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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY TREMBLING GIANT

Biologically rich Pando Forest is on the verge of collapse. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 16 A&E 19 DINE 23 MUSIC 35 CINEMA 37 COMMUNITY

DARIA BACHMANN

Cover story Bachmann is a journalist and documentary filmmaker, who covers environmental and land issues. Information on her latest documentary, The Repository, a view of Nevada’s nuclearwaste-littered Yucca Mountain, is available at therepositorymovie.com.

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Cover story, Feb. 21, “This Is the (Other) Place”

Just a few hours north/ northwest of SLC, you’ll find much better skiing then anything the Wasatch has to offer. Idaho has the best skiing in the U.S., hands down. KRISTOPHER BOATMAN Via Facebook Nice cover … and Japan is no joke. Hokkaido for the win! DANIEL COCHRANE Via Instagram That had to be a rough assignment. @MARCIESLC Via Twitter Winter 2018–19: The year everyone you know went to Japan. JOSHUA MURDOCK Via Facebook

News, Feb. 21, “Retailer Rebirth”

I’m gonna miss that Sears. I remember as kids, our mom would take us there for peanut clusters candy and hot dogs. GENO LOPEZ Via Facebook We should probably build some “luxury apartments/ condos” because we definitely don’t have any in the downtown area. JAMEY CHELIUS Via Facebook

No national chain stores. Only local businesses. Or a nice, big public park. SCOTT FRANDSEN Via Facebook

Marijuana distribution center and new liquor superstore. Hey, a girl can dream. IRIS NIELSEN Via Facebook

Honestly, a good location for a homeless resource center. BRACKEN FORD Via Facebook

Why not an awesome public marketplace/bazaar? ANDREW LATTA Via Facebook

Artist live/work spaces and galleries. KIRSTEN DARRINGTON Via Facebook

I vote we build a creative reuse center mall like the one in Sweden. Our local nonprofit, Clever Octopus Creative Reuse, could be the main center surrounded by workshops/studios and local fare. SHERI GIBB, Executive director Via cityweekly.net

If people think there should be more affordable housing, then you aren’t looking hard enough. There are plenty of affordable places if you are willing to look. We don’t live in the Bay or the eastside, people! KAMERON KWAN Via Facebook Resurrect the Woodshed and make it the size of one city block. JACOB C. RICHENS Via Facebook Roller derby? Bowling alley? Art gallery and restaurant? Local bookstore? New location for Graywhale CD that was near the U? JOHN WESLEY WALTON Via Facebook A large roller-skating rink with a wood floor and no scooters. KAREN CLUFF Via Facebook Lee’s Discount Liquor! SKYLER HARRISON Via Facebook

The new Zephyr Club! DENNIS HARRIS Via Facebook The biggest Beto’s in Salt Lake City. Every empty business in Salt Lake City become a Beto’s or a Check City. TOBY NELSON Via Facebook

Dear Soapbox:

How ’bout moving the liquor store into the old Sears monument? It would get two birds stoned at once; it would move the booze away from Pioneer Park and move it several blocks closer to my place. Win-win. Sincerely, ALAN WRIGHT, Salt Lake City

Beer Nerd, Feb. 21, “On the Level”

Would someone build a microbrewery in Kanab, please? JOE STEWART Via Facebook

Online News Post, Feb. 21, “Renegade Republican: Romney talks medical cannabis”

Give him 10 minutes, and Flip Romney will change his tune faster than Utah weather. REGIE THOMPSON Via Facebook “Never been a study.” Pure comedy. You mean, ‘There’s never been a study by the LDS church.” DANNY EGBERT Via Facebook Hippies have studied the “effects” for decades; mankind has known the benefits for millennia, thousands of years of trials. It’s time we stop the prejudice of one of the Earth’s finest inhabitants. CHRISTOPHER LEUKEL Via Facebook Medical side effects of medical marijuana: A good night’s sleep and a healthy poop in the morning. DAVE CHRISTENSEN Via Facebook What are the side effects of having to listen to this tool for five minutes? DYLAN MICHAELS Via Facebook

Such an expert of everything but the job he is supposed to do. Seems like he comments and never has an idea for a solution. MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook People who partake recreationally do not care about your opinion. Laws won’t change that. Since you Republicans love taxing everything, just legalize it and chill. All you will notice is higher tax revenue; society will remain the same. @COURTDOGGIN Via Twitter I’m pretty sure there have been well over 100,000 studies regarding the benefits, and Taco Bell can help Mitt understand the side effects. STEVE BENCH Via Facebook The problem is, Mittens, the

government isn’t allowed to do the research because the DEA won’t allow it. JASON SAGERS Via Facebook

Did anyone actually read the article? I’m as annoyed at Utah politicians and the way the church has to weigh in on every bill too, but Mitt was saying the quoted text in the context of marijuana needs to be made a Class II drug so we can run federally sanctioned research into [its] efficacy. JOSHUA MARTINETTI Via Facebook

Mitt, don’t let me down. You got this. I voted for you and Prop 2. DENISE WIETZOREK Via Facebook

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STAFF Publisher COPPERFIELD PUBLISHING, INC Director of Operations PETE SALTAS

Contributors DARIA BACHMANN, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, COLETTE A. FINNEY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, KEITH L. McDONALD, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, KARA RHODES, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, SEAN HAIR, CHELSEA NEIDER

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OPINION HB166: Headed for Herbert’s Desk

It was a miraculous scientific breakthrough: Only a relatively short time ago, science discovered the double helix of DNA. Understanding those little strands that create our very existence has revolutionized medicine, allowed scientists to reprogram the genes to eliminate some diseases, and launched glimpses of how the future might look once science has mastered that realm. DNA has solved crimes, allowed successful matching of transplant donors and recipients, brought prenatal testing for in utero abnormalities, provided Webster with the word “clone,” and opened the Pandora’s Box of related moral questions. Chromosomes are great and everyone is supposed to get their 23 pairs. That’s the recipe for a complete human being. But too much of a good thing ruins the mix. The tragic extra copy—or partial copy—of Chromosome 21 is a troubling abnormality, presenting questions of reason and belief for parents and lawmakers. It is the cause of one of humanity’s saddest congenital anomalies—Down Syndrome. Some say that having a Down syndrome child has been the best thing in their lives, though most secretly wish that the presence of a lifelong child—one who requires constant care and can never fully function on its own—has been a lifetime curse. Down syndrome takes its toll on the entire family, creates long-term financial stresses, necessitates special education, and, in the most extreme cases, requires lifetime institutionalization. While parents

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. might feel a unique usefulness in caring for a child for an entire lifetime, most merely resolve themselves to the fact that it’s just the luck of the draw. Fortunately, the prenatal tests that identify a DS fetus have become a standard option, and more than 67 percent of U.S. parents, when informed their child will be DS, elect to terminate the pregnancy. In Iceland, virtually 100 percent choose that option, and European countries range from the U.S. average, all the way to 98 percent in Denmark. Although the pro-life option is available, people are, by nature, selfish and practical. Lifelong-dependent children are emotionally taxing and economically burdensome. The prospect of having a lifelong dependent doesn’t bring most prospective parents a warm and fuzzy feeling. It’s my understanding that there are some DS children who grow up to hold down jobs, raise families, and even learn complex skills. Sadly those able to become independent are an overwhelming minority. While trying to present himself as the protector of our state, Gov. Gary Herbert finds himself in a real conundrum. Would he, should he, could he conscientiously sign House Bill 166, which would prevent a pregnant mother from basing her abortion on the discovery of Down syndrome? There’s no question Herbert is an unabashed opponent of pro-choice. He has openly talked about the right of all humans to be born, noting that the Down syndrome babies are not alone, and asserting that “none of us is born perfect.” He rationalizes that there’s a broad spectrum of human imperfections and that Down syndrome is just one of many. Understandably, the strength of the pro-life movement is at the core of the issue. These people believe all abortions to be, simply, murders by a different name. That’s not my belief, though I understand that the rights of

the unborn are part of a very complex argument. In nature, animal mothers have their own ways of dealing with damaged or abnormal babies. Mother dogs, for instance, will instinctively kill a congenitally defective pup. It seems so cruel, yet Mother Nature uses harsh solutions to prevent the corruption of the gene pool. It’s a stretch, but similarly, the right not to bear genetically defective children should be the choice of parents, not lawmakers. HB166 is supported in the House and the Senate, and indications are that Herbert will sign it. If he does, it will be yet one more attack on the hotly debated reproductive rights of parents. Several other states, such as North Dakota, Louisiana, Ohio and Indiana, have advanced similar legislation. The enactment of such bills has brought immediate challenges in the courts, but, to date, there have been no Supreme Court decisions. Understanding that Utah’s bill will lead to a legal quagmire, HB166 contains a provision that would not allow the state to implement the law unless the Supreme Court has ruled that a similar policy in another state is constitutional—something that would ensure taxpayers would not be on the hook for a costly legal crusade down a dead-end road. Regardless of whether Herbert signs HB166, its overall impact is far reaching. This bill is a bold-faced attempt to thwart the rights of parents to make choices concerning their future, and it’s yet one more example of how the state can, with the stroke of a pen, impose the will of the few upon the many. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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You can’t buy L ve But you can Rescue it

CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY RALLY

Look around. So many of the struggles around the world are related to feminist issues. And it’s not like the men in charge are going to solve the problem. Women are demanding good-paying jobs, housing, reproductive-health care, education, amnesty for all immigrants and an end to violence. Int’l Women’s Day Rally—Unite & Fight! is as much an anti-Donald Trump rally as it is a feminist and working class battleground. “Every progressive reform for women’s rights has been won through mass mobilization. Building a grassroots movement independent from the two parties who uphold the status quo of racism, war and inequality is an essential task for genuine women’s liberation,” the event’s Facebook page says. State Capitol, 350 N. State, 801-5084371, Friday, March 8, 5:30-6:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2SANJRZ.

CITIZEN LOBBYING WORKSHOP

This is it! The Legislature is wrapping up one of its most astounding sessions. Take this chance to join the Citizen Lobbying Workshop with the Utah Rivers Council and Utah Chapter Sierra Club before it’s too late. You’ll learn about all the important environment-related bills and participate in a quick lobbying 101 training before you head out to engage with our state lawmakers. The news is not all bad. There have been some hopeful bills this session, and you can make an impact on the good and the bad, including public lands, nuclear waste and air quality legislation. State Capitol, 350 N. State, State Office Building B110 (basement), Monday, March 11, 1-3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2NA86xO.

RESISTANCE ORGANIZING

Have you ever felt disenfranchised or simply unable to make a difference? Now is the time to take direct action for critical social, economic, racial and climatechange issues. Still, you have to start somewhere. Join the first community Civil Riot Meeting, which organizers hope will begin a dialogue to form strong relationships and create a collective of strong and willing participants. Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 385-256-5248, Thursday, March 14, 7-8:45 p.m., free, bit.ly/2H8gkfq.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Missing the Mark

You gotta love television news, trying desperately to become relevant in the volcanic age of journalism. KUTV Channel 2’s Beyond the Books “investigation” would like you to think they’ve uncovered shocking conflicts of interest among legislators. Maybe they weren’t paying attention. City Weekly shed light on the charter school problem in 2010, when the director of the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools resigned. UAPCS was becoming a hotbed of voucher advocates and unrepentant supporters of the profit motive in education. Then, Kim Frank, wife of a former legislator, took over on an interim basis before forming its competitor, Utah Charter Network. There are too many stories of too many legislators and their profitable management companies to list here. The Legislature doesn’t think this is a problem. Rep. Dan McKay, R-Riverton, had a hissy over the KUTV story. Maybe he wasn’t paying attention, either.

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The Legislature is giving us a lesson in making a bad idea worse—much worse. And it’s all in the name of helping those sadly neglected rural areas. You know, the ones that have been gerrymandered to pump up their legislative influence. Now, the big brains behind Salt Lake City’s inland port want to inflate its reach beyond the 16,000 vulnerable acres, and keep cities from bringing lawsuits against it with House Bill 433. The Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment want you to note there’s a water issue, too. It has to do with what we use it for—alfalfa, most of which feeds hungry cattle in China, and here. The IP board has the curious notion that spreading out the trucking to rural areas will make the air cleaner, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. You know, equal parts pollution for them and us.

Slippery Secrecy

At least some of our local newspapers advocate for the public. Both the Deseret News and Standard-Examiner ran opinion pieces dismissing the idea that special service districts might close their meetings to get attorney advice—as if there aren’t enough exemptions to the open-meetings law. The law provides closure already for real estate, litigation and bargaining, ostensibly because those issues require insider strategizing. Why the public should be prevented from hearing attorney advice on other issues is the big question. The Standard says the bill’s explicit purpose is “avoiding public knowledge regarding the discussion of audit reports.” And it creates a slippery slope to more secrecy. The good news is that Rep. Stephen Handy, R-Layton, will drop the bill if a compromise can’t be reached.

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NEWS

ALCOHOL REGULATIONS

Legislative Hangover

6

%

BEER

Stronger beer could soon be available on taps and in grocery stores across the state, but not everyone is happy.

L

“They come in here for the big stuff. The want flavor,” 2 Row Brewing founder and president Brian Coleman says of his in-store customers. “They want awesome beers that taste like something, and they’re just not satisfied with the 4-percent products.”

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MARCH 7, 2019 | 11

have one shot at this per 100 years— why are we letting mega retailers and big beer dictate the exact parameters of what is feasible and doable here?” If SB132 passes, Utah beer drinkers could be buying 6-percent ABV brews by the Fourth of July. “The implementation time for the bill is remarkably quick,” Proper Brewing Co.’s head brewer Rio Connelly says, spelling bad news for whatever lower-strength beer is still sitting in kegs and on store shelves come the summer. “Once higher-point beer is available, sales for 4 percent beer will drop off very steeply,” he predicts. Connelly doesn’t have an issue with the state tinkering with the ABV limit— he wants them to bump it even higher than 6 percent—but he’s concerned that catering to big, out-of-state businesses will give Utah drinkers fewer options to feed their alcohol sweet tooths, since national brewers could flood shelves with their mass-produced hooch. “We’re worried that this bill, and things like it, will continue to limit the choices of Utah drinkers by shutting smaller producers out of the market,” he says. “We are 100 percent behind raising ABV. We’re 100 percent behind normalizing the state’s liquor laws. What we don’t want to do is bend over backwards to give these large macrobrewers, these large out-of-state [interests,] what they want.” Dicou says sentiments like Connelly’s are common among Utah brewers. Opposition to the bill aside, she sees the ongoing discussion as a chance to educate more Utahns on what makes a good craft beer. “I think at the end of the day, discussion about alcohol caps and content is healthy for us,” Dicou says. “I would like to see them continue, and I would like to see that limit continue upward.” CW

to inject much punch into low-point brews. “You can just go up to even 5 percent, they really start tasting like real beer, not just near-beer.” Going beyond 6-percent ABV would be even better, Coleman adds. “If we went higher, now we can be more environmentally friendly. Now we can package more in kegs, we can do less packaging, period, and that’s just better on the environment,” he says, since brewers could bottle less of their heavy beers and instead serve them on tap. He suggests doing away with an ABV constraint entirely and instead restricting pour sizes. That, he says, would entrust bartenders’ and brewers’ discretion, since they could monitor whether their patrons are over-served. It also still gives lawmakers a say and preserves some of their power. “These legislators, they feel they just have to limit something,” he says. Coleman is in the minority. Many local brewers are opposed to SB132. Nicole Dicou, executive director of the Utah Brewers Guild, says 25 of her organization’s 29 members are against the measure. In Dicou’s telling, the bill is tailored to the interests of big businesses like Walmart, and it would ensure the little guy is left in the shadow of the Budweisers and Coors Lights of the world. “It really favors the big distributors,” Dicou says. National beer giants are in a lofty spot that allows them to turn on a dime. But local providers, Dicou explains, often invest in a years’ worth of packaging, putting them in a tight position if they decide to change their products’ alcohol content. “Some people say, ‘Any progress is progress,’” Dicou says, reflecting on the glacial pace of lawmakers to bring the state’s booze laws a bit closer to the rest of civilization’s. “I would argue that we

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and convenience stores. Dave Davis, president of the Utah Retail Merchants Association, warned Fox 13 last October that major domestic brewers like Anheuser-Busch have indicated they could produce less of their beer for Utah stores. “Your favorite brand may disappear altogether,” Davis said. Or it might be available only in limited packaging. The shrinking market for low-point beer already has claimed a casualty at Murphy’s Bar & Grill. The downtown pub stopped selling Killian’s on draft more than a year ago, bartender Charles Reed says, because the brewer, MillerCoors, stopped making the Utahapproved version of its Killian’s Irish Red. Save for a few questions from curious customers, the absence didn’t change much at Reed’s watering hole. “People are gonna drink no matter what we have. Having 3.2 [ABW] beer doesn’t stop people from drinking draft beer,” he says. “They just complain about it.” That’s not how Brian Coleman sees it. The founder and president of 2 Row Brewing says some Utahns, tired of the weak beer on tap and for sale at grocery stores, have turned to whiskey and wine as their grogs of choice. SB132 could give brewers a chance to show drinkers what’s possible when lawmakers give them a little more leeway. “I believe that we’re going to bring customers back to beer ...” Coleman says. “I think we’ll definitely get an increase in beer drinkers if the beer tastes more like beer and less like water.” To Coleman, the chance to serve 6-percent ABV beer on draft is an opportunity to give consumers a better product. “It’s not about more alcohol for us, it’s about the flavors that we can produce using more malt,” Coleman says, pointing out it’s difficult

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ocal and national beers are stacked in side-by-side alcoholic harmony at the Shell gas station on the corner of 2100 South and 500 East. Shelves are filled with cases of Bud Light and Wasatch Apricot Hefeweizen, but one section of the refrigerator is empty: the Park City session IPA is sold out. The missing brew makes sense to cashier Cynthia Stuckman, considering it’s the most popular beer she sells. “People get excited about it,” Stuckman says. But one thing that does not get her customers particularly pumped is the alcohol content—3.2 alcohol by weight, the equivalent of 4 percent alcohol by volume—just shy of the 5-percent national standard. “They complain,” Stuckman says of the weak brews. “So, I have to send them to the liquor store down on Highland.” Stuckman might not need to refer her thirstier patrons to the nearby Sugar House state store for much longer. If Gov. Gary Herbert signs Senate Bill 132, the state’s definition of beer would change from 4 to 6 percent alcohol by volume. That means Utah drinkers could soon buy heavier beers in grocery and convenience stores, and swig stiffer brews on draft. The Senate has already passed the bill. If the House follows suit, the legislation soon will land on Herbert’s desk. The guv has suggested he’s open to signing it, despite opposition from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “We have to reflect the market. I think that will happen, whether it’s this year or next year,” Herbert said at his monthly news conference in February, indicating that the conversation is not tied entirely to this bill or legislative session. “We just need to make sure we are following a market demand of the public and the consumer, rather than somebody thinking this is a better way to make more profit on selling beer in Utah,” he continued. Besides Minnesota, Utah is the only state in the country that imposes such a strict cap on the beer sold in its grocery

DEREK CARLISLE

BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons


12 | MARCH 7, 2019

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Soon, the biologically rich Pando Forest could be a thing of the past.

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P

MARCH 7, 2019 | 13

of regeneration, and the canopy cover of the trees via aerial photography and on-the-ground research, scientists determined that generations of trees are missing. “In fact, there are only old ones and they are senior citizens. Imagine a town of about 50,000 people and everybody in that town was 85 years old. It wouldn’t be a very sustainable town,” Rogers says. The average lifespan of aspen is between 80 and 140 years. Inside Pando, the oldest Pando clones are about 110-

bears and mountain lions are much lower than they were about 100 years ago, Rogers says. The lack of natural predators, coupled with human presence, created a situation where mule deer move much slower than they do when natural predators are present. So the deer are spread unevenly across Pando. “The deer are there much longer, about six months, versus about two weeks for cattle. The deer are doing much more damage and they are much more acclimated to people in campgrounds and homes. So they are not afraid of people, like elk would be or some other wildlife,” Rogers says. Mary O’Brien, Utah Forests program director at Grand Canyon Trust, an organization that works on conservation across the Colorado Plateau, says the part of the forest that had been fenced off from deer is recovering well, while area with a campground is more worn. Fencing in other areas doesn’t seem to work, because deer can jump it.

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“Regeneration is somewhat unique in aspen because it’s not from a seed— it’s directly from the roots, because it’s a clone,” explains Rogers, one of the study’s co-authors. About four years ago, he spearheaded a group of stakeholders to determine what’s going on with Pando. Their research suggests that while Pando Forest has existed for thousands of years, it’s been thinning out for the last four to five decades. After measuring trees, the amount

120 years old. And while they are dying a natural death, there’s no replacement. Rogers likens the situation to a “densely-woven” piece of cloth whose strings are being pulled out. Pando Forest sprawls across 107 acres in south-central Utah between Richfield and Capitol Reef National Park, and sits within half a mile of Fish Lake. The area attracts recreational visitors who come to fish or camp and are often unaware of the unique Pando. During the research, Rogers and his colleagues also looked at the number and type of animals that visited each sampled location within Pando. The study found two types: mule deer and domestic cattle. Rogers said young trees are often eaten by mule deer. Although cattle are there for only a short period of time, they often trample young saplings. The area attracts large numbers of deer that use it as a safe haven during the hunting season. There are no wolves in the area and the numbers of black

ando Forest, the world’s second-largest organism that lives within Utah’s Fishlake National Forest, is on the verge of collapse because of human mismanagement, a study says. Pando, which means “I spread” in Latin, represents a huge grove of 47,000 identical stems growing from the roots of a single quaking-aspen tree. Oregon’s “humongous fungus” in the Malheur National Forest is the only other organism considered to be larger. To continue to live, Pando produces new sprouts that gather water and sunlight. But for the last half-century, its regrowth has decreased sharply, and scientists point to a combination of factors. Paul Rogers, director of Western Aspen Alliance, recalls seeing a deer inside the fence when he toured the grove with the U.S. Forest Service more than a decade ago. The lack of regrowth already was an issue then.

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“It is strange to think that this is all one tree, and it is exhibiting recovery or death or artificially dense areas within the same clone, and it’s all due to human management,” O’Brien says. The decades-old aerial photographs of the area offer a glimpse into the issue. For example, Rogers cites one part of the grove that had small clear cuts years ago never saw any tree growth because the deer that wander through the area snack on the off-shoots. “It’s pretty remarkable because aspen actually thrives on what we call a disturbance,” Rogers continues, “but this area died completely, and it’s because animals ate everything that came up.”

Recreation’s Side Effects

The problem, Rogers says, goes back to how people have been managing the area. He points to the difference between the state and federal management of America’s natural resources, like Pando. States are more concerned with getting short-term revenues from things such as hunting licenses, while the federal government prioritizes long-term sustainability. “In a general way, the federal government is charged with a long-term mission to manage the forest for a long time, but state government in Utah and other states have a very short-term vision of gaining revenues from wildlife or water or land or forest,” Rogers says. “It’s an agricultural model versus ecosystem sustainability model, and it’s a big conflict.” While aspen clones are facing problems in several other states, and across the globe, Rogers says one issue is unique to Pando.

“There’s something specific to this area … the amount of recreation. There are homes within this grove and there is a campground within this grove,” he says. “Those things add further complication because even if we wanted to reduce the numbers of animals, it makes it more difficult because we have to do it safely because there are people around.” U.S. Forest Service allows ranchers to graze their cattle inside Pando for about two weeks every year, the study notes. Until recently, the agency hasn’t allocated any money toward resolving the problem. Its office in Loa, which supervises the Fishlake National Forest, didn’t return multiple requests for comment. Just how big is the problem? “We do know that that forest has been around for centuries, and likely several millennia, but we don’t know how many. But now, suddenly, in 50 years, it’s coming apart and dying,” Rogers warns. “This directly points a finger back at our ability or inability to live compatibly with our Earth.”

No Easy Fix

Following the report, officials want to work out a solution to prevent Pando from dying off, but the path won’t be easy because of the competing goals and opinions from the multiple interested parties. The meeting between U.S. Forest Service, and various stakeholders including ranchers, scientists and conservationists, was moved from December to early March. Rogers, an adjunct associate professor at Wildland Resources and Ecology Center at Utah State Univer-

MARK MUIR VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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KEN LUND

Utah’s Pando Forest attracts deer, cattle and humans alike, but is in danger of collapsing.

sity, says there’s no quick fix other than putting up a fence to block animals. The long-term question, he thinks, is the management of deer and cattle and how to keep them moving around the area. “I think it’s going to be difficult to do, to be honest,” he says. “A lot of rural people think we are trying to put them out of business, and in this case, we are not. We just need to have people compromise and alter things a little bit. If everybody adjusts a little bit, we can hopefully make some progress.” Aspens support a high level of biodiversity—including water in the form springs and streams, a variety of insects, including butterflies, and an array of animals—and Rogers expects grave consequences if Pando clone disappears. Other than riparian areas, it is the most biodiverse forest in the West thanks to its shade and moist soil. “It could come to a point where you have a large collapse in just a few years, and I expect it could be as little as 10 to 20 years, if we don’t get this situation straightened out,” he says. O’Brien, meanwhile, says that in addition to fencing, she wants to put up signs to educate the public about Pando clone and explain where young aspens are. “We want to talk signage and education process … and [ask] what their plans are for the parts of Pando clone that are not fenced at all. All these things will be on the table,” she said. While ranchers, conservation groups and federal agencies differ in opinion, Rogers hopes a consensus is reached. “That’s the human part that is difficult, and we can’t fix that in six months or a year,” he says. “We have to work on it long-term.” CW


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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, MARCH 7-13, 2019

PEGGY SIROTA

COLETTE A. FINNEY

MAGNUS HASTINGS

Complete listings at cityweekly.net

THURSDAY 3/7

THURSDAY 3/7

FRIDAY 3/8

During a month intended for huddling inside, it would take something extraordinary to draw art lovers out into the frigid weather. So, layer on the sweaters, because Art Access Gallery has an exhibition that burns with intensity. Frequently offering cutting-edge themes, the gallery tackles a subject matter not regularly discussed. While chronic illnesses often are referred to as “invisible” because the effects aren’t always outwardly evident, Invisible chronicles that experience from the perspective of artists Katie Benson and Betsy Auwerda (pictured). “Hidden disabilities are so misunderstood,” Art Access executive director Shandra Benito says. “We feel like we are telling an incomplete story if we don’t include artwork which brings their unique challenges to light.” Creating grace out of destruction requires a unique artistic mindset. Manipulating personal scans with cyanotype printmaking is just one of the techniques Auwerda uses to transform clinical images into a relatable experience. “I wanted to turn something that made me blue into something that was bright and beautiful,” Auwerda says. Similarly, Benson uses various media to portray the devastating effects of the challenges she faces daily, such as with the carefully stitched wall hanging “Energy Levels.” With their storytelling artistry, these longtime sufferers of invisible maladies hope to serve as voices of validation for others who also feel unseen by bringing greater awareness to this concealed, yet common, experience. Invisible is showing in the main gallery adjacent to Our (un)Natural World, a mixed-media presentation by seven artists reflecting on the erratic relationship between humans and the environment. (Colette A. Finney) Invisible @ Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through March 8, accessart.org

Artistic inspiration can come from anywhere, and for Katya Zamolodchikova—née Brian Joseph McCook—it came from a Russian gymnast, a professor at a Massachusetts art college and comedians Maria Bamford and Amy Sedaris, who all lit the fuse that created the stunning drag queen that is Katya. The character “is based on this Russian teacher I had, never leaving the house without a full face of makeup, six-inch stilettos in the snow,” McCook told RuPaul. Katya first garnered attention on Ru Paul’s Drag Race Season 7, instantly becoming a fan favorite with her Russian accent and Sovietthemed runway looks, thus winning the title Miss Congeniality. Then came UNHhhh, the web series fronted by Katya and BFF Trixie Mattel filled with genuine talks on topics ranging from heartbreak to hygiene, leading to The Trixie & Katya Show on Viceland in 2017. But all fame comes with a dark side, one that Katya has been open and honest about. Staying sober in the party scene of drag has proven to be a fight, but she’s not giving up. “I needed to take a little break,” she stated via a YouTube vlog after a year-long hiatus, but now she’s refreshed and ready to take on the world, KGB-style. The queen is even considering changing the title of her show. “Help Me I’m Dying will likely be re-titled, mostly due to the fact that I am no longer dying. I can’t wait for you to see it,” Katya tweeted to her fans last year. America’s favorite Soviet wench has returned, and in the age of Putin, Trump and Russian interference, who knew all America really needed was a self-proclaimed “high-class Russian whore” come to life to help the country forget about our woes for a night. (Rachelle Fernandez) Katya Zamolodchikova @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 801-528-9197, March 7, 8 p.m. $40-$75, thecomplexslc.com

With his everyman persona and unflinching perspective on the frustrations of daily living, Sebastian Maniscalco resembles the guy next door—if the guy next door threatened to punch your lights out. Abrupt and abrasive, Maniscalco specializes in observational humor spawned from family foolishness and common absurdities. Lauded by Billboard as its “Comedian of the Year,” he was the first to achieve that singular status. He not only sold out five consecutive shows at New York’s famed Radio City Music Hall, but also pulled off a four-show run at Madison Square Garden, setting a sales record in the process. He also posted the highest Billboard Boxscore gross for a comedian on tour in North America, raking in $8.3 million in ticket sales and boasting an attendance record of 72,960. Maniscalco’s achievements don’t stop there. His book Stay Hungry—also the title of his current tour—is a best-seller. In addition, he’s made his mark in movies with a role in the Oscarand Golden Globe-winning Green Book, as well as a part in Martin Scorsese’s upcoming film The Irishman with Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci. How does he do it? “I don’t write any jokes,” he says via email. “All the material is performed onstage, recorded and then tweaked onstage. I will begin with an idea and then add and subtract to the idea based on my analysis of the recording.” What a perfectionist. Credit him with an ability to lampoon the ludicrous. (Lee Zimmerman) Sebastian Maniscalco @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, March 8, 7 p.m., $39.75-$59.75, artsaltlake.org

Art Access Gallery: Invisible

Katya Zamolodchikova

CASSIDY DUHON

ESSENTIALS

the

Sebastian Maniscalco

SUNDAY 3/10

NOVA Chamber Music: Odyssey NOVA Chamber Music invites audiences to leave Utah behind and start on an unfamiliar musical journey with Odyssey. The evening’s four pieces play with the idea of travel in different ways. The performance starts with “Bach Shards,” “East Wind” and “Lyre of Orpheus,” composed by Pulitzer Prize-winner Shulamit Ran. The evening closes with Steve Reich’s “Different Trains,” a groundbreaking piece that combines instruments and tape recordings to create melodies that commemorate victims of the Holocaust. Both composers are Jewish, and their heritage greatly influences their work. Madeline Adkins, music director and performer in the show, says she chose these pieces because she wanted to celebrate a greater diversity of composers. “As a classical musician, a lot of the time our bread and butter is, they call it ‘dead white-guy music’—dead European composers from the 18th and 19th century,” Adkins says. “I was curious to just dig and discover a lot more composers I wasn’t familiar with.” Adkins (pictured) says while trained musicians often become familiar with Reich in music school, Ran remains more obscure, and her work is underperformed. The chance for people to hear her work is what Adkins says she’s most excited for. “A lot of people come to concerts because they’re familiar with the music and they know of it,” Adkins says. “But Shulamit Ran’s music deserves to be heard.” Odyssey is the second of NOVA’s gallery series this season. Adkins says the smaller theater creates a uniquely intimate experience, as the audience and instruments are very near one another. (Kylee Ehmann) NOVA Chamber Music: Odyssey @ 15th Street Gallery, 1519 S. 1500 E., 801-463-5223, March 10, 3-5:30 p.m., $25, novaslc.org


Artists First

Urban Arts Gallery lets the creative spirit guide their exhibit themes. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

SLC Cityscape by Vinny DiGirolamo

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March 15th Carver Lewis

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Urban Arts Gallery 116 S. Rio Grande St. Through Sunday, March 31 Gallery stroll reception Friday, March 15, 6-9 p.m. urbanartsgallery.org

March 8th

ART ELEVATED

Come and enjoy a great night of Country Music.

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might do portraiture, or more traditional oil paintings. We kind of allow ourselves some flexibility. If it’s a nice landscape of a mountain, it could be a good fit for a Utah-themed show, even if that’s not what the artist had in mind when they were making it.” Tuckfield acknowledges that such an approach presents challenges for a curator. “Sometimes I’d definitely prefer to know ahead of time [what the theme will be],” he says. “But if it turns out for some reason, 10 or 20 artists are doing work on a certain theme, that’s a creative thing that’s percolating. … We get to see what artists are doing out of their own inspiration, instead of them giving us what they think we want to see. We see a lot of interesting, really fringe-y art that way, that might be part of a more curated process.” Included among the pieces in Art Elevated are representations of the trademark arches of Southern Utah, but in styles varying between surrealism and abstraction. Other artists look critically at current politics, while there are also earnest depictions of iconography from Mormon scripture. For Tuckfield, it was important to present an exhibition that did not slant toward only one perspective on the state. “I really want to be careful, because I don’t want my own opinions necessarily to dominate what the artists get to say,” Tuckfield says. “I’d rather have a space, and let the natural diversity of voices take center stage.” Fortunately for Tuckfield, that diversity comes as part of the territory in a show where the artists can create without rigid guidelines. It might be a bit more work for a curator, but the results can be liberating for those who create the work, as well as those who get a chance to experience them. “I have art delivered, and sometimes that’s what I have to work with,” Tuckfield says. “Because of our mission of trying to be very inclusive, we get those more radical pieces and artists—weird and interesting new things—in addition to some established pros. Most of the time, that sort of diversity—when I’m really fortunate— just kind of unfolds naturally.” CW

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W

hen a gallery builds a group show around a theme, it’s usually the theme that comes first: A curator or gallery manager develops a concept, then puts out a call to artists to submit work addressing that theme. Urban Arts Gallery, however, looks at things from a slightly different perspective. They want artists’ creative impulses to dictate themes, rather than vice-versa. The new exhibition Art Elevated is just one manifestation of that unique approach, according to Urban Arts Gallery curator and gallery manager Scott Tuckfield. This show—representing between 80 and 100 pieces by 19 participating artists—finds the creators exploring ideas surrounding living in Utah, from its unique geography to its social and political climate. But Urban Arts Gallery never specifically asked those artists to create works about Utah; they simply saw that’s what artists were doing. That recognition came as part of the gallery’s annual open call at the end of the calendar year for submissions of any kind, about any subject. While some shows at the gallery—like the May Star Wars–themed show or the September skate deck show— have become annual fixtures, other monthly exhibitions emerge from the work Tuckfield receives. “We see what they’re doing, and there are always common themes that emerge,” Tuckfield says. “Maybe, for example, female artists are exploring feminist themes. So we’ll take all of those artists … and put together things that fit. And we noticed a lot of things that were commenting on the sense of being in or from Utah.” Because Urban Arts Gallery has established relationships with artists over the years, many participants recur from one year to the next. “Some [artists] have a very particular style, so we know he or she might be just right for the Star Wars show, or the fantasy show,” Tuckfield says. “Or someone

A&E COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

VISUAL ART


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18 | MARCH 7, 2019

moreESSENTIALS

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

The diva drought is over! Jason CoZmo and the rest of the Viva La Diva crew are back starting Friday, March 8, at new home Metro Music Hall ( 615 W. 100 South, 385-528-0952, thevivaladivashow.com).

PERFORMANCE

LITERATURE

THEATER

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

An American in Paris Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Apr. 6, hct.org The Cake Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through March 10, saltlakeactingcompany.org The Christians Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, through March 9, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu An Evening With Two Awful Men Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through April 7, planbtheatre.org A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 16, hct.org Hedwig and the Angry Inch An Other Theater Co., 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through March 23, anothertheatercompany.com Mama Mia! The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, through March 16, theziegfeldtheater.com Men On Boats Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, through March 10, tickets.utah.edu Mozart’s The Magic Flute Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through March 17, artsaltlake.org Newsies Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, through April 20, haletheater.org Wait! Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through March 9, artsaltlake.org

DANCE

Odyssey Dance Theatre: Shut Up And Dance Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, through March 10, odysseydance.com Ring Around the Rose: Samba Fogo Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, March 9, 11 a.m., artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Cedric Pescia Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, March 8, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org NOVA Chamber Music: Odyssey 15th Street Gallery, 1519 S. 1500 East, March 10, 3-5:30 p.m., novaslc.org (see p. 16) Utah Philharmonia: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6 Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, March 7, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

COMEDY & IMPROV

Comedy Church with Greg Kyte Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, March 10, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Dry Bar Comedy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, March 8-9, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Eric Andre Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, March 8-9, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus and Guy Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, March 8, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Open Mic Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Paul Sheffield Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, March 9, 7 & 9 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Sebastian Maniscalco Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, March 8, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 16)

LGBTQ

Katya Zamolodchikova The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, March 7, 8 p.m., thecomplexslc.com (see p. 16) Qpid’s Ball Youth Dance Horizonte Instruction Center, 1234 S. Main St., March 8, 6-9 p.m., utahpridecenter.org The Viva La Diva Show Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, March 8-9, 6:30 p.m.; March 10, noon, metromusichall.com (see above left)

Rachael Robie: Sisters in Sorrow The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 7, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Edward Lueders: The Salt Lake Papers: From the Years in the Earthscapes of Utah Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, March 8, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jody Genessy: 100 Things Jazz Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 8, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Kathryn E. Jones: Mooseberry Mooseberry Gooseberry Pie! Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, March 9, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Crystal Smith: Bloodleaf The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 11, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Peter Heller: The River The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 12, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Pam Houston: Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 13, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Christine M. Durham, Retired Justice of the Utah Supreme Court Marriott Library, 195 S. 1500 East, March 7, 7 p.m., utah.edu/events Gabby Rivera: Inspiring Radical Creativity Olpin University Union, 200 S. Central Campus Drive, March 7, noon, utah.edu/events Jade Phoenix Martinez: Say Her Name: Transgender Women & Transgender Women of Color College of Social Work, 395 S. 1500 East, March 7, 6 p.m., utah.edu/events

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Art Elevated Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through March 31, urbanartsgallery.org (see p. 17) For the Love of Fiber Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 24, culturalcelebration.org Katie Benson & Betsy Auwerda: Invisible Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through March 8, accessart.org (see p. 16) Lenka Clayton: Under These Conditions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 11, utahmoca.org Maynard Dixon: High Desert David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, through April 5, daviddeefinearts.com Mike Simi: Gettin’ By UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 11, utahmoca.org Nicholas Coley A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through April 20, agalleryonline.com Our (un)Natural World Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through March 8, accessart.org Ecaterina Leonte: Planet Ocean AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through April 11, slcpl.org (see this page) The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 26, umfa.utah.edu Shady Acres UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 25, utahmoca.org Utah’s 15 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through March 8, artistsofutah.org Wendy Wischer & Jeffrey Moore: Displacing Vibrations Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, through April 5


Murray’s Mr. Charlie’s Chicken Fingers is kid-tested, Post Malone-approved. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Best bet: The chicken finger plate Can’t miss: That sauce—get as much as you can

MARCH 7, 2019 | 19

Southern take on fried chicken. Business has been booming ever since. Now, if you’re the type of person who feels one chicken

| CITY WEEKLY |

It’s owned and operated by Bartley Melton and Cody Hilliard, two Alabama natives who moved to Utah and soon after began missing the

and let the flavor of all that freerange chicken take center stage. Forget all that bullshit about how everything tastes like chicken. Like most things in this world that get a bad rap, chicken just needs a little tender lovin’ care for folks to see how special it really is. That, my friends, is exactly what you get at Mr. Charlie’s. Even the grilled chicken, which typically pales in comparison to its fried counterparts, is worth getting—it’s juicy and well-seasoned, but restrained enough for its natural sweetness to shine. While I think the fingers on their own slightly edge out the sandwiches, anyone who has even a passing fondness for chicken fingers needs to check this place out. They’re the only thing on the menu, so the guys at Mr. Charlie’s have had plenty of practice honing their craft—and perfecting that delectable sauce. CW

A

s soon as I saw Mr. Charlie’s Chicken Fingers (554 W. 4500 South, 801-803-9486, mrcharlieschickenfingers.com) trending on my Instagram feed, I figured we’d become friends. The name alone is a bit of marketing genius—it’s simple, evocative, and the alliterative “ch ch” rolls off the tongue as if it were conceived by a Tarantino-esque screenwriter. Saying it out loud scares up a chuckle, and all that golden, fried chicken-finger goodness on their meticulously curated Instagram account has a way of luring curious diners to their door. I’ve visited a few times since it opened, and I’ve only seen long lines and happy customers—my family and I happened to be there on the same night that rapper and occasional Utah resident Post Malone visited the place.

thick slice of buttered toast. For those looking to keep their hands free of tasty chicken grease, Mr. Charlie’s also whips up sandwiches ($7 with fries; $5.50 sans) which put three of their famous fingers on a buttered bun topped with shredded lettuce. It’s also topped with what I believe to be Mr. Charlie’s secret weapon—the mysterious, vaguely-named “sauce” that comes with each plate. As a born-and-bred Utahn, I know how important fry sauce is to our local culinary culture, but this stuff just might have our condiment of choice in its crosshairs. Its reddish-orange hue denotes a similar ketchup-and-mayo mixture, but there’s something smoky and sweet going on here. It goes perfectly with the chicken and fries and has me seriously reconsidering my relationship with fry sauce. But back to the chicken. It took me a while to figure out what makes Charlie’s so damn good, and here it is: The recipe is designed to let diners taste the chicken itself—not the breading. Don’t get me wrong, they fry these hotties in some primo batter, but it’s light enough to step aside

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DEREK CARLISLE

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Getting the Finger

finger is very much like another, I have some advice for you: First, get over yourself. Second, pay this place a visit. Their adherence to serving Red Bird chicken means they only work with cage-free, vegetarianfed poultry free of antibiotics and steroids, so you’re getting some of the best chicken around. On top of that, every order is fried up on the spot—there’s nary a heat lamp on the premises. These are only a few of the little differences that go a long way when you’re in the mood for some flavorful fried chicken. Mr. Charlie’s also sports a chalkboard wall and tons of local sports memorabilia. And the service is always bright and shiny, with a little “hon” at the end. The latter is where I was sure this place would stumble—while I’m a fan of made-to-order food, it typically takes longer to hit the table. But while a bit of a wait is in store, it’s really only as long as it takes to fry up your order, which is pretty reasonable when all is said and done. The chicken finger plate ($9.50), for example, is piping hot and served with a batch of expertly cooked crinkle-cut fries and a


BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

SLC Airport Expansion

As part of the initiative to expand Salt Lake City International Airport to accommodate the 25 million travelers who come through the state each year, global restaurateur HMSHost (hmshost.com) has been selected to satisfy our jet-setters’ dining needs. The expansion includes 12 new local and national restaurants. When all’s said and done, Shake Shack, Panera Bread and Smashburger will rub elbows with Pizzeria Limone, Bruges Belgian Bistro and Market Street Grill. The 10-year contract is valued at more than $4 million, and we’ll see these restaurants opening their doors in 2020. We’re definitely excited to share a bit of local flavor with the rest of the world.

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LOVE

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8 0 1 .2 6 6 .4 1 8 2 / HOUR S : M ON-T HU 1 1 a- 1 1 p F R I- S AT 1 1 a- 1 2 a / S UN 3 p - 1 0 p

Southern Utah Chef at SUU

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

One of the best ways to get to know what’s cooking down in Southern Utah is to meet the chefs themselves, and thanks to the Southern Utah Chef cooking classes, that’s exactly what you can do. Hosted by Southern Utah University, the year-old program kicks off on Wednesday, March 13, with chefs from Don Miguel’s Mexican Cuisine in Cedar City, followed by a preview of Southwest Technical College’s Culinary Arts Porgram on April 10 and a peek into Gather restaurant on Kolob Terrace on May 8. If you’re interested in booking a class or need more information, check out the community education page at suu.edu/siel or call 435-865-8259.

Barrio SLC Opens

900 South is getting yet another tasty addition to its already impressive roster of restaurants—Barrio SLC (282 E. 900 South, 801-613-2251, barrioslc.com) is a new taquería-and-tequila joint that aims to heat things up a bit. The pride of their menu is cochinita pibil, a traditional style of Yucatán pork that has been roasted in banana leaves, Seville oranges, cinnamon and clove. They’re also not messing around with their arrachera, made from Snake River Farms wagyu steak. In addition to their stellar taco menu, Barrio also has a well-stocked tequila bar, and their margarita menu looks like it’s getting a jump start on the toasty summer to come. Quote of the Week: “A little tequila, sunshine and tacos never hurt anybody.” —Matthew McConaughey Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Celebrat i

25

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20 | MARCH 7, 2019

Food You Will

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ninth & ninth 254 south main


Berry Delicious

Beer and berries make for a timeless combo. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

B

takes its cue from the raspberries. There doesn’t seem to be any real hop bitterness. The 4 percent alcohol is well concealed and doesn’t really contribute to the flavor. The raspberry becomes more pronounced as it warms. The mouthfeel is on the light side, with the creamy nitrogen gas making it rounder. It has a medium-long finish that begins as the chocolate and roasted malt recede further into the background, leaving the raspberry, with a light sweetness and touch of tartness that slowly follow. Finally, there is again some dark-roasted bitterness that becomes tinged with a dry hint of the rasp-

berry in the back of the palate. Overall: This is a very well-made beer that I’m very much enjoying, and one I certainly expect to have again. If you think you might enjoy chocolate-covered raspberries, but don’t like too-sweet treats, this is recommended. The Raspberry Coco Stout originated out of Squatters’ SLC brewpub but can be found at the majority of Squatters Pub and Wasatch Brewery locations that offer a nitro tap. The higher ABV of Roosters’ Blackberry Cream relegates it to Roosters’ new B Street Brewery in Ogden. It’s definitely worth the trek. As always, cheers! CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

erries have been part of making beer since there have been ... well, berries and beer. The techniques might have changed over the years, but not the love for these sturdy vine fruits. Here are some nice examples of berry-forward ales that are contemporary without ignoring tradition. Roosters Brewing Co. Blackberry Cream: The beer is copper-gold and slightly hazy, with berry-infused hues. Two fingers of fizzy head sit atop but diminish fairly quickly. The blackberry aromas are fairly subtle, but not any less subtle than most other flavors that could be screaming out to my nose here. The hops and malts are blended well, but the berry is the dominating aroma. Once on the tongue, blackberry

sweetness and doughy malts show first. The flavors complement each other pretty well and form a balance of sweet versus bitter that goes back and forth throughout. The blackberry is easy to find but subtle, and the entire beer is very light to the taste. I can’t tell whether the flavor is real or artificial, but overall, it tastes fine. The carbonation is slightly above average, but not overwhelming. The beer runs medium crisp and is lightly thin. The blackberry finish only grows more intense, and the tart bitterness of the beer leaves the palate dry. Overall: I kind of liked the opposites in the nose and taste, and I’m OK with the overly obvious berry flavors and smells. I think if the title of a beer specifies an ingredient, that ingredient should be obvious. All in all, this is a very drinkable beer—especially as a 6 percent alcohol spring sipper. Squatters Raspberry Coco Stout: This beer was poured from a nitrogen tap at the Utah Brewers Cooperative. It’s got a rich dark brown hue that looks black. Atop are a tight two fingers of light tan head that have a lot of resilience. The aromas include chocolate with a very subtle raspberry blend up front. The flavors are much as expected from the nose, but with chocolate up front, backed up by a restrained use of raspberries. There’s also a light touch of roasted malt and bitterness from the roast. Mingled into the flavor is some fruity tartness that

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

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Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

Twisted Fern

The brainchild of local chef Adam Ross—formerly the head chef at Park City’s Bistro 412—Twisted Fern offers many options for gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan diners, and its seasonal variety keeps things interesting throughout the year. Chef Ross is a fan of reinterpreting comfort-food staples; fried Brussels sprouts ($10) are ubiquitous at contemporary American places, but the huckleberry vinaigrette and apple butter are nice touches. The shorty melt ($16)—an open-faced take on the classic Reuben—was the winner of the evening; the vinegary goodness of the pickles and sauerkraut play well with the creamy, housemade Thousand Island dressing. The braised short rib melts in the mouth, and the chef gets props for adding a fried egg to a Reuben sandwich. I loved the concept of the chicken fried Portobello mushroom ($17) a bit more than I did the execution, but it’s a truly inspired idea. Outside of an overzealous front-of-house experience and a few flat notes when it came to seasoning and execution, Twisted Fern remains a great option for Park City dining that’s blissfully removed from more high-traffic areas. Reviewed Jan. 31. 1300 Snow Creek Drive, Ste. RS, Park City, 435-731-8238, twistedfern.com PRESENTS:

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

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The Record That Changed Me

7 local music power players reflect on the tunes that defined them. BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

“W

ithout music, life would be a mistake.” So said philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche way back in the late 1800s. Such a strong statement still rings true, however—perhaps even more so—in this musicsaturated day and time. City Weekly asked seven local music power players to dig into the past and remember the records that changed them 10, 20, 30, even 40 years ago—ranging from Siouxsie to Steely Dan—that opened up their world, and in one case, led a wayward youth to abandon his carnie dreams.

André “DJ Bad Hair Day” Adams of the Flight89 podcast

www.theroyalslc.com

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Darin Piccoli, co-owner of The State Room, The Commonwealth Room, O.P. Rockwell and First Tracks Entertainment

“You got me digging for sure. There are so many influential albums it’s hard to remember or pick one! But as I poured through them last week in the office, I got stuck on three. First, The Isley Brothers’ Givin’ it Back, a great album of their funky take on classics, including a great version of ‘Ohio.’ Second, Steely Dan’s Aja—’nuff said. But the first album I purchased was Peter Frampton’s Frampton Comes Alive! I’m pretty sure I got it solely for ‘Do You Feel Like We Do,’ but the pink vinyl was the closer. I remember hearing that song on the radio; having never heard the guitar talk box before, I was blown away.”

Reggae

Thursday 3/7

at the Royal

Corey Cresswell, DJ, assistant electrician at Ballet West and co-founder of International Society of Rock ’n’ Roll

“Rocket to Russia by The Ramones—that’s the record! It was the sound I was looking for as a young man just getting into music and searching for something to get me going. Nothing was hitting until I heard that record. It set the path and introduced me to tons of great bands that The Ramones covered, like The Trashmen and Bobby Freeman. Later on, I moved to Phil Spector’s work. That Ramones record gets the credit for me deciding to pursue a career in the business—otherwise I was going to be a carnie! Rock ’n’ roll saves lives!”

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Live Music

Ginger and the Gents People of the Sun

(RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE COVER BAND)

Johnny Utah TUESDAY 3/12

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

friDAY 3/15

Eugenie Hero Jaffe, KRCL on-air host, Salt Shaker producer, and web & social media manager

“In 1979, I was 8 years old and my big sister was 18. She had an expansive record collection that I was not allowed to touch. One day she drove me to Mushroom Record & Tapes and coaxed me to buy The Beatles’ Revolver, which I’m pretty sure was $6. ‘Why not Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall?’ I asked her. ‘You’ll really like this Beatles record,’ she said. ‘You should get it.’ Revolver opens with ‘Taxman’ and goes right into the crushing ‘Eleanor Rigby,’ followed by the juxtaposition of songs, from ‘Good Day Sunshine’ to ‘For No One.’ It was a pendulum swing, especially for an 8-year-old. As I listened, I dutifully wrote my name on the top right corner of the album—this one was all mine. Later, I would discover that Revolver was the only Beatles album my sister was missing from her collection. I never let go of it.” CW

coming soon 3/16 3/17 3/23 3/29 3/30 4/2 5/3

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MARCH 7, 2019 | 23

“In middle school, my friends’ older, cooler siblings exposed us to the vivid electro-pop of Depeche Mode, which gained the English band a devout new following. I spent a summer devouring 101, when my world turned Technicolor after a penny I taped to a BMG Music Service ad delivered Depeche Mode’s Violator to my door. Everything about that seminal album crystallized my interest in electronic music, remix culture and design as I was coming of age in the middle of Idaho.”

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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Jesse Walker, DJ, designer, producer, and New City Movement co-founder

4760 S 900 E, SLC

“As a young black youth in the ’90s, chaos was everywhere. I’m talking drugs, domestic violence between my parents, homelessness and the death of my best friend Rosie Tapia. But through that chaos I found the record that changed me. ‘Breakadawn’ by illustrious hip-hop group De La Soul really was the spark that gave me hope for a new day where chaos wasn’t the focus of my life—rather just more pages in my book.”

“I had been working at my desk one day in the spring and somehow a track from The Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd played. I had heard the album before, but in this moment I fell into a daze, stopped what I was doing and played the record from track one. I suppose the journey of it is what moved me. I sat motionless for the entirety of the record and at its end, I wept. There can be no transcendence of light without the depth of darkness, and that depth shook me.”

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“Confession: Back in the ’80s, I was a teenage disc jockey. Everything ‘new wave’ or ‘postmodern’ was the soundtrack to my life and work. From the moment I heard ‘Spellbound,’ I was all in for Siouxsie and The Banshees, a woman-fronted band, which gave me the idea I might be able to do it, too. And I did.”

Sarah DeGraw, singer-songwriter and The Odd Jobs bandleader

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Lara Jones, KRCL community content manager and executive producer of RadioActive

MUSIC


2106 W. North Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah 801-741-1188

10% off for military, firefighters and law enforcement

BY HOWARD HARDEE, KEITH L. McDONALD & LEE ZIMMERMAN

Noname, Elton.

27-year-old Chicago native Fatimah Warner, better known as Noname, has been rapping and performing slam poetry since 2010. The rapper with no certain title made quite the reputation for herself in 2018, capitalizing on a buzz stemming from her debut album, Telefone, which had fans waiting nearly three years to check into Room 25, which was released in September to rave reviews. For those of you who aren’t familiar, Room 25 features Noname’s signature smooth monotone vocals, mature yet playful content and sharp wit over rich live instrumental sound beds. The 11-track project features fellow artists like Smino, Saba, Rayvn Lenae, Phoelix, Adam Ness and others. Most listeners first discovered Noname in 2013 due to her affiliation with fellow Chicagoan Chance the Rapper and his monumental mixtape Acid Rap. Although her political and financial aspirations might not line up with someone who is doing Doritos and Kit Kat commercials, Noname actually has the chance to surpass Chance musically. She’s slayed NPR, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and a Boiler Room live set in Cape Town, seemingly priming herself to carve out a lane in a genre thirsty for female voices and experiences. Although some traditionalists might not appreciate her spoken word-like cadence, mellow delivery and layered lyrics, fans of Kendrick Lamar, Sa-Roc, Tobe Nwigwe and Brother Ali can definitely find space for Noname in their playlists. Open yourself up to the music before her moniker becomes even more ironic. (Keith L. McDonald) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $22, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

FRIDAY 3/8

The African Children’s Choir

There’s nothing quite as enchanting as the voices of children joined in harmony, creating a sound that warms even the coldest heart. It’s little surprise, then, that The African Children’s

The African Children’s Choir

CHANTAL ANDERSON

Never a cover charge

THURSDAY 3/7

Choir has inspired such enduring sentiment in a world where fear and mistrust tend to be so pervasive. The remarkable expression embodied by this group of young people—many of whom have been impacted by war, famine and deprivation—offers hope for us all as they share their voices with audiences around the world. Like most great ideas, the concept of the choir originated from a chance encounter. Ray Barnett was on a humanitarian trip to Uganda when he offered a ride to a small boy seeking refuge from his war-torn village. The boy began to sing during their journey, and it gave Barnett the idea of creating a choir that would offer an opportunity to save lives, raise funds that could help other children in need and support the choir members themselves with other essentials. An album of traditional hymns performed with African arrangements is due soon, but in the meantime, experiencing these angelic voices in person offers an opportunity to enjoy an experience that resonates. (Lee Zimmerman) Calvary Baptist Church, 1090 S. State, 7 p.m., free, all ages, 801-3551025, africanchildrenschoir.com

SATURDAY 3/9

Joshua James, Andrew Goldring

Folk singer and string-picker Joshua James has been writing dark songs about heartland America for a little over a decade. Originally from Lincoln, Neb., and now based in American Fork, where he owns a farm

Noname he’s dubbed Willamette Mountain, James is known for his stark, moody and atmospheric style—and for singing with a scratchy and highly emotive voice. The ex-Mormon weaves themes of spirituality, love and overcoming life’s dark and difficult times throughout his catalog, which occasionally gets aggressively amplified enough to be considered Southern rock. Some of his most poignant songwriting to date has come in the form of a collaboration with country/folk singer Timmy the Teeth, who also hails from American Fork. In 2016, the pair released a single-shot music video for the song “Old Best Friend” in which they sing along to an old-school boombox and ride bicycles through the twilight on the Murdock Canal Trail near Pleasant Grove. James sounds like a Midwesterner plucked off the porch of a general store during the Great Depression and dropped into the 21st century as he sings, “Running around with a child’s mind/ A man gets only a couple of times.” On his next verse, he shares more hardscrabble, bourbon-soaked wisdom: “From Salt Lake City to the upstate town/ A man either learns to swim or he learns to drown.” This is real-deal Americana, folks, based right here in Utah. (Howard Hardee) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Joshua James

JAKE BUNTJER

Half Price Wings

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24 | MARCH 7, 2019

St. Patty’s Day

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BRENDAN WALTER

Whiskey........ like liquid Sunshine

TUESDAY 3/12

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, Flor, Grizfolk

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 3.6 JOHN DAVIS

3.7 CHRISTIAN MILLS

3.8 THE PRANKSTERS

3.9 CROOK AND THE BLUFF

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness is the solo project of the former frontman and piano player for alt-rock bands Something Corporate and Jack’s Mannequin. Always known for their intimate lyrics, McMahon’s songs explored such deeply personal themes as breaking up with a long-term girlfriend and his life following a 2005 leukemia diagnosis. And he’s kept things personal since debuting as an indie-electro artist nearly seven years ago. The lead single “Cecilia and the Satellite” from McMahon’s self-titled debut album is addressed to his daughter, Cecilia, and the song’s plainspoken lyrics about protecting her as she grows up—and as he navigates his own changing perspective on life—are genuinely touching. The song nearly topped Billboard’s alternative, rock and pop charts in 2014 and remains In the Wilderness’ biggest hit to date. But all too often, McMahon’s lyrics land too squarely on the nose. Nothing’s really up for interpretation on “Ohio”: “And my sister slept/ As we started the drive/ To California, where it’s warmer/ Gonna start a new life.” Later, he sings, “Everything’s gonna be better on the West Coast/ Better than the mess that we left back home.” Yes, McMahon’s heartfelt and introspective piano ballads range from highly impactful to a bit too mushy—even maudlin, like they’re overtly designed to punch you in the feels. But at least we’re sure he means it. A pair of Los Angeles-based bands also performs: polished indie-rockers Flor, and Grizfolk, a five-piece group with folk and electronic influences. (HH) The Depot, 13 N. 400

Cody Canada & The Departed 3.11 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

Andrew McMahon

West, 6 p.m. $33 presale; $38 day of show, all ages, depotslc.com

Cody Canada & The Departed, Micky & The Motorcars

We’d have to call this a perfect pairing: Two rock ’n’ roll bands with descriptive handles. Well, almost. Although Cody Canada was the chief instigator of a popular band called Cross Canadian Ragweed, he’s, umm, not Canadian. Instead, he was born in a little town in Texas. Still, having a name that identifies with the nation to our north isn’t necessarily a bad thing. (We’re still allies, after all.) Likewise, with a sound that evokes the grit and bluster of hardcore country and the relentless rhythm of rock ’n’ roll, it’s doubtful anyone would think twice about questioning his credentials. A taut, top-notch trio, Cody Canada & The Departed stir their audiences with fist-pumping fury and edgy, anthemic might. For their part, Micky & The Motorcars boast an unabashed bravado of their own. It’s little wonder: Founding members Micky and Gary Braun sourced their talent from their dad, western swing veteran Muzzie Braun, and they share the same skill sets as their brothers, Cody and Willy Braun, members of the renegade roots outfit Reckless Kelly. With both bands in tandem, we expect a night of combined flash and fury. Each outfit offers their own example of a genuine alt-country crossover, complete with heartland heroics and unrepentant outlooks. It ought to be interesting to compare both amplitude and attitude. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroompresents.com

3.17 MATT CALDER

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

SHANNON CANADA

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MARCH 7, 2019 | 27


WEDNESDAY 3/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Andrew Marlin and Emily Frantz, best known as the Americana duo Mandolin Orange, create a sound that reflects a traditional template, echoing an approach both tender and timeless. Like others of their ilk—The Milk Carton Kids, Shovels & Rope and Over the Rhine—they evoke a stoic sensibility by blending richness and reserve. Those sweeping sentiments are conveyed through intricate arrangements and emotion, though one never overshadows the other. The duo’s wonderful new album, Tides of a Teardrop, demonstrates their ability to strike an immediate connection; it even debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart in multiple Americana categories. Granted, Mandolin Orange’s precious pastiche sometimes makes it necessary to lean in and listen, but the resulting rewards are well worth the indulgence. The arrangements are built around vintage instrumentation—the pluck and strum of guitar, banjo, fiddle and mandolin—but more importantly, the songs stroke the heartstrings with sweetness and sincerity. It’s not surprising that after six albums and a touring regimen that’s made them festival favorites, Mandolin Orange represent a new breed of folkie troubadours, eager to please all those partial to patchouli, incense and down-home designs. Cynics, stay home. Everyone else, prepare to embrace the emotion. (Lee Zimmerman) The Commonwealth Room, 195 W. Commonwealth Ave., 8 p.m., sold out as of press time, 21+, thestateroompresents.com

28 | MARCH 7, 2019

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KENDALL BAILEY

Mandolin Orange, Martha Scanlan

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RED HEADED STEP TWINS, PAIGE MCINNIS. THE SALT LAKE WHALEFISHERS, SWAGGER

RED HEADED STEP TWINS, SWAGGER, MURPHY & THE GIANT

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THE KOTTER PROJECT

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CARRIE MYERS, TAIL LIGHT REBELLION, MURPHY & THE GIANT

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7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • ICEHAUS.COM

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MARCH 7, 2019 | 29

2550 WASHINGTON BLVD. OGDEN 801.621.3483 | FUNKANDDIVE.COM

751 N. 300 W.

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MURPHY & THE GIANT, TAIL LIGHT REBELLION

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SWAGGER


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30 | MARCH 7, 2019

JINYA RAMEN BAR

NICK McGREGOR

BAR FLY

THURSDAY 3/7 LIVE MUSIC

Alpine Loop + Untamed Engine + Footlight Parade (Velour) B.D. Howes Band (The Corner Store) The Backyard Revival (Rye) Blessed + Pillars + Emma Park (The Underground) Brasstracks + Kemba (Metro Music Hall) The Coathangers + SadGirl + The Ghost Dance (Kilby Court) Christian Mills (Hog Wallow Pub) J.R. Richards (Liquid Joe’s) Max Frost + Mikey Mike (The State Room) Noname + Elton. (The Complex) see p. 24 Red Bull Play & Destroy (Urban Lounge) Ryan Innes (Lake Effect) Sarah Brightman + Vincent Niclo (Kingsbury Hall) Zepparella (Commonwealth Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos: South & Jordan (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Haywyre (Soundwell) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) RE:FINE (Downstairs) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Valentino Khan (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Night (Tinwell) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck w/ Mikey Danger (Chakra Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 3/8 LIVE MUSIC

The African Children’s Choir (Calvary Baptist Church) see p. 24 Better Days + DJ Noiz + Donel Lewis + Kennyon Brown + David Rhythm + Mo Musiq (The Complex) Blazin’ Aces (Outlaw Saloon)

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP

What’s a ramen place doing in the BarFly column, you ask? Good question. For starters, there’s that word “bar” in Jinya’s name. Second, there are the two different adults-only seating areas inside the growing nationwide chain’s Sugar House location: one traditional bar, where patrons can watch the hustle and bustle of the hip restaurant, which includes servers hollering hello every time someone new comes in; and an intimate service bar where hungry slurpers can watch their ramen being prepared. There’s also a full list of spirits for those looking to add a kick to their tonkotsu: $15 pitchers of local drafts like Snowbird IPA and Provo Girl Pilsner, along with full-steam Japanese bottles like Kirin Ichiban and Sapporo Black and local high-point favorites like Red Rock Elephino Double IPA and Squatters Fifth Element. But the liquid highlight of my recent trip was a Suntory Toki, widely considered Japan’s finest whisky. Equal parts earthy and refreshing, it was the perfect complement to a steaming bowl of Spicy Umami Miso Ramen and a Salmon Avocado appetizer, all of which served to clear out my congested system after three days battling a bout of tonsillitis. By the time I had taken my last slurp and my last sip, the buzz surrounding both of Jinya Ramen Bar’s 21+ seating areas had abated, but that just gave me the chance to savor my place and the joy of branching out. There’s more to life than just imbibing, after all—pairing your favorite libation with a warm meal is key, too. (Nick McGregor) 675 E. 2100 South, 801-883-9466, jinya-ramenbar.com

Can’t Swim + Homesafe + Save Face + Youth Fountain (Loading Dock) Catch Fish (Gracie’s) Channel Z (Club 90) Classic Steve Schuffert (Mountain Town Music) Classic Steve Schuffert (State Road Tavern) Constellations + Skies Like Rockets (Pale Horse Sound) Crumb (Impact Hub SLC) Double Helix (Bayou) Get Lucky (Saltair) The Lovely Noughts (Garage on Beck) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Mike Rogers (Deer Valley) Mmend + Grove + Goldmyth (Velour) Nathan Spenser (Harp and Hound) Nostalgic ’90s (Gold Blood Collective) The Pranksters (Hog Wallow Pub) Peter Beckett’s Player (Egyptian Theatre) Polyrhythmics + Big Blue Ox (The State Room) Royal Bliss: Tom Petter Tribute (The Depot) VHS Collection + Strange Familia (Urban Lounge) Women in Music (Alleged)

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CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 3/9

SUNDAY 3/10

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

The Anchorage + The Holophonics + Younger Than Neil + The Gringos (The Beehive) Blazin’ Aces (Outlaw Saloon) Channel Z (Club 90) Che Zuro (Deer Valley) Companionship + Shit Dogma + Sad State of Society + Rade (Gold Blood Collective) Crook and The Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) Doobi + Krash Minati + DJ Hylyte (In the Venue) Donner Pass (The Spur) Foreign Figures + Dylan Gardener (Velour) Get Lucky (Saltair) Glass Eye (The Bayou) Joshua James + Andrew Goldring (Urban Lounge) see p. 24 Joshy Soul & The Cool (Lake Effect) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Trio (The Red Door) Matthew & The Hope (Garage on Beck) Melinda Kirigin Voss + Brian Stucki + John Sargeant (Viridian Center) Nick Passey (Handle Bar) Parrot Nation (Brewskis) Peter Beckett’s Player (Egyptian Theatre) Polyrhythmics (O.P. Rockwell) Queenadilla + Breezeway (Ice Haüs) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) SuperBubble + Funk & Gonzo + Talia Keys (The Depot) Weather + Ariana and the Rose + Overstreet (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ E-V (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Jski (The Spur) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew and JC (Tavernacle) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays w/ Schoeny (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

Black Magic Flower Power + Turtleneck Wedding Dress + Sunchaser (Metro Music Hall) Jamey Johnson (The Depot) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Lumberjack Fabulous (Legends) Moe. (Park City Live) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Peter Beckett’s Player (Egyptian Theatre) Rivers of Nihil + Entheos + Conjurer + Wolf King (Kilby Court) That 1 Guy (Urban Lounge) Will Carlisle (Garage on Beck)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Last Call w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Sunday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Nick Greco & Blues on First (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 3/11 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Carlos Medina + 4th Dimension + MUSOR (Metro Music Hall) Harry Lee & The Black Alley Blues (Lake Effect) Mansionair + Beacon (Kilby Court) Tori Kelly (Eccles Theater)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Industry Night Mondays w/ DJ Juggy (Trails) Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 3/12 LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman (The Spur) Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness +


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CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Flor + Grizfolk (The Depot) see p. 26 Cody Canada & The Departed + Micky & The Motorcars (The State Room) see p. 26 Kasadoom + Palace of Buddies + The Poppees (Urban Lounge) Mortigi Tempo + City Ghost + Bad Charm (Metro Music Hall) Phangs + Totem City + Hoppy (Loading Dock) Within Temptation + In Flames + Smash Into Pieces (The Complex)

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WEDNESDAY 3/13 LIVE MUSIC

The Backseat Lovers + Ivouries + Tate Brusa (Kilby Court)

Crucialfest Showdown feat. Bath (Metro Music Hall) Elliot & Gabriel (The Spur) Jazzy Olivo (Gallivan Center) Jukebox the Ghost + The Mowglis + Arrested Youth (The Complex) Kevyn Dern (Hog Wallow Pub) Live Jazz (Club 90) Mandolin Orange (Commonwealth Room) see p. 28 Mike Doughty + Wheatus (The State Room) New Kingston (Soundwell) Ol’ Fashion Depot (Gracie’s) William Ryan Key + Selfish Things + Cory Wells + CJ Coop (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Energi Wednesday feat. Tisoki (Sky) Industry Night (Downstairs) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) VJ Birdman on the Big Screen (Twist)

WE NEED AN ENERGETIC MUSIC EDITOR!

34 | MARCH 7, 2019

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FILM REVIEW

Family Plot

CINEMA We sell tickets!

Asghar Farhadi can’t meld his trademark humanism with potboiler mystery in Everybody Knows.

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BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

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FOCUS FEATURES

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Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem in Everybody Knows community. That’s a strangely anticlimactic stand, emotionally, for Farhadi to take, and it works against the mystery narrative as well, particularly when the resolution of it would appear to demand that there are secrets—open secrets—among these people that we are not made priv y to. The explanation about what has been going on springs from nowhere; it’s not specifically related to anything we’ve seen transpire and instead seems as if it could have been determined by a random card draw in a “Colonel Mustard in the library with a candlestick” sort of way. It’s so disappointing to see a filmmaker like Farhadi, who has been so powerfully grounded in authentic human feeling and experience in his drama before, toy with his characters the way he does here. He leaves us hanging, feeling not like we’ve lived a life with those on the screen, but instead scrambling for a connection to them at all. His mystery undermines the humanity, and his humanity undermines the mystery. It’s a sad place for us to be. CW

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BB Javier Bardem Penélope Cruz R

PAIRS WITH Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) Javier Bardem Penélope Cruz PG-13

A Separation (2011) Payman Maadi Leila Hatami PG-13

The Past (2013) Bérénice Bejo Tahar Rahim PG-13

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No Country for Old Men (2007) Josh Brolin Javier Bardem R

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EVERYBODY KNOWS

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incisive talent for plunging us into a flow of affection, bickering and intricate, inextricable relationships seems to be in fine form. If the wedding sequence doesn’t make you wish you were there partying with all these people, you might be dead inside. But from there—the wedding is early on in the film—Everybody Knows takes a turn it will never recover from. Farhadi has indulged in more “plot” this time around than he has before, but he flounders with it. It’s as if he doesn’t know quite what to do with this new situation, as if he has somehow blindsided and confounded himself with it. Something transpires at the wedding—I shan’t spoil—that morphs the film into a mystery. It’s the stuff of a melodramatic thriller, a riddle to be urgently solved and an immediate trauma to overcome. And as Farhadi attempts to meld this sudden eruption of potboiler with his usual slow-burning humanistic drama, there is little space for either cinematic impulse to be satisfied. The aftermath of the event at the wedding is the jumping-off point for profound cracks to start showing in the relationships of the people all around Laura, as family secrets bubble up to the surface and long-held resentments threaten to fracture the previous status quo. Yet there’s little that’s surprising or emotionally revelatory about anything we learn; indeed, the title of the film refers to the fact that there are few secrets among such a tight-knit group of people in such a small

tuesday, 05/28 | kilby court

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi has given us some of the most simple, most beautiful movies of recent vintage: 2017’s The Salesman, 2013’s The Past, 2011’s A Separation. His are films swelling with deep humanity, delicately wrought portraits of broken families struggling to right themselves, in which not much actually happens except our immersion in the lives of others. These are not plot-driven movies, but rather tenderly gripping exercises in coming to the realization that all families, all of us as individuals, are broken in our own ways—that there is no such thing as an unbroken human being, and that maybe we should just find a better word to describe ourselves and our families and our lives. “Works in progress,” maybe? Initially, Farhadi’s latest, Everybody Knows—his first Spanish-language film— appears on track to be much the same sort of experience. Laura (Penélope Cruz) has just returned home to her small Spanish village, after living in Buenos Aires for many years, for her sister’s wedding. Her husband hasn’t come along—work obligations have kept him home—but her two children, teen Irene (Carla Campra) and grade-schooler Diego (Iván Chavero), are having a blast with their cousins, and Laura is joyously catching up with her raucous extended family and hometown friends, who seem to comprise almost the whole village, including local winemaker Paco (Javier Bardem) and his wife, Bea (Bárbara Lennie). It’s a bit tricky keeping track of who is who and who’s related to whom and how everyone is connected, but it doesn’t matter. That’s kind of the point: that the deep, lifelong interconnections between all these people make them inseparable, reliant on one another for favors big and small in unquestioning ways. Farhadi’s exquisite,


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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36 | MARCH 7, 2019

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BIRDS OF PASSAGE BB.5 As they did in their Oscar-nominated 2015 collaboration Embrace of the Serpent, Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego take on the corruption of indigenous peoples resulting from contact with the outside world—including, apparently, too much influence by that world’s cinematic genres. The filmmakers follow the story of Rapayet (José Acosta), a Wayúu Indian of Colombia, who finances the dowry for his wife Zaida (Natalia Reyes) by beginning a marijuana distribution operation. It’s not exactly a spoiler to note that getting involved in the drug trade has consequences; the story attempts to focus on how greed and impetuousness lead these Wayúu to violate their most cherished traditions. But while the narrative rarely lingers on mere cultural anthropology, it winds up too immersed in gangland drama clichés instead of giving Rapayet a distinctive personality, with escalating vendettas leading to widespread bloodshed. Guerra and Gallego do offer some vivid imagery—notably the isolated compound Rapayet builds for his family in the middle of the desert—which at least provides a specificity of place the story can’t always manage. Opens March 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw CAPTAIN MARVEL [not yet reviewed] The origin story of a former Air Force pilot (Brie Larson) who becomes a powerful intergalactic warrior. Opens March 7 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

CLIMAX BB.5 “It’s a nightmare,” screams one character—which, frankly, is a line that could be fittingly spoken in every Gaspar Noé film. Ostensibly basing his story on a real 1996 incident, the provocateur director dives into what happens when the members of a dance company, enjoying a post-rehearsal party, discover that the communal bowl of sangria has been spiked with LSD. It takes nearly half the running time before the drugs kick in, including an intro showing the dancers’ audition interviews on a TV set, while visible VHS copies of Salo, Un Chien Andalou and Suspiria provide subtle hints as to what is to come. And Noé doesn’t skimp on the uncomfortable material, from forced miscarriage to child abuse to incest to suicide. There’s no real point to any of it, aside from a possible metaphor for French society disintegrating into suspicion and violence, but at least there’s Noé’s always-impressive ability to deliver a full-scale sensory assault: a dizzyingly layered sound design, scenes filtered through pulsing red light and a world turned literally upside-down by the end. If the goal was to cinematically simulate an acid freak-out: Mission accomplished. Opens March 8 at Tower Theatre. (R)—SR EVERYBODY KNOWS BB See review on p. 35. Opens March 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) THE KID BBB Rio Cutler (Jake Schur) and his sister Sara (Leila George) kill their psycho father and hit the prairie with their evil uncle (a surprisingly dark Chris Pratt) in hot pursuit; because this is the movies, they naturally cross paths with Billy the Kid (Dane DeHaan) while he’s on the run from Pat Garrett (Ethan Hawke). Killing ensues. For all The Kid’s faults—and there are many, including its self-serious tone, too much focus on Billy the Kid’s psychology when we’re already familiar with it, 21st century dialogue coming from 19th century mouths and not enough focus on Rio and Sara after they kick off the story—there’s plenty of good. The performances are top notch (particularly DeHaan, whose appeal I’ve never under-

stood until now, with Hawke and Pratt matching him), there’s excellent camera work, and a dark, brooding score keeps the tension high. Director and co-writer Vincent D’Onofrio, who has a small part as a sheriff, knows how to stage a gunfight, and he stages plenty of them. The Kid is a solid western. History buffs in particular will appreciate DeHaan’s first appearance on screen. Opens March 8 at Megaplex Jordan Commons. (R)—David Riedel

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BE NATURAL: THE UNTOLD STORY OF ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ At Rose Wagner Center, March 13, 7 p.m. (NR) CAPERNAUM At Park City Film Series, March 8-9, 8 p.m.; March 10, 6 p.m. (R) THE COVERED WAGON At Edison Street Events, March 7-8, 7:30 p.m. (NR) I AM NOT A WITCH At Main Library, March 12, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES APOLLO 11 BBB.5 Every frame of Todd Douglas Miller’s documentary about the NASA mission that took man to the moon is archival—and the you-are-there intensity he gets from a 50-year-old event is astonishing. Strewn throughout are wonderfully humanizing tidbits, from the crew’s quips (Michael Collins tells mission control, when his vital-sign indicators stop working, “If I stop breathing, I’ll be sure to let you know”) to photo montages reminding us that these three pioneers had childhoods, careers and families. And there are reminders of how monumental an undertaking this was, as we watch ground technicians sitting behind bank after bank of massive computers. There are certainly moments when the rapid-fire tech-

nical jargon becomes a lot to process. But it’s a terrific achievement to make the countdown to ignition feel as uncertain and fraught with consequence as if you didn’t know the outcome. (G)—SR

GRETA BB A throwback to mid-1990s “from hell” thrillers, this reminds us what was necessary for those genre entries to work on a rudimentary level. Frances (Chloë Grace Moretz) finds a lost purse on a subway and returns it to widowed Greta (Isabelle Huppert), beginning a friendship that curdles when Greta becomes obsessed with Frances. Rather than providing a slow burn of Greta’s breakdown, Greta has her go off the rails too soon, and too obviously, for anyone to doubt there’s something bad going down. That early turn does allow Huppert to go impressively bonkers, yet director Neil Jordan doesn’t take full advantage of that whacked-out performance. The script winds up too obvious and lacking in detail, making it easy to see Greta transform into a monster—a surrogate mom from hell, even—while the movie around her is barely from heck. (R)—SR

TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA FAMILY FUNERAL B The Madea franchise remains excruciating and baffling, offering viewers occasional flecks of bemusement at how misguided it is. Sassy grandma Madea, her straight-man nephew Brian and her raunchy brothers Joe and Heathrow—all played by Perry—are irrelevant observers to the main action, a family gathering at which infidelities are revealed. Most of the plot elements, which would be traumatic if played seriously, are treated as farce, but not the funny kind of farce (though Perry clearly believes he is hilarious). The dialogue sounds like it’s being made up by actors who didn’t know they’d be asked to improvise. I kept wanting to take a red pen to the screenplay and cross out lines—or entire scenes—that didn’t need to be there. The result would still have been bad, but at least it would have been shorter. (PG-13) —Eric D. Snider

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Who was the model for Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic painting Mona Lisa? Many scholars think it was Italian noblewoman Lisa del Giocondo. Leonardo wanted her to feel comfortable during the long hours she sat for him, so he hired musicians to play for her and people with mellifluous voices to read her stories. He built a musical fountain for her to gaze upon and procured a white Persian cat to cuddle. If it were within my power, I would arrange something similar for you in the coming weeks. Why? Because I’d love to see you be calmed and soothed for a concentrated period of time; to feel perfectly at ease, at home in the world, surrounded by beautiful influences you love. In my opinion, you need and deserve such a break from the everyday frenzy.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Imagine a stairway that leads nowhere; as you ascend, you realize that at the top is not a door or a hallway, but a wall. I suspect that lately you might have been dealing with a metaphorical version of an anomaly like this. But I also predict that in the coming weeks some magic will transpire that will change everything. It’s like you’ll find a button on the wall that when pushed opens a previously imperceptible door. Somehow, you’ll gain entrance through an apparent obstruction.

1. "____-a-doodle-doo!" 5. Totally destroy 10. "Stop procrastinating!" 14. French possessive 15. Outlet from the left ventricle 16. The "A" of A.D. 17. Savion Glover's forte 19. Panama's San ____ Islands 20. Weep 21. Suffix with beat or neat 22. Bottomless pit 23. Ad ____ committee 24. Pop star with the 1988 hit "Tell It to My Heart" 28. Spanish pronoun 30. "Star Wars" name 31. What's used to row, row, row your boat 32. Like family-friendly films 35. Basic trig ratio 36. FedEx rival 37. It's celebrated every April 6th in honor of Scottish heritage 40. Peaks: Abbr. 43. Bjorn with 11 Grand Slam tennis titles 44. Hall of Fame Atlanta Braves pitcher John ____ 48. ____ Speedwagon 49. Tchaikovsky ballet roles 51. Painter Cassatt 52. Publication that was once a South China Sea island's largest newspaper 56. Sponge (up) 57. "Some Like ____" 58. French word on some wedding announcements 59. One snapping a ball to the QB: Abbr. 60. Do a barista's job 61. Timing for a project's completion 65. Put on a happy face 66. Interjected 67. "A Clockwork Orange" antihero 68. Drought-stricken 69. Line that ended with Nicholas II 70. "Look what I did!" (also, look at the answers to 17-, 24-, 37-, 52- and 61-Across)

53. "Okay, I'm waiting to be impressed by your pitch" 54. English industrial city described by Dickens as "an odious place" 55. Still 61. Bit of ink 62. Annoyances in some free apps 63. Food label stat 64. "Can't Help Lovin' ____ Man" ("Show Boat" song)

Last week’s answers

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6. 1990 Stallone sequel 7. Man's name that's an investment spelled backward 8. RR stop 9. Witchy woman 10. Part of a Fred Flintstone's yell 11. 1955 hit by the Platters 12. Quickly 13. Horseshoes players 18. Aesop's "The ____ and the Grasshopper" 22. What Martin Luther King, Jr. famously had 25. Common entree at a potluck dinner 26. Role in "Thor," 2011 27. Pulls apart 29. Move low toward the horizon 33. Touches, as with a tissue 34. Unlike a child 38. Like much folk music: Abbr. 39. ____ Kippur 40. "They call me ____!" (#19 on AFI's Top 100 movie quotes) 41. Plant with fragrant leaves DOWN 42. "Yes, that news has reached 1. Yogi Berra, for one my ears ..." 2. ____ Manigault Newman, author of 2018's 45. Milan opera house "Unhinged: An Insider's Account of the Trump 46. Horsed around? White House" 47. Alternative to Risperdal, in 3. Mimic prescriptions 4. What Rick called Ilsa 50. Pink, e.g. 5. Actress Mallet of "Goldfinger"

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MARCH 7, 2019 | 37

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Not all of the classic works of great literature are entertaining. According to one survey of editors, writers, and librarians, Goethe’s Faust, Melville’s Moby Dick, and Cervantes’ Don Quixote are among the most boring masterpieces ever written. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Genius inventor Thomas Edison rebelled against sleep, which But most experts agree that they’re still valuable to read. In that he regarded as wasteful. He tried to limit his time in bed to four spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you hours per night so he would have more time to work during his to commune with other dull but meaningful things. Seek out waking hours. Genius scientist Albert Einstein had a different low-key but rich offerings. Be aware that unexciting people and approach. He preferred 10 hours of sleep per night and liked to situations might offer clues and catalysts you need. steal naps during the day, too. In my astrological opinion, Aries, you’re in a phase when it makes more sense to imitate Einstein SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): than Edison. Important learning and transformation are hap- Many of you Scorpios regard secrecy as a skill worth cultivating. It pening in your dreams. Give your nightly adventures maximum serves your urge to gather and manage power. You’re aware that information is a valuable commodity, so you guard it carefully and opportunity to work their magic in your behalf. share it sparingly. This predilection sometimes makes you seem understated, even shy. Your hesitancy to express too much of your TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Danish flag has a red background emblazoned with an knowledge and feelings might influence people to underestimate asymmetrical white cross. It was a national symbol of power as the intensity that seethes within you. Having said all that, I’ll now early as the 14th century and might have first emerged during predict that you’ll show the world who you are with more dazzle and a critical military struggle that established the Danish empire flamboyance in the coming weeks. It’ll be interesting to see how you in 1219. No other country in the world has a flag with such an do that as you also try to heed your rule that information is power. ancient origin. But if Denmark’s Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, who’s a Taurus, came to me and asked me for SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): advice, I would urge him to break with custom and design a new Sagittarian actress and producer Deborra-Lee Furness has flag—maybe something with a spiral rainbow or a psychedelic been married to megastar actor Hugh Jackman for 23 years. tree. I’ll suggest an even more expansive idea to you, Taurus: Their wedding rings are inscribed with a Sanskrit motto, “Om paramar to the mainamar.” Hugh and Deborra-Lee say it means create fresh traditions in every area of your life! “we dedicate our union to a greater source.” In resonance with current astrological omens, I invite you to engage in a similar GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On June 7, 1988, Gemini musician Bob Dylan launched what has gesture with an important person in your life. Now is a marvelcome to be known as the Never Ending Tour. It’s still going. In ous time to deepen and sanctify your relationship by pledging the past 30-plus years, he has performed almost 3,000 shows yourselves to a higher purpose or beautiful collaboration or on every continent except Antarctica. In 2018 alone, at the age sublime mutual quest. of 77, he did 84 gigs. He’s living proof that not every Gemini is flaky and averse to commitment. Even if you yourself have CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): flirted with flightiness in the past, I doubt you will do so in the In 1997, a supercomputer named Deep Blue won six chess next five weeks. On the contrary. I expect you’ll be a paragon of matches against Chess Grand Master Gary Kasparov. In 2016, an Artificial Intelligence called AlphaGo squared off against human persistence, doggedness, and stamina. champion Lee Sedol in a best-of-five series of the Chinese board game Go. AlphaGo crushed Sedol, four games to one. But there is CANCER (June 21-July 22): The otters at a marine park in Miura, Japan, are friendly to at least one cerebral game in which human intelligence still reigns human visitors. There are holes in the glass walls of their enclo- supreme: the card game known as bridge. No AI has as yet beaten sures through which they reach out to shake people’s hands the best bridge players. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, with their webbed paws. I think you need experiences akin to because I am sure that in the coming weeks, no AI could out-think that in the coming weeks. Your mental and spiritual health will and out-strategize you as you navigate your way through life’s thrive to the degree that you seek closer contact with animals. tests and challenges. You’ll be smarter than ever. P.S. I’m guessIt’s a favorable time to nurture your instinctual intelligence and ing your acumen will be extra soulful, as well. absorb influences from the natural world. For extra credit, tune AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): in to and celebrate your own animal qualities. At regular intervals, a hot stream of boiling water shoots up out of the earth and into the sky in Wyoming’s Yellowstone LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Between 1977 and 1992, civil war raged in Mozambique. National Park. It’s a geyser called Old Faithful. The steamy Combatants planted thousands of land mines that remain danger- surge can reach a height of 185 feet and last for five minutes. ous long after the conflict has ended. In recent years, a new ally When white settlers first discovered this natural phenomenon has emerged in the quest to address the problem: rats that are in the 19th century, some of them used it as a laundry. Between trained to find the hidden explosives so that human colleagues can blasts, they’d place their dirty clothes in Old Faithful’s aperture. defuse them. The expert sniffers don’t weigh enough to detonate When the scalding flare erupted, it provided all the necessary the mines, so they’re ideal to play the role of saviors. I foresee a cleansing. I’d love to see you attempt a metaphorically similar metaphorically comparable development in your future, Leo. You’ll feat, Aquarius: harness a natural force for a practical purpose, get help and support from a surprising or seemingly unlikely source. or a primal power for an earthy task.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

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Whether you own or rent, there are a few things you can do to save money on your bills. These simple things should be on a must-do home-improvement list to help you and, in many cases, the environment: n  If you ignore a leaky faucet, you’re wasting a ton of water. Just one drip per second will waste about 2,000 gallons of water per year. If you’ve got more than one leaky pipe, that’s costly. Certainly, people who have poor insulation in and around their pipes have to let their faucets drip in super-cold weather to avoid frozen pipes. But if you can, install insulation. It’s cheap and easy to do in areas where you can see the pipes. There’s a newer apartment complex on South Temple, MediaBids_190103_24.indd 1 12/28/2018 5:15:20 and during cold weather, it sports a sign telling tenants something like “Freeze tonight, drip your pipes!” That’s a great example of poor construction. n  By now, you should only be using LED light bulbs. Yeah, they are expensive, but they can save you massive amounts of money. Regular light bulbs can cost $200 in electricity during their short life span, whereas an LED bulb will cost more like $30 until it burns out. In 2010, the U.S. government helped Payson, Springville and Eagle Mountain swap out old street lamps with LED fixtures that were 50 percent more efficient than the old sodium vapor bulbs. Now it’s almost impossible to find any remnant of inefficient public lighting on the streets in cities along the Wasatch Front. n Although we’re in the midst of a terrific water year for the state, try not to overwater your lawns and gardens this summer. Check plumbing, faucets and sprinklers for THIS WEEK’S FEATURED leaks. It’s amazing how much water is wastPARTLOW RENTALS: ed in Utah, and even more amazing how many broken water lines aren’t reported. There’s a sprinkler system on 400 West just north of Pierpont Avenue that creates a bog every summer along the sidewalk and has been leaking and pooling for years without CAPITOL HILL/ attention. I know, because I’ve reported it MARMALADE WVC/MAGNA many times without any end to the waste. Hill/Marmalade Must have 2 bdrm. n  Air filters for your furnace are cheap. Affordable 2 bdrm four-plex! condo! Granite counters, stainless Change them every three months. If you Hook-ups, private patio, semi-formal steel appliances, hardwood, pool don’t, your power bill will go up because the dining, lots of closet space! $795 and hot tub! $1095 dirtier the filter gets, the harder the furnace works. Make sure you buy the right size, too. The same goes for your swamp cooler pads—get the right size to avoid wasting water. And while you’re checking out your heating and air systems, invest in a modMIDVALE/SANDY ern thermostat. Get one you can control from your phone so you can lower or raise Must have 1 bdrm plus office (or the temperature while you’re gone. We just use as a 2nd bedroom) duplex! His n’ hers sinks, hook-ups, private put one in and are saving ourselves the yard! $995 forehead slap when we forget to adjust the inside temp—plus some cash in our heating bill. They start at $150 for a simple Wi-Fi VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT system and are super easy to install.  n

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WEIRD

Awesome! Zen TV painter Bob Ross has been gone for 24 years, but his inspiration lives on—at least at Madison Middle School in Abilene, Texas, where on Feb. 7, students in Brady Sloane’s art class donned curly brown wigs, blue shirts and paint palettes for a “Flash Bob Flash Mob.” Sloane’s pre-Advanced Placement students were stressed about grades and projects, and she “wanted to find a way to reward them,” she told the Abilene Reporter News. The students used music stands as makeshift easels, where they painted “happy little trees” and projected an episode of “The Joy of Painting” as parents memorialized the special day with photos and videos.

Hangry Asalene Branch, 29, was only defending her spot in a McDonald’s drive-thru lane on Feb. 18 when she stabbed another woman in the head. Fox News reported that Branch and the other woman were waiting at a Memphis restaurant when a physical fight broke out over their places in the line; Branch took out a knife and assaulted the alleged victim, resulting in injuries that were not life-threatening. Branch was tracked down by police and charged with aggravated assault.

Government in Action You think things are wild in the U.S. Congress? In Albania, Edi Paloka, an opposition lawmaker, was asked to leave the parliament hall on Feb. 14 and suspended for 10 days after throwing ink at Socialist Prime Minister Edi Rama. It all started when Rama scolded a fellow lawmaker for making accusations of corruption against the leftist government, according to Xinhua. A statement from the center-right Democratic party explained, “The action of ink-throwing is a rejection of the bullying exerted by the PM, which is witnessed by the public opinion.” Apparently, Rama had repeatedly mocked Paloka during previous sessions of parliament.

News That Sounds Like a Joke At Towson University in Maryland, an unidentified woman was reported wandering around campus just before Valentine’s Day, showing students a photo of her son and asking if they’d like to go on a date with him. Awkward! The woman, thought to be in her 50s, staked out the Cook Library and the Center for the Arts in hopes of securing a love connection for her son, reported The Baltimore Sun. Towson police are hoping to identify her, not to arrest her, but to ask her to stop. Least Competent Criminals The moral of the story? If you’re going to rob a bank in February, target Florida or Texas. Jason Mackenrodt, 37, was making his getaway after robbing the Bangor Savings Bank in Waterville, Maine, on Feb. 12. He scrambled across four lanes of traffic and into a restaurant parking lot—where he slipped on the ice and sprawled on the ground, right in front of Maine State Police Special Agent Glenn Lang, who was sitting in his parked car. Lang didn’t know the bank had been robbed, but he became suspicious when “the money and the gun he had stashed in his jacket pocket spilled onto the parking lot,” Police Chief Joseph Massey told the Morning Sentinel. (The weapon turned out to be a BB gun.) Lang tackled Mackenrodt and took him into custody as police were responding at the bank. Mackenrodt was charged with robbery and terrorizing.

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n  On Jan. 31, Julian R. Mitchell, 20, tried to use a debit card from a wallet he had stolen at a Nashville, Tenn., bar, according to WZTV. But a fraud alert tipped off bar employees that the card had been lost or stolen, so they asked for photo ID. Mitchell fished out the Tennessee driver’s license from the wallet, which, according to the Davidson County arrest affidavit, made it “plainly obvious” that the photo was not of him because of the difference in height. Mitchell, who strangely resembles a Ken doll, with blond hair, a red beard and black eyebrows, was charged with identity theft; officers found several other cards belonging to the same victim in the wallet.

The Continuing Crisis Passengers on a 12-hour Air France flight on Feb. 18 became alarmed when a man seated in the bulkhead row boarded the plane then removed his pants and socks, settling into his seat in just his boxers and a T-shirt. Sitting across the aisle from him, passenger Lizzie Thompson took photos and posted on Twitter throughout the flight, reported The Sun. “Alerted the flight attendant. He offered to move me ... but just shrugged when I suggested he ask the man to put his pants back on,” she wrote. Thompson also wrote that six hours into the flight from Paris to Los Angeles, the scantily clad passenger got cold, “so PUT ON HIS PUFFY JACKET.” The man put his pants and socks back on after landing, much to Thompson’s relief. “Nothing bonds a group of passengers like a man half naked in your section,” Thompson wrote. The Meth Made Me Do It In Seattle, Douglas Braden Smyser, 21, boarded a plane on Feb. 13 on his way to Los Angeles and a drug rehab center in Malibu, but his behavior during the flight finally caused the pilot to land in Portland and have him removed from the plane. Smyser, from Bonney Lake, Wash., would not stay in his seat, tried to sit in first class and threw his backpack in the aisle. Passengers helped contain him until the plane could land safely. Smyser admitted later that he had eaten meth before boarding, which made him “suspicious and paranoid,” reported KIRO TV. He also claimed to have a gun. He was charged with second-degree disorderly conduct and menacing, along with a federal charge of interference with a flight crew. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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The Weirdo-American Community A dispute over a box of Cheez-Its provoked a DeKalb County, Ga., man to do the unthinkable on Feb. 12. As Jeremy Lamar Wyatt, 32, his brother and 61-year-old mother argued over the salty snacks, Wyatt went outside, locked his family inside the home, poured gasoline on the front steps and started a fire, according to WGCL-TV. Wyatt’s brother was able to lower the mother down from a second-story window, and both escaped without injury.

Wyatt, who had reportedly been enjoying some adult beverages with his Cheez-Its, was taken into custody at the scene and charged with arson and criminal damage to property.

| COMMUNITY |

People Different From Us Looking for a new home? A newly listed suburban Philadelphia home offers something a little sideways from your typical basement rumpus room. The five-bedroom, 2 ½-bath brick colonial in Maple Glen has three fireplaces, a gourmet kitchen—and a sex basement. The finished lower level includes a bed in a cage, complete with straps, whips and other accoutrements for any buyer’s 50 Shades of Grey fantasies. Realtor Melissa Leonard stresses, however, that the basement “can be converted back to a typical suburban basement.” Neighbors are shocked to find out what’s been going on in their ‘hood, but “I know it’s a way of life for people,” Leonard told Slate magazine.

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The Foreign Press Valentine’s Day is complicated in Japan. On Feb. 14, women traditionally give men chocolates: giri choco, or “obligation chocolates,” to their male colleagues, and honmei choco, or “true feelings chocolate,” to their boyfriends or husbands. (Men return the favor on White Day, March 14.) But according to Japan Today, Japanese women are rebelling against giri choco; 40 percent of workers see the custom as “a form of power harassment,” and some companies have banned the practice. Women find giving chocolates to associates stressful: “Before the office ban, we had to worry about things like how much is appropriate to spend on each chocolate and where we draw the line in who we give the chocolates to,” said one worker.

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