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AUG. 8, 2019

DNA

VOL. 36

N0. 11

How 3 individuals experienced big reveals through genetic genealogy.

Detections

By Carolyn Campbell

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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY

ANXIETY? DEPRESSION? •

A FAMILIAR TALE

How 3 lives gained new chapters through genetic ancestry findings.

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CONTRIBUTOR

6 LETTERS 8 OPINION 12 NEWS 22 A&E 35 DINE 40 MUSIC 51 CINEMA 53 COMMUNITY

CAROLYN CAMPBELL An OG City Weekly contributor since the ’80s, Campbell has written about a wide breadth of subjects— from green Jell-O, Utahns with split personalities, to alien abduction survival tales. For this week’s cover story, she dives into a trio of harrowing adoption stories and subsequent bio reunions.

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SOAP BOX Cover story, July 25, “The Beyhive State”

This was such a good piece! WESTIN PORTER Via Twitter

News, July 25, “Unshackled: New film centers on the life of Green Flake, one of Utah’s original slave pioneers”

Finally. This helps me answer all the know-nothings in Provo who refuse to acknowledge the church’s role in Black oppression. SONI BROWN Via Twitter

Online news post, July 25, “Green Flake descendants march in Days of ’47 Parade”

I want to share a huge thank you to Peter Holslin for his coverage of the Green Flake ancestors who were in the Days of ’47 Parade. My nephew (seen in your photo) and his mom’s side of the family represent a small group of proud descendents of one of the first black members of the LDS Church. Green Flake is hardly, if ever, mentioned in Utah’s history and connection with Brigham Young. One of my nephew’s relatives wrote a book in partnership with the history department at BYU, covering the significance of Green Flake’s contribution to our city’s existence. They always comment that we shouldn’t be saying “This Is the Place,” but rather

“This Is the Place That They Have Prepared for Us.” My parents and I watched the parade on KSL with anticipation to see my nephew and his family in the parade. Much to our disappointment, they were not shown or talked about. While Nadine Wimmer and Bruce Lindsay went on with their silly commentary (in my opinion, it was a great display of white privilege), we could faintly hear Nadine say “Flake” while Bruce continued jabbering. Was that the moment that the Green Flake family was passing by their view? If so, was it intentionally avoided? One might say it was an accident, but my gut feeling is no. The commentary was nothing less than one’s white privilege, as Bruce mispronounced “charro” as “churro” while the Mexican consulate was going past their booth. Within seconds, he jokes about their horses wearing leg warmers. The best was certainly saved for last, unintentionally, when Nadine mentions that Utah’s statehood day is Jan. 4, to which Bruce responded, “Really? I didn’t know that!” So again, I express my gratitude to City Weekly and Peter Holslin for featuring this story. It is important now more than ever, to share important stories like Green Flake’s, so that our black and brown children can feel pride in what their ancestors did to help this great state. These are the stories that we need to have discussions about, however uncomfortable, to bring light to the unjust actions that we have accepted throughout history. My nephew is lucky because

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he has two sides of his family with historical connections of history being made. His Green Flake side, and my family’s side of Danish immigrants settling towns in northern Minnesota, at the turn of the last century, that are still thriving. We all ensure that my nephew knows his identity and lineage. HEIDI JENSEN, Midvale

Opinion, July 25, “Trump’s Latest Physical Exam”

Thank you so much for making it clear why I find his speeches so distasteful (to put it “properly”). LORNA HARDY Via CW comments I’ve looked forward to City Weekly for many years, especially Robinson Sr.’s writings. GISELA CAVALLERI Via CW comments

A&E, July 25, “No Graze Area”

[This Land] is a great book about the criminal cattleman’s industry/lobby and our amenable Congress. Just about done with the book. MIKE CORONELLA Via Facebook

Online news post, July 25, “All Pride, Zero Emissions: Utah Pride Parade inches toward lofty zero-emissionsgoal”

Mankinis? I haven’t been

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to a SLC parade in awhile. Are there women in bikinis, too, or is this some kind of throwback? CLAIR ELLIS Via Facebook

Online news post, July 31, “Loud & Uncut: ‘Blood Stained Men’ protest infant male circumcision” So many truly stupid males in Utah. Could it just be the water? FRED A. SCHMAUCH Via Twitter I’d like to have a word with God about several imperfections. DUSTIN CLARK Via Facebook Just babies giving their 10% to the church. HUGH DEVLIN Via Facebook Having a hard time understanding who would fight for this besides the kind of single moms that post pics with their sons 40 times a day that say “my king.” DEREK CLEMENT Via Facebook I 100% wholeheartedly agree with the statement. That being said, no pregnancies should be allowed any longer. Stretch marks, back problems, knee problems, etc. because, after all, “God made your body perfect and you should not modify it.” RONNIE SCHLUTER Via Facebook

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The question is about people choosing to modify their own bodies, instead of their parents modifying them at an age before they can consent to it. JIMMY MAC Via Facebook OK, so what if your child is born with a birth defect that severely disables them. Are you going to wait until the child is 18 to make a choice for him/herself?... meanwhile holding them back from a lot of opportunities. BRIANNE HADLEY Via Facebook Who let the patients out of the state hospital? @GRKSCORPIO7 Via Twitter Please leave my penis out of this. Thank you. CHRISTOPHER BELL Via Facebook Who do they call themselves? The Lone Foreskins? SHAWN LOWRY Via Facebook

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Saw them a couple of weekends ago on 9000 South and Redwood Road. I don’t know what my opinion is because what about all the ones without circumcision and want it as an adult? I think people should be left to make decisions for their own children. I think they should be able to talk about it and maybe they can convince people to think about it. But I have heard of people having boys and then asking the doc what they did to their son and the doc saying you know they don’t come circumcised. Idk, to each his own, but nobody should be made to feel bad for doing it or not doing it ... nobody’s business. CANDACE EWELL Via Facebook

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. We are an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, that also serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. Copies of Salt Lake City Weekly are available free of charge at more than 1,100 locations along the Wasatch Front. Limit one per reader. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without express permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., can take more than one copy. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without written permission from the publisher. Third-class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery might take up to one full week. All rights reserved.

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OPINION

Gun Control: Time to Do it Right On March 13, 1996, at the Dunblane Primary School near Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland, a lone gunman named Thomas Hamilton barged into a class of first and second graders, randomly murdered 16 innocent children, killed their teacher and then turned the gun on himself. Scotland and the world were horrified at the senseless act. Outrage is the normal reaction, but outrage, alone, doesn’t fix the problem. Instead of sitting around like President Donald Trump and his collection of slime—all boosted to power by the greatest gun lobby in the world (NRA)—the U.K. decided that such a tragedy would never happen again. It hasn’t. One must ask the question, “Why?” and the answer is simple. Before the sadness of the Dunblane shootings had been relegated to follow-up human interest stories on page 11, public outrage spawned the Snowdrop Campaign— named for the flower that had bloomed in the schoolyard as the children and teacher lay dying. That movement was successful in forcing enactment of a new law. In 1997, Parliament banned all private ownership of handguns. There has never been another school shooting under the Union Jack, nor have mass shootings become the epidemic we have here. Except for the Cumbria, England, rampage of a lone, shotgun-toting gunman in 2010, which left 12 people dead and another 11 wounded, there have been no other

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR.

mass murders in the U.K. involving firearms. Now our country is reeling from not one, but two mass murders in less than a 24-hour period. Thirty-one people lost their lives and dozens more were maimed and will never be the same. In both tragedies, the gunmen used militarystyle assault rifles and high-capacity magazines. (No doubt, Trump could hardly contain his excitement when he heard the news. After all, he understood that such tragedies would hand him a bonus photo-op and a chance to display his remarkable oratory skills.) Like I, many Americans heard the president’s words delivered in a somber-but-impressive monotone, and possessing a distinctly hollow quality. Many of those words were well-chosen by the best speech writers, but, because they were not the president’s words, they failed to ring true. Frankly, I almost choked on his plastic sincerity. All POTUS could do was make excuses about who was to blame. While his own hateful rhetoric has been cited by many as one of the factors that encouraged the murders, he could not quite get his brain around that reality, choosing instead to blame the media’s fake news, mental health, the internet and the proliferation of violent video games. Sadly, the online “manifesto” of one of the shooters used the same language Trump has viciously spewed—especially his indictment of Hispanics as “invaders” of our country. Yes, Mr. President, you are the author of America’s hate, and, since the buck stops at the White House door, it’s time for you to take ownership. Of course, Trump expressed his shallow sympathies and prayers for the dead and bereaved, and he was careful to include a politically correct chastisement for his white supremacist supporters. But his mention of gun control centered only on finding a way to prevent the detectably-angry-

and-crazy-nut-cases from being able to purchase firearms. Included in his words was a lame attempt to create a bill that combines gun purchasing requirements with immigration reform. (Really!) He went a step further, parroting the trite expression of how “It is not guns that kill people. People kill people.” Charlton Heston could not have presented a more touching apology, and I suppose that Trump’s personal pistol will have to be pried from his cold fingers when the last quarter-pounder does its job. I watched Trump talk on network television, and could see his eyes darting back and forth while trying to make out the more difficult words on the teleprompter: “Heartfelt,” “sympathy” and “gun reform” seemed to give him the most trouble. This is clearly the moment for a real president, not an infantile jerk who prefers his Tonka Toys and military parades to any attempt at being presidential. While this occasion requires a man of strength, character and decisive action, Trump has avoided the most pressing issue. Emotions are high and Americans are calling on their legislators: “Do something.” It’s time for Americans to ask the questions: Do we need to own assault rifles and magazines with enough firepower to leave an entire stadium dead? Should our citizens be allowed to buy easily-concealable automatic handguns with high capacity clips? We don’t need, like Trump, to get stuck on the rationalization that it is people, not guns, who kill. The U.K. has shown us how it’s done. Now it’s our turn to finally get it right. CW The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY

You might not have experienced it. You might never experience it. That’s because hidden rules govern each economic class, and impact the stability of each person’s life. “Individuals experiencing poverty are often operating in survival mode, and support systems taken for granted in middle class and wealth are largely nonexistent,” the event website for Bridges Out of Poverty, says. This training session explores the causes and barriers of poverty and looks at it through these hidden rules of class, resources and language. The idea is to become an agent of change in the community. 1992 S. 200 East, Thursday, Aug. 8, 6:30-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Ko3aLh.

MEDICAL CANNABIS TALK

By now you’ve probably heard of Christine Stenquist. She is the brain tumor survivor who founded TRUCE, Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education, and helped clear the way to passage of Utah’s medical cannabis law. You’ve probably also heard that the Davis and Salt Lake County district attorneys have put up another road block to the distribution—the federal law. At Medical Cannabis in Utah, Stenquist speaks about the law, passed by citizen initiative, and all the hurdles yet to be jumped. Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sunday, Aug. 11, 3-5 p.m., free, bit.ly/2OAiVnx.

WOMEN’S POLICY CONFERENCE

For the second year, the Utah Women’s Policy Conference features community advocates, researchers and policymakers to understand critical issues affecting women, girls and families in the state. You learn about the latest Utah-specific data on the status of women, with a particular focus on women of color, and later join in discussions with legislators and state policymakers. Keynote speaker Valerie Lacarte, Ph.D., speaks about gender and racial dynamics that impact women and children. The YWCA will honor Rep. Lowry Snow with the Public Official of the Year Award. Jaden Event Center at Trolley Square, 580 S. 600 East, 801537-8614, Thursday, Aug. 15, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday, Aug. 16, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., $70/non-YWCA members; $60/members; $20 luncheon only, bit.ly/2ZpoOox.

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The Billboard Race

It’s a known fact that there’s no love lost between Reagan Outdoor Advertising and Jim Dabakis. Those ugly-ass billboards have been an effective political tool. And, oh, how Reagan loves the Salt Lake City mayoral races. The company has a political action committee that last mayoral election put up free billboards for all of Ralph Becker’s opponents. Yeah, ROA didn’t like Becker—and he lost. The Salt Lake Tribune reported that a watered-down billboard law passed the Senate with those voting “yes” receiving an average of $1,388 in contributions, while Dabakis took nothing. Fast forward and ROA has put up three free billboards for Dabakis’ opponents. You can’t blame his opponents. Their name recognition is in the toilet while Dabakis has long been a successful self-promoter. What does it all mean? Yes, ROA can influence elections. But more to the point—voters tend to choose their candidates based on name identification, not policies.

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The debate over college continues. Is college the right choice? The answer is always, “It depends.” Yes, college holds an economic advantage for some, depending on the discipline they choose. Nowadays, technical jobs often draw high salaries, and those careers take different educational paths. These are not easy decisions for high school students. The Utah System of Higher Education is trying to make that easier by starting a program to place college advisers in the state’s 150 public high schools by the 2021-22 school year, according to a KUER 90.1 FM story. Three dozen recent college graduates will help students chart their paths. It will cost about $7 million, but it’s money well spent toward closing the racial gap and helping youths navigate the bureaucracy.

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Summoning all Dungeon

You might have missed this story, maybe because it was in the Park Record. Your esteemed president was ranting again about the leftists and how “they” stifle the First Amendment. “Anyone can become a target of the left’s brutal campaign to punish dissent,” Trump said. Turns out this was not about Antifa or those wacky Democrats. No, this was about a kid. “Earlier this year, in Park City, Utah, a leftist released pepper spray into a high school auditorium to shut down a Turning Point USA meeting,” he said. Well, should we really be labeling teenagers who pull stupid pranks? The teen was trying to stop a conservative club from holding an event. It didn’t go well. But this wasn’t “the left.” It was one teenager. In January, another teen was labeled a racist after he blocked a Native American in Washington, D.C. Here’s an idea: Quit the public shaming and focus on consequences for youths.

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NEWS Recently overhauled Utah Transit Authority dreams up plans for the future. But where do you even begin? BY PETER HOLSLIN pholslin@cityweekly.net @peterholslin

O

n the corner of 700 South and State Street, a metal post marking a UTA bus stop sticks out from the ground, standing alone like a stray antenna on the surface of Mars. The pole stands next to an abandoned building. There is no shelter, no shade, no escape from the 96-degree heat. As a reporter stands in wait on a recent Tuesday afternoon, a stocky man with unkempt hair walks up and scans southward. Dozens of cars zoom by, spewing exhaust under the blinding sun. There’s no bus coming on the horizon, so the man walks away. Like many public transportation systems across the United States, Salt Lake’s bus and light-rail network leaves much to the imagination. Even in the best cases, the routes operated by the Utah Transit Authority often seem governed by a googly-eyed calculus— everyday rides transforming into grueling treks as passengers walk lengthy distances to transit stops, endure long waits and end up stranded when services stop in less-populated areas or after rush-hour commutes. But lately, it seems this system might be turning a corner. With record population growth and rapid expansion expected across the state in coming years, officials across the region have been tackling transit conundrums with greater urgency. The UTA, recently overhauled after years of apparent mismanagement, has been dreaming up ideas to improve services and expand coverage. Meanwhile, candidates in the Salt Lake City mayor’s race have advocated for better public transportation options as a way to offset rising housing costs and perpetual problems with air quality. Indeed, the way forward isn’t just about the minutiae of time schedules and route maps—it also means addressing fundamental questions about urban development and the environment. “They should be going back to the legislature and they should be saying, ‘Our air is terrible,’” Jim Dabakis, a current frontrunner among Salt Lake’s eight mayoral candidates according to a recent poll conducted by The Salt Lake Tribune and Hinckley Institute of Politics, says of the newly reformed UTA. “We’ve gotta do something about housing. And we’ve gotta do something dramatic about transportation. Those three issues all come together with UTA.”

A couple miles away from the sun-stricken bus stop on State Street, Eric Callison sits in an air-conditioned office at the UTA’s downtown Frontline Headquarters. On a whiteboard, he’s drawn out a map of Salt Lake City. Black lines criss-cross on a grid, each labeled with colorful magic markers to denote city bus routes. As the UTA’s manager of service planning, Callison has been busy lately with deciding which of the region’s bus routes get expanded, adjusted, or erased off the map entirely. Approximately 21.5 million people have ridden UTA transit so far this year, and he’s well aware of the power he wields. “It is a very difficult, emotionally charged decision at times,” he tells City Weekly. “I like to say, ‘Behind every number is a person.’ We can say, ‘Oh, well this route has 700 boardings a day.’ Well, that’s 700 people. If we’re going to change that route, we’re messing with their lives.” Thankfully, this time around, he’s able to give more than take away. On Sunday, Aug. 11, UTA will adjust and expand public transit service across the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake City’s 2, 9 and 21 bus lines will be revamped with longer run times and greater frequency. The 9 will be extended past the Trax line out to Redwood Road, providing more coverage for westside neighborhoods that have long suffered from poor bus access. The agency is also introducing a new bus line, the 4, providing service from Poplar Grove, into downtown, through the University of Utah, all the way to Millcreek’s Olympus Cove. All of this is being done in coordination with Salt Lake City, which has set aside $5 million a year to help expand UTA services as part of the city’s Funding Our Future initiative. There will be other adjustments as well, including bus routes being redirected away from the University of Utah Hospital to cut down on traffic congestion and extended services in Ogden, Lehi and Tooele counties. “I have lots of hopes and dreams for how to improve the public transit system,” Callison says. “We have a certain budget—we have to stick within that. We are very fortunate this time around that we’ve actually just gotten more money. Usually, if we want to make changes, it’s, ‘Take a little from here, put a little over here.’ It’s moving things around, because the budget’s fixed.” Public transportation has been part of the Wasatch Front ever since 1872, when Mormon pioneers first started getting around Salt Lake with the help of muledrawn streetcars. This wasn’t exactly the speediest or most efficient system, but it laid the groundwork for what would gradually become a bustling network of electric trolleys. In 1923, Salt Lake was home to multiple competing streetcar companies, ferrying three million passengers a month along nearly 144 miles of track, according to BYU researcher J. Michael Hunter. Alas, the streetcars started going off the rails as the automobile gained in popularity throughout the 1920s and ’30s. By the 1940s, there was only one streetcar line left—and then the system was bought out

PETER HOLSLIN

Turning a Corner

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

Eric Callison, UTA’s manager of service planning, maps out Salt Lake City’s transit system. by a Minnesota transit company backed by General Motors and fully shut down in 1946. Jarrett Walker, a Portland-based consultant on public transportation who’s now advising the UTA on ways to design its system, says the glory days of the electric street car reflect a different era in American history. Back then, trolleys moved incredibly slow by today’s standards, but cities were also much smaller and people had to travel less to get to their jobs. The advent of the car reshaped the urban landscape, Walker says, sending Americans further and further into the suburbs—and setting the stage for many of today’s public-transit problems. “What’s happened is that we spent half a century on the assumption that everyone’s going to drive cars everywhere, and it’s caused us to make metro regions really, really huge,” Walker says. “Now, of course, it is because of cars and because of the illusion of speed arising from car dependence that people have moved so far from their jobs, and that employers feel it appropriate to locate so far from their employees.” Over the years, transit authorities in Utah have struggled to get their priorities straight. Planners have made innovative moves, like introducing Trax lines in 1999, and these days, bus drivers certainly deserve credit for their generally friendly demeanor. But UTA has also been the source of scandal. A state audit in 2014 slammed the agency for mismanaging contracts and pampering executives. Last year, Utah lawmakers gave the authority a drastic overhaul, passing a bill that slashed the number of board members from 16 to three, put caps on their annual salaries and added measures for state oversight. Now, UTA officials appear to be plotting out long-term goals to better serve the public. Later this year, it will test out a “microtransit” program, offering an on-demand, fixed-rate service modeled on UberPool in remote parts of southern Salt Lake County. Officials have also planned days on which passengers can ride UTA services for free to test how it impacts ridership and greenhouse gas emissions.

Dabakis and other mayoral candidates have promoted the idea of waiving UTA fares entirely. The Salt Lake Tribune reported earlier this year that the UTA experienced a 16% overall boost in ridership on two free-fare days it instituted in February and March. But in order for free fares to work, someone would have to pony up the cash to make up for the loss in fare revenues, which cover an estimated 20% of the authority’s annual operating costs, according to UTA spokesman Carl Arky. And it’s clear that the challenges extend way beyond ticket price. Dabakis, who in 2017 had aspirations to assume a “watchdog” position on the UTA board but was blocked by the Salt Lake City Council, says the system could bring in more riders by boosting bus frequency and working to bridge the “first mile/last mile” gap— i.e., the amount a transit rider has to walk, drive or use a scooter to get to a transit stop and to reach their final destination. These can make for intolerable distances especially in Salt Lake, built on a grid of extra-wide city blocks. “We’ve gotta do two things—we’ve gotta increase the frequency, and we’ve gotta take care of that last mile,” Dabakis says. “There are solutions, but they cost money. So where would we get this money?” Sen. Luz Escamilla and City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall—who judging from the recent poll are coming up behind Dabakis in the mayor’s race, taking second and third place, respectively—point to similar problems with the public transit system. Speaking with City Weekly, they both argue that transit riders need better amenities and more efficient service, in addition to affordable fares. “Until we have made the system far more convenient and made the coverage better, it’s premature for us to subsidize every resident using UTA,” Mendenhall says. “We know it’s not usable yet. We can get there.” Escamilla suggests thinking of what the average rider has to deal with, and then dreaming up improvements from there. “If you’re waiting in 100 degrees outside right now, and you have to wait 15 minutes with your baby—that’s not going to work for me,” she says. CW


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NEWS From the Utah Royals to the World Cup in France, ‘fansplaining’ is an utterly unsurprising phenomenon that needs to end at women’s sporting events. BYMATTHEW D. LAPLANTE comments@cityweekly.net @mdlaplante

T

he young man sitting behind me was apoplectic. “Stop passing the ball backwards!” he screamed, again and again, from his seat in the seventh row at Sandy’s Rio Tinto Stadium, where two of the most talented teams in the National Women’s Soccer League were on the pitch. Between his howls of protest, he breathlessly complained to an older gentleman who seemed to be either his father or uncle. “It’s really not that difficult,” he whined. “They need to score on their opponents’ goal, but they keep moving the ball back toward their own goal. It’s ridiculous.” What’s ridiculous, of course, is the notion that a backpass—used to relieve pressure, extend possession, exhaust opponents and stretch defenses—is contrary to good soccer. What’s ridiculous is that a man who looked to be in his early 20s, confident enough in his soccer knowledge that he would scream at professional athletes, wouldn’t know this. Seven-year-old footballers can understand and execute this fundamental tactical concept. Nobody who actually watches or plays this sport misunderstands this. There’s a fan like this at every professional sports contest in America. You can’t pack tens of thousands of people into a stadium or arena and not have some know-it-all try to tell the pros how things should be done. At women’s professional soccer games, though, there isn’t one of these guys in every crowd—it seems there’s one in every row. And as the Utah Royals and other National Women’s Soccer League teams enjoy increased attention and attendance in the wake of the 2019 Women’s World Cup—including from legions of men who have awaken to the glory of the game as it is played in the best league in the world— it’s time for men to confront fellow men about our very bad habit of mansplaining to female athletes. Or, if you will, “fansplaining.” I’ll give the git from the seventh row a little credit: He shut up rather quickly when I asked him whether he actually knew anything about soccer or if he just enjoyed looking like a fool. But no sooner had he trapped

up than a guy on my same row, seven or eight chairs to my left, filled the void. “Send her!” he screamed every time a player from the home team touched the ball, as though hitting a weighted pass ahead of a sprinting forward was a) the only play in soccer; b) something every player can and should do, at any moment of the game and from any spot on the pitch; and c) an idea that had not crossed the minds of any of the players on the field when the moment was actually opportune. My 12-year-old daughter looked at me, rolled her eyes and shook her head. “Every game,” she said. “Every. Single. Game.” We’d recently returned from the Women’s World Cup in France where, if anything, things were worse. Soccer’s international governing body, FIFA, had comendably committed to putting all-women officiating crews on the pitch, but not-so-commendably decided to use this tournament to test out a few rule changes and new officiating tactics. One was a delayed offside call, in which assistant referees wait until the culmination of an attacking sequence to signal that a player was offside at some point during the immediately past run of play. This puts close calls in the hands of the videoreview officials, and ostensibly prevents sequences that might otherwise result in a goal from being stopped by a mistake. We attended matches involving 13 different nations, and heard men—and yes, it was always men, even though there were obviously plenty of women in the various crowds— screaming in nearly that many languages about the delayed calls. They weren’t complaining that this new officiating approach was bad; that, at least, would be debatable. Rather, they were screaming at the female referees that they should be signalling the offside earlier, clearly unaware that the officials were doing exactly what they’d been instructed to do. Instead of taking a clue from the fact that every assistant referee was making this call in the exact same way, these men all assumed the female officials were all getting it wrong in the exact same way. I’ve brought up the fansplaining phenomenon to several male friends. In one way or another, they’ve all told me I’m making too much of it. “You’ve got a daughter and so you’re more sensitive,” one said. “At sporting events, people yell about what’s happening on the field. If they think a player is doing something wrong, they’re going to say something, and they’re going to say it really loud.” “But do you think male fans think female athletes are doing something wrong more often?” “Nah bro. It’s all the same.” But Sarah Kaplan, the director of the Institute for Gender and the Economy at the University of Toronto, suspects there’s more to it than that. Sure, she agreed, “fans are often yelling at players and coaches, no matter what the gender.” But where it takes shape as mansplaining, she told City Weekly, “is if there is a special sense among male fans that they know better than women athletes in assuming that women can’t be experts in their own sport simply because they are women.”

HARLEY WARRICK

‘At Least You’re Pretty’

C O M M E N TA R Y

It’s not just soccer. And it’s not just professional women athletes who are subjected to fansplaining. And yes, that’s hard to quantify, but it’s not hard to see and hear, especially at the 20,000-spectator capacity Rio Tinto Stadium, where the Royals share playing space with a men’s team, Real Salt Lake. My family has sat behind the north goal at Real games since the stadium opened in 2008. In that time, I’ve heard plenty of grumbling when long-time goalkeeper Nick Rimando has an off game, but I’ve never—absolutely never— heard someone scream instructions at him. For Royals keepers Nicole Barnhart and Abby Smith, though, it’s “get back on your line” and “cover the cross” and “close the near post.” It’s not just soccer. And it’s not just professional women athletes who are subjected to fansplaining. At Utah State University, a middling Division 1 sports school where I have taught since 2011, there’s certainly no shortage of armchair coaches who think they know what actual coaches and players should be doing in every sport. The difference is that they seem to feel very comfortable letting female players and coaches hear about it. USU basketball player Taylor Franson told me she couldn’t remember a specific incident where a spectator screamed instructions at her from the stands. That could be owing to the fact that college basketball arenas tend to be louder than college soccer fields. Whatever the case, Franson hastened, men never seem shy about walking up to her after the final whistle to offer their unsolicited opinions. “Typically the men will come up to me after games and tell me how I could have done better,” she said, “and honestly, they always find a way to touch me while they’re telling me.” Former Utah State soccer standout, Brooke Larsen Leavitt, wasn’t surprised by any of this. “It was especially noticeable my senior year when I switched positions from center back to outside back and had all the fans right next to me,” she recalled. “I always did the throw-ins and free kicks, and constantly had men, including friends, telling me what I should do—who to pass to, who was open.”

And, predictably, that wasn’t the worst of it. “During away games,” she said, “men cheering for the other team would often make gross comments about my body.” This reflects of the behavior of some men’s fans at NWSL games, and at the World Cup, too, where the vile, sexist, degrading words that were flung from the stands—again always by men—will be part of the tapestry of memories of the trip that my daughter will carry with her for the rest of her life. “You suck but it’s OK,” one American fan screamed at a Swedish midfielder. “At least you’re pretty.” “Tienes la cara de un perro,” a Spanishspeaking fan screamed at a Japanese winger. I didn’t confront most of those men, just as I haven’t confronted most of the mansplainers in the crowds at Utah Royals games. That’s a failure I’m trying to figure out how to rectify. Fansplaining is a problem created by men. The misogynistic taunting that comes from the stands is almost entirely from men. Men need to be responsible for ending this behavior. How do we do that without inciting in the sort of testosterone-laden aggression that makes things worse? I’m still trying to figure that out. For now, though, there’s this much to say: Men, you don’t know more about the game than the women you’re watching. You just don’t. It doesn’t matter if you played in high school or college; they played in high school and college, too. It doesn’t matter if you started watching the game when everyone else was watching Sesame Street; they did, too. And now they get paid to play the game. And you get paid to do whatever it is you do. And if you’re sitting in a stadium, watching a game, what you get paid to do isn’t sports. Cheer. Jeer. But don’t tell women athletes how to play their game. It’s ridiculous. CW

The author is an associate professor of journalism at Utah State University, a long-time soccer coach, and the father of a kid who can bend it like Lucy Bronze.


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DNA Detections How 3 individuals experienced big reveals through genetic genealogy. BY CAROLYN CAMPBELL | COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

In 1968, Mueller was 10 days old when she was adopted from a Salt Lake City agency. Her birth parents were a rare subject of conversation when she was growing up. She was told that they were college students living in Colorado, “who couldn’t deal with a baby, so I was given up; I’ve since learned that story is partially true. I was raised with the belief that I could never find them,” she recalls. She mostly thought about her birth parents in moments when she felt disappointed or angry with her parents. “I would think, ‘Maybe I can just find my real family,’” the redhead says. Still, she doesn’t feel like she missed out on anything in the home where she was raised. She was close to her grandparents and often helped her grandfather work in his yard. “The biggest compliment he gave me was that I worked like a boy.” Her father, she says, really loved her younger sister, who was “his precious, pretty little doe-eyed girl, where I was a sturdy Irish girl who was lippy and stood up for myself.” Yet, once she had an epiphany that he would never be the Dad she wanted him to be, from her perspective their relationship changed—they got along famously. Their association became a loving one where he dined at Mueller’s home almost every week. He loved to hang out with her husband and sons. Her father was later murdered in 2002. “I still have my Mama,” Mueller says about her mom, Ruby Kohtz. “She is 82 years old and totally badass. I adore her. It wouldn’t matter when and if I ever meet my birth mother. No one could ever replace her.” Shortly after Mueller’s son was born in 1989, she wrote to the adoption agency. A social worker suggested she sign a paper authorizing members of her birth family to contact her, adding that her birth mother might have signed a similar paper that could now be in Mueller’s adoption file. She followed suit, but didn’t take the process further. She wasn’t sure how she felt about opening the Pandora’s Box of actually contacting her birth family. “Stability has always been something that I seek out and crave,” Mueller, now a City Weekly account executive, says. Her adoptive family was stable. “I just kind of glommed onto my adoptive family’s history; it became important to me. I tried to own it as much as I could, but still, inside, you know it isn’t you.” She then created her own family, giving birth to two sons, Austin and Dylan, in 13

months. “They are now 29 and 30—my Irish twins,” Mueller boasts. “For the first time in my life, I had these people that I knew were my people. We have the same blood and are cut from the same cloth. I’m totally addicted to my sons. Neither of my parents were very outwardly emotional people. I’ve always been touchy-feely and made sure my kids were showered with affection.” Six years ago, Mueller’s mother-in-law gave her an Ancestry DNA test. She left it sitting around for about a year. “I didn’t know if I really trusted it,” she says. “I wondered if it would open a can of worms.” Then, one night, when she and her husband were laughing together, “I decided what the hell, I’m doing it,” she recalls. “I love red wine. I’m sure there was a fair amount of red wine in the saliva sample that I submitted.” She felt like she took the test mostly to confirm her lineage. The initial results showed that she was mostly Irish, then English, with 9% from the Iberian Peninsula. The results showed a couple of second cousins who had included photographs, which Mueller looked at a couple of times. “I would wonder if maybe I looked like that, or if my nose looked like that.” Later, she received a report from Ancestry stating that their science capabilities had been updated and that the most current report stated that she was 68% Irish and 32% English. On Jan. 13, 2019, Mueller was “luxuriating in bed, drinking coffee and checking emails,” when she spotted an email from Ancestry. The man who wrote it said she showed up as his first cousin. He was trying to help his father figure out his own story. Mueller wrote back that, being adopted herself, she thought she wouldn’t be of much help. “I was honest with him, telling him I’d never really sought any of this information out and he was the first contact I’d had.” Mueller and her newly found cousin, Duke, hit it off from that first exchange. “It opened up the floodgates for me. We had this instant dialogue from the minute he emailed me. We probably sent 20 emails that first day. I was trying to upload a photo of myself to send to him, when he said, “My wife is the queen of Facebook stalking. She looked at your Facebook page and we totally think you look like our family.” She admits she felt fleetingly violated, but, “from the beginning, our banter was easy. I had these moments while we were corresponding that felt like [we had revived] the lost art of being

STEVEN VARGO

K

athy Mueller carried a greeting card in her purse for more than a month. She took it to work and brought it back home. She sensed that mailing this particular card could change her life. It was addressed to a woman she’d never met. The two share a connection as close as blood: the woman is her birth mother.

Left to right: Aimee Steinly, cousin Anna Martz, Kathy Mueller and Natalie Christensen

COURTESY PHOTO

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Left to right: Austin Mueller, Kathy Mueller, Ruby Kohtz and Dylan Mueller

pen pals. I was receiving kindness and generosity—basically from a stranger,” she says. Duke eventually invited Mueller to visit him and his wife in Philadelphia. Mueller asked herself, “Do I want to take this relationship to the next level and meet in person?” While deliberating whether to travel to Philadelphia, Mueller acquired additional information about her own story by requesting a redacted version of her file from the adoption agency. “For the first time, I knew where I was born, how much I weighed as a baby and how long I was,” Mueller reminisces. The file said that Mueller’s birth mother didn’t tell anyone she was pregnant, including the baby’s father. She was a 20-year-old BYU student. “Reading the case worker’s notes, I saw that [my birth mother] was raised Mormon, but had kind of strayed from the church. It said that my grandmother felt that she hadn’t done right by her children because they weren’t inclined to the Mormon faith.” Mueller adds, “I have to give her credit for carrying out a pregnancy stealth-like, where she disappeared for less than three months, gave birth and went back to her parents in Pocatello.” From the file information, she figured out which year her birth mother graduated from high school. Reading her birth grandmother’s obituary, she discovered her birth mother’s married name. “Then Facebook made things really easy. Once I saw what she looked like, I felt a sense of urgency.” She wrote her birth

mother a Facebook message, then decided to wait to send it. Mueller’s first face-to-face meeting with her cousin, Duke, in May when she and her two best friends traveled to Philadelphia. “We spent four days together. The conversations really flowed. Although he’s very East Coast and I’m very West Coast, we have the same sense of humor.” At the end of the visit, Duke told Mueller, “No matter what happens, we got you out of the deal.” Mueller later found additional connections between herself and her birth mother. Looking through their mutual friends on Facebook, she said, “It turned out that two of our mutual friends are relatives of my exhusband.” Recently, a person with connections to Mueller and her birth mom called her to say that her birth mom had died. “I felt the heaviest regret I’ve ever felt—that she was at my fingertips. I had been so close to expressing my gratitude and I didn’t reach out,” Mueller says. A few days later, the person called to say that she had been confused—it was actually Mueller’s birth mother’s sister-in-law. Mueller took the greeting card and headed for the sister-in-law’s funeral. “I saw her right off,” she says, of the moment she caught sight of her birth mother. “But she was in a group, and I thought if I could catch her alone, I could give her the card. Then, I saw that she didn’t have a purse with her, so I thought I couldn’t give her the card.”


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AUGUST 8, 2019 | 17

initial investigation hadn’t been fruitful, Stevens had resigned herself to never crossing paths with her son. Flooded by “a great sigh of relief,” she felt it “immediately comforting and healing to hear his voice.” Stevens and Thornton quickly realized they share a love of gardening. “Don’t think I’m crazy, but I love to collect rocks and crystals,” Thornton mentioned. That same day, Stevens texted him a photo of her own window sill, filled with rocks and crystals that she’s collected over the years. He later sent her one of his favorite rocks. Because he was adopted through LDS Social Services, Jacob wondered what religious beliefs his birth mother would have. It turns out he and his birth mother were raised LDS, but no longer practice. He is gay and his birth mother’s brother is also gay. “I thought you were going to have five children and be a Book of Mormon thumper,” he told her. He adds, “If she were a practicing Mormon, it’s not that she would love me any less, but it might have been more challenging for us to get close. But as it was, she was totally OK with me being gay and the experience went as smooth as butter.” He adds that his LDS adoptive parents were accepting of his sexual orientation, as well. “They always loved me, and never expressed any discomfort with who I was, even though I didn’t follow the path they wanted me to—to be a good, straight Mormon boy rather than a gay atheist.” When 23andMe flew Jacob

Jacob Thornton’s personal history began with a gray area. His life was like a book that started on Chapter Two. He had no idea what happened in the first one. Still, he had a great life with the couple who adopted him as a baby. “My real parents were the ones who changed my diapers and wiped my runny noses,” he says. His adoptive parents,

cases. The investigation yielded eight young men named Jacob who were born on Nov. 24, 1990. When they didn’t receive confirmation that any of the eight were the right one, “one of the last things they said was that I could take a 23andMe DNA test or one from another DNA company,” Stevens says. She bought a kit and planned to take the test for health reasons. “But I was discouraged and still processing what had happened with the private investigator.” Thornton was up to some sleuthing of his own. Researching his birth mom’s name, he found a link to Stevens’ private therapy practice and called up the phone number. Stevens answered her phone to hear a young man say, “I’m really nervous. I’ve never done this.” Stevens initially thought he might be a potential therapy client. “Tell me what’s going on,” she said. Thornton continued, “I did a DNA test. It linked me to someone it said was my aunt.” Awareness flooded over Stevens. “Wait. Wait. Are you my son?” she asked. They both started to cry. “I think it was a combination of excitement and shock,” Thornton says. His birth mom’s first words were, “You are healing my heart,” she says. “As a therapist, I work with a lot of different issues, but there isn’t a lot of literature on what to do when you are reunified with your child after 28 years. The emotions are profound and overwhelming in a wonderful way that blows your mind.” Given the

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Jacob Thornton and Natalie Stevens

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For genealogists and people seeking their roots, DNA testing has become a game changer, making many more connections possible as increasing numbers of people continue to take at-home tests and add their information to online family trees, says SLC native Mckell Keeney, a genealogist specializing in DNA. “If you watch any of the popular TV shows on genealogy, such as Long Lost Family, Relative Race or Finding Your Roots with Dr. Henry Louis Gates, they’re all about stories of searches and reunions. They’re not always ‘fairy tale’ encounters—not at all— but establishing connections provides people with peace and a greater sense of self just to discover information such as, ‘What was the name of my biological father?’ or ‘What did my biological grandmother look like?’” In Keeney’s adopted brother’s case, she said, “When our parents passed away, he felt lost, because he was so close to them.” After he took a DNA test, Keeney was able to figure out who his birth mother was, even though she was adopted herself, and went back a “second generation to puzzle out the rest of his line.” She says her brother—and many other fellow adoptees—feel that their adoption wasn’t a mistake and they were actually raised by the right people. “The siblings he found told him that he was the lucky one that got away. They knew he was placed for adoption—their pregnant mother went to the hospital and came home without the baby. She told the other kids to tell people he was stillborn,” she says. Mueller adds that it is emotionally healthy to be able to trace one’s biological genealogical line whether or not a person actually makes contact with newfound relatives. Regarding the debate over which weighs heaviest—nature or nurture—“I am blown away all the time about what is passed down through DNA,” Keeney says. She worked with biological half-brothers who had never met, yet sounded exactly the same on the phone. “They even used the same phrases. I would have to ask myself if I was speaking with John in Seattle or his brother, Scott, in Virginia.”

Natalie Stevens and Jacob Thornton

23andME

A Familiar Tale

who traced their own provenance directly to Brigham Young, also understood he might someday want to find his biological parents. They shared information from a locked file they kept in their office. Thornton learned that he was born to a single mom on Nov. 24, 1990. His parents picked him up a month later. “They always celebrated both my birthday and my adoption day, which was Christmas Eve,” he recalls. On his adoption day, he thought of his birth mom and tried to imagine who she might be. Now 28 years old, Thornton lives in Northern California where he works at a school for special needs kids. He’s also pursuing a master’s degree in communications disorders. Familiar with his background, a friend suggested that he submit a saliva sample to 23andMe. “She thought I could learn more about my genealogy and family history,” he says. He bought the DNA kit, filled the tube with saliva and sent it off. Two weeks later, 23andMe sent a notification to his phone. “They found someone who was 99.9% likely to be my maternal aunt,” he says. Checking out social media, he found a picture of his aunt with her three sisters. He paused while looking at one of the sisters in the photo. “Right off the bat, I saw Natalie and knew she was my birth mother,” Thornton says. A doctor told a teenaged Natalie Stevens that she might not be able to conceive a child because of a reproductive issue. “I thought that I didn’t need to use birth control, yet I soon found out that wasn’t the case,” she says, recalling her unplanned pregnancy at age 16. “I always knew that it was probably the right thing to place him for adoption.” Yet the prospect was emotionally difficult. “I had a hard time letting him go,” she says. Seeing Stevens struggle with the idea of signing adoption consent papers while still at the hospital, LDS Social Services gave her the option to place her baby in temporary foster care. “They explained that it wouldn’t be state foster care, and reassured me that he would be safe while I gave it some more thought.” Less than four weeks later, she found herself returning to school and reconnecting with her friends. “Getting back in touch with my former life helped me recognize that adoption was probably the right decision for both him and me,” she says. From age 17 to 20, she repressed her emotions; yet in her 20s, she recognized that placing a child for adoption had affected her in many ways. She came to understand that there was a grief process. “I began to feel the need to communicate with him,” she says. So Stevens began writing birthday cards to Jacob every year. “I said things you would put in letters.” She recalls filling the entire paper surface of the cards with messages describing ways in which she imagined his life. “I bet you are driving now,” she wrote in one card. “Maybe you are dating.” After finishing college, Stevens became a licensed clinical social worker. Later, she married and had a second son. Still, she knew all along she wanted to find Jacob. His first name was practically the only detail she knew about him. “I wanted to know where he was, and that he was OK. I wanted him to know that I always loved him and thought about him.” Stevens proceeded to hire a private investigator who specialized in adoption

23andME

Moments later, her birth mother walked past and picked up her purse. “I thought, ‘This is my moment.’ I grabbed my card and stopped her, saying, ‘You probably don’t remember me, but I have this card and I would like you to read it when you have complete privacy.” Her birth mother asked her name and Mueller said, “I’m Kathy. Here’s a card; I’d like you to read it when you’re alone.” Looking back, she says, “I was trying to fly under the radar and not be really obvious. I gave her a hug and left as fast as I could.” Today, she is grateful that she got to tell her birth mother thank you. She says it doesn’t matter if she ever hears back from her.


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Robin Adair Passey and Becky Skousen

Robin Adair Passey made a pact with God. “I said I would place my baby daughter for adoption if I could see her again someday,” she says. She also had a blessing from an LDS patriarch that promised her that she would be “a mother in Zion.” She adds, “One of my fears was that I might not have any other children.” She was 14 and finishing ninth grade when she became pregnant. Her boyfriend was a year older and went to a different school. “We had talked about getting married. But as soon as I got pregnant, he wanted nothing more to do with me,” she says. “I was devastated and distraught.” Her own father was often absent from her life and she knew her mother couldn’t take on another child. “Instead of sending me away, my mother and I went away together.” She and her mother traveled to Hawaii, where Passey gave birth. She told the adoption agency that she wanted her daughter to go to “a loving home, but not a rich home, because I wanted her to learn the value of work.” She remembers the precious, brief moments, when she held her newborn daughter. “I counted her fingers and toes and saw that she was whole and perfect,” she says. Handing her baby back left a hole in her heart that she felt determined to fill one day. She returned to her home and school. She and the patriarch had discussed the option to “keep my experience on the down low— between me and God,” she recalls. Feeling she should keep the truth to herself, she denied everything to classmates who suggested she left school to have a baby. “I was only gone from August to January,” she would say. She adds, “I struggled, but never fit back in [to my old life] well.” Two weeks after graduation, she began studies at BYU with the help of a dance scholarship. After three semesters at BYU, she met the husband she has now been married to for 43 years. Although they had five daughters and two sons, she never forgot the baby daughter she longed to meet. “I didn’t want to interfere in her life, only to know that she was all right,” she says. “Each of my children knew about her. I told them at

different times in their lives.” For 43 years, Passey felt she tried every possible route to find her daughter. She initially felt sure her baby was adopted in California. Then, 20 years ago, she found out that the adoption actually happened in Davis County, Utah. “I had been looking in the wrong place. I tried to register in the Utah adoption registry, but they wouldn’t let me because the birth had to be in that state,” she says. “I tried to register in the Hawaiian adoption registry, but they wouldn’t let me because the adoption had to be there. The birth was in Hawaii and the adoption was in Utah—exactly opposite from their rules.” She tried to send for the amended birth certificate (that would list her daughter’s current name) hoping, “someone would screw up and send it to me. They sent the original one.” She wrote to the court in 2003, stating that she had cancer and needed to let her daughter know her medical history “They never wrote back. I even had an attorney friend try to find a loophole in the Hawaii law code that would permit me to have the records opened. No luck. Nothing. I was pretty discouraged.” Then her mother died in 2001. “I had always wanted her to meet my daughter, but it didn’t happen,” Passey says. “I would say, ‘Mom, I know you know who she is now. Please just whisper her name in my ear.’ If I had a name, I knew the chances of finding her were pretty good.” Unrelated to her search for her daughter, Passey and her husband decided to take a DNA test to determine their countries of ancestry, “even though we had a fairly good idea of our roots and where we were from.” For Christmas 2016, they both took the Ancestry DNA test. To help in Passey’s search, genealogist Keeney came to her home. She advised her to also upload her DNA onto other sites. “If you are not adopted, having your DNA in only one place is fine,” Keeney says, “but if you are trying to solve a mystery, it can be helpful to upload your DNA in what CeCe Moore’s blog Your Genetic Genealogist calls “all four ponds.” The blog advises DNA testers, “specifically those searching for birth family and attempting to solve family mysteries, to test at all four of the major DNA testing companies, in other words to ‘fish in all four ponds.’” These autosomal DNA databases— AncestryDNA, 23andMe, FamilyTreeDNA and MyHeritage DNA—now contain more than 29 million total testers. Ancestry has the most (15 million announced at RootsTech in March 2019), 23andMe blogged in April 2019 that it had reached 10 million testers, FTDNA is estimated to have about a million and MyHeritage announced in May 2019 that it had 3 million. Considering the idea of uploading her DNA to other sites, Passey was “a little skeptical at first because it felt like really putting myself out there.” But then she thought, “the government knows everything about us anyway, what the heck!” She followed Keeney’s suggestion to upload her DNA on other sites at no cost (Ancestry and 23andMe are the only companies that allow uploads from other companies). “Every now and then, I would get an email from the sites saying they found my 14th cousin. I didn’t really understand the magnitude of DNA testing.

Robin Adair Passey, left, and Becky Skousen

COURTESY PHOTO

and Natalie to New York City to celebrate a Mother’s Day event, they saw The Book of Mormon musical together. Natalie says she and her son “are better versions of ourselves because of the adoption.” Had she chosen to parent at the time of his birth, “I would have struggled and possibly not been able to further my career—and I don’t think he would have been able to reach his potential. It was good that we came together on the flip side.” Echoing the sentiment, Thornton says, “In our first conversation, Natalie and I told each other briefly who we are, and now we have the rest of our lives to get to know each other.” He continues, “I have my parents and now my birth mother. While my initial thought was, ‘How am I going to balance this?’ I’ve discovered they are not mutually exclusive—there is enough love in my heart for both.” Reflecting, he concludes, “Adoption isn’t always a tragic tale, like a kid left in a basket at a fire department. All I have felt through this whole process is love.”

I thought it was used for crime scenes and medical issues—not to find lost people.” On April 2, 2017, Passey received a notice on her phone that she had an email from MyHeritage DNA. At 10 p.m., she opened the email. It said, “We have found a match for you,” she recalls. “OK, another one,” she thought. Then she read closer, that her top new DNA match was for someone named Becky. It said that their 49.1% shared DNA suggested the following possible relationship. In bold, it said: Daughter. And it had a name: Becky Skousen. “It took my breath away,” Passey says. She went to bed at 1 a.m. and was up the next morning at 6. Logging onto Facebook, she messaged Becky, saying, “If you are the person I think you are, I’ve been looking for you almost all of my life.” Unbeknownst to Robin, 40-year-old Becky Skousen was researching her own family history at the same time. “I was adopted and just wanted to know where my background was from,” she said of her decision to take a DNA test, coincidentally, just a month after Robin uploaded her Ancestry DNA file to MyHeritage DNA. Passey wrote to Becky, asking for her birth date. Inwardly, she thought, “If she has the right birthday, I’ll know she’s my daughter.” Becky wrote back, “What is the birthday of the person you are looking for?” Passey wrote back, “Jan. 10, 1974.” Becky responded, “Oh, my gosh. It’s me.” Recalling one of their first meetings, Becky says, “I stepped out of the car and my mom was wearing the same color as me. I took one look at her and it was like we already were connected. I felt like I already knew her.” Adds Passey, “I screamed and ran into her arms and sobbed and sobbed.” Weeks later, Robin traveled to Utah to attend Becky’s wedding. And then, Becky moved to Arizona where Robin lives. “Her mom was grateful that I live in Arizona and can look out for her,” Passey says. “Once I found my birth mom and my seven siblings, it was like all the empty pieces were now filled in,” Becky adds. Keeney explains that the number of people testing their DNA to find family members (or because they are interested

in their ethnicity estimates) has skyrocketed since early 2016, when she first tested her own DNA. Back then, there were fewer than 10 million testers worldwide at the major testing companies that show “cousin connections,” the key to building a tree for someone without immediate family matches. Now there is about three times that number in the consumer DNA testing databases, greatly increasing a person’s chances of getting a match close enough to solve their adoption mystery. “People are finding information on their biological heritage they would find no other way.” Keeney says, “Even if you do not want to take a DNA test yourself, if one of more of your second cousins or even third cousins takes a DNA test, skilled genealogists with DNA expertise will be able to piece together your genetic family tree.” There might come a time there will be no more “family secrets,” or parentage mysteries, Keeney believes—and that’s a good thing, as “keeping secrets is not healthy.” She cautions people before they test and look at their matches to be prepared for surprises, because she has had numerous people, even in their 70s or 80s, find out things about their origins they did not know. Some adults who did not know they were adopted have found out they are what is termed “late discovery adoptees,” with neither of their presumed parents a biological parent, or that one of their parents is “Not the Parent Expected” (NPE). There are some people who discover they were donor-conceived, with numerous half-sibling matches in the databases. “There is support available in any these scenarios, such as private Facebook groups filled with people in the same situation who give positive support. Other resources, such as how to find a qualified genetic counselor, if needed, are listed on WatershedDNA.com, wellregarded counselor Brianne Kirkpatrick’s website. “Keeney adds that Kirkpatrick even offers phone or Skype counseling. She concludes, “DNA testing can open up new genealogical lines to research, increase the depth of your heritage, and bring great joy through new connections to cousins near and far.” CW


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Good Company Theatre: The Jungle If you’ve ever wanted to see theater shaped before your eyes, you’re in luck. An early phase musical production of the landmark 1906 Upton Sinclair novel The Jungle is coming to Ogden. Rob Baumgartner Jr. and Ogden native Nathan Dame are the creative minds behind the musical adaptation of the story, which focused on the terrible working conditions in Chicago’s meatpacking plants. The musical follows a Lithuanian couple, Jurgis and Ona, and the struggles they deal with in a capitalistic and nightmarish version of early 20thcentury Chicago. It also tracks Jurgis’ journey from a hopeful immigrant to a jaded alcoholic. This musical is still in its developmental stage, with each performance presented as a staged reading style where the actors have scripts in hand. After every performance, the script is tweaked by Dame and Baumgartner—which means that each performance is the newest version, and the production could look different from night to night. The Jungle is performed by Ogden’s Good Company Theatre, known for its productions of “contemporary works that told the stories of marginalized people,” according to co-artistic director Alicia Washington in an interview with SLUG Magazine. Washington also says the horrific treatment of immigrants in the novel still applies to modern times—a main reason the production is relevant in 2019. A socially-conscious musical workshopped for local audiences doesn’t come along all that often, so this is a rare opportunity. (Sean Hemmersmeier) The Jungle @ Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-417-4969, through Aug. 11, 4 & 8 p.m., $20, goodcotheatre.com

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Some might consider Nick Swardson a loose cannon. He specializes in unfiltered observations that revolve around ordering food for drunk friends at drive-thrus, imagining babies as unwieldy adults, a fear of frozen drinks, his love of fajitas and the unpleasant result of overindulging at the juice bar. In many ways, he says things the rest of us might—if only we possessed his stand-up skills. That talent caught the attention of Adam Sandler’s Happy Madison Productions following Swardson’s early stint writing for the show Malibu’s Most Wanted and his role in the Comedy Central series Reno 911. He was then involved in Happy Madison film projects including Grandma’s Boy, Benchwarmers and I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry featuring Sandler and Kevin James. He’s continued to make more movies, among them, Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star, which he wrote, produced and starred in. Likewise, his first CD/DVD, 2007’s Party, provided another big breakthrough when its sales earned it platinum status. It all culminated with his 2010 Comedy Central stand-up special, Seriously, Who Farted. And isn’t that a question we’ve all asked at one time or another? Swardson’s other accomplishments include his early Comedy Central sketch show, Pretend Time with Nick Swardson, voice-over roles in the FXX animated show Chozen and the animated film Hell And Back, the Comedy Central special Taste It! as well as leading roles in the Netflix films The Ridiculous Six (with Sandler and Will Forte) and The Do-Over (starring Sandler and David Spade). Clearly, Swardson’s got a knack for making audiences laugh. (Lee Zimmerman) Nick Swardson @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 9-10, 7 & 9:30 pm, $35, wiseguyscomedy.com

More than 250 artisans, performers, crafters and inventors are coming from every corner of Utah to show off their skills and art at the 11th annual Craft Lake City DIY Festival. Angela Brown, Craft Lake City’s executive director and festival organizer (pictured), says this three-day festival provides artists with a platform to sell and network and celebrates everything do-it-yourself (DIY) while shining a spotlight on Utah’s unique art scene. The event has more than just amazing art. There are crafts in the kids’ area, performances from dozens of multicultural bands, dance troupes and enough variety of food to satisfy the taste buds of everyone in the family. While these activities are outdoors, for the first time in the festival’s history, the vendors, workshops and the Google Fiber STEM Building are located inside, in air-conditioned venues. Brown says she hopes these changes—as well as Craft Lake City’s decision to monetarily sponsor families and artisans from underserved communities—helps make DIY culture accessible to more people. That’s an impressive goal, considering that the festival already draws about 20,000 attendees annually. “There’s just a satisfaction and a feeling of accomplishment when you can create something,” Brown says. “I’ve just felt very passionate about sharing that education and that work with others, and really just encouraging locals to pick up a new tool, a creative instrument, and try something new and see what that looks like.” (Kylee Ehmann) Craft Lake City DIY Festival @ Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 801-906-8521, Aug 9, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 10, noon-10 p.m.; Aug 11, noon-7 p.m., $5-$35, craftlakecity.com

Nick Swardson

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TUESDAY 8/13

Broadway Across America: The Book of Mormon

Matt Stone and Trey Parker will probably always be remembered first and foremost as the creators of South Park. However, you could argue that they reached their artistic pinnacle when they collaborated with Avenue Q co-writer Robert Lopez on The Book of Mormon, which hit Broadway in 2011 to rave reviews and nine Tony Awards. The R-rated musical comedy follows two LDS missionaries—zealous, persnickety Elder Kevin Price and Star Wars-obsessed serial exaggerater Elder Arnold Cunningham—as they’re shipped to Uganda to convert the local tribespeople, most of whom are (understandably) not as down with Heavenly Father as two squeaky-clean Utahns. From there, as they say, the plot thickens. You might assume that a musical from the South Park guys tackling religion would be caustic, even mean-spirited. While the play isn’t exactly uncritical of the LDS faith, most of the laughs are drawn from the contrast between the white-bread wholesomeness of the missionaries and the world-weariness of their prospective converts. Tunes like “I Believe” and “All-American Prophet” might poke fun at the church’s more outlandish tenets, but the overall message highlights the positive effect religion can have on people whether their beliefs are true or not. The Book of Mormon has, unsurprisingly, been a smash hit in the Mormon capital, playing to a sold-out run at the Eccles Theater in 2015 and again in 2017. “Sal Tla Ka Siti” residents have a third chance to see The Book of Mormon when it returns this month, starring Kevin Clay as Elder Price and Connor Pierson as Elder Cunningham. (Nic Renshaw) The Book of Mormon @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Aug. 13-25, dates and times vary, $70-$165, artsaltlake.org


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Local artist and ‘reluctant bicyclist’ fosters community through participatory art. BY COLETTE A. FINNEY comments@cityweekly.net @cooliedance13

D

espite the cautious overtones of her current exhibit at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA), Megan Hallett is anything but shy and retiring, with a hand in many local projects bringing strangers, artists and bikers together. With a simple manifesto of “Ride with Us,” Hallett sought out riders willing to “sing the love of two wheels over four,” but not going anywhere was fine also, hence the title League of Reluctant Bicyclists. The collaborative approach exemplifies Hallett’s artistic philosophy. “I created the League of Reluctant Bicyclists because I was struck constantly by my own desire to ride my bike more, as a way of building a better community and living a better life, and then still not riding,” Hallett says. “I think of art first and foremost as a place to figure out how to live. For eight weeks, we combined aspects of performance, theater, installation, writing, filmmaking and visual art to try to figure out what it means to get on, or not get on, our bikes as a way of navigating our daily lives.” This latest example is just one of her many “social art-making” projects, and Hallett is hooked. With this simple notion—ride or don’t ride—she managed to enlist 60 riders to join in on her latest art project.

A&E Yet Hallett still manages to teach art to elementary students and run her art nonprofit, Framework Art, while still allowing a little time to paint. Despite driving a forklift and using a “badass” chainsaw on previous jobs, there seemed to be something steering her toward creative ground rather than cutting Christmas trees. After earning degrees in fine arts and education, she eventually took a position as a visual art instructor, and her involvement in community art grew from there. “Years ago, I was working with a wonderful art teacher, and I was still struggling with internal boundaries of ‘art teacher’ vs. ‘artist.’ Together we figured out how to be both,” Hallett says. “It was then that I saw my role as an artist working alongside these other young artists, bringing to the project different skills or abilities than what they had, and making it together.” Hallett is well respected in Salt Lake City for gathering people to create public art projects like the League of Reluctant Bicyclists. But the breadth of her energy does not stop there. Framework Art served more than 500 participants the past year with family art studio classes, art projects, a speaker series and even gallery space. Embracing a group mindset in creating art, Hallett envisions projects and seeks out opportunities for anyone willing to try. “I do what I do because I love working with people and inviting them to make meaning with art materials,” Hallett says. “I believe that too many people’s stories are not being told with accuracy and compassion, or are not being told by the people who are living them.” While finding themes tied to issues playing out among her students and in the world, curiosity is a driving force in propelling Hallet’s ideas, along with support from others such as the Salt Lake City Public Library, Saltgrass Printmakers and KRCL 90.9 FM. With a strong desire to persist in creating something even when it feels impossible, while finding “comfort

COLETTE A. FINNEY

ARTS Social ArtMaking

in discomfort,” Hallett uses her education background to guide others in the artmaking process. “The word that I fall back on for comfort in this process is ‘emergent,’” Hallett says. “My work emerges over time, with other people contributing their stories within the structure or parameters that I provide.” Working with Hallett for more than 16 years, Utah Museum of Fine Arts curator of education Virginia Catherall has seen Hallett’s ideas grow from a single-minded focus, and evolve into having a broad sense of devotion for the marginalized and underserved populations. “Her art projects allow the community to voice their own ideas, challenges and perspectives through different mediums, really showing how art can enhance and reflect people’s lives,” Catherall says. “Through Megan’s unique perspective and her experiences teaching in the schools and the community, our city and state has become more vibrant and enriched.” Hoping to keep the wheels moving forward for a long time, Hallett believes there

The League of Reluctant Bicyclists are many paths and places available in the pursuit of art, not just the artist alone at the easel. Whatever artistic avenue is being sought—whether a studio artist, musician or art instructor—seek out people who will stretch individual ideas about what is possible to fortify an artist’s ability to persist. “To show us things in new emotionally striking ways; and expose us to stories that are buried or unfamiliar about ourselves and others so that we may love and live better, together,” Hallett adds. “The vitality of our communities depends on it.” Even though she is most proud of the work with her young students, the League of Reluctant Bicyclists and other previous art-making ventures, including Work and Wisdom of the Water Closet, have brought Hallett praise for her tireless energy encouraging the voices of the public to blossom. “To see a work by Megan and her community is to come away a more fulfilled and learned person,” Catherall concludes. CW


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moreESSENTIALS

Peter Pan the Musical Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Aug. 10, ogdenmusicaltheatre.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 15, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Sunday School Musical Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, through Aug. 25, desertstar.biz Utah Shakespeare Festival Southern Utah University, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 12, times and prices vary, bard.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Beethoven Festival Eccles Community Art Center, 2580 Jefferson Ave., Ogden, Aug. 8, 7:30 p.m., ogden4arts.org Indigo Girls w/ Utah Symphony Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org Music of The Rolling Stones Circa 1969 w/ the Utah Symphony Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, Aug. 9, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org Summer Evening Concert Holladay City Hall, 4580 S. 2300 East, Aug. 8, 7:30 p.m., cityofholladay.com

DANCE Urban Arts Gallery (116 S. Rio Grande St., utaharts.org) showcases a group show celebrating the diverse beauty of animal life on earth (a work by Rosemarie Dunn is pictured) in Animalia running through Sept. 1, with an artist reception Friday, Aug. 16, 6-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Aug. 31, 7:30 p.m., cptutah.org The Book of Mormon Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Aug. 13-25, artsaltlake.org (see p. 22) Cash on Delivery CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, Aug. 9-31, cptutah.org Charley’s Aunt Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, Aug. 15-Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., visitsaltlake.com Cinderella Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 7, showtimes vary, hct.org Freaky Friday Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Aug. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Hamleton: To Be or Not to Be The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Sep. 7, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org The Jungle Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Aug. 11, 4 & 8 p.m., goodcotheatre.com (see p. 22) Little Women: The Musical Murray Park, 296 E. Murray Park Ave., Murray, Aug. 9-17, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 8 p.m., murray.utah.gov Matilda The Ziegfield Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Aug. 31, times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Mamma Mia! Sandy Amphitheater, 9400 S. 1300 East, Sandy, through Aug. 10, sandyamp.com Newsies The Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton, Aug. 14-20, 8 p.m., onpitchperformingarts.com

Fighter Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Aug. 8-10, artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Jay Whittaker Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Aug. 9-10, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Laughing Stock Improv Comedy The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., theobt.org Nick Swardson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 W., Aug. 9-10, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 22) Open Mic Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Random Tangent Improv Comedy Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Saturdays, 10 p.m., randomtangentimprov.org Ryan Erwin Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Aug. 9, 8 p.m, wiseguyscomedy.com Wes Austin Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Aug. 10, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays through Oct. 13, 10 a.m.2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Fleet Nights, Little City, 855 S. 400 West, every Saturday, 4 p.m., littlecityinc.com New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Ogden Farmers Market 25th Street, Ogden, Saturdays through Sept. 15, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., farmersmarketogden.com Park City Farmers Market Silver King Resort, 1845 Empire Ave., Park City, Wednesdays through mid-October, noon-5 p.m., parkcityfarmersmarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market Main Street, Park City, Sundays through Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., parksillysundaymarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Farimont Park,

1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, second Sundays through September, 8:30 a.m.-noon, sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays, through Sept. 14, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Craft Lake City DIY Festival Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Aug. 9, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 10, noon-10 p.m.; Aug 11, noon-7 p.m., craftlakecity.com (see p. 22) Davis County Fair Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, Aug. 14-18, times vary, daviscountyutah.gov Duchesne County Fair County Fairgrounds, 379 S. Center St., Duchesne, Aug. 10-11, 7:30 p.m., duchesnecountyfair.org Friendly Island Tongan Festival Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Aug. 8-10, 4 p.m., ntasutah.org Rich County Fair & Rodeo Rich Fairgrounds, 20 S. Main Street, Randolph, Aug. 12-17, times vary, richcountyut.org Summit County Fair Fairgrounds, 202 Park Road, Coalville, through Aug. 10, times vary, summitcountyfair.com Wasatch International Food Festival Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, Aug. 10, 11 a.m., foodfestutah.org Weber County Fair Golden Spike Event Center, 1000 N. 1200 West, Ogden, through Aug. 10, webercountyfair.org

LGBTQ

Beyond a Night of Music Encircle Salt Lake, 331 S. 600 East, every Thursday, 6:30-8 p.m., encircletogether.org Leather and Gear Night Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South, second Fridays, 4 p.m.-1 a.m., clubtryangles.com Men’s Sack Lunch Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Wednesdays, noon-1:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org TransAction Weekly Meeting Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

A.W. Baldwin University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Aug. 10, 2 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Jack Carr: True Believer The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 8, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com James V. D’arc: When Hollywood Came to Utah University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Aug. 13, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Julio Garreaud: The Observer The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 9, 7 p.m. thekingsenglish.com Kate Rice: The Stranger Among You Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Aug. 12, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

3SMITHS Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Sept. 6, artandmuseums.utah.gov 15th Face of Utah Sculptural Exhibit Utah

Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Aug. 28, culturalcelebrationcenter.org 45th Annual Statewide Competition Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, through Sept. 14, bdac.org Abstraction Is Just a Word, But I Use It UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 4, utahmoca.org Abstract Flashbacks Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, through Aug. 10, downtownartistcollective.org ACME Session Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Aug. 10, noon-10 p.m., umma.utah.edu Andrew Dadson: Roof Gap UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 7, utahmoca.org Andrew Alba: Gas Station Honeydew UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Aug. 24, utahmoca.org Animalia Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 1, utaharts.org (see this page) Anne Fudyma: Structures of Solitude Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 9, accessart.org The Art of Painting and Truth of Mind Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 10, events.slcpl.org De | Marcation Granary Arts, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Sept. 27, granaryarts.org Deanna & Ed Templeton: Contemporary Suburbium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 7, utahmoca.org Donald Yatomi: True Beauty A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Aug. 17, agalleryonline.com Donald Yatomi: New Paintings A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Aug. 17, agalleryonline.com Form, Line and Color: Modernism and Abstraction David Dee Fine Art, 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, through Aug. 30, daviddeefinearts.com Greater Merit: The Temple and Image in South Asia Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, ongoing, umfa.utah.edu Global Villagers: Portraits from a World Community Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Aug. 26, 10 a.m., events.slcpl.org League of Reluctant Bicyclists UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org (see p. 24) Love Letters The Gateway, 24 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 1, lovelettersmuseum.com Paper & Thread Modern West Fine Art, 412 S. 700 West, through Aug. 31, modernwestfineart.com Power Couples Utah Museum of Fine Art, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 8, umfa.utah.edu Ryan Lauderdale: Glazed Atrium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Spencer Finch: Great Salt Lake and Vicinity Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, through Nov. 28, umfa.utah.edu Structures of Solitude Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 9, accessart.org Time + Materials Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Aug. 30, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Tiny Portraits, Big Connections Holladay City Hall, 4580 S. 2300 East, Holladay, through Aug. 30, holladayarts.org Under the Bad Air of Heaven Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Aug. 15, slcpl.org Western State of Mind Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 9, accessart.org Yellowstone: Invisible Boundries Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, through Sept. 15, nhmu.utah.edu


ON S T W! E K TIC LE NO SA

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9 1 0 2 , 8 1 AUG 17 & C 0 W. | SL 0 0 1 . N 5 K 15 E FAIR PAR T A T S H A T U

2-8PM SAT-SUN 1PM FOR VIP & EARLY BEER

Utah’s Largest Beer Event Is Celebrating 10 Years New in 2019 CONCERT AFTER PARTIES STARTING AT 7PM WITH TICKETS FOR $10

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AUGUST 8, 2019 | 27

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| CITY WEEKLY |

EXPANDED GEAR & BEER SILICON SUDS “WHERE BUSINESS MEETS BEER”

SAT: ROYAL BLISS GINGER & THE GENTS, BAD FEATHER, THE LOVELY NOUGHTS, JOHNNY UTAHS, BREEZEWAY, BEHIND THE WHEAT GRINDER

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PHOTOCOLLECTIVESTUDIOS.COM

Mall One

Mall One—or the big, grassy area in the middle of the venue—is filled with brewery…. after brewery…. after brewery. Mixed in are a few food trucks. Pretty self explanatory. Beer typically is.

Mall Two The other big, grassy area West of Mall One is also filled with numerous breweries and food trucks, with a few nuances. The “Gear and Beer” section at the end of the grass with top outdoor brands such as Stio and Zeal Optics. There’s also a British car show hosted by the British Motor Club, with timed trial races with Minis, Jaguars, and other restored automobiles.

PHOTOCOLLECTIVESTUDIOS.COM

PHOTOCOLLECTIVESTUDIOS.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

30 | AUGUST 8, 2019

W

elcome to the 10th Annual Utah Beer Festival! The festival began in 2010 at the rise of the local craft beer scene in Utah. Then, there were 10 breweries at the allyou-can-drink event (blame your state representative for nixing unlimited beverages suspiciously soon after). In 2019, the Utah Beer Festival is bigger than ever—it’s now the largest beer sampling event in Utah with 60 breweries and over 200 beers, not to mention a slew of merchandise vendors, live art, full music lineup, and after party. To help you navigate the grounds of the Utah State Fair Park, take a look at this handy guide for support—there’s a lot to do this weekend, don’t miss any of the action. Proceeds of the Utah Beer Festival go on to support the free press and independent journalism. Over the years, CIty Weekly has donated nearly 100,000 dollars to local nonprofits, so don’t be shy about tasting another brew. Just be a reasonable adult and get a ride—your ticket gets you free transport on UTA buses, TRAX and Frontrunner during the weekend. So grab your mug, enjoy the sun, and have some beer with us as we celebrate the closing days of summer.

Zion Building

The VIP experience, sponsored by Mountain West Hard Cider and Devour Magazine, is hosted in the Zion Building at the North end of the Fair Park. VIP tickets include six (6) food and drink pairings each day, a Stanley mug, complimentary tote bag with the official festival pint glass, restaurant certificates and giveaways, chair massages, a photo booth, a silent auction, and private patio. All told, it’s the best bang for your buck deal at the festival.


PHOTOCOLLECTIVESTUDIOS.COM

Ginger and the Gents 8:00 - 9 p.m. Bad Feather 7 - 7:40 p.m. The Lovely Noughts 6 - 6:40 p.m. Johnny Utahs 5:10 - 5:40 p.m. Breezeway 4:20 - 4:50 p.m. Behind the Wheat Grinder 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. Karaoke 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

SUNDAY

Jagertown 8:00 - 9:30 p.m.

AUGUST 8, 2019 | 31

Underground Cash 6:50 - 7:40 p.m. The Vitals 6:00 - 6:30 p.m. The Green Leefs 5:10 - 5:40 p.m. HooDoo Child 4:20 - 4:50 p.m. Outside Infinity 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. Karaoke 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

| CITY WEEKLY |

The Promontory Building (South East of the grounds) has live music all day Saturday and Sunday. The building becomes a separateticket afterparty at 7 p.m. on Saturday and 6 p.m. on Sunday, headlined by local hit bands Royal Bliss and Jagertown, respectively. The full music lineup

Royal Bliss 9:30 - 11:00 p.m.

PHOTOCOLLECTIVESTUDIOS.COM

Promontory Building

SATURDAY

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There’s a ton of fun going on at the Grand Building, an extravagant, beautiful building to the South of the venue (on the North Temple side). Over 30 merchandise vendors covering all bases are housed on the main floor of the grand. On the second level, cideries such as Ace Cider, Angry Orchard, and Mike’s Hard have a vast array of hard cider. Silicon Slopes is hosting the “Silicon Suds” section of the festival, bringing in brands such as Kiln, Dapper & Dash, Spherion, Hardware Apartments, and the Utah Jazz.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Grand Building


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32 | AUGUST 8, 2019

Attending Breweries Ace Cider Founded in 1993 1: Ace Joker, 6.9% 2: Ace Pear, 5% 3: Ace Pineapple, 5% 4: Ace Berry Rose, 5% Sebastopol, CA, AceCider.com Anchor Brewing Founded in 1896 1: Anchor Steam, 4.9% 2: Brewers Pale Ale, 5.3% 3: California Lager, 4.9% San Francisco, CA, AnchorBrewing.com Angry Orchard Founded in 2012 1: Angry Crisp, 5% 2: Angry Rose, 5% 3: Truly Mixed Berry, 5% 4: Twisted Tea Half & Half, 5% Walden, NY, AngryOrchard.com Ballast Point Founded in 1996 1: Mango Even Keel, 4% 2: High West Victory at Sea, 12% 3: Grapefruit Sculpin San Diego, CA, BallastPoint.com Belching Beaver Founded in 2012 1: Me So Honey, 5.5% 2: Peanut Butter Milk Stout 5.3% 3: Phantom Bride IPA, 7.1% San Diego, CA, BelchingBeaver.com Bonneville Brewing Founded in 2012 1: Free Roller Session IPA, 4% 2: Redline Irish Style Red Ale, 4% 3: Peaches & Cream Wheat Ale, 4% 4: Sun Twist, 4% 1641 N. Main, Tooele, 435-248-0646, BonnevilleBrewery.com Boulevard Brewing Founded in 1989 1: Boulevard Tank 7, 8.5% 2: Whiskey Barrel Stout, 11.8% 3: Ommegang Rosetta, 5.6% 4: Ommegang Pale Sour, 6.9% Kansas City, MO, Boulevard.com Cigar City Founded in 2007 1: Maduro Brown Ale, 5.5% 2: Jai Alai IPA, 7.5% Tampa, FL, cigarcitybrewing.com

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery Founded in 1995 1: Super Eight, 5.3% 2: 90 Min IPA, 9% 3: Flesh & Blood IPA, 7.5% 4: Sea Quench Ale, 4.9% 5: American Beauty 6.5% Milton, DE, Dogfish.com Elevation Beer Company Founded in 2012 1: 8 Second Kolsch, 5% 2: Elevation Pilsner, 5% 115 Pahlone Pkwy, Poncha Springs, CO, 719-539-5258, ElevationBeerCo.com Epic Brewing Founded in 2008 1: Tart n Juicy Sour IPA, 5.1% 2: Los Locos Lager, 5.1% 3: Brainless Belgian Ale, 9% 4: Escape IPA, 6.2% 825 S. State, SLC, 801-906-0123, EpicBrewing.com Firestone-Walker Brewing Company Founded in 1996 1: Mind Haze, 6.2% 2: Nitro Merlin, 5.5% 3: Easy Jack, 4% 4: Pivo Pils, 5.3% Paso Robles, CA, FirestoneBeer. com Fisher Brewing Co. Originally founded in 1884, refounded 2017 1: Pale Ale, 4% 2: Light, 4% 3: Dark, 4% 4: Special, 4% 320 W. 800 South, SLC, 801-487-2337, FisherBeer.com Great Basin Brewing Founded in 1993 1: Bitchin Berry, 5% 2: 39 North, 5.4% 3: Outlaw Stout, 5.2% 4: Chilebeso 5.5% Sparks, NV, GreatBasinBrewingCo.com Guinness Founded in 1759 1: Guinness Pub Draft, 4% 2: Guinness Extra Stout, 5.6% 3: Guinness Blonde American Lager, 5% Dublin, Ireland, Guinness.com

Constellation Brands Founded in 1945 1: Corona Familiar, 5% 2: Pacifico, 5% 3: Corona Premier, 4% 4: Limon y Sal, 4% Victor, NY, CBrands.com

Hopkins Brewing 1: Sugarhouse Pilsner, 4% 2: Coconut Macadamia Porter, 4% 2: Pine Mountain Pale, 4% 4: Wolf Moon Amber, 4% 1048 E. 2100 South, SLC, 385-528-3275, HopkinsBrewingCompany.com

Desert Edge Founded in 1972 1: Bears Ear Amber, 4% 2: Pub Pilsner, 4% 3: Utah Pale Ale, 4% 273 Trolley Square, SLC, 801-521-8917, DesertEdgeBrewery.com

Illuminated Brew Works 1: Jr. Astronaut Juice DDH IPA, 6% 415 N. Sangamon St, Chicago, IL, IBW-Chicago.com

Deschutes Brewery Founded in 2008 1: Fresh Squeezed IPA, 6.4% 2: Mirror Pond Ale, 5% 3: Fresh Haze, 6.5% 4: Da Shootz, 4% Bend, OR, DeschutesBrewery.com

Kiitos Brewing Founded in 2017 1: Big Gay Ale, 4% 2: Coffee Cream Ale, 4% 3: Rimando Pale Ale, 5% 4: Imperial Red Ale, 7.8% 608 W. 700 South, SLC, 801-215-9165, KittosBrewing.com

Lagunitas Founded in 1993 1: Super Cluster, 8% 2: Little Sumpin Sumpin, 7.5% 3: Little Sumpin Easy, 7.2% 4: Hazy LSS, 7.2% Special Release at 4:20 p.m. on Saturday & Sunday: Little Sumpin’ Hazy, 7.2% Petaluma, CA, Lagunitas.com Level Crossing Brewing Company Founded in 2018 About the Brewery Some say that traditional neighborhood values, a sense of community, and customer service are a lost art and gone forever. We’re here to bring them back! Welcome to Level Crossing Brewing Company, a crossroads where people can meet, share stories and enjoy delicious beer. Come on in, there’s a seat just for you. About the Brewer Head brewer Chris Detrick grew up in a musical household playing in a family band with his two brothers and his parents. He played his violin all the way to Germany in high school, where he was first introduced to beer. It was here he noticed that every small town had their own brewery that the local community took pride in. Chris started brewing as a hobby during college, he brewed beer in a 2-gallon stockpot on his tiny, apartment stove. That first batch of amber ale stirred something inside him, propagating further interest in zymurgy. After finishing college Chris move to SLC to accept a job with the Salt Lake Tribune. While at the newspaper, he traveled the country and the world photographing stories, including three Olympics, all the while drinking beer and learning different styles, touring lots of breweries and talking with brewers. His dream was always brewing beer on a bigger scale. When he wasn’t taking pictures, he was brewing in his garage with his wife and two small assistant brewers, learning from other talented homebrewers and winning many awards at state and national levels. A mutual friend brought Mark to Chris’ garage and they bonded over a love of music, beer and Lebowski. The rest, as they say, is history. 1: Suss It Out, 6.9% 2: Soul Rex, 8.4% 3: You-tah Uncommon, 4% 4: Peach Blonde, 4% 2496 S. West Temple, SLC, 385-500-6110 LevelCrossingBrewing.com Mike’s Hard Lemonade Founded in 1999 1: Lemonade, 4% 2: Mango, 4% 3: Strawberry, 4% 4: Black Cherry, 4% Chicago, IL, MikesHard.com

Moab Brewing Founded in 1996 1: Scorpion Pale Ale, 4% 2: Deadhorse Amber Ale, 4% 3: Moab Especial Golden Wheat, 4% 4: Porcupine Pilsner, 4% 5: FMU - Double IPA, 9.6% 6: Moab Pale Ale, 6% 7: Johnny B’s American IPA, 7% 8: Desert Select Scotch Ale, 8.6% 686 S. Main, Moab, 435-2596333, TheMoabBrewery.com Mountain West Hard Cider Founded in 2014 About the Cider House Hard cider is an anytime, anywhere, anybody kind of drink. Lighter than beer, crisp and naturally glutenfree—hard cider is an everyday refreshment for active days and relaxing nights. Mountain West Hard Cider Company, proud member of Utah’s Own, sources only the finest local ingredients from the Mountain West region to craft every day, seasonal, and artisan awardwinning hard apple ciders. Mountain West is owned and operated by husbandand-wife, Jennifer and Jeff Carleton. Along with cidermaker Joel Goodwillie, they share a passion for the community, locally-owned business, and obviously—good times with good friends. Relying on Joel’s award-winning years of experience as a wine and cider maker, this trio is ready to show people that The West isn’t just for beer anymore. Mountain West Hard Cider is proud to call Utah home. Beer 1: Ruby, 6.8% Beer 2: 7 Mile, 5% Beer 3: Desolation, 6.9% Beer 4: Cottonwood, 6.9% 425 N. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4147, MountainWestCider.com Oskar Blues Founded in 1997 Beer 1: Can-O-Bliss IPA, 7.2% Beer 2: Dales Pale Ale, 6.5% Longmont, CO, Oskarblues.com Park City Brewing Founded in 2015 Beer 1: Imperial Pilsner, 7.7% Beer 2: American Pale Ale, 5.6% Beer 3: Azacca IPA, 6.4% Beer 4: Belgium White, 4% 2720 Rasmussen Rd, Park City, 435-200-8906, ParkCityBrewery.com Proper Brewing Co Beer 1: Lake Effect Gose, 4% Beer 2: Bier Rose, 4% Beer 3: Proper Beer English Golden Ale, 4% Beer 4: Hopothetical NEIPA 7% Special Release at 6 p.m. Saturday: Litha - Imperial Hoppy Saison, 8.3% Special Release at 6 p.m. Sunday: Hop v Hop - Limited Rotating Double IPA, 8% 857 S. Main, SLC, 801-953-1707, ProperBrewingCo.com

Red Rock Brewing Founded in 1994 Red Rock Brewery opened its doors on March 14, 1994. From the very beginning, they set out to brew highquality craft beers and serve delicious food. In the past 20 years, Red Rock Brewery has earned a national reputation as one of the most creative breweries in the country. Their beers have earned more than 100 regional and national awards and the restaurant has been named “Brew Pub of the Year” by Brewpub Magazine. Locally, the original brewpub has become a staple of Salt Lake City’s downtown dining scene and the company has opened additional locations near Kimball Junction and in Fashion Place Mall. In 2011, Red Rock expanded their brewing capacity with a dedicated brewery to support their restaurant growth and expand the availability of beers to local pubs and retail locations. Now, they produce six brands of high point beer that can be purchased from the Utah State Liquor stores, their restaurants and many locations throughout Utah and the nation. 1: Kolsch, 4% 2: West Coast Pale Ale, 4% 3: Belgian Wit, 4% 4: Summer Ale, 4% 5: Frohlich Pils, 5.5% 6: Biere de Mars, 7% 7: White Rainbow, 6% 8: Elephino, 8% Multiple Locations, RedRockBrewing.com Ritual Brewing Co 1: Extra Red Ale, 6.5% 2: Hop-O-Matic IPA, 7.1% 3: Pale Ale, 5.2% 4: Big Deluxe Imperial Stout, 12.2% Special Release at 6pm on Saturday & Sunday: Single Rye IPA - Citra, 7% Redlands, CA, ritualbrewing.com Roadhouse Brewery Founded in 2012 1: Highwayman, 4% 2: Wilson, 7.5% 3: Family Vacation, 4.9% 4: The Walrus, 8.3% Jackson, WY, 307-264-1900, RoadhouseBrewery.com RoHa Brewing Founded in 2017 1: Maltese Cross Red Ale, 4% 2: Three Deep American Ale, 4% 3: Shambo Juicy IPA, 7% 4: Kensington Grand Saison, 6.8% 30 Kensington Ave, SLC, 385-227-8982, RohaBrewing.com Roosters Brewing Founded in 1995 1: B Street Blackberry Cream Ale, 6% 2: Ogden Double IPA, 8% 3: Honey Wheat, 4% 4: Rude Ram Red, 7% Multiple Locations, RoostersBrewingCo.com Salt Fire Brewing Founded in 2017 1: Dirty Chai Stout, 6.2% 2: Saison de Trahison, 5.6% 3: Series of Singularities IPA, 7.2%  4: NZED Palsner, 5.4% 2199 S. West Temple, SLC, 385-955-0504, SaltFireBrewing.com


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1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM

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• 42 Lanes • Awesome Sound System • Sports Monitors

Salt Flats Brewing Founded in 2017 1: Autobahn Berliner Weisse, 4% 2: Salt Flats Hefeweizen, 4% 3: Double Decker English Pale, 4% 4: Daytona IPA, 4% 2020 Industrial Cir, SLC, 801-828-3469, SaltFlatsBeer.com Samuel Adams Founded in 1984 1: Cherry Wheat, 5.4% 2: Boston Lager, 5% 3: Sam ‘76, 4.7% 4: Sam Seasonal, 5% Boston, MA, SamuelAdams.com Sapporo Founded in 1876 1: Sapporo Black, 4.3% 2: Sapporo Premium, 4.7% Tokyo, Japan, SapporoBeer.com Schofferhofer Founded in 1870 1: Grapefruit, 2.5% 2: Pomegranate, 5% 3: Radeberger, 4.8% Frankfurt, Germany, Schofferhofer.com

• Over 40 Varieties Of Beer • Bonwood Cafe • Competitive Edge Pro Shop

801.487-7758 • BONWOODBOWL.COM • 2500 S. MAIN STREET

Shades Brewing 1: Kveik 1 Golden Sour, 6.5% 2: Pina Colada Kveik Golden Sour, 6.5% 3: Pink Tart Kveik Golden Sour, 6.5% 4: Premium Lager, 4% 154 W. Utopia Ave, SLC, 435-200-3009, ShadesOfPale.com Silver Moon Brewing Founded in 2000 1: Mongo Daze Pale, 6% 2: IPA 97, 7% 3: Salty Bos, 4.5% 4: SMB IPA, 5.3% Bend, OR, silvermoonbrewing.com Silver Reef Brewing Co Founded in 2018 1: Agua del Diablo 2: Color Country Red 3: Fresh and Juicy 4391 S. Enterprise Dr, St. George, StGeorgeBev.com SKA Brewing Founded in 1995 1: Decadent, 10% 2: Modus Mandarina, 6.8% 3: True Blonde, 5.3% 4: Pink Vapor Stew, 5.1% Durango, CO, SKABrewing.com Stone Brewing Founded in 1996 1: Delicious IPA, 7.7% 2: Arrogant Bastard, 7.2% 3: Topic of Thunder, 5.8% 4: Tangerine Express, 6.7% San Marcos, CA, StoneBrewing.com Squatters Brewery Founded in 1989 1: Juicy IPA, 4% 2: Hop Rising Tropical, 9% 3: American Wheat Hefe, 4% 4: Hell’s Keep Golden Ale, 7.75% 147 W. Broadway, SLC, 801-363-2739, Squatters.com Talisman Brewing 1: Killer Grove, 4% 2: Uplifted, 4% 3: Bel’s Fury, 6.3% 4: Hazards, 11.3% 1258 Gibson Ave, Ogden, 385-389-2945, TalismanBrewingCo.com

Strap Tank Brewery Founded in 2016 Rick Salisbury became a member of the Springville community some 50 years ago. He has made a name for himself as a successful home builder and founder of Salisbury Homes. His passion, though, has always been collecting, exhibiting and selling vintage motorcycles. With his many skills and passions, Rick decided to build a brewery, restaurant and pub with a one-of-a-kind concept, design and atmosphere that is a

destination for locals and travelers alike. Rick’s vision of creating a unique facility with fresh brewed beers, handcrafted root beer and great food in a family friendly atmosphere has made it a reality.

1: Lehi Light, 4% 2: Watermelon Gose, 4% 3: IPA, 7% 4: Barrel Aged Sour, 4% 1750 W. 596 South, Springville, 385-325-0262, StrapTankBrewery.com

Uinta Brewing Founded in 1993 About the Brewery Beer-o-philes can rejoice at the Uinta Brewery Beerhouse Pub. If Cutthroat Pale Ale or Hoodoo Kolsch are your jam, you won’t want to miss a chance to pay homage to the source of such tasty brews right at the Brewhouse Pub. Besides your favorite Uinta bevs, you can also shop at the in-house beer store for high-point beers. During the day, you can see where all the magic happens and take a quick tour of the brewery itself. Uinta has been humming along on 100 percent renewable energy since 2001, starting with wind and then adding solar to the mix.They haven’t stopped there, designing equipment over the years to make the brewing process go down as smooth as an ice-cold Pils. Their state-of-the-art Belgian BreauKon brewing system was designed to

brew beer efficiently by cutting down on wasted time and energy. From capturing and recycling steam from one brewing cycle to heat the next batch, donating spent grain to a local rancher, and utilizing a centrifuge that filters the beer without chemicals. They’re always looking for ways to make better beer in a way that is better for the planet. Many of the names of Uinta beers are inspired by Utah’s historic and natural attractions, including King’s Peak Porter, Golden Spike Hefeweizen and Dubhe, the latter of which is named after the Utah Centennial star.

Zion Brewery About the Brewery Zion Brewery is Southern Utah’s first microbrewery. Located in Springdale, Utah, at the base of Zion Canyon National Park, they are proud to handcraft a variety of beers. As the name suggests, Zion Brewery offers a gamut of brews and beers. A suggestion for first timers at the brewery is to get a flight of Tasters ($2 per 6 ounce). Alternatively, if you want to go full-on celebration mode for a job well done on the exerting day, they have a plethora of amazing beers on tap. The essentials include the Ascender (a hazy, citrus hefeweizen), the flavorful Juicy IPA, refreshing Engel Landen Pilsner and the house favorite, Zion Pale Ale.

Visitors from around the world can enjoy a pint of their latest selections and take in the stunning views from the Zion Canyon Brew Pub, located just south of the park entrance, featuring an excellent lunch and dinner menu served seven days a week. Zion Canyon Brew Pub is home to live music, unbeatable views from a beer garden patio, and a lively year-round event calendar.

Toasted Barrel Brewery 1: Black Currant Sour, 6% 2: Phinius Raspberry Vanilla Sour, 6% 3: Raspberry Weisse Man, 4% 4: Special Barrel Aged Beer, 7% 412 W. 600 North, SLC, ToastedBarrelBrewery.com Upslope Brewing Company Founded in 2008 1: Citra Pale Ale, 5.8% 2: Spiked Snowmelt, 5% 3: Rocky Mountain Kolsch, 5% 4: 2019 Experimental IPA, 6.5% Boulder, CO, UpslopeBrewing.com Unibroue Founded in 1990 1: Blanche De Chambly, 5% 2: La Fin Du Monde, 9% Chambly, Canada, Unibroue.com UTOG 1: Pucker Time, 4% 2: Mandarina Kolsch, 4% 3: Buffalo Soldier, 7.2% 4: Four Quarter Larger, 4% 2331 Grant Ave, Ogden, 801-689-3476, UTOGBrewing.com

1: Tu Me Ke Tart, 6.5% 2: Clear Daze Juicy IPA, 6% 3: Saddleback Brut IPA, 4% 4: Wyld Simcoe Ale, 4% Special Release: Rotating Seasonal Handle 1722 S. Fremon Dr, SLC, 801-467-0228, UintaBrewing.com

1: Juicy IPA, 3.2% 2: Foray Pomegranate Sour, 3.2% 3: Virgin Stout, 3.2% 4: Ascender Hefeweizen, 3.2% 2400 Zion - Mount Carmel Hwy, Springdale, 435-772-0336, ZionBrewery.com Wasatch Brewery Founded in 1986 1: Apricot Hefeweizen, 4% 2: Jalapeno Cream Ale, 4% 3: Treeline Mtn Style IPA, 6% 4: Soops Joos NEIPA, 7% Multiple Locations, WasatchBeers.com Western Standard 1: Western Standard Saloon Lager, 4% San Diego, CA, WesternStandardBeer.com White Claw Founded in 2016 1: Black Cherry, 4% 2: Natural Lime, 5% 3: Ruby Grapefruit, 5% 4: Raspberry, 5% Chicago, IL, WhiteClaw.com


DEREK CARLISLE

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

I

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Sunday, noon-2 a.m. Best bet: Anything bratwurst-related Can’t miss: The Reuben fries are the acme of bar food

AUGUST 8, 2019 | 35

just don’t get anywhere else. And it was this symbiosis that brought Beer Bar to life. After purchasing Bar X, Richard Noel, Duncan Burrell and his brother Ty—yes, Modern Family’s Phil Dunphy— became enamored with the concept of a beer garden and created Beer Bar in the adjacent space on Second South. Its menu was conceived by Viet Pham and Beer Bar’s then-executive chef, Brendan

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Brats and beer have been simpatico for as long as anyone can remember. It’s likely that German brewers started slapping ’em on the menu as a salty treat to encourage patrons to guzzle more beer, but their relationship has evolved into something much more nuanced. There’s an alchemy that happens when beer and brats are consumed together—both flavors tend to complement one another on a level that you

’m a bit of a novitiate when it comes to beer, but I’m quite well-versed in the food that one typically consumes with beer. Whenever City Weekly’s Utah Beer Fest rolls around (mark your calendar for Aug. 17 and 18 at the Utah State Fairpark), it usually means that I get to spend a good amount of time with the edible all-stars of das biergarten. To prepare for this hoppiest of occasions, I’ve set my sights on the selection of legendary bratwursts from downtown SLC’s Beer Bar (161 E. 200 South, 385-259-0905, beerbarslc.com).

hits to the menu,” Naffziger says. “I don’t think he would be a chef if he wasn’t trying to make things as ecofriendly as possible, and he really brought that to this place.” Naffziger mentioned that Kawakami accepted a position at the recently-opened Post Office Place, though the two still collaborate. “[He] has a lot of integrity as a cook, and I think he had a lot of confidence in me to take over,” Naffziger continued. “He’s like my mentor, so I call him all the time, even if I’m making something at home.” On the subject of Volgger’s brat-making prowess, Naffziger’s voice takes on a more somber, almost reverent tone. “He’s a legit badass chef, and he’s this largerthan-life character,” he says of the Austrian charcutier. Whether you’re gearing up for our annual beer bash or just in need of some serious pub therapy, Beer Bar is one of Utah’s finest places to enjoy a menu that is audacious enough to put lemon curd on a bratwurst and accessible enough to recognize how much fun an experience like that can be. CW

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Rediscover your love of sausage fests at downtown’s Beer Bar.

menu—but are after something a little different. As much as I tried to resist wandering down this particular back alley, the cinnamon toast brat ($8) was next on my list—and why wouldn’t it be? It’s a chicken-and-apple brat on a cinnamon toast bun doused with lemon curd. Yes, that kind of lemon curd. It lacked the visual flair of the banh mi brat, and surprisingly enough, was a bit light on flavor as well. I was expecting to get a citrusysweet wallop from the curd, but the supporting cast of this brat was unexpectedly muted in comparison to its smoky leading lady. If you’re planning to venture into the other areas of Beer Bar’s menu, the Reuben fries ($12) are a hidden gem within Utah’s gastropub scene. As they are named after the hallowed deli sandwich, this stacked plate of fries comes topped with pastrami, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing. It’s a gooey mess of lovely saline notes, lightly covered with the creamy, dreamy Russian dressing. It’s by far one of the best plates of fries you’ll ever have. Once I finished my meal, I had a chance to meet up with Beer Bar kitchen manager Colton Naffziger, who was quick to recognize the continuing contributions of Volgger and Kawakami. “Brendan brought all the

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Best of the Wurst

Kawakami, both well-known culinary talents in their own right. And we have local carnomancer Frodebert “Frody” Volgger to thank for creating the brats themselves. His original recipes put the establishment on the map, and he continues to keep it supplied via Frody’s Salt & Smoke, his South Salt Lake artisan meat shop. Every brat on the menu could be considered beer’s best friend, but they also happen to be straight up knockouts all their own. My very first experience with these fantastic creations was prompted by Katie Weinner of SLC Pop while writing a piece about local chefs and their comfort food staples. She has been a fan of Beer Bar since the beginning, and sharing one of her favorite low-key meals was enough to make me a lifelong fan, too. Since then, every time I’ve had a hankering for something simple yet transcendent, a visit to Beer Bar always satisfies. During my most recent one, I went for the Vietnamese-inspired banh mi brat ($12), which infuses the classic brat recipe with a hit of curry and tosses it in a bun with shreds of carrot and daikon along with some cilantro and sliced jalapeño for a bit of a kick. It’s a definite win for fans of the copious toppings and textures found on a classic Chicago dog—also on the


Summer is here...

Bröst!

BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

FAMILY

OWNED

SINCE

1968

Wasatch International Food Festival

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

NOW OPEN

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BACK BURNER

Scoot on over for the Italian taste you love!

Sometimes, it’s hard to really see the true cultural variety in the cuisine of the Wasatch Front in detail unless you round it all up and put it in the same space. Such is the goal of the fourth annual Wasatch International Food Festival, which brings some of Utah’s most delightfully diverse restaurateurs together for a celebration of all things edible. In addition to vendors like Shiro Kuma, Namash Swahili, Manka Resto Empanadas and Huckleberry Grill, attendees can attend cooking demonstrations on how to make mofongo and samosas. The festival takes place at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center (1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City) on Saturday, Aug. 10, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is free, and vendor tickets can be purchased onsite and in advance at foodfestutah.org.

italianvillageslc.com (801).266.4182 | 5370 S. 900 E. SLC

Indian Food Fair

SO GRILL KOREAN BBQ AND SUSHI 111 W. 9000 S. Sandy, Ut | 801.566.0721

If you prefer to make your foodie desires exclusive to the tasty subcontinent of India, you can check out the second annual Indian Food Fair at Liberty Park (600 E. 900 South) on Saturday, Aug. 10, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Last year’s event was successful enough to bring even more vendors this year, along with the need to expand the festival’s hours. In addition to sampling some of the most fragrant and flavorful food Salt Lake has to offer, attendees can shop around for a variety of handmade art and jewelry while enjoying some live performances. Admission is free, so get out there and unleash your inner naanimal.

Craft Lake City Food Vendors

While Craft Lake City is perhaps best known for the local artisans, sculptors and otherwise creative types to show off their hip creations, let us not forget those who keep everyone fed while the event is in full swing. With our beloved local grocers at Harmons presenting the event, Craft Lake City’s DIY Festival has prioritized culinary craftspeople of all stripes each year. Each day of the festival, which takes place on Aug. 9, 10 and 11, features a different variety of vendors like Garden O’Veaten, Tandoor Tacos, Normal Ice Cream and Argentina’s Best Empanadas. For those after something to take home, attendees can get tasty treats from The Chocolate Conspiracy, Salsitas Mendoza and The Hive Mind Apiary. Craft Lake City is held at the Utah State Fairpark (155 N. 1000 West). Quote of the Week: “What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child?” —Lin Yutang Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

Celebrat i

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GRAND OPENING SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION

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123 S. State Orem, Utah 84058

801-960-9669

Lunch Buffet: $8.95 Adults, $4.95 Kids, Mon-Fri 11am-3:30pm Dinner Buffet: $12.95 Adults, $7.75 Kids, Mon-Fri 3:30pm-9:30pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays $12.95 All Day / Take-Out: Lunch $4.75/lb Dinner $6.25/lb

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Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

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801-905-1186

5668 S. Redwood Rd. Taylorsville, Ut 84123

3620 S. State Street SLC, Utah 84115

THREE LOCATIONS!

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3 6 2 0


Two beers that represent distinctly tasty ends of the brewing spectrum. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

love it when beers contrast each other. Enjoying (or not) two beers that are completely opposite in most respects tends to bring out the unique qualities of the individual beers. I won’t go as far to say they will be complementary, but they can sure make you appreciate (or dislike) their uniqueness. 2 Row Brewing Czech Pilsner: Whenever I can, I always prefer to pour my own beer, no matter if I’m at a pub or at a party; getting the beer from the bottle or can and into my glass is a big part of my enjoyment. Pilsners are especially fun to pour. Their sunny, golden hues brighten my mood every time I see them; even the ascending bubbles are akin to a Zen garden in a glass.

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38 | AUGUST 8, 2019

Contemporary Japanese Dining L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S 18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

MIKE RIEDEL

Opposites Attract

The aromas in 2 Row’s first Czech-style Pilsner are classic and simple. There are no trendy hops, just notes of floral and spicy whole-cone noble ones. Malt shines first on your palate and prominently features stale crackers, semi-sweet malt and crusty white bread. Those herbal and spicy grass undertones from the nose come in next, evening out some of the more raw flavors from the grain bill. After the Pilsner is washed clean, some residual drying from the toasty grains lingers, along with some of the more herbal aspects of the hops. Overall: This beer mimics the flavor qualities of more full-bodied Pilsner interpretations. I give full props to 2 Row’s brewers for staying on-style for this Pilsner, as opposed to making a lager and dumping IPA hops in it. It’s one of the better Pilsners that you’re probably not drinking, and it’s definitely worth your time. Talisman Brewing Co. Nitro Udder Chaos: This wonderfully-named milk stout pours a solid obsidian black, with the scantest of amber edges, and a nice cascading effervescence effect, eventually rendering two fingers of puffy, loose foam. It smells of roasted caramel malt, bittersweet cocoa powder, rich latte coffee, a subtle dark orchard fruitiness, vanilla beans and very plain earthy, weedy and floral noble hops. The taste is toasty and slightly sweet in the beginning, opening to a more assertive roasted flavor. The slightest hint of char

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BEER NERD

adds an extra level of complexity; you’ll also taste a little bit of chocolate and caramel, but not as much as suggested by the nose— very well balanced and easy-drinking. A hint of sweetness comes to the fore, but the aftertaste is fairly dry, with roasted flavors lingering on the palate long after the swallow. It could be a little stronger in overall flavor, but for the most part, really good. The carbonation is barely there, for obvious reasons: The nitro manifests a very wan-seeming frothiness, the body is a so-so middleweight that’s generally smooth, with a thin, airy creaminess pretty much there from the get-go. It finishes off-dry, with a retreating chocolate, milk and malt sweetness. Overall: This beer is great. If you don’t

typically like dark beers because they tend to have more roasty and smokey flavors instead of coffee and chocolate, then you’ll like this offering. The nitro is amazing, and leads to a super dense and creamy head that makes the chocolate pop and subdues any bitterness completely. Sadly, Udder Chaos is only available at Talisman’s brewery pub (1258 Gibson Ave. in Ogden). Talisman’s standard Udder Chaos gassed with standard carbon dioxide can be found in most grocery stores across the Wasatch Front in 22-ounce bottles. 2 Row’s Czech Pilsner is a limited release that will be around until it’s gone. Your best bet to snag some is to visit the source at 6850 S. 300 West in Midvale. As always, cheers! CW


Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Award Winning Donuts AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

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-CREEKSIDE PATIO-89 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930


From Busk Till Dawn

MUSIC

Busker Fest celebrates the vitality street performance brings to a city. BY ERIN MOORE music@cityweekly.net @errrands_

N

ot everyone is familiar with the term “busker,” but everyone would know one when they saw one. They’re on the street, at intersections, sometimes solo, sometimes in groups of two or three, singing, dancing, hula-hooping, juggling, performing. Buskers fill a city with a sound that’s often as omnipresent as that of traffic—always distant or too-close, always around the corner, bouncing off the concrete and the buildings. The corner of, say, Main Street and 100 South calls to mind a certain echoing quality when someone’s jamming on drums or a saxophone — making the whole intersection seem like an open-air performance hall. On Friday, Aug. 16, Salt Lake City pedestrians passing through that intersection can expect to find more than one musical act filling the bustling street with their sound. The second annual Busker Fest returns for another round, extending a lineup of musicians, dancers, hula-hoopers, jugglers, comedians and many other performers all the way from Regent Street to that corner on Main. Event coordinator Kim Angeli of Primrose Productions teamed up with the Salt Lake City Arts Council to craft a night where street performers will capture the fancy of pedestrians, hopefully making them stop and appreciate all they offer. Angeli’s interest in boosting space, visibility and understanding about busking and the local busking scene comes from her years spent coordinating the Downtown Farmers Market from 2006-16, where she met a network of buskers who inspired her. “Busking and street performance are time-honored traditions in vibrant cities around the globe, and have been for centuries,” she explains. Her goals, shared by the Salt Lake City Arts Council and the Redevelopment Agency, go beyond just boosting the visibility of artistry. Both groups seek to find ways to draw activity downtown in a way that considers all of its stakeholders—performers, pedestrians and business owners. With the advent of the Eccles Theater, McCarthey Plaza and Regent Street, funds were allocated for arts and culture events to fill the spaces. The first Busker Fest in 2018 was a result of that funding. “When looking for ways to integrate culture and even walkability to the urban landscape, creating space for buskers is a valuable tool,” Angeli says. “For the most part, buskers don’t require extra infrastructure. They have selfcontained shows, they are already here and they showcase the local culture of the city.” With timed performance slots ranging from 30-minute circle acts to one-hour street acts lining Regent Street, McCarthey Plaza and a special fourth pitch (busker lingo for performance area) on Main and 100 South, there’s no way pedestrians can miss the activity. Angeli hopes this exposure will encourage buskers to consider applying for city permits. She also hopes businesses will coordinate with performers, and pedestrians learn how to interact with them (how to tip is probably a lesson many folks could stand to learn).

AUSTEN DIAMOND

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CONCERT PREVIEW

Pixie & The Partygrass Boys perform at 2018’s Busker Fest But it’s also about getting to know one’s fellow city-streets neighbor. “Inspiration, laughter, a desire to explore the city on foot, to take in the surprises an enriched urban environment can offer when you slow down and engage, to experience shared cultural events with strangers,” are the reasons Angeli rattles off for what truly motivates the festival. Like public space in general, the festival is free to all who pass by, and features performances from both amateur artists and experienced troubadours. “We are able to find places for performers of all experience levels to share their talents. In certain cases, this is one of the first times these artists have performed for an audience. In other cases, these are professional, traveling troubadours 100% dedicated to honing their craft,” Angeli explains. She particularly looks forward to the travelling troubadours, who will join the locals and provide “hysterical” entertainment, and, she hopes, inspiration to local talent. She adds, “Don’t miss the Fire Show Finale this year. Busker Fest has an underlying vaudeville theme, harkening back to Salt Lake City’s rich theater roots. Along these lines, you can expect a heavy dose of fire-eating and spitting and amazing costumery from our performers.” Angeli points out that the event “brings a little magic right out into the street,” and as our city continues to grow and change so rapidly—sometimes in hard-to-swallow ways—it can’t hurt to give back to the artists who spread their talents across it, brightening it and making it friendlier, more like a place to call home. “I want this event to catalyze street performance year-round in Salt Lake City,” Angeli says. We could all use a little of that determination to stop, look around and engage with the streets of Salt Lake City, and all the people who walk them—or use them as a stage. CW

BUSKER FEST 2019

Regent Street & Main Street and 100 South Friday, Aug. 16 3-10 p.m. Free, all ages buskerfestslc.com


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Janis Ian has never been afraid of courting controversy. As a teenager, she made an instant impression with her song “Society’s Child,” which was widely covered but also banned from several stations because it described an interracial relationship. Her best known hit, “At Seventeen,” shared the sadness of teenage girls who never get asked out because they can’t compete in high school popularity polls. Her defiant stand against the Recording Industry Association of America didn’t exactly endear her in music business circles, either. Likewise, coming out as a lesbian gave her other obstacles to overcome. Ironically, it was none other than Bill Cosby (not exactly an arbiter of sexual standards) who created trouble for Ian early on when he witnessed her resting her head in the lap of a woman who was her chaperone while backstage at a TV taping, and subsequently spread the word that she wasn’t suitable for family entertainment. Fortunately, none of those incidents impeded her progress. Over the course of her career, Ian has accumulated two Grammys, stellar album sales, chart triumphs and any number of other accolades. Her songs have been covered by numerous other artists, while her best-selling memoir established her as a leading social commentator and important voice for women in music. As for Livingston Taylor, credit him with carving out a lengthy career apart from that of his big brother James. His enduring identity as a singer and songwriter is a triumph all his own. (Lee Zimmerman) Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $49-$53, all ages, egyptiantheatrecompany.org

SATURDAY 8/10

Sunsleeper, Ugly Boys, Winter Forever, Shine Arrowmaker

Local band Sunsleeper’s new album shows they are nothing if not relatable. The band’s debut release, Stay the Same, was in large part Jeffery Mudgett (guitar and vocals) dealing with the reality of change, which is plain to see from the song and album titles alone. “Come Back Home,” “Best Friends Forget,” “Break or Bury”—it all smacks of the classic emo melancholy of time slipping through fingers, of months that fly by. “I know that people change/ Not expected from you/ But I’ll probably change too/ I swear I can change if I have to.” This release was a good one, but it tread worn ground, especially for 2016. What’s surprising about their newest release from this July, You Can Miss Something & Not Want It Back, is that it resonates harder despite still wading through more familiar emo muck. These songs carry the thoughts of their predecessors toward a more processed endpoint. From “Better Now”: “Finally feeling a calm/ Am I really worthy of love?/ Enough will never be enough/ Bury the lead and admit it was.” It retroactively makes Stay the Same more interesting, and inspires curiosity as to whether Sunsleeper will continue to take their discography into account for

Sunsleeper

subsequent albums. Janis Ian Regardless, the new album is more varied and textured than Stay the Same, and hearing Sunsleeper live will be a good benchmark as to whether you’ll want to keep them on your radar. (Parker S. Mortensen) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., all ages, $6 presale, $8 day of show, kilbycourt.com

TUESDAY 8/13–WEDNESDAY 8/14 Damien Jurado, Corrina Repp

Some songwriters bounce between sounds, trying out new ideas to see what fits, or following the winds of stylistic change. Others build their oeuvre slowly, chasing their individual muse with the confidence that success will follow. That’s the best lens through which to view Damien Jurado, whose 25-year, nearly 20-album career has unfolded bit by bit. His dusty, dark and cinematic folk-rock folds in elements of psychedelia, and his narrative twists and turns are prime fodder for intellectual indie rock fans. But there’s nothing twee about Jurado’s artistry—instead, it overflows with the kind of bleak emotion made famous by Elliott Smith while finding melancholy joy in the complicated nature of humanity. Perhaps that’s why Jurado has cultivated a small but fervent fanbase; it’s easy to slap him with the “musician’s musician” tag, especially given his stints on respected record labels like Sub Pop and Secretly Canadian, and his longtime collaboration with late, great indie rock producer Richard Swift. After Swift’s death last year, Jurado shifted away from the dense, cinematic sound of his 2010s trilogy Saint Bartlett, Maraqopa and Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son and recorded his latest album, It Took the Shape of a Storm, in a stark, stripped-down manner. “For Richard, it was always about capturing the performance,” Jurado told The Stranger, “not about recording. He didn’t really care about that.” Utah fans will be blessed with not one but two chances to catch Jurado’s riveting performance—at Velour Live Music Gallery in Provo on Tuesday night, and at The Urban Lounge in Salt Lake City on Wednesday. (Nick McGregor) Velour Live Music Gallery, 135 N. University Ave., 8 p.m., $18 presale, $20 day of show, all ages, velourlive.com; The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m. $18 presale, $20 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Damien Jurado

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If you’re like me, and have been coasting on Lord Huron’s 2012 album Lonsesome Dreams, it’s time for a check-in. The group’s two releases since—2015’s Strange Trails and 2018’s Vide Noir—still evoke the weary traveler, open plains vibe for which you might have come to love in them, but the sound is bigger and grander, perfect for an amphitheater. Vide Noir in particular has some jam band-esque tracks that should play well. Madeline Kenney is a great fit, too, as an opener: Since her initial 2016 release Signals, Kenney has hit a stride. Not that Signals wasn’t unremarkable (Chaz Bundick, aka Toro y Moi, helped produce and probably contributed to its somewhat allover-the-place sound), but with releases like 2017’s Night Night At The First Landing and 2018’s Perfect Shapes and this year’s singles “Nick of Time” and “Helpless,” Kenney has found her strengths. Her voice is the kind that can anchor a song or launch it into orbit. Often Kenney keeps her vocals in the familiar indie wrapper, but Perfect Shapes shows a willingness to contrast her music against herself, sometimes making her sound like a stranger in her own album. “No Weekend” features a pinging synth and wandering saxophone you might not think to meld with Kenney’s voice, but it works, and the album is full of such surprises. Perfect Shapes is like an artist catching themselves after a long time spent falling: There’s a relief of safety, and almost immediately a pitch toward something new, something fun. (PSM) Red Butte Garden Amphitheater, 2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road, 7:30 p.m., sold out at press time, all ages, redbuttegarden.org/concerts

Corrosion of Conformity, Crowbar, Quaker City Night Hawks, Lo-Pan

Corrosion of Conformity was a band seemingly destined to take the metal world of the ’90s by storm. Although they had already shed most of their hardcore roots by the time the decade

Corrosion of Conformity

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ABBY GILLARDI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Lord Huron, Madeline Kenney

Lord Huron

began, it wasn’t until their 1994 major-label debut Deliverance that they truly hit a sweet spot. Fusing satisfyingly chunky stoner metal riffage with Skynyrd-esque southern rock attitude, CoC developed a catchy yet hard-hitting formula that proved successful with classic rock enthusiasts and metalheads still clutching their early Black Sabbath records, and managed to slot in perfectly with the burgeoning grunge craze as well. Still, subsequent albums didn’t quite live up to the commercial and critical success of Deliverance, and the band eventually splintered apart before going on hiatus in the mid-aughts. CoC reunited in 2010 (sans longtime frontman Pepper Keenan) and released two more albums to little fanfare, but Keenan’s return to the fold in 2014 brought some substantial buzz, and their most recent album—2018’s No Cross, No Crown—has been hailed by many as the band’s finest effort since their ’90s heyday. CoC will be playing at The Complex this week along with NOLA sludge stalwarts Crowbar; Texas hard rockers Quaker City Night Hawks and Ohio desert rock outfit Lo-Pan open. (Nic Renshaw) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $24.50, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

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TUESDAY 8/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

MARCUS HANEY

Mumford & Sons, Portugal. The Man

THURSDAY 8/8 LIVE MUSIC

Aaron Benward + Kylie Sackley + Danny Myrick (Rockwell) The Alarm (The Complex) The Hardy Brothers (Dejoria Center) Korene Greenwood (Lighthouse Lounge) Jojo’s Slim Wednesday (Cabin) Joshy Soul & The Cool + Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Lash LaRue (Kimball Arts Center) Lauren Morrow + The Backyard Revival + Alicia Stockman (Urban Lounge) The Legendary Joe McQueen Quartet (Gracie’s) Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real + War and Treaty (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Moodlite (Garage on Beck) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Neal Francis (Canyons Village) The Nude Party + Lube (Kilby Court) Phantom Loop Music Co. (Velour) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Reverend Horton Heat (The Depot) Vince Staples + Leikeli47 + Concise Kilgore (Gallivan Center)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Acoustic Thursdays (Green Pig) Burly-oke (Prohibition) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Jazz Jam Band (Twist) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Pitch Control Thursday w/ Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Tritonal (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90) Thursday Night Karaoke w/ Todd Krause (Union Tavern)

FRIDAY 8/9 LIVE MUSIC

Atheras + The 1-2 Manys + Suburban

This British folk rock band, known for their bluegrass influence in soaring hits like “I Will Wait” and their literary references, took a departure from their usual fare for their fourth studio album, Delta. Rather than embracing the anthemic, declarative writing from their previous three albums, this one proves more intimate. Still implementing the acoustic guitar, banjo, piano and double bass that fans have come to recognize as the band’s signature style, the album was called “tender” by New Music Express. “I think at the beginning [of recording the album] we kind of fell back in love with the old instruments we didn’t play on Wilder Mind, like the acoustic stuff and the more folky instruments, but conscious [about] how we can make these instruments sound not like these instruments, which opened up a whole new world for us,” guitarist Winston Marshall told the BBC. In an interview with Rolling Stone, keyboard player Ben Lovett said the album discusses “the four Ds: death, divorce, drugs and depression.” Although it’s a more introspective album, it still holds the sweeping emotion Mumford & Sons fans are used to, and the tour will, of course, include old favorites. Joined by Portugal. The Man as the opening act, the outdoor show promises a lively evening. (Amanda Taylor) Usana Amphitheatre, 7:30 p.m., $29.50-$128, all ages, saltlakeamphitheater.com

Hell Kill + Hi Fi Murder (Liquid Joe’s) The B.D. Howes Band (Gallivan Center) Big Fat Nastry Round III + Big Blue Ox + SuperBubble + Dumb Luck (The State Room) Brooke Mackintosh (HandleBar) Brooke Mackintosh (Harp and Hound) Colt.46 (Westerner) The Discographers + Major Tom & The Moonboys (Ice Haüs) Janis Ian + Livingston Taylor (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 42 Live Band N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Local Bands (Green Pig) Lo-Fi Riot + Synchronicity + Hooligans Brass Band (Velour) The Mighty O.A.R. (Red Butte Garden Amphitheater) The Music Of The Rolling Stones (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Nuthin Special & The Silence the Critic (Lighthouse Lounge) Phutureprimitive + Dekai + Nght Wlkr (Metro Music Hall) Ryan Montbleau (Cabin) Ryan Walsh (Legends) Scott Rogers (Snowbird) Spot & Waldo (Outlaw Saloon)

The Swinging Lights (Garage on Beck) This Will Destroy You + Brin (Urban Lounge) Whiskey Rebellion (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ’s & Dancing (Prohibition) DJ Chaseone2 + DJ SL Steeze + Reckless Rooster (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Fell Swoop (Gracie’s) DJ Jskee (The Spur) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Open Mic (Sugar House Coffee) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)


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SATURDAY 8/10 LIVE MUSIC

Amy Jade’s Beehive Society (Utah Cultural Celebration Center) Cherry Thomas (Harp and Hound) Colt.46 (Westerner) Darkblood + From the Ashes + Sugar Bone + Anonymous (Ice Haüs) Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin Quintet (Holladay City Hall Park) Entwood (The Yes Hell) Janis Ian + Livingston Taylor (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 42 Jay Byrd (Johnny’s On Second) John Sherrill + DJ Mr. Ramirez + Matthew Bashaw & The Hope (Lake Effect) Junction City Blues Band (Lighthouse Lounge) Indigo Girls + The Utah Symphony (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Little Hurricane + Sarah DeGraw & The Odd Jobs + Branson Anderson (Urban Lounge) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Low Down Brass Band + Dan Weldon (Snowbird) Mythic Valley (Garage on Beck) N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Racist Kramer (The Depot) Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers (The State Room) Ryan Montbleau Band + Changing Lanes Experience (Canyons Village) The Reverend and the Revelry (HandleBar)

Leaning against the red tartan cushion that lines the entire long north wall of Piper Down (an Olde World Pub), I look up at the tall, slanting ceiling with its dark beams—only one of many things to lend this Irish pub a true “drinking hall” feeling. The walls are made of old brick and decorative, dark wooden panels that contribute to the dimness. Warm bulbs and some small skylights, more than providing illumination, draw your eye up, up, up. There’s a grandeur to this kind of architecture, one that makes you feel too small to outlast it, and calls to mind the dining halls of kings, celebratory Vikings or any medieval revelers—and thus also the fact that everyone who lives, and by lives I mean celebrates with beer, dies. “Olde world,” indeed. So, with the puniness of my mortal body on my mind, I order a beer and a brat. I don’t go for a traditional Irish beer, because the hot sun outside demands something lighter, so it’s an 801 Pilsner to go along with my vegan fare. Oh yes, would it be one of my BarFly features if I didn’t mention their vegan food? But, as it’s Piper Down, and they basically pioneered and are famous for vegan bar food in this city, I’ll stop there. With their food, though, comes a brunch set up that includes a Bloody Mary bar that I think might have been the highlight of my mother’s life the one time I took her. As she’s back in town soon, I’ll surely be back, indulging her while thinking on dead kings and munching on her asparagus spears. (Erin Moore) Piper Down, 1492 S. State, 801-468-1492, piperdownpub.com

Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Spot & Waldo (Outlaw Saloon) Sunsleeper + Ugly Boys + Winter Forever + Shine Arrowmaker (Kilby Court) see p. 42

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ’s & Dancing (Prohibition) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Chaseone2 (Gracie’s) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Gray (Snowbird) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Jskee (The Spur) DJ Juggy (Funk ’n Dive) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Saturday Night Dance w/ DJ Latu (Green Pig) Sky Saturdays w/ DJ Ikon (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Club 48) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

SUNDAY 8/11 LIVE MUSIC

Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals + Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue + Jessy Wilson (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Brother Chunky Trio (Snowbird) Dead Technology + Fat Apollo And The Cellulites (Gracie’s) Freddy & Francine + Branson Anderson (Kilby Court)

Icie League (Lighthouse Lounge) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Janis Ian + Livingston Taylor (Egyptian Theatre) see p. TK Lash LaRue (Copper Moose Farms) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Memphis McCool (Billy Blanco’s) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) The Proper Way (Legends)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke Night w/ Krazy Karaoke (The Union Tavern)

MONDAY 8/12 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Beethoven Festival (Chamber Music In The Park) Duwayne Burnside (Lake Effect) Galen Young (Gallivan Center) Homeshake (In The Venue) Kindo + Sirintip + Adrian Bellue (Metro Music Hall) Pure Bathing Culture + Divorce Court (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Motown on Mondays feat. J Godina + Street Jesus + DJ Chaseone2 (Alibi) Open Mic (Outlaw Saloon) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)


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CONCERTS & CLUBS TUESDAY 8/13 LIVE MUSIC

Beach Goons (Kilby Court) Beatles vs Elvis (Peery’s Egyptian Theater) Damien Jurado + Corrina Repp (Velour) see p. 42 The Fervors + Radio Blonde + Monster Hands (Urban Lounge) French Kettle Station + Muzzle Tung + Ani Christ (Diabolical Records) Headphone + Interlucid (Rad Shack) Night Star Jazz Orchestra + Salt City Rangers (Gallivan Center) Shakey Graves + Dr. Dog + Caroline Rose (Red Butte Garden Amphitheater) Sydnie Keddington (The Spur) Taj Mahal Quartet + Marc Cohn + Blind Boys of Alabama (Eccles Center Theater) Mumford & Sons + Portugal. The Man (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 46 Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

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FILM REVIEW

The Rage of Innocence

CINEMA

Brian Banks tells a cruel and true story with too little righteous anger. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

SHIVHANS PICTURES

T

Aldis Hodge in Brian Banks to redeem himself in the eyes of the law. But Brian Banks could have used a different kind of outrage: a furious, bitter kind could have, and should have, been brought to bear by the film on Banks’ behalf. Greg Kinnear as the head of the CIP is as terrific, as he always is, but even he brings only resigned disillusionment with the criminaljustice system. America is long past time for a reckoning with its own racism and corruption, and the urgent necessity of the film’s message— that America’s criminal justice needs immediate and sweeping reform—ends up nowhere near incensed enough. It unfortunately casts Banks’ own gentle toughness as perhaps too accommodating of injustice, too willing to forgive. And while it might not be the job of any given individual to push back against even the wrongs done to him—though the movie makes it clear that its subject, in real life, now works with the CIP—it should absolutely be the job of a story like this to take up that mantle. CW

BRIAN BANKS

| CITY WEEKLY |

BB.5 Aldis Hodge Greg Kinnear PG-13

PAIRS WITH The Hurricane (1999) Denzel Washington Vicellous Shannon R

After Innocence (2005) Documentary NR

Akeelah and the Bee (2006) Keke Palmer Laurence Fishburne PG

AUGUST 8, 2019 | 51

Patch Adams (1998) Robin Williams Monica Potter PG-13

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Director Tom Shadyac, best known for outrageous comedy (Bruce Almighty) and outrageous schmaltz (Patch Adams), mostly tempers his instincts for the over-the-top; there’s only a teensy bit of awkward on-thenose speechifying. But the script, by Doug Atchison (Akeelah and the Bee), overreaches in its search for spiritual succor and redemption. Banks’ desire to let go of animosity over the unfairness he has suffered is perfectly understandable. And there’s certainly something appealing in the pragmatic philosophy that he acquires in prison from a teacher played by an uncredited Morgan Freeman about finding resilience in adversity, learning how to let go of resentment and discovering the best way to grow from a scared boy into a thoughtful, sensitive man. It might have been a mistake on Shadyac’s part, however, to have the 30-something Hodge play the 16-year-old Banks in flashbacks to the incident which landed him in prison. One big issue with the U.S. justice system is in how it treats African-American children as grown-ups ... and, indeed, the teen Banks was charged as an adult even though he was a minor. Casting a younger actor would have underscored that Banks was most definitely still a child in a way that having the obviously adult Hodge enacting those scenes undercuts. Of course, it’s good for Brian’s own personal well-being to not hold onto negativity, even as he never gives up his battle

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he railroading of African-American males by the U.S. legal system. The injustices of overcrowded courts, overworked defense attorneys and overused plea-bargaining. The legal hoops that must be jumped through, and Catch-22s that must be untangled—but often cannot be—in the attempts to undo the cruelty of wrongful imprisonment. There’s a lot here to make the thinking, compassionate citizen furious. But despite a passionate and engaging central performance by the charming and charismatic Aldis Hodge, Brian Banks never quite manages to be the gripping drama it wants to be ... and needs to be. Told in a sadly familiar way, this sadly familiar tale gets a little lost in melodrama and indulging the capital-I Inspirational. Getting angry might have served it better, for the true story it tells is infuriating. In 2002, hugely promising California highschool football player Brian Banks (Hodge) was accused of a crime he did not commit— there’s no question about this—and his subsequent six-year prison sentence derailed the NFL career he was barreling toward. It almost goes without saying that Banks is African-American. This docudrama picks up his story after Banks, now in his 20s, has been released from prison but on a five-year parole, and just as he’s subjected to the new indignity of wearing an ankle monitor. Banks had been in touch with the California Innocence Project (CIP) before, while incarcerated, but the organization—which works to help free those wrongly imprisoned— turned him down. Now, he tries again to secure their help to hopefully clear his name and get on with his life: his felony record means he can’t find even a menial job, and playing football is out of the question.


CINEMA CLIPS

in which a pandemic has killed off most of the world’s female population. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON BBB It’s hard not to get a touch of a Rain Man vibe from writerdirector Tyler Nilson and Mike Schwartz’ picaresque drama, but that sense of familiarity is transcended by strong performances. Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a 20-year-old man with Down syndrome who is a ward of the state in North Carolina, flees his care facility to pursue his dream of being a pro wrestler. While one of his caregivers (Dakota Johnson) searches for him, Zak winds up tagging along with Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a down-on-his-luck fisherman who has his own reasons for not being found. The tale is mostly episodic, and focuses almost entirely on the hardened Tyler warming up to his role as reluctant guardian, which risks turning Zak into one of those characters who exists exclusively to change someone’s heart. But Gottsagen does get a few solid scenes, and LaBeouf is terrific at conveying the way Zak begins to fill a hole in Tyler’s life as they move through a landscape dripping with authentic Outer Banks atmosphere. Despite a bumpy climax, the emotion generally feels real, and honestly earned. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR

10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU At Gateway Legacy Plaza, Aug. 14, dusk. (PG-13)

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN [not yet reviewed] I think there’s, like, a dog voiced by Dennis Quaid and his owner is a race-car driver, but honestly, I have no idea what’s going on with this one. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG) BRIAN BANKS BB.5 See review on p. 51. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD BB This live-action adaptation of the kiddie cartoon is ... fine. Unless you know that it’s from director James Bobin and screenwriter Nicholas Stoller, who gave us the marvelous recent Muppets movie reboots, in which case it’s a bit of a disappointment. Raiders of the Lost Ark lite, for kids? Nothing wrong with that. But it takes Lost City a solid 35 minutes to get there, first indulging in a pointless detour with the teenaged Dora (adorable Isabela Moner) forced to attend high school in Los Angeles, where she does not fit in at all. Then it’s back to her South American jungle home for the rescue of her explorer parents (the splendid pair of Michael Peña and Eva Longoria) from treasurehunter kidnappers, all of them bent on finding a fabled lost Incan city. Even once Lost City settles into itself, it’s still poop and fart jokes and kiddie-style slapstick, stuff that drives a grownup viewer to distraction, though kids may not notice or care. This live-action Dora remains a great role model for girls and boys alike, but her movie should better than it is. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson ECCO [not yet reviewed] An assassin trying to start a new life is pulled back into his old one. Opens Aug. 9 at Megaplex Theatres. (R) THE KITCHEN [not yet reviewed] When a group of 1970s Hell’s Kitchen crime bosses go to prison, their wives take over their operation. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (R) LIGHT OF MY LIFE [not yet reviewed] A father (Casey Affleck) and his daughter try to survive a world

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK [not yet reviewed] Teenagers face the horrors that come to life from a book’s pages. Opens Aug. 9 at theaters valleywide. (R) THEM THAT FOLLOW BBB There’s a razor’s-edge margin for error in telling a story of Pentecostal snake-handlers in rural West Virginia that doesn’t play as “laugh at the yokels,” so credit to Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage for their restrained meditation on insular religious communities. Alice Englert plays Mara, daughter of this community’s pastor (Walton Goggins), whose furtive relationship with an apostate member of their church (Thomas Mann) results in a pregnancy she must hide, especially when another church member asks to marry her. While Poulton and Savage depict ceremonial snake-handling, the intent isn’t to single out this belief system as particularly weird. Instead, they look thoughtfully at how people within religious groups deal with feeling like they don’t belong, when admitting such feelings might lead to ostracism, while another subplot involves a convert (Olivia Colman) who truly believes the faith saved her life. The climax plays out with surprising excess relative to the tone of the rest of the film—practically a Requiem for a Dream horror montage—but using this exotic sect allows for a wider-ranging exploration of what happens when you can’t believe in the God of your fathers. Opens Aug. 9 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR 

TO WONG FOO, THANKS FOR EVERYTHING, JULIE NEWMAR At Tower Theater, Aug. 9-10, 11 p.m. & Aug. 11, noon. (R) STAR WARS: EPISODE V - THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK At Thanksgiving Point, Aug. 9, dusk. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW BB.5 Two supporting tough guys from the Fast & Furious franchise get a blithe spinoff that keeps with the F&F aesthetic by disregarding the laws of physics and ultimately declaring itself to be about “family.” The CIA recruits government agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and British ex-spy Shaw (Jason Statham) to work together—though they ostensibly hate each other—along with Shaw’s siter/rogue MI6 agent (Vanessa Kirby) to stop a deadly virus from falling into the hands of a semi-bionic bad guy (Idris Elba). Shaw used to be a villain, but all is forgiven now, I guess. He and Hobbs squabble amusingly, and director David Leitch carries off well-choreographed fight sequences and chases. But everything in between, especially Hobbs’ tacked-on family issues, is tedious, and it overstays its welcome by a good 30 minutes. Like I said, it’s a Fast & Furious movie. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD BBBB Quentin Tarantino enters the world of 1969 Hollywood to tell the tale of fading TV star Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio), his longtime stunt double/personal assistant Cliff (Brad Pitt), and Rick’s new next-door neighbor, rising starlet Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie). The looming spectre of the Manson Family murders hangs over the narrative, but not enough to blunt the comedic force of the performances by DiCaprio and a never-better Pitt. But this feels like far more than a nodding recognition that all things must pass, or a simple valentine to the days of celluloid and studio back lots. It’s Tarantino’s most complicated statement yet on his love of filmed stories. Yeah, people read them in dangerous ways, and yeah, the business can crush you. It’s also miraculous when everything comes together, and when you can somehow imagine worlds much better than this one. (R)—SR

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I am overjoyed that you’re not competing for easy rewards or comparing yourself to the mediocre crowd. Some people in your sphere might not be overjoyed, though. To those whose sense of self isn’t strong, you might be like an itchy allergen; they might accuse you of showing off or acting puffed up. But freaks like me appreciate creative egotists like you when you treat your personality as a work of art. In my view, you’re a stirring example of how to be true to one’s smartest passions. Keep up the good work! Continue to have too much fun! I’m guessing that for now you can get away with doing just about anything you want as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone.

head and thinking with your heart. Soon you’ll be visited by revelations about any unconscious glitches that might be subtly undermining your togetherness, and you’ll get good ideas about how to correct those glitches. Astrological rhythms will be flowing in your relationships’ favor for the next seven weeks!

1. Travel aid made obsolescent by GPS 6. Stadium display where you'll see couples being intimate 13. "Four-alarm" food 14. 1971 hit with no English lyrics 16. Like some Greek columns 17. "Paul Bunyan" and others 18. Governors Michael and Eliot ... caught on the 6-Across! 20. Melt alternative, for short 21. Word in a wedding notice 22. Eskimo boot 26. Street ____ 28. Heed the coxswain 31. "____ Shoes" (2005 Cameron Diaz film) 32. "Eureka"-esque exclamations 33. Jonathan's wife in "Dracula" 34. Comedians Andy and Robert ... caught on the 6-Across! 37. English school on the Thames 38. Nessie's home 39. Standard Windows typeface 40. Go green, say 41. Actress Rowlands 42. Hold protectively 43. Words before "gather" or "see" 44. YouTube revenue source 45. Film directors Robert and John ... caught on the 6-Across! 53. Car-pooling arrangement 54. Boxer Ali 55. "Jungle Fever" actress Sciorra 56. Finalize, as comic art 57. "Heavens to Betsy!" 58. Underhanded sort

DOWN

Martel 50. Similar to 51. "East of Eden" director Kazan 52. Holed, as a putt

Last week’s answers

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1. Word with rain or rock 2. "Wherefore art ____ Romeo?" 3. Something clickable 4. Et ____ 5. Devastating insult, in slang 6. Aquatic source of iodine 7. Cause for squirming 8. Beyond tipsy 9. Pollutant that's a portmanteau 10. "Born Sinner" rapper J. ____ 11. State as fact 12. What's more in Madrid? 14. "The Bells ____ Mary's" 15. Casual greetings 19. Sort

22. Performed with gestures 23. Consensus 24. One of the Kardashians 25. Rock's Kings of ____ 26. Girl, in Guatemala 27. Dermatologist's concern 28. Unbending 29. NBA legend whose Twitter handle is @ SHAQ 30. Pixar film set in 2805 32. "I Wanna Love You" singer, 2006 33. Sorvino of "Mighty Aphrodite" 35. "Shalom ____" (Hebrew greeting) 36. First jazz musician to win a Pulitzer Prize 41. Elapses 42. Forerunners of MP3s 43. Below-the-belt campaign tactic 44. Not at the dock, say 45. Fanboy's reading 46. Woman's name meaning "pleasure" 47. Vitamin-rich green vegetable 48. Not online, briefly 49. "Life of Pi" author

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

AUGUST 8, 2019 | 53

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I estimate that about 25% of your fear results from your hesitation to love as deeply and openly and bravely as you could. Another 13% originates in an inclination to mistake some of your teachers for adversaries, and 21% from your reluctance to negotiate with the misunderstood monsters in your closet. But I suspect that fully 37% of your fear comes from the free-floating angst that you telepathically absorb from the other 7.69 billion humans on our VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Let’s enjoy a moment of poignant silence in honor of your planet. So what about the remaining 4%? Is that based on real risks expired illusions. They were soulful mirages: full of misplaced and worth paying attention to? Yes! And the coming weeks will be idealism and sweet ignorance and innocent misunderstandings. an excellent time to make progress in diminishing its hold on you. Generous in ways you might not yet realize, they exuded an agitated beauty that aroused both courage and resourcefulness. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Now, as those illusions dissolve, they will begin to serve you When it came time to write your horoscope, I was feeling unusuanew, turning into fertile compost for your next big production. ally lazy. I could barely summon enough energy to draw up the planetary charts. I said a weak prayer to the astrological muses, pleading, “Please don’t make me work too hard to discover the LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Old rules and traditions about how best to conduct intimate relation- message that Aries people need to hear; just make the message ships are breaking down. New rules are still incubating. Right now, appear in my mind.” As if in response, a voice in my head said, the details about how people express their needs to give and receive “Try bibliomancy.” So I strolled to my bookcase, shut my eyes, love seem to be riddles for which there are no correct answers. So pulled out the first book I felt, and went to a random page. what do you do? How do you proceed with the necessary blend of Here’s what I saw when I opened my eyes: “The Taoist concept confidence and receptivity? Can you figure out flexible strategies of wu-wei is the notion that our creative active forces are depenfor being true both to your need for independence and your need for dent on and nourished by inactivity; and that doing absolutely interdependence? I bring these ruminations to your attention, Libra, nothing may be a good way to get something done.” just in time for the “Transforming Togetherness” phase of your cycle. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): There’s an old Rosicrucian vow you might have fun trying out: “I SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s time for your once-a-year shout-out to your most audacious pledge to interpret every experience that comes my way as a compossibilities. Ready? Go ahead and say, “Hallelujah! Hosanna! munication of God with my soul.” If you carry out this intention Happiness! Hooray for my brilliant future!” Next, go ahead and with relaxed playfulness, every bird song you hear is an emblem of say, “I have more than enough power to create my world in the Divine thought; every eavesdropped conversation provides hints image of my wisest dreams.” Now do a dance of triumph and of the Creator’s current mood; the shape that spilled milk takes on whisper to yourself, “I’m going to make very sure I always know your tabletop is an intimation of eternity breaking into our timegripped realm. In my years of offering you advice, I have never exactly what my wisest dreams are.” before suggested you try this exercise because I didn’t think you were receptive. But I do now. (If you’re an atheist, you can replace SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): During the next three weeks, I advise you to load up on copious “God,” “Divine,” and “Creator” with “Life.”) amounts of caffeine from Monday at 8 a.m. until Friday at 6 p.m. Then drastically cut back on the coffee and consume large GEMINI (May 21-June 20): amounts of alcohol and/or marijuana from 6:01 p.m. on Friday Below are unheralded gifts possessed by many Geminis but through 6 p.m. on Sunday. This is the ideal recipe for success. not commonly identified by traditional astrologers: 1. A skill Just kidding! I lied. Here’s the truth, Sagittarius: Astrological for deprogramming yourself: for unlearning defunct teachings indicators suggest you would benefit from making the coming that might otherwise interfere with your ability to develop weeks be the most undrugged, alcohol-free time ever. Your your highest potentials; 2. A sixth sense about recognizing potential for achieving natural highs will be extraordinary, as artificial motivations, then shedding them; 3. A tendency to will your potential to generate crucial breakthroughs while attract epiphanies that show you why and how to break taboos that might once have been necessary but aren’t any longer; 4. enjoying those natural highs. Take advantage! An ability to avoid becoming overwhelmed and controlled by situations you manage or supervise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I don’t presume you should or will gleefully embrace the assignment I’ll propose. The task might indeed be too daunting for you to CANCER (June 21-July 22): manage right now. If that’s the case, don’t worry. You’ll get another In 1993, I began writing a book titled The Televisionary Oracle. chance in a few months. But if you are indeed ready for a breathtak- By 1995, I had generated more than 2,000 pages of material ing challenge, here it is: Be a benevolent force of wild nature; be a ten- that I didn’t like. Although I was driven by a yearning to express der dispenser of creative destruction; be a bold servant of your soulful insights that had been welling up in me for a long time, nothing dreams—as you demolish outmoded beliefs and structures that about the work felt right. I was stuck. But finally I discovered have been keeping a crucial part of your vitality shackled and latent. an approach that broke me free: I started to articulate difficult truths about aspects of my life about which I was embarrassed, puzzled and ashamed. Then everything fell into place. The proAQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I have cast a feisty love spell that will be triggered in anyone who cess that had been agonizing and fruitless became fluidic and reads the first line of this horoscope. And since you have done joyful. I recommend that you try this strategy to dissolve any that, you are now becoming even smarter than you already were mental blocks you might be suffering from: dive into and explore about getting the most out of your intimate alliances. You’re what makes you feel ashamed, puzzling or embarrassed. I bet it primed to experiment with the delights of feeling with your will lead to triumph and fulfillment, as happened for me.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

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Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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When Sugar House’s S-line was installed just south of 2100 South, it didn’t make much of a splash in the community, despite its $26 million price tag with funding through a U.S. Department of Transportation grant. The problem with the project was that it was slow—20 minutes to get from the Fairmont Park station on the eastside to Central Point station in South Salt Lake—because there was just one track. I dubbed it the “ghost train” because during winter fog days, the white train would appear out of the mist without a soul sitting inside except the bundled up driver. It still has less than 1,500 riders a day. UTA, South Salt Lake, Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County have now worked together to put in more rails between 300 and 500 East, which speeds up service somewhat so that it might entice more riders. Now, it only takes 15 minutes to get from one end to the other. Pay attention to two outcomes of this highly specialized streetcar: 1. Development is popping up all along the line, from WinCo Foods at 2193 S. Main to dense residential units behind Dancing Cranes Imports on 700 East. Anywhere you put in light transit lines you will find commercial and residential development pop up soon afterward. A decade ago, locals would have never heard of or been able to find “districts” in the Salt Lake Valley. Now, there’s the North Temple District, where the Redevelopment Agency is working with locals on the Fairpark Public Market Study, Folsom Corridor, Congregation Spirits and Spark! Projects, all served by the Trax Green Line; the State Street District with the Capitol Home Apartments Project right by the S-Line; and the Ball Park Station and all the townhomes being built by private investors around there; 2. There will be many S-Lines developed in the future going east and west in the valley—which will gentrify and revitalize areas that have had poor transit options (think Poplar Grove). Trax (light rail) is headed south to Utah County. Politicos and planners are working on designs as to where the rails will eventually end up and where the stations and parking lots will be located. If you go to the Salt Lake Parade of Homes in Daybreak through Aug. 17 and head west from 1-15 along 11400 South, you’ll drive by where Trax ends. There are now 7,000 homes in Daybreak with thousands and thousands more planned. It’s obvious that the rails need to be expanded to the next valley south where all the techies are working. There are future plans for Trax to even head north of downtown Salt Lake to Bountiful. The point is to get people using mass transit to save money on driving costs, and to have more money to spend on housing. And, of course, riding the rails helps keep pollution in check.  n The author is a former UTA board member. Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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WEIRD

One of Those Days Sometimes a routine traffic stop (in this case, for an expired license plate) is the most interesting incident in a cop’s day. So it was on July 10 for Guthrie, Okla., police officers. Around 11 a.m., they stopped a car driven by Stephen Jennings, 40, who had a friend, Rachael Rivera, 30, in the front seat, and a timber rattlesnake in a terrarium on the back seat. Jennings told police he had a gun in the car at about the same time they identified the car as stolen, reported KFOR. Upon further search, officers found an open bottle of whiskey (next to the gun) and a container of “yellowish powder” labeled “uranium.” “The uranium is the wild card in that situation,” Guthrie Police Sgt. Anthony Gibbs explained. Jennings told police he was trying to create a “super snake” with the radioactive uranium. Charges for Jennings included possession of a stolen vehicle and transporting an open bottle of liquor. Because it was rattlesnake season, his valid hunting and fishing license absolved him of any charges related to the snake. Police are still trying to figure out what charges might be brought regarding the uranium. Right Under Their Noses Capitol Police in Montpelier, Vt., discovered dozens of cannabis plants growing in the flower beds along a walkway at the Statehouse on July 8. Police Chief Matthew Romei told NBC5 that it was unclear whether the more than 30 plants were marijuana or hemp, and they don’t know who planted them. But since there is no criminal case, officials don’t plan to have the plants tested. “It’s legal to cultivate, but there are limits on where you can do it, and the Statehouse flower beds certainly aren’t one of those permissible sites,” Romei said. “If there is a typical Vermont story, this is probably it.”

Questionable Judgment A. Janus Yeager, 49, of Dixon, Ill., was arrested on July 9 as she motored toward home with an inflated kiddie pool on the roof of her SUV. CBS2 Chicago reported that Dixon police officers pulled Yeager over after being alerted that there were two children in the pool. Yeager told police she took the pool to a friend’s house to inflate it, then had her daughters ride inside it “to hold it down on their drive home.” Yeager was charged with two counts of endangering the health or life of a child and two counts of reckless conduct.

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Bright Idea People in the United Arab Emirates depend heavily on expensive desalination for drinking water. But an Emirati businessman has a novel idea for providing fresh water to the Arabian gulf. Abdulla Alshehi wants to borrow an iceberg from Antarctica, EuroNews reported in May. For six years, Alshehi has been working on a plan to tow an iceberg, as much as 1.25 miles long and a third of a mile wide, the entire 5,500 miles to the UAE coast. He estimates the journey will take 10 months and the iceberg may lose about 30% of its mass, but Alshehi believes its presence could provide drinking water to about 1 million people for about five years. And that’s not all. “It’s expected that the presence of these icebergs may cause a weather pattern change (and) attract more rain to the region,” he said. A trial run this year will move a smaller iceberg, at a cost of $60 million to $80 million. Alshehi believes the cost of the larger project will be between $100 million and $150 million. Mr. Guo in the Kitchen With a Ladle Nearly a year after chef Xiu Bin Wang, 33, was found dead in his room above China Chef carryout restaurant in Brockenhurst, Hampshire, England, police are still trying to figure out how he died, Metro News reported. He apparently suffered a “forceful blow” to the head, and officials first fingered Zhu Long Guo, a colleague at the restaurant who admitted to striking Wang with a ladle during an altercation. “A ladle was seized, and there was a thorough investigation,” Detective Constable Brad Wanless reported at an inquest on July 11. But the coroner could not make a definite determination: “I do not accept that there is a clear causal link between the admitted blow with the ladle and the death of Mr. Wang,” senior coroner Grahame Short concluded. Armed and Ordained When the alarm went off at 12:40 a.m. on July 11 at the Seminole Heights Baptist Church in Tampa, Fla., Pastor Brant Adams, 40, was alerted and grabbed his handgun. He arrived at the scene just minutes later, spying a man rifling through a desk in a food pantry in the church. The intruder noticed Adams and started approaching him, so Adams drew his gun and ordered him to hit the floor, which he did. “I said, ‘Dude, what are you doing?’” Adams told the Tampa Bay Times. Adams held the man, Miguel Otero-Rivera, 49, at gunpoint until police arrived, who arrested him and charged him with burglary. When police led OteroRivera out, he told the pastor, “I’m sorry, I’m sorry.” For his part, Adams was just glad no one was hurt. “I never thought I’d pull a gun on someone,” he said. “Hope the gentleman gets the help that he needs.” Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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n  Gen. Charles Etienne Gudin, one of Napoleon Bonaparte’s “favorite generals,” was killed by a cannonball on Aug. 22, 1812, during the failed French invasion of Russia. Posthumously, he got the star treatment—a street named after him in Paris, his name carved on the Arc de Triomphe, and his heart removed and brought home to be placed in a Paris cemetery chapel. But on July 6, Reuters reported, a team of archaeologists found what they believe are his remains buried (ironically) beneath the foundation of a dance floor in Smolensk, Russia. Their first clue? Gudin had lost one of his legs below the knee in battle, and indeed the skeleton was missing its left leg. Scientists will compare the skeleton’s DNA with living descendants of Gudin’s to confirm their suspicions.

That’s Not the Way It Works, Karen In Turkey’s new Istanbul Airport, a firsttime flyer had to be rescued on July 10 after she assumed the conveyor belt carrying luggage to the baggage sorting room was her path to the plane. The unnamed woman, juggling a carry-on and a shopping bag, stepped carefully up to the moving belt at the airport check-in and tried to climb on, but lost her balance and took a tumble. The Sun reported that airport personnel were quick to stop the conveyor belt and help her off.

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Awesome! When not just any old Motel 6 will do, check into The Haneda Excel Hotel Tokyu, near Tokyo’s airport, and ask for the “Superior Cockpit Room.” Along with two beds, a bathroom and a table, the room features a full Boeing 737-800 flight simulator that offers guests the experience of piloting a full-size jet. According to United Press International, the room rents for $234 per night, but for a 90-minute simulator session with an expert, guests will have to cough up another $277. (The simulator can’t be used without supervision.) The room became available for booking on July 18.

DIRT HIPPIES!

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Secondhand High Dr. Scott Dolginow, owner of Valley Emergency Pet Care in Basalt, Colo., has noticed a new trend among his dog patients. He told The Aspen Times on July 11 that he’s seeing three to 10 dogs a week in his veterinary office with marijuana toxicity. No, they’re not toking alongside their owners around the fire pit. Dolginow’s theory is the dogs are eating human feces while on trails or camping with their owners and getting a secondhand buzz. Pet owner Rebecca Cole said her dog, Marty, started staggering, vomiting and urinating on the floor after hiking with her on a trail last spring. Cole took Marty to the vet, where “they said he was high. I couldn’t believe it because I don’t have anything in my house.” Dolginow said, “Most dogs will eat human feces given the opportunity.”

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