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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SO FRESH AND SO LEAN

A look at the rip-roaring 45 days ahead during the 63rd Legislature. Cover illustration by Andy Hood andyhoodillustration.com

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 21 A&E 31 DINE 36 MUSIC 48 CINEMA 52 COMMUNITY

ANDY HOOD

This week’s cover concept seemed like a natural fit for Hood, who for a spell worked as a sign maker for Whole Foods. “I drew chalkboard illustrations and made posters for events at our in-house tavern,” he says. “I learned a lot about custom typography and made some wonderful friends. Sadly, the position no longer exists.”

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NEWS

Not all might be lost in the Hobbitville preservation fight. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Local institutions open doors for furloughed employees.

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover Story, Jan. 10, “Hobbitville’s Last Days”

Mr. David Hampshire: Thanks for your story. I very much enjoyed it, and was interested to learn of the property’s fate after so many years of driving by and wondering about the neglect. I spent a lot of time as a youngster in the ’50s at my grandparent’s house a bit farther north on 13th East and recall many walks with my grandmother down to the now-gone Harman’s Restaurant on 21st South (the second of the nation’s Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets, where none other than Col. Sanders once told me he was “Santa Claus’ brother”), always stopping on the way back for a short detour through Allen Park. I will never forget the great collection of beautiful, exotic birds and the wonderful tile-inscribed markers throughout that so fascinated me. A dear, now deceased friend also lived there for some time in the ’70s to add to my memories. JOHN PAUL BROPHY Salt Lake City About 45 years ago a brokendown car left me adrift in Salt Lake City for a few days, during which time I wandered into Allen Park. The place was stunning— a world apart and ultimately the experience was one reason I decided to live in the city. David Hampshire’s story brought back many good memories and is much appreciated. Allen Park is remarkable and should be saved, if for no other reason than to exist as a moment out of time. I can see Tom Bombadil fitting comfortably in Allen Park. Thanks for the memories. E. O’NEIL ROBINSON Norman, Okla. I lived in a cabin and in one of the duplexes there for several years. There is nothing like it—a truly magical place and I was sad to leave. Thank you for this article as I knew that its demise would surely come someday and always wondered what had come of it. I would love to see it commemorated in some way because it holds a special place in Sugar House history. KATE EMPEY Via cityweekly.net What a genuinely entertaining article. Thank you for giving me a walk down memory lane before it’s too late. Though I trespassed there as a teenager, I am grateful that I revered this haven and kept my delinquencies to other places in the valley. Too bad they can’t relocate most of this to Memory

@SLCWEEKLY Grove along City Creek. It would be a shame to lose such bohemian art, in trade for another trail. JASON TOMLIN Via cityweekly.net My grandparents lived in an upstairs apartment in one of the buildings when they were newlyweds in 1944 or so. I lived in the dorms at Westminster for a couple years. We would often watch/ harass the kids sneaking into Allen Park from the balconies of Hogle Hall. I hope that it can be preserved and not developed. It’s a magical place. LISA HARRIS Via Facebook I admit to being one of those college kids sneaking in to what I thought was “Hobbitville” back in the day. Thanks for the walk down memory lane. @AMY_IVERSON Via Twitter I remember when Westminster was considering buying it to build dorms. The president at the time, decided against. It’s a magical place and I never visited. JOE STEWART Via Facebook One of my favorite cover stories! @KENDRARPUGH Via Instagram Salt Lake City is letting so many of the quaint things that made downtown unique history in the name of high-rise developments. Please, I hope they keep this little adorable niche in the heart of the growing city. CATHIE GALLEGOS CHANSAMONE COSTANZO Via Facebook This makes me so sad. All of the amazing places that made SLC unique are being destroyed. What an amazing article, loved it so much, wish that there was a book on the history of the Allens and Allen Park. @HSUZYQ123 Via Twitter I loved this place as a young adult. Ventured through there many times hoping to see a “For Rent” sign. It was like crossing over into another world when I visited there. ROBYN HOWARD SHERIFF Via Facebook Interesting article. I never ventured in there but have driven in front of it thousands of times. Wish I’d gone in. CORY L. MURRAY Via Facebook

Grew up hearing the myth behind “Hobbitville.” Even got yelled at myself making a U-turn through the property. I really hope they simply update, refurbish and preserve the look and feel instead of building yet another Sugar House condo monstrosity. @STEPHENDOMINIK Via Twitter May it not fall into the hands of the short-sighted development community around the Salt Lake Valley. I realize this is a pollyannaish attitude, and I have no money to backup my wish, but coming from Philadelphia, where history is cherished, something should be done to commemorate this place. GEORGE J. LABONTY Via cityweekly.net Thanks for the in-depth story that really captures the spirit of the place. Seems like the riparian designation and historic value are the threads that could preserve some of its uniqueness. Is it or could it be designated a historic landmark site? SYLVIA NIBLEY Via cityweekly.net I hope they are able to preserve it in some way. I remember the mystery and magic that surrounded it in high school. It was like a secret little fairytale land. MELANIE HOLLANDER Via Facebook I’ve lived near Allen Park for 30 years and took my kids for walks past it. Sometimes, we would go in 100 feet or so and read the monuments. My kids and I loved it. I hope the character is preserved. KISSIMI BUKUS Via cityweekly.net I grew up right next to Hobbitville and have endless memories of the place. It’s truly one of SLC’s wonderful hidden treasures, with such a cool history. So sad to see it go! SARAH MOSELLE STOREY Via Facebook Hobbitville will be missed LOCK YOUNG Via Facebook This was such an interesting read! I live in Bountiful, so I haven’t heard of this place but I asked a coworker who lives near Sugar House and she was excited to learn the history behind it. @ANNLETTERING Via Instagram [Allen Park is on] the street behind me. We always get peacocks

roaming our street in the spring. LARK KENDALL Via Facebook.com I was there 50 years ago—quaint, quiet and lovely. I hope it stays. JOANNE RAY Via Facebook Ahh, yes. We knew it as “Hobbit Lands.” We’d split from East, buy a 12-pack of Millers (and a bowl), take our fjording sticks up there, sword fight each other and orcs from 1977-79. Great times! TOM LARSEN Via cityweekly.net

Online news, Jan. 14, “The Hobbits Have Left the Bldg.” So sad! This place was magical. JUSTIN BANZ Via Facebook This is terrible @COURTNEYINCOLOR Via Instagram That’s too bad. I hope it can be preserved somehow. @EARTHCENTERACU Via Instagram It’s about time Salt Lake starts cherishing its own history. MATT MORRIS Via Facebook I had no idea this was there. Lived here all my life. JAY MICHAEL GORDON Via Facebook Sad that this history will be lost. INA LANDRY Via cityweekly.net

Sugar House is dead. They shouldn’t even call it by that name anymore. BEN MEHNER Via Facebook That was a good read. So sad. So much history. JAMES R. BURDETT Via Facebook I lived there back in 1975. Mrs. Allen would drive around in her station wagon and have her granddaughter knock on doors to pick up rent money. The one I lived in was a log cabin, very small but we loved it! LINDA LINDLEY Via Facebook I always wanted to visit, but heard warning of the locals coveted privacy. I’m so incredibly sorry for their loss of home. @EPOCHOFASH Via Instagram Tearing down the authenticity of the neighborhoods and making them all alike, is this what you really want? Are the Avenues next? BOUDICA LUTHER Via Facebook This is the price of unregulated development. Please consider voting more consistently, folks. If we continue this pattern of elderly zombie Republican voters and apathetic progressives, all of the best things in our communities will disappear. DUSTIN CLARK Via Facebook We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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OPINION

Clear and Present Danger

When you’re name is Donald Trump, your life is an endless series of verbal justifications and denials, lies, more lies and lies about the other lies you’ve told. But the idea that Trump can actually lie with impunity is only his little pipe dream: the sleuths are always lurking in the background, like bloodhounds following the ever-fresh scent that constantly eminates from Trump’s flatulent little mouth. Well, folks, oral flatulence is a dangerous thing. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a warning: “Merely having a conversation with the president presents a high risk of E. coli infection, and all White House personnel should wear masks. The newly identified “BocaPoo” (BP) is a national health threat.” (Boca is Spanish for mouth.) While most Americans are horrified by this voluminous flow of oral sewage, Trump is taking pride in breaking all records and winning himself a permanent entry in the latest Guinness Book of World Records. His flow of oral sewage is believed to be the greatest in history, and his most loyal supporters are all hoping they’ll be honored with membership on the national BocaPoo team. Oral farting has become synonymous with the Make America Great Again White House. Along with it, the tale of Pinocchio has surged in popularity after years of obscurity. Clever promoters have devised a grading system

to ensure everyone knows of Trump’s latest triumphs. Awarding one, two or three “Pinocchios” for each utterance causes Trump to swell with pride. He brags endlessly to his inner circle, “Today, I received 138 Pinocchios,” adding “and I barely had to try. I am the greatest—feel kind of like ol’ Cassius Clay. I can whoop any liar out there, and I can do it with one arm tied behind my back.” While it’s an unaudited total, Trump claims to have been awarded 76,228 Pinocchios in just his first two years in office. But here’s the downside. The “Oral Execufarts,” as people in polite company call them, have caused a dramatic spike in air pollution, and because of the government shutdown, there’s essentially no EPA out there to regulate its potentially dangerous atmospheric release. Following their do-a-good-turn-daily mantra, a Washington, D.C., Boy Scout troop has done its best to fill in for the EPA’s screw-the-environment leadership and its furloughed employees. Using the time-tested method of holding a moistened finger up in the breeze, the boys have been able to determine that there’s been a dramatic rise in airborne BocaPoo since Trump took office. The Scouts’ latest measurement showed a level of one ounce of BP for each cubic yard of (what was previously) fresh air. However, that disturbingly high level of contamination has a positive flip side. It turns out that BP is a boon to agriculture. Farmers along the Eastern Seaboard no longer will have to apply fertilizer to their crops. Trump and an unnamed Russian national have incorporated a small company to ensure that BocaPoo is profitable. Based on the average aerial shit-load for the month, each farmer will be billed on a peracre basis. The company was incorporated under Virginia law and is named TruPu Agra Technologies, Inc.

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR.

So much for air pollution; it’s time to move on to the latest revelation from the Robert Mueller team. Just when we thought we had already heard the juiciest scheme in the president’s efforts to undermine the electoral process, convicted fixer Michael Cohen has dropped a bombshell in the laps of investigators. Swearing that his omission was “simply an oversight,” Cohen detailed yet one more large financial payoff made to a woman by Trump during the last days of his 2016 election campaign. “It was clearly intended to suppress information,” Cohen admitted, “that would have affected the election results. “This one,” Cohen noted, “was a $1.5-million hush money check written to Melania. It was drawn from two accounts—primarily election campaign funds and about one-third from Trump’s New York-based charity.” Investigators were incredulous at the disclosure. Seeing the confusion in their faces, Cohen had to clarify the matter, providing the actual agreement on which the payment was based. “For the consideration of $1.5 million, I, Melania Trump, shall not disclose the following matters: 1. That I haven’t had sex with the SOB in the past 15 years; 2. That he suffers from a rare terminal STD that causes a raccoon-like absence of pigmentation around the eyes; 3. That he is largely impotent, both physically and mentally, and 4. That he regularly cheats on both me and his taxes.” And, of course, it was signed, Melania Trump. Yet another nail in Trump’s cardboard box. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

ROE V. WADE CELEBRATION

It’s been 46 years since women were granted the right to make their own medical decisions. The Roe v. Wade Anniversary Celebration is a time to commemorate the landmark Supreme Court decision that protected a person’s right to safe and legal abortion in the United States. The night features a curated open mic with performances from community members around the theme “Abortion is Health Care.” All proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood’s work providing Utahns with comprehensive reproductive health care and education, and advocating for policy that ensures that abortion remains a safe and legal option, the event’s website says. Publik Coffee Roasters, 975 S. West Temple, 801-532-1586, Friday, Jan. 25, 7 p.m., $5 or whatever you can pay, bit.ly/2RWyW Vp.

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MEDICAID EXPANSION II

You thought because you voted for it, it would happen. Medicaid expansion should already be a reality, but alas—politics got in the way. Find out how you can support the citizen initiative and protect the law before legislators weaken it. First, you can Celebrate and Protect Prop 3 with the Utah Health Policy Project. Wear your “Yes on 3” T-shirts, pick up stickers, and learn about the threats to the law. A few days later, rally at the Capitol for No Medicaid Expansion Delay! Faith & Poverty Day to emphasize the ongoing commitment to Prop 3. Hear speakers talk about reducing childhood homelessness in Utah and how unmet medical needs can lead to families becoming homeless. Celebration: Hatch Family Chocolates, 376 E. 8th Ave., 801-4332299, Monday, Jan. 28, 6-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2VZOsyV. Rally: State Capitol, 350 N. State, 801-364-7765, Thursday, Jan. 31, 10 a.m.-noon, free, bit.ly/2FBqQeW.

CLEAN AIR ASSEMBLY

It’s time again to try to make the Legislature pay attention to the air. Join the SLC Air Protectors at Stand With Us for Clean Air! to talk about strategy for this year’s session. “Our air is going to be under siege, as well as our water, so do not hesitate to come and learn the power of your voice,” the event’s Facebook page says. “We can and will change the world if we stand shoulder to shoulder to fight for what we believe in.” The legislative overview starts with a Native American-led ceremony, followed by a presentation on how to lobby. Hear a summary of bills the Air Protectors support, too. Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-953-3211, Thursday, Jan. 31, 6:30-8:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2AT3M7P.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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Maybe you don’t think that Lake Powell drying up is much to cheer about. It’s not, but at least someone’s paying attention. The Salt Lake Tribune’s front-page story on the water woes we face was probably too much for most readers to process. Water politics and policies are, after all, dense, convoluted and mindnumbing. Brian Maffly valiantly tried to explain why Lake Powell exists and who gets what—the Upper Basin (Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) and the Lower Basin (Arizona, Nevada and California). And, yeah, that lower bunch is taking a lot of water. Let’s face it, no one is interested in conservation despite drought and population growth. Thus, the Lake Powell pipeline and all the controversy surrounding it arises. Our water future is in crisis mode, but we know how Americans look at crises—we don’t believe them until they kill us.

Unsustainable Growth

Speaking of population, here’s a crisis we can get behind— but only if we don’t have to face the cause. No, it’s not all the “illegal aliens” flooding across the border. It’s largely births and in-migration. The problem, of course, is how to handle our growing population. High density housing appears to be the solution, but as Justin Swain of Utah for Responsible Growth implies in a Trib oped, we’re ignoring developers’ greed and ascent when legislators manipulate the laws for their behalf. Affordability gets lost in the mix because it is often a function of government, and you know how Utah hates government mandates. Still, there are groups like the Utah Population and Environment Council that support population control to temper the unsustainable more-people-more-jobs-moregrowth scenario.

Bad Civics

Yes, isn’t it cute that middle school students are studying the Legislature, learning the machinations without any of the real brain cramps? Because those sweet children asked, Rep. Lowry Snow, R-St. George, is sponsoring legislation to designate the Gila monster as Utah’s state reptile. “Studentbacked designations of state symbols have become something of a tradition during the annual legislative session, with varying results,” the Trib wrote. Kids didn’t get the golden retriever to be Utah’s state dog, for instance. But they just might get a state reptile. Apparently, this is what we call civics education in Utah. In what was real civics ed, high school students a few years ago worked to thwart Sen. Margaret Dayton’s attempt to end the International Baccalaureate program. If they want to do something meaningful now, they should try getting rid of the state rock—coal.


ALYN JOHNSON/SIERRA CLUB

NEWS

CLEAN ENERGY

Banking on Coal

Utah’s state rock proves costly compared to alternative energy sources. BY DARIA BACHMANN @dariabachmann comments@cityweekly.net

H

Emissions from PacifiCorp’s Huntington coal-fired power plant, one of two such facilities in Utah, blow into neighboring national parks.

Future Plans

But Wait, There’s More!

Jan. 24-25 and Feb. 21-22 March 12-13—tentative/as needed April 1—IRP filing date

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The data from the PacifiCorp report are similar to findings from a June report conducted by an independent energy consulting firm, Energy Strategies, and commissioned by the Sierra Club. According to its findings, wind and solar power, along with options for purchasing energy on the market, are in many cases cheaper or more competitive with coal generation, according to Sierra Club’s news release. PacifiCorp’s potential savings from replacing coal with solar energy would be $700 million; and potential savings from using wind energy would be $2.8 billion, according to the data from Energy Strategies’ report. One of the main differences between the two analyses is that PacifiCorp offered scenarios for retiring certain combinations of its coal units and concluded it could save hundreds of millions of dollars by switching to cleaner options, according to Sierra Club. The Oregon Public Utility Commission ordered PacifiCorp to conduct an economic study of the operational cost of its coal plants at the request of the Sierra Club and the Oregon Department of Energy and Citizens’ Utility Board. Upon completion of the report, PacifiCorp declined to make the findings public. In September, a Washington Supreme Court judge allowed the company to keep the results confidential. The findings still haven’t been made public. The coal report is part of Rocky Mountain’s IRP, a document which will detail where the company will derive its power. The plan is expected to be completed in April. Eskelsen said that additional analysis will take into account system reliability and the capabilities of all the resources to serve customers. The availability of various types of resources is an important part of this analysis, he added. “The IRP is a public process, and open meetings are held to inform interested parties and solicit their comment,” he said. CW

Still, the utility has no plans to retire unprofitable coal plants ahead of schedule. According to PacifiCorp’s report, the company assumes that almost all of its coal units will operate through 2030. The overall costs of operating PacifiCorp’s coal plants through currently planned retirement is $11.7 billion. In addition, PacifiCorp did not include the costs of legally required pollution controls that have yet to be installed at generating units Hunter 1 and 2, and Huntington 1 and 2 in Utah. The state already struggles with air quality, particularly in places such as Uinta Basin and regional haze in national parks. Environmentalists contend that it’s “critical” to account for the costs to install these pollution controls. Rocky Mountain Power made a presentation to a committee of the Utah Legislature in October about the company’s proposed plan that would realign the company’s long-lived coal plants to Utah, Idaho and Wyoming. The company expects the future mix to contain less coal over time, “as it becomes in the best interests of customers to retire individual coal units,” Eskelsen said. “We have retired a number of coal power plants in the company’s history and understand the process well. What new resources take the place of these units will be determined by the IRP, which considers the full range of factors to arrive at the least-cost, least-risk portfolio of resources for customers,” Eskelsen noted. In recent years, natural-gas power plants have supplied high-availability power to fill in when wind and solar are unavailable, according to Eskelsen. The declining costs of natural gas have been largely responsible for the changing economics of coal units.

In Western U.S. wholesale power markets, both solar and wind become available early in the day at very attractive prices. PacifiCorp has been reducing the output of its coal units to take advantage of these energy sources.

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and we will implement the energy policies each state directs,” he wrote. Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power, the operating divisions of PacifiCorp, have long managed differing energy policies of the states the company serves, he said. PacifiCorp operates its generation and transmission network as an integrated system, which lowers customer costs. This includes the company’s coal plants in Utah and Wyoming, as well as some units operated by other utilities in other states. Meanwhile, the states served by PacifiCorp pay a share of generation and transmission-system costs as a percentage based on how much energy they consume. “Because certain states have stated a desire to remove coal from their customer rates by a certain date, the company’s regulatory depreciation is being adjusted in those states to retire the debt on their share of certain plants by the date they require,” Eskelsen said.

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eralded as the official state rock by the Legislature in 1991, coal, found in 17 of Utah’s 29 counties, might soon be shelved in the state annals, much like polygamy and basic reproductive rights. See, at least half of Rocky Mountain Power’s 22 coal-fired units—including Utah’s Hunter and Huntington plants—cost customers more to run than alternative sources such as solar and wind, according to a recent report. PacifiCorp, the parent of Rocky Mountain Power, identified scenarios where it can save customers more than $300 million by accelerating coal-plant retirements into the early 2020s, according to the report released during the company’s stakeholder meeting in December. David Eskelsen, a spokesman for Rocky Mountain Power and PacifiCorp, says the study takes into account ongoing cost pressures on coal generation, driven by market forces and regulatory factors. The study does not, however, reflect a final analysis of all elements that will determine decisions, including system reliability and resource availability, Eskelsen says. “Any long-term resource decisions will be made factoring in many considerations,” Eskelsen told City Weekly in an email. “The company’s Integrated Resource Plan is updated every other year; the 2019 edition is expected to be finalized and released in April. The IRP and accompanying action plan will take into account factors that will guide these important decisions.” Rocky Mountain Power uses a variety of resources, including coal, natural gas, hydroelectricity, wind, solar and geothermal. The company started operating as a hydroelectric company more than a century ago, using rivers and streams in Utah and Idaho. Coal-fueled plants became increasingly important in the 1930s through the 80s. Today, the company has more than 1,800 megawatts of wind capacity, which surpasses its hydroelectric capacity. Since 2000, every power plant the company has built or acquired has been a natural gas, wind or solar facility. But some still say that not enough has been done. Sierra Club maintains the company has been slow in its transition to clean energy. “Utilities across the country are replacing coal plants with clean energy and saving money for families and businesses,” Christopher Thomas, a senior campaign representative at Beyond Coal Campaign with Sierra Club, says. “Yet Rocky Mountain Power is failing to make the shift in Utah from expensive and dirty coal to new clean energy, and it will cost all of us well into the next decade.” Oregon, Washington and California say they want to phase out coal units by 2030. Some worry, however, that the company will shift the operating and maintenance costs of already uneconomic coal plants to Utah, Idaho and Wyoming, of which Utah has the largest share of customers. Eskelsen, however, said that such a scenario would be improbable because of state utility regulators. “State utility commissions would not allow the utility to simply ‘transfer their coal plants’ to other states. Individual state energy policies must be respected by the company,


12 | JANUARY 24, 2019

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JANUARY 24, 2019 | 13

—Enrique Limón, Marketplace manager

a shortlist of bills to watch; a reminder of past initiatives banished to the discount bin; and how to best exercise civil disobedience. We also paint a historic picture of how lawmaking has changed over the years and introduce you to a group of USDA-approved fresh faces looking to make a splash on the Capitol floor. Before you make your way through one of our handy express self-checkout lanes, you can also earn 4X the fuel points while catching up on Utah’s flight to embrace renewable energy. Oh, and make sure to give our session bingo panel a go. Go old-school and dab each square as it happens (we’re banking on you, stagnant education funding!) or add a little spice and throw back a shot every time one of our predictive scenarios comes to play. We’ll guarantee you’ll be sloshed by the end of Week 1. Clean up on aisle 8.

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ike many things in Utah, our legislative session marches to the beat of its own drum. Perennial topics—like medical cannabis, stodgy alcohol regulations and right-to-die legislation—will be brought out of the freezer on Jan. 28 only to remain vacuum sealed and discussed in perpetuity. All the while, manager’s specials like hidden language in bills and a very loose definition of “separation of church and state” will surely manifest and distract voters from real issues—the meat, if you will. So, what’s in store for the rip-roaring 63rd Legislature? Hopefully not another musical parody. Referred to by Stephen Colbert as “easily the worst political rap since FDR’s Twerks Progre$$ Administration,” last year’s Fresh Prince of Bel-Air viral performance by state lawmakers (Rep. John Knotwell’s stuck-out tongue still haunts me) set an unbeatable bar. With this special issue, we aimed to trim the fat, and give you an insider’s take on what to expect during these 45 days. Things like


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14 | JANUARY 24, 2019

Signs of the Times

Protest signs, however clever or brief, send a strong message to the public and Capitol Hill lawmakers about what the people want. By Ray Howze

The resistance begins at home. And if you plan to protest, get your activism on, or want to tell politicos to listen up this session, you better have a visual. “Shrinke Zinke.” “Grab ’em by the Bears Ears.” “I DON’T want to be like Mike (Lee).” “Vote rape apologists out.” “Enough.” Those were just a few of the thousands of signs that have showed up around the Capitol and the downtown Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building since this time last year. Some utilized puns, others had some wordplay fun, and some were as simple as “Resist.” Regardless of what the signs said, they poked and prodded the establishment—advocating for change. With topics such as medical cannabis, clean air, education, Medicaid and public lands set for debate on the Hill this year, there are bound to be rallies aplenty. But what makes for an effective sign? What catches the eye? Two weeks ahead of the general session, one group had an idea in mind: Get crafty. Armed with scissors, glue and fabric, Danielle Susi led a small class of five inside Murray’s Clever Octopus Creative Reuse Center—an arts-and-crafts store that uses scrap and leftover material—in a protest-banner workshop. “I’m obsessed with how change can happen in a grassroots way,” Susi says. “Word play can be fun, but it’s also really powerful. I mean, which sounds better: ‘I hate Mitch McConnell’ or ‘Mitch don’t kill my vibe?’” The five budding activists said they planned to attend Jan. 19’s Women’s March downtown. Hence why some of the banners touted phrases such as, “Nevertheless, we persist,” … “This is not the only story. Listen. Think. Learn. Do” … “El pueblo unido jamás será vencido [The people united will never be defeated]” … “The resistance begins at home” … and one that simply said “Vote.” Jen Melcomian, who glued the orange letters V, O, T and E onto some gray fabric, says being able to protest is a right she doesn’t take lightly. She grew up in the neighborhood around the Capitol, and perhaps, because of proximity, kept up with ongoing political and social issues. After she graduated from West High School, the fight for Gay-Straight Alliance clubs in schools picked up around Salt Lake in the mid-1990s. School walkouts took place to send a message to administrators. During that time, Melcomian’s political activism piqued. She says she got out and supported the movement and has continued to be an ally since. “I love a good protest and I was raised to stand up for what you believe in,” she continues. Her “Vote” sign was simple, stood out, and made it clear that voting is one of the easiest ways to make your voice heard. Her next stop: the Women’s March. As the legislative session gets underway, numerous groups, such as March for Our Lives Utah and various Native American tribes, will gather on the Capitol’s south steps or in the rotunda. This year, MFOL volunteers plan to spend most of their time lobbying lawmakers. They hope to build on last year’s accomplishments, such as when nearly 8,000 protestors marched from West High to the Capitol in March, demanding lawmakers propose new gunreform legislation. Chants of “Hey, hey. Ho, ho. The NRA has got to go!” were belted out by thousands of high school students. But in addition to their crowd size and volume, their signs sent a calculated, effective message. For Noah Blumenthal, March’s rally was their first foray into gun-reform activism. Despite attending one day after having their wisdom teeth removed, Blumenthal says the

day inspired them enough to get involved with the local chapter. Now an outreach coordinator with MFOL, Blumenthal has helped design and distribute posters for the group as well as graphics on social media. While Blumenthal says the signs weren’t their original ideas, the phrase “Students demand gun reform” and “Enough” were clear and powerful. “I find that the most interesting signs are the ones that are incredibly expository,” Blumenthal says. “I feel that one of the things that is a strength of our movement is that we will say what’s going on in a very critical fashion, instead of censoring, trying to mediate or make issues seem more mild.” Blumenthal suggests rhymes help signs stand out. It creates an ironic undertone that’s direct and snarky. But, Blumenthal warns, “think of all the ways your sign could be interpreted.” “There are a lot of buzz words, phrases we hear out there,” Blumenthal says. “I think they can become misleading or even meaningless if people don’t step back and question what they really mean. You can say words like, ‘intersectionality,’ or whatever, but it’s not really meaningful unless you find out what it means and implement it in your everyday actions or protest movement.” Blumenthal says they’re currently waiting for some direction from the national chapter about any possible rallies to mark the local group’s one-year anniversary. When it comes to tribal issues and state lawmakers, you’ll likely see Moroni Benally helping lead a rally. The coordinator for advocacy and public policy at Restoring Ancestral Winds, a nonprofit tribal coalition designed to address domestic violence and sexual assault, says when it comes to signage, he likes the “ones that are kind of boring, but they have a message that’s significant.” “‘Honor the tribes. Honor the treaties,’ ‘500 years of genocide.’ Things like that, which really are an attempt to correct these very whitewashed versions of history we often get, can be a bit jarring for people,” Benally says. “I think that’s what it’s meant to do—be provocative enough and give people a moment to pause and think, ‘What do they mean by that?’” Benally and others initially plan to keep an eye on what happens to House Concurrent Resolution 6, which would designate May 5 as Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Girls and LGBT+ Awareness Day, as well as a rally in the rotunda for the MMIW group. Sometimes, though, they don’t always feel heard. Benally recalls a hearing regarding the Antiquities Act last year, but because of rules regarding decorum and public speaking, they struggled to get their message across. “I’m a firm believer that many of the rules we have, even protocols that the Legislature abides by, are designed to not necessarily hear the voices of the marginalized,” Benally says. “So when they ask to comply with those rules, they’re asking us to remain silent.” That’s where the more public rallies come in handy. People like Susi hope the time spent crafting their messages resonates elsewhere. She helped class attendees glue a PVC pipe on the top of some of the signs so they can hang them in their homes, too. She plans to hang her “Mitch don’t kill my vibe” sign inside her house, because, well, change doesn’t just take place at the Capitol—it starts at home. “I’m passionate about empowering other people to make things that are useful and radical,” Susi says. “In a way, to me, it is radical to reuse this material because topics like sustainability are even more of a statement today.” Melcomian, meanwhile, wants to encourage others to continue the grassroots fight for women, especially since the Women’s March gained steam following the 2016 election. But she worries some momentum has been lost. “I think we kind of need to re-engage,” she concludes. “Because we have to stand up for this stuff. People might be surprised how they’re not alone.” 


ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Revolt, Resist, Repeat 5 Tips to hold dear this protest season.

Plan and prepare

Oberservers

Arrange to have trained legal observers or a non-protesting police liaison attend your demonstration. The ACLU of Utah or the PJC can help you arrange this. “The best thing you can do is have people who aren’t involved in your cause. If you’re protesting animal rights, bring someone in from the environmental group to be your observer,” Sleight suggests.

“If you’re going to break the law, don’t break the law”

Memorize

Memorize the following phrases: “Am I free to go?”; “Am I being detained? For what purpose?”; “Am I being arrested? On what charge?” “I invoke my right to remain silent.”; “I do not consent to this search.” (RH)

Reps. Stephanie Pitcher, D-Holladay, and Craig Hall, R-West Valley City, have sponsored bills that would let candidates for public office use campaign funds for childcare when they’re campaigning. Or, lawmakers could just give Chuck E. Cheese’s a giant tax break in the hopes they steeply discount their services.

Giving working families a break!

The federal earned income tax credit, or EITC, puts money in the pockets of low- to moderate-income working families. If Rep. Robert Spendlove’s, R-Sandy, bill passes, Utah would join the 29 other states, plus Washington, D.C., in establishing its own EITC, benefitting children and parents who have been living off of low wages for generations.

Die with dignity!

Picking up the torch that former Rep. Rebecca ChavezHouck left, freshman Rep. Jen Dailey-Provost, D-Salt Lake City, floated a bill that would allow a terminally ill patient to end their life on their own terms. Restrictions and safeguards abound—an age requirement and the request can be rescinded at any time—but the gist is that gravely ill Utahns would have access to medication that would end their suffering.

Ban conversion therapy already!

Local LGBTQ rights group Equality Utah is asking lawmakers to ban conversion therapy, a destructive and hateful form of “help” that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation. The practice is frequently linked to suicide. The LDS church gave Fox 13 a lukewarm statement that seems supportive if you squint hard enough, but it’s unclear how they’ll flex their ecclesiastical might once the bill is filed.

Roe v. Wade, who?

In keeping with the conservative crusade to protect the unborn at the expense of the living, Rep. Cheryl Acton, R-West Jordan, proposed legislation to restrict women’s right to terminate their pregnancies. The bill would cap the procedure at week 15 of the pregnancy. (Currently,

There will be a slew of Republican- and Democrat-backed gun safety bills this year. Some, like Reps. Steve Eliason, R-Sandy, and Stephen Handy, R-Layton, hope to protect Utahns suffering with suicidal thoughts by distancing them from their firearms. Others, like Brian King and Patrice Arent, Dems from Salt Lake City and Millcreek, plan to establish a universal background check system and ban the sale of bump stocks at the state level. If the Utah Gun Exchange folks were willing to follow the Parkland kids around the country for talking about gun reform, expect them to oppose the majority of these bills.

Bonus Round: How is that law still (technically) a thing? Anti-sodomy

Classic, P-in-the-V heterosexual sex is A-OK in Utah, (though it’s recommended you get married first), but consensual sodomy is still a Class B misdemeanor. State sodomy laws can’t be enforced thanks to the ’03 Lawrence v. Texas Supreme Court ruling, yet the Beehive State is still one of a dozen that keeps these homophobic laws on the books, making our leaders just as much of asshole-ish as those in Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi.

Crime and punishment

Using similar language as the post-Civil War 13th Amendment, Utah’s Constitution bans slavery but carves out an exception if such “involuntary servitude” is a punishment for a crime. Rep. Sandra Hollins, DSalt Lake City, aims to amend the state Constitution and drag Utah into … the year 1900. (Let’s be honest, we’ve got a long way to go to make it to 2019.) Should her bill pass with a two-thirds majority vote, the public will need to OK the language change in the 2020 election.

Beaver hunting

State lawmakers clearly have it out for LGBTQ Utahns and those convicted of a crime, but they also apparently loathe beavers. In 1971, legislators updated the state code to allow residents to kill the bucktoothed bastards, so long as they’re damaging your property. Just submit a request to the Wildlife Board, then go to town. You can “kill or trap” the tree-gnawing imbeciles, per the Utah Code, but it doesn’t say how you end their miserable lives, just that you may. The less creative among us might use the rodents for target practice, but the true pioneers will channel their inner Bill Murray, pretend they’re hunting groundhogs and rig the land with explosives, to give the little scoundrels the send-off they deserve. 

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When you’re being detained or arrested, it’s not the best time for a teaching moment. Film law enforcement. Study up on how to converse and engage with police officers. Never consent to a search. When encountering police, stay in well-lit places, never run or resist and be polite—yet firm—while invoking your rights. “If an officer sees your rights differently, don’t argue,” Sleight says.

No more babies on the campaign trail!

Protect those guns!

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Police encounters

Rep. Marsha Judkins, R-Provo, wants to squash an annual annoyance: daylight saving time. Judkins’ bill would allow Utah to remain on Mountain Daylight Time yearround, so long as the U.S. Congress permits it. Screw you, seasonal affective disorder! Never again will we have to use that “fall back, spring forward” crap to remember whether we’ll be gaining or losing an hour of sleep.

women can receive abortions 21 weeks and 6 days after the start of their last menstrual period.) Expect its constitutionality to be challenged, should the bill pass.

If you plan to protest, “don’t bring anything that would cause the police to be suspicious of you,” Sleight says. This includes, weapons and contraband. Also, be careful with cell phones and make sure they’re password protected. If ordered to disperse, do so.

Down with daylight saving!

By Kelan Lyons

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Not everything goes as planned, so prepare as well as you can. Ask a lot of questions such as who, what, where, when, why and how. For example, who’s going to be doing what? “Even if it’s a legal protest, there’s a good chance you’re going to have police officers,” Sleight says, so be prepared on how to interact with law enforcement. In addition, familiarize yourself with your fellow protestors so you know who is who, and can spot counter-protestors or undercover law enforcement trying to infiltrate your group. Know, educate and train your people.

B

ills and the Legislative session are like peanut butter and jelly, Bert and Ernie, Utah and Mormons. Here’s a list of bills to keep an eye out for, and a few laws that are inexplicably still on the books:

Here’s what bills to keep a close eye on once the session starts.

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rotesting or engaging in civil disobedience has a long history in the U.S.—think Rosa Parks or even back to Henry David Thoreau. If you plan to exercise free speech and your right to assemble, it’s best you have a gameplan. Here are a few tips lawyer L. Monte Sleight with the Pioneer Justice Center shared at a recent civil-disobedience training session:

Bills, Bills, Bills


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16 | JANUARY 24, 2019

That New Legislator Smell Rep. Jen Dailey-Provost, District 24, D-Salt Lake City

What are you looking forward to most? “I’m looking forward to working on policy issues I’ve been working on as an advocate in a different capacity [Dailey-Provost used to work for the Utah Academy of Family Physicians]. I’ve been advocating for Medicaid expansion, meaningful solutions to the opioid crisis, access for mental health care, and I’m excited to advocate for them as a legislator and see how much more effective I might have an opportunity to be.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “Even though I worked on Capitol Hill for a long time, I feel like I’m drinking from a fire hose. Learning how much I didn’t understand about what goes into what I need to know in order to be an effective legislator. It’s so much bigger than I ever imagined.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “We could improve everywhere. With the state’s heavy focus on economic development, we could do a better job at recognizing the effect of things like the environment on the economy. As a business ROI [return on investment], there’s a lot to building a better economy besides a better profit margin. I think our elected officials need to be very, very careful going forward in working on changes to the ballot initiatives. What happened with medical cannabis already and what I see coming on Medicaid expansion and Better Boundaries, I think we need to be very careful and extremely respectful of the will of the voters.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I know how to juggle. When I’m in my kitchen, I often juggle oranges for my kids.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “My favorite thing that’s come up recently is Stranger Things.”

Sen. Derek Kitchen, District 2, D-Salt Lake City

What are you looking forward to most? “I’ve started to get to know all the other senators and members of the House, but honestly, building relationships with the other lawmakers and hopefully be someone they can trust and rely on [as] a voice for the

U Climate Confrontations Fresh deals at the natural resources counter. By Naomi Clegg

Rep. Suzanne Harrison, District 32, D-Draper

What are you looking forward to most? “I’m looking forward to the chance to serve my community. I’m really grateful the voters of House District 32 gave me the chance to serve and I’m looking forward to listening to and representing the issues they care about.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “I’ve spent my time thus far since the election trying to meet with stakeholders and people from the community, whether they’re from education or focused with air-quality interests, and trying meet the various stakeholders I’ll be working with in the Capitol to move good policy forward.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “One of the reasons I ran was I felt the issues that impact our families aren’t getting the attention they need in the state Legislature. Specifically, support for public education, addressing our air-quality issues, how to address affordability issues in health care and transparency. I’m going to continue to work on these issues and continue to listen to the voters of my district and be their voice up on the hill.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I enjoy mountain biking with my family and our great trail system, skiing, traveling with my family and I also know where all the best places are to get a Diet Coke in Sandy.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “The Good Place.”

city. Overall, I’m looking forward to getting in and understanding the process more deeply and getting policy done.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “I guess I didn’t really know, I should have assumed this, but it’s incredibly partisan. I knew what I was getting into running as a Democrat in a Republican majority Legislature, but for some reason, I assumed it was more like the City Council where we all marched in the same direction no matter what. The partisanship is something I’m going to have to get used to, but I just barely moved into my office so I’m still getting my feet underneath me.”

tah is warming at twice the global average, and it’s running up against an EPA deadline to improve air quality across the state within the next three years. Clean water, clean air, clean energy—it’s what Utah needs, but is our Legislature committed to change? In 2018, legislators passed a resolution committing the state government to addressing climate change. They also made sure we could all buy Teslas, gave Rocky Mountain Power the option to build a solar facility, and renewed a tax credit for rooftop solar panels. And they sent an extra $1 million to the Utah Division of Air Quality. It was a start, but considering the threats facing Utah and its growing population, was it enough? Two proposed house resolutions (H.C.R. 1 and H.C.R. 4) signal a willingness to address climate change directly in 2019. What else can we expect on the climate front this year?

By Ray Howze

Rep. Stephanie Pitcher, District 40, D-Holladay

What are you looking forward to most? “Most of all, I’m looking forward to being a voice of the people in my district and to represent the values of our district and make some positive changes up at the Capitol.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “There’s been so much. It’s kind of like drinking from a fire hydrant at this point for me. One thing I’ve kind of been pleasantly surprised about is that the work scene is even more collaborative than I anticipated. It’s not really as partisan as many people think it is. I like that. It seems like our legislative body operates much more effectively than we see happening at the federal level in Congress.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “I think there’s always areas for improvement. The people in my district care a lot about education funding and cleaning up our air. Those are two big areas where I think we still have a lot of work to do. Across the board, there are always things we can improve upon and we have a really good body that’s well-equipped to address these issues.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I used to be a competitive chess player. I used to compete nationally and even internationally. I’m still an internationally ranked chess player, I’m just not active anymore and I’m an eight-time women’s state chess champion.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/ Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “Currently my favorite show is The Good Place on NBC. It’s so unique and creative.”

Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “In this session, what I’m going to be focused on is protecting the ballot initiatives that passed in November. I want to make sure that what happened to Prop 2, doesn’t happen to Proposition 3, Medicaid, or Proposition 4, which is the redistricting initiative. I’m really going to be focused on making sure those are protected. Also, housing, homeless and issues of air quality—those are ongoing issues for me. Salt Lake City is growing so fast, affordable housing is an important issue for pretty much everybody. Air quality, obviously, is a huge issue. Focusing on

Energy A resolution sponsored by Rep. Patrice Arent, D-Millcreek, promotes “the development of wind, solar, hydrogen, hydroelectric, and geothermal energy in rural areas of the state.” Rep. Brad Wilson noted last year that the Legislature has been promoting natural gas infrastructure in rural communities; expect a continued push toward alternate energy sources, especially in areas that need an economic boost. Amendments to the State Energy Policy proposed by Sen. Keith Grover, R-Provo, promote molten salt reactors as a nuclear power technology. Grover’s amendments also include a push for increased refinery capacity. Lobbyists at HEAL Utah are pushing for amendments to the state’s energy plan, which organizer Noah Miterko says “would implement a low-risk financing tool to help utilities

long-range solutions to issues of air quality, environment and affordable housing are going to be my focus areas for the next four years.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I’ve had two members of my family go through drug and alcohol treatment just last year in 2018 so that issue of Medicaid is really important to me.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “I’m kind of a nerd, so I was watching something on blockchain last night, but that’s not really exciting. I’ve been enjoying Blue Planet on Netflix.”

transition from old, uneconomic power generation to modern generation with the opportunity for community investment into impacted communities.” Local chapters of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby are pushing for legislation that would enact a carbon tax; last year, Rep. Joel Briscoe, D-Salt Lake City, introduced a bipartisan carbon tax bill co-sponsored by two Republican colleagues. Briscoe plans to put the bill forward earlier this year than last year; he’s looking for new co-sponsors (the previous ones retired). We need to be having “a robust discussion about pricing carbon,” Briscoe says. The bill would tax carbon emissions at approximately $10/ton, which Briscoe notes would add 10 cents to a gallon of gasoline and 10 percent to energy bills; money raised from the tax would go toward air-pollution solutions, rural economic development, and reductions in some state taxes.


F

ollowing November’s election, some familiar faces throughout Salt Lake Valley districts cruised to an easy reelection. However, there are a few new faces you’ll see around the Capitol this year. City Weekly asked the new lawmakers about all kinds of topics from what policies they want to push to what’s hot on TV right now.

Sen. Kathleen Riebe, District 8, D-Cottonwood Heights

Rep. Jeffrey Stenquist, District 51, R-Draper

Sen. Kirk Cullimore, District 9, R-Sandy, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. cheapest water in the United States, huge amounts of it.” He calls it “basic data collection” for Utah’s idiosyncratic secondary water system. Utahns quite possibly use more water per capita than any other U.S. state—but there’s currently no way to accurately measure usage. The bill would give water providers 10 years to install meters. Frankel says the Rivers Council is also watching a revised version of an extraterritorial jurisdiction bill that Rep. Mike Noel introduced last year. The bill would give cities less jurisdiction over water upstream, “which is stupid, because dirty water is bad for people,” Frankel says. “The idea that protecting water quality is a bad thing is a dinosaur mentality, and it needs to go extinct.” He’s hoping the bill dies.

Air In 2018, legislators failed to pass a bill that would have doubled penalties for drivers caught disabling the emissions-control system of diesel vehicles. This “rolling coal” bill was strongly supported by the diesel industry; expect it to make a reappearance this year. HEAL Utah is pushing for this issue; Miterko says they are also “really working hard on a free-fare day”; a bill sponsored by Briscoe would offer free public transit over 14 days each winter. The big possibility here is Gov. Gary Herbert’s proposal to appropriate $100 million of the state’s budget for air quality improvements in 2020. But,

the Legislature has to approve this amount—and decide what the money will be spent on. Some possibilities: Incentives for swapping out wood stoves, upgrades to inefficient buildings, and replacements of dirty construction fleets and school buses. At an event hosted by the University of Utah’s Gardner Policy Institute, senior energy analyst Thomas Holst suggested the money could be used to promote clean energy solutions across the state. And Deseret News environment reporter Erica Evans suggested allocating funds to more comprehensive public-transit solutions. Let’s see how much legislative courage our representatives can summon this season. 

JANUARY 24, 2019 | 17

A joint resolution sponsored by Sen. Jani Iwamoto, D-Salt Lake City, proposes Utah undertake a water banking study, which would take a look at the development and creation of water banks to supply the resource for Utah’s projected population growth. As for water usage, a bill proposed by Jacob Anderegg, R-Lehi, would require water suppliers to install meters for secondary water systems. While municipal systems are metered, secondary systems—untreated water left over from now-developed farmlands, usually used for lawns and irrigation—are not. Zachary Frankel at the Utah Rivers Council says this bill would help track “some of the

it’s used to commit a felony.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “My favorite animal is a buffalo and has been since I was a little kid. One of my favorite places to visit as a child is Yellowstone. I’m a fan of the Buffalo Bills based solely on their mascot and it also goes with the Buffalo Sabres. That’s something most people don’t know but would find out if they visited my office.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “I haven’t had much time to watch TV since campaigning but I did just finish Daredevil Season 3 and loved that.” 

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Water

violence qualifying offense. Another one would make it so you can’t expunge a domestic violence offense while that offense is still enhanceable. I’m a prosecutor and in my profession, I found that having that deterrent of someone knowing that because of this conviction, a subsequent conviction could be enhanced is a good deterrent. So I’m trying to tighten up those laws to go with what was intended when the original enhancement law was passed. I also have a bill that I call, “Lauren’s Law,” and that’s in honor of Lauren McCluskey. What it would do is create automatic civil liability for a gun owner who loans their gun to someone and

What are you looking forward to most? “Seeing how the process plays out. As a lawyer, I’m one of the few people that actually enjoys reading laws and I’m really curious how they come to be made, the compromises that are made and how people can work

together to create something that works.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “I thought campaigning was busy, but since being elected it’s gotten even busier and I haven’t even started the session yet. That was surprising to me.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “Yes, one thing I’m working on this session is some bills related to domestic violence. I feel like they’ve made a lot of progress in the past couple years and we need to continue doing that because I think it’s a really important area to everyone in the state. One of the bills adds revenge porn as a domestic

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Rep. Andrew Stoddard, District 44, D-Sandy

What are you looking forward to most? “Well I’m new, so honestly, I’m not quite sure how to say this, I don’t have a specific piece of legislation that I’m pushing for yet. I woke up one morning and kind of panicked. “What am I going to do? What am I going to pass?” And I just had this feeling like, “Mark, just go learn the process.” I’m most looking forward to learning the process and then helping others that know the process—the intellectual exercise of all of the issues and trying to align with my thoughts and feeling vs. my constituents vs. other representatives and then seeing where I fit in to help. Then, next year, I’ll probably have more thoughts and direction on some specific things that I feel should come forward. I don’t want to pass a piece of legislation just to say I passed something. We’ve got plenty of laws on the book already. Maybe by next year, I’ll see some meaningful places I can play.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “The time commitment is one thing that is, I guess I knew it’s a six-week session, but the gravity of that six weeks. Monday and Tuesday I had meetings all day. I was gone from 6 or 7 in the morning until 8:30 at night and it was exhausting. It isn’t physically, but you’re just kind of sitting and listening. Intellectually, I was hammered.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “It kind of goes back to the comment I made earlier, I have some generic thoughts but not enough to really give them to you. Yes, but I don’t really know how to move forward with those kind of things yet. I’ve got to see the process. Another thing that’s really caught me off guard, you don’t just come up with an idea and pass it. You have to convince half the House, half the Senate and the governor to agree with you. Because of that, I haven’t really explored any specific issues.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I’m the father of six, grandfather of one, father to two missionaries and madly in love with my wife. And I’m an avid road cyclist.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “I don’t watch TV hardly at all. I watch it so little, I don’t know how to answer that question. On Sundays, we watch America’s Funniest Home Videos.”

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What are you looking forward to most? “Working on some education bills, trying to bring transparency and funding and a betterment to our classrooms.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “It’s busy. It’s not just 45 days, it’s year-round I believe; relationships are super important. Also, creating and writing bills, we have a great team on the hill that is completely knowledgeable about every aspect of every law and it’s so cool to call and say, “Hey, I’m thinking about doing this,” and they’re like, “Blah, blah, blah” and they know every fact. It’s incredible. That has been the most pleasant surprise ever. They’re amazing, the knowledge is incredible.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “Yes. Education, air quality, connectivity that takes us out of our cars and puts us in more environmentally-friendly modes of transportation.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I’m kind of an adrenaline junky. I’ve been skydiving, hiking. I also used to be a truck driver, a police dispatcher, a wildland firefighter.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “I like Veep. A couple other ones are Brooklyn NineNine and Sherlock Holmes.”

What are you looking forward to most? “As it will be my first session, my main thing is understanding the process a little bit better. I have a few bills of my own, but for the most part, it’s going to be a learning curve. I do look forward to being involved in the big issues we expect to be dealing with in the legislative session this year. There’s a lot of policy areas that some I’m familiar with and some that are going to be new to me.” What have you learned about the job already that you didn’t know? “I’ve learned a little bit more about the appropriations process. I’ve worked to help pass bills in the past, but didn’t really understand the process in the past. And it’s an important aspect since passing the budget is one of our main responsibilities as a Legislature.” Are there topics or issues where you think Utah could improve? “Some of the issues are problems that come up with growth that we’re experiencing—transportation, air quality, affordable housing, education— are some of the big things I think are really important for us to look at from a strategic long-term standpoint, that we’re looking ahead and anticipate this growth coming in the future.” What’s something the public might not already know about you? “I think most people that know anything about me know that I’m an avid cyclist. My background is in software development and IT, so I bring a technology background with me. I’m also an adoptive parent.” What’s your favorite thing you’re watching on TV/ Netflix/Hulu etc. right now? “I don’t watch television. But I did watch the series on Amazon called The Man In the High Castle.”

Rep. Mark Strong, District 41, R-Bluffdale


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18 | JANUARY 24, 2019

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Then vs. Now, Lege Edition Gather ’round the discount aisle that is Utah politics and revel in what’s different from years past … and what has stayed the same. By Kelan Lyons

A

hhh, the ’90s. A beautiful era when Michael Jordan and the Bulls twice owned the best Jazz team in franchise history, Utahns needed private club memberships before they could rip shots at local bars and elderly Salt Lake City slickers could breathe outside without risking their lives. Life was simpler then. Even for the lawmakers on Capitol Hill. “I remember the first time they gave every senator a pager so that we could be alerted to things we should be aware of,” former Sen. Howard Stephenson, a Republican who represented Draper from 1993 to 2018, says. “We thought, ‘This is really high-tech.’” The times they have a-changed. In the passing decades, Democrats have lost (or gained?) power, elected officials figured out that the internet exists and lobbyists stopped overtly jostling to influence elected representatives’ votes. But much has remained the same. As the 2019 legislative session fast approaches, join us in analyzing what’s metamorphosed and what’s been static in Utah politics. Let’s start with the most obvious—legislators’ tech kept evolving beyond beepers and cell phone bricks. Pagers were replaced by Blackberries, which were succeeded by even smarter phones. “We came into the digital age,” Stephenson recalls. Now, constituents can watch floor debates and listen to committee hearings in real time, or use social media to get updates on issues they’re passionate about. “Citizens have as much access to the information as legislators do, instantaneously, no matter where in the world they are,” Stephenson says. “And, boy, has that had an effect on policy, because we begin hearing from our citizens so much more quickly. And they’re more informed in their appeals to us, too, because they have literally as much of the information as we do.” Also different is how legislators communicate with us regular folk. Last year, the House dropped a dope rap mixtape called “Fresh Prints of Bills Here”—a cringeworthy play on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song—to explain how bills become laws. Pat Jones, a former Democratic state senator and representative who held office from 2000 until 2015, remembers some far-right House members shot their own video involving guns and cowboy hats, “pretending to be macho,” when she was serving on the Hill. “I think it was more to show off,” she says. Jones hasn’t suffered through the Bel-Air parody, but she says if lawmakers use the web to motivate people to engage with local officials or state politics, or to participate in the political process, “then I say all the more power to them.” There have been important developments in Utah politics

over the years beyond computer screens and bad music videos, Jones, CEO of the Women’s Leadership Institute, says. She estimates that the number of women in the Legislature usually hovers between 15 and 19 percent; this year, 25 percent of lawmakers are women, cutting into old white dudes’ entrenched power. Jones expects issues like public education, health care and environmental stewardship to be debated more in the upcoming session than in years past, reflecting a change in the political appetite of the state’s elected officials. “I think what we’re seeing is the growing of a more cosmopolitan constituency,” Jones says. The state might be getting more diverse, but the Legislature still is largely homogenous. Democrats picked up seats in the House and Senate last November, but Republicans still have a supermajority. Despite the political imbalance, Jones disputes the conventional wisdom that Dems have no power on the Hill. There are fewer Democratic legislators than Republicans, so they’re more likely to be appointed to leadership positions than the conservative legion. “Your opportunities are much, much greater in the minority party,” Jones says. “They have to have a Democrat on all their committees.” Matthew Burbank, an associate professor in the University of Utah’s political science department, says there are fewer Dems in office than in the ’80s and ’90s. There used to be more conservative Democratic representation from districts outside the Wasatch Front. “Democrats have largely become, in the state Legislature, a Salt Lake City and County phenomenon,” he says. Burbank estimates Republican shot-callers started putting more Democrats on committees about five years ago. But they didn’t do it out of the kindness of their hearts. “There is an ongoing tension,” he says, referring to the philosophical differences between moderate and conservative Republicans on issues like taxes. “Rather than having that fight in every committee year after year, I think there’s a sense in Republican leadership that, ‘What we want to do is focus on what those darn Democrats are up to,’” Burbank says. “That’s a more valuable narrative for them than only to focus on what’s going to happen in the caucus, because there are some serious differences in the Republican caucus.” That us-versus-them mentality is what got to long-time politico Peter Knudson, who served in the House and Senate for 24 years before retiring at the end of 2018. “I think the thing that’s most frustrating for me has been the inability for the majority party to give credence to the minority party,” the former Republican lawmaker says. “The minority almost is a second thought.”

Knudson says things were different when he was in the House, though he acknowledges that might be because Democrats were more of a player in state politics. He suggests future Republican leaders make more of an effort to work and communicate with Democrats on controversial, complex issues like medical cannabis. “I think everybody would benefit,” he says. Speaking of manipulative power-players, Stephenson, president of the Utah Taxpayers Association, says he’s particularly enthused that lobbyists’ privileges have been curbed. “They would be able to come onto the floor during debate and be able to corner legislators to urge them to vote a certain way,” Stephenson says of the early years of his senatorial career. “I don’t think people really appreciate how much more fair it is today than it used to be.” Burbank has his doubts. “I don’t think the power of the lobbyists or of powerful interest groups has changed dramatically,” he says. “I think the way that lobbyists try to get things done now and the way they tried to get things done in the 1990s are pretty similar.” Sure, Burbank says, there are ethical horror stories of lobbyists showing up on the floor and talking to lawmakers before they vote. “That was more exceptional than anything else,” he says. “In all reality that’s not the way most lobbying is done.” Instead, lobbyists argue their points over time, consistently articulating their views over multiple meetings with presumably impressionable lawmakers. “It’s not the sort of thing most legislators see as influencing them because it’s just so pervasive,” Burbank says. “It’s a little like watching television and seeing commercials. After a while, you think you’re just tuning them out.” There is one thing Stephenson thinks is a timeless truism: Utahns’ collective forgetfulness of state lawmakers’ legislative legacies once they leave office. When Stephenson mentions the names of former colleagues to lobbyists and currently-serving reps and senators, he’s often met with a blank stare of unrecognition. That’s a shame, Stephenson says, because he thinks the men and women who worked on the Hill in the ’70s and ’80s made Utah’s judicial system and legislative staff structure what they are today. Come the end of January, Stephenson and Knudsen will not directly have a hand in approving Utah’s new laws for the first time in two dozen legislative sessions. Perhaps searching for one last fleeting glimpse of state office, Stephenson tried logging into his old account at the start of the new year. “My Senate email shut down precisely at midnight,” he says. “It’s just really interesting to see how you’re a has-been overnight.” 


In

M em or ia m

A look inside the Capitol Hill Morgue for one last goodbye. By Kelan Lyons

Cause of death: Ambition. The outspoken state senator, known nationwide for breathalyzing himself on the Senate floor and eating a cannabis gummy “as a sacrifice to you, the taxpayers,” has left the Capitol in favor of a greener, more prestigious pasture: Salt Lake City mayor. He’s promised to stop his stunts: will we soon be writing a eulogy for his headline-grabbing antics?

Entrenched power of old, white men

Cause of death: Turning tides. Women have never held more legislative seats in Utah than in 2019. And San Juan is the first county in the state where Native Americans are the local governing majority. Don’t get us wrong, the good ole pioneer boys still hold the lion’s share of influence in the state, but their aging grips aren’t as tight as they used to be.

Cause of death: This one’s been dead a while. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has been calling the shots for decades, if not for the entirety of Utah’s 123 years of statehood. From booze to civil rights, marijuana to missiles, the LDS church has influenced faithful state and federal lawmakers for generations. Its foray into medical cannabis—think of the children!—is just more of the same. 

JANUARY 24, 2019 | 19

Separation of church and state

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Cause of death: Republicans. The supermajority already pulled a switcheroo on Prop 2. Now, there are grumblings that legislative leaders could alter Prop 3, which should expand Medicaid to 150,000 Utahns come April. Potential changes could include an enrollment cap or a work requirement, a conservative wet dream that sullies what voters approved in November.

The people’s power

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Jim Dabakis’ senatorial career

Whether it’s odd bills, odd debates, or just odd in general, we’ll be there to help you take it all in. Keep an eye out with us throughout the session to see what your lawmakers are up to.

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Prop 2

Cause of death: Those meddlin’ Mormons spearheaded an 11th-hour campaign to find a compromise between the NIMBY ilk and cannabis crusaders, gutting the medical cannabis ballot initiative voters passed last year in favor of a program that gives the state a key role in the distribution of a substance deemed illegal under federal law.


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20 | JANUARY 24, 2019

B i ngo

By City Weekly staff

S e s s i o n

S t y l e

Because what’s the point of living in a church-controlled, Republican supermajority state if you can’t laugh at its refusal to evolve and grow beyond its religious roots?

Former Sen. Jim Dabakis sends out an alarmist tweet

A Republican wants to lower taxes

Republicans dismiss Dems introduce ERA ratification a bill that dies with 1970s-era without any debate arguments

Legislature considers naming something after an old white guy

Legislators pass a bill that aligns with interests of LDS Church

A bill is passed that defies science

.05

Someone hopes to privatize public lands

A Democratsponsored bill passes!

Lawmakers don’t pass legislation on a perennial issue

A Salt Lake Democrat has the nerve to bring up clean air!

One lawmaker accuses another of overriding the people’s will

An inane alcohol bill is passed by a lawmaker who doesn’t drink. Cheers!

Protesters threaten Someone mentions the “pioneer to force an issue spirit” onto the ballot

Republican legislator cites “government overreach” in rolling back land or water protections A Republican says there’s no evidence humans or fossil fuels have made climate change worse

A Republican brings up work requirements for Medicaid and uses the “hand up, not a handout” line

Anything related to medical cannabis

A bill advances without a single Democrat’s vote

No new education funding is approved

Republicans brag about how little federal funding the state takes in

Bill introduced to handicap voter-passed propositions


ALBERT GRAY

Broadway at the Eccles: Wicked Aside from the creatives behind that Instagram egg post, there are few popularity gatekeepers as strong as Glinda Arduenna Upland, who, with her winning combination of blond locks, bubbly personality and ditzy delivery, is the toast of Shiz University. “I’ll teach you the proper poise when you talk to boys,” Glinda tells her homely dormmate, Elphaba. “Little ways to flirt and flounce, ooh!” Not sold on the “personality dialysis,” our green heroine comes into her own, finds true love, shows that dastardly Wizard a thing or two and defies gravity in what is the definition of an 11 o’clock number. Unless you’ve been living behind a velvet curtain, you’ll immediately recognize the cues from Wicked, the Oz-tastic musical that has been thrilling audiences on Broadway and abroad for 16 years. Based on Gregory Maguire’s novel, Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, and starting from the tagline, “So much happened before Dorothy dropped in,” the show focuses on the character who would later be known as the Wicked Witch, and takes a revisionist look at Oz much in the style of Maleficent or The Book of Mormon. Filled with fantastical scenery, Stephen Schwartz’s ear-wormy songs and a national touring cast that includes Kara Lindsay and Jackie Burns as the bewitching verdant one (pictured), Wicked is set to cast a spell on local audiences with a special run starting Jan. 30 at downtown’s Eccles Theater. Since its 2003 debut, the play has been translated to six languages, grossed $4.6 billion globally and nabbed more than 100 awards along the way—including three Tonys and a Grammy. Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Madame Morrible. (Enrique Limón) Wicked @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Jan. 30-March 3, times vary, broadway-at-the-eccles.com

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Shady Acres is the culmination of a three-part UMOCA series focusing on our interactions with the spaces around us. The first show asked viewers to consider what it means to exist in the landscape of the West, curator Jared Steffensen says. The second looked at urban environments and their unintended—or intentional—consequences. This show, an examination of suburbia, completes the cycle. The great American expansion from cities to suburbs began post-World War II. Now, as urban centers become increasingly crowded and expensive, people are again flocking to the suburbs. Although suburbs are known for their homogeneity, Steffensen was interested in asking two questions when preparing the show: “Do the suburbs become more of this diverse space when people start moving from downtown? And does that, in a way, fulfill the dream that was presented post-World War II?” When selecting works for the show, Steffensen says, “I wanted to present two halves, two ideas about the suburbs.” The first half plays with the idea of the surburbs as a better, safer, more innocent space; the second half is a critique of the isolation of suburbs that examines ideas about how we barricade and insulate ourselves in suburban spaces. “What I try to do is present the work in a way that has you question your relationship to it, question your role in it,” he says. “I moved to downtown Salt Lake in early 2008, so I’m trying to, in a way, come to grips with my own role in the situation.” What role do you play in our complicated urban-suburban ecosystem? (Naomi Clegg) Shady Acres @ Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Jan. 25-May 25, Tuesdays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., utahmoca.org

WEDNESDAY 1/30

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Don’t believe for a moment that Bill Engvall is just a redneck. A popular stand-up comedian, author and Grammy Award-winning recording artist, he became a regular on the late night TV circuit and found further fame as the star of his popular self-titled TBS sitcom. Oddly enough, Engvall’s comedy career happened almost by accident. He was a former DJ with designs on becoming a teacher when an impromptu appearance at a local nightclub provided all the impetus he needed to quit his job and move to LA It wasn’t too much later that he landed a Showtime special and found himself hosting A&E’s An Evening at the Improv. When, in 1992, he was named Best Male Standup at the American Comedy Awards, it served to solidify his standing. Engvall nabbed several recurring television roles, along with various Comedy Central specials. In 2013, Engvall provided the voice to the CMT animated series Bounty Hunters and made it to the finals of Dancing with the Stars. The guy stays busy. There’s that age-old saying, “You’re judged by the company you keep,” and in Engvall’s case, that has proved all-too-true. His tours with Jeff Foxworthy, Ron White and Larry the Cable Guy infused his Everyman identity with a decided Southern sensibility. Further proof: The last time Engvall, Foxworthy and Cable Guy teamed up for one of their so-called Blue Collar Comedy Tours, they renamed it the “Them Idiots Whirled Tour.” One of their popular routines involved a recital of supposed truths called “I believe.” We say, you better believe that Engvall is entertaining. (Lee Zimmerman) Bill Engvall @ DeJoria Center, 970 N. State Road 32, Kamas, 435-783-3113, Jan. 25, 8 p.m., $55-$125, dejoriacenter.com

UMOCA: Shady Acres

FRIDAY 1/25

Bill Engvall

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Since BYU’s student body is composed of many people who have lived abroad, it comes as no surprise that the university plays host to the sixth annual Off the Map: BYU International Theatre Festival. “The Off the Map Festival began six years ago as a way to bring exceptional work of international artists to the campus,” Bridget Benton, producer of BYU’s Bravo! series, which puts on Off the Map, explains. She notes the plays “are often performances that are seen only in other places. They are often small; most arrive in a suitcase.” That’s certainly the case for the 2019 festival entries. After all, where else are you going to see Mozart’s sister in an 18-foot-long dress or a puppet dog addressing environmental issues? The Other Mozart, by Polish playwright Sylvia Milo, tells the story of Mozart’s sister, Nannerl—who also happened to be a musical genius. The play features original compositions alongside classic numbers by Mozart and Marianna Martines and is set entirely in the aforementioned gigantic dress. It will run nightly and is recommended for audiences 12 and up. The Man Who Planted Trees is based on a short story by French author Jean Giono and presented by the Edinburghbased Puppet State Theatre Co. It’s a funny—and inspiring—tale of one man and his dog, making a difference in the world. It will run nightly and also have two matinees. Whichever play you pick, Benton notes, “The festival asks you to take a risk, see something new and to find a new favorite.” (Geoff Griffin) Off the Map: BYU International Theatre Festival @ Brigham Young University, Provo, Jan. 24-26; The Other Mozart, Pardoe Theatre, 8 p.m. nightly; The Man Who Planted Trees, Nelke Experimental Theatre, times vary, arts.byu.edu

FRIDAY 1/25

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Off the Map: BYU International Theatre Festival

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

AUSTIN ISBELL

LITTLE MATCHSTICK FACTORY

THURSDAY 1/24

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JAN. 24-30, 2019

JOAN MARCUS

ESSENTIALS

the


Band of Outsiders

Clusterphoque Cabaret celebrates acts—and individuals—you don’t always see on stage. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

PRESENTS:

Sponsored by:

VODKA

Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC

cix Maddix understands that the kind of acts you’d typically associate with a sideshow aren’t going to draw the symphony and ballet crowd. In fact, he embraces that outsider sensibility—to the extent that he brings up performative flatulence. “In old-time vaudeville, they wouldn’t clear out the theater between shows,” Maddix says, “so they’d put on the worst act at the end of the show, so people would leave. In France, they would have the ‘fartiste.’” Maddix brings an infectious enthusiasm to talking about his role as ringmaster for the sometimes-oddball acts that make up Clusterphoque Cabaret, a collective of performers in fields ranging from fire-spinning and aerial arts to magic and burlesque. Most significantly, he’s enthusiastic about this group as representing a spectrum of performers that don’t always take center stage. “We’ve been collecting talent from all over, particularly from art forms that aren’t particularly high-brow,” Maddix says. “And especially attracting talent that you wouldn’t typically expect to see, i.e. [those who aren’t] thin, white, straight aristocratic people. We’re really diverse. A lot of body types, a lot of racial diversity, a lot of orientational and gender diversity. And we find audiences really respond to that.” It’s not surprising that Maddix finds himself drawn to non-traditional performance. In his small Maine home town of South Paris, an internationally-renowned mime named Tony Montanaro had started a theater called the Celebration Barn, which drew performers and audiences from all over. “As backwoods as we were, we had this slightly bizarre avant-garde theater,” he says. “So I grew up sort of teething on this.” When he relocated to Utah nine years ago, he gravitated toward groups like the live performance cast of The Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Tower Theatre and the haunted house scene (he’s part of the annual cast at Fear Factory). It was through a connection in the Rocky Horror cast, someone who was looking to put on a big show for her birthday, that the idea for Clusterphoque first began to percolate. “I happened to know, through Fear Factory, one of the guys there; his wife was a burlesque dancer,” Maddix says. “I

WAYNE MATLOCK

S

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22 | JANUARY 24, 2019

A&E

THEATER

asked, ‘Do you happen to know enough people to put on a show?’ And she did. We pulled together so well, we decided to form a company of our own.” That company, right from the start, represented the kind of diversity about which Maddix is justifiably proud. The way he looks at it, that demographic variety is both intentional, and not surprising. “From the beginning, we were going to cast the net wide and specifically embrace people who don’t seem to be welcomed in other scenes,” Maddix says. “I think that’s one of the reasons we end up with such a diverse group—because we have people who start with, ‘I’m an outsider, what can I do as a talent, because I want to be part of this.’” Helping develop those performers is as much a part of Clusterphoque’s mission as actually putting on the shows, according to Maddix. The group conducts classes and workshops at the Art Factory for a variety of skills; Maddix himself teaches improv and magic. “I feel that anyone who has an interest already has a talent, and we can help you find it, and help you develop it, and turn it into an act,” he says. “People who do things to amuse their friends at parties, we can expand on that—give it some lighting, give it some sound. And people of all ages— we’ve got fairly young to quite senior—find it very liberating to step on stage. Terrifying, but liberating.” Another function of gathering those who might feel marginalized is an awareness of avoiding content in their performances that could marginalize others. “We’ve got trans performers, and the intersection between

Scix Maddix on stage

trans performance and drag performance is occasionally complicated. This is the stuff we talk about,” Maddix says. “So far, I think our track record is really solid. … There was a venue that wanted us to do a Cinco de Mayo show, and we spent a lot of time kind of debating it, because we didn’t have any Mexican performers in our show. Could we do justice to that subject? And we decided, no, we couldn’t.” At the moment, the goal of Maddix and Clusterphoque is raising the profile of their kind of performances beyond a fringe audience of friends and family members. “A lot of venues, when we first approach them, they don’t want to pay us; they think giving us stage time is payment enough,” he says. “If we were a band, you would pay us. We’re entertaining the audience … Very few of us make a living from this. One, that I know of. But we’re making progress.” “The biggest thing we do for the community,” Maddix adds, “is demonstrate that we’ll step on stage, warts and all, make fools out of ourselves, and everybody’s having fun and cheering. That’s ridiculously empowering.” CW

CLUSTERPHOQUE CABARET: GONZO RISING ALL-WEIRDO REVUE

Wednesday, Jan. 30, 7 p.m. Beehive Collective 666 S. State $10 general admission beehivecollectiveslc.com


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| JANUARY 24, 2019 | 23


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

2 & 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Spamalot Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Feb. 2, empresstheatre.com Treehouse Troupe: The Snake Prince Treehouse Museum, 347 22nd St., Ogden, Jan. 25-26, 6 p.m., treehousemuseum.org Wicked Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through March 3, artsaltlake.org (see p. 21) The Wizard of Oz Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Feb. 2, hct. org Wonderland BYU de Jong Concert Hall, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, through Feb. 2, arts.byu.edu

DANCE

BYU Living Legends Conference Center, 60 W. North Temple, Jan. 25, 7 p.m., lds.org In Accord: An Evening of Music and Movement Tanner Dance Black Box Theatre, 1721 Campus Center Drive, Jan. 25-26, 5:30 & 7:30 p.m., tannerdance.utah.edu Samba Queen Contest Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, Jan. 26, 9 p.m., sambafogo.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Just in time for the film festival week, Modern West Fine Art (177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, modernwestfineart.com) presents movie-themed new works by Ben Steele in Now Showing, through Feb. 28.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

A Raucous Evening of Opera Vieve Gore Concert Hall, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Jan. 24-26 & Jan. 31-Feb. 1, app.arts-people.com A Streetcar Named Desire CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 2, centerpointtheatre.org Clusterphoque Cabaret: Gonzo Rising AllWeirdo Revue The Beehive, 666 S. State, Jan. 30, 7 p.m., beehivecollectiveslc.com (see p. 22) Constellations Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Feb. 3, goodcotheatre.com I Do! I Do! Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, through Feb. 9, Mondays, Fridays, & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., terraceplayhouse.com Lend Me a Tenor CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 9, cptutah.org The Little Prince Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through Jan. 27, artsaltlake.org The Man Who Planted Trees BYU Nelke Experimental Theatre, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Jan. 24-25, 6 p.m.; Jan. 26, 1:30 & 6 p.m., arts.byu.edu (see p. 21) The Odd Couple Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, through Feb. 9, haletheater.org The Other Mozart BYU Pardoe Theatre, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Jan. 24 & 25, 8 p.m.; Jan. 26, 3:30 & 8 p.m., arts.byu.edu (see p. 21) Robyn Hood The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Feb. 23, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org School of Rock Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Feb. 2, Thursdays & Fridays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays,

The 5 Browns with the Utah Symphony Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Brown Bag Organ Recital First United Methodist Church, 203 S. 200 East, Wednesdays at noon, firstmethodistslc.wordpress.com Chamber Orchestra Ogden: Red Dress Concert Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m., egyptiantheaterogden.com SummerArts Piano Competition Winners Concert Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org Young Artist Chamber Players Concert Wasatch Presbyterian Church, 1626 S. 1700 East, Jan. 28, 7 p.m., youngartistchamberplayers.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Ben Bailey Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Jan. 25-26, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Bill Engvall DeJoria Center, 970 N. State Road 32, Kamas, Jan. 25, 8 p.m., dejoriacenter.com (see p. 21) Chingo Bling Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Comedy for a Cause Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 27, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com David Spade Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 25, 7 p.m.; Jan. 26, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Far Side Mic Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 29, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Jan. 25-26, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com SLUG Localized Comedy Night The Urban Lounge, Jan. 24, 8 p.m., the urbanloungeslc.com Steve Byrne Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 24, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Tobe Hixx The Falls Event Center, Trolley Square, 580 S. 600 East, Jan. 28, 7 p.m., thefallseventcenter.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Ella Joy Olsen Sweet Library, 455 F. St., Jan. 24, 7 p.m. slcpl.org Emily Butler: Freya & Zoose Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Jan. 30, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com


Sarah Jane and Kenneth Olsen: Lola Dutch When I Grow Up The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 26, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS LGBTQ

The Laramie Project UVU Bastian Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, through Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu

FARMERS MARKET

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 270 S. Rio Grande St., through April 20, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Bear Lake Monster Winterfest Bear Lake State Park Marina, 940 N. Bear Lake Blvd., Garden, Jan. 25-26, bearlakemonsterwinterfest.com DinoFest: Discover the Origin of Dinosaurs Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Jan. 26-27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu Jordan World Circus Golden Spike Event Center, 1000 N. 1200 West, Ogden, Jan. 25-27, multiple times; Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, Jan. 28, 4 & 7 p.m.; SLC County Equestrian Center, 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan, Jan. 29, 7 p.m.; Jan. 30, 4 & 7 p.m., thejordanworldcircus.com Miss Utah USA Pageant Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 26, 2 & 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE Supporting authors from “shithole” countries

Art Access Partners Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Feb. 8, accessart.org Ben Steele: Now Showing Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through March 1, modernwestfineart.com (see p. 24) Betta Inman & Joy Nunn: Color Talks Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 9, artatthemain.com Bill Laursen: Concept+Color+Composition Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Bryton Sampson: Plastic Portraits Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 14, slcpl.org Candelaria Atalaya: Time & Light Souvenirs Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Chauncey Secrist: Retrospect in Me-Flat Minor Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, through Feb. 15 Emma Goldgar: Chromatic Dreamscapes Main

BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

National Geographic Explorer Mike Libecki Our Lady of the Snows Center, 10189 E. State Highway 210, Alta, Jan. 24, 6:30 p.m., altaarts.org Jackie Chan The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, Jan. 25, 8-11 p.m., theleonardo.org Slate’s Employee of the Month Podcast Live Filmmaker Lodge, 550 Main, Park City, Jan. 27, 4:30 p.m., slate.com/live A Celebration of Black Excellence: Our Story with Charlotte Blake Alston West Lake STEM Junior High School, 3450 W. 3400 South, West Valley City, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m., timpfest.org American History, Culture, and Society Lecture Series: The Arab Spring and Failed Transition to Democracy Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Jan. 28, 6 p.m., slcpl.org Kenneth Hartvigsen: Pulitzer Prize Photographs Taylorsville Library, 4870 S 2700 West, Taylorsville, Jan. 29, 7 p.m., slcls.libnet.info

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

TALKS & LECTURES

Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 6, slcpl.org The International Tolerance Project Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 23, umfa.utah.edu Jylian Gustlin & Jared Davis Glass: New Works Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through Jan. 24, gallerymar.com Lenka Clayton: Under These Conditions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 11, utahmoca.org Lisa Anderson: Imprints: Phenomena in Nature Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Mike Simi: Gettin’ By UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 11, utahmoca.org Olivia Patterson: Artistic Musings of a Homeschooled Mind Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 3, slcpl.org Revolution Curated: Original Art of Yan’an’s New Society, 1955-1984 Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Feb. 27, culturalcelebration.org salt 14: Yang Yongliang Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 2, umfa.utah.edu Shady Acres UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 25, utahmoca.org (see p. 21) Storied Earth Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 1, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Susan Makov: Field Notes Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Those Who Can’t Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Feb. 3, urbanartsgallery.org Tom Bettin & Randee Levine Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Feb. 8, phillips-gallery.com The Tolerance Project: Promoting Dialogue Through Design Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 23, umfa.utah.edu Tracing the Path Utah State Capitol, 350 N. State, through June 26, goldenspike150.org Utah Children’s Chinese Calligraphy & Painting Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Vincent Mattina, Etsuko Kato & Bill Dunford Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 22, saltlakearts.org Watercolors by Tom Howard Phillips Gallery’s Dibble Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Feb. 8, phillips-gallery.com World of the Wild Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave, through March 17, hoglezoo.org


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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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26 | JANUARY 24, 2019

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Sunday-Monday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Best bet: Those giant albóndigas Can’t miss: The grandeur of deep-fried mojarra

JANUARY 24, 2019 | 31

to shed the corn-chip scales from their eyes and take a closer look at what Mexican cuisine has to offer, look no further than Julia’s Mexican Food (51 S. 1000 West, 801521-4228). Longtime visitors will re-

| CITY WEEKLY |

Don’t get me wrong, I love burritos and tacos with all my heart, but thinking that those near-perfect options span the length and breadth of Mexican food is a gross disservice to some truly fantastic comfort food. For those eager

I

grew up with a very limited definition of what Mexican food really is—it landed somewhere between taco day at the school cafeteria and skipping class to split an order from Taco Bell with my friends. For years, I didn’t think much of the history, versatility and nuance of Mexican cuisine, mainly because I figured that the whole spectrum of the country’s culinary culture could be wrapped up inside a hard shell and served with a side of tater tots called “Mexi-fries.” I’d like to say that approaching Mexican food as an adult is a much more well-rounded, culturally diverse endeavor—which it is, if you know where to look—but it’s amazing how many of these fascinating dishes get eclipsed by tacos and burritos.

tilapia—mojarra is a whole fish that’s been scored, deep-fried and served bones, fins, eyes and all. Its skin is crisp from the fryer, and the fact that it’s staring up at you as you start slicing into the tender flesh of its belly offers a singular dining experience. It’s served with sliced tomato, avocado, lettuce, rice and beans, along with Julia’s excellent tortillas, all of which jumpstart the brain into thinking of all kinds of creative combinations. Despite the charred appearance of the little guy on my plate, the tilapia is beautifully cooked. It’s flaky, tender and goes very nicely with a squeeze of lime and some Tapatío for good measure. As an out-of-the-way beacon of tasty Latin American comfort food, Julia’s is one more reason to pay Rose Park a visit when you’re craving something that’s both new and accessible. The service is friendly, the salsa is spicy and it’s facilísimo to taste the love in each generous portion. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Julia’s Mexican Food is a Rose Park gem.

of ground meat would be the tapas scene. Most tapas joints have some variation on albóndigas, but they’ve got their size ratios all wrong. The ones at Julia’s are monstrous and arrive, soup style, in a hot broth spiked with chile oil. Like most menu items here, the albóndigas come with complimentary chips and salsa—a good, spicy homemade brew—and a tabletop wicker basket stacked with warm, freshly made corn tortillas. Regardless of the engineering challenges, if you give me a stack of tortillas with my meal, I’m going to figure out the best way to wrap them around my entrée. In this case, one meatball on its own presents a structural threat, so it’s best to slice those suckers in half—that way you get to see the sliver of hard-boiled egg lovingly placed within each meaty sphere— and arrange them side by side. Slap them with some chopped onion and cilantro, and you’ve got something special on your hands—along with all that lovely chile broth that bursts forth with every juicy bite. If pure spectacle is something you like in a meal, then check out the mojarra frita ($14.50). Named for any fish in the cichlid family—this one’s

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Mojarra Madness

member a charming but divey spot that cranked out quality dishes like menudo and ceviche, but Julia’s has undergone some renovations over the past year that have made quite a difference. Swatches of pink and yellow painted across the walls create a vibrant dining space, complete with little quotes and Spanish proverbs written on the walls. An inescapable big screen TV occupies a prominent spot in the dining room, displaying Telemundo or a hotly contested fútbol match, depending on the time of year. Let’s also not forget one of the most welcome of changes—Julia’s has shed its cash-only policy and now accepts credit cards. At lunchtime, the place is packed with an almost exclusively Latin American clientele—which is your first sign that a restaurant is whipping up the good shit. While Julia’s has a huge variety of tacos served on homemade corn tortillas, I recommend you veer onto the path less traveled. Take, for example, the albóndigas ($10.50). I’ve often encountered these Latin-inspired meatballs as appetizers around town, but the most notorious appropriator of these fist-sized globes


the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

25

year

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

s!

Maud’s Café Turns 1

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

A year ago, the Utah chapter of Volunteers of America (voa.org) opened Maud’s Café (422 W. 900 South, maudscafe.com) to provide income and a sense of community to the tenants living at the VOA Homeless Youth Resource center nearby. Since then, it’s not only become one of the Granary District’s hippest new coffee shops, but it’s helped offset a variety of problems for the homeless youth who work there. Working at Maud’s, these young people learn professional skills and earn a wage, which helps them take control of their situations in a unique way. On Friday, Jan. 25, from 5 to 7 p.m., Maud’s celebrates its one-year anniversary. In addition to great food and coffee, KRCL 90.9 FM is live-broadcasting an episode of RadioActive, and local singer Josaleigh Pollett is performing.

Belly Dancing at Cedars of Lebanon

While the lamb tagine alone is worth your time, there are several reasons to visit downtown’s Cedars of Lebanon (152 E. 200 South, cedarsoflebanonrestaurant.com). Case in point: On Friday, Jan. 25, the Middle Eastern restaurant hosts a dinner performance from 7 to 10 p.m., featuring Megan Sybor, belly dancer extraordinaire, who performs her full routine while diners enjoy their meals. I’d suggest attending with an open mind—Sybor likes to get the most out of her audience, so be ready to learn a few tantalizing dance moves during dinner. For those who catch the belly dancing bug, Sybor also offers classes where she imparts the nuances of this celebrated form of entertainment. Fill your belly and then work it, y’all.

ninth & ninth 254 south main

Pasta for the People since 1968

Hydroponics Winter Workshop

F O O D H E AV E N N A M R E G man Delicatessen & Restaura n r Ge

| CITY WEEKLY |

32 | JANUARY 24, 2019

ng

Celebrat i

t

Interested in cultivating a garden without the benefit of a yard? You’ll want to check out the University of Utah’s Edible Campus Gardens and its Hydroponics Winter Workshop on Tuesday, Jan. 29, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The folks from Moonlight Garden Supply (moonlightgardensupply.com) explain the basics of hydroponics and aquaponics while demonstrating their products. Even if the idea of an indoor garden doesn’t strike your fancy, the event presents a few different solutions you can keep in your back pocket to prepare for the inevitable zombie apocalypse. The workshop takes place at Lassonde Studios (1701 Student Life Way) on the U’s campus. Quote of the Week: “If it weren’t for the coffee, I’d have no identifiable personality whatsoever.”

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

—David Letterman Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GRAND OPENING SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION

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JANUARY 24, 2019 | 33

Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

| CITY WEEKLY |

801-905-1186

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THREE LOCATIONS!

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3 6 2 0


Embrace these inviting brown and black beers. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

O

ver the holidays, while I was having my fingernails pulled out—err ... I mean, Christmas shopping—I came across a solid get-out-of-jail-free card in the form of a Salt Lake City beer pub. As I’m sucking down my well-deserved barrelaged imperial stout, two girls sitting next to me at the bar scoffed at my black brew and exclaimed, “How can you drink that motor oil shit?” Granted, they had never tried this particular beer, but nonetheless I spent the next 20 minutes playing beer missionary—trying to bring them over to the dark side. I failed. However, City Weekly readers might be more receptive. Dark beer is a pretty broad term, especially if you’re used to a diet of fizzy yellow beer. If you’re not a fan of walking with darkness, try it out once in a while;

| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | JANUARY 24, 2019

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

MIKE RIEDEL

Don’t Fear the Dark Side

you might be surprised by the kaleidoscope of flavors that are out there, like these two new dark beers. Proper Brewing Co. Géol (Yule): Named for the winter solstice, this Englishstyle barleywine pours a nice cherry-red color with darker ruby accents. There’s a nice sherry, almost brandy-like nose. Cherries, figs, and notes of apples are present, with hints of gingerbread if you dig down deep enough. The taste follows the nose quite well. I’m happy this isn’t a sugar bomb, like some other English-style barleywines. Dusty flavors of cocoa powder combine with deep toffee and leather up front, preparing the palate for the malt assault that soon follows. Flavors of raisin, caramel, tobacco and dark fruit round out the flavor explosion. The finish has some barely perceptible herbal hops that keep the malts from spiraling out of control. No flavor overpowers the other. They all play well together. It’s obviously a barleywine, but not such a big one that you have to back off after each sip. It could have a wee bit more body, but that’s just getting nitpicky. Overall: English-style barleywines are experiencing a bit of a resurgence in Utah. Typically, most of the barleywines you’ll find locally are more American in style, with high doses of bittering hops. This 9.5 percent ale is a nice any-time-of-year beer that happens to double nicely as a full-bodied winter warmer.

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BEER NERD

Squatters Outer Daarrgness: This newest incarnation of Outer Darkness pours like used deep ebony oil, with a full finger of light brassy, mocha head. As I hover above, I’m immediately hit with the wafting aroma of dark rum. Inhale a little deeper, and I’m met with charred oak, dark molasses, chocolate and dark fruit. It’s a very inviting nose that piques my interest, due to the fact that it’s not the typical whiskey character I’ve come to expect from barrel-aged imperial stouts. The taste picks up as the aroma started, with rum sweetness and molasses right up front, followed by a lightly charred oak. Once my palate adjusts to the shock of rum, dark fruit and cocoa

work to sooth the tongue from the light boozy wash. A slight Kahlua character becomes more prevalent as this beer warms. A very tasty 11.6 percent brew, with some very nice complexities. Overall: This offering from Squatters makes me wonder what else they have up their sleeves. Very nice, well-balanced complexity going on here. It’s a great brew, though I just wish there was a bit more body. These two beers have been around for a few weeks; the beer nerds of my tribe are quickly snagging them up for cellaring and trading. I’d get over to Proper and the Utah Brewers Cooperative today. You’ll thank me. As always, cheers! CW


You’re cordially invited to

Dine Like Royalty

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Chanon Thai

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive

Conveniently located on 900 South, this cozy restaurant serves up classic Thai dishes. Their tom kha gai is sweet and silky smooth, great as a main dish or a side to share; other standard menu items like curries, larb, pad thai and stir fries are impeccably spiced and packed with fresh veggies and seasonal squash. The restaurant also serves a variety of duck and seafood specialties; almost every dish is easily made vegan or vegetarian by opting for tofu. Finish off your evening with mango sticky rice or housemade coconut ice cream. 278 E. 900 South, 801-532-1177, chanonthai.com

ALL YOU CAN EAT

HIBACHI

Mon - Thur: Fri - Sat: Sunday:

11:00am - 9:30pm 11:00am - 10:30pm 12:00pm - 9:00pm

3370 State Street #8 South Salt Lake, UT 801-466-8888 | Full liquor license

LUNCH - $9.99 DINNER - $19.99

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SAKURAHIBACHISLC.COM

R&R BBQ

Mazza

Mazza offers an assortment of Middle Eastern cuisine such as lamb and rice dolaa, musakhan, shawarma and kebabs, delectable baked kafta, maghmoor and much more. Owner Ali Sabbah takes pride in keeping his restaurants authentic, so the food and service is always top-notch. It wouldn’t be complete without the sizable wine list, with bottles from Lebanon, Morocco and Greece. 912 E. 900 South, 801-521-4572; 1515 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9259, mazzacafe.com

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

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705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Award Winning Donuts

As seasoned veterans of the barbecue industry, Rod and Roger Livingston take pride in their craft—a little smoke, fire and rub, and soon enough you’ll get the best in town. The slow-smoked brisket is second to none, and the smoked sausage, pulled pork, barbecue ribs and chicken are equally sensational. R&R BBQ fanatics can get their dose of smoked goodness in downtown SLC or any of their locations along the Wasatch Front. Multiple locations, randrbbq.net

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 24, 2019 | 35


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36 | JANUARY 24, 2019

CONCERT PREVIEW

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

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KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

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karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/24 Reggae at the Royal

tomorrow's bad seeds projects 432 something like seduction

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islands 5 amfs & longLive Music 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 1/25

ginger & the gents mooseknuckle rust SATURDAY 1/26

Live Music

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TUESDAY 1/22

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM this weeks featured artists

neal & taylor from royal bliss coming soon 2/15 2/22 3/30 5/3

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 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

KATELYN WILLIAMS

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

M

indy Gledhill’s music has always been moving. Over the course of five full-length albums, her piano-and-guitar-driven pop-rock has spread to all corners of the globe, appearing in Super Bowl and Olympics commercials, scoring scenes on shows like Dancing with the Stars and The Good Wife, and contributing to the success of electronica star Kaskade’s Grammy-nominated album Fire & Ice. But this Provo resident’s forthcoming full-length, Rabbit Hole, explodes in awe-inspiring new directions. In addition to its technical and artistic excellence, Rabbit Hole tracks Gledhill’s religious transformation, which found her going from poster child for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to loud and proud exiled Mormon. “Making this album and creating these songs was my therapy while going through that faith transition,” Gledhill says. “Every record I’ve ever made is a chronicle of what I’ve been going through at that point in my life. Music is just how I process my life experiences.” On Rabbit Hole, those firsthand experiences skew from the terrifyingly philosophical—second-guessing her own existence, disappointing her loved ones and wearing pants to church in silent protest of Mormonism’s sexism and patriarchal structure—to the humorous. Gledhill sneaks into her dark garage to make coffee, curious about the difference between an acceptable caffeinated beverage made from artificial ingredients and a natural one barred by church teaching. She finds devastating humor in the sadness of an adult woman baring her shoulders, wearing shorts and transitioning away from symbolic undergarments to regular old underwear for the first time in her life. Gledhill admits that no one gets away easy from such strictures. Raised in California by devout parents, she spent two high school years in Spain while her family was on a mission before moving to Utah and attending BYU’s School of Music. After graduating, she signed to a label owned by Deseret Books and became a Mormon superstar with 2004 debut record The Sum of All Grace, all of which made her eventual departure from the church even harder. “I really stepped into that role of representing the church,” Gledhill says. “So it was very difficult for me to come to the conclusions I was coming to in my mind while being a public persona to so many LDS people.” That began to happen in 2013, when she was in the middle of writing and recording her last solo album, Pocketful of Poetry. “I was terrified of letting down my fans, my parents, my spouse and my children. But I would not trade this experience for anything. It has really transformed me as a person. It helped me grow up and realize it’s totally OK to think about life on my own and make decisions without having to consult my religion. It’s been beautiful.” That beauty is immediately evident on Rabbit Hole. “Bluebird” and “One” are tender acoustic numbers that delve into Gledhill’s emotional center; “Boo Hoo!” and “Wild Card” are jaunty pop bangers that, with their narratives of outsiders shocking the squares, would fit right in on modern radio. The piano-led “Icarus” borders on Adele territory, while “Lines” is pure wordplay joy, Gledhill’s vocalization of the title word blurring throughout the song from “lines” to “lies.” In fact, what’s most impressive about Rabbit Hole is how it universalizes Gledhill’s struggle.

Mindy Gledhill “I thought about how to toe that line a lot,” she says. “I didn’t want this to be an album only for people going through this specific experience within the context of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints—that’s a very small percentage of people in the big scheme of things.” Instead, Gledhill wrote Rabbit Hole so that anybody could relate to it. “Whoever you are, you’re going to go down some kind of rabbit hole where your paradigm is turned upside-down and you’re forced to look at life from different angles,” she says. “Divorce, the loss of a loved one, really any kind of disorienting experience.” The hard part for Gledhill is facing all of that pain again. With a nationwide tour following her Jan. 25 album release show at Velour Live Music Gallery in Provo, she’ll be performing for the first time ever in major markets like Boston and San Francisco, along with appearances at esteemed songwriter venues like City Winery in New York. “I feel like I’ve processed a lot of these things and I’m on the other side of it,” Gledhill says. “I’m ready to move on to new conversations, but I’m facing a road ahead of revisiting old feelings. A lot of people are in the middle of experiences like this, though, and when you are, it’s the most isolating, disorienting thing. So I’m excited for Rabbit Hole to get out there and connect with those people.” Gledhill takes those connections seriously. She’s a regular guest on progressive Mormon podcasts, an activist and ally in LGTBQ circles and even a supporter of emerging Middle Eastern feminist fashion brand Agent GirlPower. She’s vocal about finding the balance between being a parent and an artist, and she’s still a prominent presence in Provo, where she’s been performing since high school. Describing Velour as a special venue whose decades-long aura is hard to explain, she speaks lovingly of Happy Valley’s music scene. “People are more prone to champion each other than compete with one another, which I love,” she says. “That’s really fostered the growth of the music community here.” No doubt Rabbit Hole will serve the same purpose for those struggling with religious and cultural impediments. Gledhill says she wants to achieve three goals with the album: to find the humor in sadness, to build bridges of love and respect in her Mormon community and to encourage the healing of others who leave their fold. She hopes to work as a producer for more artists moving forward but isn’t sure what she’ll write next. “My creative process happens when I’m ready to process my life experiences,” she says. “I write when my body and mind feel the need to write. I don’t know when and where that will happen next.” CW

MINDY GLEDHILL

w/ Nymph Friday, Jan. 25, 7 p.m. Velour Live Music Gallery, 135 N. University Ave., Provo Sold out as of press time, all ages velourlive.com


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JANUARY 24, 2019 | 37


10% off for military, firefighters and law enforcement

Snow Fest feat. Diplo, G-Eazy, Machine Gun Kelly, Marshmello, Above & Beyond, Young Bombs, Dounia, DJ Ross One, Fred Matters

Detroit rapper Machine Gun Kelly poked a sleeping tiger late last year when he dropped the exhaustive diss track “Rap Devil,” calling out Eminem for his “weird beard,” being “sober and bored” and other offenses related to being a middle-aged rapper. MGK also made some legitimately good points, ripping the aging Slim Shady for his overdone Cookie Monster voice on 2010 single “Not Afraid” and pointing out the glaring contradiction in somehow remaining bitter at the world despite being the top-selling musician of the century. MGK’s final verse hit the hardest, beginning with a cleverly scathing spin on Em’s iconic character from the film 8 Mile. He raps: “We know you get nervous, Rabbit/ I see momma’s spaghetti all over your sweater/ I wish you would lose yourself on the records/ That you made a decade ago, they were better.” Ouch. Despite Em’s real-life history as a battle rapper, “Rap Devil” seemed to deliver a truly devastating blow, but the man born Marshall Mathers responded with the razor-sharp “Killshot,” dissecting MGK’s disses and reconstructing them for his own evil purposes—and breaking the internet in the process. Who came out victorious is neither here nor there, because the real winners were hip-hop heads with an appetite for beef. Machine Gun Kelly plays Park City’s Snow Fest on Jan. 28 alongside the likes of mega EDM producer Diplo (Thursday, Jan. 24) and G-Eazy (Friday, Jan. 25). Coincidentally, G-Eazy is another rapper who has sparred, at times viciously, with MGK. Will they make up onstage with a surprise collaboration? Anything can happen at Sundance. (Howard Hardee) Park City Live, 427 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $35-$89, 21+, parkcitylive.net

FRIDAY 1/25

New Breed Brass Band, Ol’ Fashion Depot

Many cities are defined by the music emitted from their environs. Nashville is synonymous with country, Austin with Americana. Memphis and Chicago bred the blues, while London, Los Angeles and New York are clearly the epicenter of everything cool and contemporary. Arguably, though, no city possesses a style as dynamic and distinctive as New Orleans. Since the start of the last century, it’s retained a signature sound as vibrant as it is varied. Funk, jazz, blues, rock and soul have been fused in the boisterous bars of Frenchmen Street and the celebratory sounds of Mardi Gras, spawning any number of artists and bands honoring that heritage with a signature approach of their own. New Breed Brass Band ably embraces that tradition thanks to its fusion of rhythm and revelry. Its individual members began making music early on, and when the group made its debut in 2013, it immediately proved it could live up to its handle. Like other artists New Orleans is famous for—The Neville Brothers, Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, Fats Domino and the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, among them—they follow in the footsteps

New Breed Brass Band

GRIZZLEE MARTIN

2106 W. North Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah 801-741-1188

THURSDAY 1/24-MONDAY 1/28

Machine Gun Kelly of those who have taken the Crescent City sound to the world. In that sense, New Breed Brass Band upholds and expands the standards by which NOLA’s music is measured. (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $17, 21+, thestateroom.com

SATURDAY 1/26

Bayside, Kayleigh Goldsworthy

Whether punk, screamo or good old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll, all guitarfronted genres are derived from the real OG of emotional tunes: blues. In the 20th century, a six-string guitar, a fifth of whiskey and a broken heart was all the inspiration needed to write ballads. Today’s emotional tunes might sound different, but they have the same effect. Four-piece pop-punk band Bayside isn’t the first to return to their acoustic roots. In the mid ’90s, Nirvana and Alice In Chains plied their distortionless trade on legendary TV series MTV Unplugged, while Metallica called their own performance a “symphony.” This Queens foursome kept it simple in 2018, dubbing their ninth studio album Acoustic Volume 2. A sequel of sorts to their 2006 album Acoustic Volume 1, Acoustic Volume 2 was the band’s way of “reimagining songs from our catalogue,” vocalist/rhythm guitarist Anthony Raneri explained during a live performance at Paste Studio last September. There’s something about the authenticity that brings musicians back to a clean, honest sound. Bayside’s “It Don’t Exist” has become the emo anthem for aging millennials who grew up with the now 18-year-old band. Even though folk rocker Kayleigh Goldsworthy has taken a different journey, picking up the axe on her newest EP All These Miles, the polarization of the two acts complement each other on their current U.S. tour. Together, Bayside and Kayleigh Goldsworthy showcase the trials and tribulations of falling in love and the ensuing heartbreak. Hopefully these “unjaded” New Yorkers will revive our faith in humanity at this killer show. (Rachelle Fernandez) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $20 presale; $24 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Bayside

MEGAN THOMPSON

Ostrich Buffalo Elk Venison Wild Boar Wagyu

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, HOWARD HARDEE, NIC RENSHAW & LEE ZIMMERMAN

MICHAEL MORRIS

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Ritt Momney

MONDAY 1/28

Ritt Momney, Krooked Kings, Blue Rain Boots

Salt Lake City band Ritt Momney has been gaining a lot of traction recently thanks to heavy gigging and frontman Jack Rutter’s confessional songwriting. (The fact that a certain similarly named politician is now a U.S. senator probably doesn’t hurt either.) While Rutter’s songs might seem at first blush to be rather standard indie-rock fare, there’s a bit more going on under the hood: His compositions are underpinned by a striking, minimalist sensibility, and as a lyricist, he has a pretty sharp eye for details. Ritt Momney is poised to rise to even greater heights in 2019, with their debut album Her and All of My Friends on track for release within the next few months and several tour dates in California scheduled for February. Before they head west, you can catch them twice at Kilby Court: once on Jan. 24 and again on Jan. 28. On Thursday, California garagepop outfit Fashion Jackson headline, building momentum off a string of EPs and singles released over the last two years, including their recent collaboration “Cinnamon Burn” with singer JARA; local indie group The Sardines opens. Krooked Kings and Blue Rain Boots offer support on Monday. (Nic Renshaw) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m. both nights, $8 Friday; $7 Monday, all ages, kilbycourt.com

Neyla Pekarek

MIKE RICHEY

TUESDAY 1/29

Neyla Pekarek, Hailey Knox, Tamar-kali

Whenever an artist opts to venture away from an established, critically acclaimed combo for a solo venture, there’s risk involved. In Neyla Pekarek’s case, the move was especially daunting. As cellist in nü-folk outfit The Lumineers, she had the challenge of maintaining a certain high bar but lacked any ready recognition to bank on. Happily, her debut album Rattlesnake finds her establishing an expressive individual identity while emerging with a set of songs so dynamic and distinctive that comparisons are practically moot. A concept album about Kate Slaughterback—otherwise known as “Rattlesnake Kate,” a little-known heroine of America’s Wild West—it’s an ode to one independent woman from another. Pekarek refers to it as a “folk opera,” and she asserts herself through a string of dynamic melodies, all flush with clarity, charisma and confidence. Riveting throughout, it ought to prove as compelling in concert as it does on record. “I got really inspired by the way [Kate] lived completely outside the realm of what was expected of women and outside of the box of femininity,” Neyla recently told The Washington Post. “I think it kind of inspired me to find my own voice and become a little tougher myself.” That should serve as inspiration for us all. (LZ) Broadcast Music Inc’s Snowball @ Sundance, The Shop, 1167 Woodside Ave., Park City, 8 p.m., open to festival credential holders, 21+, bmi.com

NEYLA PEKAREK

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WEDNESDAY 1/30

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CARTER SMITH

Kelly Clarkson, Kelsea Ballerini, Brynn Cartelli

THURSDAY 1/24 LIVE MUSIC

Aquarius (The Loading Dock) Crook & The Bluff (Garage on Beck) Diplo + Young Bombs (Park City Live) see p. 38 Fashion Jackson + Ritt Momney + The Sardines (Kilby Court) see p. 40 Jeremiah and The Red Eyes (Hog Wallow Pub) Joshy Soul & The Cool (Lake Effect) K Camp (Soundwell) Mountain Country (Rye Diner & Drinks) Roadie + Local Sports Team + Ben Reneer (Velour) Terence Hansen Trio (Gracie’s) Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds + Project 432 + Something Like Seduction (The Royal) Turtleneck Wedding Dress + Acacia Ridge + Black Throne (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos: Jordan & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Jayceeoh (Sky)

FRIDAY 1/25 LIVE MUSIC

Adult Prom + Coma Toast + Stop Karen (The Underground) Beatles vs. Stones (The Depot) Berlin Breaks (Ice Haüs) Brother Chunky Trio (ABG’s) Channel Z (Club 90) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) G-Eazy + Dounia + DJ Ross One (Park City Live) see p. 38 Ginger & The Gents(The Royal)

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Kelly Clarkson is having a moment. Or maybe she’s always been having a moment. Fun fact: Hanging in the City Weekly offices is a poster-sized version of an issue we published in 2002 that features, in the top-right corner, a picture of American Idol’s season one babies Clarkson and Justin Guarini. (“Taking a wild stab at the results,” the caption reads.) Kelly, 20 years old at the time, conquered the Idol competition and has been on a relentless climb to the top of the charts ever since. (Guarini, we assume, has vanished into obscurity in the annals of time.) Seven mainstream studio albums, three Grammy awards and multiple Top 100 singles later (the ubiquitous “Stronger” among them) and Clarkson is breaking out from her corporate overlords—or at least her contract with RCA Records. For her latest album, 2017’s Meaning of Life, she signed with Atlantic Records to produce an album that moves away from her usual radio-friendly, high-powered pop and toward the worlds of soul and R&B. Now—and finally, for many of her fans, after three non-touring years—Clarkson is heading back out on the road. “Meaning of Life is the album I always wanted to make and I am so excited to finally be able to tour it!” she said in a news release. See Clarkson put her incredible pipes to work with support from country up-and-comer Kelsea Ballerini and Clarkson-coached The Voice winner Brynn Cartelli. And, of course, plenty of back-up dancers. (Naomi Clegg) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $36-$399, all ages, vivintarena.com

Ivie Brie (Harp and Hound) Joe Rock Show + Damn Dirty Vultures + Benview + Heavy Pulp (Metro Music Hall) Los Stellarians + Sa of 311 (Urban Lounge) Luco + Dad Bod + In Limbic (Kilby Court) Michelle Moonshine + The Lane Changers (Gracie’s) Mike Rogers (Silver Lake) Mindy Gledhill + Nymph (Velour) see p. 36 Nathan Spenser Revue (Legends at Park City Mountain) New Breed Brass Band + Ol’ Fashion Depot (The State Room) see p. 38 New Year’s Resolution (The Loading Dock) Rage Against The Supremes (The Spur) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Rick Gerber (EBS Lounge) Scoundrels (Hog Wallow Pub) SNXP (Gold Blood Collective) Sydnie Keddington (Lake Effect)

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NO NAME SALOON & GRILL

44 | JANUARY 24, 2019

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TYLER RICE

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BAR FLY

I ventured up to Park City last week with three objectives: 1. return a pair of too-big LL Bean boots to the Maine company’s new flagship Utah store; 2. scope out shortcuts in advance of Sundance Film Festival, which I’ll be working for the first time ever; and 3. find somewhere to eat and drink far from the maddeningly rich ski-slope crowd. (Make it four, if you count escaping Salt Lake City’s inversion chokehold for the day.) Why I even thought I’d fulfill mission No. 3 anywhere but No Name Saloon & Grill, I can’t tell you. It wasn’t my first rodeo in this hell-raising Park City favorite, either; way back in 2012, I attended a conference at The Canyons, and on our only night out, we capped things off with a marathon game of shufflepuck. But as a verified Utah local, a trip to No Name is different. It’s an oasis of middle-class normalcy in a sea of ostentatious wealth—a place where you can actually afford a can of Park City Imperial Pilsner and a mushroom Swiss burger. Where a cup of split pea soup warms your soul in a way that small-plate tapas just can’t. Where the bartender nods your way and silently refills your beer while the rich lady who stepped out of the Sundance Catalog dithers over which white wine will taste better. Even better, No Name’s upstairs bar and outdoor deck is an oasis no matter the season. Want to feel snowflakes on your face while taking a breather from the football-crazed crowd inside? Want to hide away from reality in a secret wooden booth? Want to surround yourself with unseemly characters, alive momentarily in a hardliving, rough-and-tumble history that’s slowly slipping away with each year’s new corporate activation? No Name Saloon & Grill does it all and more, perhaps serving as the last lunch-pail dive bar in a city that considers a six-figure salary a requirement for entry. I can’t wait to see what the Sundance crowd looks like. (Nick McGregor) No Name Saloon & Grill, 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667, nonamesaloon.com

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SUNDAY 1/27 LIVE MUSIC

Frozen Fest feat. Almost Amateur + Cudney + Silent Miles + Fear & Loathing + Inside Job + Suburban Hell Kill (Kilby Court) Jim Fish & Friends (Legends at Park City Mountain) John Joslin Davis (Garage on Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) MarchFourth (The State Room) The Number Ones feat. David Halliday (The Bayou) Rage Against The Supreme (The Spur)

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Gothic + Industrial + Dark ‘80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules feat. Dave & JC (Tavernacle) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays w/ Kid Ink (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

ONESIE PUB CRAWL / DJ LATU

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The Backseat Lovers + Sammy Brue + Blue Rain Coat (Velour) B.D. Howes Band (Legends at Park City Mountain) Bayside + Kayleigh Goldsworthy (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Bill ’n’ Diane (HandleBar) Channel Z (Club 90) Christopher Hawley (Gracie’s) Don’t Drop The Mic + Kidd Oo (The Loading Dock) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) The Goverdogs (Umbrella Bar) The Green (Soundwell) Live Trio (The Red Door) Marshmello (Park City Live) see p. 38 Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Ol’ Fashion Depot (Garage on Beck) Parrot Nation (Brewskis) Puddle Mountain Ramblers (Johnny’s on Second) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Separation of Self + Founders of Ruin + Low Life + Far From + Threar + Winter Light (The Complex) Shannon Runyon (Silver Lake) Shuffle (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Sunsleeper + Old Blush + Despite Despair + Amalo (Kilby Court) Talia Keys (Harp and Hound) Warbly Jets + The Boys Ranch + Doubt Walk Doors (The State Room) Zolopht + Superbubble (The Royal)

SATURDAY, JAN 26

TALIA KEYS

LIVE MUSIC

Blue Divide (The Spur) Machine Gun Kelly + Fred Matters (Park City Live) see p. 38 Ritt Momney + Krooked Kings + Blue Rain Boots (Kilby Court) see p. 40 Veronica Blue (Flanagan’s on Main) Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Industry Night Mondays (Trails)

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Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

TUESDAY 1/29 LIVE MUSIC

Dorothy + Spirit Animal (The Depot) Honey and Salt + Booyah Moon + Breakfast in Silence (Kilby Court) Neyla Pekarek + Hailey Knox + Tamar-kali (The Shop) see p. 40 Scott Foster (Lake Effect) The Pink Spiders + Wicked Bears + Housewarming Party (Urban Lounge)

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WEDNESDAY 1/30 LIVE MUSIC

The Beatles Rooftop 50th Anniversary Concert (Urban Lounge) David Halliday & The Jazz Vespers Quartet (Gallivan Center) Gonzo Rising (Beehive Collective) Josh Hoyer and Soul Colossal (Gracie’s) Kelly Clarkson + Kelsea Ballerini + Brynn Cartelli (Vivint Smart Home Arena) see p. 42 Live Jazz (Club 90) Michelle Moonshine (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic Night (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam (Gracie’s) Tuesday Night Jazz (Alibi)

Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Energi Wednesdays feat. Saymyname (Sky) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Scooter and Lavelle (Downstairs) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

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have to imagine it was at least a little bit uncomfortable for John C. Reilly the first day on the set of Stan & Ollie—and I’m not referring to the prosthetic belly and jowls he wears through much of the film while portraying Oliver Hardy. No, it’s more that his Dewey Cox in Walk Hard skewered entertainer biopics so ferociously it’s tough to imagine how they ever walked again. There would seem to be an infinite number of ways to tell the story of well-known subjects cinematically, but it seems as though filmmakers generally only choose one: Earnest, thorough and mostly interested in offering an opportunity for actors to do convincing impersonations. To Stan & Ollie’s credit, screenwriter Jeff Pope (Philomena) and director Jon S. Baird (Filth) seem interested in dodging most of the genre’s pitfalls. Instead of a cradle-tograve history of Stan Laurel (Steve Coogan) and Oliver Hardy, they focus almost entirely on the twilight of the comedy team’s career. After a brief prologue set during their heyday in 1937, the narrative sprints forward to 1953 as Laurel and Hardy prepare for a theater tour of the U.K., trying to drum up interest in a comeback film project. While it might not be wildly original to focus on fading stars attempting to recapture old glory, Stan & Ollie leans into the notion that its subjects are perpetually “on” as performers, delighting in turning the mere act of checking into a low-rent hotel into an extended shtick exclusively for the benefit of the clerk. The whimsical woodwind-heavy score by Rolfe Kent emphasizes a lightness in tone; if there’s angst to be found in the lives of these aging ex-stars, you’re not going to find it here. Nor is there a desire to underline how different the two men are in private compared to their on-screen personas. Initially, there’s

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Stan & Ollie offers some minor improvements on biopic clichés.

an obvious incongruity to the portrayals—the fuming, uptight Ollie of their films shown to be the easygoing, appetites-driven guy everyone knows as “Babe,” and the befuddled, naive Stan revealed as the workaholic creative force behind most of their material. But the performances by Reilly and Coogan hit more than one note; we get to see Stan’s anxiety over not being able to pull together the project he so desperately wants and Ollie’s low-key embarrassment over being perpetually broke. Reilly might be a better physical match for the man he’s playing—and better at playing his character’s distinctive performing tics—but both actors create multi-faceted characters. The narrative itself feels most promising when Stan & Ollie explores the relationship between these two men as less a friendship or even a professional partnership than a marriage. We learn early on that there was a strain in that relationship over Hardy’s decision not to support Laurel’s desire to push producer Hal Roach (Danny Huston) for a more favorable contract, resulting on Hardy working with a cheap Laurel substitute on what they awkwardly call “the elephant picture.” At times, the story plays out like a couple trying to move past an infidelity, to the point where we find them trying to reconcile differences while sitting in the same bed together. It’s a solid enough set-up; the screenplay just mostly seems content to cruise along on the gentle goodwill of two leads playing legends and watching themselves become obso-

Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly in Stan & Ollie

lete, like when Laurel stares sadly at a poster for 1953’s popular comedy team-du-jour, Abbott and Costello. The arguments erupt at predictable moments, never quite developing into a compelling tension. It’s fascinating watching Stan & Ollie catch fire as soon as Nina Arianda and Shirley Henderson—as Stan and Ollie’s respective wives—become prominent characters late in the film. They play off one another gloriously, capturing such a fascinating dynamic—women barely pretending to tolerate one another because their husbands are friends—that it’s hard not to wish for a movie that was entirely about them. Instead, we get a movie that avoids some of the worst failings of biopics, but can’t avoid all of them—like the ever-aggravating decision to show the real Laurel and Hardy at the end of the movie, as if to elbow us into thinking, “Hey, they copied those real guys pretty good!” While it’s pleasant enough for a while, it can’t manage to become—in the immortal words of Dewey Cox—a beautiful ride. CW

STAN & OLLIE

BB.5 Steve Coogan John C. Reilly Shirley Henderson PG

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Way Out West (1937) Stan Laurel Oliver Hardy NR

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story (2007) John C. Reilly Jenna Fischer R

Filth (2013) James McAvoy Jamie Bell R

Philomena (2013) Judi Dench Steve Coogan PG-13


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NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net DESTROYER BBB.5 Nicole Kidman’s pitiless performance as rule-breaking, guildridden LAPD cop Erin Bell upends genre expectations in this tense, grim modern crime noir. Detective Bell’s undercover past comes back to haunt her when a dead body turns out to be a member of the bank-robbing gang she once infiltrated, and she must hunt down the surviving crooks to find the killer. Kidman’s bravery comes not in choosing to look like hell onscreen, but in how she dares to embrace Bell as a happy co-conspirator in the violence and macho bullshit of a “man’s world.” Director Karyn Kusama’s bravery comes in the sneaky cleverness she deploys to smash stereotypes and toy with narrative in a way that depicts trauma as a Möbius strip that we can never escape, no matter how fast or hard we run. This is uncompromising and subtly challenging filmic storytelling that will have you turning the narrative over in your mind like a cerebral itch to scratch. Opens Jan. 25 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING BBB From The LEGO Movie to The Last Jedi, we’ve entered an age of upending traditional hero mythologies. Writer/director Joe Cornish tells the story of Alex (Louis Ashbourne Serkis), a 12-year-old British schoolboy who improbably finds himself wielding Excalibur and leading a quest to prevent the rise of the sorceress Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson) with a ragtag crew of

young Round Table knights. Cornish doesn’t display the same sense of pacing he did in his debut feature Attack the Block; this two-hour kid pic drags a bit on the way to its climax. But the appealing young cast provides welcome energy, and the battles against flaming demon skeletons are solidly rousing. There’s a satisfying Brexit-era insistence on the need for a basic code of decency,and an inspirational message to young viewers: Big battles can be won by those who work together and refuse to let powerful bad guys win—and you don’t need to be a Chosen One. Opens Jan. 25 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw

teased, multiple-personality serial killer The Horde (James McAvoy) co-exists with Unbreakable’s hero David Dunn (Bruce Willis); we find them both connecting with villainous mastermind Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson). The bulk of the narrative is confined to a mental hospital where all three are treated by a doctor (Sarah Paulson) trying to convince them they’re delusional, and a deep tedium sets in while the talking is going on. McAvoy at least has fun with his role(s), compared to Willis’ grim silence. As for Shyamalan’s take on superhero mythology? Let’s just say his interpretations don’t hold up to much scrutiny. (PG-13)—SR

SERENITY [not yet reviewed] A fishing boat captain (Matthew McConaughey) confronts his mysterious past. Opens Jan. 25 at theaters valleywide. (R)

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK BBB.5 Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel combines two ideas that shouldn’t work together: swooning romance and love-destroying institutional racism. Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) plan a life together, but must confront Fonny’s arrest on trumped-up rape charges and Tish’s announcement that she’s expecting their baby. Jenkins moves between two timelines with grace and purpose, never allowing us to forget the cruel reality of the lovers’ separation or the feelings connecting them. While the fight to prove Fonny’s innocence is the central conflict, Jenkins avoids procedural, ticking-clock thriller. A story about inhumanity works when we grasp the humanity being stripped away; a love story works when we’re as invested in the hearts involved as in what pulls them apart. (R)—SR

STAN & OLLIE BB.5 See review on p. 48. Opens Jan. 25 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS SHOULDER ARMS At Edison Street Silent Movies, Jan. 24-25, 7:30 p.m. (NR) SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL At Park City Treasure Mountain Inn, Jan. 25-31. SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL At venues in Park City and Salt Lake City and Sundance Resort, Jan. 24-Feb. 3.

CURRENT RELEASES GLASS BB M. Night Shyamalan tries to paste together the worlds of Unbreakable and Split, and winds up with something tonally confusing and philosophically indefensible. As the end of Split

ON THE BASIS OF SEX BBB It could stand to be more demanding of the viewer and of its terrific cast, but I’ll take this solidly crowd-pleasing story of young Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Felicity Jones) fighting for her own professional opportunities and those of other women. It’s easy to cheer against the bigotry RBG faces and applaud Jones’ chinin-the-air defiance, though I’m a bit tired of movies about sexism that cast such battles as remnants of the past. Still, there’s

intense feminist satisfaction in the depiction of Ruth’s marriage to Martin Ginsburg (Armie Hammer). Most movies about men doing important work cast onscreen wives as quiet helpmeets; here, a wholly supportive husband character stands aside for a driven wife. However otherwise pedestrian the story might be, we need to see more relationships like this one. (PG-13)—MAJ

REPLICAS B.5 It’s not fair to call this the stupidest movie of 2019, since the year is young, and since Replicas was originally supposed to be the stupidest movie of 2017. An affectless Keanu Reeves whisper-mumbles his way through the role of Will Foster, a biotech engineer who secretly grows clones of his wife (Alice Eve) and children after their tragic deaths. Thomas Middleditch is on hand as Will’s brainy, snarky assistant, saying things like “What if something horrible goes wrong?” and “Let’s pump the brakes on the crazy train, all right?” The premise grants ample potential for horror, thrills and comedy, but the lazy screenplay, flat direction and lifeless performances (by everyone) create a dumb, tedious mess laden with glaring plot holes and general imbecility. (R)—Eric D. Snider

THE UPSIDE BB.5 American remakes of non-English language films often lose something in translation, but director Neil Burger retains the aggressively feel-good sensibility of 2011’s The Intouchables. Ex-con Dell (Kevin Hart), collecting signatures to prove he’s applying for jobs, finds someone actually willing to hire him in quadriplegic multimillionaire Phillip (Bryan Cranston), who is seeking a new “life auxiliary” to assist with daily tasks. Naturally, they both have Very Important Lessons to learn, involving broadly comic set-ups like Dell going into full gay panic about changing Phillip’s catheter. The two leads have satisfying chemistry, and Cranston particularly conveys the prickly pride of a man who can’t abide pity. The story skates past anything genuinely difficult, content to aim for easy smiles that find the same ready audience in any language. (PG-13)—SR

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ACROSS

42. Myrna of "Love Crazy" (3) 53. Story (4) 55. "Zero Dark Thirty" org. (3) 56. Beach hill (4) 58. Actor Kilmer (3) 59. That dude's (3)

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

9. Car accident sound (7) 10. Hall fixture (7) 11. Ending with many fruit names (3) 12. Juice brand with a distinctive bottle (3) 13. One of the record industry's former Big Four (3) 14. ____ Moines, Iowa (3) 21. Not forced to smell a factory's fumes, say (8) 22. Seymour Skinner, to Bart and Lisa (9) 23. "Wait ..." (10) 24. Commercial lead-in to Pen (3) 26. Patriots' org. (3) 27. Don't take any chances (10) DOWN 28. Cleaning, as a side1. Mid-April addressee, for short (3) walk (9) 2. "____ whiz!" (3) 29. Critical tennis situ3. Like Tylenol PM, for short (3) ation (8) 4. French shooting match (3) 37. A. A. Milne hopper (3) 5. What Rihanna and Madonna are each known 38. Julie who played Mary by (7) Poppins (7) 6. Tour guides, often (7) 39. "Alas!" (7) 7. Mercury, e.g. (7) 40. Never (7) 8. Buses and trains (7) 41. Big kerfuffles (7)

UDOKU

1. 60-Across user's cry upon seeing what's in this puzzle's circled letters (7) 8. Like a crucifix (7) 15. Kind of scan (7) 16. Former home of the Colts (7) 17. Discharge, as a liquid (7) 18. Temple of ____, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World (7) 19. Logic game with matchsticks (3) 20. Tennis barrier (3) 21. Cause a major disturbance in (7) 25. High-ranking angels (7) 30. Some stage assistants (7) 31. Polar bear's resting spot (7) 32. Most slippery (7) 33. Movie credits caption (7) 34. Neither Dem. nor Rep. (3) 35. Puppy's cry (3) 36. Cpl. or sgt. (3) 37. Kind of food or footage (3) 40. Org. for Penguins and Ducks (3) 43. Italian diminutive suffix (3) 44. Cacophony (3) 45. Yoko who loved John (3) 46. "Hollywood Squares" win (3) 47. ____ Fridays (restaurant chain) (3) 48. ____-Locka, Florida (3) 49. Poem of praise (3) 50. !!! (3) 51. Cain or Abel, to Adam and Eve (3) 52. Observe Ramadan (4) 54. Xerox rival (5) 56. Batty (4) 57. Storms away angrily (13) 60. Amusement park attraction suggested visually by the black squares in the center of this puzzle's grid (11) 61. Besides (4) 62. Caesar's "to be" (4)

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A motivational speaker and author named Nick Vujicic was born without arms or legs, although he has two small, unusually shaped feet. These facts didn’t stop him from getting married, raising a family of four children, and writing eight books. One book is entitled Life Without Limits: Inspiration for a Ridiculously Good Life. He’s a positive guy who has faith in the possibility of miracles. In fact, he says he keeps a pair of shoes in his closet just in case God decides to bless him with a marvelous surprise. In accordance with current astrological omens, Aquarius, I suggest you make a similar gesture. Create or acquire a symbol of an amazing transformation you would love to attract into your life.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): John Lennon claimed that he generated the Beatles’ song “Because” by rendering Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” backward. Even if that’s true, I don’t think it detracts from the beauty of “Because.” May I suggest you adopt a comparable strategy for your own use in the coming weeks, Leo? What could you do in reverse so as to create an interesting novelty? What approach might you invert in order to instigate fresh ways of doing things? Is there an idea you could turn upside-down or inside-out, thereby awakening yourself to a new perspective?

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When people tell me they don’t have time to read the books I’ve written, I advise them to place the books under their pillows and soak up my words in their dreams. I don’t suggest that they actually eat the pages, though there is historical precedent for that. The Bible describes the prophet Ezekiel as literally chewing and swallowing a book. And there are accounts of 16th-century Austrian soldiers devouring books they acquired during their conquests, hoping to absorb the contents of the texts. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest that in the next four weeks you acquire the wisdom stored in books by actually reading them or listening to them on audio recordings. In my astrological opinion, you really do need, for the sake of CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 2006, a 176-year-old tortoise named Harriet died in an your psychospiritual health, to absorb writing that requires Australian zoo owned by “Crocodile Hunter” and TV personal- extended concentration. ity Steve Irwin. Harriet was far from her original home in the Galapagos Islands. By some accounts, evolutionary superstar CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Charles Darwin picked her up and carried her away during his Among the top “how to” search inquiries on Google are “how visit there in 1835. I propose that you choose the long-lived to buy Bitcoin,” “how to lose belly fat fast,” “how to cook tortoise as your power creature for the coming weeks. With her spaghetti in a microwave,” and “how to make slime.” While I do as inspiration, meditate on questions like these: 1. “What would I think that the coming weeks will be prime time for you to formudo differently if I knew I’d live to a very old age?” 2. “What influ- late and launch many “how to” investigations, I will encourage ence that was important to me when I was young do I want to be you to put more important questions at the top of your priority important to me when I’m old?” 3. “In what specific ways can my list. “How to get richer quicker” would be a good one, as would future benefit from my past?” 4. “Is there a blessing or gift from “how to follow through on good beginnings” and “how to an ancestor I have not yet claimed?” 5. “Is there anything I can do enhance your value” and “how to identify what resources and that I am not yet doing to remain in good health into my old age?” allies will be most important in 2019.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Novelist Arthur Conan Doyle created Sherlock Holmes, a fictional character who personifies the power of logic and rational thinking. Yet Doyle was also a devout spiritualist who pursued interests in telepathy, the occult, and psychic phenomena. It’s no surprise that he was a Gemini, an astrological tribe renowned for its ability to embody apparent opposites. Sometimes that quality is a liability for you folks, and sometimes an asset. In the coming weeks, I believe it’ll be a highly useful skill. Your knack for holding paradoxical views and expressing seemingly contradictory powers will attract and generate good fortune.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The Tsonga language is spoken by more than 15 million people in southern Africa. The literal meaning of the Tsonga phrase PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): About 11 percent of the Philippines’ population is comprised I malebvu ya nghala is “It’s a lion’s beard,” and its meaning is of Muslims who call themselves the Bangsamoro. Many resist “something that’s not as scary as it looks.” According to my being part of the Philippines and want their own sovereign astrological analysis, this will be a useful concept for you to nation. They have a lot of experience struggling for indepen- be alert for in the coming weeks. Don’t necessarily trust first dence, as they’ve spent 400 years rebelling against occupa- impressions or initial apprehensions. Be open to probing deeper tion by foreign powers, including Spain, the United States and than your instincts might influence you to do. Japan. I admire their tenacity in seeking total freedom to be themselves and rule themselves. May they inspire your efforts LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The old Latin verb crescere meant “to come forth, spring up, to do the same on a personal level in the coming year. grow, thrive, swell, increase in numbers or strength.” We see its presence in the modern English, French, and Italian word “creARIES (March 21-April 19): We might initially be inclined to ridicule Stuart Kettell, a scendo.” In accordance with astrological omens, I have selected British man who spent four days pushing a Brussels sprout up crescere and its present participle crescentum to be your words 3,560-foot-high Mount Snowden with his nose. But perhaps of power for the next four weeks. May they help mobilize you to our opinion would become more expansive once we knew that he seize all emerging opportunities to come forth, spring up, grow, engaged in this stunt to raise money for a charity that supports thrive, swell, and increase in numbers or strength. people with cancer. In any case, the coming weeks would be a favorable time for you, too, to engage in extravagant, extreme, SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When animals hibernate, their metabolism slows down. They or even outlandish behavior on behalf of a good or holy cause. might grow more underfur or feathers, and some add extra fat. To conserve heat, they might huddle together with each other. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Taurus guitar wizard known as Buckethead is surely among In the coming weeks, I don’t think you’ll have to do what they do. the most imaginative and prolific musicians who has ever lived. But I do suspect it will be a good time to engage in behaviors that Since producing his first album in late 2005, he has released have a resemblance to hibernation: slowing down your mind and 306 other albums that span a wide variety of musical genres— body; thinking deep thoughts and feeling deep feelings; seeking an average of 23 per year. I propose that we make him your extra hugs and cuddles; getting lots of rich, warm, satisfying patron saint for the next six weeks. While it’s unlikely you can food and sleep. What else might appeal to your need to drop achieve such a gaudy level of creative self-expression, you could out of your fast-paced rhythm and supercharge your psychic batteries? very well exceed a previous personal best in your own sphere.

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This column is about urban topics, but this time of year, I get spring fever. When the inversion hits, I want Vitamin D on my face, so I venture out and about. My brother and sister-in-law came in last week to see a Jazz game (fun, but whoa, those ticket prices!) and got up the next day wanting to see snow. They live mostly in Tijuana, Mexico, and snow is a novelty. So, I schlepped them up to Solitude and let them walk around. Good news for our ski resorts this year: We’ve got the white stuff! I can’t ski anymore due to my Piriformis syndrome, which feels as if an alien monster is attempting to pull off my right leg at all times. As a result, I haven’t been to my old college slushing grounds in the wintertime since the first Bush was in office. As I drove my family out of the haze and into the sunlight, I was pleased to see the seasonal UTA ski bus full. But as we got closer to the resort, there were millions of cars parked along the side of the road with folks walking in boots and hauling skis. It wasn’t a holiday, and I chattered out loud: “WTF?” Well, dummy, we’ve got snow. Everyone was skiing; there was no parking; and the resort was overrun with Gen X and Millennial parents and baby skiers with boards not much longer than a baguette. I bragged, “Well, we never had ski helmets in my day!” (We didn’t— they hadn’t been invented yet.) My brother and his wife walked over to see the bunnies and wanted to experience the frozen wonderland, so they dropped backward to make snow angels. They didn’t realize how deep our powder is and had to roll to get to a packed-down area. That little jaunt was educational for all of us. I also played hooky for a day with a friend to visit the state’s Hardware Ranch near Logan. There are 500 elk there this year being fed by wildlife management. For $5, you can ride on a wagon right into the middle of the majestic beasts, watch them eat and rut around, and take photos until your fingers freeze. Animals naturally migrate down from our mountains to feed in the winter, but we have built too close to the mountains and the wildlife can’t access food anymore. The ranch is a way to keep the herds alive, and it grows all its hay (about 300 tons) during the summer. It’s an easy drive when there’s no snow on the roads. We ended the trip at Logan’s famous Bluebird Restaurant on Main for old-fashioned American food favorites. I know spring will come sooner if I get out and about and look up from my computer, because February, March? No, but April, May. n

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University of Utah Hospital and the Moran Eye Center, including the Rocky Mountain and Old Mill Eye Centers, will be destroying medical records with dates of service prior to 01/01/1997. If you would like access to your records prior to destruction, you must contact the medical records department at 801-581-2704 before 02/01/2019. After that time the records will no longer be available.

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People With Issues KION TV reported on Jan. 7 that a Salinas, Calif., family’s Ring doorbell camera captured video of a man licking the doorbell for more than three hours. The homeowners were out of town during the encounter, which took place around 5 a.m., but their children were inside. Sylvia Dungan, who was alerted to the activity at her front door on her phone, said, “I thought, boy there’s a lot of traffic ... Who the heck is that?” Salinas police identified the man as Roberto Daniel Arroyo, 33. Arroyo also relieved himself in the front yard and visited a neighbor’s house. “You kind of laugh about it afterwards because technically he didn’t do anything,” Dungan said, though police later charged him with petty theft and prowling. Super Fan Dale Sourbeck, 49, of Pittston, Pa., had football on his mind after his arresting start to 2019. In the early morning hours of Jan. 3, he used a hammer to break into the Rock Street Music store and helped himself to two guitars—to start with, WNEP TV reported. Presumably realizing he was being watched by surveillance cameras, Sourbeck left and returned to the store wearing a mask and grabbed three more guitars. Police tracked Sourbeck down using the surveillance camera shot of his license plate and found the stolen guitars in his home. Upon his arrest, the only statement he made was “Go Eagles.”

n  Students at a Fairfield, Ohio, middle school were subjected to an unexpected lesson on Jan. 8 when they reported suspicious behavior “taking place behind (the) desk” of substitute teacher Tracey J. Abraham of Cincinnati. WHIO-TV reported that the

Oh, Florida Heather Carpenter, 42, was charged with damaging property and criminal mischief in Sarasota County, Fla., after expressing in a particularly gross way her dissatisfaction with the principal of the school where Carpenter was substitute teaching. Phillippi Shores Elementary School Principal Allison Foster had been helping Carpenter with a professional issue, but Carpenter was unhappy with the way it was going, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. So on Dec. 1, in a park where Foster was hosting a birthday party for her daughter later in the day, Carpenter— whose own daughter was invited to the party—arrived with human feces, according to a witness, which she spread on the grill and picnic tables. Carpenter pleaded not guilty, but the Sheriff’s Office report stated that she admitted she “intentionally placed human waste and fecal matter on the tables at Urfer Park with the intent of disrupting the birthday party planned by Foster.” Least Competent Criminal An unidentified 39-year-old wannabe carjacker hit a bump in the road on Jan. 7 when he approached the driver of a Chevrolet Volt in San Diego, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. The thief demanded the driver’s keys and mobile phone around 6 a.m., according to San Diego police, and tried to drive off in the vehicle. But he couldn’t figure out how to operate the hybrid car, and in frustration he ran away, discarding the phone and keys. Police located the carjacker a short distance away and arrested him on suspicion of carjacking and robbery. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Unclear on the Concept Three customers and staff of a Wells Fargo branch in Solana Beach, Calif., were stunned on Jan. 3 when 35-year-old Clint Gray entered the bank shortly after it opened and yelled, “This is a robbery! Everybody get on the ground!” a witness told The San Diego Union-Tribune. But Gray, who was unarmed, didn’t follow through. Instead, he stripped down to his underwear and sat in a chair near the front door, asking bank employees to call law enforcement. He also kindly told one female customer that she could sit in a chair instead of lying on the floor. A sheriff’s deputy arrived shortly, and Gray surrendered without resistance; he was later charged with attempted robbery.

Social Media Fail Game warden Cannon Harrison, 24, is well known around his area in Oklahoma, so when he filled out a profile for the dating app Bumble, he didn’t include his profession. But when he “matched” with a woman nearby in December, he was surprised when she messaged him that she had just bagged “a bigo buck.” “I thought ... it was someone who was messing with me because they knew who I was,” Harrison told The Washington Post. Deer season had ended, though hunting with a crossbow was still legal, so he decided to play along. He wrote back, “Hell yeah, get em with a bow?” When the unnamed huntress demurred, he asked her if she had been “spotlighting”—an illegal technique that involves shining a light into the animal’s eyes to stun it before shooting it, and she replied, “Yeahhhh.” Next she sent Harrison a photo of herself with her trophy, and Harrison went to work. He tracked her down on social media, and the following morning, game wardens appeared at her door. The woman paid a fine and will avoid jail time—and probably a date with Warden Harrison.

Happy New Year 2019!

| COMMUNITY |

That Reminds Me of a Movie ... Eakins Oval, a Philadelphia traffic circle, was the scene of an ominous accident on Jan. 1 when a 21-year-old unnamed man tried to climb a monument to George Washington at the center of the circle. WPIV-TV reported that the man slipped while climbing and fell on the sharp antler of a large deer statue at the base of the monument, impaling his left side. He suffered lacerations and was admitted to Hahnemann Hospital nearby.

Smooth Reaction A female jogger on the Goldenrod Trail in Oakland, Calif., used pepper spray on a dog that attacked her on the morning of Jan. 3, angering the dog’s owner, Alma Cadwalader, 19. According to KPIX-TV, police said Cadwalader retaliated by tackling and punching the jogger multiple times, and finally biting the victim on the forearm, causing significant wounds. Police posted a surveillance camera photograph of Cadwalader and asked for the public’s help in identifying her; she was arrested on Jan. 4.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Special Delivery Veterinarian Molly Kreuze of Springfield, Va., is planning to purchase an artificial Christmas tree next year after her natural one came with something extra: more than 100 praying mantises. Kreuze told WJLA-TV the leggy insects emerged from an egg sac under the tree’s branches and were “crawling on the walls, crawling on the ceiling, crawling on the windows.” Kreuze captured as many as she could and was hoping to find a new home for them, as it seems “people really like” the bugs. The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture advised that people who find the egg sacs on their Christmas trees should clip the branch and take it outside. Otherwise, without their regular source of food, the newly hatched insects will start to eat each other.

school resource officer at Creekside Middle School received several complaints from students that the teacher was, uh, taking matters into his own hands, and he was removed from the room and building. Abraham was booked and charged with public indecency and ordered to stay away from all locations where there are children under 18 years old.


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56 | JANUARY 24, 2019

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City Weekly January 24, 2019  

What's in our Legislation?

City Weekly January 24, 2019  

What's in our Legislation?