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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

JAN. 31, 2019 | VOL. 35

CAUGHT IN THE

MAZE

How one Orem family got swept into Trump’s immigration crackdown. BY KELAN LYONS

N0. 36


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY IMMIGRATION LABYRINTH

How one Orem family got pinned underneath the Trump administration’s immigration iron fist. Cover illustration by Ronan Lynam ronanlynam.com

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SOAP BOX

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Cover story, Jan. 17, Film Festival Preview

Saw two films thus far and have loved it. Park City is doing it right. @CULTURECOLLECTIVESLC Via Instagram

News, Jan. 17, “Climate Gods”

Expect nothing new, but the same old rhetoric of denial. DAVID MELLEN Via Facebook

Cinema, Jan. 17, “What Lies Ahead”

So not a single original idea, then? Nothing that isn’t predicated on a backstory, a fan community, or an existing piece of media? That’s pathetic. CHRIS KETH Via Facebook

Online news post, Jan. 15, “Smog Lake City” The air out here is shit poison! HARRIS HAROLD Via Facebook

It’s not growing. It’s been bad for a long time, but it is important we take action on it. MIKE BERGER Via Facebook

Online news post, Jan. 19, “All In It Together”

Every human has a story, and those stories are strongest when shared with respect. That’s what

happened today! Truly amazing and those who choose ignorance by not opening your ears or your hearts, may you someday find the strength to open your minds and listen to the stories of others. You may be surprised with the love you will feel. TAWNA CAMPBELL Via Facebook Can you imagine … that a governing body, mostly men, wants to force a women to do what she doesn’t want to do? Let that sink in. Let. That. Sink. In. I applaud this effort! @UTETASTIC Via Instagram Women can make changes to be equal without having to make a big deal out of it. Take golf for example. Yes. There are “women’s tees” but who says women have to tee off from there? Women choose to do that and then say that they wish they were equal to men. Hit from the same tees then, no one is stopping you except yourself! Stop blaming men for problems that you can fix yourself as an “independent woman.” NICK FOX Via Facebook Said the mansplainer KATIE GOLDMAN Via Facebook I don’t get the witches sign in the pic? Witches? Was unaware there was a significant witch population back in the day.

@CITYWEEKLY JAMES MCCORMICK Via Facebook I can’t believe in 2019 women still have to march for equal pay, same rights, etc. Ugh! COLONAE CHRISTENSEN Via Instagram It was a great turnout! JAIME DAVID ROMO Via Instagram I think all these women need to go to a third world country and find out what it’s like to have no rights. We have way more rights and make more money than most women throughout the world. @MOMMAPATSY88 Via Instagram I wouldn’t assume that none of the women in attendance have spent time in developing countries. My guess is that more than a handful have. It seems like you are suggesting (and forgive me, if I have misunderstood) that these women should not speak up and move forward because women in developing countries “have it worse.” That is no different than saying we shouldn’t buy new clothes, upgrade our cars, phones, or appliances, expect better education for our children, or a fair justice system, etc. because developing countries are “worse off than we are.” I have spent some time in developing countries and am very well aware of the differences in how women are viewed and treated—for some

of us, that is why we march—to continue forward motion. JACQUELINE PULLOS Via Instagram Just because things are “good” doesn’t mean they can’t be made better. @MOLLYMOOSESAYS Via Instagram

Online news post, Jan. 23, “Romney’s Room”

Look, it’s the guy from Massachusetts. ALBERT GARCIA Via Facebook [Romney is] light years out of touch with the average person. He should stick to sucking money out of companies and forcing jobs overseas.

@YONAHKADE Via Twitter

Common ground—most people think the wall is nothing more than a stunt and a vanity project. BONNIE TRYONOVIECH Via Facebook The most embarrassing Utah failure EVER. MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook Boy, did we fuck up. MICHAEL FARRELL Via Facebook

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. We are an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, that also serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of Salt Lake City Weekly are available free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front. Limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of this oublication may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the publisher. Third-class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery might take up to one full week. All rights reserved.

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OPINION

The Politics of Protective Coloration

We simply call it protective coloration, and yet it’s one of the major keys to survival and the evolutionary development for a wide variety of animal, plant and insect species. The chameleons, lizards and walking stick bugs are just a few that stand out—chameleons for their ability to modify their colors to blend in with almost any surrounding; lizards for appearing as the sand and rocks beneath their feet; and the walking sticks for looking like just another innocuous twig. Masking the identity of thousands of life forms for predators and prey alike has been one of the keys to ensuring that the fittest survives. Protective coloration has also been an essential strategy for politicians who normally love the limelight, but try to blend in with the floral curtains when their survival is at stake. If there was any time for Utah’s congressmen to seek invisibility, it has been the last six weeks. Consistent with his reputation for a case of foot-inmouth-disease—acquired during his unsuccessful 2012 run for president—Utah aging-senior-junior-Sen. Mitt Romney has made himself highly visible in the matter of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history and its temporary suspension, declaring that President Donald Trump’s sound thrashing was actually a presidential victory.

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. “So the president calls their bluff,” Romney mused, and addressed the Democrats, “OK, we’ll open government. Now it’s your turn to actually come up with a deal that helps us secure the border.” The practice of a pot calling the kettle black is certainly nothing new. It is the standard strategy for the Trump administration. Romney has chosen to stand out at a time when he should be cowering in the shadows. There had been only one party doing the bluffing in the shutdown impasse, and it was the GOP, which allowed the toddler-buffoon in the White House to throw the tantrum that created the crisis. (Utahns, get real! The only crisis was in Trump’s mind—it wasn’t about a wall—and it was only his maniacal immaturity that launched this economic disaster on the lives of government workers and their families. POTUS was the cause of their suffering; he owned it, took responsibility for it and was personally culpable for the far-reaching economic impact in places like Ogden, Utah, which depend largely on federal jobs. It’s no surprise that Romney, consistent with his work at Bain Capital, has never really been concerned about the common man and his struggles. I’m not saying he’s the totally-devoid-of-conscience cousin of Trump; there have been brief glimpses of his humanity. But we need to remember, Bain Capital specialized in taking over struggling companies, with almost no capital risk of its own, using huge loans to buy the stock, which in turn created untenable debt burdens for the acquired companies. Bain Capital then gutted the businesses of their profits and fired thousands of employees to compensate for the added debt expense. For some, he arranged public stock offerings, and once the companies were public, sold off the stock for millions in ill-gotten profits. While there were a few companies that Bain Capital actually helped to grow and succeed, most were forced into bankruptcy. One must never

buy the story that Romney made his living helping floundering businesses. It’s simply not true. That was the business model that brought hundreds of millions to Bain Capital, and made Romney, who was already filthy rich from his inheritance, even richer. This is who Mr. Clean really is—a surprisingly heartless man whose own success was always off the aching backs of the American worker. He shares nothing with the typical Utahn, and he shares none of the honest, hard-working business ideals that made his own father a hero of the American Dream. At times, Romney has tried to claim that he’s actually one of us. I remember him lamenting that he had been so hard-up during his years at BYU, he was forced to sell some of the stock his father had given him. So it’s actually easy to see why he can take the side of the orange, club-wielding brute. Like Trump, Romney was a recipient of the “golden spoon,” dodged the draft using a variety of deferment options, and showed his love of the common man by handing out financial misery to thousands of hard-working people during his business career. Protective coloration isn’t even a viable option for Romney. What he is isn’t easily hidden. While his movie-star looks and glib charm will always maintain the illusion that he’s a knight in shining armor on a white horse—saving damsels in distress, and standing for the underdog—it’s his actions that we should all be watching. His telltale pandering to the president in the shutdown debacle tells us Romney’s true identity—a carpet-bagging, wishy-washy, cardboard-opportunist and corporate-looter, cloaked in respectable garb. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 7


CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM

Who gets hurt most in what is becoming a culture of pollution? You might not be surprised that race plays a part and that people of color are often more adversely affected. At Race, Place and the Politics of Pollution, you hear from professor Robert D. Bullard, often described as the father of environmental justice. He is a leading voice against environmental racism, and an award-winning author of 18 books that address sustainable development, urban land use, community reinvestment, climate justice, community resilience and regional equity. See how politics and the environment intertwine and what you can do to address the problem. S. J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Moot Courtroom, Level 6, 383 S. University St., Thursday, Jan. 31, noon1:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2RPMwuF.

INLAND PORT FORUM

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Don’t let them shut you out of one of the most crucial decisions facing the Wasatch Front. The Community Forum on the Inland Port examines the ecological and community impacts of a development that will bring in caravans of trucks, trains and freight to 16,000 acres of fragile land. “At the forum, we will discuss the risks of increased diesel truck and train traffic, the threats to air quality, the potential for water, light and noise pollution and loss of wildlife habitat,” the event’s Facebook page says. The negotiations and plans for this massive undertaking have been done largely without public input. Now is the time to take action and learn how you and the land you love will be affected. Utah State Fairpark, Zion Building, 155 N. 1000 West, Saturday, Feb. 2, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m., free, bit. ly/2HybD0h.

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OK, the #fakenews. What do you think of the media today? At Free Press = Free Society: Why Journalism Matters, you learn about the press vs. the trolls and how social media plays into First Amendment rights. “Journalists in America are often derided as ‘the enemy of the people’ and their work dismissed as ‘fake,’” Jennifer Napier-Pearce, editor of The Salt Lake Tribune, says in a news release for the event. Here, she presents her argument about how reporters do their jobs and why protecting journalism is more important than ever to our democracy. Whether you believe the news or not, this is certain to be an important and enlightening discussion, and one every media user should take part in. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., Midvale, Tuesday, Feb. 5, 7-8:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2UhcBPM.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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At the risk of hearing cries of “Oh, but the babies,” Utahns need to get comfortable with abortion— and its history. Provocative as it might be, RadioWest took the risk in showing pregnancy as both a social and political issue. For instance, Theodore Roosevelt encouraged white women reproduce. Abortion laws were also fashioned to clean up vice as witnessed in courtrooms with all-male juries where women were asked how many men they’d slept with. Now, a West Jordan lawmaker wants to make abortion illegal after 15 weeks into a pregnancy, even though it might be unconstitutional. And U.S. Sen. Mike Lee wants to revive the “Mexico City Policy,” prohibiting family planning aid to any country that provides or promotes abortion. Ostensibly, that would include the United States.

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On to the issue of death by car and the latest Deseret News story. You might recall that last year, Utah unveiled its .05 percent BAC law, with many asserting that drunk driving deaths would plummet. The good news is that auto deaths have indeed gone down, but it’s anything but clear that the lower limit was the reason. Speeding and texting are way up there. In the mid-1970s, alcohol was a factor in more than 60 percent of traffic fatalities and two-thirds of traffic deaths for 16- to 20-year-olds, according to the National Institute of Health. Alcohol-related deaths have now been cut in half, and are a factor in only 37 percent of deaths for that demographic. Drinking and driving don’t mix, and Uber and Lyft are making a difference. Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Holladay, is proposing a real life-saver with her distracted driving bill. Passing this should not even be a question.

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Storage Location is: West Valley Storage | 4667 S. 4800 W. West Valley City, UT 84120 West Valley Storage is hereby giving public notice to the following individuals who are delinquent on their payments that their storage units are going to public auction which will be held online from February 5th, 2019 at 10am to February 15th, 2019 at 11 am MDT, at which time the auction will officially be closed. Renters of the delinquent units have until 5pm on February 14th to settle the debt owed on the unit. All delinquent units will then be sold off to the highest bidder to satisfy the lien. • Claudia Conejo-Medrano Unit#136 • Nicholas Marvin Unit#137 • Michael Berry Unit#216 • Enrique Arciga Unit#218 • Dawn May Unit#239

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH

There’s lots of LGBTQ news this week. The saddest and most shocking is that of David Matheson, a former conversion therapist who has now come out as gay, KSL Channel 5 revealed. Oh yeah, and he apologized, like pouring salt in a wound. He was married to a woman for 34 years, has three kids and who knows how many people he put through the trauma of his program. Let’s not forget that he’s an active Mormon, for what it’s worth. Equality Utah is trying to persuade legislators to ban conversion therapy for those in that community. Meanwhile, the Legislature is considering—again—hate crimes legislation, and this time the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints says it’s not opposed to it even if it includes LGBTQ people. So that’s the good news until you realize that at least one legislator wants to prevent people from changing the gender on their birth certificates.


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10 | JANUARY 31, 2019

62

64

Cedes control of pristine wildlife to a rich, old guy

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51 46

50

Stairway to heaven: It’s sponsored by an LDS legislator over the age of 80

48

Affects power players’ ability to make money

54

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57

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60 53

63 Threatens prosperous coal industry

33

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61

Mia Love contests bill’s signatures

43

Deemed to be “too progressive”

44 You convince the public, “The Prophet told me to”

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38 39

36 37 29 28

35

55 56 42

Limits access to sinful indulgences like booze or sex

41 Outgoing Republican legislator wants to help it pass for legacy purposes

40

Opposition group runs radio ads

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30 19 20

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It’s “for the children”

17 The Deseret News endorses it in an editorial

16 1

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21 13 12

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The LDS church sends an alarming email to its flock about it

Lawmakers call a special session after voters’ approval

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15 2 Is backed by any white male

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Loosens existing alcohol restrictions

Bill has the words “cannabis,” “women’s rights” or “right to die” in it

4

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Intends to separate church and state … the nerve!

Is backed by a Republican

6

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Includes hidden anti-abortion language

8

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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 11

Paz says. “So, I’m not even sure why we’re having a conversation about bond, because he, at this point, should just be released.” Montfleury has been in the detention center since October. “It feels a lot longer,” the 27-year-old says during a recent phone call. “It feels like a year, an eternity.” The Haiti native passes the time by reading—he says his pace is four books a week—and talking with his cell mates, fellow intellectuals from African and Caribbean countries. They talk through their anxiety and lend each other money for the commissary, whatever they have to do to get through the day. “Each of them are kind of looking out for one another,” Montfleury says. “I’ve met some of the strongest, some of the bravest young men in here, and I’ve watched them break down because their situation is so stress-induced,” he adds, his faint French accent barely carrying over the din of the detention center. “They don’t know what’s gonna happen, if they’re ever gonna see their family ever again, if they’re getting deported.”

J

onathan Paz looks like he’s having a staring contest with his office desk. He interrupts his tense glaring with periodic Post-it note scribbling and computer scrolling as he grips his phone and listens to a Department of Homeland Security attorney argue that his client, Mackenley Montfleury, should stay locked up in the Aurora, Colo., Detention Center until the federal government decides whether he should be deported. “Your honor, first of all, it appears to me that counsel is just trying to generalize a criminal record,” Paz tells Immigration Court Judge Elizabeth McGrail. “That’s not what the law says.” Paz is the only member of this conversation who is not in Colorado. Montfleury, McGrail and the DHS lawyer are all in Aurora; Paz is pleading his case from his Salt Lake City office via telephone. He gets more and more exasperated as the conversation drags on. Two of Montfleury’s three drug possession charges have either been dismissed or the pleas withdrawn, Paz tells the judge. “Mr. Montfleury is now not even deportable,”

@KELAN_LYONS

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How one Orem family found itself swept into Trump’s immigration crackdown.

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CAUGHT IN THE IMMIGRATION MAZE


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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Marie Micheline and Jospeh Ernst Montfleury hold up a family portrait taken during happier times.

From Port-au-Prince to Orem

The explosion shook the concrete house so hard that it woke 9-year-old Montfleury one late 2000 evening. His ringing ears were still pounding when his mother, Marie Micheline Montfleury, rushed into the room he shared with his brother and told the boys to move to her bedroom. As he trudged down the hallway, Mackenley spotted his father, Joseph, pointing a revolver at the door, waiting for someone to bust through and try to end their lives. Six months earlier, Joseph Ernst Montfleury unsuccessfully ran for a seat in the Haitian legislature. For months, the government had been cracking down on the opposition’s protests, killing dissidents who challenged the election’s legitimacy. “They planted bombs everywhere,” he remembers. “And they planted a bomb in my own house.” Smoke filled the Montfleury family’s Port-au-Prince home after the detonation. The patriarch didn’t need to use his gun that night. No one was seriously hurt, but the constant state-sponsored violence and death was enough to make him realize that he had to leave Haiti to keep his family safe. “It was time for me to get out because the situation was getting worse and worse and worse and worse,” the senior Montfleury says. He kept his head down for two years before fleeing to the U.S. in 2002. He was quickly granted asylum. His wife and children joined him shortly after. They built new, austere lives in Orem, a far cry from the relatively posh ones they had led in Haiti’s capital city. “In my country, we were someone,” he says wistfully from the living room of his cozy Utah County home. In Haiti, his four kids attended a prestigious private school. Maids helped them get dressed and prepared their food. Montfleury had a driver who transported him around the city and to the classrooms where he taught chemistry. Now, the couple work at a local grocery store. They drive themselves everywhere. There are no more servants. They’ve created proud, modest lives in a strikingly different country than the one in which they were born. As Mackenley Montfleury grew older and reached his teens and 20s, he rebelled and experimented with marijuana. He held customer service and sales jobs, graduated from Orem High School and took classes for two years at Utah Valley University. He joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He routinely cooked and cleaned the house, completed a hunting course and asked his mother if she could pay for him to take a drawing class—he wanted to get better at one of his favorite hobbies. But their son also got in trouble with the law. He picked up a few misdemeanor drug charges. His father told him that if he didn’t respect the house rules, he would need to leave. So, he moved out. “It’s possible Mackenley received so much shock from Haiti,” his dad says. “It’s a shock. Leaving his country, leaving his friends, leaving everything.”

Then came the fight. A few days before Thanksgiving 2017, Marie Micheline Montfleury called her son to check in. He hadn’t had a place to live after getting kicked out of his family’s house. “He said, ‘Mom, I’m hiding downstairs,’” she recalls. He was in a closet. He could smell her cooking. Could she bring him some food? The matron went to sleep early that night to rest for her shift at the local Harmons the following morning. While at work, her daughter called and told her to come back right away. There was some kind of emergency. When she got home, her daughter was talking to a police officer. There had been an altercation and the cops were called. Mackenley Montfleury had fallen asleep after eating the previous night. When his dad found him, he told him to leave. Mom remembers her son saying the whole thing had been an accident. He’d hit his father on his way out of the house. There had been a scuffle, but someone held dad back while Mackenley ran away. “We didn’t even think about that because we know he is here legally,” Joseph Ernst Montfleury says of his decision to call the police, “and we don’t even think ICE will get involved.”

An Extended Stay

Still arguing over the detention, Paz asks the judge to set his bond at $1,500 so he can fight his deportation case from outside the confines of a cell. To justify the low bail, Paz has to convince the judge that his client won’t run once he gets out—a nonissue, Paz assures her, because the family lives in Orem, a town he’s called home for nearly two decades—and isn’t a threat to the general public. “Simply violating the law does not make someone a danger to their community,” the attorney says, standing up to face the barren, gray wall in his office. Montfleury has been charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession, Paz explains, not theft. He hasn’t threatened anyone with a knife, or beaten someone with a weapon. “This isn’t someone that’s hurting anyone.” Paz’ voice rises a few octaves as he explains that for all of the younger Montfleury’s previous convictions—possessing a controlled substance and paraphernalia, drinking alcohol when he was underage—the local prosecutors never saw fit to keep him behind bars for more than 30 days. They don’t think he’s a menace to society. So why should the immigration court keep him detained for months while he waits for the feds to decide whether he can stay in the U.S.? The line goes dead. “I think they hung up on me,” Paz says, sighing. The phone rings after a few seconds. Paz immediately atones. “I’m sorry, your honor, I know I can be loud and verbose.” “I think we’re going to have to agree to disagree here,” McGrail says. The assault,


ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A Death Sentence

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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 13

Over his dad’s objections, Orem prosecutors filed charges against Montfleury. According to a story in The Salt Lake Tribune, he pleaded no contest last November to misdemeanor assault and marijuana possession. Paz says his client served a 30-day sentence before ICE agents transported him to the Aurora Detention Center, where he has remained since. Joseph Ernst Montfleury wrote a letter to the immigration court last September. He reminisced about camping and fishing trips they took together, the “tender notes” his son would write him for his birthdays, how he and his wife helped their son buy his first car. “He needs help, not rejection,” the elder Montfleury tells City Weekly, a pile of paperwork spread across his living room table— family pictures and old projects Mackenley submitted for school assignments. “We understand that bad things can happen; but that doesn’t mean he is a bad person.” Mackenley Montfleury’s detention and potential deportation are complicated by additional misdemeanor convictions in two neighboring Utah County towns. “It just doesn’t make sense to me that you would try to deport a lawful permanent resident over these low-level crimes,” Paz says. “He’s just a dummy whose dad and him have not gotten along for a while, and he got kicked out of his house for not following their house rules, so he’s on the street, and he’s doing stupid things.” Paz is trying to get the pleas withdrawn, vacated and dismissed. Two public defenders have signed an affidavit or filed a plea withdrawal motion indicating they did not warn his client that taking a plea could affect his immigration status. That’s in violation of a 2010 Supreme Court decision that requires defense attorneys inform their clients when a conviction carries a risk of deportation. According to the

Things were different under President Barack Obama. Some called him the “Deporter in Chief”—more than 2.5 million people were removed from the U.S. under his administration—but Obama officials told Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to focus on removing people who’d been convicted of violent crimes, joined a “criminal street gang” or posed a threat to national security. They prioritized immigrants whose presence reached a certain threshold of danger for their communities. “Under the Trump Administration, it’s kind of anybody with crimes,” Melissa Moeinvaziri, an immigration attorney at the West Jordan-based Perretta Law Office, says. A few days after taking office, President Donald Trump signed an executive order that vastly expanded the groups of immigrants that ICE prioritizes for deportation. Among those targeted are people “convicted of any criminal offense,” “charged with any criminal offense,” or who have “committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense.” Essentially, local immigration attorney Dan Black says, ICE can put any undocumented immigrant who has entered the criminal justice system into deportation proceedings. “These priorities are so broad that you’re saying everyone is a priority,” he says. Montfleury is not an undocumented immigrant. He got his lawful permanent residency (LPR), or green card, in 2005. But Paz says his potential deportation is also a consequence of Trump’s broadening of ICE’s priorities. “Mackenley would not be in these proceedings under Obama,” Paz says. “It just wouldn’t be happening.” The bar for deporting LPRs is higher than it is for removing people who are not legally allowed in the U.S. Immigrants who possess a green card are considered “deportable” if they have been convicted of certain offenses involving domestic violence or drugs, or two or more “crimes of moral turpitude“—an ambiguous term described by members of the Board of Immigration Appeals as something that “shocks the public conscience as being inherently base, vile, or depraved, contrary to the rules of morality.”

Black, an associate attorney at South Salt Lake’s Stowell, Crayk and Bown, says he hasn’t noticed an uptick in LPR deportations, but he sees a change in how their cases are handled once removal proceedings are filed. DHS lawyers can no longer exercise their judgement and back off deporting longtime residents convicted of low-level crimes. “They have been stripped of basically any and all prosecutorial discretion,” Black says of DHS counsel. “They’re forced to continue and try and deport these folks, regardless of what the mitigating circumstances would be.” Reached by phone Tuesday afternoon, an ICE spokesperson told City Weekly that DHS attorneys continue to exercise prosecutorial discretion. Montfleury’s predicament is a more complicated Gordian Knot than merely being a victim of Trump’s deportation machine. The reasoning for his detention is a nexus of the immigration and criminal justice systems, a perfect storm of ineffective counsel, bureaucratic buffoonery and a long wait for a potentially predetermined outcome.

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Shifting Priorities

—Joseph Ernst Montfleury

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the drugs—those criminal charges make her nervous. She denies bond, but reserves Montfleury’s right to an appeal. He’ll need to remain in the Centennial State, hundreds of miles from his family, as he waits for a judge to rule on whether he’ll be sent back to Haiti. Paz sits back down and puts his head in his hands. He runs his fingers through his wavy brown hair. “Hang on, I need a minute,” he says. He stands again to take a quick lap down the hallway, trying to burn the adrenaline that had animated his 20-minute phone call. Paz is still trying to work out what just happened as he paces through the office’s common area, asking no one in particular, “Over drug charges?”

“We still love him, we still care, and we still have to figure out exactly how he can come back. We need him back.”


Tribune story, Orem Prosecutor DJ Summers argued in court that the plea agreement papers Montfleury signed contained language that warned his citizenship could be affected. The Orem City Attorney’s Office, which only prosecutes misdemeanor cases, did not respond to City Weekly’s request for comment. If all the convictions stand, Montfleury could be deported. Lawful permanent residents are allowed one conviction for possessing 30 grams of marijuana or less— Paz says two of his client’s three misdemeanor marijuana convictions have either been dismissed or their pleas withdrawn, meaning he is no longer deportable. But DHS is still opposing the attorney’s motion to terminate immigration proceedings because of a single possession instance. What’s more, Paz says, Montfleury qualifies for cancellation of removal, thanks to his green card, so his deportation is unlikely regardless. What frustrates him is how callous prosecutors are in giving a “son of the community” a plea deal that could get him kicked out of the U.S., and the waste of taxpayer funds to charge, house, feed and try Montfleury’s cases in federal immigration court, “only for him to end up getting out anyway. So, not only are you trying to deport someone you probably shouldn’t, you are also wasting our money.” City and county prosecutors are not federal agents. It isn’t their responsibility to enforce immigration laws. “Our job is to provide a measure of safety and proportionality of justice at the local level,” Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill says. “As a prosecutor, I think it’s important for us to consider, ‘How do we define justice?’” Prosecutors walk a fine line between keeping their communities safe and ensuring the plea deals they strike and sentences they seek do not impact any one defendant more than another. A prosecutor’s definition of justice can vary between cases. They can seek punishments that don’t place immigrant defendants at risk of deportation. “This doesn’t mean that because of your status, that you should get a different outcome than our citizens,” Gill, who didn’t play a role in this case, points out. “I think the point is if you are not getting an outcome just like your citizens. That’s the concern.” For many people, deportation is worse than serving jail time, Paz says. “You can’t be in the country you want to be in, a lot of times where your family is, and where everything you know is.” Deportation could also make a person vulnerable to violence; many asylees fled their own countries out of fear for their and their family’s lives. Joseph Ernst Montfleury warns that his son could be hurt or held for ransom if he were sent back to Haiti. “It’s like a death sentence,” he says. “It’s true.”

KELAN LYONS

KELAN LYONS

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Immigration attorney Jonathan Paz

Gill understands that the intersection between crime and immigration is a polarizing topic. “People say, ‘Oh, they’re illegals, and illegals committing crimes need to be deported out of the country,’” he says. But sometimes people who have a legal right to be in the U.S. get snared into deportation hearings. Families can be separated and never see each other again. “I think it’s important for people to resist the urge to say this is a very simple, black and white issue,” Gill says. “It’s not.”

Finding His Way

Joseph Ernst Montfleury last saw his youngest son in August. The memory was anticlimactic— Mackenley was on his way out the door when his dad was coming home from work. But the brief interaction left an impact. “I think I saw him as someone trying to do his best,” he says, “to keep going and find a job, and to be self-sufficient.” Mackenley Montfleury was arrested the following month. Family members have offered to give him a room once he gets out of detention, to help him get back on his feet. “We still love him, we still care, and we still have to figure out exactly how he can come back,” the dad says. “We need him back.” Marie Micheline Montfleury tries to talk to her son every other day. Sometimes they discuss his case, but mostly she wants to make sure he’s OK and healthy. “As a mom, I need to talk to him,” she says. “In his voice, I can recognize when he’s happy, when he’s not. I don’t have to see him, but I know when there is something wrong.” For his part, Mackenley Montfleury tries to stay positive and far away from the violence in the detention center. A few weeks ago, he says a fellow detainee was jumped by five people. They had to be taken to the hospital. Their unit was locked down for a few days. “There’s some people that are under a lot of stress and dealing with different kinds of situations and circumstances,” he says. He mostly keeps to himself or his cell mates, reading and sleeping to stave off the boredom and anxiety. He has a mantra—“try to stay positive.” Montfleury wants to go back to school and finish earning the engineering technology degree he started at UVU. He hopes people take time to understand his situation and not just write him off. “I just see myself as a young man trying to find myself in this world,” he says. “I’ve made a lot of mistakes, a lot of bad decisions, but I don’t think that I’m a bad person.” CW


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SB Dance: Deccadance In the midst of Sundance and all the attendant excitement, Salt Lake’s SB Dance showcases its own attractions. Deccadance events include a poster art show and a conversation collaboration with Sundance Institute, both free of charge, and which culminate in two cabaret performances. The week-long series marks a break from the company’s past film fest-related events, which focused on lounges. Another change is the introduction of a theme; this year, tolerance. “I love the idea of looking at tolerance from all these different points of view,” Stephen Brown, artistic and creative director for SB Dance, says. Every event engages with the theme in a unique way. From Jan. 26 to 30, the traveling poster art installation Tolerance, conceived and organized by Mirko Ilic, featured theme-inspired graphics. Creative Tensions, a 90-minute interactive collaboration between Sundance Institute Theatre Program and global design firm IDEO, follows on Jan. 31. The “conversation on your feet” invites audiences to become a part of the performance, as well as engage with a broader conversation about what it means to be tolerant. The cabaret shows Drag Plus— hosted by Jason CoZmo and co-produced by Gia BIanca Stephens (pictured)—and Kinky Beasts shift the conversation from tolerance toward acceptance, as they celebrate identities and sexualities that aren’t always featured, let alone given the spotlight. “That is a place for really cool performance and design,” Brown says, “coming from the drag scene and then from the kink scene. The cabaret shows invite people to see alternative universes that they might not have experienced before.” (Casey Koldewyn) SB Dance: Deccadance @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Creative Tensions, Jan. 31, 7 p.m., free, reservation required; Drag Plus & Kinky Beasts, Feb. 1-2, 9 p.m., $10-$12, deccadance.sbdance.com

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

LUCY UNSWORTH

UNION PACIFIC HISTORIC COLLECTION

BEAU PEARSON

THURSDAY 1/31

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JAN. 31-FEB. 6, 2019

SHERI JARDINE/UTAH PRESENTS

ESSENTIALS

the

FRIDAY 2/1

FRIDAY 2/1

TUESDAY 2/5

When Utah’s state quarter was issued in 2007, the reverse didn’t feature Brigham Young, one of Moab’s arches, mountains or even skiers. It instead marked the Beehive State as the “Crossroads of the West” and featured the golden spike being driven into the rails between two trains facing each other at Promontory Summit. The meeting of east and west lines of the Transcontinental Railroad took place on May 10, 1869, and to celebrate the 150th anniversary of that historic day, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts hosts The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West. The show collects photographs and stereographs by Andrew Joseph Russell and Alfred A. Hart, who documented the railroad’s construction from 1866 to 1869. Russell shot the Union Pacific line running east to west, while Hart documented the Central Pacific line going west to east. “We are thrilled to bring the story of this landmark American moment and these historic photographs to our audiences,” Gretchen Dietrich, UMFA executive director, says. “Through these images, visitors will not only connect with the story of the railroad, but also explore the aesthetic considerations and challenges faced by 19th-century photographers.” Russell and Hart’s photographs are on loan from the Union Pacific Historic Collection. The collection arrives in Salt Lake City as part of a tour that recently included the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Neb., and travels next to the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento. (Geoff Griffin) The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West @ Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, University of Utah, Feb. 1-May 26, umfa.utah.edu

When a comedian is especially adept at doing impressions, their identity often gets lost behind the personalities of those they imitate. So it’s not so surprising that Tommy Davidson is often identified with the characters he portrayed on the groundbreaking Fox network television program In Living Color. Sammy Davis Jr., Michael Jackson and Sugar Ray Leonard were among those he mimicked on the show, which also helped introduce Jamie Foxx, Damon Wayans, Jim Carrey and David Alan Grier to the comedy world. Nevertheless, these impressions helped elevate Davidson’s career, which began in stand-up. Early on, he frequented the nation’s comedy clubs and opened for the likes of Luther Vandross, Anita Baker, Kenny G and Patti LaBelle. Before that, Davidson got his start when he won a talent contest at the Apollo Theater. He got his big break when he appeared on the Arsenio Hall Show and then worked his way into the movies, acting in the films Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls, Strictly Business, Booty Call and Disney’s animated attraction The Proud Family. Following his stint on In Living Color, he was a recurring regular on MADtv and guested on several sitcoms and reality shows as well. “I’m a creature of adaptation,” Davidson told the Los Angeles Times shortly after In Living Color was canceled in the ’90s. “My comedy breathes; it’s not really that predictable. I do have a linear style, but other than that, there’s a lot of abstract. I can just go off on what I’m thinking. I’m not that topical. I like to talk about me and my experiences.” Figure Davidson’s routine will soar on spontaneity and lead to lots of laughs along the way. (Lee Zimmerman) Tommy Davidson @ Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, 801463-2909, Feb. 1-2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

The dismissive descriptor “YouTube celebrity” is easy to apply in the 21st century, bestowing a second-class status to those who have built careers entertaining on social media. But there are as many different stories behind social-media stardom as there are people who achieve it, and there’s a uniquely emotional component to the story of Anna Akana. As she told NBC News in 2015, she was using drugs to cope with her sister’s suicide in 2013 when a performance by comedian Margaret Cho actually made her laugh. “I was like, ‘I forgot how great this feels. I want to devote my life to this,’” Akana said. “I have been just chasing laughs ever since.” That chase has included two distinct but intertwined paths as both comedic performer and filmmaker. Akana’s 2.4 million YouTube subscribers know her for confessional and witty videos covering topics including white guys’ fetishized attraction to Asian women and coming out as bisexual, while she has also carved out a small acting career in films like Ant-Man and Hello, My Name Is Doris. And she has also created her own short films—including a music video dedicated to her late sister and the stop-motion animated Dolor—and web series like Miss Earth and Youth & Consequences. Akana visits Kingsbury Hall this week for a conversation moderated by University of Utah professor Sarah Projansky, focused on the media and celebrity. When it comes to this multihyphenate creator, however, it’s best not to place too many limits on that word “celebrity.” (Scott Renshaw) Anna Akana @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Feb. 5, 7 p.m., free, online reservation required (limit 2 per person), utahpresents.org

The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West

Tommy Davidson

Anna Akana


A&E

THEATER

Penny For Their Thoughts

Ririe-Woodbury collaborates with young storytellers—and many local artists—for a new Red Fred Project creation. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

Ririe-Woodbury company members rehearse The Live Creature & Ethereal Things

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Feb. 1-2, 7:30 p.m.; Family matinee, Feb. 2, 1 p.m. Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. Capitol Theatre 50 W. 200 South 801-355-2787 $10-35 artsaltlake.org

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THE LIVE CREATURE & ETHEREAL THINGS

and the Ririe-Woodbury dancers throughout the project. While developing his Jolly Troop, Graham created small bios for each of his birds, giving them unique personalities. Having worked so closely with Graham on other Red Fred projects, Smith says that he and Harbold understood the nuances of each character. The Live Creature & Ethereal Things is a dance performance, so the birds don’t speak, but the goal was to create recognizable characters simply through movement—like a silent movie, or a picture book with no words. Together, Charon, the dancers and the acting team developed a movement language that could express each character’s individuality. And in the end, it was little Penny that stood out the most. “The children who write the Red Fred books can pick any character they want from the troop to tell the story,” Harbold explains. “Penny became our trooper. It changed the whole thing when we noticed that was happening. Fred has always been the leader of the troop, and they all have strong personalities, but in this story she is the one that goes through a transformation.” CW

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That idea was rekindled for Charon, in 2016, when he attended a performance of Climbing With Tigers. Delighted by the production, Charon decided to reach out. “Dallas and I met again about a year and a half or two years ago, to finally discuss a collaboration. Even then, I didn’t know what it meant. I didn’t know if we would adapt a book for the stage, or how exactly we would use his characters and ideas.” Since joining Ririe-Woodbury as artistic director in 2008, Charon has continued to choreograph his own works for the company with surprising regularity (Elegy, 2016; Snowmelt, 2017; the Alone Together trilogy). Charon’s work often addresses complex, mature concepts, but for The Live Creature & Ethereal Things, Charon was tasked with creating a work that would also appeal to children. The project was daunting, but with Graham’s help Charon was able to pull together his artistic crew—a rare and elaborate creative collaboration that signals a new level of artistic maturity for Salt Lake City. The first piece of the creative puzzle came from Flying Bobcat Theatrical Laboratory. “I’ve been friends with Dallas for a very long time,” Robert Scott Smith of Flying Bobcat says. “We worked together before on Climbing With Tigers, and the birds really resonated with us. So if Dallas asks us to do something, we are there.” An additional selling point for Smith and his colleague Harbold was working with dancers. “I was over the moon,” Smith says. “We both felt it was a windfall of great luck since our company has been very interested in exploring movement.” The actors worked closely with Charon

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TORI DUHAIME

T

his is a story about Penny. Penny is a small bird. She is purple and she likes being fast, especially when dodging raindrops. Penny has a big flock of bird friends, called the Jolly Troop. These birds have a very important job: They help critically-ill children tell a story, and ultimately write a book, about their fears, joys and loves. All of the Jolly Troop birds are characters from the Red Fred Project, started in 2013 by Dallas Graham to give kids living with serious illnesses a voice. Over the last five years, each of these characters has been featured in various child-authored storybooks. Recently, however, these characters have caught the attention—and sparked the imagination—of adults. In 2016, the Red Fred Project teamed up with the Salt Lake Acting Co. and Flying Bobcat Theatrical Laboratory to translate the book Climbing With Tigers—a story by Nathan Glad, a child living with brittle bone disease—into a theatrical performance. Now Graham’s birds, led by Penny, are teaming up with Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. for an all-ages friendly performance, The Live Creature & Ethereal Things. From the ground up—music, costumes, story and choreography—everything about The Live Creature & Ethereal Things will be entirely original, with each part crafted by local artists and musicians. The original musical score comes from John Paul Hayward, a composer and performer with the Utah Chamber Artists and the Utah Symphony. Costumes are by fashion designer Jared Gold. And while the characters and the inspiration come from the Red Fred Project, the choreography is entirely new work from Ririe-Woodbury’s artistic director Daniel Charon, with theatrical guidance from Flying Bobcat’s Alexandra Harbold and Robert Scott Smith (Smith will also appear in the performance). Assembling such a diverse team has been years in the making. “I met Graham when I moved to Utah five and a half years ago,” Charon recalls. “Right away I knew there existed in Red Fred the potential for a joint project some day with Ririe-Woodbury.”


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

S. Main, through Feb. 23, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org School of Rock Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Feb. 2, Thursdays & Fridays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Spamalot Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Feb. 2, empresstheatre.com The Tortoise and the Hare Scera, 745 S. State, Orem, through Feb. 22, Mondays and Fridays, 7 p.m., scera.org Wicked Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through March 3, artsaltlake.org The Wizard of Oz Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Feb. 2, hct. org

DANCE

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: The Live Creature & Ethereal Things Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 2, 1 & 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 27)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Works with a unique slant on romance from Brian Christensen, Brent Godfrey , Jared Walker (his work pictured) and more are on display in Love in the Abstract at the A Gallery (1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, agalleryonline.com), Feb. 5-March 2.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The Cake Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through March 10, saltlakeactingcompany.org Comedy of Errors BYU Nelke Theatre, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Feb. 6-9 & 13-16, 7 p.m.; Feb. 9 & 16, 2 & 4 p.m., arts.byu.edu Constellations Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Feb. 3, goodcotheatre.com Disenchanted! The Musical Midvale Main Street Theatre, 7711 S. Main, through Feb. 16, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 5 p.m., midvaletheatre.com A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder Hale

Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe Street, Sandy, through March 16, hct.org I Do! I Do! Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, through Feb. 9, Mondays, Fridays, & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., terraceplayhouse.com Lend Me a Tenor CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 9, cptutah.org Nunsense Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, through Feb. 11, Fridays, Saturdays & Mondays, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org A Raucous Evening of Opera Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, through Feb. 1, app.arts-people.com Robyn Hood The Off Broadway Theatre, 272

Madcap Musical Mania Riverton High School Auditorium, 2476 S. Silverwolf Way, Feb. 5, 7:30 p.m., slsw.org Utah Symphony: Symphonie Fantastique Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Feb. 1-2, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Wild Up: We the People Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Chamber Music Society of Salt Lake City: Calefax Reed Quintet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 5, 7:30 p.m. Campus Symphony: From Stage to Screen Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

COMEDY & IMPROV

Adam Sandler: 100% Fresher Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m., vivintarena.com Addicts Comedy Tour Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Feb. 4, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Alex Velluto Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Feb. 1-2, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Ari’s Storyteller Show Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Feb. 1-2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Michael Quu Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Feb. 5, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Michael Quu Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Tommy Davidson Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Feb. 1-2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 26)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Betsy Mason: All Over the Map: A Cartographic Odyssey The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 6, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Hanif Abdurraqib Salt Lake Community College South City Campus, 1575 S. State, Jan. 31, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Robin Becker & Jennifer Elise Foerster Kim T. Adamson Alumni House, Westminster College, 1170 E. Blaine Ave., Feb. 4, 7 p.m., westminstercollege.edu

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKET

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 270 S. Rio Grande St., through April 20, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

LGBTQ EVENTS

Alaska Thunderfuck 5000 Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, Feb. 2, 9 p.m., metromusichall.com SB Dance: Deccadance Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Feb. 1-2, 9 p.m., deccadance.sbdance.com (see p. 26)

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Jordan World Circus Wasatch County Event Complex, 415 Southfield Road, Heber, Jan. 31, 7 p.m., thejordanworldcircus.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Anna Akana Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 5, 7 p.m., utahpresents.org (see p. 26) The Planet We Call Home: Cavity-Nesters in a Changing Climate Ogden Nature Center, 966 W. 12th Street, Feb. 4, 6-7:30 p.m., ogdennaturecenter.org SB Dance & Sundance Institute: Creative Tensions Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South Jan. 31, 7 p.m., deccadance.sbdance.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Arash Rahimi: The Eyes Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 N. Medical Drive, through March 1, slcjcc.org Art Access Partners Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Feb. 8, accessart.org Ben Steele: Now Showing Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through March 1, modernwestfineart.com Betta Inman & Joy Nunn: Color Talks Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 9, artatthemain.com Bill Laursen: Concept+Color+Composition Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Brian Kershisnik Meyer Gallery, 305 Main, Park City, Feb. 6-16, meyergallery.com Bryton Sampson: Plastic Portraits Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 14, slcpl.org Candelaria Atalaya: Time & Light Souvenirs Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Emma Goldgar: Chromatic Dreamscapes Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 6, slcpl.org Lisa Anderson: Imprints: Phenomena in Nature Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Love in the Abstract A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, Feb. 5-March 2, agalleryonline.com (see above left) The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 26, umfa.utah.edu (see p. 26) Revolution Curated: Original Art of Yan’an’s New Society, 1955-1984 Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Feb. 27, culturalcelebration.org Storied Earth Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 1, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Susan Makov: Field Notes Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Tom Bettin & Randee Levine Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Feb. 8, phillips-gallery.com Utah Children’s Chinese Calligraphy & Painting Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Vincent Mattina, Etsuko Kato & Bill Dunford Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 22, saltlakearts.org Watercolors by Tom Howard Phillips Gallery’s Dibble Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Feb. 8, phillips-gallery.com World of the Wild Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave, through March 17, hoglezoo.org


KYLE JENKINS

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

I

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Sunday, 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Best bet: The shorty melt Can’t miss: The vegetarian-friendly chicken-fried Portobello

JANUARY 31, 2019 | 19

in March of last year. During his time at Bistro 412, Ross transformed the menu to reflect his from-scratch attitude, which now is on full display at Twisted Fern. The menu offers many options for gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan diners, and its seasonal variety keeps

| CITY WEEKLY |

Twisted Fern opened in June 2017 as the brainchild of local chef Adam Ross, who moved to Park City after graduating from culinary school in Denver. It wasn’t long before he worked his way to head chef at Bistro 412, which was a Park City mainstay until it closed

f you’re planning on trekking up the mountain to ski or hit up the Sundance Film Festival, you’ll no doubt be looking for a place to eat. While Main Street in Park City is a treasure trove of fine dining options, it’s also a logistical nightmare this time of year—unless you’re hoping to spot a wandering celebrity, it’s best to seek out other options for your dining needs. Luckily, Main Street isn’t the only place in town where you can get a decent bite to eat. The farm-to-table bastion known as Twisted Fern (1300 Snow Creek Drive, Ste. RS, 435-731-8238, twistedfern.com) has a well-stocked menu of contemporary American cuisine and is far enough from the bustle that you can still find parking.

inspired idea. Fully embracing the Portobello mushroom’s ability to stand in for hamburger patties, this dish consists of a sliced Portobello that has been deep fried in a wonderfully crispy buttermilk and flour coating. It arrives on top of cauliflower grits, asparagus and green peppercorn gravy. This dish’s cardinal sin was simply a lack of seasoning—I should have saved some of that garlic from the Brussels sprouts to mix with my cauliflower grits and gravy. All the same, it’s an inventive dish that makes the joy of chickenfried steak more accessible, which is God’s work. Outside of an overzealous frontof-house experience and a few flat notes when it came to seasoning and execution, Twisted Fern remains a great option for Park City dining that’s blissfully removed from its more high-traffic areas. Just make sure you have a reservation if you want an evening free from snorts of derision. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Park City’s Twisted Fern offers great eats away from the Sundance crowd.

of fried Brussels sprouts ($10); the shorty melt ($16), an open-faced take on a classic Reuben; and the chicken-fried Portobello ($17), a vegetarian-friendly interpretation of chicken-fried steak. We ordered the kids’ cheddar burger ($8) for our 1-year-old—she’s been in a burger and sandwich mood lately, and she found this burger very much to her liking. Based on this order alone, it’s easy to see that Chef Ross is a fan of reinterpreting comfort food staples. Fried Brussels sprouts are ubiquitous at contemporary American places, but the huckleberry vinaigrette and apple butter were nice touches. I did find a few smatterings of undercooked garlic that gave my taste buds an unexpected wallop, but no harm done. The shorty melt was the winner of the evening—the vinegary goodness of the pickles and sauerkraut play well with the creamy, house-made Thousand Island dressing. The braised short rib melts in the mouth, and the chef gets props for adding a fried egg to a Reuben sandwich. My only gripe was that our portion was a bit small. I loved the concept of the chicken fried Portobello a bit more than I did the execution, but it’s a truly

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Fest Feasting

things interesting throughout the year—plus, they have one of the most inventive kids’ menus that I’ve ever seen, which was a good excuse to bring my 1-year-old along for the trip. My family and I visited for an early dinner during the week, so we didn’t expect the place to be overly crowded—and it wasn’t. Despite the ample seating options we saw before us, our host promptly asked whether or not we had a reservation— we didn’t. After a few moments of scrolling through his iPad, our host informed us that, since the next reservation was in an hour and a half, he supposed he could seat us—but we had to be quick! Eyes rolled from all three members of my party. The restaurant itself is comfortable, and despite its location in a strip mall off Kearns Boulevard, it’s got a lovely patio with a nice view of the mountains. Of course, this time of year that patio is blanketed by a few feet of snow, so I don’t recommend patio dining here unless it’s part of your polar bear challenge. The menu really does have a nice range of contemporary American dishes, and all of them make sure you eat your seasonal root vegetables. Based on our server’s recommendation, we ordered a starter


the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER

by

@captainspringer

Mr. Charlie’s Chicken Fingers Opens

Let’s just take a moment to recognize that chicken fingers might be the most universally accessible food known to man. That being said, let’s take a trip to Mr. Charlie’s Chicken Fingers (554 W. 4500 South, 801-8039486, mrcharlieschickenfingers.com), which recently opened in Murray. The menu boasts a scant variation on this most beloved of fried meats—orders come in two, three or five chicken fingers, or you can get them piled on a sandwich. They also offer plates of chicken fingers for large gatherings—a hundred bucks gets you a hundred fingers! Any place that does one thing and one thing only almost definitely knows something we don’t, and we’re glad to have it on the radar.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

20 | JANUARY 31, 2019

A LA MAISON

Super Bowl Bites

Super Bowl Sunday is upon us, which means you better damn well bring your A-game to whatever watch party you’re gracing with your presence. Those who are looking to bring something unique to the party should check out the Salt Lake campus of the Park City Culinary Institute (1484 S. State, parkcityculinaryinstitute.com) on Friday, Feb. 1, for their Serious Super Bowl Bites and Beer event. Attendees receive all the ingredients necessary to whip up something special—including a signature dish from each team’s hometown for maximum rivalry bonus points. While enjoying the fruits of their labor, guests over 21 receive some local beer to try. This can either be consumed in triumph or defeat, depending on how your cooking turns out. Tickets are available via Eventbrite, and the event lasts from 6 to 9 p.m. AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived 1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

You’re cordially invited to

Dine Like Royalty

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive

Proper Burger on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

Our local beer-and-burger tag team at Proper Burger Co. (865 S. Main, 801-906-8604, properburgerslc.com) recently had the honor of hosting Food Network’s bleachblond gastro-bro Guy Fieri, which is a proud moment for any local establishment. The episode first aired on Friday, Jan. 25, but it will be replayed throughout the rest of the month and into February for those who missed it. Proper Burger celebrated its admission into Flavortown by unveiling a burger known as Fry Gruyeri that contains a pile of their famous fries, Gruyére cheese, crispy onions and shallot jam. I hope they keep it on the menu permanently, as I think Fry Gruyeri and Johnny Utah need to hang out more.

Award Winning Donuts

Quote of the Week: “If it tastes really good and it’s funky, it’s funkalicious.” —Guy Fieri Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net 4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


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GRAND OPENING SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION

801-969-6666

123 S. State Orem, Utah 84058

801-960-9669

Lunch Buffet: $8.95 Adults, $4.95 Kids, Mon-Fri 11am-3:30pm Dinner Buffet: $12.95 Adults, $7.75 Kids, Mon-Fri 3:30pm-9:30pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays $12.95 All Day / Take-Out: Lunch $4.75/lb Dinner $6.25/lb

JANUARY 31, 2019 | 21

Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

| CITY WEEKLY |

801-905-1186

5668 S. Redwood Rd. Taylorsville, Ut 84123

3620 S. State Street SLC, Utah 84115

THREE LOCATIONS!

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3 6 2 0


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| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | JANUARY 31, 2019

I.P.-Yea!

New meets sorta-new with these fresh IPAs. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

E

very January, I take a break from alcohol—mostly to prove that I’m the boss of the beer in my life, not the other way around. However, when I do get back on that wonderful beer wagon, IPAs are my go-to beers. They’re just so flavor intensive, and I love that tingling I get on the sides of my tongue at the first sip. Luckily, two new IPAs were awaiting me on my first day back. Uinta Brewing Co. Clear Daze Juicy IPA: It pours just like the name describes— clear, with honey tones bordering between orange and amber. As soon as I finish pouring, I can smell the fruit basket this beer imitates. Pineapple, mango and tangerine smells swirl around, and doses of orange and tropical fruit-driven hops dominate the aroma. This beer smells damned good. The flavor profile might not be quite as vibrant or bright as the nose, but it’s certainly close. The tropical fruits get it started again

with pineapple and mango flavors; the tangerine and big, fleshy orange show up in the middle, but not before that softly sweet, almost lactic, sugar-cookie sweetness hits. It’s funny the way the bright orange and sugars combine. A whisper of herbal, earthy hops hows up at the end. The finish dries up after 10 or 15 seconds and leaves behind a bitterness that grows but never surpasses moderate. The mouthfeel and 6 percent alcohol fit well and actually make this beer quite dangerous. It’s on the lighter side of moderate with a snappy, possibly slightly overaggressive carbonation. Overall: Clear Daze is the way to do it in the Northeast style, if you don’t want all of those unnecessary turbid calories. The flavor is interesting and fun to be around, and that giant nose of bright fruit is enough to make you smile. Give this one a go. Wasatch Brewery West Coast IPA: This is part of a new series of beers made exclusively at the original source, Wasatch’s Park City brewery, helmed by head brewer Nils Imboden. This West Coast-style IPA pours a hazy, golden, amber-light orange color, with two fingers of dense and rocky off-white head. Very nice aromas emerge, with a good balance and complexity of bright citrusy, fruity, and piney hops and moderate pale malt notes. The taste starts with big grapefruit, tangerine and pineapple. More domesticated fruits emerge from there, with

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

peach, apricot and melon popping up from the malt-and-hops combo. As we approach the end of the flavor palate, lemon zest, orange peel, pine and light honey round out all of the aforementioned flavors. The finish has a nice assertive bitterness that builds upon the more grassy and resinous pine elements. There is a moderate dryness from that bitterness with a very smooth, balanced, sticky, resinous and fairly grainy and bready mouthfeel, with zero warming alcohol for 6.5 percent. Overall, this is a great IPA. The all-around

complexity and balance make it very smooth and easy to drink. Despite its fairly aggressive bitterness and resinous dryness, it’s a very enjoyable offering. Clear Daze is currently available in cans at Uinta Brewery Pub’s adjacent bottle shop and should be making its way into beer pubs around the Wasatch Front. The West Coast IPA can only be purchased to-go at Wasatch’s Park City brewery; however, it can be enjoyed in-house at most Wasatch and Squatters locations, so keep that in mind. As always, cheers! CW


Pasta for the People since 1968

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Boltcutter

This plant-based Mexican food presses all the right buttons. The team at Boltcutter has developed meatless versions of classic burrito and taco fillings like carne asada, barbacoa and fried fish. Whereas some plantbased eateries feel an obligation to make their meatless “meat” taste like the original, Boltcutter lets the natural flavors of jackfruit, tempeh and seitan meld with their house blend of seasonings to create something new, yet bracingly familiar. For a maiden voyage, consider trying the delectable tacos al pastor, the sin carne burrito or the nachos. 57 E. Gallivan Ave., 801-555-1212

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Ditta Caffè

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182 MON-TH U 11a-11p / FR I - SA T 1 1 a- 1 2a / SU N 3p-10 p

ears

!

With its solid menu of Middle Eastern cuisine and preternatural intuition regarding the way food can knit a community together, Laziz Kitchen has established itself as a warm and welcoming spot since its opening day. Its location within the Central Ninth neighborhood serves to cement its presence as one of the city’s most hospitable restaurants. The ever-changing stew menu, which offers both vegan and non-vegan varieties, is always a good bet, as are the fried cauliflower florets and life-affirming shakshouka. 912 S. Jefferson St., 801-441-1228, lazizkitchen.com

Bumblebee’s BBQ & Grill

11:00am - 9:30pm 11:00am - 10:30pm 12:00pm - 9:00pm

3370 State Street #8 South Salt Lake, UT 801-466-8888 | Full liquor license

LUNCH - $9.99 DINNER - $19.99

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SAKURAHIBACHISLC.COM

JANUARY 31, 2019 | 23

ninth & ninth 254 south main

Here you’ll find tasty variations of the classics—tacos, burritos and quesadillas—but it’s the house mole negro burrito that takes the (tres leches) cake. This bad boy will take care of your grumble and leave you ready to rumble. Never mind a baby’s arm; stuffed with rice beans and mole-soaked chicken, this burro is thicker than most newborns. And did we mention the tacos? 208 E. 500 South, 801-428-2704, tacotacoslc.com

Mon - Thur: Fri - Sat: Sunday:

| CITY WEEKLY |

Taco Taco

HIBACHI

The menu at this Korean-American fusion joint is all you really need to realize that America and North Korea can learn to love each other. You’ll find KPOP Fries, which take an American staple and make it better by adding Korean bulgogi; kimchi fried-rice balls introduce traditional Korean spicy cabbage to the American habit of adding cheese and throwing food in the deep fryer. If only our political leaders would look to the harmonious fusion Bumblebee’s has achieved, the world would be a much better—and tastier—place. 7962 S. State, 801-561-0608, bumblebeesbbq.wixsite.com/bumblebzbbq

ALL YOU CAN EAT

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25 y

ng

Celebrat i

Laziz Kitchen

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italianvillageslc.com

Whether you want to be productive, people-watch, meet a date, chill with friends or just get coffee to go, Ditta is the spot. Their locally sourced drinks and food— think La Barba, Tea Grotto, and Rosehill Dairy—are superb, but the best thing about this place has got to be the insanely huge patio out back. In the summer, Ditta sports a riotous wrap-around garden; the interior is warm and welcoming when snow season hits. 1560 E. 3300 South, 801-410-4696, dittacaffe.com


REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews 100% gluten-free

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail

24 | JANUARY 31, 2019

| CITY WEEKLY |

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

Szechuan Garden

Travel With The City Weekly Experts! 10 Night Trip Hosted By John Saltas Sept. 14 - 24, 2019

The Garden’s interior is awash in deep reds and greens—a sneak preview of the omnipresent red chiles and green scallions that will inevitably end up on your plate. For those after a quick, concentrated jolt of Sichuan flavor, start with the minced meat with bean curd ($7.95), otherwise known as mapo doufu; it’s one of the Chinese region’s flagship entrees. The bowl of cubed tofu is softened to a silky texture from its time spent wok-frying with a spicy gang of ground pork, chile oil, Sichuan peppercorns, garlic and bean paste. The fish fillet in Szechuan chili sauce ($14.95) is perhaps one of the more luxurious options: thin slices of fried fish fillet doused in that same chile oil and peppercorn mixture are served with green peppers, onions and dried chile peppers. The eggplant with Szechuan garlic sauce ($7.95) is yet another balanced mix of heat, flavor and texture, served sizzling in a clay pot and looking deceptively like barbecued spare ribs. If you appreciate spicy food that prefers subtlety over trying to burn a hole in your chest, it’s time to take a trip down Sandy way. Reviewed Jan. 10. 1275 E. 8600 South, Sandy, 801-233-0027, szechuangardensandy.com

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20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

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The Violet Temper goes against the grain with heartfelt, non-computerized art.

I

DJ RUDE BOY & BAD BOY BRIAN

SPINNIN THE FRESHEST FRIDAY NIGHT JAMS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

Lindsay Heath, left, and Cache Tolman of The Violet Temper

9PM - NO COVER SUNDAYS & THURSDAYS & SATURDAYS

WASATCH POKER TOUR @ 8PM BONUS: SAT @ 2PM

WIN JOHNNY CASH! MONDAYS

STARTS @ 9PM

FREE TO PLAY ENTER TO WIN CASH & PRIZES

TUESDAYS

SUNDAY FEBRUARY, 3

JOIN US FOR THE BEST COMMERCIALS OF THE YEAR! & A MAROON 5 CONCERT! NEW ENGLAND VS LOS ANGELES 4:30

w/ SWIMM, Brain Bagz, Kyoht Thursday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East Free, 21+ theurbanloungeslc.com

165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

JANUARY 31, 2019 | 25

THE VIOLET TEMPER

| CITY WEEKLY |

they’ve destroyed rock ’n’ roll music.” Tolman began his quest to find a like-minded artist and make rock pure again. Around 2002, he went to a local show at Kilby Court and witnessed Lindsay Heath’s earth-shattering chops on the drums. “I’ll just say that [Heath] murdered everyone else in the band,” Tolman explains. “I said it in my head and to my mutual friend: ‘She should play drums in Mötley Crüe—she’s great!’” After that show, however, it took a handful of years before the two would jam together. Tolman contributed stand-up and electric bass to the Lindsay Heath Orchestra, making him the perfect passenger for a new project. Ultimately, the two linked up in a last-ditch effort to fight computerized, generic music, and last year formed The Violet Temper. “I was totally starstruck,” Heath explains. “I went from listening to Cache’s band as a teen—that was my band that I was fan-girling, and that’s how I learned to play. Now, I get to play with the real deal. I get to play with my favorite teacher.” Before the release of their debut self-titled album in 2018, the two weren’t always on the same page musically. It took long hours of practice and studio time to develop musical chemistry. “This project is really cool because it’s even-steven as far as bouncing ideas off each other,” Tolman says. “I wanted to figure out if it works, and now that I know it works, we can have more fun with the inner mechanics. After about the first four or five songs, I said. ‘OK, this is going to work.’” Heath and Tolman wanted to keep their music simple yet complex, but how many sounds can be emitted from drums, bass and guitar? On The Violet Temper, recorded by friend and producer Andy Patterson at The Boar’s Nest in Salt Lake City, the possibilities were infinite. “Everything you hear on this record, we are making that happen in the moment,” Heath says. “We can recreate that sound anytime, anywhere. And the fact that Cache did the vocals live in the moment and nailed them is kind of unheard of.” The best things really do come in pairs, and for The Violet Temper duo, every show, every song and every note counts. “My idea was, it needs to be fun,” Tolman says. “If it’s not fun, it’s not music. We’ll play a show, and it doesn’t matter if there are 500 people there or five—we’re going to have a blast and we know it.” CW

n his 2013 best-selling autobiography, The Smiths icon Morrissey described a friend as having a “violet temper.” Those words stuck with Utah’s Cache Tolman so much that the guitarist pays tribute to the sarcastic, witty Englishman in his new project, The Violet Temper, with drummer/vocalist Lindsay Heath. Morrissey is just one of the many muses Tolman and Heath draw inspiration from as they crash head-on into a new “doom shoegaze” alt-rock adventure. Every artist starts their journey somewhere. For Heath, it was at elementary school with a friend’s drum kit at the tender age of 10. Self-taught, Heath began diving deeper into music when she got her own Tama starter drum set at 15. “It was so beat down, my cousin sold it to me for $150,” Heath laughs as she reminisces. “I was so happy. I used to play along to Helmet records all the time.” For Tolman, friendship guided the then-teenager to the guitar. “I joined Iceburn when I was 15, so naturally, I learned from the guitar player, Gentry [Densley], who was 21,” he recalls. “He had six years on me, so I had to do a light-year’s jump. I continued to play with different people, and that was my school.” Those in Salt Lake City’s underground music scene might recognize Heath and Tolman. This isn’t their first time in the spotlight; together, both musicians have decades of experience on stage and in studio. Heath has performed in bands including Kid Madusa and solo on her 2014 album Holy Medicine. Tolman is also a fixture in the SLC music scene. Best-known for his mathematical avantgarde licks as the guitarist for the city’s homegrown jazzcore band Iceburn Collective, which grew to underground fame throughout the ’90s, Tolman has kept his music raw and unscathed, avoiding the overproduction that so many bands fell victim too. Alternative rock in the ’90s was loud, fast and honest, but eventually, the digital age came, and alt-rock went from a niche taste to the status quo, heard on radios nationwide. “Sometime in the ’90s, rock music got put on a grid,” Tolman explains. “What that means is, [record companies] put it to a computer grid so that [rock] sounds like dance music, making it ‘perfect.’ In my mind,

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ comments@cityweekly.net @rachell57180584

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

If It’s Not Fun, It’s Not Music

MUSIC RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

CONCERT PREVIEW


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2106 W. North Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah 801-741-1188

10% off for military, firefighters and law enforcement

THURSDAY 1/31

Casual, Z-Man, DJ True Justice, Vocab Slick, Fokis, Save 1, Swelly, Zac Ivie, AU, DJ Mixter Mike

Oakland native Jonathan “Casual” Owens is credited with co-founding the West Coast’s answer to Wu-Tang Clan: the underground legends known as Hieroglyphics. Lesser MCs would shudder at the idea of teaming up with such a talented group of voices, but not Casual, who used his unique wordplay, rugged beats and irreverent attitude toward his competitors to carve out a classic major label solo debut, 1993’s Fear Itself. The brash, battle rap-inspired project was a stark contrast to the light-hearted lyrics and smooth beats of Souls of Mischief, another offshoot of the popular Hieroglyphics crew. Although Casual hasn’t charted since Fear Itself’s release 26 years ago, he’s stayed busy with guest spots on his crewmates’ albums and collaborations with peers from other camps. Casual has worked with Planet Asia, Copywrite, Zion I & The Grouch, Jake One, Swollen Members, Goapele, Sean Price and Everlast, proving that his presence is respected far away from his old stomping grounds in sunny California, even without much commercial recognition. Rapping isn’t the only thing Casual is into: He recently launched a production company called Wetworks Films and dabbled in cryptocurrency, creating the “Hiero Coin.” Casual blows through Salt Lake City at the tail end of January on the 5th Annual Slap Frost Tour, with a loaded bill featuring nationally acclaimed rappers Z-Man, DJ True Justice, Vocab Slick, Fokis, Save 1 and Swelly, as well as Utah’s very own Zac Ivie, AU and DJ Mixter Mike. With Jack Frost slapping Salt Lake Valley down with winter cold and feet of snow these days, this concert will buck the trend and provide a warm welcome to our friends from the West. (Keith L. McDonald) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 9 p.m., $5-$15; 21+, metromusichall.com

Mozes & The Firstborn

Casual

FRIDAY 2/1

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives, The Hollering Pines

Although he’s just 60 years old, Mississippi native Marty Stuart plays Americana music like he’s 90, continuing an unbroken tradition of showmanship and reverence that stretches back to titans like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Lester Flatt and Ralph Stanley. Mixing bluegrass, honkytonk and traditional country is nothing new in 2019, but back in the late ’60s, when Stuart got his start at the tender age of 10, it was downright revolutionary, shunning the rock ’n’ roll trend in favor of history and ritual passed down through the ages. Stuart hit all the early milestones, appearing on Hee Haw and joining Johnny Cash’s backup band. He even married Cash’s daughter, Cindy, in 1983, putting him squarely in the fold with one of the greatest Southern music families of all time (Johnny’s wife, June Carter Cash, was the daughter of gospel icon A.P. Carter, whose brogan now rests in Stuart’s possession, along with a treasure trove of other country memorabilia). By the mid ’80s, Stuart was considered a leading member of Nashville’s new breed of trad-country radicals. He signed record deals with Columbia, MCA and Decca and scored top-10 duets with Travis Tritt, but the unblazed path still called. Stuart’s own Superlatone Records specializes in forgotten roots and blues albums, while his work on Porter Wagoner’s final album, 2007’s Wagonmaster, garnered attention for reviving the career of an original rhinestone cowboy. Today, Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives live up to their name, whipping up 100 years of American music history into a delectable, danceable hybrid blend that feels both fresh and timeless. (Nick McGregor) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $50 general admission sold out at press time; $195 VIP admission, 21+, thestateroom.com

Mozes & The Firstborn, The Parrots, Billy Changer

NICK HELDERMAN

26 | JANUARY 31, 2019

BY KEITH L. McDONALD & NICK McGREGOR

JONATHAN OWENS

Ostrich Buffalo Elk Venison Wild Boar Wagyu

LIVE

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Dutch quartet Mozes & The Firstborn might sound biblically motivated, but their skewed take on grunge rock and power pop is more indebted to the sumptuous sleaze of T. Rex and the ironic profligacy of Guided by Voices. First breaking through in North America thanks to those slacker saints at Burger Records, Melle Dielesen, Corto Blommaert, Raven Aartsen and Ernst-Jan van Doorn have since elevated their profile on tours with stateside garage rock heroes like The Growlers and Unknown Mortal Orchestra. But 2019 album Dadcore, the band’s third full-length, makes its own statement with blistering glam rock and sonic fuzz, pieced together by producers Chris Coady (of Beach House fame) and Roland Cosio. Extending the international flavor on Friday are Spanish folk-rockers The Parrots, who combine tender acoustic jams with sweaty punk energy to hit the perfect spot of what they call “that genius-stupidity of all ace garage rock bands … sunbaked stoner elation [and] a gleeful mangling of the English language.” As frontman Diego Garcia admits, “Everybody gets motivated when they see us play.” Here’s to a rowdy night. (NM) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $10, all ages, kilbycourt.com


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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 27


CAITLIN MCCANN

The Districts

SATURDAY 2/2 The Districts, Deeper

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 1.31 MICHELLE MOONSHINE

2.1 CROOK AND THE BLUFF

2.2 YOU TOPPLE OVER

2.3 KAPIX

No young punk band has changed more drastically than Pennsylvania’s The Districts, who started in high school with standardissue emo ballads before metamorphosing over multiple releases into anthemic, avantgarde specialists. Frontman Rob Grote sings with a wounded air of isolation and abandonment, but his understanding of loneliness can turn on a dime, lunging on most recent album Popular Manipulations from tortured to life-affirming with the turn of a phrase. Bassist Connor Jacobus, drummer Braden Lawrence and guitarist Pat Cassidy add layers of inscrutable context, pulling from the often-overlooked work of mid-2000s rock by Wolf Parade and The Diableros. But at its heart, The Districts’ music is raw and direct, digging in to the human condition with startling insight and agitation. Opening is Chicago quartet Deeper, who bring their intricate instrumental interplay and post-punk propulsion on the road to the West Coast for the first time ever. (NM) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $14 advance; $16 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Guster

2.4 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

MONDAY 2/4

Guster, Henry Jamison

Guster is another tough act to pin down. Starting in the early ’90s in Boston’s prolific coffeehouse scene, they eventually latched on to the regional explosion of jam bands like moe., Widespread Panic, Phish and The Disco Biscuits. Their first big single, 1999’s “Fa Fa,” inexplicably earned traction on the adult contemporary charts, but it alienated Guster from its more underground peers. That was fine by Ryan Miller, Adam Gardner, Brian Rosenworcel and Joe Pisapia, however, who embraced their eccentric streak by adding layers of jazz-inspired percussion to otherwise standard alt-rock songs and creating memorable on-stage moments. They have fans throw Ping-Pong balls on stage during “Airport Song”; they open their own shows in costume as the Peace Soldiers and Trippin’ Balls; they play the theme song from The Price Is Right during introductions. But don’t let that history distract from the fact that Guster has built up a devoted fan base over nearly 30 years in the game, with New Englanders particulary in thrall to them. The same goes for new album Look Alive, which was recorded in a vintage keyboard museum in Calgary during the winter, adding an icy, synthesized sheen to the band’s sparkling pop-rock. Arrive early for Vermont’s Henry Jamison, whose incisive folk music takes aim at the toxic masculinity of the 21st century. (NM) The Depot, 13 N. 400 West, 7 p.m., $30, all ages, depotslc.com

2.8-2.9 STONEFED

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

ALYSSE GAFKJEN

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28 | JANUARY 31, 2019

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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 29

WEDNESDAY:

Micro Brew Pint Special $3

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.50¢ Buffalo Wings Prizes & Give Aways & Breaking Bingo pot $950

SUNDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00pm

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SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! THURSDAY: Dusty Grooves all vinyl DJ @10:00pm

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30 | JANUARY 31, 2019

MONDAY 2/4

CONCERTS & CLUBS

DARREN CRAIG

LP, Yoke Lore

THURSDAY 1/31 LIVE MUSIC

Caleb Gray Band (The Spur) The Deltaz (Gracie’s) 5th Annual Slap Frost Tour feat. Casual + Z-Man + DJ True Justice + Vocab Slick + Fokis + Save 1 + Swelly + Zac Ivie + AU + DJ Mixter Mike (Metro Music Hall) see p. 26 Fox Running + Tate Texton + Nate Hardyman (Velour) John McEuen & The String Wizards + Jonathan McEuen (The State Room) K-UTE Radio & The Hip Hop Drip feat. vinniecassius. + Lisa Frank + Purr 2x + Jwinn + Big Uce Out Da 6 + Undecided Music (Kilby Court) MIchelle Moonshine (Hog Wallow Pub) Reggae at the Royal feat. Wasted Daze + Sundaii + DJ Napo (The Royal) Talia Keys (Lake Effect) The Violet Temper + Brain Bagz + Kyoht (Urban Lounge) see p. 24 Vann Moon (Rye)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect)

Dueling Pianos: Troy & Jordan (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. The Glitch Mob (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Night (Tinwell) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck w/ Mikey Danger (Chakra Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 2/1 LIVE MUSIC

Andrew Cole (Legends) Avant Vespers 8 feat. Gavin Ryan + Ricksplund + Nathan Adams + Erik Matthew Larson

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

Laura Pergolizzi’s far-reaching success is borne of frustration. While her career as a songwriter for Cher, Rihanna and Christina Aguilera flourished in the late 2000s, Pergolizzi’s solo work as LP was left for dead multiple times. She famously played her brooding, big-tent single “Lost on You” for a Warner Music Group executive mere weeks before he dropped her; the song went on to become a No. 1 hit in Greece, Russia, Poland and 10 other European countries, with 233 million YouTube views to date. Yet LP, pictured, is decidedly American, a singular product of her New York upbringing and Los Angeles home. A little bit chainsmoking Lou Reed and a little bit ukulele-playing pop polymath, tortured romanticism is what the 37-year-old does best. And that’s not different from the way things started back in 2001, when LP kicked off her career with debut album Heart-Shaped Scar. But 2018’s Heart to Mouth—which hit No. 2 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart—expands upon that downcast template with songs that feel arena-ready and intimate, all at once. Those years of struggle seem like they paid off: “Each person has to discover what makes you you,” she told the New Statesman in December 2018. “How you’re going to get through, what you’re going to hold on to, what you’re going to strip away and uncover in yourself. Would you rather hit it right away, but with a song that you weren’t behind, with an image you didn’t really like? Or would you rather wait a little bit longer and have the song that defines you, have a look that speaks to you?” (Nick McGregor) The Union Event Center, 235 N. 500 West, 8 p.m., $25-$30, all ages, theunioneventcenter.com (St. Mary’s Episcopal Church) Bas + Rexx Life Raj + Innanet James + Correy C (The Complex) Brennan Mackey (Satori Sound Garden) Chambray (Metro Music Hall) Crook & The Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) Dubwise feat. Roommate + King Dubbist + illoom (Urban Lounge) Excision Apex (The Great Saltair) Herban Empire (State Road Tavern) JT Draper (Harp and Hound) Late Night Savior + Chronic Trigger + Poet Bones (The Royal) Mark Owens (Westerner) Martin Garrix (Park City Live) Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives + The Hollering Pines (The State Room) see p. 26 Matthew Bashaw (Lake Effect) Metal Dogs (The Spur) Method Man & Redman (Sky) Mike Rogers (Silver Lake) Morgan and The Mountain (Garage on Beck) The Moth & The Flame (Velour) Mountain Country + Cosy Sheridan (South Valley Unitarian Universalist Church) Mozes & The Firstborn + The Parrots + Billy Changer (Kilby Court) see p. 26 The Pranksters (The Ice Haüs)

Rick Gerber (Deer Valley) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Talib Kweli (O.P. Rockwell) Young Culture + The Happy Alright + Benson Hedges + Vertical Minds (The Underground)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Mike feat. Dave & JC (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Funky Friday w/ DJ Godina (Gracie’s) Hot Noise (The Red Door) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Ying-Yang Twins (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

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JANUARY 31, 2019 | 31

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 3pm-5pm & 10pm-midnight.

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kitchen open until midnight

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W/ TYCOON MACHETE & A MIGHTY BAND OF MICROBES

TOURING ARTISTS THE DELTAZ 8PM-11PM

OT P K AC !! J T ES TA H!! GOING G R LA IN U

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Friday, Feb. 1st

WED

PLAY GEEKS WHO DRINK PUB TRIVIA AT 6:30 BREAKING BINGO AT 8:30-JACKPOT AT $4100.00 TOURING ARTISTS JOSH HOYER AND SOUL COLOSSAL 10PM-1AM

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32 | JANUARY 31, 2019

THE GREEN PIG

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

SATURDAY 2/2 LIVE MUSIC

The Amity Affliction + Senses Fail + Silent Planet + Belmont (The Complex) Always Late + Riddled With + Bruhound (The Royal) The Backseat Lovers (Bill’s Warehouse) Brett Dennen (The State Room) Broncho + Pinky Pinky + Ugly Boys (Kilby Court) The Districts + Deeper (Urban Lounge) see p. 28 Eric Anthony + Lounge 40 (Lake Effect) Excision (The Great Saltair) For Mad Men Only + Red Checkerboard (Gold Blood Collective) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Trio (The Red Door) The Main Squeeze (Canyons Village) The Motet (The Commonwealth Room) Mark Farina (O.P. Rockwell) Mark Owens (Westerner) Matthew and the Hope (Johnny’s on Second) Orphans Cabaret + Tycoon Machete + A Mighty Band of Microbes (Ice Haüs) The Proper Way (Legends) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Shannon Runyon (Silver Lake) Shuffle (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Take Two (HandleBar) Talib Kweli (Soundwell) Terrapin Flyer w/ Melvin Seals (The Depot) You Topple Over (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules and

Dave & JC (Tavernacle) Mix Master Mike (Downstairs) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays feat. Fashen (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

SUNDAY 2/3 LIVE MUSIC

Kapix (Hog Wallow Pub) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Margo Cilker + An American Forrest (Satori Sound Garden) Stonefield + Martian Cult + Lord Vox (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Sunday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Nick Greco & Blues on First (Gracie’s) Sunday Night Sinners Club feat. (Quarters Arcade Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 2/4 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Chrome Sparks + Kalbells + Max (Urban Lounge) Evening In Brazil (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Guster + Henry Jamison (The Depot) see p. 28 The Home Team + Hylian (Kilby Court)

It’s Taco Tuesday at what is arguably the best corner bar in downtown Salt Lake City, The Green Pig. When I mosey on in, The Pig is packed with patrons clinking pints of Guinness and cocktails amid the chatter. I’m greeted by Tom LeBaron, an Ogden tattoo artist working the door. Tom gives me the lowdown on the spot’s patrons: “I know a few local artists that come in here,” he tells me as he pens a “flash piece” that will one day be for a potential client. It’s clear why The Pig seems to be a hub for artists: Plenty of inspiration can be drawn from the patrons, and The Pig offers epic views of the Salt Lake City and County Building from the outside patio. However, during the winter, the action’s inside. Although this evening is all about tacos and tequila, I go with cod hand-dipped in pilsner batter and hand-cut chips. I snack on my delicious deep-fried bar food solo, staring in awe at the knickknacks that hang above the whiskey bottles. I decide to strike up a conversation with Tim, one of the bartenders, and we land on the topic of Facebook stalking. “Back then, if you wanted to know where someone was, you’d have to hire a private investigator,” Tim says as we chat about how easy it is to find someone these days compared to way back when. I start to think about how easy it would be for someone to find me, considering I geotag my location everywhere I go. Well, world, tonight I’m at The Pig. I’ll probably be here next Tuesday, too. (Rachelle Fernandez) 31 E. 400 South, 801-532-7441, thegreenpigpub.com

LP + Yoke Lore (The Union Event Center) see p. 28

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Industry Night Mondays w/ DJ Juggy (Trails) Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Motown on Mondays feat. J Godina + Street Jesus + Chaseone2 (Alibi) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 2/5 LIVE MUSIC

Aaron Carter + Lenerd + Justin Stone + Le Voir (Urban Lounge) Daniel Torriente (The Spur) J.I.D. + Reason + Hardo + Lou the Human (The Complex) Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers (Canyons Village) Wild Moccasins + Ivouries (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic Night (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s) Tuesday Night Jazz (Alibi)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Liquid Joe’s) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 2/6 LIVE MUSIC

Behind the Zion Curtain: Love Is in the Arse! (The Beehive) CJ Drisdom Quintet (Gallivan Center) Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers + Paris Monster (The State Room) Jon O Radio (Hog Wallow Pub) Live Jazz (Club 90) Post Animal + Ron Gallo + Stuyedeyed (Urban Lounge) Shannon Runyan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)


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MORE UPCOMING SHOWS @

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

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2/15

TUESDAY 2/5

great food & drink specials jersey giveaway every quarter TONS OF great prizes

FEB 8 SEASONED AMNESIA FEB 22 TOASTERS MAR 8 XYZ MAR 15 OINGO BOINGO DANCE PARTY APR 12 FRAMING THE RED JUL 21 ROUGH RIOT

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34 | JANUARY 31, 2019

RENDEZVOUS N. RIO GRANDE STREET

APRIL 20TH | 2PM - 8PM FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AN EXPERIENTIAL EVENT SPOLIGHTING THE ACTIVITIES THAT CAN BE ENJOYED BY THE WHOLE FAMILY KID STRIDER RACES

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FOR MORE INFO VISIT VAMOOSEUTAH.COM 02/06/19


FILM REVIEW

Writer’s Bloc

CINEMA

The gorgeous Cold War isn’t always clear what it’s saying about the Iron Curtain era. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

AMAZON PICTURES

I

Joanna Kulig and Tomasz Kot in Cold War responding to sexual violence at the hands of her father. The incandescence of her performance unbalances the dynamic between Zula and Wiktor—it’s always considerably clearer what he sees in her than vice-versa—but makes Cold War consistently intriguing to watch. That still leaves the question of what Pawlikowski is trying to convey about the period in which this story is set, and it’s clear that the key is somewhere in the way he uses music. There’s the initial compromise by the troupe in agreeing to include blatantly pro-Stalin songs in its repertoire at the “suggestion” of a government official, and the later attempt to translate one of Zula’s signature folk tunes into a sexy torch song. Wiktor and Zula keep getting further and further from their heritage as they attempt to cling to one another, right up to a final snippet of dialogue that’s almost aggressive in its double meaning. Aesthetically, it’s easy to embrace Cold War. The things going on beneath its beautiful surface remain a bit more elusive. CW

Cupid’s Crawl SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH 12PM - 6PM

Dating Games

BBB Joanna Kulig Tomasz Kot R

Photo Booth

Prizes Ida (2013) Agata Kulesza Agata Trzebuchowska PG-13

The Innocents (2016) Lou de Laâge Joanna Kulig PG-13

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people who aren’t meant for one another, tragically divided by the whirlwind of history. It’s fortunate, then, that Cold War has two other terrific things going for it. One of them is the look of the film, shot in stunning black-and-white by Pawlikowski’s Oscar-nominated Ida cinematographer Lukasz Zal. There’s a rich texture to every image, accentuated by Pawlikowski’s decision to consistently frame his characters under a lot of empty space, making it feel as though they’re being pinched into the bottom of their own lives. Individual shots are some of the most striking compositions of the year, whether it’s Zula floating in a lake where the silvery water makes it look like she’s suspended in mercury, or a party where a mirrored wall only gradually makes it evident that we’re watching Wiktor and Zula unable to stop staring at one another. The other terrific thing is Kulig, a veteran actress of (mostly) Polish films who somehow feels like a pure discovery here. It’s not just her look, though it is fascinating—turn her head this way, and she’s a dead ringer for Jennifer Lawrence, making it easy to imagine an English-language remake; tip her chin just so, and suddenly she’s a young Liv Ullmann. But even more striking is the ferocious survival instinct she brings to Zula, evident from the early moments when she understands what she has to do to make the cut for the troupe, and the matter-of-fact way she describes

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t’s an odd feeling watching a filmmaker reach for a thematic complexity he can’t quite wrap his arms around. On the one hand, there should always be incentives for artists to think big and not play it safe; on the other hand, the degree of difficulty can’t be the only criterion for creative success. In Cold War, Pawel Pawlikowski seems interested in nothing less than distilling the Soviet Bloc era of Polish history into one messy romantic relationship—and he sometimes seems so compelled by the broad strokes of his idea that he forgets to shade in the details. The narrative opens in 1949 as the Communist government of Poland begins putting together a troupe of singers and dancers to celebrate the authentic folk music of the common people. The company’s artistic director, Wiktor Warski (Tomasz Kot), immediately becomes intrigued with one particular auditioner, Zula Lichoń (Joanna Kulig), whose talent is matched by her determination. The two soon begin an affair, but their plans to make a life together are complicated fairly immediately by the politics of their time. “Fairly immediately” describes the way nearly everything happens in Cold War. The story ultimately spans 15 years, moving back and forth between both sides of the Iron Curtain, over the space of only 89 minutes. That kind of ruthless narrative efficiency is a trademark of Pawlikowski’s—none of his features have ever topped 90 minutes, including his 2014 foreignlanguage film Oscar-winner Ida—which makes him unique in an era when sheer tonnage of running time is equated with seriousness. Yet there are times when the breakneck pacing leaves gaps in the central relationship. In a sense, the shallow intensity of the connection between Wiktor and Zula feels like part of the point, but it should still be important to show two


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NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net COLD WAR BBB See review on p. 35. Opens Feb. 1 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) MISS BALA [not yet reviewed] A woman (Gina Rodiguez) is entangled in the world of border drug cartels. Opens Feb. 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS IN SEARCH OF GREATNESS At Main Library, Feb. 5, 7 p.m. SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL At venues in Park City, Salt Lake City and Sundance Resort, through Feb. 3.

CURRENT RELEASES DESTROYER BBB.5 Nicole Kidman’s pitiless performance as rule-breaking, guiltridden LAPD cop Erin Bell upends genre expectations in this tense, grim modern crime noir. Detective Bell’s undercover past comes back to haunt her when a dead body turns out to be a

member of the bank-robbing gang she once infiltrated and she must hunt down the surviving crooks to find the killer. Kidman’s bravery comes not in choosing to look like hell onscreen, but in how she embraces Bell as a happy co-conspirator in the  macho bullshit of a “man’s world.” Director Karyn Kusama’s bravery comes in the sneaky way she smashes stereotypes and toys with narrative to depict trauma as a Möbius strip we can never escape, no matter how hard we run. It’s uncompromising and subtly challenging storytelling you’ll turn over in your mind like a cerebral itch to scratch. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson GLASS BB M. Night Shyamalan tries to paste together the worlds of Unbreakable and Split and winds up with something tonally confusing and philosophically indefensible. As the end of Split teased, multiple-personality serial killer The Horde (James McAvoy) coexists with Unbreakable’s hero David Dunn (Bruce Willis); we find them both connecting with villainous mastermind Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson). The bulk of the narrative is confined to a mental hospital where all three are treated by a doctor (Sarah Paulson) trying to convince them they’re delusional, and a deep tedium sets in while a lot of talking goes on. McAvoy at least has fun with his role(s), compared to Willis’ grim silence. As for Shyamalan’s take on superhero mythology? Let’s just say his interpretations don’t hold up to much scrutiny. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING BBB Writer/director Joe Cornish tells the story of Alex (Louis Ashbourne Serkis), a 12-year-old British schoolboy who improbably finds himself wielding Excalibur and leading a quest to prevent the rise of the sorceress Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson) with a ragtag crew of young Round Table knights. Cornish doesn’t show the same sense of pacing he did in Attack the Block; the two-hour kid pic drags a bit on the way to its climax. But the appealing young cast provides welcome energy, and the battles against

flaming demon skeletons are solidly rousing. There’s a satisfying Brexit-era insistence on the need for a basic code of decency, and an inspirational message to young viewers: Big battles can be won by those who work together and refuse to let powerful bad guys win—and you don’t need to be a Chosen One. (PG)—SR SERENITY BB An obsessive quest to land a mythically gargantuan tuna leaves a flat-busted fisherman (Matthew McConaughey) uniquely susceptible to a murderous proposal from an old flame (Anne Hathaway). The Buick-sized fish proves to be the most subtle thing in the film. Writer/director Steven Knight (Locke) lays on the sweaty noir tropes with a trowel while dropping increasingly broad hints that things might not be quite as they seem. Meanwhile, Hathaway’s boorish husband, played by Jason Clarke, appears to be channeling Popeye’s nemesis Bluto. The results are a movie that drifts between intriguingly meta and utter malarkey, often within the very same scene. If this had come out 20 years ago, lids might very well have flipped at Serenity’s genre-bending shenanigans. These days, awkward curio status seems much more likely. (R)—Andrew Wright STAN & OLLIE BB.5 Instead of a cradle-to-grave history of Stan Laurel (Steve Coogan) and Oliver Hardy (John C. Reilly), this story focuses on the 1950s twilight of the comedy team’s career, as they tour the U.K. trying to drum up interest in a comeback film project. The performances—with Reilly stronger overall—are most interesting when exploring the marriage-esque relationship between these two men. The film has a solid enough setup but mostly seems content to cruise on the gentle goodwill of watching the two leads play legends drifting toward obsoletion. It’s fascinating watching Stan & Ollie catch fire as soon as Nina Arianda and Shirley Henderson—as Stan and Ollie’s respective wives—become prominent characters late in the film. It’s hard not to wish for a movie entirely about them. (PG-13)—SR

THE UPSIDE BB.5 American remakes of non-English language films often lose something in translation, but director Neil Burger retains the almost aggressively feel-good sensibility of 2011’s The Intouchables. Ex-con Dell Scott (Kevin Hart), collecting signatures to prove he’s applying for jobs, finds someone actually willing to hire him in quadriplegic multimillionaire Phillip (Bryan Cranston), who is seeking a new “life auxiliary” to assist with daily tasks. Naturally they both have Very Important Lessons to learn, involving broadly comic set-ups like Dell going into full gay panic about changing Phillip’s catheter and uptight white guy Phillip getting stoned. The two leads have satisfying chemistry, and Cranston particularly conveys the prickly pride of a man who can’t abide pity. The story skates past anything genuinely difficult, content to aim for easy smiles that find the same ready audience in any language. (PG-13)—SR

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK BBB.5 Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel combines two ideas that shouldn’t work together: swooning romance and institutional racism working to destroy that love. Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) plan a life together, but that commitment collides with Fonny’s arrest on trumped-up rape charges, and Tish’s announcement that she’s expecting their baby. Jenkins moves between two timelines with grace and purpose, never allowing us to forget either the cruel reality of the lovers’ separation, or the feelings that hold them together. While the fight to prove Fonny’s innocence is the central conflict, Jenkins never builds it as a procedural, ticking-clock thriller. A story about inhumanity works when we grasp the humanity being stripped away; a love story works when we’re as invested in the hearts that unite them as we are in forces that pull them apart. (R)—SR

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: Start a new trend that will serve your noble goals for years to come. March: Passion comes back into fashion with a tickle and a shiver and a whoosh. April: As you expand and deepen your explorations, call on the metaphorical equivalents of both a telescope and a microscope. May: This is the beginning of the end of what you love to complain about. Hooray! June: You’ll have an abundance of good reasons to celebrate the fact that you are the least normal sign in the zodiac. Celebrate your idiosyncrasies!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: There’s a general amnesty in all matters regarding your relationships. Cultivate truces and forgiveness. March: Drop fixed ideas you might have about what’s possible and what’s not. Be keenly open to unexpected healings. April: Wander out onto the frontiers. Pluck goodies that have been off-limits. Consider the value of ignoring certain taboos. May: Sacrifice a small comfort so as to energize your ambitions. June: Take a stand on behalf of your beautiful ideals and sacred truths.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: You’ll have a knack for enhancing the way you express yourself and present yourself. The inner you and the outer you will become more unified. March: You’ll discover two original new ways to get excited. April: Be bold as you make yourself available for a deeper commitment that will spawn more freedom. May: What are the gaps in your education? Make plans to mitigate your most pressing area of ignorance. June: Your body’s ready to tell you secrets that your mind has not yet figured out. Listen well.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: Master the Zen of constructive anger. Express your complaints in a holy cause. March: You finally get a message you’ve been waiting to receive for a long time. Hallelujah! April: Renew your most useful vows. Sign a better contract. Come to a more complete agreement. May: Don’t let your preconceptions inhibit you from having a wildly good time. June: Start your own club, band, organization or business. Or reinvent and reinvigorate your current one.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: Be alert for vivid glimpses of your best possible future. The power of self-fulfilling prophecy is even stronger than usual. March: High integrity and ethical rigor are crucial to your success—and so is a longing for sacred adventure. April: How can you make the best use of your likability? May: Cheerfully dismantle an old system or structure to make way for a sparkling new system or structure. June: Beginner’s luck will be yours if you choose the right place to begin. What’s a bit intimidating but very exciting?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: You’ll have the need and opportunity to accomplish some benevolent hocus-pocus. For best results, upgrade your magical powers. March: Make sure the turning point happens in your power spot or on your home turf. April: You should be willing to go anywhere, ask any question, and even risk your pride if necessary so as to coax your most important relationships into living up to their potentials. May: If at first you don’t succeed, change the definition of success. June: You can achieve more through negotiation and compromise than by pushing heedlessly ahead in service to your single-minded vision. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: A new phase of your education will begin when you acknowledge how much you have to learn. March: Initiate diplomatic discussions about the Things That Never Get Talked About. April: Revise your ideas about your dream home and your dream community. May: You have the power to find healing for your oldest lovesickness. If you do find it, intimacy will enter a new golden age. June: Solicit an ally’s ingenuity to help you improvise a partial solution to a complex problem.

50. Retail giant established in 1886 that filed for bankruptcy in 2018 51. Whopping 55. Soldier who's gone missing 56. "Mm-hmm" 58. Letters on some kits 59. ____ Speedwagon 60. Bus stop: Abbr. 61. ____ polloi

Last week’s answers

JANUARY 31, 2019 | 37

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: Your sensual magnetism peaks at the same time as your spiritual clarity. March: You want toasted ice? Succulent fire? Earthy marvels? Homey strangeness? All of that is within reach. April: Sow the seeds of the most interesting success you can envision. Your fantasy of what’s possible should thrill your imagination, not merely satisfy your sense of duty. May: Deadline time. Be as decisive and forthright as an Aries, as bold as a Sagittarius, as systematic as a Capricorn. June: Go wading in the womb-temperature ocean of emotion, but be mindful of the undertow.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: The world might finally be ready to respond favorably to the power you’ve been storing up. March: Everything you thought you knew about love and lust turns out to be too limited. So expand your expectations and capacities! April: Extremism and obsession can be useful in moderation. May: Invisible means of support will become visible. Be alert for half-hidden help. June: Good questions: What do other people find valuable about you? How can you enhance what’s valuable about you?

12. In the blink of ____ 13. Downton Abbey, e.g. 18. Symbol seen on viola music 22. Bacon runoff 24. Overjoy 25. Disney's "____ & Stitch" 26. "Of ____ Sing" (Pulitzer-winning Gershwin show) 27. Capek play that debuted the word "robot" 28. "Nothing's broken" 29. The Big Easy, by another nickname 32. The first Mrs. Trump 33. ____ Paese (variety of cheese) 34. Earth tone 35. They may be made with pitching wedges 36. Lion : pride :: ____ : husk DOWN 37. Suffix with trick 1. Häagen-____ 40. "Out of Africa" author 2. Suffix with switch Dinesen 3. Character played by Mickey Rooney in 16 films 42. Friend of Huck 4. Number of weeks per annum? 43. Something to grind to? 5. Where the buoys are 44. Place for pickles 6. "Boogie Oogie Oogie" music genre 46. Toward the stern 7. Not quite right 47. Actress Linney in "Kinsey" 8. Badger or hound 48. "You're such ____ for 9. "The Fountainhead" author Rand helping" 10. Tennis' Borg 49. 3.3, give or take 11. Enter again

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: You have access to a semi-awkward magic that will serve you well if you don’t complain about its semiawkwardness. March: To increase your clout and influence, your crucial first step is to formulate a strong intention to do just that. The universe will then work in your behalf. April: Are you ready to clean messes and dispose of irrelevancies left over from the past? Yes! May: You can have almost anything you want if you resolve to use it for the greatest good. June: Maintain rigorous standards, but don’t be a fanatic. Strive for excellence without getting bogged down in a counterproductive quest for perfection.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: Be open to romantic or erotic adventures that are different from how love has worked in the past. March: You’ll be offered interesting, productive problems. Welcome them! April: Can you explore what’s experimental and fraught with interesting uncertainty even as you stay well-grounded? Yes! May: You can increase your power by not hiding your weakness. People will trust you most if you show your vulnerability. A key to this season’s model of success is the ability to calmly express profound emotion. June: Wild cards and X-factors and loopholes will be more available than usual. Don’t be shy about using them.

1. Mergers and buyouts 6. Delany or Carvey 10. Stoker of fear? 14. "The Governator" 15. Wishy-washy response 16. Actress Malone of "The Hunger Games" 17. Cancer, e.g. 19. Author Robert ____ Butler 20. Protein source in a vegan diet 21. Amts. of blood 22. Cold treat, informally 23. Comment upon bumping into an old friend 28. Awkward way to be caught 30. QB's cry 31. Strength of character 34. Adolph who coined the motto "All the News That's Fit to Print" 38. "You're never too ____ learn" 39. 22nd out of 26 40. Facebook Messenger precursor 41. Danny who co-starred in "White Christmas" 42. "The Godfather" actress 44. Garfield's owner, in the funnies 45. Author Lee 46. Southern rock band with the 2012 hit "Hold On" 52. What a divorce may generate for a celeb 53. It may be a shocker 54. "Bali ____" (Rodgers and Hammerstein show tune) 57. "The Clan of the Cave Bear" novelist 58. Outlets for artisans ... or what you do by solving 17-, 23-, 31-, 42- and 46-Across 62. Woman of the Haus 63. Sassy 64. From head ____ 65. Smears, as a reputation 66. Like some cheeks and outlooks 67. Air passenger's request

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the next five months. February: You’ll be invited to make a pivotal transition in your relationship with your most important life goals. It should be both fun and daunting! March: Don’t waste time and energy trying to coax others to haul away the junk and the clutter. Do it yourself. April: The growing pains should feel pretty good. Enjoy the uncanny stretching sensations. May: It’ll be a favorable phase to upgrade your personal finances. Think richer thoughts. Experiment with new ideas about money. June: Build two strong bridges for every rickety bridge you burn. Create two vital connections for every stale connection you leave behind.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

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Picture this: You’re a self-employed realtor— we are all self employed, really—who hasn’t sold a home in a month, and a potential buyer calls and wants to see the listing you just put on the market. It’s kind of in the middle of nowhere, but you agree to meet this stranger at 8 p.m. You show up and the stranger turns out to be a rapist, robber, murderer or all of the above. This happened more than 20 years ago—when I taught prevention classes and served on the board at the Rape Recovery Center—to a local agent who worked at a real estate brokerage in Sugar House. This was in the pre-internet days, when those magazines advertising “free homes” were out at every grocery store. As I remember it, we later learned the perpetrator profiled the agent MediaBids_190103_24.indd af1 12/28/2018 5:15:20 ter seeing her photo published in the magazine and proceeded to check out her listings to see which one was the most secluded. Then he called her up. He offered to pick her up at her office and drove her out there. She began to show him the home and walked down into the basement ahead of him—and he grabbed her and raped her. This sick fuck then drove her back to her office (located across from the Rape Recovery Center) but was soon tracked down by a helicopter and dogs in the canyon and subsequently arrested, convicted and sent to prison. THIS WEEK’S FEATURED Realtors drive nice cars and show nice homes and are victims of crime all over the PARTLOW RENTALS: United States. This unfortunate fact was brought back home this month when Dave Stokoe, a local real estate agent, was shot and killed and his body hidden in the crawl space of a home after trying to evict the tenFOOTHILL ants, according to police. The three suspects, HOLLADAY COTTONWOOD now arrested, supposedly cleaned up the Deluxe 2 bdrm Duplex! Washer Dryer Charmer! 2 bdrm 2 bath condo! property by pulling out the bloody carpet, included, two covered parking stalls, Central Air, Pool and year round neglecting to wipe the hardwood floors, and central air, extra exterior storage closets, hot tub, stainless steel appliances, dishwasher, crown moulding! $1195 private patio! ONLY $1095 then stole his car. It took two days for the police to find his body after he was reported missing. Stokoe, my friend and fellow realtor, worked for RANlife Real Estate in Sandy. He was a stand-up guy, who, despite being selfemployed, was always in a cheery mood. He SANDY MIDVALE/SANDY left behind a wife and four kids. Could he have Must have 1 bdrm plus office (or Stunning 3 bdrm 3 bath single family prevented the attack? We don’t know the full use as a 2nd bedroom) duplex! His home w/ mature landscaping! Sun room! details, but we do know no one should ever n’ hers sinks, hook-ups, private Shudders, hardwood, two tone paint! yard! $1195 lose their life over a property dispute. A vigil LOVELY! $1795 with hundreds of folks was held Jan. 21, and a GoFundMe page has been set up to help his family with funeral expenses. How safe is your work environment? In this day and age, even walking to your car to go home can be scary. Stokoe didn’t get up DOWNTOWN one morning and expect to die. Be careful out Delightful Vintage 1 bdrm! Alcove there, folks, and make sure you give a hug to entries, free on-site laundry, free the people you love every day … because one interenet, close to TRAX! $785 day your life will flash before your eyes, and you better make sure it’s worth watching. n

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First-World Solution When Victoria Amith, 18, headed to college last fall, she couldn’t take along her beloved cats, Tina and Louise. And her dad, Troy Good, 43, couldn’t keep them at his new apartment in San Jose, Calif. So rather than abandon them, Good did what any doting daddy would do: He rented them an apartment of their own. Tina and Louise now live the good life in a 400-square-foot studio apartment behind the Willow Glen home of David Callisch, who told The San Jose Mercury News: “They’re very quiet, obviously. The only problem is they stink up the place.” Good pays $1,500 a month in rent, and Callisch stops in every day to feed and play with the kitties. Sounds puuuurrrr-fect. Recurring Themes The first clue for police that Craig Wistar, 51, of Warren, Ohio, shouldn’t have been driving was that he was behind the wheel of a car facing east in a westbound lane around 2 a.m. on Dec. 4. The second was the woman in the back seat, who mouthed “Help me” to officers as they questioned Wistar, who had a bottle of vodka at his feet. When asked what he was doing, Wistar replied, “I’m Ubering,” reported WFMJ-TV. Officers moved the passenger to their patrol car and administered a field sobriety test, during which Wistar admitted, “I’m plastered. I’m talking hammered. I confess I’m drunk.” Wistar’s Uber passenger got a ride home from police, and he pleaded guilty on Jan. 14 to driving under the influence. Most important, he will no longer be able to drive for ride-sharing apps.

Promises, Promises On Jan. 1, Curtis Brooner filed a lawsuit claiming a Burger King in Wood Village, Ore., reneged on its promise following a traumatic incident on Dec. 15. KATU-TV reports Brooner was having lunch at the fast-food joint that day when he became locked

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Inexplicable Mmmm, breakfast! Around 7 a.m. on Jan. 6, at a McDonald’s in San Francisco, a man carried a dead raccoon into the restaurant and laid it on a table, then sat down with it. Restaurant patron Chris Brooks captured the spectacle on Facebook Live, recording as the man stood from his seat and walked around the restaurant, talking with people. Another man, wearing gloves, then picked the raccoon up by its tail and took it outside to a garbage can, trailing blood on the floor. Fox News reported San Francisco police responded to the restaurant and released the unidentified raccoon owner after speaking with him. McDonald’s closed the store immediately and reopened two hours later after sanitizing the dining room. One patron wrote on Twitter: “I’ve seen worse than a dead raccoon at that same McDonald’s.” Love Gone Wrong It was love at first ... arrest, for 27-year-old Ashley Keister of Nanticoke, Pa., when she was apprehended by a West Wyoming, Pa., police officer last year. Ever since, Police Chief Curtis Nocera told the Associated Press, Keister had been harassing the officer with sexual messages on social media and would call 911 just to talk with him. On Jan. 7, police said, Keister took her infatuation a step further, using a large cigarette butt receptacle to break through the door of the West Wyoming police station around 1 a.m., where she rummaged through filing cabinets. Keister was caught on surveillance video and was charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, burglary and vandalism. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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n  In the category of Straining Logic, Jana Moschgat’s defense attorney suggested at her drunk-driving hearing on Jan. 8 in Berwick, Pa., that the results of her breath test might have been compromised by the fact that, according to the arresting officer, she was nibbling on her coat before the test was administered. Moschgat, 47, smelled of alcohol, the officer testified, and failed a field sobriety test; her blood alcohol level was tested at 0.151 percent, almost twice the legal limit. Attorney Travis Petty questioned the officer about his knowledge of the fabric content of her coat, reported The (Bloomsburg) Press Enterprise, saying certain materials can alter the results of breath tests. The judge wasn’t buying the argument and sent the case to trial.

Great Art! Namibian artist Max Siedentopf, 27, has placed an installation in the ancient Namib Desert consisting of six speakers attached to an MP3 player projecting the song “Africa” by Toto—over and over and over, for all eternity. The song, released in 1982, has enjoyed a resurgence of popularity and was one of Spotify’s “Top Throwback Songs” in 2018. Siedentopf told the BBC that solar batteries will keep the song playing forever: “I wanted to pay the song the ultimate homage and physically exhibit ‘Africa’ in Africa ... but I’m sure the harsh environment of the desert will devour the installation eventually.”

Julie “Bella” Hall

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n  Sunita Jairam, 48, of Lexington, Ky., was arrested for driving under the influence at about 1 a.m. on Jan. 13, which she explained to police by saying she did it for her son. According to the Lexington Herald Leader, Jairam told police she had been drinking all day and “drank a bunch of beer and got in her car to drive to teach her son a lesson.” Her son, whose age was not reported, told police he had tried several times to get out of the BMW X1 “due to his mother’s driving,” but the doors were locked. Jairam was also charged with endangering the welfare of a minor.

in the restroom. Employees provided him with a flyswatter to use to wrench the door open, but Brooner cut his hand on it, and the lawsuit says employees laughed at Brooner from the other side of the door. It wasn’t until an hour later, when a locksmith arrived, that he was set free. “To make things right,” said Brooner’s attorney, Michael Fuller, “the Burger King manager offered (Brooner) free food for the rest of his life” at that restaurant—and followed through for a few weeks. But eventually the regional manager stepped in and ended it. Brooner’s suit seeks damages of $9,026.16—the price of one burger meal per week for the next 22 years. “There are funny elements of the case,” Fuller told KATU, “but there is nothing funny about being locked in a dank bathroom for an hour.”


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40 | JANUARY 31, 2019

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City Weekly January 31, 2019  

Caught in the Maze

City Weekly January 31, 2019  

Caught in the Maze