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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, February 7, 2020 • Vol.23, No. 06

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EQUAL

Greenville looks back on a half-century of school integration

photo courtesy of THE UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM, JAMES G. WILSON COLLECTION


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Remembering Integration p.6

WELLNESS COACHING

Educator Edward Anderson p.10

and Fitness Planning to fit your health goals and your schedule

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Museum Events p.31

Afterschool and School Holiday Care, Summer Camps, Parents’ Night Out, Youth Sports, Swim Lessons and more!

DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Each week throughout February the Greenville Journal will celebrate Black History Month with features on African American community leaders, artists and the historical events and locations that made an impact on the Greenville community. QUOTED

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“We wanted to create a park-like setting where residents of Greenville can come and hang out for the entire day in the woods.”

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“We love to keep our shows fresh - to reinvent the wheel!”

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

COMMUNITY

eat

FARM FRESH this Winter

n story and photos by JESSICA MULLEN

Open-air farmers markets are hard to come by in January in the Upstate. While subscription services have been trending in recent years, one form of farm-fresh delivery is helping Greenvillians eat healthy all year round: the CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture program. Community Supported Agriculture has been practiced in the United States since the 1980s, according to the South Carolina Department of Agriculture’s website, which notes the concept originated in Switzerland and Japan in the 1960s. In a CSA program, shareholders pay one large fee to a farmer before the growing season begins. The farmer uses the influx of cash to invest in updating facilities or buying seeds. In return for their support, CSA members get regular portions of the harvest.

At Bioway Farms in Ware Shoals, farmer Chris Sermons has run his CSA program for 10 years. Every Thursday, approximately 30 members of the Bioway CSA come out to the farm to pick up their shares. “CSAs are the most direct way to support local farms and the local food system. Our food system is only healthy to the degree that we participate in it,” says Sermons, whose farm is certified organic. Sermons says some of his CSA members are regulars, and some just recently found Bioway’s program by Googling it. At The Anchorage in the Village of West Greenville, a farm-to-restaurant model helps attract CSA members for The Anchorage’s farm partner, Horseshoe Farm. “The hardest thing when you’re out in the field is actually breaking away and marketing and delivering and figuring out how to procure new CSA members,” says Greg McPhee, owner of The Anchorage and partner at Horseshoe Farm. “Balancing that with the market demand while figuring out how to pay yourself is a struggle, but I think we can more easily get exposure in the long term because of our anchor in the West End.”

CSAs are the most direct way to support local farms and the local food system. Our food system is only healthy to the degree that we participate in it.” -Chris Sermons, farmer, Bioway Farms Above: (left to right) Greg McPhee, Thomas Rapp, and Chris Miller pose outside The Anchorage

While the Anchorage-Horseshoe CSA started in spring 2019, the Anchorage is shooting for 65 shares in the 2020 spring season. “The commitment and

WHAT'S THAT? CSA: money allow us to invest in larger projects and make products better and make the lives of the farmers a little bit easier,” McPhee says. For now, Horseshoe Farm’s CSA pickups are on Thursdays at The Anchorage, which helps the farmers keep their margins from growing too thin. “The logistics could very easily make it not worth your time if you have to deliver,” says Chris Miller, farm manager at Horseshoe Farm. “We try to couple everyone’s favorites — carrots, beets, turnips, salad greens — with more unique culinary products. Greg writes up veggie notes with cooking tips, or we’ll try to give a message from the farm,” Miller says. “We try to connect people with the food, especially if it’s their first time with a CSA and they’re not familiar with the relationship.” McPhee says it’s usually the unconventional vegetables that thrill members the most. The Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery also acts as a local drop-off point for CSA shares from local farms, such as Bioway or Growing Green Family Farm of Anderson. For those veggie lovers who are not yet ready to take the full CSA leap, produce manager Samantha Clawson spends her

Community Supported Agriculture

• Introduced to the U.S. from Europe in the mid-1980s • Originated in the 1960s in Switzerland and Japan • Growers and consumers provide mutual support and share risks • Shareholders cover costs of farm operation • In return, they receive shares of the farm’s crops in growing season Source: South Carolina Department of Agriculture

days packing the Swamp Rabbit Cafe’s produce boxes, which have been offered for five years. “Our longest-running regular has been buying the boxes for three years,” Clawson says, “and I always ask her, ‘What do you want in your box this week?’ But she always wants to try new things.”

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7


NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

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UPSTATE AREA NEWS AND NOTES North Hills Automotive ready to operate at new facility North Hills Automotive is excited to announce the opening of a new downtown extension off Augusta Street this week. The extension will add an additional four bays to the six existing bays as well as more parking and an exit to Cateechee Avenue. The additional parking and exit will alleviate the congestion customers were experiencing when entering and exiting the parking lot. Owner Ken Gamble stated, “We want to provide the best experience for our customers. With the extra space, we will have more availability and a faster turnaround time for our customers to ensure they are inconvenienced as little as possible while they are without their vehicle.” North Hills Automotive is a family-owned and -operated automotive service and repair facility that has been serving the upstate since 1986. North Hills Automotive: 8 Cateechee Ave., Greenville

Cherokee Valley recognized as one of the Most Innovative Golf Courses Cherokee Valley Course and Club was recently recognized as one of Golf Inc. magazine’s Most Innovative Golf Courses. Cherokee Valley, located in Travelers Rest, will be honored along with Seville Golf and Country Club in Gilbert, Arizona, at the Golf Inc. Innovation Strategy Conference, April 20-21 in Nashville. The golf course was chosen based on its golf and non-golf programming, membership plans and how it has grown its game initiative. Jennings credits the Cherokee Valley’s ability to cater to groups beyond the typical golf audience as one reason the golf course was recognized.

Greenville Women Giving is accepting names for SHEroes campaign Greenville Women Giving is accepting names of women who have guided, encouraged, empowered or made an impact on others until Feb. 16 as part of their third annual SHEroes campaign. “The ideal SHEro is a woman on whose shoulders we stand, who has guided us, encouraged us, shown us the way, empowered us and made an unforgettable impact on our lives,” said Greenville Women Giving co-chair Janet Sumner. “Whether living or honored in remembrance of someone, a SHEro might be a mother, sister, grandmother or aunt; a teacher, doctor, church leader, coach, friend, daughter, daughter-in-law, colleague or boss. The list is endless.” In order to be considered, the honoree must be a female and the person recognizing her must make a $50 donation to the Greenville Women Giving Endowment by Feb. 16. A list of honorees and those who honored them will be published in the Mar. 6 edition of the Greenville Journal. To nominate a SHEro, visit www.greenvillewomengiving.org/membership/shero/ and click the “Honor a SHEro Today” button.

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FEATURED

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FROM THE COVER

Students recall Greenville’s pivotal moment 50 years ago n story by ANNA LEE photo courtesy of THE UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM, JAMES G. WILSON COLLECTION.

INTEGRATION came to Greenville County in the middle of the school year. In January 1970 — 16 years after Brown v. Board of Education — Judge Clement F. Haynsworth Jr. ordered the school district to desegregate, ending the era of “separate but equal.” When schools reopened on Feb. 17, “some 58,000 students and 2,000 teachers and 105 schools had been peacefully integrated,” the New York Times reported. It was a pivotal moment in Greenville’s civil rights history. Later, national news outlets noted that Greenville had integrated with “grace and style” and held the district up as a model for the South.

There were siblings in the same household that were sent to other schools. Families were split. -Nell Hinton, former J.E. Beck High School student

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But the move was far from seamless. In order to thoroughly mix each school in the system, some 7,500 blacks and 5,000 whites were transferred to new schools. Black students bore the brunt of integration, Nell Sullivan Hinton, a senior at J.E. Beck High School, recalled. “There were siblings in the same household that were sent to other schools,” Hinton said. “Families were split.” Clyde Mayes, the All-American basketball player who had led Beck to the state championship the previous year, was transferred to Wade Hampton. His older sister went to J.L. Mann.


FROM THE COVER

|

FEATURED

Greenville County Desegregation Mayes recalled how much the split had upset their mother. “She wanted me to be going to school with my sister [to] watch over her,” Mayes said. He said their mother tried to keep the siblings together and even appealed to a judge, but the answer was no. “We were pulled up and uprooted,” Hinton said. “We were treated as pawns on a chess board.” Hinton was nearly finished with her senior year when she and her classmates were transferred to J.L. Mann, and Beck — along with most other black schools in the district — was closed.

FROM FREEDOM OF CHOICE TO DESEGREGATION

Yet black students had already begun to enroll in all-white schools several years before the court order. In the summer of 1963, A.J. Whittenberg, president of the Greenville NAACP, led a group of black families in filing a federal lawsuit that forced the school district to admit blacks. According to news reports, Whittenberg had visited an all-white school for a Democratic precinct meeting in 1962 when he noticed stacks of new textbooks set aside for the students. They were not at all like the battered ones his 11-year-old daughter, Elaine, used. Whittenberg believed his daughter should go to the white Anderson Street school, which was closer than the one she had been assigned to. Five other black parents thought the same for their children, and when the school board denied their request, the parents sued.

The district integrated

58,000 STUDENTS & 2,384 TEACHERS

throughout its 103 schools

The next year, U.S. District Judge J. Robert Martin ordered the district to enact a freedom-of-choice plan. By that fall, 55 black students were enrolled in 16 white schools. Elaine Whittenberg was among them. She later recounted her first day and the crowds that had gathered in a 2019 interview with the school district. “I see all these people all across the street everywhere, the media and everything’s going on, and [my father] tells me to get out of the car and go in,” she said. “I think I’ll never forget that.” By 1969, however, the state Supreme Court had declared freedom-of-choice plans unacceptable and ordered school districts to desegregate. No more delays.

AUGUST 1963 I see all these people all across the street everywhere, the media and everything’s going on, and [my father] tells me to get out of the car and go in. I think I’ll never forget that.

Greenville NAACP President A.J. Whittenburg, along with five other parents, files a motion seeking to desegregate Greenville County's school system.

-Elaine Whittenberg (Boyce)

SEPTEMBER 1964 School board members in Greenville called on the community to help. A biracial committee was formed to coordinate the move, and volunteers were enlisted. Newspapers reported that local businesses raised money to distribute 75,000 buttons proclaiming: “The Important Thing Is Education.”

Approximately

12,500 STUDENTS & 531 TEACHERS

were transferred to new schools

Mayor Knox White, then a sophomore at Greenville High School, recalled that the students “took it all in stride and took it very well.” “There was a high degree of awareness of what was happening in that we needed to pull together to make it successful,” he said. But integration had been forced, and resentment lingered. It all came to a head when black students began objecting to the playing of “Dixie,” the school’s fight song, at school events, Bob Farnsworth, who was then a senior at Greenville High, recalled. Farnsworth, who was the student body president, said there had been no issues with the song before.

blacks and whites, and hundreds of black students walked out of class. The U.S. News & World Report described police using tear gas to break up a brawl at J.L. Mann and said National Guardsmen had been put on “standby alert.” But no students were expelled. The school district, led by Superintendent J. Floyd Hall, quietly pushed forward, appointing black and white ombudsmen to help settle students and pass questions and complaints to the administration. Federal money was used to fund programs on black history and black culture and to bring in black artists. In May 1971, the Christian Science Monitor published an article saying Greenville had regained its luster. The headline read: “Carolina school district stages desegregation comeback.”

Of the students who were reassigned 7,500 were black & 5,000 were white “Suddenly, somebody gave that song power, and this fight song was demonized,” he said. “It got out of hand very quickly.” The unrest spread to other schools the following year. In November 1971, disruptions were reported at six area high schools. Fights broke out between

Right: United States postage stamp marking the integration of the public school system in the 1950s. ISTOCK

55 black students transferred to white schools under a limited freedom of choice plan after the federal courts refuse to dismiss the case.

MAY 1968 U.S. Supreme Court declares that freedom of choice plans are unacceptable because they did not lead to integration.

JANUARY 1970 Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals orders Greenviller to submit a plan of desegregation.

FEBRUARY 1970 Federal judge approves integration plan proposed by the school district, and the district is given 11 days to comply.


NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

NEWS

Greenville Pavilion to close for renovations in March n story by JESSICA MULLEN | rendering provided by GREENVILLE REC.

The Pavilion Recreational Complex in Taylors is scheduled to close for renovations March 1 with a scheduled reopening set for Sept. 30. The upgrades to the facility include new locker rooms and an expanded entrance area and follow a 2016 closure that allowed Pavilion personnel to upgrade the rink's ice and refrigeration system. The upgrades have been needed for decades, says Bob Mihalic, governmental af-

THE PAVILION CURRENTLY HOSTS:

26 adult hockey teams 13 youth hockey teams Clemson Tigers Ice Hockey Greenville Swamp Rabbits The Palmetto Curling Club

fairs coordinator for Greenville County. "These are the changes that our patrons who use the ice most often have asked for," he says. "In 2016, we upgraded the ice, and now we’re focused on the amenities around the ice. It will get our facility ready for the next few decades.” Every part of the facility will be closed, including the main rink, the in-line rink and the bounce house area. Only the outdoor tennis courts will remain open during the sevenmonth period. The rink is currently open to the public seven days a week and serves more than 180,000 people annually, according to Mihalic. The closure was announced in July 2019. For many of the Pavilion's user groups, the announcement began an exodus to new ice in a region of the country where it can be hard to find. "This is my home rink. I’ve been here since day one," says Charis Sloan, a contracted figure skating instructor who grew up learning to skate at the Pavilion.

VISITING SOON? CLOSED

Sloan, who lives 45 minutes away from the rink, teaches there 12 to 15 hours a week. During the closure, she plans to travel to the nearest available rinks in Irmo or Indian Trail, North Carolina, to continue teaching with her most dedicated skaters. "Some students on the fringes of the sport will be faced with a decision: drive two hours away to another rink or just take time off," says Sloan, who anticipates losing up to a third of her students due to the logistics and cost of making it to another rink. "Right now, we’re going through a boom with a lot of people moving into town from other areas of the U.S. and the world. For the longest time, we were the only rink in the state," Sloan says.

DURING RENOVATIONS Main rink In-line rink Bounce house

OPEN

DURING RENOVATIONS Outdoor tennis courts

"That’s a big thing to be part of, but at the same time, this rink wasn’t planned to serve that big of a population."

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NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

OUTDOORS

Tryon International Equestrian Center’s 73rd season to begin this February

Tryon International Equestrian Center 2020 SEASON

39 COMPETITIONS IN 2020 INCLUDING:

n story by JESSICA MULLEN | photos provided by TIEC

The Tryon International Equestrian Center kicks off its 2020 season Feb. 7. The Tryon landmark will bring in elite equestrian competitors and local fans alike as it enters its 73rd year of hosting competitions. The off-season has been full of preparation. “While we continue to offer dining and entertainment events throughout the winter, January and February are important months for us to refresh our facilities, prepare awards and organize logistically for what will be a very busy season for us,” says Sharon Decker, chief operating officer of Tryon Resort. “We’ve added driving to the calendar this year for the first time since it was part of the International Federation for Equestrian Sports World Equestrian Games Tryon 2018, and that’s particularly exciting,” Decker says. She also highlights the 73rd Tryon Block House Races, which will take place

on April 11, as a highly-anticipated steeplechase and tailgating event. In 2020, the center plans to host 15 international-level competitions across all disciplines. In some competitions, such as show jumping, Tryon International Equestrian Center will host as many as 100 riders representing different countries. Decker says that approximately 60% of them will represent countries outside of the United States. At the height of the season, the facility can accommodate up to 1,400 horses in its seven barns and indoor complex. Decker says the facility reaches capacity during the summer and fall series. The international draw has a massive local impact, according to Decker. “Tryon International Equestrian Center was the highest taxpayer in Polk County [North Carolina] in the 2019 fiscal year, and as the venue continues to become

hUnters JUmping eVentinDressage para-Dressage reining DriVing moUnteD games steepleChase

SEASON STARTS FEB. 7 tryon.Com

Tryon Equestrian Properties directly benefits the region in which we are located through taxes, jobs, and attracting people to the Carolinas to work, play and live.” -Sharon Decker, COO, Tryon Resort utilized year-round instead of seasonally, that impact will continue to grow,” she says. “Tryon Equestrian Properties directly benefits the region in which we are located through taxes, jobs, and attracting people to the Carolinas to work, play and live.”

The center isn’t just for the equestrian elite. “Tryon Resort is for all who love horses, active lifestyle and outdoor living,” Decker says. “We are open to the public seven days a week, and horse shows generally run Wednesdays through Sundays, which gives plenty of opportunities to come see horses on-site.” The “Saturday Night Lights” event series is a free, familyoriented series hosted Saturday evenings from May through October. The event offers free kids’ activities, pony rides, face painting, live music, concessions and more, all before the weekly competition begins in Tryon Stadium. Though Tryon International Equestrian Center is an easy day trip away from Greenville, it also offers on-site lodging that ranges from one-bedroom “tiny house” cabins to three- and five-bedroom creekside cabins.

God’s Healing for a Mother’s Heart A Day-Retreat For Women Who Have Experienced the Death of a Child

“Life After the Storm” Saturday, March 21, 2020 8:45 am - 4:00 pm First Baptist Simpsonville

3 Hedge Street, Simpsonville, SC 29681 Check-in: 8:15-8:35 am Registration Cost - $15.00 (Includes lunch)

Please join us for a day of encouragement, pampering, loving support,comfort food, authentic presenters, and sharing the love of Christ, our Great Healer and Comforter. We welcome all moms at all points along their journey of healing regardless of the age of the child. For small group topic choices/online registration visit www.fbsimpsonville.org/womens-ministry/ or contact Alice Ann at 864-979-3198 or kathryn.helt@dignitymemorial.com. Deadline to register is March 16. Limited to the first 125 people. FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Changing lives one conversation at a time Tanglewood Middle School principal is one of youngest in Greenville County n story by JOHN JETER | photo by DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

presented by

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

Edward Anderson remembers one of the earliest lessons he learned as a teacher was when a student stopped by one day to talk — only to get an earful about school rules and meeting expectations. Now that young man sits in prison for life after murdering his girlfriend. “Sometimes, it takes one poignant conversation to change the trajectory of a person or a child. I was 23 years old at the time, and that was my chance to have changed his trajectory,” Anderson says a decade later. At 33, Anderson is one of the youngest principals in Greenville County Schools, running Tanglewood Middle School since 2017. He oversees 85 faculty and staff and some 850 students. For the first time since his arrival 11 years ago, African Americans comprise a minority, 42%, with Hispanics numbering 45% and white students at 11%. Anderson grew up in Southernside, about five miles from his school just off White Horse Road. He knows what it’s like to come from an under-resourced neighborhood — and what it takes to get to where he is, including the doctorate in education he earned in 2014. “If we were in trouble with one family, we were in trouble with all families. Everyone knew what was going on,” he says with a laugh. His mother was 14 when she gave birth to Edward. A 2008 University of South Carolina graduate, he went on to teach at Lakeview Middle School. His awards include the 2019 Xanthene Norris Educational Achievement Award; 2017 Urban League Talented Tenth; and districtwide Teacher of the Year for 2012-2013. “He’s the man my boys need to see so they can grow up and be successful and have

Black History Month does say to the world that, ‘Hey, all right, we’re focusing on this community right now.’ So what does this community have to say? Now you have this audience listening every year. So this is the perfect time. -Edward Anderson, principal, Tanglewood Middle School

a family and be happy,” says Cassie, Anderson’s wife of seven years, a specialeducation teacher at Buena Vista Elementary School. Cassie Anderson, who is 34 and white, says their two sons, Ellison, 5, and Micah, 1, aren’t old enough to realize that their parents, together, don’t look like they do. Mostly, she says, they just notice how hard their dad works. “To be a product of the community, of Greenville County Schools, and to be successful and giving back to the community where he grew up is very important to him,” she says. “Other people often remark on how wonderful he is, but I can’t say anything but ‘thank you.’” During an interview 50 years after Greenville County Schools’ desegregation, Anderson talks about the same things as he looks forward to February’s commemorations: gratitude and community. “We have to come together to solve our own issues because we’re closer to the problem,” he says. “Black History Month does say to the world that, ‘Hey, all right, we’re focusing on this community right now.’ So what does this community have to say? Now you have this audience listening every year. So this is the perfect time.”


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mor and traocular lens designed to provide Clemson, Easley, ophthalmologists Greenville, Simpry performed in the world. In mediate, and far &still Saluda). Clemson Eye er, distances patients stillwithout need glasses er,berry, patients for board-certified need glasses er,ophthalmologists patients for still need glasses for board-certified ophthalmologists board-certified Dr. Glaser, MD implants new PanOptix Trifocal Lens. thousand years ago. Today, the implant the PanOptix® tri-are offering cataract, which is a clouding of asurgery. cedures. activities at near. For this activities reason, at For this activities reason, atatnear. For this reason, at near. Clemson Eye are vision offering Clemson the Eyenew are offering at Clemson the Clinton/Laurens, Eye the you with clear for near, intersonville, Newminutes orA less, the cloudy glasses after cataract provides comprehensive medical PAID ADVERTISEMENT newer lenses have been designed newer lenses have been designed newer lenses have been designed PanOptix® trifocal lens including PanOptix® trifocal lens including PanOptix® trifocal lens including Eye focal lens. “The PanOptix is the the natural crystalline lens due to most advanced and precise form Cataracts are the leading cause surgery performed in the world. In mediate, and far distances without berry, & Saluda). Clemson It’s called “The Next-Generation and surgical eye care, LASIK, the s removed and is replaced by over the past several yearsover to imthe past several years over toBrian imthe past several years imJoseph Parisi, MD, Johnson, Joseph Parisi, MD,toBrian Johnson, Joseph MD, cause Brian Johnson, Cataracts are Parisi, the leading surgery perfo of reversible blindness in theTrifocal” first-of-its’-kind trifocal implantable of cataract surgery involves the use a Clemson change in its protein content, isTop fifteen minutes or less, the cloudy glasses after cataract surgery. provides comprehensive medical tificial intraocular lens that because itvision is designed to Kamra inlay, pediatrics, cornea, Eye Among Five in U.S. to Implant New Trifocal Lens prove atofallastigmatism. focal points: prove vision atlenses all focal points: prove up vision atRidallPanOptix focalGlaser, points:MD, upreversible MD, Donald Glaser, MD, Keith MD, Donald Keith MD, RidDonald Glaser, MD, Keith Ridof blindness in the fifteen minute have been available with els Thisup method 1. AcrySof® IQ PanO United States. As lifelater expectancy It’s called “The Next-Generation lens is removed and isdisreplaced by surgical eye care, LASIK, led not only to has better surgifocus, the PanOptix or a lifetime. Remarkably, this correction at three oculo-plastics, and aesthetics lens.” states Glaser, one ofall ahas femtosecond laser toextended fragment, usually seen inprovide life and must close, far away, and everything close, in away, and everything close, in far away, and inand dle, MD, Jay dle,isserMD, MD, JayDr. Montgomery, dle, MD, MD,As Jay Montgomery, MD, United States. life expectancy lensthe is remov Cataract surgery afar fascinating history thatMontgomery, dates back to “The everything PanOptix isDonald the first-of-its’-kind trifocal implantable lens.” for Use. cal outcomes, but also to reduced expected (and known from Europeincreases in this country, so between. between. between. Justin Roman, MD andprecise Adam Roman, MDtoand Adam Justin EastRoman, MD and artificial intraocular lens that Trifocal” because itJustin isEastdesigned Kamra inlay, pediatrics, cornea, increases inthe this soat Adam over aand thousand years ago. Today, the most advanced and states Dr. Donald Glaser, one of eyecountry, surgeons ClemsonEastan artificial ens is notbe felttreated or seen surgically. by the tances.¹ ² ancatavices. Its American Board-Certified soften, remove our natural lens of the eye surgeons at Clemson In fact, an experience) to provide a strong need for glasses in many patients. 2. Alcon Datafor erling, This new lens erling, implant This new lens erling, implant MD.have This new lens implant form of cataract in surgery involves theprovide useMD. of a femtosecond laser to Eye.MD. “While other range-of-vision lenses been available with lasts has the prevalence of cataracts, lifet has the prevalence of cataracts, lasts for a lifetime. Remarkably, this correction at all three disoculo-plastics, and aesthetics ser-ona File Improvements surgical technear focus and an additional interClemson Eye, a leading eye care nt. team ofnatural Ophthalmologists have Eye. extended “While range-of-vision ract surgery is the most common while also correcting moderate lev(Mar 2017). fragment, soften, remove our lensafocus while also correcting the PanOptix is expected (and known from European continues long tradition of continues Clema focus, longother tradition of continues Clema long tradition Clemmaking it even more important toof 10 mediate without detracting nologies have alsoand been paralleled new lens is n Sof®  IQ PanOptix®  IOL  is an indoctors in 9 than locations (Anderson, you withLens. clear ing vision for near, inter- ing sonville, NewDr. Glaser, MD implants new PanOptix Trifocal or watching television; howevor watching use inClinton/Laurens, television; more ing howev70orcountries. watching use inAll television; more howev70five countries. use the inAllmore All population. ing history that dates back to than over among the than first in U.S. to70 countries. ract, LASIK,

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Clemson Eye, a leading eye care team of Ophthalmologists have su story that dates back to over among the firstRecently, five in the ract, microsurgical prothe U.S. first to and Recently, only LASIK, theto and firstUpstate. and Recently, only tion the firstUpstate. and only tion the to the tion to the Upstate. and optimize vision for a growing torically, most patients have had a puter and reading at near.” many patients. translates into vision for driving, computer and reading at near.” and optimize vision for a growing FDA-Approved trifocal FDA-Approved was trifocal lens wasmore trifocal was Eye serves than Eyelens serves moreClemson than more Eye serves more than surgery has fascinatpractice inFDA-Approved Upstate was also performed than 100,000 catapopulation. ing history th usand years ago. Today, the implant theCataract new PanOptix® tri-alens cedures. Statistics from a the pivotal studyClemson at standard monofocal IOL implanted.Clemson Improvements surgical technologies have for also patients been paralleled Statistics a pivotal study at 12which investigation sites in the of U.S.busiSTEVEN E. investigation CIVILETTO, MD ADAM EASTERLING, MD DONALD GLASER, MD y launchedthat inThis the U.S.ofback for patients launched in the U.S. launched in the U.S. forfrom patients 200,000 patients, has been 200,000 inU.S. busipatients, has been 200,000 in LASIK, busipatients, has been in 12 sites in five the type lens in often eliminates A cataract, is a clouding a thousand population. among the first in the U.S. to ing history dates to over ract, and microsurgical proadvanced and precise form focal lens. “The PanOptix is for the by exciting improvements in ness intraocular lens (IOL) technology. showed that 99% ofyears, patients would choose the 50 lensyears, again. This 20 the need glasses (especially showed that 99% ofAcrypatients undergoing cataract surgery. undergoing Acrycataract surgery. undergoing cataract surgery. Acryfor almost 50 years, would ness with 20 forCataract, almost 50Medical ness with for 20 almost with Medical Cataract, Medical the natural crystalline lens due to most advanc A cataract, which is use a clouding of a thousand years ago. Today, the implant the new PanOptix® tri- iscedures. Historically, most patients have had a standard monofocal IOL trifocalinIOL already in useinin 9 more than 70 countries. with laser technology) for so called choose lens again. This trifoaract surgery involves the first-of-its’-kind trifocal implantable IQ Trifocal PanOptix®  IOL  isSof®  an inIQ PanOptix®  IOL  isSof®  an isinIQalready PanOptix®  IOL  is an aindoctors in the 9 locations (Anderson, doctors 9 technology locations (Anderson, doctors locations (Anderson, change in its protein content, is of cataract su ts new PanOptix Dr. Trifocal Glaser, Lens. MD implants new PanOptix Dr. Trifocal Glaser, MD Lens. implants newSof®  PanOptix Lens. activities, cal IOL technology in “distance” such as drivimplanted. This type of lens often eliminates the need for glasses All board-certifi ed ophthalmologists at Clemson Eye are offering 1. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions most advanced and precise form focal lens. “The PanOptix is the the natural crystalline lens due to designed totelevision; traocular providehowevlens designed to traocular provide lens designed to provide Clemson, Easley, Greenville, Clemson, SimpEasley, Greenville, Clemson, Simp-later Easley, Greenville, Simpmtosecond laser to fragment, lens.” states Dr.traocular Donaldlens Glaser, one usually seen in life and must use in more than 70 countries. All ing or watching (especially with laserfor technology) for so called “distance” activities, the PanOptix® trifocal lens including Joseph Parisi, MD, Brian of a femtosec Use. patients stillnear, need glasses for board-certified ophthalmologists of cataract the use first-of-its’-kind trifocal implantable changeour in its protein is eye you withsurgery clear vision for you interwith clear vision for near, you interwith clear vision for near, intersonville, Clinton/Laurens, sonville, NewClinton/Laurens, sonville, NewClinton/Laurens, be treated surgically. InJayfact, cata- Newsoften, and re of the surgeons ater, Clemson , andaremove natural lenscontent, such asinvolves driving or watching television; however, patients still need Johnson, MD, Donald Glaser, MD, Keith Riddle, MD, Montgomery, 2.this Alcon Data ondistances File.Saluda). activities at In near. For reason, at Clemson Eye are offering the 1.and AcrySof® PanOptix® IOL Directions leading cause Cataracts are the leading cause Cataracts are theof leading causeE. surgery performed in the world. surgery In performed mediate, in and the farworld. surgery distances performed mediate, without in and thethis far world. InTDOC-0053542 mediate, without and far distances without berry, & Clemson berry, Eye & Saluda). Clemson berry, Eye &IQthe Saluda). Clemson Eye STEVEN CIVILETTO, MD ADAM EASTERLING, MD DONALD GLASER, MD BRIAN JOHNSON, M ract surgery is most common while also cor lens.” states Dr. Donald Glaser, one usually seen later in life and must a femtosecond laser to fragment, glasses for activities at near. For reason, newer lenses have MD, Justin Roman, MD Adam Easterling, MD. This new lens Eye.   “While other range-of-vision also correcting moderate levnewer lenses have been designed (Mar 10 2017).PanOptix® trifocal lens including for Use. dness in the of reversible blindness in the of reversible blindness in the fifteen minutes or less, thefifteen cloudy minutes glasses or after less, cataract the fifteen cloudy surgery. minutes glasses or after less, cataract the cloudy surgery. glasses after cataract surgery. provides comprehensive medical provides comprehensive provides medical comprehensive medical Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Medical beenthe designed over the past years toParisi, improve vision all implant continues a long tradition of Clemson Eye bringing surgical over past natural several years toseveral im- of Joseph MD, surgeons Brian at Johnson, soften, and remove our lens the eye at Clemson be treated surgically. In fact, cataAlcon on File. life expectancy United States. life expectancy United States. As life expectancy lensAs is removed and is MD replaced lensnew is byPanOptix removed It’s and replaced “The lens Next-Generation isby removed It’s and called replaced “The Next-Generation byineye It’s called “The Next-Generation and surgical care, LASIK, and the surgical care, 2. LASIK, and Data the surgical eyeTDOC-0053542 care, LASIK, the focal points: up close, farpoints: away,isup and everything between. innovation toeye the Upstate. vision at all focal MD, Donald Glaser, MD, Keith RidDr. Glaser, implants Trifocalcalled Lens. is prove Eye.   “While other range-of-vision ract surgery is the most common while also correcting moderate lev(Mar 10 2017). close, far away, and everything in dle, MD, Jay Montgomery, MD, country, soincreases in country,intraocular soincreaseslens inanthis country, so because anthis artificial artificial that Trifocal” intraocular lens anit artificial that is designed Trifocal” intraocular to because lensitinlay, that is designed Trifocal” to because itinlay, is designed to more Kamra pediatrics, Kamra cornea, pediatrics, Kamra cornea, inlay, pediatrics, cornea, Clemson Eye serves than 200,000 patients, has been

leadinghas cause reversible in the between. Justin at Roman, MD and Adam East-ser- at all three ce of cataracts, has theCataracts prevalence cataracts, the ofprevalence of cataracts, lasts are for the aoflifetime. Remarkably, laststhis forblindness a lifetime. provide Remarkably, correction lasts atthis for allathree lifetime. provide dis-Remarkably, correction this all three provide discorrection dis-50 years, oculo-plastics, and aesthetics oculo-plastics, and aesthetics oculo-plastics, serand inaesthetics in business for almost with 20 doctors 9 locations serTRIFOCAL IOLS erling, MD. This new lens implant United States. As life expectancy increases inmore this has ore important making to it even important to it even important to seen new more lens is not making felt or seen new by the lenscountry, is tances.¹ notsofelt ² or new by the lens is tances.¹ not felt ² or seen by the tances.¹ ² vices. Its American Board-Certified vices. Its American Board-Certified vices. Its American Board-Certified (Anderson, Clemson, Easley, Greenville, Simpsonville, Clinton/ continues a long tradition ClemRecently, the first and only FDA-Approved trifocal lens of was the prevalence of cataracts, making it even more important to Laurens, Newberry, & Saluda). Clemson Eye provides comprehensive dition effectively manage this condition effectively manage thispatient. condition effectively patient. Clemson Eye, a patient. leading eye Clemson care Eye, a leading eye Clemson care Eye, a leading eye care team of Ophthalmologists team have of Ophthalmologists team have of Ophthalmologists have Trifocal IOLs son Eye bringing surgical innovamanage this condition effectively and optimize vision for a growing launched in the U.S. for patients undergoing cataract surgery. Acrymedical and surgical eye care, LASIK, themore Kamrathan inlay, 100,000 pediatrics,cataRecently, the was first andis an only tion tolens the Upstate. on for a growing and optimize vision for a growing and optimize vision for a growing Cataract surgery has a fascinatCataract practice surgery has in the a fascinatUpstate Cataract surgery practice also has in the a fascinatUpstate was practice also in the Upstate was also performed more than 100,000 performed catamore than 100,000 performed cataSof® IQ PanOptix® IOL intraocular designed to provide population. FDA-Approved trifocal lens was Clemson Eye serves more thancornea, oculoplastics, and aesthetics services. Its American Boardpopulation.ing history that population. dates backing to over historyamong that dates the back first ing five to clear over history in vision theamong that U.S. dates tothe back firstLASIK, five to and over infar the among U.S. to theract, first five in and the microsurgical U.S. to ract,proract, and microsurgical proLASIK, LASIK, and microsurgical proyou with for near, intermediate, distances without A cataract, which is a clouding of the natural crystalline lens launched in the U.S. for patients 200,000 patients, has been in busi-Certified team of Ophthalmologists have performed more than glasses after cataract surgery. a thousand years ago. Today, a thousand the implant years ago. the Today, new a thousand PanOptix® the implant years triago. the Today, new PanOptix® the tri- the new PanOptix® tri- cedures. h is a clouding A cataract, of which is a clouding A cataract, of which is a clouding of cedures. cedures. almostimplant 50 years, with 20 due to a change in its protein content, is usually seen later in life undergoing cataract surgery. Acry- ness for 100,000 cataract, LASIK, and microsurgical procedures. alline lensthe due natural to MD most crystalline advanced lens the and due precise to cataract most crystalline form advanced focal and due precise toSof® “The PanOptix form advanced is lens. and precise “The PanOptix form focal lens. “The PanOptix is the IQcalled PanOptix®  IOL the is an indoctors in 9 locations (Anderson, It’smost “The focal Next-Generation Trifocal” because itisis the designed Dr. Glaser, implants new PanOptix Trifocal Lens. and must be treated surgically. Innatural fact, surgery islens the lens. most traocular lens designed to provide Clemson, Easley, Greenville, Simp-trifocal implantable to provide correction at all three distances.¹ ² rotein content, a change is in of its cataract protein surgery content, a change involves is in of the its cataract use protein first-of-its’-kind surgery content, involves is trifocal of the cataract use implantable first-of-its’-kind surgery involves trifocal the use implantable first-of-its’-kind common surgery performed in the world. In fifteen minutes or less, you with clear vision for near, inter- sonville, Clinton/Laurens, New-1. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions for Use. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions 1. Dr. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions 1. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions r in life and usually must seen of alater femtosecond life and usually laser must toseen fragment, of aanfemtosecond in life lens.” and states laser mustto Dr.fragment, Donald of aand femtosecond Glaser, one states laser to Dr. fragment, Donald Glaser, lens.” one states Donald Glaser, one the cloudy is in removed replaced bylater artifi cial Clemson Eye, alens.” leading eye1.care practice the Upstate was Cataracts are thelens leading cause and issurgery 2. Alcon Data on File. TDOC-0053542for Use. performed in theintraocular world. In mediate, far distances without berry, & in Saluda). Clemson for Use. forEye Use. the surgeons at of thein the eye surgeons at of the eye ally. In fact, be catatreated surgically. remove In fact, our catatreated natural soften, surgically. lens In remove fact, cataourEASTERLING, natural lens and remove our2. natural lens lens thatsoften, lasts STEVEN forand a lifetime. Remarkably, this new lens is not felt eye or also soften, among the fiClemson rst five U.S. to implant the new PanOptix® of reversible blindness in the fifteen minutes orand less,of the cloudy glasses after cataract surgery. provides medical E.be CIVILETTO, MD ADAM MD S. JACOB MONTG Alcon Data oncomprehensive File.Clemson TDOC-0053542 2. surgeons Alcon onat File.Clemson TDOC-0053542 Alcon Data on File. TDOC-0053542 DONALD GLASER, MD BRIAN2. JOHNSON, MD (MarData 10 2017). United States. As life expectancy seen bywhile the trifocal lens. is removed and most iscorrecting replaced by moderate It’s called “The correcting Next-Generation and surgical eye care, LASIK, the he most common ract surgery ispatient. the also most correcting common ract lens surgery moderate while is levthe also Eye. common   “While other while range-of-vision levalso Eye.   “While moderate range-of-vision levEye.   “While other range-of-visionCataract, (Marother 10 2017). (Mar 10 2017). (Mar 10 2017). 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JOSEPH PARISI, MD, FACS cornea, H. KEITH RIDDLE JR, MD BALAJI PERUMAL, MD increases in this country, so an artificial intraocular lens that Trifocal” because it is designed to Kamra inlay, pediatrics, has the prevalence of cataracts, lasts for a lifetime. Remarkably, this provide correction at all three dis- oculo-plastics, and aesthetics serCataract, LASIK, Medical Cataract, Medical Oculoplastics STEVEN E. CIVILETTO, MD Cornea, ADAM EASTERLING making it even more important to new lens is not felt or seen by the tances.¹ ² vices. Its American Board-Certified Medical Cataract, Medica manage this condition effectively patient. Clemson Eye, a leading eye care team of Ophthalmologists have and optimize vision for a growing Cataract surgery has a fascinat- practice in the Upstate was also performed more than 100,000 catapopulation. ing history that dates back to over among the first five in the U.S. to ract, LASIK, and microsurgical proToday, the implant the FACS new PanOptix® tri-BALAJI A cataract, which is a clouding of a thousand years ago. cedures. JOSEPH PARISI, MD, H. KEITH RIDDLE JR, MD JUSTIN ROMAN, MD PERUMAL, MD focal lens. MD “The PanOptix is the MONTGOMERY JR, MD the natural crystalline lens due to most advanced and precise form JOHNSON, STERLING, MD S. JACOB DONALD GLASER, MD BRIAN Cataract, LASIK, Medical Cataract, Cornea, Medical Cornea, Cataract, LAS Oculoplastics of cataract surgery involves the use first-of-its’-kind is Medical ct, Medical a change in its protein content, Cataract, Glaucoma, Medical Cataract, Cataract, Medical trifocal implantable usually seen later in life and must of a femtosecond laser to fragment, lens.” states Dr. Donald Glaser, one 1. AcrySof® IQ PanOptix® IOL Directions for Use. MD STEVEN E. CIVILETTO, MD ADAM EASTERLING, MD S. JACOB MONTGOMERY JR, MD DONALD GLASER, BRIAN JOHNSON, MD CORNEA G EYE CARE be treated surgically. In fact, cata- soften, and remove our natural lens of the eye surgeons at ClemsonADVANCED 2. Alcon Data on File. TDOC-0053542 Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Glaucoma, Medical Cataract, Medical Cataract, Medical ract surgery is the most common while also correcting moderate lev- Eye. “While other range-of-vision (Mar 10 2017). • • Diabetic Eye Disease • Keratoconus

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NEWS

|

NEED TO KNOW

OUTDOORS

MOVE-IN MADNESS!

Aerial ropes, obstacle course planned for future Swamp Rabbit Trail extension

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH | rendering PROVIDED

Ask About Our Best Pricing of the Year! 55+ Active Adult Apartment Homes Starting from $979*

864-332-4839

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4 Market Point Dr. Suite F, Greenville, SC 29607 55+

*This pricing is for a limited time only.

I am a scientist. I am curious. I am a Monstessori student. I am Five Oaks Academy.

Lydia Jane, age 5, observes outcomes and classifies objects while performing an experiment in the outdoor classroom.

Toddler through Middle School

1101 Jonesville Road Simpsonville, SC (864) 228-1881

www.fiveoaksacademy.com

Minds Opened Here! Schedule a tour to see how Five Oaks Academy can unlock your child’s unique potential. 12

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

A new aerial adventure course is in the works for Greenville, slated to be built at the site of the future Prisma Health Swamp Rabbit Trail extension off Laurens Road at the intersection of Rector and E. Washington streets. The Flying Rabbit will be a three-story, tree-spanning obstacle course, the first of its kind in the Upstate. The adventure park will feature a multilevel design with four tiers of difficulty to accommodate a wide range of ages and thrill-seekers.

We wanted to create a park-like setting where residents of Greenville can come and hang out for the entire day in the woods.” -Jonathan Simmons, managing partner, the Flying Rabbit But the adventure course is not yet a sure thing. The Flying Rabbit will require a special exception from the Board of Zoning Appeals to be approved, which will be reviewed on Feb. 13 during a public hearing. Jonathan Simmons, a managing partner with the Flying Rabbit, said the area where the course will be built is unique in that it features very large mature oak trees.

“We’re looking to preserve that area’s large trees while also allowing people to do this three-story obstacle course within those trees,” Simmons said. “You basically have routes that are like ski routes: beginning, intermediate and expert.” The adventure course will also feature a canopy walk sky bridge for those looking to enjoy the views without too much adrenaline. Those who want to stay more grounded can take part in the pump track down below, which accommodates kids bikes, mountain bikes, BMX bikes, skateboards and scooters. There will also be a mountain bike trail. “We wanted to create a park-like setting where residents of Greenville can come and hang out for the entire day in the woods,” Simmons said. With the future Swamp Rabbit Trail extension planned for the area, Simmons said one key aspect of the course will be routes that span from one side of the trail to the other, giving those up high a view of the trail-goers below. The aerial course will be constructed within Holland Park, a 12-acre mixedused development that will feature Home Team BBQ, Double Stamp Brewery, a half-acre of shaded green space and more than 18,000 square feet of additional office, retail and restaurants. No date has been set for the course’s completion.


NEED TO KNOW

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NEWS

ART IN FOCUS

MURAL AT THE ANCHORAGE artist: eliZabeth kinney

COMPLETED 2016 n photo by IRINA RICE

Post yo photos in ur of the M front ur Anchora al at The ge using #gvlar tinfocus

GJ: WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE PIECE? E: I was inspired by the thriving and growing local farm-to-table scene here in the Upcountry. GJ: HOW LONG DID THE PIECE TAKE TO CREATE? E: I designed the piece at home, in my studio, for about a week. It took me another few days to transfer the images onto the wall and about six weeks to paint it.

Schedule Your Tour Today • (864) 606-3055

GJ: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE PIECE AND WHY? E: My favorite part about the mural is how people interact with it. That, and of course the giant red and white Chioggia beet. The Anchorage: 586 Perry Ave., Greenville

COMMUNITY

County looks five years ahead for affordable housing

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH

Every five years, the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) puts together what’s known as its “consolidated plan,” which looks at the county’s affordable housing needs in the coming halfdecade. The plan describes the housing needs of the low- and moderate-income residents across five participating county municipalities (the city of Greenville being excluded), while outlining strategies to meet those needs. This latest comprehensive plan, for which the Redevelopment Authority held a kickoff meeting on Jan. 30, comes as “the drumbeat for affordable housing has grown louder and louder,” according to Joe Smith, operations director for the organization. With access to affordable housing taking center stage in the ongoing debate over the County Square redevelopment, Smith said the coming half-decade will be a crucial period for ensuring low- to moderate-income residents are not left behind as the county grows. Established in 1974, the GCRA works to secure resources and educate stake-

NEED TO KNOW MORE?

The county will be holding public hearings from now until March in Simpsonville, Fountain Inn, Travelers Rest, Greer and Mauldin. Visit GreenvilleJournal.com for dates and locations. holders to meet the needs of Greenville County citizens through affordable housing. That means everything from building subsidized homes, to repairing homes, to improving surrounding infrastructure, to demolishing unsafe properties, to improving facades and more. The last half decade saw the GCRA construct 55 new housing units and 73 rental units, financially assist 120 households in buying their first homes, rehab 280 housing units, improve 22 storefronts and rapidly rehouse 350 homeless individuals.

Independent Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Skilled Nursing • Rehab Greenville’s Premier Life Plan Community

10 Fountainview Terrace, Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 606-3055 • Cascades-Verdae.com FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

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NEED TO KNOW

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

presented by

JOSEPH VAUGHN BROKE FURMAN’S COLOR BARRIER Adare Smith was in Furman University’s Trone Student Center one day when she noticed a plaque honoring the man who broke the color barrier there in 1965. For Marcus Tate, it wasn’t until he attended Furman that he learned that that man was his cousin. Fifty-five years after Joseph Vaughn became the school’s first African American student, Tate and Smith participated in the university’s inaugu-

Black history is right here where we’re standing, where we go to class every day. -Adare Smith, student, Furman University

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

n story by JOHN JETER | photo provided by FURMAN UNIVERSITY

ral commemoration of the Greenville trailblazer and the day he arrived on campus — and made history. “Jan. 29 being so close to February, you really couldn’t ask for a more perfect gateway into celebrating Black History Month,” says Smith, 21, an English major from Greenwood. “We don’t have to look to all of these outside places or to all these people who are exclusively in history books to look for black history. Black history is right here where we’re standing, where we go to class every day.” Tate, 35, a Furman alumnus and now digital marketing director at Steve White Auto Group, was 7 years old when Vaughn, his grandmother’s cousin, died. Vaughn, whose great-grandfather was born into slavery, said in a 1986 speech that he enrolled in Furman not as part of any movement, “but I was equally determined that I was coming to Furman to be ‘Joe Vaughn: student,’ not ‘Joe Vaughn: black student.’” After graduating cum laude in 1968, Vaughn taught English in Columbia and Greenville for 13 years. He died in 1991 at age 45.

“ B e i n g connected The more I learned about Joseph, the more to him as a family memI became comfortable with accepting what ber is incredibly humeveryone told me — that we were very bling,” Tate kindred, similar spirits. says. “I’m very grate-Marcus Tate, Furman alumnus, relative of Joseph Vaughn ful to have an example that’s in the bloodline. “At times, it’s kind of intimidating because you think you can’t you live up to that, but the more JOSEPH VAUGHN ORATORICAL COMPETITION I learned about Joseph, the more I beFeb. 15 | Tabernacle Baptist Church came comfortable with accepting what 400 Hudson Street | Greenville everyone told me — that we were very Furman and Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation kindred, similar spirits.” co-sponsor the contest, which encourages Says Smith: “He acts like a constant public speaking skills among students in the reminder that there is a place for us. spirit of Vaughn and of Martin Luther King Jr. I feel like all of us can fall under this big umbrella of Joseph Vaughn and the FOR MORE INFORMATION: Mike Chatman other African American students who Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation were here to integrate Furman.”

jvoc@alphagreenville.org | 864-906-7078


NEED TO KNOW

|

NEWS

READER'S LENS

January Reader's Lens winners ALL THINGS NEW The dawning of 2020 was not just the start of a new year, but also a new decade. With that in mind, our readers were encouraged to submit photos in the theme of "All Things New." Below are January's winners.

EDITOR'S PICK

The dawn of a new day | Aimee Trepanier

1ST RUNNER-UP

New generations | Lizbeth Thomas

2ND RUNNER-UP

Who can resist two new puppies? | Casey Porter

THIS MONTH

FEBRUARY THEME THINGS WE LOVE 3RD RUNNER-UP

New adventures to Europe! | Lydia Porter

GreenvilleJournal.com/readerslens FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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HOME REAL ESTATE

Within 30 minutes or less from downtown, these three mountain communities each offer different architectural styles and amenities

MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES: Escapes with altitude n story by JEANNIE PUTNAM

Mountain properties offer an escape from the busier life around Greenville by placing residents into a less developed area where they can enjoy mountain views and fresh air. Residents in communities like The Ridges at Paris Mountain, The Cliffs at Glassy and Montebello enjoy their privacy by living in smaller subdivisions. These communities also allow residents to enjoy the outdoors in a variety of ways. Both The Ridges at Paris Mountain and The Cliffs at Glassy give residents access to golf courses. The Ridges uses Green Valley Country Club’s course, whereas The Cliffs at Glassy has its own. In addition to golfing, residents of all three communities can enjoy nature by exploring nearby parks or hiking. All three of these communities are also located 30 minutes or less from downtown Greenville. Residents will experience weather similar to Greenville, but living at a higher altitude means an increased chance of seeing snow.

THE RIDGES AT PARIS MOUNTAIN theridgesatparismountain.com

• 18 customized and masterfully crafted residences. • Partnered with Green Valley Country Club and Furman University’s Herman W. Lay Physical Activities Center. • Residents receive a free month of fitness membership with the purchase of a yearly membership for $35 per month. • Every part of The Ridges has been designed with purpose and attention to detail, resulting in an unprecedented mountain community that will be enjoyed for generations to come.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

THE CLIFFS AT GLASSY cliffsliving.com

• Sits on 3,500 acres between Greenville and Asheville. • 75-mile views on a clear day. • Amenities include its own golf course, clubhouse, private helicopter pad, community parks, chapel, sunset pavilion, nature trails, fitness center, training area, four tennis courts, Olympic size outdoor pool, spa services and more. • High peaks and craggy nooks that were once home to bootleggers of Carolina Dark Corner fame, Glassy Mountain is today home to a rich and colorful new chapter — The Cliffs at Glassy. • A breathtaking mountaintop course designed by Tom Jackson includes a par 3 recognized as the fourth most scenic hole in America.

MONTEBELLO

montebellosc.com

• A 350-acre gated community on the slopes of Piney Mountain. • Subdivision is divided into four sections representing European mountain homes, French-style homes, Tuscan-style single-family or town homes, and Tuscan-style condominiums. • Amenities include a clubhouse, pool, tennis court, park for each section of the subdivision, Lake Como and playground. • Located minutes from downtown Greenville.


EVERYTH I N G WE TOUCH TURNS TO SOLD Ch e t a n d Be t h Smit h.com

GREAT LOCATION – CLAREMONT

22 SCOGIN DRIVE, GREENVILLE | 4 BEDS | 4.5 BATHS | MLS#1409915 | $699,900

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BRAXTON RIDGE 505 Rustic Outland Drive, Simpsonville $529,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1409916

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9 Stonewash Way, Greer $389,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1401660

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609 Foxcroft Road, Greenville $599,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1410009

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You will fall in love with this spacious and light filled home in one of the most convenient Greenville locations. This custom built 4BR/4.5BAwas designed with 3 Bedrooms on the main level, amazing attention to detail and plenty of space for entertaining. Beautiful oak hardwoods with cherry inserts can be found throughout. The gourmet Kitchen is a chef’s delight! It is filled with ample custom cabinetry, spacious pantry, high-end stainless steel appliances including 5-burner gas cook-top, granite countertops and a coordinating tile backsplash. Storage is no problem in this home thanks to the huge Walk-In Attic and Crawlspace. The Screened Porch is adorned with a tongue and groove ceiling, Trex Deck and ceiling fan. Claremont is an exclusive gated community with upscale amenities.

T IN RAC

864-458-SOLD ( 765 3 )

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THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS

155 Riverplace Unit 103, Greenville $299,900 • Beds: 1 Baths: 1 • MLS#1407000

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129 Largess Lane, Piedmont $219,000 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1410585

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WALKERS CROSSING

THE RAVINES AT SPRING MILL

220 E Shefford Street, Greer $319,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1410670

106 Smithwood Court, Simpsonville $207,000 • Beds: 3 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1409239

132 Grinders Circle, Greer $314,900 • Beds: 3 Baths: 3 • MLS#1404633

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SEVEN OAKS

EASLEY

18 Griffith Knoll Way, Greer $614,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 4 | 1 • MLS#1406711

236 Grandmont Court, Greer $389,900 • Beds: 5 Baths: 4 • MLS#1401665

123 E Woodburn Drive, Greenville $269,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 3 • MLS#1410262

112 Oaklane Drive, Easley $149,900 • Beds: 4 Baths: 2 | 1 • MLS#1410131

(864)458-SOLD (7653)

EVERYTH IN G WE TOUCH TURNS TO SOLD

ChetAndBethSmith.com


HOME

and REAL ESTATE

THE LIST

MOUNTAIN HOMES 43 EAGLE ROCK ROAD • $4,500,000

LOVE YOUR SUMMER JOB work outdoors

WORK SOMEWHERE AWESOME

MEMORIES & FRIENDSHIPS they’ll last a lifetime

SUMMER JOBS MAKE A DIFFERENCE help your community

SUMMER & PART TIME

JOB FAIR

FEBRUARY 15 9 am - 1 pm

GREENVILLE COUNTY AQUATIC COMPLEX

Now hiring lifeguards (ages 15+), camp counselors, maintenance techs, swim instructors, concessions & admissions staff, party hosts, bus drivers, nurses, team leaders and more.

LEARN MORE @ GREENVILLEREC.COM

THE CLIFFS AT GLASSY: Magnificent log home, meticulously crafted from western red cedar logs. A wide variety of features including a chef's kitchen, indoor court, sauna, 12 seat movie theater, and an outdoor pizza oven. Natural and peaceful surroundings in a gated community located between AVL, NC and GVL, SC. SPECS: 8| 6.5 | MLS 1394291 Holly J May & Tim Heatley, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 864.315.3821

10 HIGH BLUFF COURT • $2,495,000 THE CLIFFS VALLEY: Rustic, yet stately home nestled on over 11 acres with stunning mountain views. It boasts an open floor plan and stunning bedroom suites, each with their own private deck. A large study on the upper level provides the option of a fifth bedroom with a full bath. 4| 5.5 | MLS 1394291 SPECS: James Patton, Cliffs Realty 864.249.4364

137 BLAZING STAR TRAIL • $1,750,000 THE CLIFFS AT GLASSY: Spectacular residence custom built by one of the best builders and architects known in the area. No detail was missed throughout both the interior as well as the exterior. Gourmet kitchen, entertainment room, workshop, copper gutters, million dollar views, blue stone flooring, exposed beams, gorgeous. SPECS: 5| 5.5 | MLS 1405569 Jacob Mann, Coldwell Banker Caine 864.325.6266

136 HIGH ROCK RIDGE DRIVE • $945,000 THE CLIFFS VALLEY: Come home to a beautiful modern mountain dream home complete with a waterfall and meandering mountain creek in the backyard. Stunning views, open floor plan perfect for entertaining, gourmet kitchen with curvilinear walls and handsome wood finishes. SPECS: 4| 5 | MLS 1346118 John Clark Kent & Jean Durham, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 864.784.9918

200 KNIGHTSRIDGE ROAD • $849,950 THE CLIFFS VALLEY: Come home to this mountain golf course home overlooking #3 tee/fairway! The second lot ensures privacy while the location is within walking distance to the Cliffs Valley Clubhouse. A huge master suite, patios, walkways and much more is to be discovered at this home. 3| 3+2 | MLS 1385599 SPECS: John Clark Kent, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 864.784.9918

1 ROSE THORN COURT • $690,150 THE CLIFFS VALLEY: Mountain dream home is a short walk to the Cliffs Valley Wellness Center and is offered with all LGB Interior Design furnishings! The stunning sun room is the perfect space to relax. Gourmet kitchen, soaring ceilings, stone fireplace nestled in the natural landscape...ready to live in. SPECS: 4| 3.5 | MLS 1402811 John Clark Kent, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate 864.784.9918

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7


HOME

and REAL ESTATE

Featured Home

KINGSBRIDGE 6 Summerhall Glen Lane, Simpsonville, SC, 29681 HOME INFO PRICE: $949,900 BEDROOMS: 5 BATHS: 4/1 LOT SIZE: 0.5 Acres

MLS #: 1410177 SQ. FT: 5403 YEAR BUILT: 2007

SCHOOLS: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and JL Mann High

AGENT:

Melissa Morrell 864.918.1734 melissamorrellagent@gmail.com

Old World Charm. New World Luxury. A Builder’s Personal Residence. This private retreat situated on a nearly half acre cul-de-sac lot in the established and gated Simpsonville community of Kingsbridge features a chef’s kitchen with breakfast area and Hearth Room as well as an elegant front dining room with French Doors, and butler’s pantry complete with a wine chiller. The home affords its own wine cellar and tasting room with custom mahogany racking. The first􀂧􀂧􀂧􀂧􀂧􀂧r Master Retreat boasts its own fireplace, walk in closet, and spa like bathroom. There are six sets of French doors leading to the home’s outdoor oasis! Strategically placed outdoor lighting and lanterns truly make this home magical. The 1000 square foot covered patio with its stained cedar ceiling gives way to a full outdoor kitchen and large stone fireplace with TV connections above. There’s an outdoor jetted splash pool with waterfall enveloped by European landscaping, a regulation bocce ball half-court and a pergola, all on the nearly half acre lot that still affords green space for recreation.

Apply Online Now 2020CENSUS.GOV/JOBS Thousands of jobs are available nationwide. Help support your community — be a census taker.

 Extra income

 Flexible hours

 Weekly pay

 Paid training

For more information or help applying, please call 1-855-JOB-2020 Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339 TTY/ASCII www.gsa.gov/fedrelay The U.S. Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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HOME

and REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

AREA OPEN HOUSES

414 MCIVER STREET • $775,000

THE UPSTATE’S LEADING INDEPENDENT REAL ESTATE AGENCY

ALTA VISTA: Come and see what it is like to live at this prestigious address in the sought after Alta Vista area. SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

4|

3.5 | MLS 1405875

Blair Miller, Wilson Associates 864.430.7708 blair@wilsonassociates.net

25 EAST HILLCREST DRIVE • $775,000 NORTH MAIN: Do not miss this fabulous home in the great school district of the North Main area on a double lot!

FEATURED HOME - 105 WHITE PINE DRIVE - WHITE PINE COTTAGES - $395,000

Custom built 4BR, 3BA new construction home full of designer details! LVP flooring, shiplap accents, unique lighting, granite throughout & gas log Fireplace. Dining Room w/ butler’s pantry. Gourmet center island Kitchen. Main level Master Suite & Guest Suite. Screened porch, patio, covered front porch, side entry Garage & +/-.59 acre lot w/ full site sprinkler system. Outstanding Simpsonville location! 140956

SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

4|

4 | MLS 1391287

Nick Carlson, Wilson Associates 864.386.7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net

146 MODESTO LANE • $599,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION ESTATES: Need elbow room? Look no further! Home on 2.69acres at end of cul-de-sac. Master on Main. 400' of river frontage. SPECS:

864-448-1234 • team@carolinamoves.com 2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

RELAX! De-Stress Your Car Payment!

5|

3.5 | MLS 1410734

Holly May, Blackstream | Christie's International Real Estate • 864.640.1959 holly@blackstreaminternational.com

7 DRAYTON HALL ROAD • $475,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION: This home has it all! Only 3 years old in the sought after Five Forks Plantation community. SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

4|

2.5 | MLS 1405065

Linda O'Brien, Wilson Associates 864.325.0495 linda@wilsonassociates.net

316 MONTALCINO WAY • $422,900 TUSCANY FALLS: Fantastic 5 bedroom, 4 bath homes in Tuscany Falls. Immaculate! Great open floorpan with a fantastic flow.

Refinance your car loan with GHFCU! If you don’t save at least $50 per month on your new loan of $10,000+, we’ll give you $100 and 60 Days with No Payment! NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN!

SPECS:

2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

Call 467.4160 or visit our website at www.greenvilleheritage.com for information on this promotion or how to join.

5|

4 | MLS 1410132

Nick Carlson, Wilson Associates 864.386.7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net

47 LAYKEN LANE • $389,900 VILLAS AT CARRIAGE HILLS: Rare, truly maintenance-free one-level living with all luxury finishes located close to the best of Greenville and Simpsonville! SPECS:

*Promotion dates: January 1 to March 31, 2020. Normal credit guidelines apply. Cannot be combined with any other promotion. Offer applies to loans of $10,000 or more not currently financed with GHFCU. $100 Cash Back will be disbursed when the loan closes.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

2-4pm | Sunday, February 9

3|

2 | MLS 1406081

Ashley Steigerwald, Wilson Associates 864.609.7219 ashley@wilsonassociates.net


SPONSORED

SPONSORED

Kitchen trends 2020 MELISSA MORRELL GREENVILLE’S AGENT 24/7 est. 2003

B

n story by JOEL R. LINN, PRINCIPAL DESIGNER

FOREST KITCHEN DESIGN STUDIO

Light & Bright

White won’t quit — data from national manufacturers show this. There is a recent divergence, though, between warmer, creamier whites and the cooler, slightly grayer whites. This light and bright look is typically contrasted against natural or jewel-tone splashes in certain areas such as the kitchen island.

Jewel Tones

As mentioned before, jewel tones, especially in greens and blues, are big. Blues have been big, but jasper greens as well as hunter or brighter true greens are trending upward. We encourage clients to go bold in powder rooms, and the vanity color is often the key place to compliment a more subdued kitchen.

High-Sheen or Super-Matte Materials

High-sheen materials are being favored, even if monochromatic, to create a stunning, clean look. High-gloss tiles in simple geometric patterns are big. High-gloss acrylic cabinet doors are sharp and crisp looking. Representing the other end of the sheen spectrum are the super-matte materials. Leathered or honed stone countertops bring a softer feel and aesthetic to a kitchen, and super-matte lacquer cabinet finishes can soften a contemporary kitchen’s edge and make it feel truly liveable.

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Walnut

Walnut is everywhere in the furniture world, and this means kitchens too! Mid-century modern interior design is warranting perfect walnut use and we love it.

KINGSBRIDGE

6 Summerhall Glen Lane | $949,900 | 5 BR/4.5 BA | MLS# 1410177

Marble & Quartzite Counter-tops

We are strong advocates of natural stone such as marble because of its tremendous beauty, but to use it one must embrace it like the Europeans do — let it patina naturally and don’t be afraid of it. Quartzite — not to be confused with the ever-popular quartz — is another natural beauty of the counter-top world that is much more forgiving than marble.

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1040 W. Washington St | Suite B Greenville, SC | 864.326.0036 www.ForestKitchenDesign.com

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VILLAGE @ BENT CREEK

Ranges & Column Refrigerators

All-in-one ranges are on trend right now rather than separate cook tops and ovens. Stainless steel finishes continue to dominate, although some are bold enough to do a red range. Even though the 30-inch range continues to be industry standard, we plan a large share of kitchens utilizing 36- and 48-inchwide ranges. Refrigeration trends are moving toward separate refrigerator and freezer columns that can be mixed and matched and dressed in cabinetry fronts to completely appear as a cabinet, thus keeping aesthetic clean and integrated. The industry standard for refrigerators continues to be 36”, but we often plan combinations up to 48” wide.

S

169 Chandler Crest Court | $319,900 | 4 BR/3 BA | MLS# 1410703

R YE B U E S! N 0 I IV 0 0 NT $ 5 IN CE

W NE

CHANCELLORS PARK 1 Knightsbridge | $589,900 5 BR/5.5 BA | MLS# 1399807

PR

ICE

HIGHLAND CREEK 104 Carrick Drive | $339,900 4 BR/2.5 BA | MLS# 1407386

864.918.1734 GreenvilleAgent247.com *SOURCE: C. Dan Joyner Internal Records, 1/1/2017-12/31/2017.

FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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and REAL ESTATE

SOLD PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBDIVISION

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

$5,000,000 $2,149,687 $1,800,000 $1,138,000 $975,000 $761,500 $692,600 $655,000 $550,000 $515,000 $510,000 $503,900 $489,000 $448,000 $435,000 $423,000 $420,000 $410,734 $405,800 $396,650 $389,000 $375,000 $355,000 $350,000 $344,900 $335,000 $334,500 $330,000 $326,926 $325,000 $324,500 $320,000 $313,822 $310,130 $309,000 $305,000 $300,000 $289,927 $289,000 $287,120

C&C PROPERTY HOLDINGS LL 22 MAPLE STREET LLC 357 WOODRUFF LLC I & A PROPERTIES LLC COPE ANDREW M COPE KATHL HOWELL KATHRYN SHAW (JTW COATES KATHY L COATES WI ALLEN ANNETTE V (JTWROS) KUHLEN JAMES L JR (JTWRO PENDLETON STREET BAPTIST MORROW-FOX LAURA H (JTWR WATSON DREW M (JTWROS) W LEVA GLODETH LEVA RONALD HASTINGS JAMES JR (JTWRO DONLAN KRISTI TUCKER DON ALMAND LANDIS W (JTWROS) HALL BARBARA W (JTWROS) DOUGLAS ELIZABETH A (JTW FRANKENFIELD MONTE STEPH ALFARO JOSE F (JTWROS) CRAVEN RIGGS J CAROLINE SK BUILDERS INC COLON SARIAN RIVERA DYENSON MICHAEL J (JTWRO HARDEN ALLAN J OLSEN JEANNE MAPEL WALLACE DAVID L WALLACE BLUESTONE CONSTRUCTION L MURRAY HEENA PATEL (JTWR RUBIO NICHOLAS JAMES FER GRAMANN ROBERT J (JTWROS CARLAN CHERYL A (JTWROS) STAPLES JAMIE LEE SANTIAGO NORMA IRIS (JTW FITZGERALD RYAN H (JTWRO WESTON HOLDINGS LLC 404 GREEN AVENUE LLC SCHARPING KEVIN GREIN HOLLIE DELIGHT (JT LI JOY (JTWROS) VINAS JU

7021 AUGUSTA RD 284 OIL CAMP CREEK RD PO BOX 1537 206 WOODLAKE DR 53 PARTRIDGE LN 101 FERNWOOD LN 177 MARSHALL BRIDGE DR 305 OAKLAND AVE 226 OAK MEADOW DR PO BOX 2108 1209 E WASHINGTON ST UNIT 201 110 N MARKLEY ST APT 103 110 N MARKLEY ST UNIT 104 105 PARKSIDE DR 10 MARSHALL CT 213 FORT DR 175 OLD BOSWELL RD 210 GORDANVALE ST 24 JONES AVE 304 GRAYSON DR 50 MAYDELL AVE 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 204 E PARK AVE 1001 108 E FARIS RD 2 ASHFIELD CT 13 RICE ST 127 COVEY HILL CT 271 SWEETWATER HILLS DR 3423 ONEAL CHURCH RD 8 DELTA CT 1107 SUNSET LN 638 S PIEDMONT HWY 3345 W GEORGIA RD 105 MOHEGAN WAY 406 LONG HILL ST 9 NEAL ST 121 TINDAL AVE 101 RYDERS WAY 216 ROANOKE WAY 503 BRIAR OAKS LN

KATHERINES GARDEN SUGAR CREEK PEBBLECREEK AUGUSTA RD HILLS DUNEAN MILLS CASTLEWOOD STILLWOOD BELL'S CROSSING HERITAGE CREEK HERITAGE POINT NORTHGATE TRACE GLASTONBURY VILLAGE PARKSIDE AT LISMORE LISMORE PARK CANEBRAKE THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL KATHERINES GARDEN KATHERINES GARDEN FAIRVIEW CHASE FORESTDALE HEIGHTS ORCHARD CREST WILLOW GROVE LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK EDGEWOOD AT PARIS MTN HALF MILE LAKE DEL NORTE BATESVILLE FOREST HILLSIDE HEIGHTS WADE HAMPTON GARDENS DEVENGER PLACE RIVERSIDE CHASE DUNEAN MILLS BROOKWOOD COMMONS BRYSON HOLLOW

$286,760 $285,900 $285,000 $285,000 $284,000 $283,000 $276,850 $265,000 $263,500 $263,000 $263,000 $262,000 $261,332 $250,000 $250,000 $239,900 $237,000 $235,000 $233,000 $229,000 $226,850 $226,615 $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 $224,603 $222,500 $221,000 $220,000 $219,000 $217,500 $216,500 $215,200 $215,000 $215,000 $213,000 $211,000 $209,900 $207,735 $207,500

STRUB PETER M (JTWROS) S BIGGERT CHARLES L III (J BROWN ZACHARY SANDERS (J ANDERSON AMANDA JUDD (JT PAULSON DAVID RICHARD (J ESTES HARRISON ANDREW DAVIS ALISON (JTWROS) DA FELDMAN ALEXANDRA J NACRELLI DAVID M (JTWROS DOLAN LINDSAY LEE (JTWRO NEWTON MARISSA (JTWROS) SOUTHERN HOME SOLUTIONS HALL BARBARA W (JTWROS) JODOIN PAULINE R (JTWROS NOGUCHI HENRIQUE KENJI F KEELER JONATHAN D ABADIA PAOLA A (JTWROS) DIN NAILA (JTWROS) DIN Z JOHNSON ANNA LIA A (JTWR TALIAFERRO CINDY D FAMIL RODRIGUEZ LAURA INSCO CASSANDRA CAITLYNN KEELY CHRISTINE CORBITT PARKER C (JTWROS FISCHENICH JOSEPH RAYMON SIMONS JENNIFER L (JTWRO AMAKER DUSTIN J BAUR APRIL GRAHAM (JTWRO EUBANKS REBECCA BAHE (JT ARGUETA CARLOS ERNESTO ( FLESCH ANDREW T (JTWROS) TEC HOLDING LLC CWABS INC SERIES 2004-5 WEEKS ASHLEY HO HOI Q TUSTIN JENNIFER VOYTENKO NIKOLAY BALANCE JAMIE ELLEN DAWN BARRERA CARLOS EDUARDO MILLER ANTORIA ORIANA (J

803 ABBERLY TRL 124 SUGAR CREEK LN 16 PINE VIEW TER 4 HIGH HILL ST 5115 WETHEREDSVILLE RD 49 BLAKE ST 1140 WOODRUFF RD UNIT 106 320 SORONO DR 12 MIDDLEWICK CT 359 AMBERLEAF WAY 9 PENINSULA CT 502 S MAIN ST 175 OLD BOSWELL RD 15 HERITAGE POINT DR 900 N MAIN ST UNIT 19 112 FAUST PL 16 PARKWALK DR 112 STEEPLECHASE 311 KINGS MOUNTAIN DR 205 GOLDEN GATE PT APT 401 509 PRESLEY CT 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 37 HINDMAN RD 20 HEATHERFIELD DR 2700 EDWARDS RD 913 JOHN THOMAS WAY 503 HEATHRIDGE LN 124 LANSFAIR WAY 2418 E GEORGIA RD 32 COREY WAY 607 HALF MILE WAY 115 E FRONT ST 1600 S DOUGLASS RD 116 CONVERSE ST 209 RAVEN RD 403 WOODS LAKE RD PO BOX 4068 3 DUKE ST 409 HUNTINGDALE PL 9 CHELSEABROOK CT

PR ICE IM PR OV EM EN T

SAMPSON REAL ESTATE LLC WILD TURKEY ASSOCIATES L WILSON FAMILY PARTNERSHI STRATTON HILLS PROPERTIE RUGGIERI JEFFREY M CUNNINGHAM DIXON C PARSONS CHRISTINE W (JTW BONITATI CAROLYN GODBEY FRANK R L&G PROPERTY HOLDINGS LL GROOMS LINDSEY MARKLEY PLACE LLC MARKLEY PLACE LLC HOOTS ADAM MARION ALEXA J (JTWROS) SAIN JAMES L (JTWROS) WILLIAMS DONNA L MUNGO HOMES PROPERTIES L KLINE MARY ANN SK BUILDERS INC QUINN CAROLINE M (JTWROS WESWAL LLC COOK WILLIAM R FOSTER JOSEPH B WALKER TERESA J BLUESTONE CONSTRUCTION L ROPER CREEK PROPERTIES L JONES CATHERINE L CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC GARREN WILLIAM R AND GAR TALBOTT KEN H & PATRICIA LOCKLEAR CHRISTOPHER LEE RELIANT HOMES SC LLC NVR INC MARK THOENNES BUILDERS L GAMBRELL EDDIE DON DODDS SUSAN K SK BUILDERS INC WARRINGTON JONATHAN M (J NVR INC

26 Gatwick Lane, Cobblestone

4 BR/3 BA • $744,900 • MLS 1399994 Carole Atkison | 864-787-1067

PR ICE IM PR OV EM EN T

SUBDIVISION HALTON GREEN VIZCAYA BROOKSIDE FOREST OAK MEADOWS THE RICHLAND MARKLEY PLACE MARKLEY PLACE RIVER WALK KILGORE FARMS COPPER CREEK GRAYSON POINTE MAYDELL PARK BOWERS CORNER CHEROKEE PARK KANATENAH KENSINGTON ROPER PROFESSIONAL PARK ROCKWOOD PARK ONEAL VILLAGE ASHFORD WOODSIDE GLEN RIVERSTONE AUGUSTA ROAD RANCHES RYDERS RIDGE FORRESTER HEIGHTS BRIAR OAKS

PROPERTY TRANSFERS FOR JANUARY 6-10

3111 Highway 56 South, Clinton

6 BR/6.5 BA • $724,000 • MLS 1388991 Susan Tallman | 864-923-1958

DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SWEENEY IRENE M HAMILTON TRACI (JTWROS) ELROD ELIZABETH ANN SMITH JAMES R SHOPS ON CLEVELAND LLC BOWEN DAVID A 910 LAURENS ROAD LLC GRANT WILLIAM H EMDE NICOLE E KULIG JANET V (JTWROS) ANDERS ANITA WILLIAMS KENNETH L MCMULLAN PATRICIA JANE LESCANO SUSAN M BAKER NICOLE M (JTWROS) BROWN JAMIE R KIGER NICOLE BYRD FERNANDEZ-RUBIO NICHOLAS HAAS LESLIE FAYE SK BUILDERS INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL EASTMAN BENJAMIN DAVID PRICE JENNIFER (JTWROS) SMITH LENA F ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L D R HORTON INC RICE MARGARET J (JTWROS) MAYFIELD MIRANDA LYNNE ARLEDGE DAVID H (JTWROS) STRATTON SARA G INDWELLINGS INC ROWAN MARK D CAPPELMANN WILLIAM E JR BOITER FLORINE MCKINNEY CRAIG BETHANY C ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC GVL HOMES LLC NVR INC AKS HOLDINGS LLC

TBB OR BRI NG Y OUR OW N PL AN

HOME

0 Bennett Street, North Main Area

4 BR/2.5 BA • $650,000 • MLS 1409314 Leigh A Irwin | 864-380-7755 Debbie K Levato | 864-380-9150

Exceptional agents. Exceptional results.

13 Meredith Lane, Henderson Forest 3 BR/2 BA • $299,900 • MLS 1399764 Margaret M Marcum | 864-420-3125

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

35 Meyers Court, North Main

3 BR/2.5 BA • $279,900 • MLS 1405470 Carole Atkison | 864-787-1067

115 Fairway Dr, Laurens

LO T

4 BR/3.5BA • $375,000 • MLS 1404768 Susan Tallman | 864-923-1958

AC RE

10 Knotty Pine Ct, Ridge Water

6 BR/3.5BA • $399,900 • MLS 1407676 Kate A Anderson | 864-363-3634

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4 BR/3.5 BA • $465,000 • MLS 1406566 Pamela McCartney | 864-630-7844

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501 Pawleys Dr, Five Forks Plantation

125 Martin Court, Williamston $34,500 • MLS 1410811 Debbie Levato 864-380-9150

www.SpauldingGroup.net 864.458.8585


Featured Listings January 2020

REDUCED

TRAXLER PARK

KILGORE PLANTATION

COBBLESTONE

THORNBLADE

37 Rock Creek Drive Build your custom home in the GCC-Traxler Park area on almost 1/2 lot! Adjacent lot is also available for sale. These are the last lots remaining on popular Rock Creek Drive. Bring your own architect & builder to create your dream home!

226 Kilgore Circle Elegant Georgian 4BR/3f & 3h BA + bonus, beautifully sited on over an acre lot & magnificently landscaped! Lovely detailing throughout this immaculate home, hardwoods on main, rich warm family room, very spacious kitchen, fabulous brick patio.

26 Gatwick Lane Beautiful 4BR/3BA plus large Bonus Room home on private cul-delsac lot. Open floor plan. Master plus another BR on main level. Screened Porch and deck overlook .96 acre large fenced yard. 3 car garage.

110 Golden Wings Way Located on a quiet street with lots of backyard privacy. Fabulous 5 BR/4.5BA basement home, almost 5400 SF! Perfect home for a growing family w/2 bonus rooms up & basement that could easily be in-law ste or teen quarters!

MLS# 1409202 $1,189,000

MLS#1398148 $769,900

MLS#1399994 $759,900

MLS#1403062 $678,000

Leigh Irwin (864) 380.7755

Lisa Norton Reese (864) 414.3477

Carole Atkison (864) 787.1067

JUST LISTED

Jennifer Van Gieson (864) 590.4441

REDUCED

CHANTICLEER TOWNS

RIVER WALK

ASHETON LAKES

FIVE FORKS PLANTATION

109 Hidden Hills Great single family residence in an exquisite neighborhood. Nestled among a canopy of tall mature trees this masonry stucco home is a wonderful setting & 3800+SF. Large master on main w/2 BR’s & open bonus room or an upstairs family room.

113 Parkside This wonderful craftsman style, 4BR/3.5BA + large bonus home is located in the sought after River Walk neighborhood! The open floorplan is perfect for entertaining. Beautifully landscaped fenced yard. Grilling porch.

603 Mossy Ledge Ln Open floorplan w/hdwd floors throughout main. 2 story GR w/fp. Master ste on main w/large walk in closet & spa like BA. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths and bonus ppstairs. Large screened porch overlooking beautifully landscaped, fenced yard.

501 Pawleys Drive Beautiful Craftsman Style home with 3 car garage! 4BR/3.5BA, master & office on main. Open FP w GORGEOUS FR and kitchen! Award winning schools and amenities. Fenced yard and deck.

MLS#1402634 $635,000

MLS#1403269 $549,000

MLS#1409677 $475,000

MLS#1406566 $465,000

Tim Keagy (864) 905.3304

Margaret Marcum (864)420.3125

REDUCED

Margaret Marcum (864)420.3125

JUST LISTED

Pam McCartney (864) 630.7844

REDUCED

BLUE RIDGE

REDCROFT

CYPRESS RUN

HAWTHORNE RIDGE

55 N.Packs Mountain Road Welcome to this traditional, southern-style home on over 2 acres! This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home boasts generous size rooms to meet all of your needs, and offers a freshly painted main floor! It is move-in ready!

513 Allenton Way This 5BR/4.5BA home is a “Rare GEM”!! Master + 2BA’s on main. Upstairs is a teenage or in-law suite with BR/full BA & office. Formal Dining & HUGE kitchen. Open floor plan . Downstairs w/ BR/BA & bonus room.

101 Bouchillion Dr Statley 4BR/3BA brick home. All new paint, new custom mahogany front door, oak hdwd floors, new granite cntrtops, backsplash, under cabinet lighting, brand new Jenn Air appliances with a downdraft gas cooktop range.

209 Jones Peak Dr Centrally located between Simpsonville & Greenville. Shopping is just 10 minutes away in either direction. Top rated Rudolph Gordon schools! One drop-off and one pick-up as this is the only school in Greenville County that is K-8.

MLS#1407781 $440,000

MLS#1403534 $399,900

MLS#1410332 $389,900

MLS#1409350 $249,900

Stephanie Miller (864) 915.6076

Lisa Norton Reese (864) 414.3477

Sam Hankins (864) 561.8119

Kelsey Bishop (404) 308.1524

© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Your Home’s Best Friend.

Match up with an agent that’s right for you and find your new home at www.cdanjoyner.com.


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

ARTS & CULTURE

‘AXEL’ ARRIVES... n story by PAUL HYDE photo courtesy of CIRQUE DU SOLEIL

The fearless acrobats of Cirque du Soleil love a challenge. That’s why the contemporary circus company staged its latest show, “Axel,” on ice. “We thought it was important to explore new regions,” said artistic director Fabrice Lemire, speaking on the phone from a tour stop in Cincinnati. “We love to keep our shows fresh — to reinvent the wheel!” “Axel” arrives at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena Feb. 13 with six shows through Feb. 16. This production, only a few months old, features 40 skaters, acrobats and musicians. Fans can expect the usual eye-popping and death-defying aerial acrobatics for which Cirque du Soleil is famous. Added to the mix this time is world-class skating. The show is propelled by a hard-charging rock band. Everything is surrounded, of course, by surreal sets and aesthetics. It takes 15 tractor-trailers to transport the lights and expansive Cirque scenery from city to city.

FANCIFUL STORYLINE

As usual for Cirque shows, there’s a fanciful storyline behind the proceedings: The young musician Axel falls for the captivating Lei. Together they jet off on a fast-moving quest through fantastic and colorful worlds to retrieve the stolen light from the mystical Vi. “Axel” is actually the second show Cirque has staged on ice. The first, several years ago, was “Crystal,” for which Lemire also was artistic director. Greenville is one of the first stops for “Axel” on a multi-year tour that will take the show across the U.S. and likely to Europe and elsewhere. It was designed last summer in and around Montreal, the home of Cirque du Soleil. What does Lemire, the artistic director, love most about the show? “What I love is to see a performer really get outside of his or her comfort zone,” Lemire said. “I like to see artists grow. When a performer is surprising not only you but also himself or herself, that’s very exciting.”

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S “AXEL” » FEB. 13-16 | TIMES VARY » BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA » $53 TO $131 BONSECOURSARENA.COM 24

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7


Greenville Theatre

LIFE CAN BE

HARD WITHOUT

THE CARD The ArtCard makes a great Valentine’s Day gift!

Buy-One-Get-One Free Tickets With a donation of $50 or more to the Metropolitan Arts Council, MAC, you will receive an ArtCard which entitles you to buyone-get-one-free tickets for one time at each of the following venues for one full year! The ArtCard is a great way to sample the fantastic performing arts in Greenville at a substantial savings. In just two uses the ArtCard pays for itself.

*select shows

Get your ArtCard today!

You can donate through PayPal on our website, over the phone or at our office in downtown Greenville.

*MainStage productions

16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com/donate @macARTScouncil | #gvlARTS


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ARTS & CULTURE

THINGS TO SEE & DO

PAUL'S PICK

‘Aladdin’ takes magic carpet ride into Peace Center

SUMMER

PAUL HYDE Contributor

n photo by DEEN VAN MEER

CAMPS “ALADDIN” Ask the star of “Aladdin” to reveal his favorite moment in the stage show, and he responds without hesitation. “It’s flying on the carpet!” That’s the scene when the young couple, Aladdin and Jasmine, sing “A Whole New World,” perhaps the musical’s most familiar song, while soaring on an enchanted carpet. “It’s pure magic for the audience but also for myself and the actress playing Jasmine,” said Jonah Ho‘okano, who performs the role of Aladdin.

It’s pure magic for the audience but also for myself and the actress playing Jasmine.” -Jonah Ho‘okano, Aladdin

weekly schedule online now registration opens march 1

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Disney’s “Aladdin,” a show for the whole family, arrives at the Peace Center on Wednesay, Feb. 12, for a two-week run, with 16 performances scheduled. The story, based on the ancient set of tales known as “The Thousand and One Nights,” follows the young Aladdin, who find a magic lamp and is given three wishes from the Genie inside. He transforms himself into a prince to win the heart of the princess Jasmine. With music by Broadway hitmeister Alan Menken, the show features a memorable score with consummate showstoppers such as “Friend Like Me” and several songs that were not part of the hit 1992 Disney animated film of “Aladdin.”

» FEB. 12-23 | TIMES VARY » PEACE CENTER » $40-$110 PEACECENTER.ORG Tuneful ballads alternate with full-ensemble dazzlers. “What the ensemble does in ‘Friend Like Me’ is insanity. It’s quick change after quick change after quick change,” Ho‘okano said. “You won’t know how the ensemble does it, and I still don’t know either.” LAVISH PRODUCTION The national tour is a notably lavish production with an array of colorful costumes and sets that require 30 tractor-trailers for transportation from city to city. “I think we’re using the most tractortrailers of Broadway tours that are out now,” Ho‘okano said, speaking from a tour stop in Orlando. It’s a high-tech show as well, with 84 illusions and special effects, such as Ho‘okano’s favorite, the flying carpet. “People always ‘ooh’ and ‘aah’ when the carpet flies,” he said. Ho‘okano, who grew up in Hawaii, created the role of Aladdin in a recent Disney Cruise Line version of “Aladdin: A Musical Spectacular.” He’s also played the role in other performing arts venues, such as at Tokyo Disney and Disnelyand in California. “I’m playing a dream role,” he said.


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

MUSIC

DRIVING MELODIES:

NC musician joins NASCAR legend n story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo by DOLPH RAMSEUR

WINTERSKUNK MUSIC FEST

GIVE YOUR VALENTINE A GIFT THEY’LL ! FOR HIM!

» SATURDAY, FEB. 8 | 2PM » THE SPINNING JENNY » $40/ADVANCE | $45/AT DOOR THESPINNINGJENNYGREER.COM If it seems like there’s a real sense of intimacy, a sort of warm, homespun vibe to “Interstate Lullaby” the new album by veteran North Carolina singer/songwriter David Childers and his band, The Serpents, that might have something to do with joyed being in a recording studio. I just where (and how) it was recorded. Childers, a skilled, incisive song- like playing live shows; that’s the most writer who sits comfortably at the three- important thing to me. And I probably enway intersection of rock, folk and country joyed this project more than any I’ve ever just like Guy Clark or John Hiatt used to, done, because it was more like playing a made the album in his boss’ living room, live show. We were putting this part here playing the songs live with his band and and this part there, sort of building Frankenstein’s monster right there on the spot.” recording them in all-analog sound. Childers will no doubt be spotlighting His boss, by the way, is Dolph Ramseur, the some of those beautiful monsters this owner of Ramseur Records, Childers’ label. “I’ve worked with Dolph a long time,” Saturday at The Spinning Jenny in Greer. Childers says. “I trust his instincts, and Childers will be part of the 2020 WinterSkunk Music Fest, an that’s how he wantoffshoot of the ed to do it. And that I probably enjoyed indoor popular multi-act Alwas fine with me. bino Skunk Festival. The other guys were this project more than He’ll be performing totally into the idea, any I’ve ever done, a duo set with fellow too. My son Robert plays drums, he has a because it was more like s i n g e r /s o n g w r i t e r Kyle Petty. lot of say in how we playing a live show.” Yes, THAT Kyle do things, and he was -David Childers Petty. always a proponent of The former NASthe old-school, onetake, everybody-playing-in-the-room-at- CAR driver and TV personality has long pursued music as a second career, and the-same-time approach.” The result is a natural-sounding collec- he and Childers began performing a few tion of easy-rolling songs, with acoustic and years ago, once again under the aegis of electric instruments meshing together un- Dolph Ramseur. “Dolph introduced us, I guess initially derneath Childers’ blurry howl of a voice. The 14 rough-hewn gems on the album might because he wanted to see what we could do not grab you by the throat (Childers is far too together,” Childers says. “And we instantly subtle a writer for that), but once a tune like hit it off; I liked the guy immediately. It’s the gentle, loping ballad “Twilight Road” gets hard not to; he’s always ready to shake in your head, good luck getting it out. And the your hand and he’s not a stuck-up dude. intimate, live-show feel that Ramseur was He didn’t act like he was a celebrity or anyperhaps hoping for comes through in spades. thing, although he IS. I’ve had quite a few “The atmosphere in the room when we free meals just by hanging out with him. recorded it was warm” Childers says. “It But we started doing shows and I liked his was friendly, And everybody was on the songs a lot. I think he’s a really good songsame page. As a performer, I’ve never en- writer, and I’d like to see him grow more.”

ON SALE NOW! A TRIBUTE TO NAT KING COLE AND THE LADIES OF SONG

JOHN PIZZARELLI & ALICE CATHERINE FOR (in wonderland) THEM! RUSSELL APRIL 21 MARCH 19

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“WILDLY INVENTIVE. YOU’LL BE BREATHLESS FROM LAUGHING!” FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Houston Press

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

for TEZ SHERARD, keeping the beat is a family thing VINCENT HARRIS Contributor

There are few sights on the Upstate music scene more familiar or welcome than Tez Sherard sitting behind his drums with a smile on his face, laying down beats for any number of bands. Equally skilled in rock, country, soul and jazz, Sherard came by his vocation naturally. “My dad was a musician, and my mom was a singer,” Sherard says, “so I grew up in a very musical household.” That being said, Sherard’s most likely path seemed like guitar or bass playing, simply because that’s what his dad played. But Tez actually became a drummer because his father needed a hand doing something else. “My dad taught guitar and bass, and he would have a lot of his students come for lessons,” Sherard says. “And timing was always a factor with him trying to teach them chord progressions and chord patterns. He would always end up having to turn on a drum machine in order to keep time. And eventually, he’d have me come in and clap while he was teaching his students. And one day he said, ‘Wow, you’ve got good rhythm! Let me get a drum set in here.’ And I really took a liking to it and spent a lot of time on it, and the rest is history.” Well, not quite. First off, Sherard had to move beyond his toy drum kit, one that didn’t stand up too well to his constant playing. “It was a junior drum set with all professional cymbals,” Sherard says with a laugh.

That’s what I’ve always tried to do with my playing; play the song, be truthful to the elements of the song, but at the same time put my fingerprints on it. -Tez Sherard, drummer

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

TEZ SHERARD “There’s a picture of me with a kiddie set with these big ol’ ’80s Zildjian cymbals around the drum set, because I was hitting the little toy cymbals that came with the set so hard that I was cracking them. So he eventually got me a full set.” Sherard’s dad wasn’t done making modifications just yet, though. Once his son started playing live shows, there were some other obstacles to overcome. “I was a child, and being so short, having short legs, they never could find a drum throne that was small enough for me to reach the pedals,” Sherard says, “so I would stand up when I played. So he had the bright idea of taking an old barstool and cutting the legs down so low that I could actually sit and hit the pedals. But that also meant you couldn’t see me. Everybody could hear the drums and see sticks flying all over the place, but nobody could see my head!” Sherard grew into a drummer who’s as versatile as they come, and he credits one of the biggest bands of the 1970s for showing him that musicians don’t have to stay within one genre.

Instrument: Drums Plays with: The Jamie Wright Band, Nathan Angelo, Edwin McCain, Carolina Coast Band, Wanda Johnson, J-E-T, many more

“Earth, Wind & Fire were a big influence on me,” he says. “I always knew that I gravitated to them, but I never understood that the basis of the band was jazz, and then they started to move in the soul and funk directions later on. But the original blueprint of Earth, Wind & Fire was jazz fusion. So as I got older, that got me into a lot of different styles of music.” In any given week, Sherard could be playing with as many as 20 musicians in different configurations, and he can fit right in like a chameleon. But he says his ultimate goal is always the same, no matter what style of music he’s playing. “There was a drummer named Dennis Chambers, who has recorded and played

with everybody,” he says, “but no matter what he’s playing, you can hear his fingerprints. That’s what I’ve always tried to do with my playing: Play the song, be truthful to the elements of the song, but at the same time put my fingerprints on it.”

presented by


Andrew Stevovich February 5 through March 29, 2020

Andrew Stevovich (born 1948) moved from Austria to the United States in 1950. He grew up in Washington, D.C., and as a child often visited the National Gallery of Art, where he was captivated by the Renaissance paintings that continue to influence his work. Spanning almost three decades, his paintings depict ordinary men and women in mundane situations and locations, ranging from restaurants and bars to public transportation. With their clean design, vibrant colors, and exquisitely finished surfaces, the works are informed by the Old Master paintings he first loved as a boy. This is “gestural” painting for the Simpsons Generation.

ALSO ON VIEW:

Andrew Stevovich, born 1948 Cosmetic Counter, 2015

The Real Thing Impressionism and the South Jamie Wyeth: Our Own (and a loan) Andrew Wyeth: Eight Decades Art and Artists of South Carolina: David Drake, Jasper Johns, William H. Johnson, and Grainger McKoy Bryan Collier: Dave the Potter

GCMA Journal Stetovich.indd 1

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

admission free

1/31/20 3:15 PM


ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

TRAVEL

How to travel like a local: Downtown Asheville Traversing downtown Asheville, North Carolina, like a local means walking. And, since you can’t be underdressed in Asheville — running shoes, flip-flops, boots of any kind and age are the norm — ambling blocks between food and drink stops can feel like an escape from the norm. I’m asked weekly where to go in Asheville. So much is notable, both old and new, that I’ll focus here on downtown with a promise to highlight other districts soon. So, you want to go to Cúrate? Yep, locals love Katie Button’s mecca of tapas too. Here’s how to get in: go at 2:30 p.m. Sit at the bar and chat with a sous chef and enjoy the skill of this staff at its best. A skip away is the reopened Asheville Art Museum. The expansion is wrapped in glass and its collection of Black Mountain College art is unparalleled. If it’s Thursday, then Perspective Café (on the fifth floor) is open until 9 p.m.; plan for fantastic small

plates, noteworthy cocktails and mountain air on the sculpture deck. No trip to Asheville is complete without a lap through Tops for Shoes; the store, nearly a block long, carries every brand you covet in every imaginable size. The sale room is the stuff of legend. 5 Walnut wine bar offers a fantastic bythe-glass list and feels just right after brewery stops. Live music is on the calendar every night, and there is usually a sociable dog or two under a table and a knot of locals who will dance with friends and tourists alike. End a day in Asheville at The Montford Rooftop Bar. Chef Philip Bollhoefer runs a stellar kitchen with a smart, delicious cocktail program and the views are everything you drive up the mountain for.

WHERE TO STAY: • The Foundry Hotel, Curio Collection (in the restored Foundry & Supply Co. complex and home to Benne on Eagle) • Hyatt Place Downtown • Cambria Hotel Downtown BEST BEER: • Thirsty Monk • Burial (because you need a donut hole with your stout) • Bhramari (order the pickled eggs with marmalade)

2/7/20

Above: A woman enjoys shopping in downtown Asheville photo provided by EXPLOREASHEVILLE.COM

SOUL SHOPPING: • Cultivated Cocktails (sip a cocktail and then buy the ingredients to make it at home) • Battery Park Book Exchange and Champagne Bar • High Climate Tea

BREAKFAST: • All Day Darling (what we’re missing in Greenville in so many ways) • Over Easy Cafe • Button & Co. Bagels BRUNCH: • Limones • Posana (you’ll never know this is a dedicated gluten-free kitchen) • Chestnut LUNCH: • Chai Pani (delicious plates each and every time by the dream team of Meherwan Irani) • 67 Biltmore • Aux Bar

Above: People enjoy beers at Bhramari Brewing Company photo provided by EXPLOREASHEVILLE.COM

EASY DINNER: • White Labs Kitchen & Tap • Salsas • Red Ginger Dim Sum RESERVATION DINNER: • Cucina 24 (start next door at their sip and snack purveyor: Contrada) • Rhubarb • Benne on Eagle (Chefs John Fleer and Ashleigh Shanti pay culinary homage to The Block) NEWLY NOTABLE: • The Greenhouse, by Noble Cider • Antidote • The Times (order the inexplicably good Talking in Cursive)

Shining Stars! Greenville County Schools

For more information on Shining Stars : Teacher Recruiting Event

GreenvilleJournal.com/Greenville-County-Schools 30

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

n story by STEPHANIE BURNETTE

COCKTAILS: • Sovereign Remedies (food and drink driven by farmers, foragers and chef Graham House) • The Imperial Life • The Montford Rooftop Bar GET A MEMBERSHIP: • Little Jumbo (perfectly priced, perfectly made cocktails and parking, practically downtown) • Top of the Monk • The Crow and Quill (unmarked bar with a wall of whiskey) SOUTH SLOPE TRIFECTA: • Catawba Brewing Co. (drink like a local) • Vortex Doughnuts (apple fritters are for the early birds) • Buxton Hall Barbecue

TEACHER

RECRUITING EVENT

Monday, March 2


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Museums commemorate 50th anniversary of school integration n story by ANNA LEE | photo by GREG BECKNER

It’s our hope that because schools are closed, parents can bring their children to learn more about this important time in our shared history. -Beth Brotherton, communications director for Greenville County Schools

“This is an opportunity for visitors who’ve never experienced the museum to bring their family for free,” said Beth Brotherton, communications director for Greenville County Schools. “It’s our hope that because schools are closed, parents can bring their children to learn more about this important time in our shared history.” The Children’s Museum of the Upstate, 300 College St., will follow the exhibit with a one-night performance of “One Voice: A Black History Narrative” at 7 p.m.

» FEB. 17 | 3-6PM » UPCOUNTRY HISTORY MUSEUM » FREE UPCOUNTRYHISTORY.ORG

"ONE VOICE: A BLACK HISTORY NARRRATIVE" » FEB. 17 | 7PM » THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF THE UPSTATE » $10 TCMUPSTATE.ORG Performed by local entertainer and emcee JDew, “One Voice” is a 180-year journey of the African-American story told through the voices of iconic figures in black history, according to a release. JDew will play roles ranging from James Weldon Johnson, the writer of the “Negro National Anthem,” to former President Barack Obama, the release said. He’ll be joined by Elaine Whittenberg Boyce, who played an integral role in desegregating Greenville’s classrooms as a student, the release said. Tickets to the “One Voice” performance are $10 and include light refreshments.

THE HIT BROADWAY MUSICAL

FEBRUARY 12 – 23 PEACECENTER.ORG

©Disney

Two Upstate museums are commemorating the 50th anniversary of school integration in Greenville County with special activities on Feb. 17. The Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St., is partnering with the school district to host a free exhibit from 3-6 p.m. The exhibit includes “history markers” serving as oral historians and a documentary-style video. District- and school-level documents and memorabilia will be on display in addition to the museum’s existing civil rights and Black History Month exhibits.

FREE EXHIBIT FEATURING HISTORY MARKERS

B E G I N S W E D N E S DAY ! Puzzle Solutions

Challenge yourself with the weekly puzzles, see page 40

presented by

FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

DATE NIGHT

artscalendar February 7 - 13

METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL First Friday Feb. 7 ~ 409-1050 GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Past & Present Feb. 8 ~ 467-3000 PEACE CENTER James Gregory – Crock Pots & Chicken Legs Feb. 8 ~ 467-3000 YOUNTS CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS The Kingsmen Feb. 8 ~ 409-1050 COFFEE UNDERGROUND Say What! Poetry Feb. 9 ~ 298-0494 THE BEETHOVEN ODYSSEY Concert No. 2 of 13 Feb. 9 ~ 271-4883 PEACE CENTER Third Coast Percussion Feb. 10 ~ 467-3000 CENTRE STAGE Cheek to Cheek: The Great American Songbook Feb. 11 ~ 233-6733 PEACE CENTER Disney’s Aladdin Feb. 12-23 ~ 467-3000 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM Caroline Ulrich, Flute & Lillian Buss Pearson, Piano Feb. 13 ~ 520-8807 NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERSITY THEATRE Truth Be Told Feb. 13 ~ 663-0169 CENTRE STAGE I Feel Good: A Trip to Motown Through Feb. 16 ~ 233-6733 METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL Zodiac: Works by Garland Mattox Through Feb. 21 ~ 467-3132 GREER CENTER FOR THE ARTS Works by Jose Romero Through Feb. 29 ~ 848-5383 METRO. ARTS COUNCIL @ CENTRE STAGE Works by David Armstrong Through Mar. 6 ~ 233-6733 FURMAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Art by Matthew Baumgardner Through Mar. 31 ~ 294-2191 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM Trumpets, Weird & Wonderful Through Apr. 12 ~ 520-8807 CAROLINA MUSIC MUSEUM 7 Centuries of Keyboard Instruments Through Apr. 24 ~ 520-8807

www.GREENVILLEARTS.com 16 Augusta St. | 864.467.3132

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Dinner&a Show n DINNER story by ARIEL TURNER | photo PROVIDED

n A SHOW story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo LIBBY GAMBLE

where we're EATING BASIL THAI

Basil Thai is in the downstairs area of Aloft Greenville

9 NORTH LAURENS ST, GREENVILLE

Parking in one place and not having to leave the area for multiple activities brings with it a small sense of joy. So enjoy the convenience of parking in the Aloft parking garage, hanging a left from the breezeway and landing at Basil Thai Cuisine, just underneath the show location. Tucked away in One City Plaza at 9. N. Laurens St., Greenville, Basil’s Greenville spot is not as visually prominent as the original King Street Charleston location, but the basil rolls are just as fresh and flavorful. Since you’ll likely be drinking plenty upstairs at the show, opt for hot tea service for a pick-me-up with dinner.

BASIL THAI IS THE REALIZATION OF THE LIFELONG DREAM OF HENRY AND CHAI EANG, WHO IMMIGRATED TO THE U.S. FROM CAMBODIA

RECOMMENDED DISHES: Fresh basil rolls (two) ............$6.95

Shrimp, rice noodles, lettuce, bean sprouts and basil, wrapped in a rice paper wrapper. Served with chef Suntorn’s house sauce

Masaman curry ....................$15.50 Potatoes, onions and cashew nuts

Basil duck (to share) ............$26.95 Boneless half duck, deep-fried, topped with basil, bell peppers, onions, garlic, snow peas and button mushrooms. Stir-fried with the house Basil Sauce

what we're SEEING APRIL B. & THE COOL AT ALOFT GREENVILLE

April Bennett was once a familiar face on the Greenville music scene, a compelling frontwoman who could captivate a crowd with an acoustic guitar or lay down sinuous, seductive funk-soul-rock grooves with her fantastic backing band, The Cool. April B. relocated to Asheville, North Carolina, a few years back, though, and we don’t get as many chances to see her around here. That’s a shame, because she and her band have developed by leaps and bounds since heading up to North Carolina, adding guitarist J.P. Miller and becoming a more explosive, joyous outfit that can jam all night or drive home a pinpoint-precise groove. Take this chance to see her and The Cool back in town this weekend.

APRIL B. & THE COOL DRAWS STYLE AND INSPIRATION FROM HIP-HOP, SOUL, R&B, FUNK, ROCK, JAZZ AND REGGAE MUSIC

APRIL B. & THE COOL » SATURDAY, FEB. 9 | 9PM » ALOFT GREENVILLE W XYZ® BAR » 5 N. LAURENS ST., GREENVILLE » FREE APRILBMUSIC.COM


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

EAT & DRINK

Young chef heads Bar Mars

Herring Chamber Ensemble of the Greenville Chorale presents:

“Music of Then and Now”

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH | photo by SARAH COCHRAN

Sunday, February 23, 2020 – 3:00 pm Charles E. Daniel Chapel, Furman University

At just 24 years old, it’s fair to say Jen Anderson is objectively on the younger side for someone running her own kitchen. Anderson recently came on board as the head chef at Bar Mars, the new cocktail bar and restaurant that operates out of the old Golden Brown & Delicious location on Pendleton Street. Although the GB&D name is still painted on the side of the building (for now, that is), Anderson is already bringing her unique style of smallplate, made-from-scratch, elevated bar food to the Village of West Greenville.

I want it to be simple, but then there’s always a little element of surprise: the familiar and the unfamiliar.” -Jen Anderson, head chef, Bar Mars “It’s very important to be to be respectful of the history and everything Alex has put into this space,” Anderson said, referring to Alex George, the co-owner of Bar Mars and head chef at GB&D. Anderson got her start working under George in the GB&D kitchen in 2016. With no formal training — she actually has a degree in interior design — Anderson developed her style on the fly, with GB&D acting as her informal culinary school. Since GB&D has moved to its new location in The Commons, Anderson said the challenge for her was how to reinvent the old space while also paying proper homage to its history. The burger is a good example of that challenge. Anderson wanted to keep the simplicity of GB&D’s popular burger, while still offering something unique. “There’s always a little element of surprise: the familiar and the unfamiliar,” she said. That focus on balance drives the everevolving Bar Mars menu, which includes

staples like mac and cheese, French fries and salads, as well as Southern favorites like hushpuppies and fried cauliflower. There are also more unique options like pork belly bao dumplings and sautéed oyster with shiitake mushrooms and soft egg. “When I get a thumbs-up from everybody else I work with, that’s when I know the dish is done,” she said. Bar Mars is operated primarily by just four people. Besides Anderson in the kitchen, there’s Chris George, previously of the Anchorage, who runs the creative cocktail services. Former GB&D food truck worker Justin Klack is the jack-of-all trades and so-called “prep master,” according to Anderson. And Sarah Cochran is the business mind and in-house photographer. “Everything builds on itself,” Anderson said. “Moving forward, it’s still going to be the four of us, everyone doing their part.”

The magnificent 24-voice Herring Chamber Ensemble will feature works by Dan Forrest, Mark Kilstofte, Eric Whitacre, and John Tavener.  Last season, the Chorale performed Handel’s Messiah, Parts One and Two.  The Herring Ensemble will complete the work with Messiah, Part Three, joined by a chamber orchestra to perform this beautiful music “as Handel himself would have heard it.” For tickets, call 864-467-3000 or visit www.greenvillechorale for more information.

What makes this burger special? Japanese milk bun with poppy seeds Fried onion rings Classic American cheese DOUBLE patties

Special steak sauce mayo

BAR MARS:

1269 Pendleton St. Greenville FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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EAT & DRINK

a

Super Way

The

PAIR to remember

Finding the right drink to complement your Valentine’s Day chocolate may be trickier than you thought n story by ARIEL TURNER | photo by WILL CROOKS

to Feed This Winter

WINTER SUPERBLEND™ THE SEASON’S SUPERFOOD FOR YOUR BIRDS Ever wonder what it takes for wild birds to survive the winter season? Even when temperatures are milder, it takes a lot of energy to make it through winter’s longer hours of darkness. You can help by offering Winter SuperBlend™ available only at Wild Birds Unlimited. It provides a super-boost of energy and fat essential for winter survival. Visit our store to learn how you can help the birds this season.

Locally Owned and Operated

626 Congaree Road 864-234-2150 www.wbu.com/greenville Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5 Bird Food • Feeders • Nesting Boxes Hardware • Bath & Garden

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

Brushing your teeth and then taking a giant swig of orange juice — that’s how James Alford of Foxcroft Wine Co. compares the palate experience of badly paired chocolate and wine. But that contradicts the marketing. Look around the few weeks before Valentine’s Day, and you’ll see images of red wine and chocolates suggested as the perfect gift for your loved one. The obvious message: All red wine and dark chocolate taste good together.

It’s important to make people understand, we’re talking about something that is actually scientific.” -James Alford, Foxcroft Wine Co. “Wrong,” Alford says. Pairing a dry red with a sweet bite is contrary to the science behind which flavors enhance each other. Tasting an almost no-sugar drink with a high-sugar dessert won’t improve either one, and in fact, will cause an unpleasant sensation that may make you think you really don’t like the wine you’re tasting. “One thing with a lot of sugar and one with almost no sugar don’t pair well together,” Alford says. The result will bring out the tannins and acidity of the wine to an uncomfortable level for most people. Alford recommends pairing a sweet thing with another sweet thing — for in-

stance, a sweeter red wine with a chocolate truffle — which will cause the sugars to essentially cancel each other out and then allow you to taste the other flavors in the wine or chocolate. Elizabeth McDaniel, owner of LaRue Fine Chocolates, has some guidance for those wondering what they should pair for the quintessential Valentine’s Day gift, with some consideration for people’s tastes. “I think people should do whatever makes them happy,” she says. “If having a highly tannic Napa Valley cab makes you happy, then do it.” But, she says, if you’ve had that toothpaste-and-orange-juice experience, she’s spent the last several years homing in on her recommendations. At the end of February, McDaniel is opening her first brick-and-mortar chocolaterie in the Poe West development in the Village of West Greenville, where she will pair her handcrafted high-end chocolates and desserts with alcoholic beverages.

Bourbon or cognac are my favorite to pair with chocolates.” -Elizabeth McDaniel, owner, LaRue Fine Chocolates For wine, she looks for zinfandels, grenache-based blends and syrahs/shirazes that are on the jammier side for the sugar balance. In addition, maybe look for a sweeter white wine as well, she says. Wine isn’t her top recommendation, though. “Bourbon or cognac are my favorite to pair with chocolates,” she says. She often holds beer pairings, as well, and recommends porter and stout beers along with milkshake IPAs that work well because of the lactose content. The science, however, doesn’t negate personal taste. “Everyone’s taste buds are different,” McDaniel says.

Chocolate's Perfect Match:

PERFECT PAIRINGS: BAD PAIRINGS: Zinfandel Grenache-based blends Jammier syrahs/shirazes Romagna Cagnina Dolce Sweeter white wine Cognac

Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot Pinot Noir Malbec


THINGS TO SEE & DO

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ARTS & CULTURE

MUSIC

Third Coast Percussion brings eclectic sound to Peace Center

She Doesn’t Want Roses! Be Creative! Send a Custom Designed Potted or Fresh Cut Flower Arrangement from Roots!

n story by VINCENT HARRIS | photo by SAVERIO TRUGLIA

The Grammy-award-winning ensemble Third Coast Percussion has spent 15 years proving that classical music doesn’t always have to be performed using strings, brass or keys. The quartet uses everything from marimbas to vibraphones to tuned cowbells, steel pipes, glockenspiel, children’s desk bells, crotales, a Thai gong and a singing bowl. Playing either its own pieces or those the quartet has commissioned from a wide variety of classical-avant-garde composers, Third Coast has carved a singular niche for its members as both percussion innovators and educators. For its upcoming Feb. 10 performance at the Peace Center, Third Coast member David Skidmore says the audience should expect the unexpected. “We’re going to be playing some instruments that the audience has never heard before,” he says, “and we’ll be playing a really wide range of styles of music. Percussion is this thing that you can find all over the world, but each culture has a unique sound and unique take on that instrument type.”

There’s so much melody in percussion. Melody and harmony are big parts of what we do in addition to these crazy rhythms and awesome sounds.” -David Skidmore, Third Coast Percussion The through-line in much of Third Coast’s material is the unexpectedly musical possibilities of instruments

THIRD COAST PERCUSSION » MONDAY, FEB. 10 | 7PM » PEACE CENTER GUNTER THEATRE » $45 PEACECENTER.ORG that most people associate with rhythm, not melody. “There’s so much melody in percussion,” Skidmore says. “Melody and harmony are big parts of what we do in addition to these crazy rhythms and awesome sounds.” There are compositions for percussion ensembles dating back to the 1930s, but there often weren’t professional groups to play them, and Skidmore says that’s because it’s more challenging to form a percussion group than other types of classical ensembles. “If you want to start a string quartet, you typically already own your stringed instrument,” he says. “If you want to start a percussion quartet, there’s no guarantee that you’re going to own a marimba, or a vibraphone or a set of drums. Then there’s finding a place to rehearse; if you’re a percussion quartet, you have to find a space that’s big enough so you can make enough sound. So there are some barriers.” Skidmore says that ultimately, Third Coast Percussion’s goal is to break down some of those barriers. “This music is still unfamiliar to a lot of people,” he says, “but when people are introduced to it, they so often find it fun and unique and inspiring. So that’s our life’s work to get it out there.”

Order Your Arrangement Today! 864-241-0100

w w w.RootsofGreenville.com 2249 Augusta Street, Greenville (Open 7 days a week)

WINTER CLEARANCE SALE UP TO 75% OFF

Friday, February 7th - Sunday, February 16th

• Tag Sale Items Up To 75% OFF • 20% OFF Any 2 Regular Priced Items of your choice • Free Fabric Upgrades on All Rowe & Robin Bruce Upholstery! Purchase at the lowest grade fabric price! • 20% OFF All Custom Orders

GIFTS • HOME DECOR • OCCASIONAL PIECES • ACCENTS 864-241-0100 3021 augusta street 4roomsgreenville.com mon-sat 10am-6pm; sun 1-5pm FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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WRITING

EAT & DRINK

Local author Megan Prewitt Koon talks ‘Sweet Divinity’

Jianna goes independent from Table 301

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH | photo by PAUL MCHAFFEY

n story by EVAN PETER SMITH photos PROVIDED

Greenville author Megan Prewitt Koon is fresh off the recent publication of her debut novel, “Sweet Divinity,” a story of one woman’s journey toward self-discovery. If the title is any giveaway, it’s also a tale of sweetness — both literal sweetness (expect some mouth-watering descriptions of delicious pastries and desserts) as well as the more metaphorical kind. So it’s only right that we chatted with Koon over bowls of chocolate gelato to hear more about her process and motivation as a writer.

GJ: WHAT IS “SWEET DIVINITY” ABOUT? MPK: It’s a story of a woman whose marriage dissolves and she moves back to the farm on which she was raised to try to restart her life, to find herself again as an independent person. She’s trying to recapture the goals that she originally had. Her life has morphed, of course, in order to be part of a family. But she had goals of being a baker, a small-business owner, and opening her own place. Now she’s a single mother, moving back in with her mom, which has a whole lot of complications going along with it, so she’s navigating those transitions in life. Really, the story is about how much of home stays with you even when you go off and make a new life for yourself. You may have gone to a whole new place, but how much of that home is still retained inside of you?

WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR THE STORY? MPK: Well, I grew up on a farm in northwest Georgia, in a very small town called

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Chatsworth. When I came to Greenville to attend Furman University, I thought it was just the biggest city. So I grew up with that experience of wanting to get out of my farm town and go somewhere else. I had dreams of going to New York City, all these big goals. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve begun to appreciate more of the nice things about where I came from. In that small town, the things that used to annoy me before, I now find many of them charming. Now that I have that shifted perspective, I was thinking about that and trying to write something that was both critical where it should be of the place I’m from, but was also in many ways a love letter of sorts to that kind of place too.

WHAT’S THE STORY BEHIND THE TITLE? MPK: I didn’t have any idea of what the title would be until I was almost completely finished with the book. I was thinking about how when I was a little girl, one of my favorite things to do in my hometown was to go to the country fair, and my favorite booth at the fair was a church’s booth at which they sold divinity candy. I realized later that a lot of people don’t know what divinity candy is. It’s basically egg whites and sugar, a confection. It looks like a white meringue, but it’s very sticky. It’s all kinds of goodness: white, fluffy looking, pure sugar, which is divine. I was thinking about that candy and how much I loved it, and also how painstaking a process it is to make divinity candy. It takes a lot of time and effort. So I really like the double play on the divinity that is the candy, as well as the divine intervention, so to speak, when things finally come together and the universe is on your side. And the journey toward reaching that point is really what this book is all about.

Jianna is now under new ownership. As of Feb. 1, the Italian restaurant and oyster bar at Falls Park Place in downtown Greenville is owned entirely by Jianna head chef Michael Kramer. The news of the restaurant going independent of the Table 301 Restaurant Group was announced to Jianna staff by Kramer and Table 301 Founder and President Carl Sobocinski at a meeting on Tuesday Feb. 4. “We made sure what we’ve built for everyone at Jianna doesn’t change,” Sobocinski said. “This is a talented crew with the right mindset. Service and food quality won’t change, so we can assure everyone that Jianna will be flying high for a long time.” Jianna is the third Table 301 restaurant to go independent or announce plans to go independent from the restaurant group in the past year alone. Last March, Papi’s Tacos on the Reedy River shifted ownership over to Jorge “Papi” Barrales, and Passerelle Bistro at Falls Park is in the process of transitioning ownership to its current general manager Mike Minelli. Sobocinski won’t deny what seems to be a recent pattern. “There is a pattern, sure, but it’s a pattern of wanting to help hardworking people be-

TABLE 301 RESTAURANTS: — Soby's — — Soby's on the Side — — The Lazy Goat — — Nose Dive — — Passerelle Bistro — — Southern Pressed Juicery — — Highway 301 — — Table 301 Catering & Kitchen —

I’ll never leave Soby’s. I want to be buried in the basement behind the wine cellar.” -Carl Sobocinski, founder, Table 301 come independent entrepreneurs,” he said. The recent string of restaurants going independent comes as Sobocinski himself eyes what he calls an “exit strategy” – which he stresses does not mean retirement. Instead, he wants to evolve the restaurant group with a focus on uplifting younger potential entrepreneurs, leaving behind a legacy for when he does eventually step back. “I could keep building the machine up as big as possible, then find some equity firm and sell to someone. Sure, that’s one strategy,” Sobocinski said. “But then I think back to, how is that helping individuals? The way to help the community is to have a whole bunch of entrepreneurs, leaving behind a legacy of people who hopefully share that philosophy as well.” He said any restaurant in the Table 301 portfolio is now a candidate for going independent, with the exception of Soby’s. “I’ll never leave Soby’s. I want to be buried in the basement behind the wine cellar,” he said. Modeling Table 301 as a kind of restaurant incubator, Sobocinski wants to offer rising chefs and entrepreneurs a chance to grow a concept under the umbrella of the restaurant group, eventually letting them take that concept independent on their own. Other ideas, such as using the Soby’s on the Side location as a week-long popup kitchen for chefs to try out new concepts, are also on the table. Even as Sobocinski admits to wanting to spend more time with his family and working on philanthropic ventures, he says he and Table 301 are not going anywhere. “I might tomorrow find a building for another concept,” he said. “I still have that same entrepreneurship, that same bug. We’re not stopping anytime soon.”


FEATURED EVENTS

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THE LATEST CAN’T-MISS EVENTS

THRU FEB. 21 5PM

‘We Must Cultivate Our Garden’ at Furman

In the first of its kind at Furman University. The Department of Art presents a student-curated exhibition in “We Must Cultivate Our Garden.” The exhibition includes the work of Douglas 3300 Poinsett Piper, Mary Mazziotti, Millian Hwy., Greenville Giang Lien Pham and Suzanne Dittenber.

Furman University, Thompson Gallery, Roe Art Building

FEB. 7

SC Governor’s School Student Exhibit

9AM-5PM

In collaboration with the Greenville Center for the Creative Arts and Greenville Symphony Greenville Orchestra, Governor’s School Center for Creative Arts Visual Arts students in the 101 Abney St., senior figure drawing class Greenville created large-scale illustrations to accompany the GSO’s performance of Igor Stravinsky’s “Firebird Suite.”

Furman.edu

SCGSAH.org

Cheek to Cheek: A Celebration of Love through the Great American Songbook

FEB. 11 7-9:30PM Centre Stage

501 River St.,Greenville

$

$50

Featuring songs like “They Can’t Take That Away From Me”, “Fever”, “They Say It’s Wonderful” and “Unforgettable”, your evening is sure to be filled with love and memories to last a lifetime.

CentreStage.org

Truth Be Told

FEB. 13 7:3010:30PM North Greenville University Billingsley Theatre

$

7801 N. Tigerville Rd. Tigerville

$5-12

Based on the life of Sojourner Truth, born Isabella Bomfree, this original play explores the unlikely friendship of two women, a former slave and the white abolitionist Olive Gilbert who helped her write her life story. Truth became an outspoken advocate for abolition, temperance, and civil and women’s rights in the nineteenth century.

NGU.edu/theatre

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY IS MARCH 8

No man can tell the intense agony which was felt by the slave, when wavering on the point of making his escape. - Frederick Douglass

Join the global celebration by honoring the SHEroes in your life! This International Women’s Day, honor the special women in your life with a donation to Greenville Women Giving’s SHEro Campaign.

Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad SPECIAL EXHIBITION

• Each SHEro will be recognized in the March 6 edition of the Greenville Journal and will receive a card letting her know you are honoring her. • Your contribution will support the work of 550+ GWG members, who have granted over $6 million to 79 Greenville County non-profits. - $50 contribution per SHEro. Deadline is February 16.

OPENING FEBRUARY 15, 2020

- For more information: greenvillewomengiving.org Sponsored by

Becky & Bobby Hartness Smithsonian Affiliate

864-467-3100 UPCOUNTRYHISTORY.ORG

Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

FEBRUARY 7 Treasures from the National Music Museum – The Utley Collection of Brass Instruments. Weird, Wonderful and who knows what. • February 7 • Carolina Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St., Heritage Green

The exhibit features selected pieces from one of the world’s finest collections of over 600 historic brass instruments from the Joe and Joella Utley Collection of Spartanburg,

p r e s e n t e d

b y

Greenville Journal honors the history and lives of African Americans in our community. Each week, during the month of February, we will highlight the inspirational stories, events, notable people, music, culture and more.

Clemson MBA Innovative Leadership Series • February 7: 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. • Clemson One Building, 1 N. Main St. • Free

Bring a brown bag lunch and join the Clemson University MBA Program at Greenville ONE to meet Miyun Cho Fellerhoff, managing director responsible for Ziegler Investment Banking’s general municipal and structured finance practice. Cho’s success is based upon her scientific background and ability to analyze projects from both the technical and financial perspective.

Monster Jam

• February 7: 7:00 p.m. Monster Jam Triple Threat Series® offers the ultimate mix of action and excitement in six different competitions. World-class athletes tear up the dirt in Monster Jam trucks, speedsters and ATVs. They compete head-to-head for points in challenging Racing and Freestyle events testing their agility, speed and versatility.

Black Tie and Sneakers gala

• February 8: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Drive • $60 This annual event benefits the Urban League of the Upstate and includes a lively band and dancing plus a cocktail reception and dinner.

FEBRUARY 9 Greenville Venue Crawl

• February 9: 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. • Old Cigar Warehouse, 912 S S Main St. • Greenville, SC United States + Google Map • $10 – $15 Engaged couples and event planners are invited to experience some of Greenville’s most charming spaces in an event setting. The Greenville Venue Crawl, organized by High Spirits Events, is designed to make event planning simple, personal and enjoyable. Unlike traditional wedding shows, the Greenville Venue Crawl will invent an animated environment to allow couples to have an interactive experience at each dressed up venue.

Judd Winick Children’s Book Talk and Signing • February 9: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. • Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 • $14.83

New York Times bestselling graphic novelist Judd Winick will give a children's book talk and signing in celebration of the latest installment in the Hilo series, “Hilo: All The Pieces Fit.” Winick will give a talk, take questions from the audience, and will be

FEBRUARY 10

FEBRUARY 8 Race for Grace 5K

• February 8: 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. • Carolina High School, 2725 Anderson Road Race for Grace 5K is a fundraiser to help the community surrounding Carolina High School in when families find themselves in times of crisis. All money raised goes directly to the Grace Fund. The 5k is a cross country style race starting in the stadium of Carolina High. There will be awards for the top three male and female runners as well as t-shirts designed by students of Carolina.

available to sign books afterward.

Around the World in 3/4 Time

• February 10: 7:00 p.m. • Greenville International Folk Dancers, 100 E. Park Ave. • $8 Learn to move confidently in waltz time with line, circle and set dances from around the world. No partner or experience needed.

French Conversational

• February 10: 5:30 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.

Follow along with the series each week in the Greenville Journal and on GreenvilleJournal.com

PROUD BLOOD PROVIDER FOR ALL UPSTATE HOSPITALS. GIVE LOCAL WITH THE BLOOD CONNECTION Donate blood at our Greenville Donation Center. 435 Woodruff Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 Save a neighbor’s life.

Schedule your donation today by visiting thebloodconnection.org

38

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7


THINGS TO SEE & DO • Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. • $85 – $320 Upstate International offers language classes from beginner through advanced and conversational. Regular classes are 60 minutes and meet once a week for 10 weeks. Intensive classes are 90 minutes long and meet twice a week for 10 weeks. Language classes generally run with 3-15 students per class. All students must be members of Upstate International. Register early to guarantee a spot. Classes are dependent on registrations and we cannot offer refunds.

American Sign Language Series

• February 10: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Travelers Rest Sargent Branch Library, 17 Center Street • Free The Travelers Rest library branch is hosting a four-week series on American Sign Language. Attendance at all four sessions is encouraged and registration is required. To register, email travelersrest@greenvillelibrary.org or call 8343650. The sessions are Getting Started on Feb. 3, Alphabet & Numbers on Feb. 10, Greetings & 5 W's (who, what where, when, and why) on Feb. 17 and Colors & Occupations on Feb. 24.

Wholeness Health Series: Nutrition & Diabetes

• February 10: 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. • Pelham Road Library, 1508 Pelham Rd, Greenville, SC, 1508 Pelham Rd • Free Revitalize, heal, and grow. Begin 2020 with a renewed dedication to healthy change. This talk is led by Daniel Andras, registered dietitian and adjunct instructor with Greenville Technical College. Registration is required. To register, email pelhamroad@greenvillelibrary.org or call 2886688.

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ARTS & CULTURE

FEBRUARY 12 Jewelry Basics (Session I)

• February 12: 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $285 – $305 This class is a work and critique space for students interested in developing wax modeling, metal piecing, cold-connections and designing skills. If you have some experience in jewelry fabrication, you are encouraged to work at your own pace on your own bodies of work. If you have limited experience in jewelry fabrication, you will receive more direction from the instructor. Class demos will be determined by your needs. All supplies are included.

Don’t Be Quiet: Trauma Informed Responses in Libraries (Upstate)

• February 12: 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. • Greenville County Library System, 25 Heritage Green Pl • Free The goal of this training is to support safer spaces within South Carolina libraries. This training will focus on domestic and sexual violence training for library staff. The training is provided by the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SCCADVASA). Specific goals for this training include: better understand and identify the patterns and behaviors associated with domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, which can be seen in library settings and beyond.

Demonstration of New Voting Machines

• February 12: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • St. Giles Presbyterian Church, 1021 Hudson Road The GCDP is sponsoring two demonstrations of the new voting machines conducted by county election director, Conway Belangia. The presentation will include an explanation of the process and enhanced security of the machines. You'll also get a chance to cast a demo vote. Get comfortable with the new machines before the Feb. 29 Democratic Presidential Preference Primary. Please complete very brief registration form just so we know you're coming.

2 • 0 • 2 • 0

READER’S

LENS PHOTO CONTEST The Greenville Journal invites you to

share your best photos of what the Upstate has to offer.

Each month one Editor’s Choice winner will win a $50 gift card to an Upstate business. Three honorable mention photos will also receive a $25 gift card to an Upstate business. Winning entries will be published in the Greenville Journal.

FEBRUARY 2020 THEME:

THINGS WE LOVE, “AWWW”

Experimental Painting (Session I) • February 12: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. • Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 101 Abney St. • $229 – $249

The Pink Unicorn

• February 11: 8:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. • $12 – $15 Proud Mary Theatre Company presents the one-woman show “The Pink Unicorn.” In this heart-wrenching play by Elise Forier Edie, Trisha Lee’s life and faith as a Christian widow in a conservative Southern town is suddenly upended when her 14-year-old daughter Jolene announces she is “gender queer” and starting a Gay-Straight Alliance chapter at their high school. Upstate actor Kelly Davis stars in and Anne Tromsness directs this production.

This class is an introduction to a serious rethinking the parameters of painting. Various methods and materials will give you a point to begin experimenting with your own painting methods. Class lessons will relay the importance of material and process in relation to conceptual ideas. Processes presented in class will include photo transfer, no brush painting, encaustic, sculptural painting, frottage and painting machines. We will also discuss relevant artists and explore the artist’s process.

SEE MORE EVENTS ONLINE

GreenvilleJournal.com

For details on each month’s contest, or to submit your photo and vote, visit:

GreenvilleJournal.com/ReadersLens FEBRUARY 7 // GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

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THINGS TO SEE & DO

PUZZLES

EATING WITH A SPOONERISM ACROSS

1 Uncertainty 6 Home to the Taj Mahal 10 Sporty Mazda 15 Pats gently 19 Mistake 20 Co. bigwigs 21 Tunesmith Harold 22 Opera solo 23 Denim pants that rise up to the navel? 25 Illusions a postman performs with his letters? 27 Astrologer Sydney 28 Small dent 29 Discusses at length, with “over” 30 Bet taker who’s great with scissors? 35 Weed-nixing tools 37 — B’rith 38 “— afraid of that” 39 Baffle a lecherous fellow? 44 Actor Crystal playing a high-ranking policeman? 48 Ship spars 49 Margarine, quaintly 50 Pants lines 51 Ump relative 52 Ridicule 53 Busy crawler 54 Phone bug 55 Violent guys on a Greek island? 60 “Can — witness?”

62 Abbr. on a bank door 63 Eagle’s nest 64 Make anew 65 Add cornstarch to spiced tea? 69 Sitarist Shankar 73 Appeals 75 Debt memos 76 Involving warships 77 Bloated dancer? 82 Genetic helix 84 Sugar suffix 85 Florida Air Force Base 86 Realty unit 87 Uses logic 89 Kingly Norse name 90 Seismic event 93 Romantic song sung with an audience watching? 96 What might result in an octuple bogey? 98 Arizona tribe 99 Oscar — Renta 100 Currency unit of 11-Down 101 Solution to rinse partially closed eyes? 105 Akron native 109 Sale caveat 111 Olive-green songbird 112 Supermarket vehicles within easy reach? 114 Comic Foxx being shamelessly bold? 119 Longish skirt 120 Kellogg’s waffles

121 City in central Poland 122 Beast of Borden 123 Plumlike fruit 124 Tending to ooze 125 Comply with 126 Ford fiasco

DOWN

1 Cotillion star 2 Mine metal 3 Net address 4 Cowboys’ neck cords 5 “Go ahead, I’m listening” 6 Sour-tasting 7 Transmission lubricants 8 “Hellboy” star Perlman 9 Beast of burden 10 First lady Eisenhower 11 Persia, now 12 Dismounts from a horse 13 — Aviv 14 Patriotic songs 15 Lectern spot 16 Shoe part 17 BMX vehicle 18 Give lip to 24 Pantry item 26 Scraping file 28 Belittle, informally 30 Ottawa-based TV network 31 Disconnect, as a door 32 Sullied 33 Barn hooter 34 Eloise creator

Thompson 36 Ump’s cry 39 Ump’s cry 40 Musical period since the 1950s 41 Balm additive 42 Deborah of “Quo Vadis” 43 Huge spans 45 Greek cheese 46 Lamb’s call 47 Bratty kid 48 Encountered 51 Proof of purchase 52 — -fi 53 Make public 55 Public health agcy. 56 “Drop Dead Fred” star Mayall 57 Infants’ cries 58 “Isn’t — little old for her?” 59 Jackie’s “O” 61 Best-of list countable on one hand 62 Closed hand 65 Actor Danson 66 Possesses 67 — Valley, San Francisco 68 Mongrel dog 70 “Anne of Green Gables” town 71 Feudal tenants 72 Dot in la mer 74 Actor Cariou 76 Skylab org. 77 Lowly worker Crossword Solution: Page 31

Be part of the local publication, formerly known as Behind the Counter, that has featured hundreds of businesses for over 17 years!

YOUR BUSINESS. YOUR STORY.

Local Business Matters. 78 Aptly named hybrid fruit 79 Custard tart 80 Deer cousins 81 “Annabel Lee” poet 82 Wildlife lair 83 Arrest 87 Enter hostilely again 88 Europe, Asia and Africa

90 Pear relatives 91 Hagen of the stage 92 Like fugitives 93 —’wester (storm type) 94 —Pen 95 Lah-di- — 97 Talk to God 98 Command ctrs. 101 Actress Spacek

102 Fluster 103 Previous to 104 Zellweger of Hollywood 105 Resistance units 106 Salute 107 — -Chinese 108 Pooch in “Garfield” 110 Knock off 113 Get mellow

114 Slo- — fuse 115 Knock off 116 Ar-tee linkup 117 Fizzle out 118 Costa — Sol

LOCAL BUSINESS MATTERS. Live Local will showcase the people and personalities of businesses across all Upstate industries. It’s about you and what your business offers locally —and how our readers can connect with you! Tell your story to the community with 31,000 copies, delivered directly to Greenville County homes! Reserve your space today.

L I V E

L CAL

the local people, the upstate businesses that you need to know SPACE RESERVATION DEADLINE MARCH 6, 2020. For information call 864.679.1242 or email meredith@communityjournals.com

40

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

MIXING IT UP IN 2020 Challenge yourself each week with our new cryptoquip puzzles and see if you can crack the code. Use the Cryptoquip Clue to get started and then see if you can figure out the common phrase or saying.

CRYPTOQUIP

Cryptoquip Solution: Page 31


GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC

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LEGAL NOTICES

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION COMMISSION A hearing to enlarge the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located at 113 and 115 Harvard Dr  off  S Fairfield Rd  and to provide public notice thereof. PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on  (2/25/2020)  at 4:00 p.m. in the Conference room of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District Administration Building located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for the consideration of enlarging the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located at 113 and 115 Harvard Dr  off  S Fairfield Rd  and to provide public notice thereof. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission at 864-232-6721 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday.  Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission.  Public comment can also be posted on the website. www.GGSC.gov

SUMMONS STATE OF SC GREENVILLE COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-06090_ GREENVILLE COUNTY REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY v. THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY SCOTT, et. al, including DEFENDANTS ANN HILL AND WILLIE ROY SANDERS. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Greenville County, SC court in action number 2018CP-23-06090. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint.

NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Prime Storage Simpsonville located at 2711 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville, SC 29681 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www.storagetreasures.com on 2/17/2020 at 12:00 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the selfstorage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Joshua McCorkle unit #A064; Randy Hunt unit #D019; Wayne Mcculley unit #E086; Lasondra Wright Atkins unit #J070. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept bids for the following: • Aluminum Live Floor Transfer Trailers, RFP #64-02/26/20, until 3:00 PM, EST, February 26, 2020. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Video Surveillance System RFP #66-02/28/20, due at 3:00 P.M., EST, February 28, 2020. Mandatory Pre-Proposal meeting, 10:00 A.M., EST, February 18, 2020 at Greenville County Detention Center, 20 McGee St., Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at https://www. greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE (JURY TRIAL DEMANDED) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. NO. 2019-CP-42-04126_ Doretha Cohen, Plaintiff, vs. Kaitlan S. Brown, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S): KAITLAN S. BROWN You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, which was filed in the Office of the Clerk of this Court on the below mentioned date; and to serve a copy of your answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at their office, 303 East Greenville Street, Post Office Box 4025, Anderson, South Carolina, within thirty days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE: You are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem to represent you in this action within twenty days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. s/J. Christopher Pracht J. Christopher Pracht, V (SC Bar#77543) THOMASON & PRACHT, LLP PO Box 4025 Anderson, South Carolina 29622 864-226-7222 864-226-7224 (fax) chris@864law.com Date: 11/21/2019 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Anderson, South Carolina

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2019-CP-23-07013 DEFICIENCY WAIVED U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Home Equity Asset Trust 2003-3 Home Equity Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Robert Lee Simmons and Beatrice Simmons and if Robert Lee Simmons and Beatrice Simmons be deceased then any children and heirs at law to the Estates of Robert Lee Simmons and Beatrice Simmons, distributees and devisees at law to the Estates of Robert Lee Simmons and Beatrice Simmons and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm LLP P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by

the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on December 4, 2019. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm LLP, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803-726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm LLP, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Slicks LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 953 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 9, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Maestros Bistro and Dinner Club LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises INCLUDING SUNDAY consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 104 S. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 9, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CPR Burger, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 Woodruff Drive, STE-D 101, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 23, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Golden Beverages Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 108 Balcome Blvd., Simpsonville 29681. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 16, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS NOTICE (MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISION) JURY TRIAL DEMANDED STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO.: 2019-CP-__-____ Norman Brian Mathis, Plaintiff, v. Amber Sorrow, Defendant. You are summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action served upon you. A copy of your answer to the Complaint must be served on Plaintiff’s lawyer at their offices located at 224 NE Main Street, Simpsonville, South Carolina 29681, within 30 days after your receipt of this Summons. If you fail to answer this Complaint within the specified time, a judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded within this Complaint. Law Office of M. B. Derrick, LLC s/M. Brooks Derrick M. Brooks Derrick (SC Bar No. 76330) 224 NE Main Street Simpsonville, SC 29681 (864) 757-0757 brooks@derricklawoffice.com Attorney and Counselor for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE SALE Please take notice Fort Knox Storage Units - Mauldin located at 117 North Murray Drive Mauldin SC 29662 intends to hold a Auction of storage units in default of payment. The sale will occur as an Online Auction via www.lockerfox.com on 2/21/2020 at 12:15 PM. This sale is pursuant to the assertion of lien for rental at the selfstorage facility. Unless listed otherwise below, the contents consist of household goods and furnishings. Darrian Robinson unit #B113; Brittney Moses unit #C73; Taphnaiah Mcclodden unit #D01; Patricia Gentry unit #D06; David Hendrix unit #E20; Brittany Moreland unit #F100; Mary E Hunter unit #F60; Jamie M Dill unit #G32; Robert R Hill unit #G39. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Duck Airport, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 301 Airport Road , Suite J, Greenville, SC 29607 . To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 16, 2020. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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LEGAL NOTICES

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GREENVILLE COUNTY, SC

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2020-CP-23-00249 Charles E. Cannon, PLAINTIFF, VS. The Personal Representative, if any, whose name is unknown, of the Estate of James Douglas Lowe; Christine Howes Lowe, Nicholas Lowe, and any other heirs – at – law or devisees of James Douglas Lowe, deceased, their heirs, personal representatives, administrators, p e r s o n s entitled to claim through them; all unknown persons with any right, title or interest in the real estate described herein; also any persons who may be in the military service of the United States of America, being a class designated as John Doe; and any unknown minors or persons under a disability being a class designated as Richard Roe; and The County of Greenville, DEFENDANTS YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, (which Complaint was filed on January 14, 2020) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within

thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO ,(GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Rachael Ann Hardin, 3 Boyce Avenue, Greenville, SC 29601, (phone # 864-331-1751) has been

appointed Guardian ad Litem for any other heirs – at – law or devisees of James Douglas Lowe, deceased, their heirs, personal representatives, administrators, persons entitled to claim through them; all unknown persons with any right, title or interest in the real estate described herein; also any persons who may be in the military service of the United States of America, being a class designated as John Doe; and any unknown minors or persons under a disability being a class designated as Richard Roe. In the event you are in one of the categories listed above and have a claim to the real property which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding foreclosure of a mortgage on property located in Greenville County. The subject

property is described as follows: All that certain piece, parcel or tract of land situate on the southern side of Brushy Creek Road at King’s Creek Drive in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, and containing 2.086 acres and further being described as follows: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land situate, lying and being in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, in Bates Township, containing 1.65 acres, more or less, and shown on a plat entitled “Property of James Munro and Loretta A. Lowe”, prepared by Lindsey & Associates, Inc., dated June 13, 1995, and recorded April 1, 1999, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Greenville County, SC, in Plat Book 39 – X, at Page 2. Reference is hereby made to said plat for a more complete metes and bounds description thereof. Also includes a 1987 Champion Mobile Home Serial #507285M0979A&B C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM // FEBRUARY 7

NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE COUNTY The General Election for Sheriff Special Election will be held on Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Any person wishing to vote in this election must register no later than In-person February 7, 2020, Online Registration 11:59pm February 9, 2020 and Registration By Mail post marked February 10, 2020. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES.org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on March 10th, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville SC 29601, (864) 467-7250. At 12 noon on March 13th, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in this election. This hearing will be held at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville SC 29601, (864) 467-7250. The following precincts and polling places will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: PRECINCTS Greenville 1* Greenville 3* Greenville 4* Greenville 5 Greenville 6 Greenville 7 Greenville 8 Greenville 10 Greenville 14* Greenville 16 Greenville 17 Greenville 18* Greenville 19 Greenville 20* Greenville 21 Greenville 22 Greenville 23* Greenville 24* Greenville 25 Greenville 26* Greenville 27 Greenville 28 Greenville 29* Aiken* Altamont Forest Asheton Lakes Avon Belle Meade Bells Crossing* Belmont Berea* Boiling Springs Botany Woods Brook Glenn* Canebrake* Carolina* Chestnut Hills Circle Creek Clear Creek Conestee Darby Ridge Del Norte* Devenger Donaldson Dove Tree Dunklin Eastside* Ebenezer* Edwards Forest* Enoree Feaster* Fork Shoals* Fountain Inn 1 Fountain Inn 2 Furman Gowensville Grove* Jennings Mill Lakeview* Laurel Ridge Leawood* Maple Creek Maridell Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2 Mauldin 3 Mauldin 4 Mauldin 5 Mauldin 6 Mauldin 7* Mission Monaview* Mountain Creek Mountain View* Neely Farms Northwood*

POLLING PLACES Stone Lake Community Club Stone Lake Community Club Brutontown Community Center Sears Shelter Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church W Greenville Recreation Center WestEnd Comm. Dev. Center Springfield Baptist Church Phillis Wheatley Augusta Rd Baptist Church St Matthew United Meth. Church Augusta Rd Baptist Church Pleasant Valley Connection Center Meals On Wheels Meals On Wheels Sanctuary Church Sanctuary Church Flour Daniel McCarter Presbyterian Church Overbrook Baptist Church Overbrook Baptist Church Francis Asbury United Meth. Ch New City Public Works Parker Fire Station Station #2 Redeemer Presbyterian Church Five Forks Baptist Church First Church of God Disciples Fellowship Bapt. Ch. Immanuel Lutheran Church Belmont Fire Station Hdqt Unity Baptist Church of Berea Devenger Rd. Presbyterian Church Lutheran Church of Our Savior Lutheran Church of Our Savior Sugar Creek Clubhouse Anderson Rd Library West Branch Dunean Baptist Church Cross Roads Baptist Church Pleasant View Baptist Church Reedy River Missionary Bapt. Ch Velocity Church Heritage Bible Church St. Giles Presbyterian Church Donaldson Center Fire Sta Hdqt Dove Tree Clubhouse Dunklin Fire Station Hdqt First Church of God Renfrew Baptist Church Lutheran Church of Our Savior Enoree Career Center Rolling Green Retirement Center Reedy Fork Baptist Church Younts Center for Performing Arts Fountain Inn Activities Center Reedy River Baptist Church Gowensville Community Center Mt. Pleasant Community Center Cleveland First Baptist Church Parker Fire Station #3 St Mark United Methodist Church Parker Fire Station #3 Southside Baptist Church New Liberty Baptist Church Mauldin Cultural Center Forrester Woods Clubhouse Mauldin First Baptist Church Mauldin United Methodist Church Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 Ray Hopkins Senior Center Holland Park Church of Christ Morningside Baptist Church Parker Fire Station Hdqt Mountain Creek Baptist Church Double Springs Baptist Church Christ Community Church First Church of God

POLLING SITE ADDRESS 707 Chick Springs Rd 707 Chick Springs Rd 200 Leo Lewis St 100 E Park Ave 2 Jeff Circle 8 Rochester St 404 Vardry St 600 E McBee Ave 40 John McCarroll Way 1823 Augusta St 701 Cleveland St 1823 Augusta St 510 Old Augusta Rd 15 Oregon St. 15 Oregon St 302 Parkins Mill Rd 302 Parkins Mill Rd 352 Halton Rd 2 Pelham Rd 1705 E North St 1705 E North St 1800 E North St 475 Fairforest Way 104 S Washington Ave 6150 Old Buncombe Rd 112 Batesville Rd 709 Brushy Creek Rd 105 Crestfield Rd 2820 Woodruff Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 12 Piney Rd 1200 Devenger Rd 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd 103 Sugar Creek Rd 2625 Anderson Rd 21 Allen St 705 Anderson Ridge Rd 110 Old Rutherford Rd 25 Lakewood Dr 1720 Reid School Rd 2005 Old Spartanburg Rd 1021 Hudson Rd 2291 Perimeter Rd 2 Sugarberry Dr 11353 Augusta Rd 709 Brushy Creek Rd 951 Geer Hwy 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd 108 Scalybark Rd 1 Hoke Smith Blvd 3115 Fork Shoals Rd 315 N Main St 610 Fairview St 871 N Highway 25 14186 Highway 11 710 S Fairfield Rd 5 Church Dr 700 State Park Rd 911 Saint Mark Rd 700 State Park Rd 410 S Main St 1798 N Highway 25 101 E Butler Rd 424 Piney Grove Rd 150 S Main St 100 E Butler Rd 802 Miller Rd 203 Corn Rd 1131 Holland Rd 1115 Pelham Rd 107 Cedar Lane Rd 255 W Mountain Creek Church Rd 3800 Locust Hill Rd 700 Harrison Bridge Rd 709 Brushy Creek Rd

PRECINCTS POLLING PLACES Oakview* Five Forks Baptist Church Palmetto Grace Church Paris Mountain Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Pebble Creek Pebble Creek Baptist Church Pelham Falls Cornerstone Baptist Church Piedmont Piedmont Comm. Cntr-BeattieHall Pineview Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt Poinsett* Duncan Chapel Fire Sta Hdqt Raintree The Bridge Church Reedy Fork Reedy Fork Baptist Church River Walk River Walk Clubhouse Rock Hill* E North Church Rocky Creek Rocky Creek Baptist Church Rolling Green Rolling Green Retirement Center Royal Oaks Rock Of Ages Baptist Church Saluda Unity Baptist Church of Berea Sandy Flat Double Springs Baptist Church Sevier* Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Silverleaf Heritage Bible Church Simpsonville 1* Cedar Grove Baptist Church Simpsonville 2* Renovation Church Simpsonville 3 Simpsonville United Meth. Ch Simpsonville 4 Renovation Church Simpsonville 5 Center for Community Services Simpsonville 6 Calvary Baptist Church Skyland* Eastside Apostolic Lutheran Ch Slater Marietta* Slater Hall Community Center Southside* Pleasant Valley Connection Center Spring Forest Greenville Nazarene Church Stone Valley Springwell Church Stonehaven Advent United Methodist Church Suber Mill Praise Cathedral Sugar Creek Sugar Creek Clubhouse Sulphur Springs* Berea First Baptist Church Sycamore First Presbyterian Church Tanglewood* Anderson Rd Library W Branch Taylors Taylors Ministry Center Thornblade* Sugar Creek Clubhouse Tigerville* Glassy Mountain Fire Sta. Hdqt Timberlake Aldersgate United Methodist Ch Trade Needmore Recreation Center Tubbs Mountain Enoree Baptist Church Wade Hampton Faith Baptist Church Walnut Springs Clear Spring Baptist Church Welcome* Anderson Rd Library West Branch Wellington E North Church Westcliffe* Unity Baptist Church of Berea Westside Agnew Rd Baptist Church Woodmont* Valley Brook Outreach Bapt Ch Woodruff Lakes Woodruff Rd Christian Church Mt Pleasant Mt Pleasant Community Center Baker Creek Valley Brook Outreach Bapt Ch Bridge Fork Kingdom Life Church Castle Rock Washington Baptist Church Fox Chase Northwood Baptist Church Frohawk Grace United Methodist Church Granite Creek Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Graze Branch Holly Ridge Baptist Church Greenbriar Messiah Lutheran Church Hillcrest* Cedar Grove Baptist Church Holly Tree Faith Baptist Church Kilgore Farms Gilder Creek Farm Clubhouse Locust Hill Fairview Baptist Church Long Creek Rocky Creek Missionary Bapt Ch Moore Creek South Greenville Fire Station #6 Oneal Eastside Apostolic Lutheran Church Ranch Creek* Take Heart Church Riverside* Riverside Baptist Church Sparrows Point Immanuel Lutheran Church Standing Springs Standing Springs Baptist Church Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest City Hall Travelers Rest 2 Renfrew Baptist Church Tyger River* Northwood Baptist Church Verdmont Hopewell United Methodist Church Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Ch Ware Place* *LOCATION OR PRECINCT CHANGE

POLLING SITE ADDRESS 112 Batesville Rd 2801 Pelham Rd 2119 State Park Rd 1300 Reid School Rd 8508 Pelham Rd 3 Main St 100 Hillside Church Rd 5111 Old Buncombe Rd 257 Harrison Bridge Rd 3115 Fork Shoals Rd 103 River Walk Blvd 4108 E North St 1801 Woodruff Rd 1 Hoke Smith Blvd 105 Donaldson Rd 12 Piney Rd 3800 Locust Hill Rd 2119 State Park Rd 2005 Old Spartanburg Rd 206 Moore St 611 Richardson St 215 SE Main St 611 Richardson St 1102 Howard Dr 3812 Grandview Dr 2200 Mays Bridge Rd 5 Whitney St 510 Old Augusta Rd 1201 Haywood Rd 4369 Wade Hampton Blvd 2258 Woodruff Rd 3390 Brushy Creek Rd 103 Sugar Creek Rd 529 Farrs Bridge Rd 510 E Curtis St 2625 Anderson Rd 1 W Main St 103 Sugar Creek Rd 2015 Highway 11 7 Shannon Dr 202 Canteen Ave 881 Tigerville Rd 500 W Lee Rd 301 Bethany Rd 2625 Anderson Rd 4108 E North St 12 Piney Rd 400 Rainbow Dr 8323 Augusta Rd 20 Bell Rd 710 S Fairfield Rd 8323 Augusta Rd 416 Holland Rd 3500 N Highway 14 888 Ansel School Rd 627 Taylor Rd 1002 S Buncombe Rd 260 Adams Mill Rd 1100 Log Shoals Rd 206 Moore St 906 Highway 14 404 Grimes Dr 1300 Locust Hill Rd 239 Rocky Creek Rd 1800 W Georgia Rd 2200 Mays Bridge Rd 1330 Fork Shoals Rd 1249 S Suber Rd 2820 Woodruff Rd 1111 W Georgia Rd 125 Trailblazer Dr 951 Geer Hwy 888 Ansel School Rd 1420 Neely Ferry Rd 8323 Augusta Rd


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February 7, 2020 Greenville Journal  

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