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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

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Past stories lay the foundation for new ones in Park City.

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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY TWO REEL

As the Sundance Film Festival dawns anew, and kid brother Slamdance turns 25, all eyes are on Park City. Cover by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

6 LETTERS 8 OPINION 12 NEWS 25 A&E 28 DINE 34 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

SCOTT RENSHAW

Cover story, p. 13 When it comes to Sundance, Renshaw has been there, done that and gotten the multiple parking ticket scares that go along with covering the film bash for 20 years. His go-to movie snack? Nothing. “Real talk: I’m too busy paying attention and taking notes to ever be eating anything during a movie,” he says.

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Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, MARYANN JOHANSON, ASPEN PERRY, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. We are an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, that also serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of Salt Lake City Weekly are available free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front. Limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of this oublication may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the publisher. Third-class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery might take up to one full week. All rights reserved.

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SOAP BOX

@SLCWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Cover story, Jan. 3, Will Winter Games redux be a boon for SLC?

No to Salt Lake Olympics!

scending “we know what’s good for you” version. Anybody who drinks in Utah really wants the DABC to end, to close all the liquor stores in favor of allowing private businesses to fill the gap, and for the liquor and beers laws to normalize more in line with the rest of the country.

Via Twitter

Via Facebook

Nah

@TOLIKAN1

Via Twitter

@JUDYCLEVERLY1

CHRIS KETH

Yes. It’s a no-brainer.

What a joke the DABC is. “They seem to have everything I’ve ever attempted to seek out”—probably written by some fresh 21-year-old pup who only knows of Jose Cuervo and Taaka at best.

Via Twitter

Via Facebook

Hopefully I’ll be dead or living in Oregon by then.

If you have to be told to keep beer cold for freshness (especially IPAs) and/or if you have to be told to sell cold beer ... why are you the one in charge?

No, let someone else have it this time. We already did. @NOELLE2028

Via Twitter

@SWAMPSTEVE

@VIRGILGLASS

Via Twitter

Online news post, Jan. 2, “Sauced-Up Survey”

They won’t give us what we want, really. It will always be a conde-

@CITYWEEKLY should build or buy quality beer cold by the 6 or 12 pack at the local grocery store along with wine, and how about at least being able to buy a 5 gallon keg.

MEL P. STONE

Via Facebook There are much worse beer problems than warm beer. CONOR AUGUSTINE

Via Facebook I don’t see the harm in selling a few basic boxed wines in grocery stores. MATT MORRIS

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NICK FOX

BRITTNEY HEMINGWAY

Via Facebook Why everyone still puts up with buying beer warm by the bottle for an extremely overpriced ...

They don’t really care as long as they make drinkers pay their sin taxes. DEANNA BISHOFF GARCIA

Via Facebook First thing I noticed when I went to a state liquor store—higher prices than other states and they don’t refrigerate to basically raise prices even higher. @ANGRYROCKHOPPER

Via Twitter

It’s like a cursed monkey paw situation with these people. State Liquor Stores now open on Sunday* *for sales of Smirnoff Ice only.

poet, statesman and raconteur or y’all short of material. Neener, neener, neener.

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MICHAEL JAMES BILLS

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8 | JANUARY 17, 2019

OPINION

Back to the Street

In the long-fought battle over equality, there are pauses where the world settles in to enjoy the newly established perks the previous generation afforded them. First, flappers took a seat at the bar in lieu of domestic life, after their suffragist mothers earned them the right to vote. Then, women picked up their briefcases to become serious contenders in the workforce following the women’s liberation movement of the ’60s and ’70s. And for a time, all seemed well. Then Xennials began their careers, only to discover the female-friendly world they were sold didn’t always function as advertised. From childhood cartoons to history lessons in adolescents, Xennial girls like myself were told the world was our oyster. On Saturday mornings, we watched as Jem and the Holograms took on seedy male executives, and She-Ra saved the day. Through our teens, we were told stories of the women who fought for our seat at the table. We were told we could vote, we could work, and, in theory, we could have it all. That created a lull for some women, considering the messages of our upbringing. So when women returned to march in the streets, I was far from surprised. If anything, I was more shocked at the depths society had to sink in order to revive our collective ability to revolt. After all, rumblings of dissatisfaction with continued harassment in the workplace, gender pay gap, new threats against reproductive rights and subpar family medical leave—whether to take care of aging parents or as a means of maternity leave—had been building for years prior to the 2016 presidential election. The TV celebrity rube winning the election was merely the breaking point. Then and now, despite the legitimacy of female frustrations, opposition is inevitable. Yet, in the face of equality

BY ASPEN PERRY deniers, the women’s movement has made significant contributions to the ever-changing landscape of our world since the march in January 2017. The path hasn’t been easy, and there certainly have been some setbacks (ahem, Brett Kavanaugh), but overall progress is in the works. On the political front, last year taught us that when women run for office, they win. An unprecedented number of women seeking office started 2019 off on the right foot, with a record number of women holding congressional seats. On the local front, Utah went from 45th to 36th place for percentage of women in elected positions. Businesswise, Utah women and men received a win when Salt Lake City established six weeks of paid family leave for city employees, encouraging more cities and businesses to follow its lead. Women returning to the streets to challenge societal disparities of our time also resulted in a boost of support for both new and existing organizations geared toward female empowerment. Whether a woman’s interest lies in resurrecting her corporate career or learning the ropes of the political arena, organizations such as Real Women Run or Women’s Leadership Institute are available to help them reach their goals. Given swelling attention surrounding the Women’s March, it is unclear what the future for the movement will look like. Their goals of tackling reproductive and disability rights, violence against women and joining forces to ensure LGBTQ, racial, economic and environmental justice are of equal importance in order to create the country their mission statement—“We are all free, equal and safe”­— envisions. My assumption is even if the number of physical marchers dwindles, the momentum to empower under-represented communities will continue to grow. To lose motivation now would risk further resolutions, and behind

every win is an issue still waiting to be solved. Reaching a record number of women holding political positions is an accomplishment; however, women still hold less than 25 percent of statewide elective offices across the country. Utah increasing family-leave support is commendable. Unfortunately, the state is still coming to terms with how to monetarily compensate women. After the release of the latest data on gender pay equity, Utah’s rank sank further below the national average, landing in the 50th spot, according to the Salt Lake Chamber. Change is a funny thing and is often met with resistance. Some change takes getting used to, while other evolutions have little backlash once in place. It’s part of the human condition. When people are content, they are far less likely to want to cause waves. In the ’60s, conservative-leaning women would roll their eyes at the notion of burning bras. Yet, for all the pomp and circumstance of the opposition, no one has heard a peep since bras went from a constricting apparatus design to one with support and comfort in mind. That’s progress! Well ... my version of it any way. How far we’re able to move forward remains to be seen. In the meantime, our daughters and sons are watching this all play out, and the future contributions they make to the world will be based on the reality they see around them. While they’ll probably face their own challenges, it strikes me as important to model in real time the view that speaking up against injustice is always better than complacency. Perhaps the current movement will afford our kids more than a couple decades of leisure. If it doesn’t, I have no doubt they’ll pick up the torch. CW Aspen Perry is an SLC-based aspiring author, feminist failure and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

INSPIRING MINORITY WOMEN

At Real Women Run Celebrating the Political Kaleidoscope, hear Delia Garcia, who was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives in 2004, and became the first Latina woman and the youngest female at age 27 to serve in that Legislature. Starting out as a student organizer, she is now chief leadership officer and co-director of ReflectUS, a nonpartisan coalition of seven leading women’s organizations. Garcia talks about the challenges and opportunities that women of color, LGBTQ and other marginalized groups face as candidates, officeholders and in other civic leadership roles. YWCA, 322 E. 300 South, 801-5378600, Friday, Jan. 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2FppHGE.

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JANUARY 17, 2019 | 9

Don’t forget the Women’s March. Washington Square Park, 451 S. State, Saturday, Jan. 19, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., bit.ly/2VSVFAY.

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WOMEN’S MARCH

Now is the time to learn how to push your state legislators to the next level. They are getting ready to eviscerate the citizen initiatives you passed in November, and have other plans to take your rights and shred them. At this interactive training—Speed Date … to Legislate—you will interact with legislators and paid lobbyists, listening to their feedback about how well you did in persuading them. Experts represent different legislative issues—from ballot initiatives to employment discrimination to hate crimes. This gives you the chance to practice lobbying on multiple topics as you move around the room. Impact Hub Salt Lake, 150 S. State, Ste. 1, 801-355-3479, Thursday, Jan. 24, 6-7:30 p.m., free, bit. ly/2H8u7UN.

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Have you always harbored the desire to run for office—even if you’re not a man? The Real Women Run Winter Training is geared to people just like you or your friends. Did you know that if women run for office, they win at the same or better rate than men? But only 24 percent of Utah’s legislators are women. This full-day training has workshops for current candidates and campaign managers, future candidates looking for information on where to start and women who want to get more involved in public service. Illinois’ Lt. Gov. Evelyn Sanguinetti, the highestranking elected Latina in Illinois history, is keynote speaker. Salt Lake Community College Miller Campus, 9750 S. 300 West, Sandy, 801-537-8604, Saturday, Jan. 19, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., $35 ($15/students), bit.ly/2RmlieL.


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The “New American” can’t help but call everything #fakenews, and so the good news becomes bad. Yes, we’re talking about what should be cause of cheer now that Cottonwood Heights has pledged to go to 100 percent renewable energy by 2032. What could be wrong with that, other than the fact that the Utah news media all but ignored it? Why the Deseret News put this story on B3 is beyond reason. This is the fourth Utah city to make such a commitment, so where’s the high-five? Enter the trolls in the comments. “Wouldn’t it be nice if we had quotes from someone who doesn’t concur with global warming. It’s getting old to see the agenda-driven Sierra Club quoted in many articles concerning environmental issues. They don’t have a monopoly on science or the environment,” one commenter wrote. Another claimed that 80 percent of our pollution is caused by what’s blowing over from China. False. It’s closer to 65 percent and the country is actually spending more on renewables than the U.S.

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What Is Truth?

COME SEE WHY OASIS SHOULD BE YOUR REFUGE FROM THE ORDINARY!

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BY KATHARINE BIELE

The New American

698 Park Avenue • Park City Townlift • 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South • Salt Lake • 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union • South Valley • 801-942-1522

10 | JANUARY 17, 2019

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Speaking of #fakenews, here’s the reason: Journalists might not be doing their due diligence in tracking down the facts. But who cares? People seem to really, really like stories and would just as soon not hear the truth if they don’t agree with it. This was emphasized by the front-page story “What is truth? Why Pontius Pilate’s question still resonates today,” in Sunday, Jan. 13’s Deseret News. Oh, and let’s not forget Rudi Giuliani’s now infamous quote, “Truth isn’t truth.” So it was not at all surprising to see KUTV Channel 2 post that it was “working to confirm the authenticity” of a photo that showed graffiti saying “Joseph Smith was a pedophile.” You may well wonder why this is news, but the initial lack of follow-up and posting someone’s unsubstantiated Twitter photo is what we like to call sensationalism.

Sticking It to the Poor

Well, The Salt Lake Tribune said it, but does anyone pay attention to them anymore? “Legislature must keep its hands off Utah’s Prop 3,” its editorial says. In keeping with the Republican conviction that all poor people are slackers, Sen. Allen Christensen, R-North Ogden, is proposing work requirements—again. It’s one of those core beliefs based on nothing but belief. The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities found that 17,000 Arkansans lost coverage after work requirements were implemented, mostly because of the bureaucratic red tape. Of course, work requirements would need federal approval, delaying expansion yet again. Legislators worry about hoards of people applying. Maybe they should worry about how to really help these people.


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12 | JANUARY 17, 2019

NEWS

ENVIRONMENT

Climate Gods

What role can Utah’s legislators play in addressing climate change?

L

ast month, local and state politicos, athletic types and Olympic aficionados gathered at the City and County Building, locked hands and raised their arms like they’d just won a gold medal as they celebrated Utah potentially hosting another Winter Games. As he basked in the Olympic euphoria, Gov. Gary Herbert seemed flat-footed when City Weekly asked if he was concerned climate change could hamper the Beehive State’s second throwing of the international soirée. “There’s always concern about climate change and global warming, and whether that’s man-caused or just happening in the Earth’s cycles. Doesn’t matter. But certainly there’s concern about that,” Herbert said. Anyone with eyes or lungs might raise an eyebrow (and belt out a hearty cough). Still, the governor seemed perpetually optimistic. “We can host the Winter Olympics, and I’m sure the climate will, in fact, be in condition to have that happen,” he elaborated. “We’re going to do everything we can to make sure we’re good stewards of the Earth.” Utah lawmakers can’t control the weather—they’re not Greek gods, no matter how much lip service they pay to the Olympics—but Herbert’s comments implied legislators will do what they can to protect the state’s climate. How much of an impact can they really have, though? And, given that just about every Republican state lawmaker got an “F” grade in the Utah Sierra Club’s legislative scorecard last year, why should we be optimistic that the Republicandominated Legislature will pass climate-friendly legislation? “Given the political landscape nationally … there is a big role local governments can play,” Jessica Reimer, HEAL Utah policy associate, says. “I think Utah can show real leadership if they wanted to, in terms of taking action on climate.” Ashley Soltysiak, Utah Sierra Club chapter director, says state lawmakers have the power to incentivize utility companies to use cleaner, renewable energy like solar power. “I don’t think the Utah Legislature is going to single-

SEAN HAIR

BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

“We’re not at the point yet where people are convinced that we need to take action,” HEAL Utah Policy Associate Jessica Reimer says. That said, “there’s starting to be an underlying acceptance that there are new norms, and we’re going to have to operate within them.” handedly address climate change,” she says, “but we can be a leader for other conservative states who at the moment are heavily tied to coal.” Reimer points to the resolution Herbert signed last year, which made Utah the first red state to officially acknowledge climate change and the role fossil fuels play in the crisis, as a step in the right direction. “Even though it’s a big, global problem,” she says, “what we can do at the local level is just as important.” Climate advocates say they’ll be tracking a few bills in the upcoming Legislative session. One piece of legislation would increase the fines for “coal rolling,” slang for when a driver tampers with their engine so it spews black smoke. Another would create funding for free-fare days on UTA buses and Trax so locals don’t have to drive on heavy inversion days. Public transportation will no doubt play a big role in cutting down on pollution as state and city populations grow. Expanded access is great, Breathe Utah Executive Director Debbie Sigman says, but free fare days are a short-term fix; added infrastructure, expanded train and bus routes, and more drivers and conductors would go a long way toward minimizing air pollution. “A community’s travel patterns are established through habit, and infrastructure gives rise to convenience,” she says. “We as a community want to convert motorists to riders. And that takes a commitment to building the infrastructure to make it possible.” While Salt Lake City and Utah public officials have made plans and advanced bills that would expand public transportation, Sigman says more can be done. One roadblock to passing such comprehensive, long-term legislation at the state level is that climate change is an amorphous problem with consequences that emerge slowly over years. It just isn’t as sexy of an issue as tending to the econ-

omy, Republicans’ bread and butter. “If unemployment is on the rise, then there are people who don’t have access to basic needs. And that tends to be the first and foremost for legislators,” Sigman says. “And so if an environmental appropriation looks like it’s going to get in the way of making sure that a legislators’ constituent is going to have a stable job or access to a new job, then the choice is clear.” But, Sigman warns, inaction will force the state to spend more in the future, when the issues raised by climate change are even more pressing. “Imagine what kind of infrastructure it would take to accommodate a water supply with a shrinking snowpack.” Environmental-advocacy groups have had to adjust their arguments’ focus to appeal to some of the more conservative lawmakers in the Legislature. Soltysiak says it’s wise to highlight the economic impacts of climate change and poor air quality to underscore their pernicious effects on Utahns. “Those are issues that are very present and visible, that people can wrap their heads around easily,” she says. “I think people stop listening to you at a certain point if you use the wrong jargon.” Rep. Joel Briscoe, D-Salt Lake City, is one legislator that groups like Soltysiak’s won’t have to work hard to sway. For the third time in his eight-year career on Capitol Hill, Briscoe plans on introducing a carbon pricing bill in the upcoming session. Research suggests that such a tariff could reduce greenhouse gas emissions, an important goal considering U.S. carbon emissions rose by 3.4 percent last year, the biggest increase in eight years. “I don’t know how to be more direct in dealing with climate-change issues,” Briscoe says. If passed, the bill would tax fossil fuels at $10 per metric ton of carbon dioxide emissions. About 90 percent of the revenue would be returned to Utahns. The state sales taxes on grocery store food,

electricity and home-heating fuels would be eliminated, as would the corporate income tax on mining and manufacturing businesses. The state would also match 10 percent of the federal earned-income tax credit and extend and expand the retirement tax credit, benefitting low-income families and the elderly. The rest of the revenue—about $50 million a year— would be spent on reducing air pollution and generating economic development in rural communities. “I’m cutting taxes. A carbon tax is libertarian economics,” Briscoe says. Instead of creating regulations, he explains, the bill would “put a price on what we don’t want to have and let the market respond.” Briscoe knows it’s a long shot, but he says a few Republicans have indicated they might be persuaded to vote for the bill. “We talked to several who are interested [but] who are not ready to be publicly supportive yet,” he says. Utah has a Republican supermajority, an ominous sign considering that Republican party members are less willing to address climate change than their Democratic counterparts. Herbert might not acknowledge humans’ role in global warming and called climate science “a little debatable,” but that didn’t stop him and the Legislature from formally recognizing climate change. It takes a long time to create systemic, radical change, Briscoe says. “How long did it take for us to get gay marriage?” he asks. “You don’t get [to solve] complex and difficult ideas in year one.” A 30-year veteran of public education, Briscoe says one of his goals in introducing controversial legislation is much the same as when he was in the classroom: to facilitate conversations on important issues. “One of the things you can do to create a discussion is to run legislation,” he says. “You have to push those issues, and you make people talk about it.” CW


ISSUE

DEREK CARLISLE

Past stories lay the foundation for new ones in Park City.

with some of its founders about how the upstart festival was born. You’ll also find a reminder about some of the great Sundance performances that crossed over into Oscar nominations and wins, and a guide to some of the 2019 Sundance filmmakers who have brought their work here before. And, of course, there are tips and tricks to help you get the most out of these major events in our backyard. So pull on your best black clothes and practice your “don’t you know who I am?” voice. If you set out to explore the wild world of independent filmmaking, who knows what stories you’ll bring home? scott renshaw

>

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 13

Park City in January. A place where an artist’s dreams can come true, and logistical nightmares can reign. But mostly, it’s a place of stories—both the stories movie-lovers get a chance to experience on film festival screens, and the stories that emerge from the experiences of creators and attendees in this crazy high-altitude environment. City Weekly offers its annual preview of festival week (beginning Jan. 24) with a chance to look forward and backward. On this 25th anniversary year of Slamdance, we talk


14 | JANUARY 17, 2019

SLAMDANCE

at 25:

An Oral History

Festival co-founders reflect on going guerilla in Park City. This year, the Slamdance Film Festival celebrates its 25th installment. Three of the festival’s co-founders—Peter Baxter, Dan Mirvish and Shane Kuhn—spoke with City Weekly, reflecting on how they came to launch an alternative to Sundance in the festival’s own back yard.

Before Slamdance Before there was any idea to start a festival, there were simply filmmakers trying to create their work and get it out into the world. Peter Baxter: I started to make short films while I was at college [in England], though I wasn’t studying film. I was very interested in working in the film industry. But at that time, unless you were connected, and knew someone in the film industry, it was very hard to get a leg up. So I was working as a photographer also. I started to do that as a post-graduate. I was working in New York and also London, and managed to get a green card from the place where I was working in New York. I came to L.A. and met a writer, and I made Loser, with Kirk Harris the producer. Dan Mirvish: I grew up in Omaha, Neb., and went to college in St. Louis at Washington University. They only had one or two film classes there, and I really liked it. I took summer school classes at UCLA; it smelled like eucalyptus and opportunity. They taught me how to use a 16mm camera. Then back at Wash. U, they had a student group that showed films every night—classic, foreign, cult films. I had been involved with that for most of my time there, but now I was the one guy on campus who could use a 16mm camera, so I shot the “Coming Soon” and “No Smoking” trailers. Then I moved out to D.C.—I had been involved with journalism in college—and got a speechwriting job for [former senator] Tom Harkin. But if you stay in D.C. for too long, they give you a three-piece suit and a law degree, so I applied to film school, and got into [University of Southern California]. The summer after my first year there, I got a job on a very low-budget kickboxing movie in the Philippines. There’s an old adage that you learn more working on a bad film than working on a good film. So in the span of just a summer vacation, I learned how to make a movie from beginning to end.

Poster created for first Slamdance Film Festival in 1995.

DAN MIRVISH

By Scott Renshaw

Shane Kuhn: After graduating from college, I went to film school in London for a year, mainly to figure out what part of that business I wanted to work in. I’d always been a writer. After going to school in London, I got into the [American Film Institute] screenwriting program. Mark Waters, Darren Aronofsky, [cinematographer] Matthew Libatique were in my class. And while I was in film school, that was like the second wave of independent filmmaking. When I was in London, that was when I first became aware of independent filmmaking as a thing. Richard Linklater was in London promoting Slacker, and I actually interviewed him for my film school newspaper. And he told me, “Whatever you do, do not go to film school.” But I did anyway. While I was at AFI, these other independent films were getting notoriety: Laws of Gravity [and] Slacker, of course. That seemed like the right thing for me.

The R oad to Park City

The would-be filmmakers get to work on the projects they dreamed would get them to Sundance. DM: In the early ’90s, if you made a short film, people would go, “That’s great, kid; get back to us when you make a feature.” So my second year of film school, I said, “Screw making a short.” I went back to Omaha, and I knew a lot of local actors there that I was still friends with, but I needed a local producer. There was this guy Dana Altman—and by the way, his grandfather is Robert Altman. And Altman became our mentor on the film. A friend of mine had told me about a great location called Carhenge. I thought, great, we start in Omaha, come up with a road-trip story [called Omaha (The Movie)]. We were pretty happy with it. SK: I thought to myself, because I was in the screenwriting program but was always interested in directing—I was a photographer before I went to film school—I’ll do what these [independent filmmakers] have done: I’ll raise money. I raised about $80,000, and made probably the worst movie ever made, called Redneck.


PETER BAXTER

COURTESY DAN MIRVISH

Dan Mirvish (center, in hat) leads the annual Slamdance Hot Tub Summit panel discussion in 2014.

Slamdance filmmakers and crew pose at the 2006 festival.

Slamdance visits the 2000 Cannes Film Festival.

DAN MIRVISH

PETER BAXTER

A venue from the 2001 Slamdance Film Festival.

Coming Up with Plan B

The co-founders take their movies to the Independent Feature Film Market in New York in September 1994, hoping to be discovered and get their invitation to Sundance. DM: At the time, before Vimeo, you would go to IFFM, do screenings, distributors would go, and more importantly, film festival programmers would go. The goal was to get Sundance programmers to see your movie. The year before, Kevin Smith was there with Clerks, Sundance programmers saw it and discovered it, and suddenly he was Kevin Smith. There were 95 completed feature films that showed there [in 1994], plus a number of works in progress. SK: My producer friends watched an unfinished version of [Edward Burns’] The Brothers McMullen. After we watched it, we thought, “Thank God that’s not our movie.” DM: So if it hadn’t got into Sundance, it wouldn’t have gotten into Slamdance. [The Brothers McMullen went on to become the hit of the 1995 Sundance Film Festival.] DM: It was kind of Sundance or nothing. We had one distributor come up to us and say “We love it … if you get into Sundance.” So we realized that was kind of the paradigm at the time: If you got into Sundance, you’d get an agent, you’d get distribution, you’d get into other festivals. PB: It was very important, because back then, there were far fewer film festivals than there are today. If you didn’t get in [to Sundance], you wouldn’t have an opportunity, if you didn’t have star power, didn’t have a budget. They had made huge inroads into attracting the industry to the festival. Even at that time, films that were beginning to play at Sundance, that was becoming the new competition for emerging filmmakers. DM: The other thing that happened at IFFM, Dana Altman was kind of feeling a little bit alone out there. When you make your own film, you’re in your own little bubble; whatever city or town you’re making it in, you’re all alone, you don’t need anyone’s help. It’s only when you take it out in the world that you need anyone to help you. Dana had this kind of unique idea to create some forum where all of us filmmakers, spread out around the country, on some grassroots level, help each other out. We called this sort of impromptu meeting with about 15-20 other filmmakers at the Angelika [Film Center]. September ’94, before the internet, before IndieWire. People were barely getting cell phones. A lot of us that ended up starting Slamdance were at this New York meeting. We talked about, “What are we going to do if we don’t get into Sundance?” … Sundance in the end, when they announced their list, of the 95 films at IFFM, Sundance didn’t take any of them. We thought we were going to get in; we were one of the “buzzy” films.

The rejected filmmakers try to decide what to do next. PB: The year before, Matt Stone & Trey Parker had gone to Park City with Cannibal! The Musical, and played it in a conference room at the Yarrow Hotel. So that provided some inspiration. DM: We had the same lawyer as Stone and Parker, so we heard about it through them. SK: I was sitting around thinking, I had known some people who had gone up to Park City and shown movies in hotel rooms. My producing partner was thinking, maybe we could do that. But I was thinking, maybe we could talk to all these other people, and I knew none of them had gotten in to Sundance. Maybe we could bring a whole bunch of movies. DM: Shane calls me up at 8 in the morning: “Why don’t all of us go to Park City and help each other out, combine resources and put on a festival there?” … A week before the Sundance list came out, I thought, “If I get into Sundance, I’m definitely going to need boots.” So I got some, and now I’ve got to use these boots. PB: Like everyone else, we didn’t get our film into Sundance, and we wanted a showcase for our work. We wanted to make a change, and we wanted to make a change for others who wouldn’t have a showcase for their work. SK: Basically, it was my concept, but I wasn’t sitting around thinking we were going to revolutionize everything, grand thoughts about what this was going to be. We all had selfish motivations: We wanted to get our movies recognized, and it would be better to do it as a group than as individuals. But eventually, we realized it was bigger than us. And it was fueled by this incredible naiveté and ignorance, that I thought my movie was actually worthy of Sundance. DM: One of the other guys in New York was Jon Fitzgerald. We were spitballing names; I came up with “Loserfest ’95.” Brendan Cowles came up with Slamdance. SK: I talked to Dan immediately, because he was the guy who could do the press. We really had nothing organized yet, other than “let’s do our own collective festival there.” Dan wrote the press release, faxed it to a bunch of outlets. DM: AOL was just kind of starting. I had a connection at Variety, so we got a front-page story in Variety, which was one of those news services where AOL was distributed. AOL had picked up the Variety story. More filmmakers started to find out what we were up to. We didn’t have a website, we didn’t have a phone number or an address, so how would people get in touch with us? I was working at a Good Guys store as a Christmas job, and people stopped by to drop off tapes with me. … The funny thing is, everyone thought, “If I didn’t get into Sundance I guess I’m in [Slamdance].” We did reject films, even in the first year.

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The Founders Meet


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COURTESY PETER BAXTER/SLAMDANCE

COURTESY PETER BAXTER/SLAMDANCE

COURTESY PETER BAXTER/SLAMDANCE

Left to right: Slamdance alumni filmmakers Steven Soderbergh, Christopher Nolan and Benh Zeitlin.

What Will Sundance Think?

The Aftermath

The founders and others wonder about how Park City’s big festival will react. DM: As soon as it started to look more real, some people panicked, thought they were going to get blacklisted. We thought, “We didn’t get into Sundance anyway, we’ve got nothing to lose.” SK: Keep in mind this was a kind of risky proposition. [Then-Sundance director] Geoff Gilmore left this phone message that was kind of threatening: “I don’t think you guys should do this.” DM: For years, Shane kept this tape. SK: A lot of people around us were like, “You’re going to make more films, right? You’ll never get into Sundance if you do this.” PB: There was definitely a sense of “there goes the neighborhood” when we showed up. We have to appreciate what [Sundance] had done in terms of establishing their event. To create something like this takes tremendous effort. But you can’t care what others have to say—other artists, a festival organization or both—if there’s something you want to change. And we were determined to do that. DM: Dana called up Robert Altman, said, “We’ve got this idea for this renegade festival, but people are concerned they’re going to piss off [Robert] Redford.” Altman thought about it for a second and said, “Eh, fuck ’em.” So we had his blessing. PB: [The relationship with Sundance] has warmed, but it still can be a little chilly. We’ve always, where possible, been open to trying to combine and express the spirit of what we stand for. I think generally over time, what happened is that people at Sundance realized that we’re obviously serious about what we do, that we’re not here to upset what they’re doing. I think they see us as doing good things for the filmmakers we support. We don’t battle with Sundance; we don’t have a sense of competition.

The Slamdance braintrust decides what happens next. PB: After [the first Slamdance], there was this discussion of whether it should continue. It was only supposed to be a one-off event. We had no clue, really, how to organize a festival. Most of us had never even been to one. There was a lot of positive energy, but also naiveté, but the energy had been an important ingredient. DM: We thought, “Why don’t we do this again next year?” Baxter had proven himself as a good producer. Why don’t we go down to Yarrow’s front desk and put a deposit down for next year? Peter had a credit card, so that cemented Peter’s involvement. SK: In the beginning, I didn’t have a grander concept beyond that first festival. We were caught off guard by how it took hold. Probably after that first year, we all had a lot of big ideas about what we wanted to do. PB: Year one, we pulled it off, showed that we could do this. Even films from the first year got distribution. The film I produced ended up showing in over 50 theaters. DM: The next year, Jon [Fitzgerald] was technically in charge, Peter very much working with him. We kind of ran the festival out of Jon’s apartment in Santa Monica. I was like, “Good luck, guys.” I was one of the filmmakers that good things came out of [Slamdance]; my film ended up on the festival circuit. It was largely Jon and Peter that second year at the Yarrow. Because I was on the circuit more than the other guys, at SXSW I met Steven Soderbergh. I was kind of afraid to meet him. He’s like Mr. Sundance; isn’t he going to hate us? On the contrary, he was like “I love you guys!” He had had a falling out with Redford at the time and was also getting soured on the studio system. He said, “I have this crazy little low-budget film I’m working on, Schizopolis, I’m producing this other film (Greg Mottola’s The Daytrippers).” Because of that connection, we showed Daytrippers. PB: [The Daytrippers in 1996] attracted a lot of industry attention, and sold [to a distributor] out of Slamdance, and sold well. It showed that a film here could do just as well as a film at Sundance … There have been various stages in the festival where I thought, we’re progressing, we’re growing. But personally, I never take for granted from one year to another that anything and everything is going to be fine. To ever get comfortable and feel like, “That’s it, we’ve got it,” is always going to be a mistake. It’s about being open to certain changes that your community needs. [Baxter continues to serve as the festival’s director.] SK: I probably was involved for like the first three years more heavily. Then I moved to San Francisco and was out of it for a bit. I’m still part of the board. [Kuhn is a novelist whose books include The Asset, Hostile Takeover and Casual Friday.] DM: I stayed active for about the first seven years. The way we do our programming is very unique, all by alumni filmmakers, and it’s very decentralized. Every film gets seen by at least two different people, and there are these committees where nobody has any more influence than anyone else. When I started to have kids, it was a lot harder for me to do that. There were enough other alumni; it doesn’t have to be me. I’ve still gone every year. [Mirvish continues working as an independent filmmaker, most recently 2017’s Bernard and Huey.] PB: I do love Slamdance and this community. We’re looking at the next 25 years, and I want to be involved as long as I can be, as long as the organization will have me. SK: The way it’s run is still very much about trying to give a voice to first-time directors. That’s something I really like about it. But there’s more ability to do that now than back then. There are all these extensions of that original idea: Let’s look for creators that are looking for a break, and give them that break … The thing about Redneck is, even though it was the worst movie ever made, it was kind of one of the foundations of Slamdance. Whenever I think about what a terrible failure it was, at least it resulted in Slamdance.

Finding a Venue

The new festival was now in motion; there was just the small matter of where it would be. DM: The original plan—and Shane was the one who kind of came up with this idea, he had spent a year at University of Utah—was to screen at the university. All of our films were on 35mm or 16mm; they had actual screening rooms with actual projectors. We thought, “We can screen there.” We looked at a map: “Salt Lake City, it’s right there, people will just come down the mountain from Park City.” … We all got a big condo in Salt Lake; Shane and I drove up from L.A. together. SK: We held this press conference, and there were a lot of press there, and I was terrified: “Oh my God, this is on the record, and people are writing this down, and we have to be careful what we say.” It’s no longer just, “Hey dudes, let’s put a fucking festival together.” It suddenly had this face that was going to be presented to the public, and it had to look right and sound right. I was worried we were going to look like a bunch of amateurs. DM: We were doing these screenings in Salt Lake, but by the first night we realized, nobody’s coming, just a handful of people. So a couple of our filmmakers said, “This is bullshit, we gotta be screening our films up in Park City.” So we rented a 16mm [projector] from somewhere and rented a screen, too. The car was a little Honda hatchback and had the screen sticking out the window, so there was snow blowing in the car. We tried to find a venue, and the second place we went was Prospector Square. It was late at night, and some teenage bellhop, when we asked if they had a ballroom we could use, said, “Sure, why not?” The main Prospector ballroom, before the Eccles, was Sundance’s main venue. So we were 30 feet down the hall. We got on the pay phone there, called down, told everyone to haul ass up here, we have a venue. We did keep screenings going at the University of Utah, because that was the only way to show the 35mm films. By the third or fourth day, I got a call from a filmmaker who had just heard about us: “My short is on 35mm, I brought a projector, and I’m up at the Yarrow.” Congratulations, you’re in Slamdance. So then all of us could screen in Park City. Which is ridiculous, for a first-year festival to have three venues.


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Whiplash

SUNDANCE OSCAR ALUMS

A look at the honored performances that emerged from festival films. By David R iedel It’s January; the movie industry’s a dead zone. Studios dump the dreck into the multiplexes, the critics have handed out their self-important awards, the Golden Globes have come and gone in all their nonglory, and we have a short respite from Oscar prognostications. So, to paraphrase Christian Bale’s Golden Globes acceptance speech, thank Satan for the Sundance Film Festival! It arrives at just the right time, providing critics and audiences thrills, spills, chills and some other word that rhymes. The Brothers McMullen notwithstanding, Sundance has showcased some damn good movies filled with wonderful performances. For example, in the past 20 years, movies that made their debuts at Sundance have received 32 Oscar nominations in the acting categories, with five wins. That’s a pretty impressive total. More impressive is that the winners are a truly fine bunch. Take Alan Arkin. The 2006 Sundance favorite Little Miss Sunshine is what I consider the nadir of filmmaking; its characters are loathsome (particularly Greg Kinnear’s, whose natural unpleasantness makes the character even more foul), they don’t resemble real people, and the best gag in the picture is lifted from National Lampoon’s Vacation. But Arkin makes it all bearable. His hour of screen time before his character’s demise is a godsend. His nasty grandfather is strangely lovable, so much so that when he dies of what’s presumably a heroin overdose, it’s actually affecting. It’s also a serious bummer, because the movie’s final 40 minutes doesn’t have

Boyhood

his wisecracking to offset the bullshit of seeing the family push their beater Volkswagen bus down the highway for the millionth time. Arkin’s Best Supporting Actor Oscar win gives the movie cachet it doesn’t deserve, but he’s good enough for us to sit through the parts he’s not in. Speaking of loathsome characters, Mo’Nique won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance as Mary in the 2009 film Precious. Mary, Precious’ mother, is so monstrous it’s hard to believe people like her could exist—though they do; take a look at the White House. But Mo’Nique infuses her with enough pathos (without dipping into bathos) that her final teary showdown with Mariah Carey’s social worker elicits pity. That’s quite a feat considering Mary subjected Precious to years of physical, emotional and sexual abuse. Another Oscar award-winning performance for an inhuman character went to J.K. Simmons for his role as Terence Fletcher, the asshole music instructor who beats his students in Whiplash, which premiered at Sundance in 2014. How can someone win a Best Supporting Actor Oscar while playing a man who’s so ruthless he goes out of his way to ruin his student’s lives? Maybe it’s because his competition was Foxcatcher, The Judge and Birdman (and Boyhood in the form of Ethan Hawke, who gave an outstanding performance in an outstanding film). Or maybe it’s because Simmons is so goddamn good you root for him even though he’s the villain. I mean, who are you gonna root for instead? Bitch-ass Miles Teller? Really, Whiplash is filled with characters who are so rotten you wonder how they function in real life; my one gripe with the movie is that none of these musicians seems to care much about music. On the other side of humanity’s spectrum is Olivia Evans, the character that earned Patricia Arquette a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for Boyhood. Olivia is the title boy’s mother, the movie’s emotional center, and Arquette gives one of those performances that’s so brilliantly understated it’s a miracle the Academy awarded an actor who faded into the scenery instead of chewing it to bits (see: Emma Stone in Birdman or Meryl Streep in Into the Woods, two other nominees from the same year). When Olivia dissolves into tears shortly before her son heads off to college, it’s a well-deserved emotional moment for a character who, faults and all, has made sacrifice after sacrifice for her family. Lastly among the Oscar winners, there’s Casey Affleck, who was awarded the Best Actor Oscar for his role as a

IFC PRODUCTIONS

Precious

LIONSGATE

BOLD FILMS

FOX SEARCHLIGHT

Little Miss Sunshine

grieving father in Manchester by the Sea. Affleck’s ick factor aside (it’s hard to think about him without also thinking about the sexual assault allegations made against him), his performance is a highlight in a movie overflowing with excellent performances. His character is one of the most emotionally damaged to ever hit the big screen, and Affleck is excellent in the role. But forget about the Oscar winners for a moment. There are 27 other Sundance-movie performances that received Academy Award acting nominations, many of which are just as worthy as the winners. For my money, it’s difficult to find a movie more uniformly excellent than In the Bedroom, Todd Field’s 2001 heartbreaker about the way violence and resentment corrupt the soul. Sissy Spacek, Tom Wilkinson and Marisa Tomei were all nominated in acting categories and all failed to take home a statuette. Spacek lost to Halle Berry in Monster’s Ball, and Wilkinson to Denzel Washington in Training Day. It’s hard to argue with those results, but Tomei lost out to Jennifer Connelly from A Beautiful Mind, a good performance in a corny movie. Such is life. Sundance movies also have a solid streak of introducing us to new gotta-watch performers. Laura Linney, Jennifer Lawrence, Amy Adams, Abigail Breslin and Melissa Leo all made their marks via Sundance movies for, respectively, You Can Count on Me, Winter’s Bone (if you haven’t seen it, do), Junebug, the afore-shit-on Little Miss Sunshine and Frozen River. Lawrence and Leo went on to win Oscars for subsequent roles. Adams, Breslin and Linney are all still waiting, though I’m stunned Linney didn’t pick one up for her role in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows. Finally, I’m making special mention of Quvenzhané Wallis’ Best Actress nomination for Beasts of the Southern Wild. She holds the distinction of being the youngest Best Actress nominee ever, at 9 years old. Plus, I got into a long-deleted minor Twitter beef with disgraced former CBC Radio host Jian Ghomeshi about her nomination (my argument: She was nominated, who cares about her age?), so I feel like I have skin in the game. What say you? Now that I have to wait a few weeks to see what the most honored Sundance performances for 2019 will be, I’m kind of chomping at the bit. Until then, I have tons of movies to revisit in anticipation. Happy festival-going! Save me a spot in line for Big Time Adolescence.


very year, industry insiders and movie-lovers descend on Park City for a chance to see the Next Big Thing before that thing becomes big. It’s a showcase for work by artists who are often unknown or just starting out— and that can make choosing your movies more than slightly challenging.

VICE STUDIOS

BLUMHOUSE PRODUCTIONS

EXHIBIT A PICTURES

The Death of Dick Long

PEDIGREES IN PARK CITY

The Mountain MACRO

Relive

A24 FILMS

Hail Satan?

Memory – The Origins of Alien

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BLUMHOUSE PRODUCTIONS

HARD WORKING MOVIES

BRON STUDIOS

The Nightingale

Sweetheart

Ms. Purple

Veteran Sundance filmmakers bring new movies this year that deserve a look. By Scot t Renshaw Some Sundance features, however, come from filmmakers who have been here before, or simply have at least a bit of a track record worth looking at. Here’s a look at a handful of Sundance 2019 films where you might have at least a little sense of what to expect based on their creators’ previous work.

Hail Satan?

Relive

The Mountain

Synopsis: Revenge thriller about an Irish convict in 1820s Tasmania who enlists the aid of an aboriginal tracker to find the people who brutalized her family. Director: Jennifer Kent Also known for: The 2014 Sundance horror highlight The Babadook, a tale of grief manifesting in the form of a monster. The stunningly directed debut wasn’t just the scariest film of that year’s Sundance, or the best debut feature; it was the best film of the year, period. So you might expect: Something grim and terrifying but still genuinely emotional, served up with true cinematic artistry.

Synopsis: Documentary exploration of the Satanic Temple, and the way its members have taken their controversial beliefs to the forefront of the “separation of church and state” culture war. Director: Penny Lane Also known for: The 2016 Sundance documentary Nuts!, a fascinating profile of inventor/entrepreneur/snake-oil salesman John Romulus Brinkley, which combined visual imagination in its animated re-creations with a tale of pirate radio and impotence cures. So you might expect: An unconventional approach to an unconventional subject, one that treats strangeness with a welcome sense of humor but also as an absolutely worthy topic of conversation.

Synopsis: A detective (David Oyelowo) investigates an apparent murder-suicide involving his young niece and her parents— after he receives a telephone call from that dead niece, from the past. Director: Jacob Estes Also known for: The 2004 Sundance thriller Mean Creek (about teenagers plotting revenge on a bully) and 2011’s The Details (a weird, dark domestic comedy with Tobey Maguire fighting raccoons). Estes also directed the not-so-great 2017 Rings, which attempted to reboot The Ring horror franchise. So you might expect: With this guy, who knows? He clearly likes traveling through strange, dark territory, but at times seems to lose his grip on his material.

Synopsis: In 1953, a teenage Zamboni driver (Tye Sheridan) joins a lobotomist (Jeff Goldblum) on a tour of rural mental hospitals as the doctor tries to drum up business. Director: Rick Alverson Also known for: Most recently, at Sundance 2015 for the Gregg Turkington collaboration Entertainment—about a bitter touring comedian—and before that at Sundance 2012 with The Comedy, both of which emphasize Alverson’s fondness for almost aggressive anti-comedy. So you might expect: More of the same, based on that synopsis. Either you want to see the guy who directed Entertainment directing Goldblum as a lobotomist, or you don’t.

Sweetheart

Ms. Purple

Synopsis: A young woman (Kiersey Clemons) is stranded on a deserted island, where she’s hunted by a creature that comes out of the water at night to feed. Director: J.D. Dillard Also known for: The 2016 thriller Sleight, about a teenage street magician and parttime drug dealer who needs to use his skills after he gets in over his head. It’s a slick, lowbudget variant on a superhero origin story, with solidly directed performances. So you might expect: Another spin on genre tropes—this time, both a survival drama and a monster thriller—that takes those tropes in creative directions, with a talented young actor at the center.

Synopsis: Estranged Korean-American siblings in Southern California are pulled back together to decide how they must care for their bedridden father. Director: Justin Chon Also known for: The 2017 Sundance Next Audience Award-winning Gook, about racial tensions in a Los Angeles neighborhood between Korean-American store owners and their mostly African-American customers during the era of the Rodney King verdict. So you might expect: Character-based drama with a vivid sense of place and cultural specificity, anchored in the KoreanAmerican immigrant experience.

Memory – The Origins of Alien Synopsis: Documentary look at the story behind the creation of the 1979 horror/ sci-fi classic Alien, including the germ of the original script idea that was almost never finished. Director: Alexandre O. Philippe Also known for: The 2017 Sundance Midnight documentary 78/52, a deep dive into the structure and cultural resonance of the infamous “shower scene” from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. It was a close reading of a film text with an engaging enthusiasm and insight. So you might expect: A lesson in film history that avoids stuffy academic discourse in favor of a look at why certain creepy things get so deeply under our skin.

The Death of Dick Long Synopsis: A pair of friends in a small-town Alabama band, Zeke and Earl, try to keep it a secret when their bandmate Dick dies, but they’re a bit too dumb for a successful cover-up. Director: Daniel Scheinert Also known for: The love-it-or-hate-it 2017 Sundance feature Swiss Army Man—yes, the one with Daniel Radcliffe as a talking, farting corpse—co-directed with Daniel Kwan. Sure, it was irreverent, but it also managed to dig into the insecurities that keep so many relationships on a superficial level. So you might expect: Another dark comedy that finds humor in a dead body, giving Scheinert a leg up on being America’s poet laureate of Weekend at Bernie’s-inspired philosophizing.

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The Nightingale


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SUNDANCE 2019

COURTESY SUNDANCE INSTITUTE

HOW TO

It’s not too late to be part of the festival with these tips and tricks. By Scott Renshaw

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If you opt to do all of your Sundancing at Salt Lake City venues, you can still take advantage of public transportation. Three of the principal valley venues—Broadway Centre Cinema, the Main Library Theater and Rose Wagner Center—are a 10-15 minute walk from the Gallivan Plaza Trax stop. If you’re headed from one of those clustered downtown venues to either the Tower Theatre or Grand Theatre, give yourself plenty of time for navigating weather conditions, parking (local streets around the Tower get particularly full) and making your way through the long lines. Seeing a Movie. Oh yeah, you might also want to watch movies. Many screenings are officially sold out well before the festival begins, but in part that’s to allow wiggle room for the many festival passholders who might attend any one of a number of films at a given time, and who might leave town before the end of the festival. That means taking advantage of waitlisting, which got considerably less stressful in the past few years with the addition of the eWaitlist. Download the official festival app, create an account, then select titles you want to see. You can get in the electronic queue for a movie two hours before its scheduled start time—on the dot, so have your trigger finger at the ready. Once you get a number for your virtual spot in line, you can decide whether you’ve got a good enough chance to make it worth your time to head over to the actual venue, where you’ll need to be present no later than 30 minutes before start time, and have $20 cash only per ticket (or $10 for Kids section titles). Your odds for getting in will always be better at the larger venues—like Park City’s Eccles Theater—as well as the earliest and latest screenings of any given day, when many festival attendees are either enjoying a party or sleeping off the previous night. Of course, locals can also consider seeing the “Best of Fest” screenings on the Monday after the festival officially ends (Feb. 4, this year). Titles aren’t announced until Sunday, Feb. 3, but they’re all winners of festival awards, which certainly increases the odds that you’ll see something great. Tickets are free, distributed via the festival’s eWaitlist beginning two hours prior to each screening time (just like regular festival screenings). Valid Utah identification will be required for admission. Stargazing: Celebrities turn up in Park City, most often to promote the movies that they’re in, but sometimes just to be part of the festivities. Main Street is the center of gravity for such goings-on, and it’s often easy to spot where the famous people are just by looking for clouds of paparazzi that seem to materialize out of nowhere. A lot of the time, you’ll just pass a famous face on the street, or in a restaurant. But one of the easiest ways is simply going to their movie, especially if it’s premiering at the Eccles Theater. Those screenings usually have a red-carpet photo-op before showtime, and if you’re actually in the screening itself, look for the seats that have the “Reserved” signs and ropes over them. That’s probably where you can spot your favorite actors getting ready to watch themselves on the big screen.

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 21

very Sundance year has its own feel—sometimes determined by the weather, sometimes by the political winds that are blowing, sometimes even by the movies themselves. Other things, however, remain relatively consistent, making it possible to navigate the festival—whether in Park City, or at Salt Lake City venues— with the benefit of insight from someone who has been attending since the 1990s. Here’s a look at the basics for how to Sundance, whether it’s your first time or your 22nd. What’s New in 2019. The main difference this year is the timing of the festival, which is getting started a week later as part of the agreement between the festival and Park City to avoid scheduling the festival during the tourism-lucrative Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. For locals, the Best of Fest screening tickets that had previously been distributed in person at the physical box office locations will now be part of the eWaitlist process (see “Seeing a Movie” for more details). How to Get Around. Navigating Park City during Sundance week is a nightmare, and that’s if the weather conditions are ideal. Traffic can be brutal on the main arteries of Park Avenue, Kearns Boulevard and Main Street. There is exactly one officially designated parking area— the China Bridge structure on Marsac Avenue—and it’s ridiculously expensive ($40 per day, with no re-entry permitted) and likely to fill up completely by early morning on any given festival day. There are two park-and-ride options outside of Park City limits—Richardson Flat (off the Kearns Boulevard exit from Highway 40), and Ecker Hill (2500 Kilby Road, off the Jeremy Ranch exit from I-80)—that offer free shuttles to, respectively, the Eccles Theater and the Kimball Junction and Park City Transit Center stops. If you still feel like braving Park City in your own vehicle, make your trek up the mountain as early in the day as possible. Find one of the limited (and free) street parking spots in Prospector Square, in the general vicinity of the Park City Marriott festival headquarters. Then leave your car and take the festival shuttle buses everywhere you need to go. Word of warning: Try to avoid heading out of town during the peak 4–7 p.m. period, no matter whether it’s a weekday or weekend. Bumper-to-bumper traffic is expected, as locals getting off work and day skiers combine with festival traffic to create a perfect storm of frustration. For a stress-free option, consider taking the PC-SLC Connect buses (UTA routes 901 and 902). The 901 leaves Saturday and Sunday only from the 3900 South (Meadowbrook) Trax parkand-ride at least twice daily to the transit center at Kimball Junction—where you can catch festival shuttles into town—and heads back down the mountain from the same stop. The 902 departs Salt Lake Central daily and stops at the Park City Transit Center. Best of all? The cost is a measly $4.50 per person each way, and someone else does the driving. (Visit rideuta.com for schedule and snow routing information; routes run limited hours each way.)


22 | JANUARY 17, 2019

What Lies Ahead Our critics get fired up over their most anticipated 2019 films. BY SCOTT RENSHAW, MARYANN JOHANSON, ERIC D. SNIDER AND DAVID RIEDEL

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he awards season for 2018 films remains in high gear for the next month or so, but it’s already time to start contemplating what we’ll be fired up about in 2019. Here are our most anticipated titles coming to theaters and major streaming services: Scott Renshaw: It’s always worth getting excited when one of the greatest directors of all time has a new project coming. When that director is Martin Scorsese, and he’s diving back into the world of mobsters with Robert DeNiro—as in the Netflix release The Irishman (late fall, release date TBD)—it’s even more noteworthy. Then consider that he managed to get Joe Pesci to come out of several years of semi-retirement, and it’s an occasion for fireworks. Speaking of “greatest directors of all time,”

there’s the prospect of Steven Spielberg’s remake of West Side Story for year-end awards consideration (though at press time, it still was uncertain whether it would make a 2019 release). That’s just one of more than 40 remakes, sequels and franchise installments set for wide release in 2019, so you better hope that at least some of them will be great. My fingers are crossed for Toy Story 4 (June 21), since betting against the Toy Story movies to continue being great hasn’t paid off yet. But I’ve got a sneaking suspicion that one of my favorites will come from one of my favorite underappreciated directors: James Gray, who’s moving away from his usual earthbound, gritty character dramas with the science-fiction adventure Ad Astra (May 24), starring Brad Pitt as an astronaut searching through space for both his missing father (Tommy Lee Jones) and the solution to a planet-threatening mystery. Eric D. Snider: I don’t know which 2019 movies will be good (probably some), but these are the ones I’m curious about: As a fan of Unbreakable since day one, and then of its surprise kinda-sequel Split, I’m looking forward to Glass (Jan. 18), which promises to bring all the threads together. Men in Black: International (June 14) looks like the sexy reboot the franchise needs (to the extent that any franchise “needs” to be perpetuated). It’s sure to be better than Men in Black 3, which is a real movie that

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Captain Marvel came out in 2012 (seriously!). There’s no reason for a Toy Story 4—but, then, there was no reason for a Toy Story 2 or 3, either, and both turned out to be classics. With Spider-Man: Far from Home (July 5), mostly I’m curious how they’re going to make a Spider-Man movie when SpiderMan died in Avengers: Infinity War. There’s no way all those dead superheroes will come back to life, is there?! A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (Oct. 18), starring Tom Hanks as Mr. Rogers, might be the soothing balm we need. I wish it were out now, though we’ll probably need it even more in October. MaryAnn Johanson: I’m a geek, so of course my most-anticipated movies of 2019 tend to be of the science fiction and fantasy variety. I can’t wait to see Brie Larson take on Captain Marvel (March 8); hopefully it will prove that great women-led superhero movies are not a Wonder Woman one-off. I’ll watch anything from director Jordan Peele after Get Out, and he’ll give us Us (March 15); we don’t know much about it yet, except that it’s another horror flick, and I’m happy for its secrets to be kept until the lights go down. I’m not always enamored of sequels, but I’m ready for Avengers: Endgame (April 26), Godzilla: King of the Monsters (May 31), Toy Story 4 and Star Wars: Episode IX (Dec. 20). A chance to revisit the tremendous sci-fi comic chemistry Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson shared

TRISTAR PICTURES

MARVEL STUDIOS

Men In Black: International

A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood

SONY PICTURES

Ad Astra

20th CENTURY FOX

CINEMA

in Thor: Ragnarok comes with the landing of Men in Black: International . Just about the only non-genre film I’m already psyched for is the Tom Hanks-as-Mr. Rogers drama A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood. Directed by Can You Ever Forgive Me’s Marielle Heller, it should be lovely. David Riedel: I’m thrilled 2019 is likely the last year we’ll see Stan Lee cameos in Marvel movies. Look, I like Lee as much as the next guy. He was funny! He had that great voice. He created fascinating characters. Plus, he wasn’t a half-bad actor. That he made his contrived-as-shit role in Kevin Smith’s Mallrats seem authentic is a testament to his skills as a performer as well as a creator. But, Jesus, man. The Marvel cameos. Just think: It’s a crowded opening weekend and you’re watching Black Panther or Avengers: Infinity War for the first time. Suddenly, Lee and his ridiculous hairpiece show up, and every Marvel fanboy is hooting and hollering like he just discovered his dad’s stack of Playboys. (I was raised in the ’80s.) And then anything that happens in the 90 seconds following Lee’s appearance is something you’ll miss entirely or have to witness later via your favorite streaming app. So, yes. After Captain Marvel and Avengers: Endgame come and go, I’ll be relieved Lee won’t appear on screen. Fanboys are like nuclear weapons: They fuck up everything, even the harmless old guy with the funny toupee.


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Jodi Kantor

SATURDAY 1/19 Ronan Farrow

KATHLEEN SYKES

Puppies and pirates share the Eccles Theater stage in PAW Patrol Live!: The Great Pirate Adventure. Based on the popular and longrunning Nickelodeon children’s show PAW Patrol, the live production follows the human boy Ryder and his pack of search-and-rescue dogs on a high seas adventure. After the group finds a treasure map while on a mission, they embark on a musical race against time to save both the day and the pirate treasure from the bad guys. This is the second live show from the PAW Patrol team, following up Race to the Rescue. It is produced by the same group responsible for creating Sesame Street Live touring shows for the past 37 years. Maggie Henjum, the show’s director of publicity, says while the production values are always great, the best part is the audience. She believes that in addition to being a lot of fun for kids, the show is a great introduction to live theater for young viewers. “It’s truly like a preschooler’s first rock concert,” she says. “PAW Patrol Live! conveys that ‘No job is too big, no pup is too small,’” Henjum adds, “and shares lessons for all ages about citizenship, social skills, problem solving and the importance of teamwork.” The run time is a family-friendly 75 minutes— or, roughly, three consecutive episodes of PAW Patrol—with a 15-minute intermission. As this show is a family affair, every child 1 year old or older must have a ticket. (Kylee Ehmann) PAW Patrol Live!: The Great Pirate Adventure @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801355-2787, Jan. 19, 10 a.m., 2 & 6 p.m.; Jan. 20, 1 p.m., $20-$125, live-at-the-eccles.com

PAW Patrol Live!: The Great Pirate Adventure

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 25

Oftentimes, fact mirrors fiction—never more so when it comes to stories that impart life lessons to children. They offer a gateway to actual experience, instilling essential truths about moral obligations and the practical precepts that dictate life’s journey. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s timeless 1943 children’s story The Little Prince is an ideal example of how ideas imparted to young readers can plant seeds for success. “The moral of the piece is just as timely as ever,” Tara Faircloth, director of Utah Opera’s upcoming production, insists. “In a world that is increasingly fast-paced and difficult to understand, it’s our relationships that matter.” That might seem like a heady precept, especially for a child, but Faircloth maintains that was the point of the book on which composer Rachel Portman and librettist Nicholas Wright based their opera, which premiered in 2003. As the libretto states, “What is essential is invisible to the eye.” It contends that we find value in people or things not because of anything inherent to them, but because they earn our time and attention. “They are valuable because they are loved,” Faircloth adds. The story follows a young prince who has fallen to Earth from a tiny asteroid. He embarks on a journey of discovery and unexpected encounters. The adventure is brought to life through imaginative sets, creative costuming and the voices of the The Madeleine Choir School. It is, Faircloth promises, “a feast for adults and children alike.” We say, that’s a prince of a proposition. (Lee Zimmerman) Utah Opera: The Little Prince @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Jan. 19-27, dates and times vary, $15-$108, utahopera.org

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SATURDAY 1/19

Utah Opera: The Little Prince

In fall 2017, a bombshell story rocked the entertainment industry: Movie mogul Harvey Weinstein had been accused by multiple women of sexual assault and professional intimidation. That story became the spark for the #MeToo movement, which found many women opening up about their own experiences as survivors of sexual assault and harassment. Journalists at competing publications broke that story and earned Pulitzer Prizes. Two of them visit Utah this week. New York Times reporters Jodi Kantor (pictured) and Megan Twohey initially chronicled the revelations of multiple women—many of them big-name Hollywood actresses—who accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct. Kantor was also subsequently part of the reporting team that broke the story about comedian Louis C.K.’s harassment of female comedians. She speaks in Park City about the process of developing her stories and the cultural fallout from their revelations. Later in October 2017, Ronan Farrow added details to the Weinstein story in The New Yorker, and for the next several weeks built the case for the mogul’s pattern of trying to silence his accusers. While his reporting began while he was under contract at NBC News, he has stated that the network’s reluctance to pursue the controversial story led to him moving it to The New Yorker. Farrow is scheduled to talk about his role breaking open a national—and even worldwide—conversation about sexual abuse. (Scott Renshaw) Jodi Kantor @ Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., $29, parkcityinstitute.org Ronan Farrow @ Val Browning Center, Weber State University, Ogden, Jan. 19, 7 p.m., $8-$50, weber.edu/artscalendar

SATURDAY 1/19

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Nick Payne wrote the script for Constellations at age 29. The play premiered in London; since then, it’s been performed on Broadway—by Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson, no less—and was named a winner in the U.K.’s Evening Standard Theatre Awards for best play. Now, this twocharacter drama opens the 2019 season for Ogden’s Good Company Theatre. The play follows the romantic entanglements of beekeeper Roland (Jesse Nepivoda) and quantum physicist Marianne (Haley McCormick). Payne said in a 2017 interview with London’s Royal Court Theatre that the idea for the play began with two documentaries. First, Vanishing of the Bees—but “I sort of worried about how you could do bees on stage. So I decided not to go down the bee play route,” Payne said. Then he watched The Elegant Universe, which dives into string theory and the multiverse. The multiverse forms the backbone of Constellations, as the two characters repeat chance encounters. “What makes this play so compelling is its intimate approach to the vastness of the multiverse,” director Tracy Callahan says. This one-act, 70-minute play about nerds in love resonates; The New York Times critic Ben Brantley wrote, “I would even venture that it’s impossible not to identify with Roland and Marianne if you’ve ever been in love.” Above all, it speaks to the wonder of possibility. “The beautiful thing is it leaves you feeling hopeful,” producer Alicia Washington says. “Constellations offers an optimistic, poetic take on human connection, and the potential for change.” (Naomi Clegg) Constellations @ Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-917-4969, Jan. 18-Feb. 3, Fridays & Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 4 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 26, 4 p.m., $20, 13+, goodcotheatre.com

FRIDAY 1/18

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Good Company Theatre: Constellations

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JAN. 17-23, 2019

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ESSENTIALS

the


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26 | JANUARY 17, 2019

A&E

Renaissance Man

The multi-talented W. Kamau Bell serves up comedy with his commentary—or maybe vice-versa. BY LEE ZIMMERMAN comments@cityweekly.net

W

. Kamau Bell could be considered a Renaissance man on the subject of race. He’s known for many things: his albums, his activism, and his roles as author, television host and radio and podcast commentator. He pontificates about politics and social issues and is one of the most thoughtful pundits in the nation today. He’s also one of the funniest. As a comedian, Bell sheds light on the indignities and injustices that have permeated our nation’s history. Because many of the topics he touches on often expose raw nerves in the country’s collective psyche, it’s fair to say Bell is a daring and defiant individual, a man who’s unafraid of straddling the racial divide. And yet, he never fails to make his audiences laugh, and, in the process, gain a deeper understanding of the topics he tackles. Still, he does admit that it can be a fine line that divides comedy from commentary. “Comedy is the way I communicate,” Bell remarked during a recent phone conversation. “I’m always trying to communicate and share a message. If I’m doing standup, I’ll lean towards the laughs. If I’m on CNN, I’ll lean towards the commentary. For

me, I think people relate more towards the comedy, so I feel like I’m walking in the footsteps of Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, George Carlin, and the people that inspired me.” Given the state of the nation in 2019, one would think that Bell might be hardpressed to mine laughter from what’s become an increasingly hostile environment, where racial animosity is often approved by those sitting at the highest levels of government. Bell says he’s still determined to stay the course. “I’m always in the moment, so I’d be doing this no matter who is the president or what’s going on in the country,” he maintains. “Certainly, though, it feels like the work’s a little more special when you’re living in times like these.” But, he adds, he has his three children to keep him grounded. Because of all the jobs he balances—in particular, the CNN documentary program United Shades of America, for which he garnered an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Host of a Reality Program—he’s acquired the need to be an effective multitasker. “If you ask my wife, not that well,” he responds when asked how he juggles his myriad responsibilities. “In the early part of my career, I was unknown and not working that much. So I have a hard time saying no to things, especially things that I think are important. I want to get as much out of my career as possible. I feel that there’s nobody else doing things this way, so I have to take advantage of that. It’s my particular spin on things.” That unique spin has led him to record three successful comedy albums, star in a well-received Showtime stand-up special and pen a 2017 autobiography, The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell: Tales of a 6’4”, African American, Heterosexual, Cisgender, Left-Leaning, Asthmatic, Black and Proud Blerd, Mama’s Boy, Dad, and StandUp Comedian. In addition, he continues to

JOHN NOVAK

COMEDY

host a variety of podcasts and take part in several think tanks. In 2013, he was named a celebrity ambassador for the American Civil Liberties Union, and in 2017, he was tapped to be an artist in residence at Santa Clara University. It’s not surprising he’s developed a successful rapport with white audiences that negates any sense of confrontation or hostility, despite the sore subjects that saturate his stand-up. “I think we have to remind ourselves that not all white people are the same,” he says with a laugh. “I know it sounds funny to say this, but I’ve been around white people all my life. So it’s not like when I stand before them I don’t know how to talk to them. I know how to relate to people. There certainly are individual people who have their own feelings, but we can work our way through that, because I’ve been doing this for a while now. I know that if an audience is willing to sit in a room with me, then we can figure something out.”

W. Kamau Bell

Still, it’s easy to be angry these days. Bell, however, believes that his methods have allowed him to effectively channel his outrage. “This is the way I process the anger and frustration,” he insists. “Comedy is a relief valve.” Maybe, just maybe, Bell is the kind of leader this country needs. Would he ever consider running for office? “It’s funny,” he responds. “We need a comedian to run for office? It says more about the current leaders in office then it says about me as a qualified candidate.” CW

W. KAMAU BELL

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moreESSENTIALS

Treehouse Troupe: The Snake Prince Treehouse Museum, 347 22nd Street, Ogden, Jan. 18-19 & 25-26, 6 p.m., treehousemuseum.org The Wizard of Oz Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Feb. 2, dates and times vary, hct. org

DANCE

Body Logic Dance Co.: Cages Leona Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, through Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Brown Bag Organ Recital First United Methodist Church, 203 S. 200 East, Wednesdays at noon, through May 15, firstmethodistslc.wordpress.com Jaanan Ensemble: Grand Persian Music Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Jan. 18, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Utah Opera & Utah Symphony: Access to Music Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Jan. 22, 7 p.m., utahsymphony.org Utah Symphony: Mozart’s Symphony No. 39 St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

A.G. Howard: Stain The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Carol Moldaw, Cori Winrock & Noam Dorr Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Jan. 17, 7 p.m., saltlakearts.org Emily Butler: Freya & Zoose The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 22, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Mark E. Smith & Corey Rushton: Salt Lake City Cemetery The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 17, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKET

Clean Air Solutions Fair The Gateway, 18 N. Rio Grande St., Jan. 19, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., catalystmagazine.net Superhero Saturday Show Barn at Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, Jan. 19, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org The Laramie Project UVU Bastian Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Jan. 18-26, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu Love Louder Gallery Opening & Reception Encircle SLC, 331 S. 600 East, Jan. 18, 5-9 p.m., encircletogether.org

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 27

LGBTQ

Art Access Partners Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Feb. 8, accessart.org Ben Steele: Now Showing Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through March 1, modernwestfineart.com Betta Inman & Joy Nunn: Color Talks Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 9, artatthemain.com

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FESTIVALS & FAIRS

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 270 S. Rio Grande St., through April 20, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

VISUAL ART

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Constellations Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Feb. 3, dates and times vary, goodcotheatre.com (see p. 25) Die Fledermaus UVU Ragan Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, through Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu Grassroots Shakespeare: Much Ado About Nothing Scera, 745 S. State, Orem, through Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., scera.org I Do! I Do! Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, through Feb. 9, Mondays, Fridays, & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., terraceplayhouse.com The King & I Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, Jan. 22-23, 7:30 p.m., cachearts.org The Lion in Winter Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Jan. 19, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org The Little Prince Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through Jan. 27, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 25) The Odd Couple Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, through Feb. 9, haletheater.org PAW Patrol Live! Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Jan. 19, 10 a.m., 2 & 6 p.m.; Jan. 20, 1 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 25) Robyn Hood The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Feb. 23, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org School of Rock Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Feb. 2, Thursdays & Fridays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Spamalot Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Feb. 2, dates and times vary, empresstheatre.com

LITERATURE

Celebrating the Political Kaleidoscope YWCA Utah, 322 E. 300 South, Jan. 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m., ywcautah.org Healthcare: Stories of Illness & Wellness Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Jodi Kantor Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., ecclescenter.org (see p. 25) Lisa Anderson & Susan Makov Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Jan. 19, 3-4 p.m., slcpl.org National Geographic Live: On the Trail of Big Cats with Steve Winter Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m., ecclescenter.org Ronan Farrow WSU Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, Jan. 19, 7 p.m., weber.edu (see p. 25) TEDxMarmalade: Satin Tashnizi Marmalade Branch Library, 280 W. 500 North, Jan. 19, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Walking the Tightrope: Contemporary Diplomacy in American Indian Country Gore School of Business, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Jan. 22, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org

Bill Laursen: Concept+Color+Composition Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Bryton Sampson: Plastic Portraits Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 14, slcpl.org Call and Response Studio Elevn, 435 W. 400 South, Ste. 304, Jan. 18, 5-10 p.m.; Jan. 19, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., art.utah.edu Candelaria Atalaya: Time & Light Souvenirs Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Chauncey Secrist: Retrospect in Me-Flat Minor 90 N. Main, Bountiful, through Feb. 15 Emma Goldgar: Chromatic Dreamscapes Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 6, slcpl.org The International Tolerance Project Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 23, umfa.utah.edu (see left) Jylian Gustlin & Jared Davis Glass: New Works Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through Jan. 24, gallerymar.com Kristeen Lindorff: My Journey with Pen & Ink Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, through Jan. 17, slcpl.org Lisa Anderson: Imprints: Phenomena in Nature Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 1, slcpl.org Nicholas Wilton: Orchestrated Moments Julie Nester Gallery, 1755 Bonanza Drive, Ste. B, through Jan. 22, julienestergallery.com Olivia Patterson: Artistic Musings of a Homeschooled Mind Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 3, slcpl.org Opposition Gallery Series: The Space Between Impact Hub, 150 S. State, Jan. 19, 1 p.m.-1 a.m., projectopposition.com Revolution Curated: Original Art of Yan’an’s New Society, 1955-1984 Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Feb. 27, culturalcelebration.org

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International designers—a piece by Mexico’s Alejandro Magallanes is pictured—present The Tolerance Project: Promoting Dialogue Through Design at Utah Museum of Fine Arts (410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, umfa.utah.edu), through June 23.

Marcus and Guy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Jan. 18-19, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Ms. Pat Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Jan. 18-19, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Stand And Deliver: Crowdsourced Comedy Improv Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com W. Kamau Bell Salt Lake Community College South City Campus, 1575 S. State, Jan. 17, 7 p.m. calendar.slcc.edu (see p. 26)

TALKS & LECTURES


Frozen treats to get you through the bleak winter months. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

I

find it hard to trust someone who only eats frozen treats when it’s hot outside—it’s the very definition of a fair-weather friend, and I’ll have none of it. Ice cream and its ancestors and offspring are at their most delicious when they’re not eaten out of necessity, and Utah—in all its ice-cream-obsessed glory—is home to some of the best purveyors of frozen treats in the country. Here are a few joints to help you appreciate the cold while we trudge through the dead of winter.

Monkeywrench

Before I visited Monkeywrench (53 E. Gallivan Ave.) and its effortlessly hip coffeeshop-meets-ice-cream-parlor vibe, I was a staunch believer that ice cream was the sum of its parts—and those parts had to come from a dairy. I mean, how can one make ice cream without cream? Well, Monkeywrench took my ass to task because, holy moly, does this place deliver the goods. Their plantbased vegan witchery isn’t limited to the ice cream and soft serve, either. One of my favorite items is the brownie à la mode ($6), which comes with a generous slab of toasty vegan brownie that’s topped with whatever flavor of ice cream they have at the time. I’m a bit of a purist, and if I’m chasing this brand of chocolate dragon, I like a scoop of vanilla with a drizzle of their chocolate sauce—yes, they have vegan chocolate and caramel sauce as well. The brownie is rich, loaded with dark chocolate, yet sweet enough to keep your taste buds interested. The vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce melt slowly over the top, so when you’re down to the last few bites, it’s all blended together in a cocoa-and-vanilla lovefest. Even as a die-hard dairy enthusiast, I’d put this up against any traditional brownie-and-ice-cream combo in town every day of the week. When you’re after something to tickle your tongue while you do some window shopping downtown, the double scoop in a homemade waffle cone ($6.25, pictured) is always a solid bet. The only problem with this option comes when faced with only choosing two flavors. If you’re too indecisive, $1.25 more gets you a third scoop, but they tend to frown upon requests that attempt to pile three flavors onto a single cone. I mean, that’s what I hear, anyway.

Normal Ice Cream

What started with a casual glance on Instagram has blown into a full-scale obsession. At first, I would stop by Normal Ice Cream (600 S. 700 East, normal.club) whenever I was shopping at Trolley Square, but now I find myself in full soft-serve-stalker mode. I’ll leave the house to shop, only to find myself lining up in front of the mirrored surface of their conspicuous, chrome-plated van. It all happened with my first taste of Normal’s signature dulcey dip—it jumpstarts the nostalgia of the zillion brown toppers that I found at my local Arctic Circle into something that makes me go weak

in the knees as an adult. This transcendent topping is flavored with the smooth, caramel goodness of dulce de leche, and simply getting Normal’s homemade vanilla soft serve enrobed in such decadence ($6) is enough to put this place on the map. A glance over Normal’s menu also reveals ice cream cookie sandwiches ($6) that create harmonies like brown butter ice cream and snickerdoodles, s’mores ice cream bars ($4) and the ultimate nod to treats of a bygone era, the choco taco ($7). Not only does Normal maintain a solid menu year-round, they’ve started to mix up their flavors in a big way this month. Every week, they have four or five new flavors of soft serve to experiment with—and we’re not talking about clichés like rum raisin or cookies and cream. Think more along the lines of Thai tea and pear—it’s vegan!—sorbet. If you have yet to check out what Normal is slinging, now’s a great time to catch up—but don’t blame me if you start showing up without any memory of how you got there.

Sweetaly

Sweetaly (multiple locations, sweetalygelato.com) has been around since 2015, when Francesco and Lisa Amendola opened their 3300 South location. As native Italians, they approach the art of gelato with passion, creativity and no shortage of discipline. Francesco studied with some of Italy’s most prominent gelato chefs before opening Sweetaly in Utah, and their menu reflects all that hard work. Just in case you missed out on the great American gelato boom a few years back, gelato is traditionally made with milk instead of heavy cream, which gives it a lower fat content. It’s also less frozen than ice cream, which gives it a creamier texture. In short, it’s such a hot frozen treat right now because it offers up a lot of flavor without all that fatty fat fat. Their menu also revolves around a scoop system—a piccolo ($3.40) gets you two flavors while a grande ($5.50) gets you four. It’s hard to go wrong here, but any combination of mascarpone and fruit always does me right. I got cherry gelato with my mascarpone during my last visit, and the tang of the latter complements those tart cherries nicely. Before your visit, remember that each scoop of gelato will only deliver a fraction of ice cream’s fat to your thighs—feel free to overindulge a little. CW

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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Churn Up the Volume


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GRAND OPENING SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION

801-969-6666

123 S. State Orem, Utah 84058

801-960-9669

Lunch Buffet: $8.95 Adults, $4.95 Kids, Mon-Fri 11am-3:30pm Dinner Buffet: $12.95 Adults, $7.75 Kids, Mon-Fri 3:30pm-9:30pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays $12.95 All Day / Take-Out: Lunch $4.75/lb Dinner $6.25/lb

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 29

Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

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801-905-1186

5668 S. Redwood Rd. Taylorsville, Ut 84123

3620 S. State Street SLC, Utah 84115

THREE LOCATIONS!

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3 6 2 0


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F O O D H E AV E N N A M R E G man Delicatessen & Restaura nt

Ger

the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Award Winning Donuts

Cake Decorating with Megan Whittaker

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

It’s a new year, which means everyone you love will get another birthday to celebrate—funny how that works, isn’t it? If you’re the type of person who sucks at getting gifts but has the wherewithal to follow a recipe and bake a cake, then this event is for you. Craft Lake City is hosting a workshop with professional baker Megan Whittaker of Noisette, who will set up shop at West Elm (51 S. Main) on Thursday, Jan. 17, to demonstrate how to artfully crumb coat a cake and frost it like a champ. The event starts at 6:30 p.m., and tickets can be purchased via craftlakecity.com.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

A LA MAISON by

Mindful Eating Class

There’s a lot of interesting psychology behind our eating habits, which extend far beyond the knee-jerk response to salivate when someone presents us with a plate of lasagna. Those interested in hacking their brains to gain a bit more control over their approach to food will want to check out Utah State University’s meditation-based mindful eating class which kicks off on Jan. 17 and takes place every Thursday through Feb. 7. According to the event description, it’s a general-education class for “individuals who want to learn to listen to their body to guide eating.” It’s a free class, but registration can be completed via Eventbrite. The class will be held at the Salt Lake County Government Center (2001 S. State) from 6 to 8 p.m.

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived 1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

Tu B’Shevat at Laziz

The Congregation Kol Ami Synagogue (conkolami.com) is hosting a celebration to honor the Jewish holiday Tu B’Shevat, otherwise known as the Jewish New Year for the Trees, at Laziz Kitchen (912 S. Jefferson St., lazizkitchen.com). Traditionally, Tu B’Shevat commemorates the trees that bloom earliest in Israel. As this holiday celebrates the fruit of these trees, Laziz Kitchen will prepare a meal made from exclusively vegetarian and vegan sources along with a selection of Kosher wines. In addition to a tasty plant-based menu, the night will be spent discussing issues regarding our responsibility to take care of the environment. The event takes place on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 5 to 7 p.m., and tickets can be purchased via the Congregation Kol Ami website. Quote of the Week: “A party without cake is really just a meeting.” —Julia Child Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

You’re cordially invited to

Dine Like Royalty

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive


Opposites Attract

How to pump up the flavor by drinking different varieties of beer. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

its sweet and spicy yeast character helps define the pineapple, banana and peach that emerge from the alcohol-laden beer. Since the aroma was so great, I thought I’d take a bigger-than-normal swig; 10.2 percent ABV isn’t exactly below my swigability threshold, but the experiment allowed me to take notice of the whole package. The taste starts with flavors of stone fruit—mostly peach— then quickly transitions into bubblegum and peppery clove-like yeast. As the beer warms, some honey and darker fruits make an appearance. Some hops provide a little balance, and some of that peach and pineapple from the nose come through to round it out. It’s solidly sweet through most of the

sip, with a drying finish, though it remains on the sweeter side. The contrast from start to finish, though, creates a slight puckering. Overall: This is one of the better tripels I’ve had in a while. It’s not overly complicated with extra spice additions and relies only on the malt, yeast and a good dose of Belgian candy sugars. The booze is well integrated, and many traditional tones come through. Both of these beers shine in 16 ounce cans, and both are finding fridge space in bars and restaurants all along the Wasatch Front. However, going to their respective sources will ensure the best drinking experience. As always, cheers! CW

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’ve found that one of the best ways to enjoy a variety of beers in one session is to go with contrasting flavors, one after the other. It keeps your tongue from getting bored and sharpens the palate. One of my favorite counterpoint combos is Pilsner and IPA. The hops in a traditional Pils alter the tongue just enough to make the IPA’s hops explode in the mouth (in a good way). Try it, you’ll see. This week’s selections aren’t nearly that simple, but the differences between these two new beers are guaranteed to bring out the best in both of them. Kiitos Pro-Am Winter Porter: This is the first of Kiitos’ Pro-Am Series of beers. This 7 percent ABV porter is brewed with coconut, coffee and cocoa nibs in collabora-

tion with Salt Lake City homebrewer Andrew Frost. Frost’s Frosted Morning Pow Porter won a gold medal at the Beehive Brew-Off, Utah’s preeminent home-brew competition last year. The Pro-Am beer is black with a subdued nose, showcasing mostly vanilla and roasted malt. Once in the mouth, bittersweet baker’s chocolate comes through at first, while the middle adds a small dose of caramel and coconut. These flavors play well with the cocoa from the top of the taste. Muddled coffee and light cream (which might be the coconut sweetness) round out the end. The beginning is solid, but the middle through the end is a little confusing and hard to dissect. The best part of the flavor is the lingering aftertaste, where big notes of dark chocolate combine with the mildly bitter coffee grounds along with a lingering, soft nuttiness. This beer gets much better as it nears room temperature; the coffee flavors become more pronounced and seem to smooth out and meld more completely with the rest of the beer. Overall: The drinkability is good for a 7 percent porter. There’s no discernible alcohol; the flavors end up coming together nicely after some warming and are interesting enough to keep me coming back again and again. Templin Family Brewing Albion: This has a golden cantaloupe color with eggshell white foam crowning a couple of centimeters above the ale. The aroma is fairly bold;

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

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18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 31

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Settebello

ALL YOU CAN EAT

HIBACHI

Mon - Thur: Fri - Sat: Sunday:

11:00am - 9:30pm 11:00am - 10:30pm 12:00pm - 9:00pm

3370 State Street #8 South Salt Lake, UT 801-466-8888 | Full liquor license

LUNCH - $9.99 DINNER - $19.99

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SAKURAHIBACHISLC.COM

100% gluten-free

This upscale pizzeria uses high-quality, often imported ingredients—including flour, prosciutto crudo, and Parmigiano-Reggiano from Italy—to craft its classic Neopolitan pizzas, which are cooked in a woodfired oven in less than a minute. Choose from classic toppings options, like the restaurant’s namesake Settebello pizza, which includes pancetta, sausage, mushrooms, pine nuts, and mozarella; or, opt for a white pizza. Settebello offers an excellent gluten-free crust; the menu also boasts a robust selection of salads and antipastos. For an after-dinner treat, pop over to conjoined Capo Gelateria and choose from the extensive, rotating selection of gelato and sorbetto. 260 S. 200 West, 801-322-3556, settebello.net

The Bayou

It’s “beervana” at The Bayou—with a selection of more than 300 brews, it would take nearly a year to try them all, although owner Mark Alston is always making additions to his impressive stock. Still can’t decide on a particular brewski? Download The Bayou app, which randomly selects 10 beers from the complete menu. The Bayou doesn’t just serve the Devil’s nectar, though. They also have an amazing dining selection of Creole and Cajun dishes, such as the Cajun chicken sandwich, served with spicy chicken, chipotle aioli, provolone and onions. 645 S. State, 801-9618400, utahbayou.com

Celebrat i

25

ng

32 | JANUARY 17, 2019

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

year

s!

ninth & ninth 254 south main

Pasta for the People since 1968

Oh Mai

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

Whether you have in mind the classic pho soup with fragrant broth, a banh mi sandwich served on a French baguette, or traditional noodle and rice bowls, Oh Mai has you covered on all things Vietnamese. The restaurant—which now has four Salt Lake Valley locations—first took off as a banh mi and sandwich shop, but now offers an extensive and delectable menu. Multiple locations, ohmaisandwich.com

Provisions

This American craft kitchen preaches seasonal, organic and locally produced ingredients. The houseinspired architectural design might even convince you that you’re sitting at your own dining room table. The small plates are all wonderful, including the steamed buns and roasted-beet salad, and larger appetites can indulge in heftier dishes like the braised rabbit cannelloni. 3364 S. 2300 East, 801-410-4046, slcprovisions.com

italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182 M ON-T HU 11a-11p / FR I -SA T 11a-12a / SU N 3p-10p


REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

Bhutan House

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

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Bhutan House serves the expected Indian staples, but also offers cuisine from Nepal and Bhutan, meaning there’s a lot to explore at Kamal and Geeta Niroula’s (pictured) Sandy restaurant. Fans of Indian food will recognize a large chunk of the menu, like lamb tikka masala ($15.45); the spiciest version just about singed my eyebrows, but with or without the extra dose of heat, it’s a rich, smoky blend of spices and flavor. The Bread Basket ($8.95) is like a naan variety pack, stocked with freshly baked slabs of garlic naan, whole-wheat roti and aloo paratha, which is a delicious mix between naan and samosas. A bowl of ema datshi ($15.95)—considered to be Bhutan’s national dish—is a veggie stew made with Bhutanese cottage cheese, peppers, potatoes and onions. The vegetable dumplings called momos ($10.45) here are different from those of the Tibetan variety—closer in size and shape to gyoza and served with a tasty condiment made from sesame seeds and cilantro. From the inviting, serenity-inducing interiors to the flavors culled from an Eastern cultural identity, Bhutan House is a great spot for fans of Indian food who are looking to expand their culinary horizons. Reviewed Sept. 20, 2018. 1241 E. 8600 South, Sandy, 801-679-0945, mymozo.com

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Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

SALT LAKE

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City Weekly is looking for a Driver for the

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SALT LAKE VALLEY AREA. Those interested please contact

ERIC GRANATO: 801-661-5219

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Drivers must use their own vehicle, be available Wed. & Thur.


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MUSIC

CONCERT PREVIEW

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

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enjoy great food & all the games on our 26 tvs

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wednesday 1/16

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/17 Reggae at the Royal

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amfs & long islands

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 1/18

RETRO RIOT DANCE PARTY WITH DJ JASON LOWE THE RETURN OF SYNTH-POP SATURDAY 1/19

Live Music

NATURAL ROOTS DAVERSE DUBWIsE monDAY 1/21

Live Music

The no body's lhaw the sleights suburban hell kill 1-2 many's TUESDAY 1/22

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM this weeks featured artists

neal & taylor from royal bliss coming soon 1/25 1/26 2/22 3/30 5/03

ginger & the gents zolopht / superbubble mushroomhead puddle of mudd Buckcherry

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

Cole Barnson returns to Utah and reboots his musical career with Kasadoom. BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

H

ow far does one wander when they strike out for new territory—and how long does it take until they, as Thomas Wolfe once wrote, look homeward, angel, once again? For Cole Barnson, leaving Utah first for Las Vegas and then for Los Angeles to chase his rock-’n’-roll dreams provided a formative education in “figuring shit out.” Touring heavily with indie rock bands Kid Theodore and Toy Bombs served as Barnson’s coming of age—with the inevitable cycle of highs and lows. “Oddly, the most influential people in my music career were met in some of those lows,” he says. “My first booking agent was literally the only person ... at a show in Connecticut, and I met a music supervisor in one of the other bands playing a partially promoted, poorly-attended bar gig. I feel like the universe rewards those who hustle. The key is making ‘your thing’ available and then working at it.” Barnson’s “thing” never took during his decade out West, though. He acknowledges the Springsteen-esque nature of his dream: Leave the stifling confines of Utah for the promised land of California, sign a record deal, shower in the money raining down around him, then rail against said record company for taking advantage of him. “What I ended up finding in Los Angeles was so much better,” he admits. “There’s an amazing network of artists and musicians with mountains of support in the community. L.A. gets a lot of shit for being shallow and fake, but a kind of yin and yang exists, with an equal amount of creativity and authenticity. The best stuff comes out of collaboration, be it active or passive.” That spirit of active collaboration—of turning a long-spurned dream into reality—motivated Barnson to start Kasadoom once he moved home to Utah in 2017. For this first musical project formed fully from his own ideas, Barnson says his years touring and hustling with Kid Theodore and Toy Bombs finally empowered him to write “the kind of stuff I want to write, not the kind of stuff I think you want to hear.” After a two-year hiatus from music, he recruited some of his favorite musicians around the Beehive State—Ryan Darton, Seth Stewart, Derek Gailey, Will Allmen and Russell Carroll—to bring Kasadoom to the masses. “The synergy level with these guys is off the charts,” Barnson says. “They just keep making better and better sounds.” Those sounds are on perfect display on the band’s debut four-song EP, which is steeped in the sonic traditions of underground garage rock and psychedelic pop, with electronic underpinnings. Barnson compares Kasadoom to “Brian Eno going through a rockabilly phase” and early Arcade Fire. He wrote the four songs with longtime friends Brandon McBride and Spencer Peterson before tapping Danny Kalb to handle the mixing and mastering process. Sego, Petersen’s current band, will perform with Kasadoom on Jan 18. at Velour Live Music Gallery in Provo “Sego has this great quality of creating accessible experimentation in their music. I feel like I was able to access a little of that through working with those boys,” Barnson says. “They did a great job at complementing my overall vision for these songs. It helps that they know I want everything to sound like Ray Davies wrote it.”  As for Kalb, Barnson gushes about his résumé, which includes

PARKER HADLEY

4760 S 900 E, SLC

Back in the Motherland

Cole Barnson of Kasadoom work for Ben Harper and Garbage, and the way he applied his skills to Kasadoom. “Danny is an amazing producer, and a better human being, who’s really sincere about what he’s working on,” Barnson says. “If you look at his track record, a lot of diverse and influential artists have worked with him because of that sincerity. When we brought ‘White Light’ and ‘Verona’ to him, they were pretty raw. One of them was still a voice memo on my phone. After a few days in the studio, we concocted what you hear today. Danny’s a real treasure—and he definitely has some blood in this EP.” Although the recording is relatively short, Kasadoom covers a gambit of deep issues: love and loss, politics and religion, drug use and abuse, the afterlife. “Maybe it’s our social climate, but my opinions on these subjects have become more and more fluid,” Barnson says. “Our culture seems more extreme and entrenched, and I find myself unsure about my personal reflections. These songs are less of a stance on any of these subjects and more of a critique.” He adds, “These songs are products of luck, instability and a slight obsession with Brian Eno’s Here Come the Warm Jets.” With regular gigs around Salt Lake Valley and the support of his family and friends, Barnson says he’s thrilled to be “back in my motherland playing rock-’n’-roll.” He and his wife have young kids, and they’re excited about exposing them to the same childhood touchstones they grew up with: Lagoon, Hogle Zoo, Zion National Park. “Our first year back, we did the whole Utah experience in record time,” he says. But it’s the thriving music community that really made Barnson happy to come to home. He says every show he plays at Kilby Court, Velour and The Urban Lounge gets him high on nostalgia. Shuttling north and south from his Riverton home, he thrives on the distinctive music scenes in Provo, Ogden and Salt Lake City. “Despite the stereotypes about our state, there’s always been a constant flow of solid, relevant music in and out of here,” he says. “What’s interesting to me now is the amount of success on a national level. Growing up, maybe I didn’t notice, but I can’t remember many bands breaking out of Utah—or even really wanting to. Now, there are artists from all genres doing really well after starting out in SLC or the Happy Valley. That’s a huge credit to our music community.” CW

KASADOOM

w/ Sego and Wallfly Friday, Jan. 18, 8 p.m. Velour Live Music Gallery 135 N. University Ave., Provo $10, all ages velourlive.com


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JANUARY 17, 2019 | 35


FRIDAY 1/18

2106 W. North Temple. Salt Lake City, Utah 801-741-1188

10% off for military, firefighters and law enforcement

Credit OFOAM—Ogden Friends of Acoustic Music—for serving up a superb headliner at this year’s annual SnOwFOAM party. R&B legend Booker T. Jones offers every reason to kick-start the winter party season thanks to his catalog of timeless tunes. One of the originators of the Stax sound, Booker T. & The MGs made instrumental music viable at a time when great singers dominated the charts. In addition, as a multiracial band—members included keyboardist Jones, guitarist Steve Cropper, bassist Duck Dunn and drummer Al Jackson Jr.—they were among the first outfits to feature both black and white musicians of equal status within the same ensemble. The list of artists they supported onstage and in the studio reads like a who’s who of American soul: Wilson Pickett, Sam & Dave, Otis Redding, Rufus Thomas, Carla Thomas and Bill Withers. But Booker T. & The MGs were more than merely a backing band. They scored several hits on their own, with “Green Onions” serving as their signature song. Locals might recall Booker T.’s outstanding performance at the Ogden Valley Roots and Blues Festival in 2015 and last year’s sold-out show at The State Room. His recent induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award ensure his immortality. (Lee Zimmerman) Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 7 p.m., $25 presale; $30 door; $23 students and seniors, all ages, egyptiantheaterogden.com

Wild Child, Batty Jr.

Austin, Texas, septet Wild Child lives up to its name, producing pop euphoria informed by nearly every strain of American music. But where their early work relied on a foundation of indie rock rowdiness, 2018’s Expectations more clearly integrates the R&B, soul and gospel roots of frontwoman Kelsey Wilson and the ukulele skills of fellow vocalist Alexander Beggins. The single “Sinking Ship” is particularly personal, building its beat off a sample of Wilson’s heartbeat and blending orchestral folk into a heartrending look at how love comes and goes— often violently and without warning. Engineered by in-demand producers like Chris Walla (Death Cab for Cutie), Chris Boosahda (Shakey Graves), Scott McMicken (Dr. Dog) and Adrian Quesada (Brownout, Black Pumas), Expectations struck a nerve with fans, racking up nearly 2 million streams in less than two months and landing single “Think It Over” on the AAA radio charts. Returning to Salt Lake City just nine months after their sold-out show at Kilby Court, Wild Child now headlines The State Room stage on Jan. 18—one day before their debut appearance on the prestigious TV show Austin City Limits finally airs. They’re triumphant and tender, so don’t miss Wild Child as they teeter on the edge of hard-won artistic maturity. (Nick McGregor) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroom.com

Wild Child

Booker T. Jones

SATURDAY 1/19 Wifisfuneral, Robb Bank$

Although he’s barely 21 years old, South Florida rapper Wifisfuneral is far ahead of his years when it comes to his complicated lyrical flow, his desolate beats and his level of success. Breaking onto the scene with no promotion and no fanfare beyond his own social media, Wifisfuneral’s first two independent albums, 2016’s Black Heart Revenge  and 2017’s When Hell Falls, sold well on the hip-hop charts, leading to a deal with legendary label Interscope Records. Two 2018 mixtapes—Boy Who Cried Wolf and Ethernet—earned Wifisfuneral a coveted spot in XXL Magazine’s Freshman Class and a star turn atop YouTube’s trending chart. That last metric of success reflects the zeal of Wifisfuneral’s fans, who’ve clung to this MC longer than other flavor-of-the-minute cloud rap sensations. The young maestro’s answer: Last fall’s Leave Me The Fuck Alone EP, which plumbed the depths of Wifisfuneral’s tormented mental state. There’s plenty of zeitgeist moments—no word on whether “Alone as a Facetat” is a takedown of today’s in-your-face rap look—and abrasive auto-tune, but “Pain” puts our man’s rapid-fire rhymes on display: “Listen, I was lost a lot/ Trapped in hell with no parking spot/ No pot to piss, they watched me rot/ I was rottin’ in my grave, I thought/ But it was back to reality, it kept me soft.” Don’t miss opener Robb Bank$, another fast-rising South Florida young gun with a confrontational style. (NM) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $19.50 presale; $50 VIP meet and greet, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

Wifisfuneral

SEBASTIAN RODRIGUEZ

Ostrich Buffalo Elk Venison Wild Boar Wagyu

PIPER FERGUSON

Booker T. Jones, The Legendary Joe McQueen Quartet

DANIEL MUDLIAR

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JANUARY 17, 2019 | 37

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31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

GOING


MAGDALENA WOSINSKA

TUESDAY 1/22 Dawes

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 1.16 JON O RADIO

1.17 KRIS LAGER BAND

1.18 STONEFED

1.19 TANGLEWOOD

1.21 OPEN BLUES & MORE

Dawes has come a long way since its emergence a decade ago. At the time, pundits were all too eager to point out a certain similarity in the band’s style to the sun-speckled, patchouli-patched sound of Laurel Canyon’s hipper denizens that took root in the hills above Los Angeles in the late ’60s and early ’70s. Although Dawes outgrew those references, the band has shared a sense of intimacy ever since, further illuminated through the gentle embrace of their last two albums, We’re All Gonna Die and Passwords. The band harbors no pretensions, but the rabid following they’ve gathered over the course of six full-lengths suggests they’ve attained an easily relatable niche nevertheless. “We’ve never been hip and fashionable,” guitarist Taylor Goldsmith says. “That’s allowed our relationship with our audience to be so much more genuine and authentic. The role that we play in people’s lives has been purely about the music, and that makes our dance with them that much more fun and that much easier.” Those fans clearly concur; despite the fact that Dawes opts for melody over mayhem, there’s a communal bond that turns each concert into a celebration of pure glee. “We were lucky that people took notice,” Goldsmith continues, insisting that the band eschewed any desire to become superstars. Still, give Dawes credit for succeeding by creating such a casual connection. (LZ) The Commonwealth Room, 195 W. 2100 South, 8 p.m., $32, thecommonwealthroom.ticketfly.com

Dawes

WEDNESDAY 1/23

Michal Menert & The Pretty Fantastics

Need a musical solution to our fractured, fragmented times? California-based musician and producer Michael Menert and his band The Pretty Fantastics have just what you’re looking for. On recent release From the Sea, the crosscurrents of jazz, hip-hop and electronica have never felt so synergistic, the groove-heavy tunes ebbing and flowing between chaos and clarity. Menert’s love of analog equipment and fastidious studies of both Eastern and Western traditions gives his music a global sheen, with guest vocalists and backing musicians kicking things up a notch thanks to a coastal California recording process that encouraged the embrace of good vibes and the refusal of negativity. Still, this is far more than just music to groove to; considering his work “philosophical poetry,” Menert says in a news release for From the Sea that, “We too often move through life on autopilot. When we stop and look back, it’s all a blur. This record is an exploration of how seemingly inconsequential moments ripple through time and haunt us. I want to help people realize that they’re not the only ones confused about how this is all supposed to go down. It’s universal.” (NM) Soundwell, 149 W. 200 South, 8 p.m., $16 presale; $21 day of show, 21+, soundwellslc.com

Michal Menert & The Pretty Fantastics

1.25 SCOUNDRELS

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

RYAN NELLI

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Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 VJ Birdman on the Big Screen @ 10:00pm

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER! 32 EXCHANGE PLACE • 801-322-3200

WWW.TWISTSLC.COM • 11:00AM - 1:00AM

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 39

WEDNESDAY:


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TUESDAY 1/22

CONCERTS & CLUBS

KAREN JERZYK

Amigo the Devil, Harley Poe, Folk Hogan

THURSDAY 1/17

FRIDAY 1/18

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman + Mindy Dillard (Rye) Crucial Showdown (Metro Music Hall) Gorgeous Gourds (Gracie’s) Kris Lager Band (Hog Wallow Pub) MarchFourth (OP Rockwell) Rita Coolidge (Egyptian Theatre) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Supersuckers + Thunderfist (Urban Lounge) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Van Larkin + Nick Johnson + Mia Hicken (Velour) Winter Sirens + Summer Bloom + Harbor Patrol (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves All Vinyl DJ (Twist) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Re:Fine (Downstairs) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51)

A Pink Floyd Tribute: Pigs Over The Depot (The Depot) Booker T. Jones + The Legendary Joe McQueen Quartet (Peery’s Egyptian Theater) see p. 36 Burnell Washburn (Metro Music Hall) Che Zuro (HandleBar) Colt. 46 (Outlaw Saloon) Farmboy (The Westerner) The Floozies + Powder Rangers 3 (Sky) Halogyns + The Rubies + Moodlite + Kirby Dorsey + Lauren Williams (Kilby Court) Hoppy + Subloser + Dadbod + Melancholy Club (The Monarch House) Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Mythic Valley (ABG’s) Nate Robinson (Legends) Rick Gerber (Harp and Hound) Riding Gravity + Dash (Ice Haüs) Rita Coolidge (Egyptian Theatre) Sego + Wallfly + Kasadoom (Velour) see p. 34 Seven Spires + AfterTime + Benview (Loading Dock)

NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

What the hell is “murder folk,” and how seriously can we take something that’s named after one of the grossest of sins? Whether or not Johnny Cash actually did shoot a man in Reno just to watch him die, the roots of the genre run back to the Man in Black. Today, Danny “Amigo the Devil” Kiranos leads the charge, incorporating key elements of gothic folk, Satan-obsessed country and bluegrass’ evil cousin, murdergrass, into his stark acoustic sound. Equal parts troubadour (think Tom Waits), balladeer (think Nick Cave) and rural truth-teller (think William Elliott Whitmore), Amigo the Devil cuts his music with darkness, delivering morbid lyrics injected with the blackest sense of humor this side of Reddit. Amigo the Devil’s debut album might be titled Everything Is Fine, but the irony is obvious to anyone who watches him take over a stage. Produced by metal maven Ross Robinson and featuring percussion from Rage Against the Machine’s Brad Wilk, Everything Is Fine hinges on lead single “Cocaine and Abel,” which builds on a finger-picked guitar line to include thrumming piano and weeping string arrangements before Amigo unleashes the hell within. “The confessions in the song [reflect] the process of personal change and hopefully growth, which is a strong theme throughout the record,” Kiranos says in a news release. “I was born impatient and I was born unkind, but I refuse to believe I have to be the same person I was born when I die.” Don’t miss this powerful show, upgraded to The Urban Lounge after Amigo wowed an intimate crowd next door at Rye Diner & Drinks last fall. (Nick McGregor) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $13 presale; $15 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com Sounds Like Teen Spirit (The Spur) Steve Schuffert (State Road Tavern) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Stonemary + Hotel Le Motel + Escher Case (Brewskis) Timeless (Club 90) Triggers & Slips (Garage on Beck) True Story (The Yes Hell) Van Larkins + Nick Johnson (Pale Horse Sound) Wild Child + Batty Jr. (The State Room) see p. 36

New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Retro Riot Dance Party feat. DJ Jason Lowe: The Return of Synthpop (The Royal) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY 1/19

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Bollywood Club Invasion Party (Urban Lounge) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Funky Friday w/ DJ Godina (Gracie’s) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Catch Fish (Harp and Hound) The Crystal Method + Loki + Dekai (Urban Lounge) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Disturbed + Three Days Grace (Vivint Smart Home Arena) Donner Pass (The Spur) Farmboy (The Westerner) Fat Candice (Ice Haüs) Hell’s Belles (The Commonwealth Room) Indie Fest feat. Indigo Waves + HBD + Muninn + Dante Filerio + Mia Hicken + The Housecats (Third Space Studios)

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CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Lil Jon (Park City Live) Live Trio (The Red Door) Magic City Hippies + Future Generations (The State Room) Metal Dogs (Brewskis) Michelle Moonshine + The Distillers (Johnny’s on Second) Natural Roots + Daverse + DJ Dubwise (The Royal) Nick Passey (HandleBar) Rita Coolidge (Egyptian Theatre) Snyderville Electric Band (Umbrella Bar) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Garage on Beck) Talia Keys (The Yes Hell) Talia Keys (Lake Effect) Tanglewood (Hog Wallow Pub) Tigerblood Rampage + Shit Dogma + The Wake of an Arsonist (The Underground) Tim Daniels Band (Legends) Timeless (Club 90) Wifisfuneral + Robb Bank$ (The Complex) see p. 36

WED. JANUARY 23RD

PRESENTS

COMING UP

1.22 - RICK GERBER

1.29 - TALIA KEYS

1.26 - THE SEXTONES W/ LE VOIR

2.1 - HOT HOUSE WEST

WWW.PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

Fri, Jan. 18th DASH W/

KARAOKE

RIDING GRAVITY

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51)

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Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) Lounge 40 + DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ‘80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Scandalous Saturdays w/ DJ Logik (Lumpy’s Highland) Sky Saturdays w/ Craig Smoove (Sky) Syndicate at Soundwell feat. Dimond Saints (Soundwell) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

FAT CANDICE FOLLOWING

kitchen open until midnight 7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 41

SATURDAY NIGHT COMEDY

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Sat, Jan 19th


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42 | JANUARY 17, 2019

RACHELLE FERNANDDEZ

BAR FLY

DUFFY’S TAVERN “The word elephant comes from the Greek word ‘elephas,’ which means ivory.” No, this is not me tipsily searching Google trying to impress our erudite City Weekly readers. This fact is brought to you by Duffy’s Tavern on Main Street. However, I will say that witnessing an elephant charge me in South Africa last fall was an experience crazy enough to make any person sober up. That memory rushes back to my conscious mind when I spot the red and white elephant logo emblazoned outside of Duffy’s. Immediately, I’m drawn in, and I’m not alone. Despite a recent snowstorm that slammed the city, plenty of patrons have also made their way to Duffy’s for pitchers of Squatters brew and delectable sandwiches. “It’s amazing what you guys can do with a toaster oven,” one patron proclaims after ordering the GLA sandwich, chock full of pepperoni and mozzarella. I follow suit and go heavy, giving the Mark Cleveland Special a try and chatting with one of the bartenders, Dakota, hoping he knows the story behind all of the tavern’s elephant symbolism. “No one really knows,” Dakota responds between refilling pints and delivering food. Out of nowhere, our chat is cut short from a shriek in the distance—a well-known patron named Sam just showed off a tarantula’s molted exoskeleton to a group of women near the bar. I wasn’t expecting such an authentic experience in a bar off good ol’ Main Street, but finally, my Mark Cleveland Special (toasted to perfection) is ready—and it’s worth every calorie. The multitude of sports memorabilia and elephant history snippets that line the bar keep reminding me of the moment I went face-to-tusk with that big African elephant. As in South Africa, there is never a dull moment at Duffy’s. (Rachelle Fernandez) 932 S. Main, 801-355-6401, facebook.com/duffystavernslc Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Last Call feat. DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Sunday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Nick Greco & Blues on First (Gracie’s)

Campdogzz (Metro Music Hall) Ghost Atlas + The Conscience + Amorous + Allies Always Lie (Kilby Court) The Hague + Sportscourt + Emma Park + Dead Metro (The Beehive) Jordan Matthew Young (Umbrella Bar) Jordan Young Quartet (Lake Effect) Juggalo Unity Tour (Liquid Joe’s) Mae + Matthew Thiessen (Urban Lounge) The No Bodies + LHAW + The Sleights + Suburban Hell Kill + 1-2 Manys (The Royal) Teresa Eggertsen Cooke (Legends) Tiny Meat Gang: Cody Ko + Noel Miller (The Depot)

MONDAY 1/21

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SUNDAY 1/20 LIVE MUSIC

Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Shannon Runyon (Legends) Sycamore Slim (Garage on Beck)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Cursive + Summer Cannibals +

Industry Night Mondays (Trails) Monday Night Blues & More Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

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TUESDAYS

NFL playoffs

CHAMPIONSHIP SUNDAY LA @ NEW ORLEANS 1:05PM NEW ENGLAND @ KANSAS CITY 4:40PM

Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic Night (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s) Tuesday Night Jazz (Alibi)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Liquid Joe’s) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 1/23 LIVE MUSIC

Jim Fish (Lake Effect) John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Kid Furey + Mixxer + DJ DiXon (Urban Lounge) Live Jazz (Club 90) Men in the Kitchen + Shrk (Kilby Court) Michal Menert & The Pretty Fantastics (Soundwell) see p. 38 Morgan & McCune (The Spur) Primitive Man + 2-Headed Whale + Glume (Diabolical Records) Timpanogos Big Band (Gallivan Center) YG (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Energi Wednesdays feat. Pegboard Nerds (Sky) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition)

JANUARY 17, 2019 | 43

165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE AT 8PM

Amigo the Devil + Harley Poe + Folk Hogan (Urban Lounge) see p. 40 Daniel Torriente (The Spur) Dawes (Commonwealth Room) see p. 38 Matthew Bashaw (Lake Effect) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow Pub) Nao + Xavier Omar (Kilby Court) Peter Murphy + David J (The Depot) Wolf Skin + Far From + Let’s Get Famous (Loading Dock)

WEDNESDAYS

LIVE MUSIC

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WIN JOHNNY CASH!

TUESDAY 1/22

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9PM - NO COVER

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam w/ West Temple Taildraggers (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)


Š 2019

SIGHT

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Indian state known for its tea 2. Words after a digression 3. Carmelo Anthony, when he played college ball at Syracuse 4. Prefix with plunk or plop 5. Big name in kitchenware 6. Kutcher's character on "That '70s Show" 7. "The Little Mermaid" mermaid

51. Onetime alternative to Facebook Messenger 52. Give a lift 53. Get some sun 55. John who sang "Bennie and the Jets" 58. Sugar and spice amts. 61. "Do ____ Diddy Diddy" (1964 #1 hit) 62. Poison ____ 63. One in la familia 64. "Am ____ risk?"

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

8. Word after big or oil 9. German's "Oh my!" 10. Tit for ____ 11. Bond portrayer after Brosnan 12. Gift in a Nativity scene 13. "Try to ____ my way ..." 18. That dude's 22. Climb 24. ____ Lingus 26. "____ I like to call it ..." 27. Initial venture 28. Small item dropped at Woodstock 30. Buxom 32. Ingredient in a Dark 'n' Stormy 33. Another name for the Furies 34. "____ knew?" 35. Great Seal image 36. Sagittarius 37. Crestfallen 40. Spice Girl Halliwell 43. Scintilla 45. What dogs' tails do 48. Dealt with 49. "Piece of cake" or "easy as pie" 50. Places for pedestrians to be alert, informally

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

CAMP COMFORT MUSIC

1. Stirred up, as memories 6. Jeweler's unit 11. Ruler divs. 14. Ogre with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame 15. "The Goldbergs" daughter 16. Bread for a Reuben sandwich 17. "Slumdog Millionaire" studio 19. "Come as you ____" 20. "Prince Valiant" son 21. River to the Seine 22. Nickname of the singer of 2007's "Umbrella" 23. ____ Millions (multistate lottery) 25. Charles Lindbergh's feat across the Atlantic 29. ____ Ewbank, 1969 Super Bowl-winning coach 31. One of the friends on "Friends" 32. Muzzle-loading tool 34. Costs of fighting? 38. Network showing "Suits" and "Mr. Robot" 39. Expresses boredom with 41. "Of course!" 42. Small version of a popular cookie 44. "And when we got to the village they ____ us ashore": "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" 46. Actor Sharif 47. "____ bing!" 48. Year "Rosemary's Baby" came out, in short 54. "American Gigolo" star 56. Sarah McLachlan hit that begins "____, I do believe I failed you" 57. Jacket 59. Knee injury initials 60. Triumph 61. On the horizon, maybe ... or a description of this puzzle's circled letters 65. Get dolled (up) 66. Alternatives to Nikes 67. Kind of diet replicating that of early humans 68. Mantra chants 69. Marriott alternative 70. Sirius XM radio star

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Writing at The Pudding, pop culture commentator Colin Morris reveals the conclusions he drew after analyzing 15,000 pop songs. First, the lyrics of today’s tunes have significantly more repetitiveness than the lyrics of songs in the 1960s. Second, the most popular songs, both then and now, have more repetitive lyrics than the average song. Why? Morris speculates that repetitive songs are catchier. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I encourage you Capricorns to be as unrepetitive as possible in the songs you sing, the messages you communicate, the moves you make and the ideas you articulate. In the coming weeks, put a premium on originality, unpredictability, complexity and novelty.

crammed with parasitic roundworms. It was a brilliant stratagem. The proposition spooked Bismarck, who backed down from the duel. Keep this story in mind if you’re challenged to an argument, dispute or conflict in the coming days. It’s best to figure out a tricky or amusing way to avoid it altogether.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): An imaginative 27-year-old man with the pseudonym Thewildandcrazyoli decided he was getting too old to keep his imaginary friend in his life. So he took out an ad on eBay, offering to sell that long-time invisible ally, whose name was John Malipieman. Soon his old buddy was dispatched to the highest bidder for $3,000. Please don’t attempt anything like that in the coming weeks, Cancerian. You need more friends, not AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In May 1927, Aquarian aviator Charles Lindbergh made a pioneering fewer—both of the imaginary and non-imaginary variety. Now flight in his one-engine plane from New York to Paris. He became is a ripe time to expand your network of compatriots. instantly famous. Years later, Lindbergh testified that partway through his epic journey he was visited by a host of odd, vaporous LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): beings who suddenly appeared in his small cabin. They spoke with In December 1981, novice Leo filmmaker James Cameron got him, demonstrating a sophisticated understanding of navigation sick, fell asleep, and had a disturbing dream. He saw a truncated and airplane technology. Lindbergh’s spirits were buoyed. His con- robot armed with kitchen knives crawling away from an explocentration, which had been flagging, revived. He was grateful for sion. This nightmare ultimately turned out to be a godsend for their unexpected support. I foresee a comparable kind of assistance Cameron. It inspired him to write the script for the 1984 film becoming available to you sometime soon, Aquarius. Don’t waste The Terminator, a successful creation that launched him on the road to fame and fortune. I’m expecting a comparable developany time being skeptical about it; just welcome it. ment in your near future, Leo. An initially weird or difficult event will actually be a stroke of luck. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): More than four centuries ago, a Piscean samurai named Honda Tadakatsu became a leading general in the Japanese army. In the VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): course of his military career, he fought in more than 100 battles. Yet Psychologists define the spotlight effect as our tendency to imagine he never endured a major wound and was never beaten by another that other people are acutely attuned to every little nuance of our samurai. I propose we make him your inspirational role model for the behavior and appearance. The truth is that they’re not, of course. coming weeks. As you navigate your way through interesting chal- Most everyone is primarily occupied with the welter of thoughts lenges, I believe that, like him, you’ll lead a charmed life. No wounds. buzzing around inside his or her own head. The good news, Virgo, is that you are well set up to capitalize on this phenomenon in the No traumas. Just a whole lot of educational adventures. coming weeks. I’m betting you will achieve a dramatic new liberation: you’ll be freer than ever before from the power of people’s opinions ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1917, leaders of the Christian sect Jehovah’s Witnesses proph- to inhibit your behavior or make you self-conscious. esied that all earthly governments would soon disappear and Christianity would perish. In 1924, they predicted that the ancient LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Hebrew prophet Moses would be resurrected and speak to people What North American community is farthest north? It’s an everywhere over the radio. In 1938, they advised their followers Alaskan city that used to be called Barrow, named after a British not to get married or have children, because the end of civilization admiral. But in 2016, local residents voted to reinstate the was nigh. In 1974, they said there was only a “short time remaining name the indigenous Iñupiat people had once used for the place: before the wicked world’s end.” I bring these failed predictions to Utqiagvik. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose your attention, Aries, so as to get you in the mood for my predic- that in the coming weeks, you take inspiration from their decition, which is: all prophecies that have been made about your life sion, Libra. Return to your roots. Pay homage to your sources. up until now are as wrong as the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ visions. Restore and revive the spirit of your original influences. In 2019, your life will be bracingly free of old ideas about who you are and who you’re supposed to be. You will have unprecedented SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Alaskan town of Talkeetna has a population of 900, so it opportunities to prove that your future is wide open. doesn’t require a complicated political structure to manage its needs. Still, it made a bold statement by electing a cat as its TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Movie critic Roger Ebert defined the term “idiot plot” as “any mayor for 15 years. Stubbs, a part-Manx, won his first campaign film plot containing problems that would be solved instantly as a write-in candidate, and his policies were so benign—no if all of the characters were not idiots.” I bring this to your new taxes, no repressive laws—that he kept getting re-elected. attention because I suspect there has been a storyline affecting What might be the equivalent of having a cat as your supreme you that in some ways fits that description. Fortunately, any leader for a while, Scorpio? From an astrological perspective, temptation you might have had to go along with the delusions now would be a favorable time to implement that arrangement. of other people will soon fade. I expect that, as a result, you will This phase of your cycle calls for relaxed fun and amused melcatalyze a surge of creative problem-solving. The idiot plot will lowness and laissez-faire jauntiness. transform into a much smarter plot. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Trees need to be buffeted by the wind. It makes them strong. As GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1865, Prussia’s political leader, Otto von Bismarck, got they respond to the pressure of breezes and gusts, they generangry when an adversary, Rudolf Virchow, suggested cuts to ate a hardier kind of wood called reaction wood. Without the the proposed military budget. Bismarck challenged Virchow to assistance of the wind’s stress, trees’ internal structure would a duel. Virchow didn’t want to fight, so he came up with a clever be weak and they might topple over as they grew larger. I’m plan. As the challenged party, he was authorized to choose the pleased to report that you’re due to receive the benefits of a pheweapons to be used in the duel. He decided upon two sausages. nomenon that’s metaphorically equivalent to a brisk wind. Exult His sausage would be cooked; Bismarck’s sausage would be in this brisk but low-stress opportunity to toughen yourself up.

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Thinking of buying a home in Provo or a condo in downtown Salt Lake City during a federal government shutdown? Here’s how I see the situation affecting real estate buyers and sellers: 1. Although you can still get home loans insured by the Federal Housing Administration and Veterans Affairs or through your local bank, credit union or mortgage broker, lenders can’t get your tax returns from the IRS to prove income. If the underwriter requires a certified copy of your taxes, you’re screwed. But ... 2. If you live in a flood zone, FEMA is still being funded because it’s part of the Department of Homeland Security­, thus you can get flood insurance for your loan. And ... 3. Zero-down rural development loans cannot be issued because the Department of Agriculture is not funded. If you’re not a buyer or seller but looking for low-income Section 8 housing, Housing and Urban Development is closed. Thus, there are no federal approvals for local housing authority inspections of new housing for rent, no new rent vouchers created for people who need gap funding, and possibly no rent subsidy checks sent out in February to millions of tenants who rent subsidized housing. In the meantime, you can marvel at some of the largest home and condo sales in Utah so far in 2019: n  Park City—Home: $11,600,000. A 14,000 square-foot, seven-bedroom, 10-bath mansion in Deer Valley. Condo: $8,400,000. A 5,400 square-foot, fourbedroom, five-bath place at the Montage Residences. n Utah County—Home: $3,620,000. A 14,000 square-foot mansion and equestrian estate with pastures on 3.38 acres in Mapleton. Condo: $599,900. A 2,850 squarefoot, three-bedroom, two-bath place at the Country Club Villas. n  Salt Lake City—Home: $3,600,000 on Walker Lane. Condo: $1,858,000 penthouse at City Creek. (That’s $971 per square foot!) What are the predictors saying for the Utah housing market in 2019? Unless the world blows up, prices will keep rising, but maybe not at such an aggressive rate as in the past few years. Mortgage interest rates climbed up to 5 percent but dropped this past week. I think interest rates will creep toward 6 percent or higher this year. I want to agree with 92-year-old Alan Greenspan, who said last month, “It’s over,” but my go-to guru, Sister Dottie S. Dixon, croons, “Utah is jus’ so damned poplar!”  n

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WEIRD

Regifted? Rakhi Desai of Houston didn’t think much at first of the gift she brought home from a white elephant party in mid-December—a brown stuffed bear with a stitched-on heart. As she looked it over later, Desai noticed the words “Neptune Society” stitched on its foot, “and then I started to feel, and it’s almost like little pebbles or rocks” inside, she told KTRKTV. That’s when it hit her: The bear was filled with someone’s cremated remains. The friend who brought the bear to the gift exchange got it at an estate sale, so Desai called the Neptune Society, hoping to reunite the bear with the family it belongs to, but the organization doesn’t track the bears. However, there is a name on the bear’s tag, and Desai is hoping to find the owner through that. “This bear is very special to somebody and belongs in somebody’s family,” she said. Weird Roundup On Christmas Day, the website Deadspin shared a “verbatim” list from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission of emergency room visits paid by Americans who inserted items into various body parts and shouldn’t have. Here follows an edited sampling. Into the ear: “Popcorn kernels in both ears, ‘feeds her ears because her ears are hungry’”; “Was cleaning ear with Q-tip, accidentally walked into a wall, pushed Q-tip into ear”; “Placed crayon in ear on a dare.” Into the nose: “Sneezed and a computer keyboard key came out right nostril, sneezed again and another one almost came out”; pool noodle; piece of steak; sex toy. Into the throat: mulch; “Swallowed a quarter while eating peanuts”; plastic toy banana. And finally, into the rectum: “Significant amount of string”; cellphone; Christmas ornament ball; “Jumped on bed, toothbrush was on bed and went up patient’s rectum.”

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Weapon of Choice Rogelio Tapia, 26, was arrested in Des Moines, Iowa, on Dec. 31 after a dispute at a QuikTrip around 3 a.m. The store clerk and witnesses told police Tapia chased the clerk around the store and assaulted him with a banana after the clerk tried to intervene in a domestic situation. According to KCCI, Tapia caused about $1,000 in damage; he was charged with assault and thirddegree criminal mischief. Bright Idea If super-sharp shears snipping near your ears isn’t enough of a rush, you might want to visit Madrid, Spain, and the salon of Alberto Olmedo, who uses ninja swords and blowtorches to cut hair. Claiming his approach is inspired by Renaissance tradition, Olmedo told Euronews that swords allow a hairdresser to cut hair from both sides of the head at once, resulting in a more even finish. He started perfecting the skill when he became “disillusioned with scissors.” Olmedo also offers a cut with claws worn on the ends of his fingers, and plans are in the works to bring lasers into his work. Armed and Clumsy Despite a flood of warnings from law enforcement about the dangers of shooting celebratory gunfire into the air on New Year’s Eve, an unnamed Kansas City, Kan., man just couldn’t resist. As he prepared to head outside at midnight with his .22-caliber handgun, he “sat the gun down in the couch [and] accidentally shot himself in the stomach,” tweeted Police Chief Terry Ziegler. The Kansas City Star reported Ziegler’s department conducted a “tweet-along” during the evening, with multiple reports of shots fired—so many that at 11:50 p.m., officers headed to a parking garage to take cover from the bullets that were expected to rain down at midnight. At 12:01 a.m., the department tweeted, “Gunfire EVERYWHERE.” Thankfully, no injuries were reported in the city as a result of the merrymaking. Great Art! You’ve seen photo books and calendars depicting swaddled infants surrounded with flowers. In Irmo, S.C., on Dec. 29, photographer Stephanie Smith re-created the look using her high school friend Nicole Ham, according to FOX13 News. Ham, who is “336 months old,” was swaddled in a pink blanket and wore a giant gold bow on her head as she lay within a circle of garland and flowers. A sign next to her read: “Loves—champagne. Hates— dating in 2018. Go Tigers!” “We couldn’t keep a straight face,” said Smith, adding that she and Ham are already brainstorming ideas for future funny photo shoots. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Weird Science On Jan. 1, Camron Jean-Pierre, an 11-year-old Brooklyn, N.Y., boy, lost his life after apparently suffering an allergic reaction to the smell of the fish his family was cooking for dinner, reported the New York Daily News. His parents used an unspecified medical device to try to help him, but he lost consciousness and emergency services were called. Camron was taken to Brookdale Hospital, but he couldn’t be revived. Scientists have noted that people with food allergies can react strongly to odors from food, and inhaling these odors can cause extreme asthmatic reactions.

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Which Witch? Tiffany Butch, 33, of Timmins, Ontario, Canada, might go down in history not for her psychic gifts, but for being the last person ever charged in Canada with “pretending to practice witchcraft.” On Dec. 11, Butch, whose nickname is the White Witch of the North, was charged under Section 365 of the Criminal Code for demanding money in return for lifting a curse. Two days later, that law was repealed. Marc Depatie, spokesperson for the Timmons police force, said Butch gave a customer “a sense of foreboding that a dreadful thing was about to happen to their family ...” But Butch denies the charge, saying other psychics framed her. “People proclaimed me a witch here and gave me a nickname, but I’m not a witch. I’m a psychic,” she told CBC News. Butch is scheduled to appear in court on Jan. 22.

Overreactions Alarmed neighbors in Perth, Australia, called police after hearing a child screaming and a man repeatedly shouting, “Why don’t you die?!” on Jan. 1, according to the Evening Standard. Multiple units of officers arrived at the property, only to learn that the unnamed man, an extreme arachnophobe, had been trying to kill a spider. His wife confirmed to police that her child had been screaming, and her husband apologized to police for the confusion. The spider didn’t survive.

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Likely Story Vanessa Elizabeth Helfant, 38, of Knoxville, Tenn., floated a “man bites dog” defense at her DUI hearing on Dec. 13, arguing that several parked cars struck her on March 25, 2017. The jury, however, didn’t buy her story after hearing evidence: Witnesses at the scene followed Helfant to her destination, and when officers arrived and knocked on the door, Helfant called 911 to report people knocking on her door. WATE reported that she eventually admitted that she had drunk half a pint of vodka and smoked marijuana. Helfant, who had no prior offenses, was convicted and faces at least 48 hours in jail and her license will be suspended for a year.

People Different From Us Asparagus is healthy and delicious. But for 63-year-old Jemima Packington of Bath, England, the columnar vegetable is much more: Packington is an asparamancer, a person who can foretell the future by tossing the spears into the air and seeing how they land. “When I cast the asparagus, it creates patterns and it is the patterns I interpret,” Packington said. “I am usually about 75 to 90 percent accurate.” In fact, out of 13 predictions she made for 2018, 10 of them came true. What’s in store for 2019? Packington tells Metro News that England’s women’s soccer team will win the World Cup; “A Star Is Born” will win an Oscar; and fears over Brexit will be largely unfounded. Oh, and asparagus will see an all-time high in sales.

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