEWS

Art hub opening in Village of West Greenville n story by ANNA LEE | photo PROVIDED

A new art hub is opening in the Village of West Greenville. Located at the historic Bank Building Studios, 1279 Pendleton St., the hub houses the local and national award-winning artists Janina Tukarski Ellis, Patricia Kilburg, Traci Wright Martin and Barbara Castañeda. The grand opening will be held 6-9 p.m. Friday, March 6.


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

COMMUNITY

Students from Greenville Early College and the Donaldson Career Center come together to build tiny shelter n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM | photo PROVIDED

Eighth grade students from Greenville Early College joined Donaldson Career Center building-construction students and worked together to build a tiny shelter for Greenville’s homeless population to use. “This project is actually the modification and extension of a project I did last year,” said Greenville Early College English teacher Rebekah Genovese. “Originally, I wanted to build a tiny house. I wanted my children to research homelessness and wanted them to build tiny houses. I went to Habitat and they said, ‘It was a great idea, but you have got to baby-step it first.’” Following Habitat’s advice, Genovese and her students performed research and built a scale model. At the end of the school year, she approached principal Marjon Ford and was given a budget of $1,000 to cover building the tiny shelter.

Our main goal is to just help people. We just know that someone will have a safer place to live.” -Alexis Mcghee, Early College student Before starting on the plans for the tiny shelter, Genovese said that she had her students do additional research and build other scale models. They consulted with students from the Fine Arts Center on how the shelter would need to be built and where they could put it. “At first it started out as a little homeless project, learning about the homeless,” said Early College student Alexis Mcghee. “Then we learned that we would be making a shelter for the

TINY SHELTER vs TINY HOME tiny SHELTER:

tiny HOME:

• Used to provide shelter for homeless • Can be mobile • Does not have electricity or plumbing • Can be built following simple carpentry rules

• Can be mobile or built as a permanent structure • May require building permits • Uses plumbing & electricity • If built off-site, the house must be 400 square feet or less in Greenville County

homeless. We just started off making the model and I thought we were going to just going to do the model. Source: Rebekah Genovese, 8th grade teacher at Greenville Early College; Dennis Pederson, Then we learned that building-construction technology teacher at Donaldson Center; and www.greenvillecounty.org. we would be making an actual shelter for someone to live in. “This collaboration between GreenOnce we did that, everyone got excited ville Early College and the Donaldson because this is the first really big proj- Career Center is exposing students ect we have done with us being at the at two schools and two grade levels to school for three years. Our main goal is the needs in our community and how to just help people. We just know that they can be of service,” said Dr. Burke someone will have a safer place to live.” Royster, superintendent of Greenville Once Genovese’s students completed County Schools. “Early College students their research, she contacted building- are learning quality research skills, construction technology teacher Dennis teamwork and business relations. It alPederson about his class at Donaldson lows Donaldson Center’s high school Center helping her class with this project. building and construction students In addition to the Early College stu- to become teachers and use the trade dents researching the project, they skills they’ve learned in the classroom helped the Donaldson Center students to complete a real-world project. This with some of the construction. The next exemplifies the type of hands-on expestep for the tiny shelter is fig- rience necessary to ensure students are uring out where it needs to go, prepared for the next step, whether that Genovese said. is college or career.”

A NEED FOR SHELTER

Source: Greenville Homeless Alliance, Report on Homelessness in Greenville County 2019

At least 3,633 men, women and children experienced homelessness in Greenville County in 2018-2019.

3,633 EMERGENCY SHELTERED 242 UNSHELTERED 1,106 SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

Greenville County ranked THIRD in SC in number of persons experiencing homelessness FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

LEE GILL:

Building bridges, bringing diversity to Clemson University n story by ANNA LEE | photo PROVIDED

Lee Gill’s first week at Clemson University was marked by student protests. In the days before he started as Clemson’s chief diversity officer in April 2016, more than 100 students had staged a sitin at Sikes Hall to demand that the school do more to address diversity and racism. The demonstration was in its fifth day when Gill arrived on campus. “They were out on the steps right in front of my office welcoming me,” he said with a laugh. Gill, a 20-year veteran of higher education, said he doesn’t admonish the students who participated. In a way, he admires them. He attended college during the tumult of the late 1960s and early 1970s, when student demonstrations were a “rite of passage,” Gill said. “We as students were all involved in that, and we thought we could change the world,” he said.

You can win the battle but lose the war. I want to win the war. -Lee Gill, chief diversity officer Clemson University

‘I WAS A TOTAL COUNTRY BOY’

Born and raised in the Midwest, Gill grew up on a farm in South Bend, Indiana, and spent an idyllic childhood hunting and fishing and swimming in his favorite swimming holes. “I was a total country boy,” he said. His parents were farmers who hailed from the South. His mother had an eighth-grade education; his father never finished elementary school. Yet Gill said they stressed education and made their son go to church “literally seven days a week.” In college, Gill studied sociology and political science at the University of Michigan before receiving his law degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

He worked as an affirmative action officer, then started his own consulting firm, where he advised organizations on how to diversify staff and build a more inclusive environment.

WHEN CLEMSON CAME CALLING

In 2015, Gill was serving as chief diversity officer at the University of Akron in Ohio when he received a call from Clemson. The school was conducting a search for its own diversity officer and wanted to know if Gill was interested. Gill, who said he knew relatively little about Clemson at the time, wasn’t sure. But as he learned more about the school and did his own research, Gill began to change his mind. He read about Harvey Gantt, and the role Clemson had in the Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina. “I realized the legal fight that it took for Harvey Gantt to enroll here, but that being said, there was no other institution besides Clemson that led the way, and that was very intriguing to me,” Gill said.

FIGHTING FOR STUDENTS

Gill accepted the job during a particularly tense time at Clemson. The previous year had been rocked by protests in which students as well as faculty members fought unsuccessfully to rename Tillman Hall. The building is named in honor of Benjamin Tillman, a Reconstruction-era South Carolina politician and wellknown white supremacist who had advocated for the lynching of blacks. While Gill understands why the building should be renamed, he believes that there are purer victories. “You can win the battle but lose the war. I want to win the war,” he said. Gill said he’d rather invest money on student scholarships, faculty diversity and bridge programs along the state’s Interstate 95 corridor. “I want to begin to touch our students as early as the fifth grade and build those pipelines to Clemson University,” Gill said. “So yes, you can fight over a building if you want to, but I want to fight for students.”

presented by


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

NEWS

County Square project moves forward with city and county approval

Where would you send

your family?

n story and photo by EVAN PETER SMITH

Greenville County Council voted unanimously to approve the mechanism that will fund the $120 million County Square redevelopment project. The moment of the vote, which followed months of deliberation, was uncharacteristically brief and without comment from councilmembers. Council deliberated over the very same ordinance for a full half hour in its second reading, but the ordinance’s third and final reading passed by so quickly that you might’ve missed it had you not been paying attention.

$1 BILLION:

total cost of the County Square redevelopment project

37 ACRES:

amount property to be redeveloped From the moment Councilwoman Liz Seman began reading the content of the ordinance to the moment the votes were cast unanimously in favor, a mere one minute and 10 seconds had passed. “Now, moving on to our next ordinance,” said Council Chairman Butch Kirven – and just like that, the largest redevelopment project in Greenville County history was given the go-ahead. Council had originally stalled the vote on the funding, which approves the county

to issue revenue bonds to pay for the project in an amount not exceeding $120 million – the presumed budget for the project. The holdup was due to the city’s rezoning of the County Square site, a matter over which the county and city had disputed for months. On Jan. 22, the city voted unanimously on the first of two readings for a new rezoning plan, which would cap buildings at 12 stories, despite county recommendations to push building height up to 18 stories. The city’s rezoning plan also addresses traffic mitigation and issues of historical neighborhood character being lost due to the adjacent development. County councilmembers had previously stated they wanted to wait until the city’s plans were set in stone before they went ahead to fund such a large project. While the city had not yet fully approved that new rezoning plan at the time of the county’s vote on Feb. 4 — the city eventually voted to approve the development plan one week later, on Feb. 10 — the county could not wait any longer, according to the county’s bond attorney, Brad Love. April 1 is the deadline by which the county must close on the $33 million purchase of property on Halton Road near Haywood Mall, the site of the proposed new county buildings. If the county misses that deadline, it would lose the $3.5 million down payment it made on the property and would be forced to enter a long-term lease agreement with the property owners. Given that it takes about 60 days to get bonds rated and sold, the county had to vote now and could not wait until its next council meeting.

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and

HOME REAL ESTATE Discover a hidden oasis Transform your master bedroom and bathroom into a spa-like setting n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM

Having a spa-like master bedroom and bathroom can turn the homeowner’s living quarters into a den of tranquility and can also serve as an asset when selling a house. When making a spa-like master bedroom, follow the rule “less is more.” To begin with, remove the clutter by cleaning out closets and drawers and taking extra objects out of the room. If a television in the master bedroom is a must-have, explore furniture options such as an armoire, where it can be hidden when not in use. In addition to decluttering the room, use simple furniture and decorations without hard lines, intricate carvings or curves. If the homeowner already has ornate furnishings, use throw pillows and décor to balance out the busyness in furnishings. To help create a calming environment, consider utilizing soothing colors such as white, beige, pale sage or blues for walls and décor. Also, avoid allowing harsh sunlight into the room or bright overhead lighting by upgrading lighting fixtures. After decluttering and choosing soothing colors and lighting, add Egyptian cotton or bamboo linens to the bed and spa-like accents such as light-colored and scented candles to a nightstand or bookshelf or a plant such as a vase full of bamboo. For additional comfort, place a bench at the foot of the bed and get a plush bedside rug. Lastly, invest in an air purifier for the master bedroom to remove the allergens, dust and other impurities from the air and reduce respiratory issues. As with the master bedroom, one of the first steps to creating a spa-like master bathroom is a calming color palette with whites, beiges and muted colors. In addition to the calming colors, choose tile made of glass or rustic stone to help reduce humidity. In the shower, instead of using a standard shower head, install a rain shower head for wider waterflow and choices in water pressure or use multiple shower heads. Homeowners may want to create a spacious feeling in the shower by utilizing glass panels and doors rather than having a standard shower with a shower curtain. To add contrast to the calming colors around the bathroom, use darker colors on an accent wall in the shower. While having a spacious shower can add a spa-like feel, upgrading to an extra-large bathtub can add an extra level of relaxation to the master bath. Whether the homeowner chooses a jacuzzi, soaking or clawed bathtub, he or she will find comfort in one of these larger tubs at the end of a busy day. For increased comfort, the homeowner may want to install heated floors. By adding this feature, cold bathroom tile and the need for bathmats are gone. If space allows, try adding a stereo or flat-screen television to bring relaxing music to the master bathroom.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

Quick and easy tips for a spalike feel: • Less is more • Calming colors • Avoid harsh lights • Egyptian cotton or Bamboo linens • Natural elements • Plush fabrics • Scented candles • Air purifier


Featured Home

PARKINS MILL AREA 6 Quail Hill Court, Greenville, SC, 29607 PARKINS MILL AREA 6 Quail Hill Court, Greenville, SC, 29607 Featured Home

HOME INFO PRICE: $1,500,000 MLS #: 1410892 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHS: 6/2 SQ. FT: 6200-63999 HOME INFO YEAR BUILT: 1980 LOT SIZE: 1 Acre PRICE: $1,500,000 MLS #: 1410892 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHS: SQ. FT: 6200-63999 SCHOOLS: Sara Collins 6/2 Elementary, Beck Middle, YEAR BUILT: 1980 LOT SIZE: 1 Acre and J.L. Mann High SCHOOLS: Sara Wilson Collins |Elementary, Beck Middle, AGENT: Sharon 864-918-1140 and J.L. Mann High sharon@wilsonassociates.net

AGENT:

Sharon Wilson | 864-918-1140 sharon@wilsonassociates.net

Custom built home with updated designs throughout. Located on 1 acre in the desirable Parkin’s Mill Area on a quiet cul-de-sac street. This home has 5 spacious Custom built home with designs throughout. sized bedrooms, 6 full andupdated 2 half baths. Separate formal Located on 1 acre in the desirable Parkin’s Mill Area dining room and living room with fireplace. Two story on a quiet cul-de-sac street. This home has 5 spacious den with vaulted ceiling, gas fireplace and built-in wet sized bedrooms, full and halfher baths. Separate bar. Master suite6 with his 2and baths, homeformal office dining room and living room with fireplace. and additional guest bedroom with full bathTwo on story main den with vaulted ceiling, gas fi replace and built-in wet level. Eat-in kitchen with granite counters and high-end bar. Master suite with his and her baths, home offi ce appliances. 3 additional bedrooms en suite, loft and and additional guest bedroom with full bath on main bonus room upstairs. Workshop attached to two-car level. Eat-in granite counters and high-end garage with kitchen epoxy flwith oor and custom cabinets for extra appliances. 3 additional bedrooms en suite, loft and storage. Large backyard with patio that is perfect for bonus room upstairs. Workshop attached to two-car outdoor entertaining. garage with epoxy floor and custom cabinets for extra storage. Large backyard with patio that is perfect for outdoor entertaining.

We're Everywhere. See all of our extraordinary properties on wilsonassociates.net We're Everywhere. 213 East Broad Street | Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.640.8700 | info@wilsonassociates.net See all of our extraordinary properties on wilsonassociates.net 213 East Broad Street | Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.640.8700 | info@wilsonassociates.net


HOME

and REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

The Cliffs announced $186 million in 2019 sales n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM

TOP PRODUCING

AGENT

2016 2017 2018 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS®

YEARS IN A ROW

Maggie Aiken Toler

The Cliffs announced a 9% increase in sales volume at the close of 2019 with $186 million in sales spread over a total of 283 closed transactions among its seven communities. The residential mountain and lake club communities saw $171 million with 271 closed transactions in 2018. In addition, there are 1,782 completed homes and 140 houses under construction across The Cliffs communities along with an additional 200 club memberships sold in 2019. With the new memberships sold, there are now more than 3,000 member families as part of The Cliffs club. “We were pleased to finish 2019 strong with continued sales growth across our seven communities,” said Rob Duckett, president of The Cliffs. “This momentum positions The Cliffs for an exciting year ahead as we continue to invest in our communities, members and internal team. We also congratulate our top producers as we look forward to another great year at The Cliffs.” The Cliffs was acquired by South Street

SALES UP

9%

Partners, one of the nation’s largest developers and operators of luxury residential private communities and master developer of Kiawah Island. Since the acquisition, The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards Lakehouse broke ground, releasing 26 lakefront homesites at The Landing at The Cliffs at Keowee Springs. Plans were also announced for the Keowee Springs clubhouse as well as new club amenities at The Landing. The Cliffs also announced the launch of Cliff Builders in October 2019 and broke ground on its first home in The Meadows neighborhood at The Cliffs at Walnut Cove.

REAL ESTATE

TWICE THE EXPERIENCE. TWICE THE SERVICE. TWICE THE SATISFACTION! LET US HELP YOU WITH ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS.

AREA OPEN HOUSES 225 KILGORE CIRCLE • $864,900

The Van Gieson Team

KILGORE PLANTATION: Gorgeous, stately home positioned on 1.09 acres of land. New Architectural Roof with stain and mildew resistance installed December 2019! SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 16

5|

4.5 | MLS 1402177

Linda O'Brien, Wilson Associates 864.325.0495 linda@wilsonassociates.net

204 GARDEN TRAIL • $860,000 CHANTICLEER: Amazing views, amazing location, amazing home! Opportunities like this do not come around very often. SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 16

Sam Van Gieson

Jennifer Van Gieson

svangieson@cdanjoyner.com

jvangieson@cdanjoyner.com

864.630.4708

22 PINCKNEY STREET • $950,000

864.590.4441

HAMPTON-PINCKNEY HISTORIC: Own a piece of Greenville's history! This Circa 1910 Gallivan - Fewell home has been restored to a beautiful showpiece.

2-4pm | Sunday, February 16

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

3.5 | MLS 1405135

Blair Miller, Wilson Associates 864.430.7708 blair@wilsonassociates.net

SPECS:

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3|

4|

4 | MLS 1403962

Blair Miller, Wilson Associates 864.430.7708 blair@wilsonassociates.net


HOME REAL ESTATE

and REAL ESTATE

The List: Spa-like master bedrooms and bathrooms 1 MCDANIEL GREENE • $1,950,681

5 CALAVERDI COURT • $1,750,000

KINGSBRIDGE: Spectacular. Completely updated, top to bottom, inside & out, incredible finishes such as imported Italian marble kitchen counters & heated master bath floor. New roof, updated HVAC, new designer lighting, new stainless appliances.

SOUTHAMPTON: In the coveted, gated community of Southampton. This custom estate has a fantastic floor plan for easy living with great indoor/outdoor space. Meticulously designed details and intricate moldings throughout. The 7000+ home offers 5 bedrooms and 6 full baths.

6| 5+3 | MLS 1409326 SPECS: Joan Herlong, Joan Herlong & Associates Sothebys International Realty 864.325.2112

5| 6 | MLS 1409920 SPECS: Sharon Wilson, Wilson Associates 864.918.1140

125 RHETT STREET, UNIT 300 • $1,490,000

570 LAWSON FORK RD • $1,295,000

DOWNTOWN: Spectacular penthouse condo steps from downtown Greenville’s main street. Absolutely no detail was spared in this custom 2 Bedroom, 2.5 bathroom home with office space off living room. Beautiful hardwood floors and 12' ceilings throughout.

INMAN: No need to leave home for a Spa Day! Come home to this European style 24 acres gated luxury estate designed to accommodate an entrepreneur's family. Fireplaces, water fountain, home theater, wine cellar, exposed beams and an owner's suite that will make you feel like you are at the spa...with a fireplace for elegance. SPECS: 4| 6.5 | MLS 1384746 John Clark Kent, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 864.784.9918

SPECS: 2| 2.5 | MLS 1405692 Sharon Wilson, Wilson Associates 864.918.1140

6 SUMMERHALL GLEN LANE • $949,900

223 E EARLE STREET• $698,000

KINGSBRIDGE: Builder’s personal residence. Oldworld inspired. New-world luxury. The 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath custom home boasts a master bathroom with a fully tiled steam shower, a corner jetted tub, a vanity with two glass vessel sinks and a water closet, all lending to a spa-like experience.

HISTORIC EARLE STREET: This home has a master bathroom perfect for a spa day at home. With a soaking tub, glass enclosed shower with dual shower heads, natural light and modern colors, this space is an oasis waiting to be used. SPECS: 5| 3.5 | MLS 1403740 Whitney Poitevint, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 757.620.7105

SPECS: 5| 4.5 | MLS 1410177 Melissa Morrell, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C Dan Joyner, Realtors® 864.918.1734

217 CAMMER AVENUE • $774,605

155 RIVERPLACE, UNIT 103 • $299,900

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA: Get the low-maintenance of new construction without the wait!! This fabulous home was custom-built in 2015 by the renowned AJH Custom Builders. Offering the best value in price per square foot throughout the Augusta Road Area - No detail has been left undone!

DOWNTOWN: Check out Greenville’s ultimate downtown living in this first floor condo on the interior courtyard. Spacious interior with an open floor plan. The HOA includes one parking spot in the parking Garage. There is a secure keypad/code for the entrance of the building with a security camera.

SPECS: 4| 3.5 | MLS 1409326 Grace Herlong Loveless, Joan Herlong & Assoc. Sothebys International Realty 864.238.5114

SPECS: 1| 1 | MLS 1407000 Chet Smith, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C Dan Joyner, Realtors® 864.918.1734

Treat Your Sweetheart To A Sweet Deal! LY W NE STED LI

SIMPSONVILLE - GREYTHORNE

SIMPSONVILLE - ADAMS CREEK

SIMPSONVILLE - SUMMERWALK

IMMACULATE 5BR/3BA W/GUEST SUITE ON MAIN! MOVE-IN READY! COVERED PATIO & MANY EXTRAS! #141298 • $329,900

AWESOME 4BR/3.5BA W/MASTER ON MAIN! LARGE 0.40 ACRE LOT! UPGRADES! #1408922 • $324,900

NICELY UPDATED! 4BR/2.5BA! 2800 SQ. FT. RENOVATED KITCHEN. SCRN PORCH, LEVEL LOT! #1409593 • $289,900

Susan McMillen, REALTOR® | 864-238-5498 | Susan.McMillen@allentate.com FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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HOME

and REAL ESTATE

SOLD

SUBDIVISION

PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR JANUARY 13-17

PRICE SELLER

$5,823,000 $3,650,000 HOLLINGS VERDAE MANOR $2,475,000 COBBLESTONE $1,600,000 SOUTHAMPTON $1,580,000 $1,082,000 MARKLEY PLACE $899,900 COBBLESTONE $775,000 $750,000 SPAULDING FARMS $738,000 PARK HILL $712,000 BRUCE FARMS $660,000 CLIFFS VALLEY LAKE RIDGE $635,000 PALM GROVE $629,900 THE PRESERVE AT PARKINS MILL $622,000 TUXEDO PARK $620,000 $600,000 MILLS MILL RESERVE $570,000 COLUMNS @ ROPER MOUNTAIN $555,000 PARK HILL $471,250 $470,000 SUGAR CREEK $469,000 SILVER MEADOWS $460,908 STILLWATERS $455,000 THE COURTYARDS W. GEORGIA $450,000 RIVER WALK $450,000 WEATHERSTONE $443,500 FARRINGDON $435,000 MARKLEY PLACE $434,900 MARKLEY PLACE $434,900 SUGAR CREEK $430,000 CARILION $425,000 CHASTAIN GLEN $421,595 CARSON'S POND $420,000 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $415,000 NORTHWOOD HILLS $407,000 BROOKFIELD WEST $400,000 EASTON RIDGE $387,693 KELLEY FARMS $385,000 STONEHAVEN $380,000

NHPMS LLC AEI ACCREDITED INVESTOR FOSTER PAUL W REVOCABLE YOPP JAMES MICHAEL LIVIN WENDEROTH CHRISTOPHER J CLEVELAND BILLIE T REVOC MARKLEY PLACE LLC FICKLING CHRISTINA P PAULOS NICK P TR JONES DAVID A FREE BRITTANY (JTWROS) ROGERS JEFFERY JAY VANDER ZANDEN BARBARA A BLUE ATLAS BUILDERS LLC DONOVAN ROBERT M JR IZAGUIRRE SIMON A JR PASSCO NAVARRO GREENVILL MILLS MILL RESERVE LLC BELKNAP JACQUELYN N JONE BARNHILL BENJAMIN A HAMBY DONNA KAY DICKERT CARL RICHARD II COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC HATCH ELLEN M ANCHOR CUSTOM HOMES LLC WILLOUGHBY MICHELLE B (S LADD MARY T (JTWROS) LEWIS MARINA F MARKLEY PLACE LLC MARKLEY PLACE LLC SMITH DANIEL G CLARK THOMAS R III TOLL SOUTHEAST LP COMPAN HATHAWAY BENJAMIN (JTWRO PROPERTIES PLUS GROUP LL THRELFALL DANIEL J STEPHAN MARK J MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC BARKER DIANE M (JTWROS)

BUYER PARKER PROPCO LLC THE PEABODY LARRY & THERESA WHITE MACAULAY L (JTWROS CHURCH BRENDAN H (JTWROS ELLIOTT FORD SHIPLEY (JT CRAIN CLARISSA P (JTWROS STEPHENS ELAINE ANNETTE BURROUGHS PATRICIA HARAD GULDEN BRIAN (JTWROS) GU KUSNIERZ IIONA LUVINA (J MONTALVO ERIC BALDASSARRA GENINE (JTWR MYERS MICHELE P WOLK JOE LADD MARY THERESA VEGLIA MCHUGH ROBERT J (JTWROS) MCDUFFIE APRIL F (JTWROS AUGUSTA GROVE PASSCO II DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH VALENTA DONNA A (JTWROS) TUCCI ADAM MICHAEL (JTWR CLARK DOUGLAS F CLARK WA SMITH DANIEL G (JTWROS) KIM-RE KAREN A (JTWROS) KARNISKI LAWRENCE KARNIS HOLTON PATSY P (JTWROS) FICKLING CHRISTINA P (JT ACUNA JOSHUA (JTWROS) SA JONES ELIZABETH B S (JTW CLAYTON MAXWELL BUNCH JACOB LEE BARRETT JESSICA TROUTMAN HARRIS LAURA E SMITH PAU BELL LUKE A (JTWROS) BEL ULRICH LUKE E (JTWROS) U JACKSON DANIEL CARSON (J PEARCE BRANDON MARK (JTW ALI AHMAD (JTWROS) BYERS KENNEY ROBERT J (JTWROS) KANTZ MATTHEW A (JTWROS) DAMBMAN BRANT G (JTWROS)

e v o L I s t n e i l C y M ltor for een my rea Paige has b ade them m s w, and ha 4 closings no trusted less. She’s a all seem flaw ner a business p rt professional, . nd ie and close fr ll — J.J. Cantre

ADDRESS 8000 WESTPARK DR STE 495 13435 ESTELLE ST 18 WELLING CIR 18 FINSBURY LN 15 CALAVERDI CT 30 SOUTHLAND AVE 104 MARSH LAKE PL 309 CHANCERY LN 23 BARRETT ST 529 SPAULDING FARM RD 111 MELVILLE AVE 5 AVENS HILL DR 913 HIGH KNOLL WAY 50 PONDEROSA DR 2 SILVERY BLUE CT 230 TUXEDO LN 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 25 APPIAN CIR 301 ABERDEEN DR 881 KNOLLWOOD DR 211 SUN MEADOW RD 69 ENOREE FARM WAY 700 KINGS HILL ST 224 CORONADO CT 334 PARKSIDE DR 117 BENTWATER TRL 15 FARRINGDON DR 110 N MARKLEY ST UNIT 205 110 N MARKLEY ST APT 204 205 E SHALLOWSTONE RD 300 PALLADIO DR 703 SAINT LAURENT WAY 5 SPRING MOSS CT 6 WIUKA AVE 215 COVINGTON RD 4 HANSON CT 310 EASTON MEADOW WAY 535 SAINT MARK RD 202 MOSS WOOD CIR

SUBDIVISION

GA ! BEIN E E GEM NOWLEDG U R T Y IS A E LOCAL K GANIZED, E N A H U PAIGE HE HAS TR Y WELL OR SISTENTLY ON VER E, S NATIV E AREA, IS TLY, AND C ORMED. OF TH DS PROMP IENTS INF FOR A N D CL RESPO EEPS HER HAVE ASKE RING K D CA N’T N D A L U T I CO ER AGEN IN THE BETT SON TO AID OME. H R R E P OF OU SALE . HARRISON —S

Paige was absolutely wonderful to work with! She was always available, quick to respond, and offered a wealth of knowledge. I would definitely recommend Paige and will use here again in the future. — F. Moran

PRICE SELLER

LOST RIVER JONES MILL CROSSING WEST FARM VILLAGE GOWER ESTATES EASTON RIDGE BELSHIRE LOST RIVER RIDGEWAY COTTAGES LOST RIVER LINCOLN PARK MORNING MIST CHANTICLEER CHEVY CHASE AUTUMN RIDGE RIVERSTONE OAK POINTE ABBEYHILL PARK THE RESERVE AT RICHGLEN COVE SAVANNAH POINTE LAKE LANIER VERDMONT SUDDUTH FARMS TRIPLE CREEK TERRA PINES ESTATES COTTAGES AT NEELY TIMBER GLEN FOWLER FIELDS KINGSFIELD ANNANDALE ESTATES KATHERINES GARDEN SUNSET HEIGHTS CANEBRAKE MEADOWS GILDER CREEK FARM

$354,000 $351,928 $345,893 $345,000 $340,000 $330,000 $320,000 $314,150 $313,500 $313,065 $312,900 $310,503 $304,125 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000 $297,952 $293,325 $290,000 $290,000 $289,500 $285,000 $281,510 $280,000 $280,000 $275,000 $272,500 $269,990 $267,990 $265,000 $265,000 $263,406 $259,500 $250,000 $245,364 $245,000 $244,271 $242,000 $241,000 $241,000

FOWLER BARRY DWAINE JR ( JONES MILL PROPERTIES LL MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L COMING HOME DESIGN & REN POSTICH ROSE MARIE TRUST THOMPSON MARY D MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L COOK MATTHEW D SCHMITZ GERMAIN (JTWROS) MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SK BUILDERS INC JAMES JAMMIE R (JTWROS) MARTIN DON K M & J OF GREENVILLE INC SK BUILDERS INC NVR INC CUSTOM MACHINING & DEV I KNESEL JUDITH A (JTWROS) PETERS BETH A KLINGEL JAN-ARENDT DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH HUFFSTETLER ROGER II VERBONIC MICHAEL BRYANT THOMAS EARLE (JTW MASON CHRISTOPHER M D R HORTON INC D R HORTON INC KNIGHT JASON MICHAEL KATIC MICHAEL (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC SAUNDERS TAMARA R GARRISON CHERYL G SK BUILDERS INC BURKE JOANNE (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC COX ASHLEE P (JTWROS) ROBERTSON MADISON G (JTW AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR

Paige is the very definition of a true professional that is highly knowledgeable and has a unique ability to hone in on exactly what you are looking for. Stop searching for a realtor and call Paige Haney. She is simply THE BEST! — N. Dobmmeier

And the Feeling is Mutual!

BUYER KERLEY CHRISTOPHER L (JT TOLL SOUTHEAST LP COMPAN ODELL GINA (JTWROS) PAGE SARDINA SEPTIMIO C A CARROLL 844 S E MAIN L FOWLER KAITLYN DAUM (JTW GUZMAN LUIS G 208 W PARK LLC WEBB DONNA M (JTWROS) WE SMITH MORGAN D (JTWROS) CORTEZ JAIME E KIRKLAND JASON ALLEN (JT KELLEY HEIDI C AIKEN ANGELATHIA A FANNING MICHAEL (JTWROS) JAY AMBE 1 LLC REED JONATHAN GLENN (JTW RUDE JEFFREY SCOTT STEVENSON CUSTOM SOLUTIO RANDALL JESSICA (JTWROS) BRAZNELL ERIN (JTWROS) B VON ENGEL HEIKO (JTWROS) MCDANIEL AMY L KASPAR FRANK JUSTIN (JTW HOLLIFIELD JEANIE (JTWRO LEE CARRIE E (JTWROS) LE HALL-WALKER AMANDA JO (J AGYEMAN CHARLES ANTWI (J SONMEZ YUKSEL WOLFORD ANNA F (JTWROS) HUTCHISON SHARON S (JTWR NAZARUK DANIEL (JTWROS) DANELZ MANDY MICHELLE MCCARTER JACKSON H (JTWR STYER EMILY (JTWROS) STY SMITH LINDA S (JTWROS) S WALLACE MEGAN (JTWROS) W ALLEN DERRICK ZUMSTEIN MATTHEW C LOPEZ JENNIFER (JTWROS)

ADDRESS 19 WINGED BOURNE CT 250 GIBRALTAR RD 14 GUERNSEY WAY 40 SKYLAND DR 36 DOGWOOD LN 120 DUPONT DR 213 EASTON MEADOW WAY 208 W PARK AVE 40 LOVVORN CT 8800 E RAINTREE DR STE 300 26 RIDGEWAY AVE 323 BRISTLE FERN TRL 211 BUCHANAN RIDGE RD 102 ONSLOW CT 202 CHAMBERLAIN CT 8811 AUGUSTA RD 104 RIDGEFIELD LN 213 WALLA WALLA CT 560 SHACKELFORD RD 10 PILOT RD 413 FIELDING WAY 412 HEATHER FALLS LN 303 BEVY CT 204 TICKFAW CT 14 GLENOLDEN DR 11 CRESTLINE RD 6 MARQUETTE RD 108 PRESERVATION DR 801 LONGHORN DR 119 TERRAMONT DR 18 GLADES END LN 200 SPRUCE CREEK CT 8 LARK LN 280 TRAMMELL RD 104 KINGSFIELD PL 103 FAIRMEADOW WAY 406 ANSEL WOODS LN 216 VESPER CIR 208 SARATOGA DR 32 GINGER GOLD DR

Paig e Ha ney I hav is by e ev fa er w know orke r the bes ledg d wi eabl th! S t realtor the l e ab ocal he out t a rea. he m is very with I wa a her t rke s so h impr t and hom rough th e ssed e sa e th buyi at I used le of my ng m y ne her in xt —L . Sto one. ne

Paige not on ly also g ot us in sold our ho me for to our She w us, sh perfec as ver e t forev y h er hom elpful possib e. in eve le. I w r y way ould re her to comm anyon end e wan ting to buy or — A. B sell. ridges

PAIGE HANEY | 864.414.9937 | phaney@cdanjoyner.com | www.GreenvilleLifeSC.com 20

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14


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PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR JANUARY 13-17 SUBDIVISION ADAMS RUN HEARTHSTONE RIVER SHOALS CREEKLAND CARRINGTON GREEN WATERMILL LINCOLN PARK TRAILSIDE AT GARRETT ST JAMES PLACE AUTUMN WOODS HERITAGE LAKES HIDDEN SPRINGS @ B RIDGE ROLAND HEIGHTS HEARTHSTONE RIVER SHOALS THE GROVE CROSSWINDS HOWARDS PARK HOLTZCLAW ESTATES STATE PARK COMMONS CYPRESS LANDING POINSETTIA OAKWOOD PLACE HEATHER HILLS JUSTICE ESTATES SOUTH MAIN TOWNES OAK POINTE GLEN GARRY RIVERSIDE GLEN PEPPERTREE WALDEN POND SUNNY ACRES PINEHURST MAPLE CREEK BROOKWOOD COMMONS BROOK GLENN GARDENS BROOKWOOD COMMONS GRAND VIEW HILLS CARRINGTON MAYFAIR STATION MORNINGSIDE CAMBRIDGE PARK SHELBURNE FARMS STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES BRUSHY CREEK TOWNHOMES CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE WESTWOOD ORCHARD CREST EASTRIDGE PARKSTONE HOLLY SPRINGS HARTNESS FOUNTAIN INN TOWNES FARMINGTON ACRES BRIARCREEK HOWARDS PARK HARTNESS CHESTERFIELD ESTATES PARKWOOD

PRICE SELLER $239,000 $238,800 $238,000 $238,000 $237,500 $234,900 $234,101 $229,850 $226,000 $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 $224,000 $222,000 $220,272 $215,000 $214,724 $211,000 $210,000 $210,000 $206,000 $204,900 $202,500 $201,721 $200,000 $200,000 $199,900 $199,190 $199,000 $197,000 $195,000 $195,000 $195,000 $194,000 $192,500 $190,000 $188,085 $188,000 $186,430 $185,000 $183,200 $181,000 $180,890 $180,500 $180,000 $179,000 $178,500 $177,500 $176,000 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $174,836 $170,000 $167,000 $166,822 $165,000 $164,000 $163,000 $162,000 $161,100 $160,000 $155,000 $155,000 $155,000

GRAY STEVEN B LEEMAN FRANCES L WILSON TYLER S (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC PLAIN SAILING INC VENDRAMINI ANA PAULA (JT SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC HYMAN SALLY A HAWK HOMES LLC PARTON JAMIE STEVEN SCHUTH VOLKER BONILLA-CASSEL GILBERT A LANIER MICHELLE (JTWROS) LAZY OAK ACRES LLC VELASQUEZ MIGUEL SK BUILDERS INC STEVENS DEBBIE L ROGERS LOUISE SULLIVAN BORKLUND STEVE REDMOND CHRISTINA H (LIF BROWN KENNETH J JR (JTWR ARBITRARY LLC CAYLOR ROBERT E HANCOCK WALTER A JR CLARK DENNIS W (SURV) ANDERSON DANA ESTEE LIVI NVR INC TYLER CHARMAIN C A-1 PROPERTIES LLC KARBASSIAN MOHAMMAD A&E HOME BUILDERS LLC ELLIOTT WINNIE SUE QUIGLEY ELAINE MARIE COATES KELI R RIVERA ADRIANA M (JTWROS NVR INC CHUDOBA JOHN DAVID NVR INC HERCULEAN PROPERTY LLC MARKO DALE F GEDIKOGLU YAMAN DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH MCKINNEY JAMES COPONEN ANDREW WINSTON MARKI WILLIAMS RUTH MICKLER TURNER ANGELA LEE D R HORTON INC HAYDEN GREGORY G (SURV) HAWTHORNE CLARA YVONNE RUNWAY PROPERTIES GA LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC KIRALY DAVID JOHN (EST) ROACH KATHRYN ELIZABETH KRAUSE PETER (SURV) HARTNESS DEVELOPMENT INC FOUNTAIN INN PARTNERS LL HOOPER ANDREW W MOORE KEVIN D MARK III PROPERTIES INC HARTNESS DEVELOPMENT INC HOUSE PAUL D ESPINAL ASHLEY WALLACE MEGAN C

BUYER MCNALLY SHANNON D (JTWRO JONES DELROY (JTWROS) JO SUN JIANGSHAN (JTWROS) Y MOORE KEVIN D PARTON JAMIE STEVEN MANTEGHI IRIS L PALMER PHILLIP B (JTWROS GALLOWAY DANENON L MOORE BARTON PROPERTIES LTD 313 OAKBORO LANE LAND TR THEODORE SAMUEL CHASE HALL ROBERT J FILLNER COURTNEY ERIN FI BARTON PROPERTIES LTD OAK HILL RANCH LLC PARKS KAREN M (JTWROS) P DEVON BANK KNIGHT RACHELLE A FORRESTER JAMES DYLAN FO COMPU-COUNTING INC MMF-V LLC CULBERSON MICHAEL REECE BRANDY S ELECTUS DEVELOPMENT GROU UPSTATE DRIVE LLP TAYLOR CRAIG EUGENE (JTW LANIER DAVID A FISCHER JACQUELINE MACKE COWNIE DAVID (JTWROS) CO WEATHERLY LINDA L (JTWRO HUNTER TRASHON SAMUEL GAIL A SAMUEL RIC D HOLDINGS LLC LEWIN ANNA HAMILTON (JTW TOUMA ADAM GABRIEL NABERGOY GABRIELA CARLA GOTTIPATI RAMPRASAD DOWNIE FREDERICK COLLURA JAMES MICHAEL (J ZYLSTRA ALEX J (JTWROS) LITTLETON OLIN B SWINGER KENYA FORD JASMINE L BUCKEY DANIEL (JTWROS) B IANNI EMILY BARTON PROPERTIES LTD WHITESIDE SHAKIRIA SHANI CROWSON JOSHUA MARK (JTW JOHNSON PAMELA D HUGGINS MATTHEW R (JTWRO RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES RASCH SAMANTHA J ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L DEL VALLE FIGUEROA MELVI LONG CHARLOTTE (JTWROS) HALL MICHAEL MOSER MADEL HARTNESS CONSTRUCTION LL NVR INC BLACK CAROLYN K BELT ALLISON (JTWROS) D R HORTON-CROWN LLC HARTNESS CONSTRUCTION LL SMITH REGINA (JTWROS) SM BEAUDET KATIE CORBIN ALEXA M

ADDRESS 5 KINGLET CT 203 VERLIN DR 429 RIO GRANDE PL 3 CREEKLAND WAY 2 CLEVINGTON CT 427 RIVERDALE RD 105 BUCHANAN RIDGE RD 31 KENDALS LN 108 GAVINS POINT RD 2091 OAK GROVE RD 115 HARLEQUIN CT 102 HIDDEN SPRINGS LN 117 SUNRISE AVE 108 GAVINS POINT RD 114 OAK CREEK LN 120 APPLETON LN 113 RAMSHACKLE WAY 225 ELMHAVEN DR 110 WATKINS CIR 6717A STATE PARK RD 1112 EDWARDS RD 317 CABOT HILL LN 115 HILLPINE DR 16 BUIST AVE 26 BOXELDER LN 110 ASHBY CROSS CT 337 MOUNT LEBANON CHURCH RD 27 COUNTRY DALE DR 36 OAK GROVE LAKE RD 100 GLASGOW CT 21 GLEN WILLOW CT 600 REID SCHOOL RD PO BOX 24230 762 WOODWARD RD 100 VISTA DR 204 GOLDEN LEAF LN 405 PLACID FOREST CT 20 RAVENSWORTH RD 403 HUNTINGDALE PL 234 KONDROS CIR 8 KNOLL CIR 300 RIVEREEN WAY 112 MAYFAIR STATION WAY 109 SPRING VALLEY RD PO BOX 1434 108 GAVINS POINT RD 107 OLD FIELD DR 301 DUNCAN RD 111 MOORLYN LN 303 PAMPAS CT 47 PRIMROSE LN 20 CHATWOOD CT 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 10 GLENCOVE CT 18050 S TAMIAMI TRL LOT 86 405 HOLLY LN 3500 S HIGHWAY 14 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 305 MARSH CREEK DR 501 ROLLINGREEN RD 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 3500 S HIGHWAY 14 4 CARVERSHAM ROW 109 OAK PARK DR 820 ANSEL SCHOOL RD

and REAL ESTATE

SOLD

SUBDIVISION

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

HARTNESS HARTNESS LAKE LANIER FAIR HEIGHTS PLANTATION ESTATES FRANKLIN HEIGHTS ANNISTON RIDGE MILLS MILL HAMMETT FARMS ABNEY MILLS W T PATRICK TOPVIEW ACRES KIMBERLY HILLS GRAYSON POINTE ANDERSON ST HIGHLANDS CREEK VILLAS LEWIS VILLAGE LAKE LANIER DARLINGTON PLACE WHITE HORSE HEIGHTS LONGLEAF SUMMER WOODS COLE ACRES WOODSIDE MILLS BROOKHAVEN LAKEVIEW CHASE TOWNES PLEASANT VALLEY OGDEN ACRES CREEKSIDE VILLAS THE PINELANDS WALDEN POND MONAGHAN HARBOR TOWN RANDALL COURT CHESTERFIELD ESTATES CLEARVIEW ACRES LEGACY PARK OAKVIEW ORDEREST PARK TOWN PARK FURMAN TERRACE BEREA HEIGHTS CHARLESTON WALK GLENN FARMS JAMESTOWNE ESTATES KATHERINES GARDEN POE MILL JUG FACTORY ESTATES RIVERSIDE

$155,000 $155,000 $151,320 $150,000 $149,400 $145,600 $145,000 $143,000 $142,500 $141,350 $140,000 $139,900 $139,500 $137,000 $135,350 $134,871 $133,900 $130,000 $130,000 $124,000 $124,000 $121,400 $120,000 $120,000 $118,000 $118,000 $115,000 $114,778 $110,000 $109,395 $109,000 $108,900 $106,000 $105,000 $103,900 $102,045 $100,587 $100,000 $100,000 $98,500 $92,000 $91,665 $89,000 $85,000 $85,000 $84,800 $83,000 $82,650 $81,601 $80,000 $79,800 $79,500 $75,000 $75,000 $69,000 $65,000 $60,000 $60,000 $60,000 $59,000 $57,297 $57,000 $49,000 $48,000 $47,000

HARTNESS CONSTRUCTION LL HARTNESS CONSTRUCTION LL WILLIAMS LAURA Q (JTWROS GARCIA PEDRO M WOOD ELIZABETH A PARENT CATHERINE ANNETTE DAGHER LUKE (JTWROS) WEH ADAMS TANYA COUSAR REIGELMAN PETER C EDMONDS CASEY ARTISAN CUSTOM WOODWORKI HERNANDEZ KRISTINA (JTWR CAMPBELL JACOB N (JTWROS GORDON SCOTT ODELL GUTHRIE WILLIAM ALEX FREUDENTHAL DANIELLE SCH GAULT CALEB MICHAEL PEDEN JAMES DOUGLAS BONNING CHASE BRIAN (JTW SK BUILDERS INC SC HOME OFFER LLC FIELD LAUREN EMMA FIELD MORRIS MELVIN GREGORY (J PELLETT JOHN D III BRYSON JOANN L BRYSON JO SEPPALA COREY A (JTWROS) JENKINS DAVID P FEIZ HOMAYOON TURNKEY FINANCIAL LLC D R HORTON INC FAUST WILLIAM ANDREW WIMPY CAMERON MICHAEL M633 INVESTMENTS LLC ERVIN JOSEPH D D R HORTON INC THOMAS AND SON PROPERTIE DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH CALLAHAM MICHELLE 24 GATLING AVE LAND TRUS LUNGUY ALEXANDER (IRA) L VELAZQUEZ EUTILIO HERNAN EAGLES NEST MANAGEMENT L DERSCH COURTNEY (JTWROS) ROSS GLEN GREENVILLE REVITALIZATIO U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI BLAKE COMPANY LLC THE SC HOME OFFER LLC ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC ANSELMO HECTOR HUGO CONT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL RAVE RENOVATION LLC PALMETTO RENTALS LLC JDC LLC DAVIS WYATT AIKEN JR CABRERA LAURA APARICIO HICKS JAMES F JR ASHLEY AMY ELLIOTT (JTWR CRAFT JASON B CHM GROUP INC SK BUILDERS INC LEDFORD FRED CODY CJ CREATIVE LLC V HOLDINGS LLC PATEL ASHOKKUMAR B

3500 S HIGHWAY 14 500 HARTNESS DR 600 OLD IRON WORKS RD 1300 DEVENGER RD 321 EDWARDS RD 202 W MOUNTAINVIEW AVE 112 CALDWELL ST 107 PANORAMA CT 419 WESTCLIFFE WAY 7 ANNISTON WAY 225 PINEY MOUNTAIN RD 332 CRESTHAVEN PL 12 HATCH ST 108 MOUNT PLEASANT AVE 10 LAWNVIEW CT 7311 BARRINGTON RIDGE DR 230 WOODVILLE RD 16 SARAH CT 305 LEXINGTON PLACE WAY 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 31 BOLAND CT 805 STALLINGS RD PO BOX 364 100 LEWIS DR APT 2B 155 GLENDLYON CIR PO BOX 2357 00 MORROW DR 100 TURBEN CT 302 TRADE ST STE A-3 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 304 NEW DUNHAM BRIDGE RD 606 SUMMER WOODS DR 100 RIDGECREST DR 103 5TH ST 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 343 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 27 GUESS ST 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 15 BLAIR ST 6 HWY 418 W 5 CREEKSIDE WAY 7113 HAMPDEN DR 104-B HARBOR DR 301 UNIVERSITY RDG STE 2500 4801 FREDERICA ST 324 S SANDY BROOK WAY 31 BOLAND CT PO BOX 4068 2 EASTVIEW DR 2857 WESTPORT RD 209 PINE KNOLL DR 9105 WARREN H ABERNATHY HWY 50 GRAND AVE STE D PO BOX 566 1170 BATSON RD 12 WARDVIEW AVE 20 KNOB CREEK CT 113 BROOK DR 471 TRAMROD TRL 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 PO BOX 382 1209 S CHURCH ST APT 1209 715 PENDLETON ST 105 ABBY CIR

HARTNESS DEVELOPMENT INC HARTNESS DEVELOPMENT INC PAYNE MARTHA MCPHERSON STYLES LORENE P HALL DANA K PARENT COMPANY LLC THE VAN PATTON MILDRED H JONES DOLLIE MICHELLE CONSTANTINO ANTHONY JOSE HOLMES SHERRY T MOORE JAMES WILLIAM SR SONMEZ ELIF (SURV) SNOSRAP LLC 2015 FUND LLC GUTHRIE BARBARA (JTWROS) BUNCH STEVE D SMITH MORGAN NORTHSTAR HOLDINGS LLC COGGINS CYNTHIA ANNE PALMETTO TRUST OF SC LLC WU HAO ALL UPSTATE INVESTMENT L SPENCER CLAYTON R CRICK ALAN LANCE (JTWROS BRANDON KNOLLS LLC ALS ENTERPRISES LLC GORDON RUTH H CYROX BA LLC REECECO PROPERTIES LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC CARTER JESSE A BROWN KAREN L EATON SUSAN D BAUR APRIL GRAHAM MARK III PROPERTIES INC JARAMILLO MAIDE LAKEVIEW CHASE LLC DAWKINS KENDALYN GILSTRAP LEVIS LEON JR WELLS FARGO BANK N A CLARK JAMES R HAMBRICK PAUL A ELECTUS DEVELOPMENT GROU PHILLIPS GARY C TWO SCORES PROPERTIES LL KEITH ARTHUR SHAUN (JTWR MELEHES JAMES M (JTWROS) WU HAO MCNEELY WALTER A (JTWROS SIMPSON EDWIN S LEGACY PARK OF MAULDIN L EYE JACOB L FRANCO FERNANDO ADDYMAN MELISSA SUTTON MARK CLEVELAND BRENDA M FURR SHEILA H HEARTHSTONE DEVELOPMENT HUTSON WALLINDA JONES RENEW PROPERTIES LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC RAINES FAMILY TRUST MANN GENEZ STEPHENS KATHERINE M MCCALL DONALD VANCE

THORNBLADE

Tim & Della Toates

1313 A. MILLER RD. • GREENVILLE, SC 29607 864-360-6600 • THETOATESTEAM.COM

8 Rubaiyat Ct., Greer 4 BR/3.5 BA • $779,000 Come home to Southern Charm & Elegance in this gorgeous all brick home located in the fabulous Eastside Country Club Community of Thornblade. This pristine home offers spaciousness & ease of flow for those who love to entertain and is situated on a cul-de-sac lot that affords a large, private sanctuary backyard. Great Room addition added by the Architect homeowner showcases a two story arch between the Living and Great Room. This home will check all of your boxes with master on the main level, bonus/craft room, loft and a 3 car garage.

FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

21


ARTS & CULTURE

|

THINGS TO SEE & DO

ARTS & CULTURE

Artist: Douglas Piper

ART CROSSING

Artist: Larry Seymour

The best money-losing investment Phil Hughes ever made n story by EVAN PETER SMITH | photos PROVIDED

From a purely financial standpoint, Art Crossing was a bad investment. But Phil Hughes doesn’t mind at all. When Hughes came up with the idea for the row of art studios along the Reedy River across from the Wyche Pavilion, there wasn’t much reason for people to walk along that thin stretch of real estate. Hughes, who runs the development company Hughes Investments, wanted to create something that would draw foot traffic to that space. But nothing was there other than a parking garage. “Sure, we knew how to make the side of a parking garage pretty: plant ivy, design some nice lattices,” Hughes said. “But then we thought: Wouldn’t it be nice to take some of these parking spaces underneath this garage and just

22

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

have places for starving artists to work from?” Hughes envisioned it in his head. There’d be some roll-up doors, and the artists would work with their canvases, clay and other

then we had a bit of a challenge, I guess you could say.” The challenge was: Hughes had already set his mind on the project. And he knew, practically speaking, that if he wanted to still charge the artists for the cost of a parking space, he probably wouldn’t be able to turn those spots into profesLook how beautiful sional storefronts and still if turned out, how lasting make his money back. “It became a loss leader,” that is. And we certainly Hughes said, “but we still hope that adds to the wanted it so bad.” Years later, Hughes still culture here.” hasn’t made his money -Phil Hughes, Hughes Development back — not even close. By his estimate, it might take anywhere from 100 to 200 years for that to happen. materials in the minimalist space, But he looks at Art Crossing as one paying only for what it would cost of the projects of which he’s especially proud. to rent a parking space. “Look how beautiful if turned “But then we realized, nobody wants just some cheap roll-up out, how lasting that is,” Hughes door,” Hughes said. “They want said, “and we certainly hope that lights, heat, a sink, a storefront. So adds to the culture here.”

Artist: Meredith Piper

Artist: Shannon Dudar


LOVE LETTERS “What a wonderful experience we had!”

Knoxville, TN

“Open, airy and with a sound sense of the relationship between how art is hung and viewer appreciation. A worthy stop for any art lover.”

Charleston, SC

“A jewel of a museum.”

Boston, MA

“An unexpected gem.”

Los Angeles, CA

“World-class art.” Charlotte, NC “An art museum you won’t want to miss!” Birmingham, AL “Wonderful place to visit.” Chicago, IL “Addresses thematic issues of race, urbanization, nature, and humanity in a subtle, yet powerful manner.” Houston, TX “Should be on anyone visiting Greenville’s “to do” list.” Wakefield, UK

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570

gcma.org

Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

GCMA Journal Love Letters 2020.indd 1

Free Admission

2/10/20 10:25 AM


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

SHANNON HOOVER’S LOW-END THEORY n story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo by DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising that, along with being a first-rate composer, instructor and bandleader, Shannon Hoover is a brilliant bass player. He’s been a fan of low-end sounds since he was a child. “I really took to music early,” Hoover says. “and the two instruments that I really got attached to were tuba and upright bass. So from then on, I was really into low brass and I definitely wanted to play bass. By middle school, when I was able to start in band, I played trombone and bass guitar at the same time.”

I love playing different kinds of music with different people. I love seeing what’s out there. -Shannon Hoovere, musician

Bass eventually won out over brass, though, because of the instrument’s elemental role in a band’s sound, whether that band played jazz or classical or rock music. “I just caught on to the bass and how powerful the bass is in an ensemble,” Hoover says. “You need the bass to outline the rest of the story. I still realize today how much learning how to play bass has influenced my compositions, my sense of harmony and time. It’s something that always stuck out. Even now when I hear music, the bass line stands out.” Hoover’s earliest musical exposure was to gospel music, and there are numerous bass players from that genre whom he cites as influences. As time went on, other players from the jazz world began to shape his style. “Some of the main players that showed me what you could do on the bass were Victor Wooten, Jaco Pastorius, John Patitucci,” he says. “Those were the main people, and of course the Motown guys like James Jamerson, who was from South Carolina.”

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

Hoover also mentions a teacher, Ray McGee, who was with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra for years, as one of his most important mentors, which might be why Hoover teaches almost as much as he plays. As part of Upstate nonprofit the Greenville Jazz Collective, he works to create appreciation and awareness of jazz in the Upstate through performance and education, but that’s merely the most recent of Hoover’s many educational efforts. “The Jazz Collective is the newest educational thing I’ve been part of, but I’ve been teaching music for a lot of years,” he says. “I actually started teaching lessons in high school, when I was about 17, and I taught at USC Upstate for 10 years. I like giving back; I like to see other players come up, and music teaches you so much about yourself, and life. It’s healing.” Hoover says that his teaching philosophy is simple: Enjoy playing your instrument. “I like to make sure my students have fun with it,” he says, “even if they’re really serious about it. Because it’s not just a job to me. I still love to play. I still make time where I can play music and have fun. Much like the man we spoke with last week, drummer Tez Sherard, Hoover has a busy schedule. His most visible role is with the Greenville Jazz Collective, but he also plays his own shows, and he’s served as a sideman with a long list of local and national names, including Jeff Sipe, Branford Marsalis, Clarence Clemons, Col. Bruce Hampton, Derek Trucks and many more. “People joke that I play with everybody,” he says, “but I love playing different kinds of music with different people. I love seeing what’s out there. I’ve learned a lot doing things with other bands just by being out there, like how to channel your energy or get your practice routine together. And all of these things that I learn help me to focus on my own projects.”

presented by


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

PAUL'S PICK

Herring Chamber Ensemble lends different flavor to Handel's 'Messiah' PAUL HYDE Contributor

A SWEET NOTE

FOR YOUR VALENTINE

n photo by DEEN VAN MEER

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE OUTSIDE OF SAN FRANCISCO! MARCH 9

“MUSIC OF THEN AND NOW” The Herring Chamber Ensemble circles back to one of the most popular works in the choral repertoire for its winter concert: “Messiah” by George Frideric Handel. The ensemble will spotlight the 35-minute Part III of “Messiah” at its 3 p.m. performance on Sunday, Feb. 23 in Daniel Chapel at Furman University. The 24-voice group is part of the larger Greenville Chorale, which featured Parts I and II of Handel’s choral masterwork in December 2018. “This seemed a fine opportunity to present the rest of this work and also give it a different flavor with the smaller ensemble,” said Bing Vick, artistic director and conductor of the ensemble.

I thought it would make an interesting program to combine an old baroque work by Handel with contemporary music.” -Bing Vick, artistic director and conductor, Herring Chamber Ensemble The Herring Chamber Ensemble is celebrated for its warm, beautiful sound and polished musicality. A 12-member chamber orchestra will accompany the vocal ensemble, providing a glimpse of the way the work might have been performed in Handel’s time. Nancy Smith, the ensemble’s piano accompanist, will be featured on organ.

» SUNDAY, FEB. 23 | 3PM » DANIEL CHAPEL » FURMAN UNIVERSITY » $35 PEACECENTER.ORG The first half of the ensemble’s program, meanwhile, will offer shorter contemporary works, including pieces by two Greenville-based composers: Dan Forrest and Mark Kilstofte. “I thought it would make an interesting program to combine an old baroque work by Handel with contemporary music,” Vick said. Also on the program is John Tavener’s “Song for Athene,” which gained notice after it was performed at the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, in September 1997. Tavener’s haunting “Svyati” (“O Holy One”) will spotlight guest cellist Yuri Leonovich. Two pieces by Eric Whitaker, one of the most popular of contemporary choral composers, will also be featured. “I think we’ll leave everyone with a smile on their face,” Vick said. “The ensemble sounds terrific. The singers are all excellent musicians and they really rise to any challenge. It should be a great concert.” The Herring Chamber Ensemble, sponsored by Sarah and Gordon Herring, was founded by Vick in 1997. Now in his 39th season as conductor of the ensemble and the Greenville Chorale, Vick retired from Furman University in 2010 after a 40-year career as director of the Furman Singers.

Itzh ak Per lm a n v iolin Roh a n De Silva, pi a no

M arch 12

ON SALE NOW!

ALICE (in wonderland)

APRIL 21

TICKETS MAKE A GREAT GIFT! IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO PLAN A DATE! BEST PRICING ONLY AT

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FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

DATE NIGHT

artscalendar February 14 - 20

FURMAN UNIVERSITY Jazz Ensemble & Combos Feb. 14 ~ 294-2086 WOODBINE STUDIO & GALLERY Works by Dwain & Meredith Skinner Feb. 14 ~ 421-5730 GREENVILLE THEATRE A Tribute to John Denver Feb. 14-16 ~ 232-6238 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM Tuba Gin, New Orleans Jazz Feb. 15 ~ 520-8807 YOUNTS CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS Rick Alviti: An Elvis Tribute Feb. 15 ~ 409-1050 COFFEE UNDERGROUND Say What! Poetry Feb. 16 ~ 298-0494 MUSIC ON SUNDAY  TEMPLE OF ISRAEL Bandana Klezmer Concert Feb. 16 ~ 292-1782 CENTRE STAGE I Feel Good: A Trip to Motown Through Feb. 16 ~ 233-6733 GREENVILLE CHAUTAUQUA SOCIETY Hedy Lamarr Discussion Feb. 18 ~ 244-1499 PEACE CENTER Che Malambo Feb. 18 ~ 467-3000 FINE ARTS CENTER Jazz Concert Feb. 19 ~ 355-2550 METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL Zodiac: Works by Garland Mattox Through Feb. 21 ~ 467-3132 PEACE CENTER Disney’s Aladdin Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3000 GREER CENTER FOR THE ARTS Works by Jose Romero Through Feb. 29 ~ 848-5383 METRO. ARTS COUNCIL @ CENTRE STAGE Works by David Armstrong Through Mar. 6 ~ 233-6733 FURMAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Art by Matthew Baumgardner Through Mar. 31 ~ 294-2191 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM Trumpets, Weird & Wonderful Through Apr. 12 ~ 520-8807 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM 7 Centuries of Keyboard Instruments Through Apr. 24 ~ 520-8807

www.GREENVILLEARTS.com 16 Augusta St. | 864.467.3132

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

Dinner&a Show n DINNER story by ARIEL TURNER | photo FIREFORGE

n A SHOW story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo PROVIDED

where we're EATING

It's an 8-minute walk from Fireforge to Bon Secours Arena

FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER 311 E WASHINGTON ST., GREENVILLE These homegrown beer stars at 311 East Washington St. have quietly rolled out more food options for a full-on dinner experience within walking distance of Bon Secours. Additionally, because Taco Tuesday is an event around here, mobile food operator Comal 864 will be serving up tacos, quesadillas and nachos at the brewery. Everyone wins. And considering alcoholic beverage prices are typically more expensive at arenas, drinking before the show at dinner is a cheaper alternative. Thus, the walking distance comes in handy.

FIREFORGE CRAFTED BEER IS A COZY WAREHOUSE WITH 15 HOUSE-BREWED BEERS ON TAP

RECOMMENDED DISHES: Gooey Greatness Grilled Cheese

muenster, havarti, and smoked gouda, local green apples, and house-pickled red onion on sourdough bread with housemade red pepper jelly for dipping

“Cheesecake of the week”

made in-house by Brian’s mom, Nancy

FROM COMAL 864: Taco de el pastor Chorizo nachos

what we're SEEING DANCING WITH THE STARS: LIVE!

The “Dancing With The Stars: Live!” show allows people the chance to see some of the most skillful dancers in the business without the sometimes awkward celebrities with two left feet getting in the way. The touring version of the hit TV show features popular pros like Brandon Armstrong, Lindsay Arnold, Alan Bersten, Witney Carson, Val Chmerkovskiy and more, doing classic old-school dances like the tango or the cha-cha, reenacting fan-favorite routines from the show’s 28-season run and throwing in some newly-choreographed dances that you can only see live. You don’t have to worry about snarky judges or fan votes; at Bon Secours Wellness Arena, the dancers are the stars.

GREENVILLE'S PERFORMANCE WILL FEATURE SPECIAL GUEST KATE FLANNERY OF 'THE OFFICE'

DANCING WITH THE STARS: LIVE! » TUESDAY, FEB. 18 | 8PM » BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA » 650 N. ACADEMY ST., GREENVILLE » $55-$85 BONSECOURSARENA.COM


The Warehouse Theatre

LIFE CAN BE

HARD WITHOUT

THE CARD The ArtCard makes a great Valentine’s Day gift!

Buy-One-Get-One Free Tickets With a donation of $50 or more to the Metropolitan Arts Council, MAC, you will receive an ArtCard which entitles you to buyone-get-one-free tickets for one time at each of the following venues for one full year! The ArtCard is a great way to sample the fantastic performing arts in Greenville at a substantial savings. In just two uses the ArtCard pays for itself.

*select shows

Get your ArtCard today!

You can donate through PayPal on our website, over the phone or at our office in downtown Greenville.

*MainStage productions

16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com/donate @macARTScouncil | #gvlARTS


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

CHOTSANI DEAN:

sojourning through history with art n story by JOHN JETER | photos PROVIDED

Right: "Memory Spoon" ‘plantation values, the tension and only available pride, as she waits for her cotton bushel Far Right: "Memory Basket" ‘transatlantic passage, planted, picked, transformed, sold, traded, sewed, stitched, separated

presented by

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

Spend an hour with Chotsani Elaine Dean and you travel through 400 years of history and art. She leads you into a sprawling discussion of her ceramics and quilts, raw cotton she grows, her work at a tea plantation and in studios and art galleries and in her classrooms. “You can take those materials that are so disparate and come from different parts of the world or different strata of the Earth,” she says of her clays and textiles, “and it becomes something that’s not just functional but visual. It can give you a voice in a way you might not expect.” A Malawian name meaning “take away,” Chotsani takes from myriad sources and pours it back into her art and pedagogy, which she practices primarily at Anderson University’s South Carolina School of the Arts; she has been assistant professor of art, ceramics and sculpture there since 2014. During a lengthy Black History Month interview, the 43-year-old artist-professor-student discusses the likes of Sojourner Truth, the escaped slave who grew up speaking Dutch; the abstract expressionist painter Helen Frankenthaler; and Matisse. She recalls the nine months she spent as a Fulbright Scholar on a tea plantation in India in 2012-13. She talks about the history of her hometown. Dean grew up in New Haven, Connecticut. That’s where the Dutch, one of Europe’s leading slave-trading nations then, established a commercial settlement they named Huys de Hope (House of Hope) just 14 years after enslaved African Americans first arrived on America’s shores. “It’s about coalescing the past, the present and things about the future,” she says of her art. “I’m always positioning myself in terms of what I’m seeing.” Her pieces illuminate centuries’ worth of history, generally focusing on commodities, their provenance and distribution. Take, for instance, a ceramic pot called “Memory Basket — ‘transatlantic passage, planted, picked, transformed, sold, traded, sewed, stitched.’” Or a porcelain stoneware vessel that features Sea Island cotton: “from seed to hand, mine.” Last year, she wanted to establish an artisanal “trading post” of her own, so along with four other multimedia artists, she opened an exhibition in

Minneapolis titled “Trading Post: Exchange and Sojourn.” “The many Dutch trading posts and Dutch participation in the transatlantic slave trade to the Abolitionist movement are significant to my communal ancestry as an African American, raised in New England, now residing in the South,” her website says. “Another part of the Trading Post,” she says, “is about trying to unpack this idea of what it means to trade with someone because as soon as you talk about trade, the first thing you talk about is value.”

It’s about coalescing the past, the present and things about the future. -Chotsani Dean, artist

Her works have appeared in galleries from Montana to India and belong in private collections from Seoul, South Korea, to New York. Through Feb. 20, the University of South Carolina’s School of Art and Design played host to a solo exhibition, “Trading Post: Huys de Hope.” Peter Chametzky, a USC art history professor, sat on the committee that selected Dean for a January residency. “When you start talking about the process of making a piece, say, in ceramics, there’s a lot of emotion involved in that,” he says, noting that during Dean’s pre-exhibition lecture, “she really filled us in about her intellectual and emotional background, different experiences she’s had and how that all is wrapped up in these objects she makes.” He goes on to cite metaphorical connections he sees between the potter’s wheel, which spins like the Earth, whence her material comes, and her artist’s hands, which shape works that also reflect the manual labor of enslaved peoples. “That’s all really a part of the piece,” he says. “It’s very process-oriented, and I think her work communicates that very well. “


THINGS TO SEE & DO

FEATURED EVENTS

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ARTS & CULTURE

THE LATEST CAN’T-MISS EVENTS

FEB. 14-16 El Thrifty Social Valentine's Experience

THRU FEB. 21

11AM10PM

5PM

El Thrify

25 Delano Dr., Greenville

$

$45

El Thrifty Social features fresh and locally sourced ingredients highlighting authentic Mexican dishes. From Feb. 14-16, El Thrifty Social will offer a three-course meal for two people for $45 with the choice of an appetizer, two entrees and churros all with a Don Julio tequila tasting.

ElThriftySocial.com

‘We Must Cultivate Our Garden’ at Furman

In the first of its kind at Furman University. The Department of Furman Art presents a student-curated University, exhibition in “We Must Cultivate Thompson Gallery, Roe Our Garden.” The exhibition Art Building includes the work of Douglas 3300 Poinsett Piper, Mary Mazziotti, Millian Hwy., Greenville Giang Lien Pham and Suzanne Dittenber.

Furman.edu

FEB. 22 12-1:30PM Bon Secours Wellness Arena

$

650 Academy St N,Greenville

Furman Paladins Mens Basketball Furman Basketball is heading to Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Saturday, Feb. 2. Come out and support the Paladins as the Mens team faces Wofford at 12 PM.

5th annual African American History Month art exhibition

THRU FEB. 29 9AM-1PM Greenville Technical College Beattie E. Huff Student Center

506 S. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville

$10-$20

bit.ly/PaladinsMens

The show includes the work of several African American visual artists. Current and former Greenville Technical College students, faculty and staff are among them. South Carolina native John Pendarvis is one of the featured artists.

GVLTEC.edu

No man can tell the intense agony which was felt by the slave, when wavering on the point of making his escape. - Frederick Douglass

Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad SPECIAL EXHIBITION

OPENING FEBRUARY 15, 2020 Sponsored by

Becky & Bobby Hartness Smithsonian Affiliate

864-467-3100 UPCOUNTRYHISTORY.ORG

FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

FEBRUARY 14 SC Governor’s School Student Exhibit

• February 14: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. In collaboration with the Greenville Center for the Creative Arts and Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Governor’s School Visual Arts students in the senior figure drawing class created large-scale illustrations to accompany the GSO’s performance of Igor Stravinsky’s "Firebird Suite". Produced in a range of media including acrylics, inks, cut paper and pastels, these works tell the story of young Prince Ivan as he battles the evil sorcerer Koschei with the aid of the fabled Firebird.

Numerous Nuptials

• February 14: 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • South Wind Ranch, 330 Bates Crossing Rd, Travelers Rest

The event, deemed Numerous Nuptials, will feature the exchanging and renewing of vows of fifty couples simultaneously. The ceremony will be led by the show’s lead on-air personalities, Mattman and Nine, and will be officiated by Attorney Rob Ianuario. Numerous Nuptials gives Upstate couples an opportunity to participate in a no-cost ceremony and reception without the stress that planning and executing a wedding involves. Each couple preregistered via the station’s website. Registration is first come, first served and will be capped…

Kids Night Out at the Pavilion • February 14: 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. • The Pavilion, 400 Scottswood Road, Taylors • $20

Drop your children off in a safe, structured environment while you enjoy a night on the town, catch a movie, grab a bite to eat or just enjoy a nice evening of peace and quiet. Kids will enjoy playing at the bounce house, ice skating, themed crafts, a pizza dinner, and/or popcorn and a movie. This event is open for children in K5-5th grade.

Daddy Daughter Date Night

• February 14: 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. • Simpsonville Activity Center, 310 W. Curtis St. • $15 – $30

10th Annual Julie Valentine Luncheon

• February 14: 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. • $75 Join us for the 10th Annual Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the remarkable story of an amazing woman, Rachael Denhollander. Denhollander is an attorney, advocate and educator who became known internationally as the first woman to file a police report and speak publicly against USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, one of the most prolific sexual abusers in recorded history. As a result of her activism, over 250 women came forward as survivors of Nassar’s abuse, leading to his life imprisonment.

Daddy Daughter Date Night will feature dinner, a DJ, dancing and photo-ops. Tickets are $30 per couple and $15 per additional child. The event is for children ages 3-13 and their parent. Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance at the Activity & Senior Center.

Cirque Du Soleil AXEL

• February 14: 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. • Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. Cirque du Soleil is back on ice with AXEL, a new electrifying experience fusing world-class ice skating with breathtaking acrobatics. Follow AXEL and his dynamic group of friends whose passion for live music and graphic arts come to life in an exhilarating adventure that reminds us that our dreams are within reach. Discover this young artist as he falls for the fascinating Lei in a high-speed chase for love and self-realization.

Truth Be Told

• February 14: 7:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

• North Greenville University Billingsley Theatre, 7801 N. Tigerville Rd., Tigerville • $5 – $12 Based on the life of Sojourner Truth, born Isabella Bomfree, this original play explores the unlikely friendship of two women, a former slave and the white abolitionist Olive Gilbert who helped her write her life story. In 1843, “Belle” declared that the Spirit called on her to preach the truth, renaming herself Sojourner Truth. Truth became an outspoken advocate for abolition, temperance, and civil and women’s rights in the nineteenth century.

Disney’s Aladdin Broadway Musical • February 14: 8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. • Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. • $40 – $110

Disney’s Aladdin Broadway musical will be at the Peace Center for a limited, two-week engagement. The musical is based on the Academy Award®winning animated film. It opened on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre to critical acclaim in 2014 and quickly established itself as one of the biggest new blockbusters in recent years. Its global footprint includes productions in Tokyo, Germany and on tour across North America.

Furman Theatre presents ‘The Bear’ and ‘Afterplay’ • February 14: 8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. • Furman University, The Playhouse, 3300 Poinsett Hwy.

Furman University Theatre presents two plays by Brian Friel, “The Bear” and “Afterplay.” All performances take place in The Playhouse on campus and are open to the public. Distinguished Irish playwright Friel is noted for his clever and thoughtful reimagining of Anton Chekhov’s wonderful plays. In “The Bear,” Friel adapts Chekhov’s play of the same name with modern sensibilities. A boorish landowner visits with comic and unexpected results. For more information, call the box office at 864-294-2125.

I Feel Good – A Trip to Motown • February 14: 8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. • Centre Stage, 501 River St. • $15 – $35

Put on your dancing shoes and kick off the new year with Centre Stage’s hit annual rock show "I Feel Good: A Trip to Motown". Celebrating the music and success of Berry Gordy and his iconic Motown record label, this concert style show features hits from Diana Ross, James Brown, Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson and many more. Backed by a live band, join the featured live band and talented cast of Centre Stage favorites as they journey through this electrifying…

and faith as a Christian widow in a conservative Southern town is suddenly upended when her 14-year-old daughter Jolene announces she is “gender queer” and starting a Gay-Straight Alliance chapter at their high school. Upstate actor Kelly Davis stars in and Anne Tromsness directs this production.

FEBRUARY 15 Stitch South Carolina

The Pink Unicorn

• February 15: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $350

Proud Mary Theatre Company presents the onewoman show "The Pink Unicorn." In this heartwrenching play by Elise Forier Edie, Trisha Lee's life

Create your own stitch book full of slow stitching, applique and embellishments that will celebrate the Upstate and South Carolina. You will experiment with indigo dye, rust from old mills, farm and forge relics, natural dyes, and a variety of textiles. You will also learn a variety of embroidery stitches and

• February 14: 8:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. • West Main Artists Co-Operative, 578 West Main St. • $12 – $15

The Legacy Continues. Since 1913, the McAfee family has been part of the Greenville community. Tommy and John McAfee are proud to introduce the fifth generation of the firm. Downtown Chapel, (864) 232-6733 Northwest Chapel & Cremation Center, (864) 294-6415 Southeast Chapel, (864) 688-1600 Tommy McAfee, Elizabeth McAfee, Jay McAfee and John McAfee

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

thomasmcafee.com


THINGS TO SEE & DO applique techniques including reverse applique, image transfer, and how to add texture and southern charm to your cloth and paper pages with both new treasures and vintage bits.

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ARTS & CULTURE

This versatile and exhilarating group brings a program of Old World Eastern Celebration music often played at weddings and other happy occasions. The tunes are a synthesis of music from Gypsy, Romanian and Jewish cultures, and instruments include accordion,fiddle, percussion, guitar and harmonica, and vocals. Following the concert, a complimentary wine and cheese reception will be held so attendees can meet the artists.

FEBRUARY 17 Doctors With A Heart Day 2020

Swamp Rabbit Trail Clean-Up Day

• February 15: 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery, 205 Cedar Lane Rd. Teamwork makes the dream work. Birds Fly South and Swamp Rabbit Cafe have teamed up to host a clean up day in the Water Tower district. We'll focus on the Swamp Rabbit Trail, the orange line of the trail, and Hampton Ave. and Washington St. Bring just yourself or get a group together and check in at either Birds Fly South or Swamp Rabbit Cafe. We'll have all of the clean-up supplies you need.

• February 17: 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Greer Chiropractic Center, 215 W. Poinsett St. • Free

Join us for Doctors With A Heart Day. This day will benefit Ronald McDonald House of the Carolinas. This is a day for new and existing patients to receive free chiropractic care. Consultations, exams and treatment will come at no charge. Walk-ins are welcome, but new patients should call 864-8775795 for appointments. Patients are asked to bring items from the Ronald McDonald House February wish list to benefit the Ronald McDonald House of the Carolinas. Monetary donations are also appreciated.

FEBRUARY 18 Dancing with the Stars Live

Makers Market 2020

• February 15: 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. Join us at the GCCA Makers Market to support local artists and take home a work of art for someone you love, plus something for yourself. The Makers Market is a one-day opportunity to buy handcrafted art by GCCA Members. With a variety of mediums, styles and prices available, there's something for every art collector.

FEBRUARY 16 Bandana Klezmer

• February 16: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road • $5 – $20

Puzzle Solutions

• February 18: 8:00 p.m. • Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St “Dancing with the Stars: Live!” tours North America this winter, celebrating the year 2020 in classic style with your favorite dancers from the hit ABC show. The all-new production continues its legacy of wowing live audiences performing fan-favorite routines from the TV series and new numbers choreographed just for the live audiences.

English Intensive Intermediate • February 18: 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320

Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes

Challenge yourself with the weekly puzzles, see page 33

FEBRUARY 14 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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READER’S

LENS PHOTO CONTEST The Greenville Journal invites you to

share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer.

Each month one Editor’s Choice winner will win a $50 gift card to an Upstate business. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an Upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal.

FEBRUARY 2020 THEME:

THINGS WE LOVE, “AWWW”

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

Upstate Republican Women February Meeting • February 18: 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. • The Poinsett Club, 807 E. Washington St.

We have two speakers from the Phoenix Center to talk to us about marijuana legalization that is currently in the statehouse and the stance the Phoenix Center has taken on the bill and facts to back up why we should fight to keep our state from legalizing marijuana.

Graffiti

• February 18: 3:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $175 Learn graffiti and street-art techniques for design and mural art. An introduction to the styles, terminology and culture of graffiti and tagging. Learn start up tips and techniques from spray strokes and paint prep to transferring designs to large scale spaces. This is created to help you wield the spray-can more effectively. This workshop is open to all 12 and older.

FEBRUARY 19 Jewelry Course: Mixed Metal Cocktail Ring

• February 19: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • MAKE MADE Jewelry, 241 N. Main St., Suite C • $230. In this five-week class, students will learn to make a festival mixed metal cocktail ring. Students will learn how to saw, pierce, hammer texture, solder, form and finish their own cocktail ring from sheet metal. Students will use sterling silver, copper and brass. Materials for one mixed metal ring are included in the class price. No experience is needed to participate.

FEBRUARY 20 Seussical auditions

• February 20: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E. Butler Road The Mauldin Theatre Company will hold auditions for its 2020 spring production, Seussical, on February 29, 2020. The Mauldin Theatre Company holds auditions for actors in the community who are interested. No prior experience is necessary to audition. Pre-registration for auditions is REQUIRED. Visit mauldinculturalcenter.org/auditions for more information and to claim your spot. DIRECTOR: Tim St. Clair Arts AUDITION WORKSHOP: Saturday, February 22, 2020 @ 9 a.m. – noon. Contact Tim St. Clair for more information. AUDITION DATE: Saturday, February 29

Principles of Illustration

For details on each month’s contest, or to submit your photo and vote, visit:

GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens 32

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

• February 20: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $170 – $190 Illustration is storytelling art. This class will work through the principles that make for strong, effective artwork that supports a narrative. Lessons will focus on the importance of characters, composition, line, color,

Retro ’80s Ski Weekend

• February 20: 8:00 a.m. - February 22: 11:30 p.m. • Free Buckle up tight for a blast to the past via this year’s ‘80s Retro Ski Weekend. This year’s eighth annual ‘80s Retro Ski Weekend will feature a can’t miss parade of visitors from all over the Southeast. Residents will be dressed in their best 1980s garb, along with a long list of nightly performances by popular artists and tribute bands. Touted as one of the Southeast’s top events for a reason, this year’s larger than life event is not to be missed. Hosted by the town of Beech Mountain and the Beech Mountain Resort, visitors are privy to a long list of events and activities from cosmic tubing, neon dayglo rides down the slopes, live concerts and so much more. Many of the events happening during the weekend are free to visitors and participants.

sequential applications, and the business of freelance illustration. These lessons are open to people of all skill levels and are targeted to students 12 and older.

2020 Bingo Bash

• February 20: 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. • 13 Stripes Brewing, Print Works, No. 3, 250 Mill St., Taylors • Free Free Bingo games, music and prizes at 13 Stripes Brewery. Great items will be available in our silent auction. Food by Tacos and Mas and The Farehouse. Donations will be accepted to benefit the Barbara Stone Foundation’s mission to see all individuals with disabilities flourish in Greenville County.

2nd Annual Greenville Jewish Film Festival

• February 20: 6:00 p.m. - February 23: 9:00 p.m. • Greenville ONE Center, 1 N. Main St. • $25 – $35 The 2nd Annual Greenville Jewish Film Festival is back with three nights of carefully selected films, which proudly represent the artistry and storytelling of our Jewish culture and heritage. On Feb. 20 is "Golda’s Balcony, The Film", Feb. 22 is "Shoelaces" and Feb. 23 is "A Day of Shorts". Each event features expert speakers and refreshments.

SEE MORE EVENTS ONLINE

GreenvilleJournal.com


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

PUZZLES

DOWNSIZING ACROSS

1 Unicellular swimmer 7 Fold in a skirt 12 Jolie of film 20 The “R” of 33-Down 21 Actor Cox 22 Prepared for storage, as a hose 23 Endlessly repeating programming problem 25 Fashion designer in “The Incredibles” 26 Hwy. felony 27 Man-mouse middle 28 What iPads run on 30 “Boston Legal” actor James 31 Higher, spiritual level of awareness 38 Get a whiff of 40 Lift to check the weight of 41 Gig hookup 42 PC key abbr. 43 Elicitor of a major “Whew!” 46 Zodiac ram 48 Truckload 51 Basso solo, e.g. 52 Eligible for Soc. Sec. 53 Head honcho 57 Some hole menders 59 Force unit 60 Bouffant, e.g. 61 Pipe joint 62 — Yello (Coca-Cola brand) 64 China’s Zhou — 68 Sharon of “Cagney & Lacey” 69 M114 howitzer, e.g. 72 Prickly shrub 75 Occurrence 76 — d’Or (Cannes award) 77 G-man, e.g.

80 Cousin’s mommy 82 Actresses Carrere and Mowry 84 “Look here as well,” in a reference book 86 1931 crime film starring Edward G. Robinson 90 — Juan 91 Late hours, in ads 92 MinneapolisMontreal dir. 93 King of CNN 94 1971 Elton John song 97 CD- — drive 100 Comical Costello 101 Just OK 102 Microwaves 103 Bacterium, e.g. 109 Blissful 110 “General” of Chinese cuisine 111 Miracle- — (plant food) 112 Vocalist Sumac 115 Not together 118 2, for helium 123 Like rags 124 Follow, as a pointer 125 Join a force 126 Evaluates 127 Partner of Cheech 128 Chinese system of calisthenics

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Quite dry Bill of fare She may be a gofer Wallach of “Lord Jim” Actor Affleck Universal truth “Amen, pastor!” Online chuckle Roxy Music’s Brian

10 Put holy oil on 11 Manuscript mistakes 12 King beater 13 Nonverbal “yes” 14 Knife of old infomercials 15 Pass, as time 16 French racing city 17 “Upon my word!” 18 “David” and “The Thinker” 19 Imitating sorts 24 Prefix with state 29 Make afraid 32 Fake fat in some chips 33 Kind of camera, in brief 34 Just-OK grade 35 — a mile (not even close) 36 “Yes, sign me up” 37 14-member oil gp. 38 Color 39 Wall painting 44 Did it wrong 45 “Gigi” star Caron 46 G-man, e.g. 47 “Quiet down” 49 Chances 50 New Mexico skiing spot 54 Lethargy 55 “You got that right!” 56 Floral symbol of purity 58 Former “Top Chef” judge 59 Rounded roof 63 “P.S. I — U” (old TV show) 65 They may be glossed over 66 Carte lead-in 67 “You got that right!” 69 “Joey” star LeBlanc

70 Anxious 71 Make revisions to 72 Farm bundle 73 Lay waste to 74 Picks off, as a pass 77 Lighter catchphrase in old ads 78 Lauder of fragrances 79 Active types 81 Sometimes-jellied fish 83 — -Detoo (sci-fi droid) 85 Latin for “year” 87 Trig is a prereq for it 88 Ending for buck or stink 89 Spew lava 90 Being amorous, to Brits 95 Jerusalem’s nation: Abbr. 96 Darth Vader, as a kid 98 Rococo 99 Watery silks 101 Whiskey type 103 Political hostess Perle 104 Thoughts 105 Injury marks 106 Singer Hayes 107 Bow’s shape 108 Tune for nine 113 Fit together 114 Beginner’s painting class 116 Pipe joint 117 Mag staff 119 Western tribe 120 Sun.-Tue. link 121 Article in Argentina 122 1,051, in old Rome

Crossword Solution: Page 31

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LEGAL NOTICES

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GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2019-CP-23-06701 DEFICIENCY WAIVED STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Ronen, LLC, PLAINTIFF, vs. Richard A. Joseph aka Richard Alan Joseph and if Richard A. Joseph aka Richard Alan Joseph be deceased then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of Richard A. Joseph aka Richard Alan Joseph, distributees and devisees at law to the Estate of Richard A. Joseph aka Richard Alan Joseph, and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; John M. Joseph; Kyle Doggett; Amy Doggett; Chrissy Doggett aka Linda Christine Doggett; AIS Recovery Solutions, LLC as agent for Bank of America, N.A.; Discover Bank; KIA Motors Finance; South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles; Capital One, National Association; County of Greenville DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm LLP P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE

34

MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on November 15, 2019. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm LLP, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803-726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm LLP, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 14

IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. NOTICE TO APPOINT ATTORNEY FOR DEFENANT(S) IN MILITARY SERVICE TO UNKNOWN OR KNOWN DEFENDANTS THAT MAY BE IN THE MILITARY SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ALL BEING A CLASS DESIGNATED AS RICHARD ROE: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED that Plaintiff’s attorney has applied for the appointment of an attorney to represent you. If you fail to apply for the appointment of an attorney to represent you within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you Plaintiff’s appointment will be made absolute with no further action from Plaintiff.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE (JURY TRIAL DEMANDED) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. NO. 2019-CP-42-04126_ Doretha Cohen, Plaintiff, vs. Kaitlan S. Brown, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S): KAITLAN S. BROWN You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, which was filed in the Office of the Clerk of this Court on the below mentioned date; and to serve a copy of your answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at their office, 303 East Greenville Street, Post Office Box 4025, Anderson, South Carolina, within thirty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE: You are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem to represent you in this action within twenty days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. s/J. Christopher Pracht J. Christopher Pracht, V (SC Bar#77543) THOMASON & PRACHT, LLP PO Box 4025 Anderson, South Carolina 29622 864-226-7222 864-226-7224 (fax) chris@864law.com Date: 11/21/2019 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Anderson, South Carolina

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • (3) 2019/2020 Dodge Ram Pickups RFP #70-03/03/20, due at 3:00 P.M., EST, March 3, 2020. Solicitations can be found at https://www. greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 67-03/11/20 Construction Manager at Risk for Halton Road Renovations, March 11, 2020, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Beverage Services, RFP #7103/10/20, until 3:00 PM, EDT, March 10, 2020. • Wren Way Drainage Improvement Project, IFB #7203/11/20, until 3:00 PM, EDT, March 11, 2020; a Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting (with Site Visit to Follow) will be held 10:00, AM, EDT, March 20, 2020 at Greenville County Procurement Services Division; 301 University Ridge, Suite 100; Greenville, SC 29601. • Delinquent Tax Resolution and Collection Services for Non-Real Estate, RFP #73-03/12/20, until 3:00 PM, EDT, March 12, 2020. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS STATE OF SC GREENVILLE COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-06090_ GREENVILLE COUNTY REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY v. THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY SCOTT, et. al, including DEFENDANTS ANN HILL AND WILLIE ROY SANDERS. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Greenville County, SC court in action number 2018CP-23-06090. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint.

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CPR Burger, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 Woodruff Drive, STE-D 101, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 23, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Golden Beverages Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 108 Balcome Blvd., Simpsonville 29681. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 16, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that BI LO LLC / DBA Bi Lo #5195 intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 12435 E. North Street Suite # 1106, Greenville, SC 29615-1442. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than March 1, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Duck Airport, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 301 Airport Road , Suite J, Greenville, SC 29607 . To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 16, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Fort Knox Storage Units - Mauldin located at 117 North Murray Drive Mauldin SC 29662 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www.lockerfox.com on 2/21/2020 at 12:15 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the selfstorage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Darrian Robinson unit #B113; Brittney Moses unit #C73; Taphnaiah Mcclodden unit #D01; Patricia Gentry unit #D06; David Hendrix unit #E20; Brittany Moreland unit #F100; Mary E Hunter unit #F60; Jamie M Dill unit #G32; Robert R Hill unit #G39. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2020-CP-23-00249 Charles E. Cannon, PLAINTIFF, VS. The Personal Representative, if any, whose name is unknown, of the Estate of James Douglas Lowe; Christine Howes Lowe, Nicholas Lowe, and any other heirs – at – law or devisees of James Douglas Lowe, deceased, their heirs, personal representatives, administrators, p e r s o n s entitled to claim through them; all unknown persons with any right, title or interest in the real estate described herein; also any persons who may be in the military service of the United States of America, being a class designated as John Doe; and any unknown minors or persons under a disability being a class designated as Richard Roe; and The County of Greenville, DEFENDANTS YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, (which Complaint was filed on January 14, 2020) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND

TO ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Rachael Ann Hardin, 3 Boyce Avenue, Greenville, SC 29601, (phone # 864-331-1751) has been appointed Guardian ad Litem for any other heirs – at – law or devisees of James Douglas Lowe, deceased, their heirs, personal representatives, administrators, persons entitled to claim through them; all unknown persons with any right, title or interest in the real estate described herein; also any persons who may be in the military service of the United States of America, being a class designated as John Doe; and any unknown minors or persons under a disability being a class designated as Richard Roe. In the event you are in one of the categories listed above and have a claim to the real property which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding foreclosure of a mortgage on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: All that certain piece, parcel or tract of land situate on the southern side of Brushy Creek Road at King’s Creek Drive in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, and containing 2.086 acres and further being described as follows: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, in Bates Township, containing 1.65 acres, more or less, and shown on a plat entitled “Property of James Munro and Loretta A. Lowe”, prepared by Lindsey & Associates, Inc., dated June 13, 1995, and recorded April 1, 1999, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Greenville County, SC, in Plat Book 39 – X, at Page 2. Reference is hereby made to said plat for a more complete metes and bounds description thereof. Also includes a 1987 Champion Mobile Home Serial #507285M0979A&B C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com


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Contemporary & Traditional

Sale runs month of February only. Prior purchases excluded.

COMPLIMENTARY ASID DESIGN SERVICES (IN-STORE OR IN-HOME)

3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330 | oldcolonyfurniture.com

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February 14, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

February 14, 2020 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina.

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