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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

JAN. 10, 2019 | VOL. 35

N0. 33

Hobbitville’s LAST DAYS

Current tenants evicted, the future of fabled SLC community is now in the hands of probate court. BY DAVID HAMPSHIRE


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DID YOU KNOW UTAH RANK’S 5TH IN THE NATION FOR SUICIDE?

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY ALLEN PARK’S WANING DAYS

Fabled SLC destination is on the brink of becoming history.

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DAVID HAMPSHIRE

Cover story, p. 13 Twelve years ago, the former Park Record editor scored the sweetest of pads: a house in Allen Park, aka Hobbitville. Now, along with seven other remaining human tenants and four winged ones, he’s being forced out. To remaining trollhunting intruders, he offers the following warning: “No, Virginia, there are no actual hobbits in Hobbitville.”

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SOAP BOX

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Cover story, Dec. 27, The Year in Photo Review

Beer Nerd, Dec. 27, Hops and Spice and Everything Nice

This is awesome! @ROOTSHIGHCHARTER Via Instagram

Hits & Misses, Dec. 27, Sen. Mike Lee blocks another public lands bill

With politicians like Mike Lee and Jason Chaffetz, Utah needs nothing more for complete and total embarrassment. MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook What a whiner this author is. I can’t imagine being so angry about everything all the time. Hopefully Ms. Biele doesn’t have access to guns. RODNEY LAMBEAU Via cityweekly.net

News, Dec. 27, Pennant Penance

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It’s a damn shame if your editor didn’t submit your Chuck-A-Rama review to the Pulitzer committee. @SPRYUTE Via Twitter

2 01 6

Opinion, Nov. 14, White House Report: Trump’s Heart Condition

2 01 7

mired you and your wife. But, your petulant, jealous attacks on our president over the past two years against his accomplishments has been highly offensive. I thank God that you were defeated in the election. MARY CATHERINE FULLER, Las Cruces, N.M.

Shutdown Theater

Not only his heart, but his mind is at risk at well. He is the most uninformed person in the world, except possibly the Freedom Caucus. We are going down the tubes without a working government in place. It’s not the Democrats’ fault; it’s the President’s strong-arm tactics, and the Republicans’ acquiescence. It’s no way to run a world. CHAS MADDEN Via CW comments

Trump > Romney

Proud to have my snarky bullshit take on SLC’s future flag featured next to the hopeful, inspiring one Ella Mendoza created for City Weekly! It’s people like Ella that keep this place afloat. Salt Lake would be nothing without your hard work and vision. Thanks for everything you do. ROBIN BANKS Via Twitter

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Why don’t they make one that tastes like feces and coal for Trump supporters LYNN BAKER Via Facebook

@CITYWEEKLY

Well, Mitt, you have begun your first day as a senator from Utah doing exactly as was predicted. You have opened up by criticizing our president, Donald J. Trump. You had your chance at the presidency and you were unable to defeat an inexperienced, lazy street organizer. You sat in the debate with your superior attitude and lost the election for Republicans. For you to march into the Senate or give information to any of the fake news papers against the policies of the president is extremely despicable. Are you intent on replacing the negative, egotistical late senator, John McCain? I voted for you when you were a candidate for president. I ad-

As I write this, the U.S. government is in its 18th day of a putative “shutdown.” Some federal employees have been furloughed (sent home). while others are expected to show up each day but also warned to expect an empty pay envelope come Friday. The shutdown is set to become the second longest in history, surpassed only by a 32-day funding fight in December 1995 and January 1996. Does anyone want to bet against President Donald Trump holding out for the record? He likes doing things in a big way. It wouldn’t surprise me if he went for 33 days just out of the cussedness he’s known for. And at the moment, frankly, he’s winning this fight. To understand why, consider what he’s really after. Hint: It’s not just a border wall. On Christmas Day, Trump said that “many” of the furloughed/ unpaid government employees “have said to me, communicated, stay out until you get the funding for the wall.” Two days later, he tweeted “Do the Dems realize that most of the people not getting paid are Democrats?” He was right on both counts. A major component of federal employment is in law enforcement and corrections. Many of these people are, and others might well become,

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part of the “Trump Democrat” portion of his base that put him over the top in 2016. More funding for “border security” means more jobs in their line of work. If the shutdown pain isn’t too bad and doesn’t go on for too long, he’ll keep some of those government employees in, and move others into, his column for 2020. And even if the shutdown pain is bad or drags on, many of them will blame Congress, not Trump. After all, he’s “only” asking for $5 billion for the wall. That’s 1/200th of what the government spent on Social Security last year and about 1/800th of total federal expenditures. Pocket change! And Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi are holding their paychecks over it. Trump is also winning by signaling a divided Congress that things are going to start getting done his way or not getting done at all. It takes a 2/3 vote of both houses to override a presidential veto. Assuming Democrats (in-

cluding those posturing as “independents”) vote unanimously, forcing a spending deal on Trump that he doesn’t accept would require 55 Republican Representatives and 20 Republican Senators to defect. That’s incredibly unlikely. I personally don’t want Trump to get his wall, and I’d rather the federal government stayed “shut down” forever on general principle. But if I was a betting man, I’d bet that the shutdown will end with something resembling the wall funding he’s demanding and with a cowed Congress. You read it here first. THOMAS L. KNAPP, Director of the William L. Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy Journalism

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. We are an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, that also serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of Salt Lake City Weekly are available free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front. Limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of this oublication may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the publisher. Third-class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery might take up to one full week. All rights reserved.

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Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, GEOFF GRIFFIN, DAVID HAMPSHIRE, MARYANN JOHANSON, MIKE RIEDEL, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRYAN YOUNG, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION

Donnie Boy’s Visit with Santa

As visions of swirling sugar plums began to wind down, and elves took their well-deserved long winter’s naps, the White House Grinch still was tirelessly at work, axing his officials, cabinet and staff. As of New Year’s Day, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)—the largest humanitarian organization in the world—declared that the mass of displaced Trump officials and staff were “among the world’s largest refugee populations.” Tent cities, its spokesman noted, “are being created to house them, and food earmarked for Yemeni children is being diverted to the more-deserving victims of Trump’s vicious purge.” But, folks, the news isn’t all bad. In an unprecedented move to ensure a Happy New Year, Trump denounced Obama’s overly restrictive environmental regulations, and assured Americans, “What the last president did was a disgrace. My commitment is to ensure that adequate breathable lead will always be available as a key component of America’s fresh air, and the future leaders of the EPA will just have to remember to mind their own business.” He also made a rare admission: “I take full credit for the crash of the Dow. It was far too high, so, as your president, I took it upon myself to make a little correction. Did Obama ever do that? Not on your life!” (Now that’s what you call “ownership.”) Much like the deranged cousin of the Energizer Bunny, the batteries that power the (mostly mechanical) Orange Raccoon-Bandit Buffoon were showing no signs of dying.

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. Just when the festive drumbeat’s cadence had all but faded, his energy was magically regenerated, allowing him to work on new ways to horrify the cringing U.S. populace, offend the leaders of the world, and spread sheer terror among his most faithful supporters. Just in time for the holidays, he also announced U.S. withdrawal from Syria. It might have been a welcome Christmas message for tired soldiers, but it was an act of throwing the Kurds under the Greyhound Bus and grinding them up to re-pave bomb-damaged asphalt roads. (In response to the rising din of displeasure, Trump backed off a bit, swallowing at least some of his words in an appropriate show of reconsideration.) To his credit, he finally visited troops in Iraq. And, out of genuine deference, and as a message acknowledging Trump’s deity status, no Iraqi official felt worthy to meet with him, and finally advised him, “Take the crusaders with you when you go.” Despite his enthusiasm for hurting and terrorizing Americans and their friends, the overgrown toddler-president still possessed a bit of Christmas magic. Although the Secret Service opposed the idea, Trump made a wish they could not talk him out of. It had been a family tradition dating back to the first U.S. Trumps, so, after days of whining and tantrums, Donnie Boy’s head security man relented grudgingly. “OK,” he submitted, “we’ll take you to see Santa.” Insisting on his traditional visit with St. Nick, the Trump’s entourage descended on Macy’s in Manhattan. Clueless on the $1.8 million cost of the Air Force One flight, security measures and the motorcade expenses, the childking stood in line with the other drippy-nosed toddlers. After a short wait, and temporarily pacified with a Tootsie Pop, he made it to the front of the line and leaped into Santa’s lap. “Ow! Hey, watch it,” Santa howled. “Gotta watch the jewels, you know. What’s your name?”

“Donnie.” “Well, Donnie, have you been a good little boy this year?” Donnie’s head dropped. He smiled sheepishly and silently made sure that his fingers were crossed. Then he answered—a resounding, “Yes, Santa. I’ve been very, very, amazingly good.” Santa turned to the Secret Service “parent,” shielding his mouth and whispering, “How much budget are we working with?” “A lot,” the agent responded. “OK, my dear little boy, what are you wishing for Christmas this year?” “I want a little Lionel choo-choo train; I want a big parade; but, most of all, I want a wall.” “Sorry, kid,” Santa lamented, “can’t do it this year. Consider the train yours—maybe even a parade. But the wall …” Santa left his sentence dangling. Donnie launched into an angry tantrum, kicking the buckle from Santa’s belt and screaming, “You’re not the real Santa!” Then, angrily, he pulled the rubber-band tie from the jolly man’s beard. “See, I knew it wasn’t real,” he exclaimed. In the resulting scuffle, Santa retaliated, snatching the orange mop from the president’s head. “See,” said Santa, “two can play that game.” “I knew,” Donnie said, “that you weren’t the real McCoy … Hey, wait a second, I know you. What the hell are you doing here, Mike? OMG! A Santa at Macy’s! I haven’t even fired you yet. You’re still my VP.” “Well, Donald, a guy can’t play it too safe, and after what I’ve seen in the past, I figured I needed to develop some useful work skills and at least find a few prospective employers—just in case. Ho, Ho, Ho.” n

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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ADVOCATE FOR WATER

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“Water, water everywhere, and not a drop to drink.” That old saying could use a reboot because water isn’t everywhere anymore—and certainly not in arid Utah where climate change has done its dirt. At Channel Your Influence—Learn to Advocate for Utah’s Water, you’ll hear from the experts—the Friends of the Great Salt Lake and the Utah Sierra Club. Join this advocacy training to protect Utah’s waters. With the legislative session coming up, now is the time to deepen and develop your advocacy skills. This is not just about undrinkable water; it’s about ill-advised usage and waste. Patagonia Outlet, 2292 S. Highland Drive, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 7-9 p.m., free, bit.ly/2TtM4hJ.

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Yes, it’s coming! The 2019 Utah Legislature, with all of its important or ponderous new laws waiting to affect your daily lives. Find out now before it’s too late. Bills are being readied to diminish those citizen initiatives you passed in November—you know, redistricting, Medicaid expansion, medical cannabis. The United Way Legislative Preview Breakfast hosts legislative leaders who talk about advancing the education, financial stability and health of our families, neighborhoods and communities, while the League of Women Voters and American Association of University Women are hosting their Annual Legislative Preview at a morning bipartisan panel of legislators who will also take your questions. United Way: The Grand America Hotel, 555 S. Main, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 7:309:30 a.m., free, sforce.co/2Re0mqs. League: Girl Scouts of Utah, 445 E. 4500 South, 801-550-3585, Saturday, Jan. 12, 9-11a.m., free, bit.ly/2Fdgxx1.

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HITS&MISSES

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We read every day about the piles of garbage at our national parks, but we forget about the piles of garbage in the U.S. Capitol. These are the politicians who would rather focus on a female legislator’s use of the word, “motherfucker,” and Sen. Mitt Romney’s screed against the “president” than on any workable compromise to the budget impasse. Don’t they get it yet? This is a classic distraction technique, and might be the president’s only real skill. But our congress members need to look at the real problem. There are serious safety issues in national parks that require employees, former National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis wrote in The Guardian, and it’s not up to the kindness of strangers, which USA Today touts. We can talk about air travel safety, too, but it’s up to Congress to lead instead of grouse.

• •

• •

Moroni’s Mirage

Well, here we go again, and Marty Stephens, the former House speaker and now LDS church spokesman, is right. “It seems strange that there are those that don’t want us to be involved in the public arena when our views oppose theirs, but they do want us to be involved when they are hoping we’ll support their position,” he told The Salt Lake Tribune. The debate, of course, is about broadening the state’s hate-crimes legislation to include the LGBTQ communities. The first law Utah passed in the ’90s was revised in 2015, and is still largely unenforceable. But there are ways, and Sen. Daniel Thatcher, R-West Valley City, might get it done. He’s focusing on “victim targeting” instead of “hate crimes” to eliminate First Amendment concerns over free speech. But let’s focus on the real issue: the church. It wouldn’t matter what position it takes if lawmakers would vote independently instead of waiting for church pronouncements.

Ah, Polygamy

It was 123 years ago on Jan. 4 that Utah became the 45th state. Yea, Utah, except that we had to give up polygamy to do it. We say “except” because polygamy persists and news outlets like the Trib continue to write fondly, if nostalgically, about it. A front-page Sunday story in collaboration with The Guardian U.S. illustrates just how interested Utahns are in this banned-yetenduring practice—this time in Missouri. Maybe outsiders think of polygamists like the Amish, which they are not. But hey, it’s quaint. The Trib story did mention, way down, about sexual abuse and how law enforcement kind of overlooks polygamists until someone complains. Still, there seems to be a continuing appetite for news about these polygamist compounds and the men who purport to talk to God about “how great Thou art.”

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NEWS This Poll’s

ALCOHOL

for You

Utahns have another avenue to vent their liquor frustrations, but it only goes so far. BY RAY HOWZE rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

RAY HOWZE

N

DABC deputy director Cade Meier says he’s heard some of the comments from the survey before. But, he adds, “I need to have the funding in order to address issues. Everything costs money, and right now we’re doing the best we can with the budget we have.”

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 11

year. Final totals for the current fiscal year won’t be available until after June 30, but sales could reach even higher. The DABC plans to leave the online questionnaire up indefinitely. The agency has placed small placards and business cards at checkout lines to promote the online feedback tool. While the comments might not directly lead to changes, Meier says they don’t hurt, warts and all. He adds they haven’t noticed any trends regionally yet, but that could be because the system is still in its infancy. Rural stores tended to receive a higher numerical score—such as a 4 or 5—but some only received as many as seven responses. Once it collects enough data, the DABC can use it to help make decisions on where to allocate resources, time and money. Lenart points out “just the fact they’re even doing the survey is a positive step.” But as for the casual consumer’s or business owner’s seemingly futile hope the DABC changes its ways, it’s more of the same for now. In the meantime, if consumers can be more specific in their comments, Meier says, there’s a better chance they’ll be a catalyst for DABC changes. “The yelling and the screaming is fine, but I’m really looking for specifics,” Meier concludes. “If we can get down to having a real conversation, that’s the most helpful. I get that people feel passionate and feel strongly about what they’re trying to say, but when they get more specific in what they’re looking for, it’s truly helpful for us to address it.” CW

lies in how the DABC interprets state law. A lot of the comments, such as having cold beer in stores, could be construed as promoting the consumption of alcohol—a no-no in the eyes of the state. “Is that going to help people drink it more quickly?” she asks. “There are some things that are very obvious, blatant, statutory, brightline rules and then where I come in, is helping with interpretation of those statutes,” Lenart says. “Of course, my clients, we’re always trying to interpret the law to favor industry, whereas it seems like a lot of the DABC’s tendency is to default to the most conservative vantage point because that’s their job, that’s reflective of our conservative Legislature.” That’s perhaps why, she says, some of these requests haven’t been implemented before. Things like long lines and more in-store help, however, could be improved with money. In 2016, for example, Sen. Karen Mayne, D-West Valley City, introduced a bill that would have allowed the DABC to keep 15 percent of its gross profits. Previously, the DABC was required to turn over all of its profits to the state. Mayne’s bill failed to pass. In 2017, she sponsored Senate Bill 155 that allowed the DABC to keep $1 million for employee incentives, equipment purchases and technology upgrades. The law passed and has been in effect since July 2017. At the same time, liquor sales have been surging. In July, the DABC announced its sales for fiscal year 2017-18 reached a record of nearly $454 million, a 6 percent increase from the previous

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be ashamed of yourselves!” “Long lines and being treated like a second-class citizen by the Legislature and DABC leave me extremely dissatisfied. I appreciate you conducting this survey, but you need to drill down to the core issues which you are not addressing with the questions so far.” Some of those comments might not be surprising to shoppers or DABC staff, and Meier says he’d like to use the comments to help spur potential changes in state stores. The department, though, is limited by the Legislature, which determines its budget and promulgates rules, like the one that forbids liquor advertising. The customer observations aren’t new, Meier says. “I am hopeful that [the survey] may send a more clear picture of what people are looking for, and I view it as just another tool in our toolbox that we’re trying to use and leverage to our advantage.” Some requests, like more staffing, boil down to the budget. If the DABC wants to hire more people, it would need more money from lawmakers— and that’s easier said than done, Meier explains. “I don’t think the people are unaware of the challenges we face,” he says. “I’m always appreciative of the working relationship we currently have [with the Legislature] and am grateful for it, but I am looking for ways to better communicate our situation.” Tanner Lenart, a lawyer who specializes in helping clients navigate Utah’s liquor laws, says that while the survey could help promote change, the problem

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ew year, new you. At least that’s what Utah’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control could be thinking. At its monthly meeting in December, the department revealed data from the first responses it received in its new customer-satisfaction survey. The result: With more than 2,300 people answering the questionnaire since its October launch, the DABC was rated as a 3 on a 1-to-5 scale for customer satisfaction. That’s right in the middle, but it doesn’t quite tell the whole story. Hoping to improve on the old written comment cards, the DABC’s deputy director, Cade Meier, says he wants the online tool to become a department mainstay and offer customers a routine way to provide feedback. Meier previously told City Weekly he wants it to be a method “to address concerns, evaluate if we can fix things and give them a way to vent their frustrations.” And vent they did. Here is just a sample of the comments the DABC received and shared with commissioners: “Lack of refrigeration for beer. Deal killer for excellent beer.” “The beer selection is way too small. The hours open need to be extended beyond 7 p.m.” “The staff are amazing but they are overworked and underpaid [and] it is apparent there is not enough of them for the workload. Please hire more staff for their sake and ours. I have also heard, on the news, you were considering removing the information placards; please don’t as I rely on these for my purchases. Thank you for listening.” “For a highly profitable operation, this simply sucks. You guys/gals need to [be like] the Apple Store, not post-W WII Eastern Europe. Please get your act together and treat your customers with some simple respect, product knowledge and clean and delightful environment … with some parking that is not brim full of homeless people begging. It’s simply creepy that you allow this highly profitable enterprise to wallow in such lowbrow treatment. You should


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HOBBITVILLE‘S LAST DAYS

I

A STORIED HISTORY Dr. Allen, an Illinois-trained physician with eclectic tastes, acquired this piece of ground in 1931, 11 years after moving to Utah. Dr. Allen had a passion for exotic birds and compassion for those least likely to afford his services. During the Great Depression, that included a lot of people. “He was an up-and-coming young doctor with a big practice among the worker class,” his oldest daughter, Mary Rose Black, told me in 2009. “And he would make personal calls a lot … He never turned anybody down that needed him to come to their house.” When her father acquired this land, she said,

it was a small farm. The Allens—Dr. George, his wife, Ruth, and three children—moved into the barn near the west end of the property. “We lived there for about a year or so, and my little sister was born there,” Mary Rose recalled. “Father was so embarrassed because he was a doctor, but my mother refused to go to the hospital. She said she wanted her last child to be born on this property.” In the meantime, Scandinavian craftsmen were building an imposing log home for them nearby. “There was one in particular whose name was Mr. Eskelsen,” she said. “Very strange little bachelor guy. And he was an immigrant. But he knew how to build log houses.” In the 1930s, the Allens built a series of winding paths along Emigration Creek in the expanse of property east of the log house. They planted trees and shrubs and created nooks with benches and tables where visitors could rest. They built fountains. They added cages and nesting boxes for Dr. Allen’s growing collection of rare pheasants and other exotic birds. Every Sunday, the property was opened to the general public. Mary Rose remembers a sign out on 1300 East that said, “Visitors Welcome.”

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Allen Park, I witnessed this cycle over a couple of six-packs with Ruth Price, the granddaughter of Allen Park founder Dr. George A. Allen, and Ruth’s husband, Glen Becker. We sat in the dark on lawn chairs, not far from the back of the main house, drinking beer and waiting for the show to start. Glen waited until several intruders were almost parallel with our concealed spot. Then he opened up with a blast of his signature salty language through an electronic megaphone. The kids shrieked as if being confronted by the

ghost of Dr. Allen himself, turned around and skittered pell-mell toward the front gate. For the most part, these interlopers did little damage. However, my neighbor came out one morning to find his Toyota 4-Runner’s rear window shattered. On many nights, I’ve woken up to the sound of tires squealing and horns blowing. And, late one night, Glen intercepted a group of troublemakers who had hijacked the trailer holding my small sailboat and were gleefully wheeling it down the driveway toward 1300 East.

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On weekends during the summer months, their antics became an evening ritual. Around 10 p.m., teens looking for hobbits would swarm on the sidewalk outside the brick pillars leading into the park. Then, as if responding to a signal from the earth’s magnetic field, they would surge down the long driveway and past the main house that guards the entrance. It was a game. Ignoring “No Trespassing” signs, the kids would try to see how far they could venture in before they were detected. One evening during my first summer in

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have a confession: I once went 11 months without a shower. But before you judge, let me explain. For the past dozen years, I have been a resident of Allen Park, a quirky little private community off 1300 East, across from Westminster College. A couple of generations of teenagers know it better as Hobbitville, because, as the story goes, it’s a community of little people. I’ve never understood how this legend got started, but I can’t tell you how many people have looked crestfallen after I told them that no, Virginia, there are no actual hobbits in Hobbitville. Allen Park sits on a strip of about eight acres running west to east almost two city blocks along Emigration Creek. In addition to a main house, there are about 15 individual buildings—including a number of clapboard bungalows, which once contained about 30 apartments. At one time, the bungalows were well-maintained, the grounds were manicured and the property was brightly illuminated with a series of wrought-iron lamps on rock-and-concrete pillars. Today, the paint is peeling, the grass is losing ground to weeds, the lamps are gone and only eight of us live quietly in what was once a bustling community. It’s no wonder curious kids turned Allen Park into a de facto spook alley.

By David Hampshire

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Current tenants evicted, the future of fabled SLC community is now in the hands of probate court.

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Photos by Enrique Limón


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14 | JANUARY 10, 2019

Then and now: Once Dr. George A. Allen’s Xanadu, Allen Park’s manicured grounds have given way to a derelict wasteland. (Archival pictures via Allen Publishing Co., Special Collections, J. Willard Marriott Library, The University of Utah) The Allens, of course, had help. “There were lots of people that—they were quite honorable [but] they couldn’t pay their doctor bills,” Mary Rose said. “And some of them would come and say, ‘Can’t pay you money but I’ll work for you.’” With cash in short supply, the family found other creative ways to develop the property. They welcomed truckloads of soil discarded by nearby building projects. They also convinced street construction crews to dump unwanted road material in Allen Park. “And we’d have to run out with our picks and shovels and spread it fast,” Amy Allen Price, Mary Rose’s younger sister, said in a 1992 interview. “And then father would take the car and run back and forth over it. That’s how the road got built.” Meanwhile, Dr. Allen was already making a name for himself beyond the boundaries of his nascent community. In 1932, author J. Cecil Alter included him in a collection of biographies of local community leaders, citing his involvement “with nearly every important civic movement in recent years.” Among many other things, Alter gave Dr. Allen credit for conceiving the idea for the Salt Lake Zoological Society. He was its president when it broke ground for the Hogle Zoo. “Largely through his untiring efforts, this has developed into one of the most modern and complete zoos in the West,” he gushed. To generate interest in the new zoo, Mary Rose said, her father could be quite a showman. “At noontime, he would take an animal from the zoo—I think a young mountain lion or something like that—on a leash, and he would walk up and down Main Street with it. And people would [ask], ‘Hello, doctor, where did you get that?’” From time to time, Dr. Allen would also keep zoo animals on the property. Amy said the list included an elephant, a chimpanzee and several reindeer. The family also collected an unusual assortment of “pets” including a coyote, a sandhill crane named Sandy and a raccoon that sometimes followed the girls to school. He also served as president of the Sugar House Businessmen’s League, Alter wrote, “and it was largely due to his suggestion and assistance that a monument was erected to commemorate the founding of the sugar industry in Utah.” That monument still towers over the plaza on the southwest corner of 2100 South and Highland Drive. Mary Rose recalls going downtown with her mother to the office of the architect of the monument. “I was about 8 years old, I guess,” she says. “I remember her helping to plan that monument and planning how to make that square there.” Along with the monument and the derelict remains of his eponymous park, the doctor’s spirit lives on in other corners of the city. “Dr. Allen was instrumental in establishing Tracy Aviary,” Tim Brown, the organization’s CEO tells City Weekly via email. “In addition to providing financial support and guidance, Dr. Allen also allowed his good name to be associated with the organization and helped strengthen the Aviary’s connection among influential Salt Lake community members.”

THE BIRTH OF HOBBITVILLE

Beginning in the late 1930s, the character of Allen Park began to change. Dr. Allen started to collect old houses that had been built elsewhere and had outlived their usefulness. He had them trucked across town and installed on new foundations on the property east of the main house. One of the first was a log house built in the 1850s by pioneer Thomas Boam in what is now Holladay. During the 1940s, he acquired a number of old employee houses that had been built by a Kennecott Copper predecessor company in a town on the west side of Salt Lake Valley. “I think the house mover was a patient of father’s who couldn’t pay his bills,” Mary Rose said. “So he moved these little houses in here, in exchange … Gee, as a kid I’d wake up and see another house coming down the driveway on a truck.” Those little houses were cobbled together in pairs to create duplexes. Some fit together seamlessly; others made very odd couples. Dr. Allen named four of the buildings after his children. There was the Mary Rose, the Roberta (Amy’s middle name), the George Albert and the Sally Ann. A fifth building, that began life as a gas station, he named the Ethylene. Mary Rose recalled that one regular visitor to Allen Park was George Albert Smith, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1945 to 1951. “He would have his driver bring him out here in, mostly, early evening,” she said. “He liked to chat with father. I guess he was history-minded. And father certainly was … And George Albert Smith was a lovely old gentleman.” In his later years, Dr. Allen shared his passion for poetry with his visitors and renters, creating decorated concrete monuments inset with quotations. “Down in our basement he had a grinding machine,” Mary Rose said. “And mother would go down to the tile store and, in the dump behind the tile store, was the stuff—the leftovers … Father would go down in the basement and grind them off and make all his letters and so forth. And he would mix the cement by himself.” Today, you can find these monuments scattered around Allen Park. When Dr. Allen died in 1961, his wife, Ruth, took over the management of the property. By 1970, when college student Larry Warren moved into 1389 E. Allen Park Drive, Dr. Allen’s birds were gone, the “Visitors Welcome” sign had come down and the place was already showing signs of neglect. “I’d tell friends, ‘Drive [south] down 13th and you see Westminster on the right. Look left and see the grown-over bird cages and turn in there where it says No Trespassing,’” Larry says. “They kind of thought they were entering a horror-movie set,” he says. Everything was so overgrown and abandoned … It just gave off a creepy vibe from the street. And then, once you got inside, you went, ‘Wow, this whole thing is overgrown, and cool, and funky old log homes. Who’d


BOHEMIAN IDIOSYNCRASIES

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Along with the remaining eight human tenants, four winged ones—the last vestiges of Dr. Allen’s amatuer ornithologist past—will be forced out of Allen Park on Jan. 14.

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By 1992, Allen Park had caught the eye of David Stanley, then a professor of American literature at Westminster College. Stanley also taught classes in American folklore, and saw the weird little community across the street as an ideal subject for his students. “It’s what folklorists call an idiosyncratic environment,” he told me recently. “There was kind of a Bohemian side to Utah back then [when Allen Park was built] and Dr. Allen was part of that.” That spring, some of his students toured Allen Park with Amy Allen Price. A videotape of that tour is now in the Westminster archives. Some of Amy’s comments on that tape appear in this story. Stanley said he heard talk then about Westminster possibly buying the property from the Allen family. In April 2007, I was driving Pierre, my daughter’s red Mazda Miata convertible, down 1300 East when I spotted an “Apartment for Rent” sign on one of Allen Park’s brick pillars. I did a quick Uturn and rolled up to the log house. Standing in front of the house, surrounded by chickens, was Ruth Price, Amy’s daughter and Ruth Allen’s granddaughter. She looked at Pierre, looked at me and asked, “Are you a real-estate agent?” By that time, Price had become convinced that outsiders were conspiring to take over Allen Park. That belief might have begun when she heard, a few years earlier, about a suggestion in a 1992 Salt Lake City open-space master plan that a public-access trail could be built through the property. “Ruth Price … says she only recently found out about the city’s open-space plans put into law in 1992,” Scott Lewis reported in City Weekly in January 2001. “With the discovery, she began organizing local landowners and residents who fear Big Brother is threatening their security, property rights and perhaps even their livelihoods.” The city did nothing to allay her suspicions when, in 2008, it passed an ordinance adopting a riparian corridor overlay (RCO)

district restricting new construction along above-ground stream corridors including Emigration Creek. It clearly affected the resale value of Allen Park. By then, I had convinced Ruth that I was not a secret agent for Coldwell Banker and was ensconced in the Roberta, a charming two-bedroom cabin north of the creek. I was enchanted by the place. It felt as if I were living in the woods. In summer, the now-mature trees provided a canopy that blocked the heat of the sun and much of the cacophony of the city. In winter, a sunny day after a snowfall would turn Allen Park into a photographer’s fantasy. At noon and 5 p.m. each day, the gentle tones of Westminster’s carillon would waft over on the wind. I walked around Allen Park with a notebook, writing down all the engraved quotations I could find. Then, with the help of the internet and Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, I tracked down the authors: Alexander Pope, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Shakespeare and many others. One of my favorite quotes, near the roost on the south driveway, is from Rabindranath Tagore: “Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark.” A few monuments have fallen over in recent years. One, along the north driveway, now lies face down on the pavement. If you could somehow pry it upright, you would find a line from Edward Young: “Too low they build, who build beneath the stars.” Like a never-ending scavenger hunt, the more I walked around, the more I found. I also noticed that many of the house numbers were mounted on wooden panels. Accompanying the numbers were whimsical illustrations, some hand-painted with delicate strokes. One shows the silhouette of a cat and four birds perched on a fence, watching each other from a respectful distance. Although Dr. Allen’s fancy pheasants were long gone, Amy and Ruth kept a brood of peacocks and less-exotic fowl, including chickens, turkeys and geese. As time went on, I began feeding the birds, sharing the duties with Glen and another renter. I met a cast of colorful characters in Allen Park. There was Randall, who claimed he had been fine until a bite from a brown recluse spider sent him off the deep end. We nicknamed him Rando after he started patrolling the place at night, dressed in black leathers, an assault rifle slung over his shoulder. There was Daniel, who lived for a while in the Roost, the old barn near the front entrance, and was assigned to keep the gatecrashers out. His weapon of choice was the machete, though I don’t think he ever used it on anybody. Then there was Ruth. Oh, Ruth. You were a force. You could charm me one day and berate me the next. But I took it all in stride. I soon discovered that maintenance in Allen Park could be a little sporadic. In 2010, I noticed a crack in the fiberglass tub in my bathroom and notified Ruth and Amy. Three years later, the crack had become a chasm and water was pouring out, causing the floor to buckle. Glen removed the tub and the toilet. Ruth gave me a key to the vacant apartment next door so I didn’t have to pee in the bushes. Thus began my 11 months without a shower. At least not in my own home. I waited. I waited some more. Finally, after about five months, I had a toilet. But it took another six months to finish the tile work and hook up the new tub. In the meantime, my girlfriend Lynne, bless her heart, let me use her shower. During my years in Allen Park I have seen many people throw up their hands and move out. But a few of us persisted, convinced that the magic of our Sugar House sanctuary far outweighed the headaches. One of those survivors is Gretchen Graehl, who moved into the George Albert fourplex almost 13 years ago. I asked her to share some thoughts about life in Allen Park. Here are excerpts from her response: “As Amy advanced in years, I helped her on occasion with errands and bookkeeping,” she wrote. “I got to know her as a tough pioneer woman—with the dust of the trail still clinging to her skirts—and as a former socialite. I learned she was once a fashion designer and model in San Francisco. She always took a keen interest in what I was wearing. She often mused on joyful childhood memories, spending time alongside her father as he created Allen Park. She had her own pet turkey, which she rode as if it were a pony.

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have thought this would be in the middle of a city?’” At that time, Allen Park was known not for its hobbits but for its hippies. “I know my neighbor was a big pothead,” he says. “There was always a plume of pot smoke in my neighborhood.” He remembers Ruth cruising the property in her big green station wagon. “But she wouldn’t drive out on the street, so her whole driving world was inside Allen Park,” Larry says. “Even with that limited amount of space, every once in a while she would run low on gas. And then she would give me some money and I would run it down to the Conoco a block away and fill it up. Then she was good for another few weeks.” He recalls rent was about $80 or $90 a month, which included heating. Like other units in the park, Larry’s place was heated with a small natural gas furnace mounted in the crawl space. The heat came up through a metal grate in the floor. “I remember, the first time I turned the heat on and got up in the middle of the night, I stepped full weight on the heating grate and the bottom of my foot looked like a grilled steak,” he says. Lesson learned, during the winter months, he would climb out over the end of the bed to avoid any further flesh-grilling incidents. Larry moved out in 1972 and went on to a career in broadcast and print journalism that allowed him to hang his hat in several homes. “I do remember, of all the places I lived, it was by far the funkiest, most unique, one-of-a kind property,” he says. Dr. Allen’s wife, Ruth, was a gifted artist who grew up in Chicago and was a fashion illustrator for some of that city’s best known department stores. Later in life she became known as an outstanding wildlife artist, contributing illustrations to a familyowned publication devoted to exotic birds. Ruth died in 1985. A year later in Utah Holiday magazine, Ken Kraus wrote an insightful piece on Allen Park noting that Dr. Allen’s heirs were struggling to resolve the future of the property. He speculated that the end could be near. “Now believed to be worth about a million and a half dollars, this oasis, this safe harbor from the city, this eight-acre parcel of prime real estate, could be leveled,” he wrote.


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Author David Hampshire “Her home was a cabin of curiosities, exhibiting layers of history: her father’s exotic bird and other animal taxidermy, commingling with white doves cooing in the background; a bear-skin rug casually draped over the balcony banister; and life-size portraits of Amy’s parents, Dr. and Mrs. Allen, flanking either side of the double staircase, along with a glamorous portrait of Amy. “Crossing the bridge to my place is like passing through a portal into another land,” she continued. “The rushing of the creek below washes away the stress of the city. From my windows, I see a thicket of trees, flowing water, a few of the original Allen Park houses, and the peacocks, who routinely come by to say hello … “The house I live in has been here since the ’30s, and since then, generations of students, artists, hippies, college professors, party animals, recluses, misfits, survivalists and other interesting characters have occupied the same cabin … On a regular basis, many of these former residents drive by to visit the cabin they so fondly recall. With few exceptions, they express surprise at how little some things have changed over the years.”

BETWEEN A PROBATE AND A HARD PLACE About three years ago, Amy suffered a stroke, moved into an assisted-living facility, and died not long afterward. Then, last summer, Ruth also died, leaving Glen to run the place by himself. I suspected then that our days in Allen Park might be numbered. Still, it came as a shock when, on Dec. 6, I came home to find this notice from Four Winds Realty taped to my front door: “You will please take notice that as of the 31st day of December 2018, the end of your current rental period, your right to occupy the premises … will be terminated and you are hereby required to vacate said premises …” This was followed by some aggressive legal language threatening me with treble damages if I failed to comply. Merry Christmas! In response to my angry reaction, and those of other residents, Four Winds gave us a couple more weeks, moving our deadline to Jan. 14. That means that, when this story appears in print, we will be bracing for our reentry into the real world. It turns out that the ownership of Allen Park and several other family properties is being settled in probate court. Mary Rose, the last survivor among George Allen’s four children, still owns a piece of the pie. So do other members of the Allen clan. The court has appointed a private company, Stagg Fiduciary Services, to serve as the personal representative for Amy’s estate. According to utcourts.gov, the responsibilities of a personal representative include contacting heirs and creditors, taking inventory of the estate, paying taxes, selling property to pay taxes or debts, and distributing the remaining proceeds to the heirs. Stagg, in turn, hired Four Winds Realty to take over the management of Allen Park. It looks as if the scenario anticipated more than 30 years ago by Ken Kraus is finally coming to pass. I wanted to know what might happen to the property, when the case might be settled and why it was necessary to boot out the tenants before its future had been decided. So I called up

the person who, as I understood it, was calling the shots: Becky Allred, partner and manager at Stagg Fiduciary. It was a short conversation. She told me that probate is a private matter and, besides that, Stagg was too new to the case to answer any questions about it. “We’re moving as fast as we possibly can. That’s about all I can tell you,” she said. Among those concerned about the future of Allen Park is Kirk Huffaker, executive director of Preservation Utah (formerly the Utah Heritage Foundation). Huffaker says that, over the years, he’d had two conversations with Amy and Ruth to discuss options for the stewardship and preservation of the community. “Obviously, those things didn’t happen,” he says. “But I feel like the place has the potential to continue to be a unique residential community that preserves that rustic and authentic quality of many of the original buildings and I think, with the right development approach, could balance preservation with some additional improvements.” Huffaker says that approach might include new buildings of a relatively small scale. “You’d have to do some things, probably, to enhance the property economically. But I think, really, what I’d like to see is a balance there.” Both state and federal governments offer preservation tax credits, he says. “The ideal developer of this property is someone who is in it with a long view,” he says. “This is not something to buy, hold onto for two or three years, and turn over to some other big conglomerate.” Joel Paterson, Salt Lake City zoning administrator, says that putting a public trail through Allen Park, as suggested by the city’s 1992 open-space plan, would require the cooperation of the property owners. “So, yeah, it would be fantastic to have a trail along that section along the creek, but there’s nothing in the works at the moment, certainly, to try to push that through,” Paterson says. When I asked him for an example of that approach, he pointed to the Federal Heights subdivision in the foothills near the University’s block U. “As that subdivision was being developed, the city worked with the developer to provide an easement and helped develop the trail that goes through that subdivision,” he says. “It’s part of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail connection.” Paterson notes that the 2008 riparian corridor overlay district would limit new construction in Allen Park, specifically within 50 feet of the high-water mark of Emigration Creek. However, he says that the district makes allowances for “lawfully established structures” built before 2008. “So, certainly, the structures that are existing in Allen Park would be able to be renovated, repaired and maintained.” Whether that happens remains to be seen. But many former residents of this odd little community will, no doubt, smile and nod in agreement with the words longtime resident Gretchen Graehl used to wrap up her eloquent essay: “May the magic continue.” CW


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WEDNESDAY 1/16

One part cheerleader, one part mad physicist, one part satirist and several parts stand-up comedian, Doktor Kaboom (real name David Epley) entertains audiences in the guise of a manic German scientist obsessed with sharing his weird experiments with audiences young and old. Best not to ask how he adopted his stage name—suffice to say it had to do with a demonstration gone wrong—but his ability to educate and entertain simultaneously with catapults, air cannons and, naturally, chemical reactions breaks down the barriers between fact and frenzy. Bedecked with signature goggles, orange lab coat, goulish-looking gloves, motorcycle boots and turnip-top hair, he’s not exactly the kind of doctor you’d consider first for a house call— unless, of course, you’re willing to give yourself over to mayhem. He’s no Mister Wizard, no Bill Nye the Science Guy, and certainly no Captain Kangaroo. He appears far more intimidating, but as he assures audiences early in his show, “It’s just rocket science”—a ready retort to those who say acquiring knowledge should be hard. The Doktor incorporates stand-up comedy, interactive stagecraft and a love of science into an eccentric—and attention-grabbing—show that offers life lessons to both the young and impressionable and their begrudging parental units. Given that he takes his name from his explosive personality—and that hapless victim of the aforementioned experiment gone astray—when he implores the audience to shout its approval, simply say, “Yes Doktor,” and quickly comply. (Lee Zimmerman) Doktor Kaboom @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Jan. 12, 2 p.m., $5-$12, tickets.utah.edu

Who said the party has to stop on New Year’s Day? Under the glittering stars of Ogden’s Peery’s Egyptian Theater, six world-renowned dancers from Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York City and San Francisco keep the festive atmosphere going as they take the stage for An Evening of Burlesque. Sponsored by Endless Indulgence Retro Wear, an Ogden boutique specializing in high-end vintage reproduction clothing, the evening features bawdy humor and the classic tease-of-the-fan dance—a number in which performers dance on stage with two large and elaborate fans and not much else. It also includes new twists on the genre, including aerialist performances. This show, the first of its kind at the Egyptian, is hosted by pinup model and performer Ms. Redd (pictured). Other performers include Harvest Moon, Bettina May and Michelle L’amour and Kalani Kokonuts—winners of the 2005 and 2009 Miss Exotic World competition, respectively. The show also features a male burlesque dancer, Mr. Gorgeous—a multi-award-winning performer who has strip-teased his way into the Burlesque Hall of Fame three times. For those willing to pay a bit extra for a VIP ticket, the doors open at 5:30 p.m. for an hourlong meet-and-greet beginning at 6 p.m. VIP ticket holders have a chance to get their playbills signed by the performers, take pictures with them and fill up on some hors d’oeuvres. And— because what kind of burlesque show would it be without alcohol—enjoy the cash bar. (Kylee Ehmann) An Evening of Burlesque @ Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-689-8700, Jan. 12, 8 p.m., 21+, $35-$100, egyptiantheaterogden.com

A cruel prince. Treacherous faerie realms. Palace intrigue. And one mortal girl, striving to belong in a world where she’s not welcome. These were the driving plot elements of Holly Black’s first young-adult fantasy novel, The Cruel Prince. Now, in her sequel, The Wicked King, our girl hero Jude must protect her brother and fend off a traitor—by binding herself to the wicked faerie king and controlling the faerie kingdom from behind the scenes. The faerie realm—and, more broadly, the world of fantasy—is a place Black is accustomed to visiting. Her long bibliography includes the acclaimed middle-grade Spiderwick series, which takes place in a realm between human and faerie and was adapted into a popular movie. Lest you think Black’s work is solely relegated to the kid-lit realm, her Cruel Prince series takes on decidedly adult themes. Join Black and Utah’s own Ally Condie at The King’s English to discuss Black’s series. Condie published the wildly popular young-adult Matched series; Black’s Cruel Prince series carries similar dark, dystopian undertones, and like Matched, features a young, determined heroine. But Black does not put romance at the fore; tor.com described the first book in the series as “the platonic ideal of a coming-of-age novel set in faerie,” and in the second book, Jude must navigate the complicated eddies of attraction and power in order to survive in the faerie world. Kirkus Reviews describes the book as “a heady blend of courtly double-crossing, faerie lore, and toxic attraction.” Perhaps a bit of faerie escapism is what we all need right now. (Naomi Clegg) Holly Black with Ally Condie @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 14, 7 p.m., free; book purchase required to secure spot in signing line, kingsenglish.com

In the spring of 2009, Mark Oram and Alex Ungerman, inspired by faculty at Utah Valley University, co-founded the Grassroots Shakespeare Co. Their first production that summer was Much Ado About Nothing. Nearly 10 years later, there are Grassroots Shakespeare Cos. in Utah, Arizona, Alabama and London, but the company is going back to its roots with a series of performances of Much Ado About Nothing Jan. 16 to 19 in Utah County. The Grassroots group looked to the American Shakespeare Center and its philosophy of, “We do it with the lights on.” With universal lighting, the audience can see the actors, and vice versa. The result is an interactive theater experience with give-and-take between the performers and those encouraging them. Grassroots likes to keep things moving at a brisk pace while staying true to the Bard’s language and plots. They usually perform in openair spaces, so a chance to see them indoors at SCERA is a unique opportunity. That setup should work well with a mischievous rom-com like Much Ado About Nothing. Beatrice and Benedick are tricked into professing their love for each other. Claudio rejects Hero at the altar in the mistaken belief she has been unfaithful. Hero’s father pretends his daughter is dead. Beatrice and Benedick set things right, Hero and Claudio get back together, and everybody ends up dancing. How could you not have fun? (Geoff Griffin) Grassroots Shakespeare Co.: Much Ado About Nothing @ SCERA Center for the Arts, 745 S. State, Orem, Jan. 16-19, 7:30 p.m., $10-12, scera.org

Doktor Kaboom

An Evening of Burlesque

Holly Black: The Wicked King

Grassroots Shakespeare: Much Ado About Nothing


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JANUARY 10, 2019 | 19


A&E

Geek Sneak Peek What to look forward to in 2019.

801-394-4891

147 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT

Kingdom Hearts III

Dungeons & Dragons: Fifth Edition

WALT DISNEY CO.

bookedon25th.com

DC’s Shazam!

this year, starting with Captain Marvel, their first female-led superhero film. Then we get the conclusion to last year’s incredible Avengers: Infinity War with Avengers: Endgame. After that, a new Spider-Man movie. These promise to bring more than 10 years of storytelling to some sort of conclusion and springboard into the next phase—and are unlike anything else in film right now. In comics, the Uncanny X-Men is getting relaunched, and Wolverine is getting resurrected. Let’s hope Spider-Gwen gets resurrected, too. 1. Star Wars: 2019 might be the biggest year ever for the Star Wars universe. Not only do we have the final installment of the Skywalker saga coming out with the as-yet untitled Episode IX in December, we have so much more to look forward to. First, there are the new television offerings. Star Wars Resistance will finish up its first season and likely begin a second. The Clone Wars will get a highly-anticipated seventh season after years of cancellation, wrapping up the Clone War saga and bridging the series into the events of Revenge of the Sith. We also have Jon Favreau’s The Mandalorian to look forward to on the soon-to-launch Disney streaming service, which will take us to the farthest reaches of the galaxy in a series starring Game of Thrones alum Pedro Pascal. And that’s just in the realm of motion picture entertainment. We haven’t even mentioned the single largest land expansion ever in Disneyland’s history. Or that Marvel is continuing to kill it with comic book offerings, and Del Rey is releasing two books about three of my favorite characters: Queen Amidala, Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jinn. And there’s more, from video and board games to YouTube shorts and all points in between—a real embarrassment of riches. There’s so much good stuff coming in 2019, I have to fight to keep the smile off my face. Whatever it is you’re looking forward to most in 2019, be sure to enjoy it. Life is too short to spend consuming stories you don’t like. And if it turns out you don’t like something, don’t dwell on it; just move along, like the Stormtrooper says. CW

Captain Marvel

The Mandalorian

MARVEL STUDIOS

N

ow that 2018 is finally in the rearview mirror, it’s time to ponder what the new year has in store. There’s no reason to think the only entertainment we’ll have in 2019 is waiting for Robert Mueller to pull the proverbial trigger. This year is chock full of geeky goodness, and I’m here to give you a list of the things we should collectively be most anticipating. 5. DC: DC doesn’t have the best track record for quality movies, but the trailers for Shazam! look like they’ve finally cracked the code. It looks fun and good. They’ve also got Joker coming out, with Joaquin Phoenix in the titular role, promising an interesting take on the classic villain. In the realm of their actual comics, Detective Comics (the flagship title from which DC gets its name) is releasing its landmark 1,000th issue, and it looks to be a doozy, with contributions from luminaries across the comics industry. I’d also keep an eye on Brian Michael Bendis’ relaunch of Young Justice. 4. Kingdom Hearts III: There will be many video games released this year, but my money is on this being one of the most anticipated and, eventually, most popular. It’s been more than 10 years since the last Kingdom Hearts game was released, and there’s a thirst for it. Kingdom Hearts is a collaboration between Disney and the makers of the Final Fantasy games and is part cartoon (classic Disney characters roam around lands that replicate the most iconic landscapes in Disney’s oeuvre) and part roleplaying game in which players take on unspeakable forces of evil. Since this is the first iteration of the game to come out for nextgeneration consoles, I fully expect it to blow minds. 3. Dungeons & Dragons: Tabletop roleplaying games have taken over the world in the last few years thanks to a couple of things. First, Dungeons & Dragons: Fifth Edition, released in 2014, is the easiest, most streamlined and most fun version of the game that’s ever come out, and it’s sold more copies than anything the company has ever released. Second, there’s a proliferation of YouTube videos that show celebrity gamers (and actual celebrities, in many cases) playing the game and showing people how it’s done. With rumors that they’re releasing a new setting for the game in 2019, this might just be the year of the RPG. 2. Marvel: Marvel promises three incredible theatrical releases

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

LUCASFILM

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE Supporting authors from “shithole” countries

WIZARDS OF THE COAST

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20 | JANUARY 10, 2019

BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS


moreESSENTIALS

Multimedia artist R.Ariel visits for an art installation, book tour (promoting her novel No One Likes Us) and musical performance, also featuring local bands, for one night only at Art Access Gallery (230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, accessart.org), Sunday, Jan. 13, 7:30 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

DANCE

Repertory Dance Theatre’s Ring Around the Rose: Malialole Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Jan. 12, 11 a.m., rdtutah.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Janalyn Guo: Our Colony Beyond the City of Ruins The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 10, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com RuthAnne Snow: When the Truth Unravels

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 21

Brown Bag Organ Recital First United Methodist Church, 203 S. 200 East, Wednesdays at noon, through May 22, firstmethodistslc.wordpress.com Faculty Chamber Recital BYU Madsen Recital

Allen Strickland Williams Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 15, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Andy Woodhull Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Jan. 11-12, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Dry Bar Comedy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Jan. 11, 8 p.m.; Jan. 12, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Roy Wood Jr. Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 11-12, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

COMEDY & IMPROV

Annie Jr. On Pitch Performing Arts Center, 587 N. Main, Layton, through Jan. 14, dates and times vary, onpitchperformingarts.com Die Fledermaus UVU Ragan Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Jan. 16-19, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu Evening of Burlesque Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Jan. 12, 8-9:30 p.m., egyptiantheaterogden.com (see p. 18) Grassroots Shakespeare Co.: Much Ado About Nothing SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, Jan. 16-18, 7:30 p.m., scera.org (see p. 18) I Do! I Do! Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, through Feb. 9, Mondays, Fridays, & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., terraceplayhouse.com The Lion in Winter Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Jan. 19, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org New Horizons Theatre Co.: Clean Up Artists Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, Jan. 11, 7 p.m.; Jan. 12, 2 p.m., midvalearts.com The Odd Couple Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, through Feb. 9, haletheater.org The Very Hungry Caterpillar Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Jan. 12, 1:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

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THEATER

Hall, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Jan. 15, 7:30 p.m., arts.byu.edu Family Concert: Soar: Fantastic Flying Friends Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 12, 2 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org The Sound Bath Experience Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Jan. 16, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Utah Symphony: Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 1 Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Jan. 11-12, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org

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R. ARIEL

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


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22 | JANUARY 10, 2019

moreESSENTIALS The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 11, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Tiana Smith: Match Me If You Can The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 12, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Holly Black with Ally Condie: The Wicked King The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 14, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 18) Yamile Saied Méndez: Blizzard Besties Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Jan. 16, 7 p.m., provolibrary.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKET

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 270 S. Rio Grande St., through April 20, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

La Fiesta del Mariachi SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, Jan. 11, 7-9 p.m., scera.org Lady Wild Film Festival WSU Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, Jan. 12, 6:30-9:30 p.m., andshesdopetoo.com Winter Festival Wasatch Mountain State Park, 750 Homestead Drive, Midway, Jan. 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., stateparks.utah.gov Yule Ball Noah’s Event Venue, 322 W. 11000 South, South Jordan, Jan. 12, 2-11 p.m., noahseventvenue.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Doktor Kaboom Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 12, 2 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 18) Wasatch Speaker Series: James Comey Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Jan. 15, 7 p.m., wasatchspeakers.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Bryton Sampson: Plastic Portraits Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 14, slcpl.org Candelaria Atalaya: Time & Light Souvenirs Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Feb. 23, slcpl.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Daniel Everett: Security Questions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org DeConstructed Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Jan. 11, slcpl.org Emma Goldgar: Chromatic Dreamscapes Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 6, slcpl.org Jylian Gustlin & Jared Davis Glass: New Works Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through Jan. 24, gallerymar.com Kelly Baisley & Virginia Catherall: Sense of Place, Great Salt Lake Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Jan. 11, visualarts.utah.gov Kristeen Lindorff: My Journey with Pen & Ink Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Jan. 17, slcpl.org Molly Morin: Information Density UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Nicholas Wilton: Orchestrated Moments Julie Nester Gallery, 1755 Bonanza Drive, Ste. B, through Jan. 22, julienestergallery.com Olivia Patterson: Artistic Musings of a Homeschooled Mind Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 3, slcpl.org Pop-Up Installation & Music: R.Ariel, Kafari, Adult Prom, Drive 45 Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, Jan. 13, 7:30-11:30 p.m., accessart.org (see p. 21) salt 14: Yang Yongliang Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 2, umfa.utah.edu Small Works Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Jan. 12, modernwestfineart.com Statewide Annual Exhibition Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Jan. 11, heritage.utah.gov Those Who Can’t Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Feb. 3, urbanartsgallery.org Tom Judd & Kiki Gaffney: Point of View Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Jan. 12, modernwestfineart.com UMOCA at Trolley: Rendezvous Trolley Square, 602 S. 700 East, through Jan. 26, utahmoca.org Vincent Mattina, Etsuko Kato & Bill Dunford Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 22, saltlakearts.org Wesley Daugherty: Exploration of Creativity Main Library, 210 W. 400 South, through Jan. 21, slcpl.org


JOSH SCHEUERMAN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

W

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Sunday, 4-9 p.m. Best bet: Anything that features the word “Szechuan” Can’t miss: The silky, spicy, sexy mapo doufu

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 23

bassador to China will do the trick. I’m talking about Jon Huntsman Jr., whose accolades are immortalized on a plaque in the dining area. This establishment, it turns out, is a favorite of Utah’s former governor, which is high praise considering he’s a connoisseur of local flavor and a world-traveling diplomat.

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If all this talk of mouth-numbing culinary foreplay gets your engine revving, then Szechuan Garden (1275 E. 8600 South, Sandy, 801-233-0027, szechuangardensandy.com) needs to be on your 2019 must-visit list. In the event that my recommendation isn’t enough, perhaps that of a former am-

hile I have yet to try all eight great regional cuisines of China, I know that the Sichuan region’s food is currently the one to beat. It’s a cuisine renowned for its deep exploration into the wonders of pungency and heat, perhaps most prominently displayed by the Sichuan peppercorn. These small, berry-like peppercorns are famous for imparting a boozy, numbing sensation to the entire mouth, which takes a little time to get used to. I like to see these as a primer of sorts—something that helps prepare the taste buds for an onslaught of smoky heat that would otherwise overwhelm the senses.

another balanced mix of heat, flavor and texture. It’s served sizzling in a clay pot and looks deceptively like barbecued spare ribs. Based on my experience, ordering multiple items in one sitting has an interesting effect on the taste buds— those numbing peppercorns like to play tricks on the senses. Some bites felt spicier than others, some were smokier and still others highlighted a pleasant saltiness. This experience of surrendering your tastebuds to the magic of that Sichuan chile oil is perhaps what makes the Sichuan cuisine so desirable. Each bite is just a little different, and there’s really no way to predict when you’re going to be hit in the back of the throat with some unexpectedly pungent heat. If you appreciate spicy food that prefers subtlety over trying to burn a hole in your chest, it’s time to take a trip down Sandy way. CW

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Sandy’s Szechuan Garden turns up the heat to electrify the tastebuds.

tofu, softened to a silky texture from its time spent wok-frying with a spicy gang of ground pork, chile oil, Sichuan peppercorns, garlic and bean paste. It arrives slathered in an angry-looking red broth that almost dares you to snag a cube of quivering tofu and pop it into your mouth. The moment that the mixture hits your tongue, your sense of taste gets hijacked by those peppercorns. At first you resist, but once the chile oil starts to seep into your taste buds, you’re grateful for that extra layer of numbing protection. Zipping around the menu, anything with the word “Szechuan” in the title is going to be a safe bet. The fish fillet in Szechuan chili sauce ($14.95) is perhaps one of the more luxurious options. The thin slices of fried fish fillet are doused in that same chile oil and peppercorn mixture and served with green peppers, onions and dried chile peppers. I dug into this after my time with the mapo doufu, so my mouth was already primed for the extra dose of heat that the dried chiles impart. The fish is tender, and its fried outer layer is the perfect texture for sopping up all that delicious sauce. Additionally, the eggplant with Szechuan garlic sauce ($7.95) is yet

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Sichuan and Only

While it’s a good bet that he and I wouldn’t see eye to eye on political matters, I can’t help but think we’d get along when it comes to food. I’ve seen a similar plaque at Curry in a Hurry, which has made me start to see Huntsman’s seal of approval in the same way that I’d view one of those signed posters of Guy Fieri from Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Szechuan Garden shares a building with Bhutan House, and it’s put the unassuming eastside strip mall they both call home on my radar. The Garden’s interior is awash in deep reds and greens—a sneak preview of the colors that will inevitably end up on your plate, with red chiles and green scallions omnipresent. Gigantic displays of 3D wall art dominate the main dining room, and curtains separate this room from a smaller banquet area used for private parties and the karaoke nights that appear and vanish based on a seemingly unwritten calendar. For those after a quick, concentrated jolt of Sichuan flavor, start with the minced meat with bean curd ($7.95). This is otherwise known as mapo doufu—or pockmarked grandmother’s tofu if you prefer—and it’s one of the region’s flagship entrees. It’s a bowl of cubed


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BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Santo Taco Opens

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

I’ve been keeping an eye on this Rose Park taqueria, and, as of press time, it looks like Santo Taco (910 N. 900 West, Ste. B, 801-893-4000, santotacos.com) is scheduled to open on Tuesday, Jan. 15. Based on its tasty website photos and positive Instagram updates— hello, patio warmers!—we should be enjoying its tacos al pastor sometime this week. Thus far, I’ve become enamored with their pics that show demonstrations of everything from posole to the Yucatán cochinita pibil— not to mention the fact that they’re planning on being open 24 hours on Fridays and Saturdays. I’m always happy to welcome another taqueria to Salt Lake and look forward to checking this place out at 3 a.m. on Saturday morning.

The Angry Korean BBQ Opens

Another noteworthy addition to Utah’s restaurant scene is The Angry Korean (11587 S. District Main Drive, Ste. 300, South Jordan, facebook.com/theangrykorean), a Korean barbecue spot that has evolved from a popular local food truck. The brick-and-mortar store opened in mid-December, and has been cranking out Korean classics like japchae and bulgogi while fusing these traditional flavors with burgers and cheesesteaks. As of Jan. 2, it’s now open for lunch and dinner, according to a Facebook post with a photo of one fantastic-looking take on a Philly cheesesteak. If you’re looking for a tasty bite after catching a movie or doing some shopping at The District, take a moment to stop by and get Angry.

Designer Cookie Decorating

Jeanette Durham and Laurie Thompson, the sisters behind Blyss Cookies, are kicking off a series of cookiedecorating classes at the Gygi Culinary Arts Center (3500 S. 300 West, 801-268-3316, gygi.com) starting Tuesday, Jan. 15, at 1 and 6 p.m. Blyss Cookies has become known for its colorful use of airbrushing and royal icing, and the owners have partnered with Gygi to share this knowledge with the rest of us. Classes will extend into February, and tickets can be purchased online at gygicookingclasses.com. Attendees learn the basics of the airbrush technique and leave with a whole satchel of hand-decorated designer cookies at their disposal.

Dine Like Royalty

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Celebrati

n 2 5 y

g

24 | JANUARY 10, 2019

You’re cordially invited to

the

ears

!

Quote of the Week: “A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand.” —Barbara Johnson Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

ninth & ninth 254 south main


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GRAND OPENING SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY LOCATION

801-969-6666

123 S. State Orem, Utah 84058

801-960-9669

Lunch Buffet: $8.95 Adults, $4.95 Kids, Mon-Fri 11am-3:30pm Dinner Buffet: $12.95 Adults, $7.75 Kids, Mon-Fri 3:30pm-9:30pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays $12.95 All Day / Take-Out: Lunch $4.75/lb Dinner $6.25/lb

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 25

Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

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801-905-1186

5668 S. Redwood Rd. Taylorsville, Ut 84123

3620 S. State Street SLC, Utah 84115

THREE LOCATIONS!

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3 6 2 0


Hopkins Brewing Co. brings hyper-local beers to Sugar House. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

O

n the last day of 2018, Utah added one more brewery to its record-breaking list of debut beer joints. Hopkins Brewing Co. seemed to come out of nowhere, due to the efforts of some dedicated homebrewers and a little help from Epic Brewing Co. Epic has had some difficulty at its Sugar House location (formerly The Annex), but beer enthusiasts Chad Hopkins and Teddy Walton (picture, top left) approached the brewery’s owners with a solution to their problem: The two entities would team up and create a brand-new brewery based on the

good beer with a solid mix of different hop qualities all around. Hopkins Bourbon Barrel Porter: It pours a dark brown color with more than a finger of beige head. The nose has notes of roasted malt and cocoa, which are also present throughout the flavor profile, with whiskey notes becoming more apparent after it warms. The finish is bitter with slight lingering bourbon notes. Overall, a straightup roasty porter with enough bourbon qualities to make it different. Hopkins Smoked Porter with Jalapeño: The aroma is driven by a refined leathery roastiness; char, tobacco and chipotle bring clarity and roundness. The flavors follow the nose, with an added tickle from the chipotle creeping in. The smooth leatheriness from the chiles plays off the chocolate and malt of the base porter without dominating and finishes with a rather bitter roast character. Overall, the chile addition is great, with little heat. Hopkins Old Merchant Nitro Cream Ale: It pours a hazy orangeyellow with two fingers of dense nitro foam and has very light aromas of lemon citrus and cracker malt. The taste is more assertive but still light, like most cream ales. Earthy

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26 | JANUARY 10, 2019

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

MIKE RIEDEL

New Year, New Beer

hyper-local concept that’s driving the craft beer industry right now. “We have no plan to distribute,” head brewer and co-owner Hopkins explains; “we just want to stay small and serve the Sugar House community with fresh beer and rotating taps.” I got the chance to try their new 4 percent suds, and here’s what you can expect. Hopkins Friendly Introduction Pale Ale: The beer pours a slightly hazy amber orange, with a creamy off-white foam head. It smells like grapefruit, mild orange citrus, some sweet malt and woody/ floral grass; it tastes like grapefruit peel, sweet malt, and some spice, with floral pine and earthy grass. It’s light-bodied and creamy with low carbonation. Overall, a nice and refreshing pale ale. Hopkins NAIPA: It pours a dark honey-orange color with a foamy tan head. Aromas of biscuit, citrus fruit and floral tickle the nostrils. The taste is much the same, with biscuit, floral, citrus zest and pine needle flavors on the finish. There is a mild amount of bitterness on the palate with each sip. This beer has a lower level of carbonation with a slightly crisp mouthfeel. Overall, this is a pretty

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malt with a light citrus hoppy character shows up in the finish, making it definitely more malty than hoppy. Overall, it’s light bodied with high drinkability. Hopkins Coffee Cream: Light in color, but then the smell of coffee hits you nicely; not overpowering, but not subtle either. The taste is where the subtlety of the coffee is, which is perfect, as I didn’t want it to dominate. The La Barba coffee addition is very easy to

drink; creating a nice representation of a coffee-infused cream ale. Overall, coffee fans will rejoice. The seven-barrel brewhouse currently has beer flowing from all eight tap handles and a full kitchen with comforting pub fare for hungry patrons. You can find Hopkins Brewing at 1048 E. 2100 South in Sugar House, open 11 a.m. to midnight. Welcome to the Utah beer family and, as always, cheers! CW


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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Rose Establishment

Located at the west end of Pierpont Avenue, The Rose Establishment offers an artsy and hip take on the casual coffee shop and fits right in with its artcentric neighbors. Try the Hojicha latte with candy cap mushrooms, turbinado sugar, salted cacao bitters and nutmeg. For those on the hungrier side, the Rose serves brunch and lunch until 4 p.m., offering delicious options, such as the smashed avocado tartine, ham frittata or a grapefruit and avocado salad. The Rose also offers rental options for parties and weddings. 235 S. 400 West, 801-208-5569, theroseestb.com

Serving classic Italian cuisine Beer & wine available Open seven days a week 11a-11p 11a-12p 3p-10p

(801).266.4182 | 5370 S. 900 E. SLC

italianvillageslc.com

801-466-8888 | Full liquor license

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SAKURAHIBACHISLC.COM

This movie-theater-turned-restaurant serves fresh and unique pizzas and calzones. Start off with their breadsticks and Killer Cheese Dip: artichoke heart, spinach and sun-dried tomatoes mixed into three melty, delicious cheeses. Move on to a specialty pizza like the pesto chicken or enjoy your selection in calzone form. You can also have complete control with the build-your-own option. Wash it all down with a local brew. 2010 S. State, 801-483-2120 The century-old log mansion in Millcreek Canyon that’s home to Log Haven is known for its beautiful ambiance and fine dining, and as one of Utah’s premier destinations for weddings and other special events. With impressive indoor and outdoor venues surrounded by foliage, it feels like another world just minutes away. Plus, their wine list is impressive and their food is superb—try the bacon-wrapped elk strip steak. 6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, 801272-8255, log-haven.com

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

JAN 11TH

Tin Angel

@

JAN 2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC 12TH FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

crazy woolf

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

Tona

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 27

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

Tony Chen and Tina Yu’s sushi restaurant is one of the hottest and busiest establishments in Ogden. The extensive tapas list includes a delicious gyoza plate (pan-fried pork potstickers with sesame-seed vinaigrette); charred Brussels sprouts (with fresh basil, lemon zest, diced chili and sweet soy) and Bacon Bubble Gum (mochi rice cake, pork belly, grapefruit and sweet soy), to name a few. Not into sharing? The bento boxes are bountiful and beautiful, as are the traditional sushi rolls. 210 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-8662, tonarestaurant.com

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Tin Angel integrates a fun, lively ambiance with quality local ingredients and creative dishes, creating the perfect atmosphere for first-daters. The family-run restaurant has found the recipe for success with their specialty tapas—such as the Moroccan-spiced cauliflower and chickpeas; spiced almonds, gorgonzola and pear; or gypsy pork empanadas. In warm weather, the patio is a great place to take in the neighborhood sights and sounds. 365 W. 400 South, 801-328-4155, thetinangel.com

chicago mike beck

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★★★★★

3370 State Street #8 South Salt Lake, UT

Rusted Sun Pizzeria

Log Haven

STORE

11:00am - 9:30pm 11:00am - 10:30pm 12:00pm - 9:00pm

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100% gluten-free

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

SEAN HAIR

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A sample of our critic’s reviews

Ruth’s Diner

There’s something to be said about the fact that Ruth’s has been a Utah favorite for nearly a century. If you haven’t been to the place lately, things are still as lively—and crowded—as ever. If I’m there for breakfast, the pulled pork Benedict ($13.49) typically wins me over; it keeps the overall structure of its predecessor, but swaps out the English muffins with green chile cheese cornbread, popping poached eggs on top of a generous helping of pulled pork and barbecue sauce. For dinner, it’s hard to see past Ruth’s meatloaf ($14.89, pictured), served up as a pair of thick, meaty slices accompanied by mashed potatoes, brown gravy and veggies. If you happen to be craving meatloaf for lunch, Ruth’s also serves it in burger form ($10.89)—they charbroil a slice of this delicious stuff and throw it on a bun with provolone cheese and barbecue sauce. For dessert, the chocolate malt pudding ($4.99), made with egg yolks and heavy cream, is a concentrated dose of pure chocolate goodness. To call Ruth’s Diner a Beehive institution doesn’t do the place nearly enough justice. Reviewed Dec. 20. 4160 Emigration Canyon Road, 801-582-5807, ruthsdiner.com

F O O D H E AV E N N A M R E G man Delicatessen & Restaura n r Ge

28 | JANUARY 10, 2019

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20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

t


Existing Loudly

BY KARA RHODES comments@cityweekly.net @karadiane1

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

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wednesday 1/9

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/10 Reggae at the Royal

Talia Keys (center) & The Love

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friDAY 1/11

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w/ outside infinity, terry burden project, behind the wheat grinder Live Music SATURDAY 1/12

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1/25

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1/18

TALIA KEYS & THE LOVE

w/ Big Blue Ox, VadaWave Saturday, Jan. 12, 9 p.m. $18, 21+ The Commonwealth Room 195 W. Commonwealth Ave. thecommonwealthroom.com

5 amfs & long islands

bands get involved. Volunteer for things, play more fundraisers and attend more queer events.” Or, as Keys puts it, participate in the “human” community. Referring to her Utah bubble of queer and marginalized people, she adds, “Those are the humans facing discrimination for who they are.” Issues about which she is passionate drive many of her creative decisions. In a recent New Year’s Day concert for the community organization One World, Keys played solo under her Gemini Mind project. “I am new to the event myself but understand it’s for addiction recovery,” Keys says. “Having lost my dad to addiction three years ago, this hits home.” Keys hopes her audiences relate to the experiences she writes about. Inspired by life events as well as other artists, including the kids at her camps, Keys says she uses music as a “crucial way to express emotion,” and writes to heal and “to say how it is and fight for what I believe in.” While Keys devotes time and energy to her full band, her solo allows her unique opportunities. “I started playing solo out of a necessity to tour,” she says. “It became a crucial way for me to get out of Utah. I ended up loving it and have had many awesome opportunities because of it.” During the last five years, Keys has opened for multiple rock heroes, including Michael Franti and Karl Denson. “I will always play solo and will always play with a band,” she says. “The band is special; we play fewer shows and try to play bigger events. It’s a production, a performance piece instead of a concert.” Putting on a performance is the best way to open a new year full of new commitments to her causes. “Playing The Commonwealth Room is a big deal,” Keys says. “We are really looking forward to collaborating with the opening acts, as well. Big Blue Ox is putting out some of the nastiest instrumental funk, and they are so fun. VadaWave are such passionate performers, too.” And while Keys will always be looking for the fun in performance, she can’t separate her art from her identity. Referencing her lifelong “awareness of and desire to squash judgment and fight to have the same rights,” she says it has definitely been hard growing up in the state as a pansexual woman. Fulfilling her role as “an outspoken woman on stage” has cost her countless jobs in and around Salt Lake City. “It always stings,” she says, “but why would I want to play somewhere that doesn’t fully support me? When these doors close, bigger ones always open.” CW

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L

ocal standouts Talia Keys & The Love grew immensely over the past year thanks in part to their newly released fulllength album We’re Here. They headlined spots at the Utah Pride Festival and the Utah Arts Festival and made appearances on KRCL 90.9 FM’s Women Who Rock feature. Frontwoman Keys also set out on two 30-day tours to the Southeast and the West Coast, tallying more than 100 shows. “My proudest moment was releasing the album,” Keys reflects. “It took two years of recording, mixing and production to get the end result. I worked closely with Michael Sasich and Greg Shaw at Man vs. Music, and we produced it together. My band brought their hearts into the studio, and we created a musical political statement.” Now, Keys and crew are looking forward to an even bigger 2019 starting with their Saturday, Jan. 12 show at The Commonwealth Room, which by design is meant to be more than a couple of mics and amps crowded in a corner. “I really like the performance art aspect of our shows, so we are hoping to do more collaborations. I love supporting other artists, and we like sharing the bill with other local acts,” Keys says. “Our New Year’s resolution is to not sweat the small stuff—life is too short to be caught up in the small things—keep existing loudly and be the best human I can.” That sentiment is echoed in her role as musical director for Rock ’n’ Roll Camp, a weeklong nonprofit camp for female, transgender and nonbinary kids ages 8 to 17. During their stint, campers learn a variety of instruments, form bands, write original songs and perform on a stage with their peers in the audience. Along with learning a thing or two about the music process, kids also pick up the skills to proudly be themselves. “Rock Camp is my favorite thing I do,” Keys muses. “It’s a music camp, but more importantly it’s about empowerment, working together and being brave.” This year marks Rock Camp’s fourth—Keys has helped out since its creation—along with the debut of an adult version for women, transgender and nonbinary individuals ages 18 and up. Keys believes LGBTQ and community advocacy is important, and she takes the responsibility of her platform seriously. When asked how the music and queer communities here in Salt Lake City overlap, she says, “I would love to see more of my local friends in

4760 S 900 E, SLC

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Talia Keys & The Love look back on a year of growth and forward to living out loud.

MUSIC

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THURSDAY 1/10 FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

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Brent Penny, Strong Words, Sally Yoo

Brent Penny brings years of experience playing and curating inclusive, openhearted performances in his hometown of Minneapolis out on the road for his debut West Coast tour. Hailed for a “lo-fi, let’s cry” approach that mixes queer folk, psychedelic pop and experimental ambiance, Penny’s tender compositions display a far-reaching range of artistic influences. Some of his melodies are informed by Mormon youth choirs; some evoke the singular range of Neil Young at his most effeminate moments. Penny has developed his own niche as an authentic songwriter, bridging the gap between the DIY rock of past bands Bathtub Cig and The Awful Truth with the quivering vulnerability and unabashed honesty of our finest anti-folk heroes. Best of all, Penny plays twice on this Thursday night: once in support of Nadine and Remember Sports at an all-ages Kilby Court show and again later that night in a headlining gig at The Urban Lounge. Local support for the latter show comes from emotional indie rock quartet Strong Words and audio explorer Sally Yoo. The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $5, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

RACHEL WINSLOW

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

Laura Gibson

Brent Penny

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165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

SHERVIN LAINEZ

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

Newly armed with an MFA in fiction writing, Oregon native Laura Gibson returned in late 2018 with her fifth full-length album, Goners. Marked by vibrant language, incisive storytelling and a narrative imagination that runs wild and free, Goners felt like just the record we needed to wrap up a dark year: At times weary and exhausted, it also flashed moments of radical hope, starting with its Leonard Cohen-esque first line: “If we’re already goners, why wait any longer/ For something to crack open.” Tackling the responsibility of grief and its far-reaching tentacles, Gibson doesn’t stay in one lane. Instead, the singer-songwriter ramps up her sonic palette with stomping rockers and fiery odes to metamorphosis, scars and the loss of Gibson’s father. “Goners seemed an apt title because it speaks of both the future and the past,” Gibson said in a news release for the album. “The word is used for two types of people: those who lose themselves in the ones they love, and those whose deaths are imminent. My days are charged. Potential future grief forces me to reckon with past grief. These were two points on a map of grief. I wanted to explore the territory between them.” Embark on the journey with Gibson and her full band, who by all accounts have been bringing fans to tears with their cathartic show. Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $13 presale; $15 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com


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JANUARY 10, 2019 | 31


JOHN LAPPEN

Nick Moss Band

CHRIS MONAGHAN

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There aren’t many bands left from the ’60s heyday of classic rock, but Los Angeles’ Canned Heat are still alive and kicking. Longtime members Fito de la Parra (drums) and Larry Taylor (bass) still drive Canned Heat’s fiery groove, which started in 1965 with pure electric blues before expanding outward into colorful boogie rock, psychedelic jazz and country-fried folk. The band’s biggest hit, “Going Up the Country,” formed the cornerstone of their appearance at Woodstock in 1969, and its prominent placement in the 1970 documentary about the legendary music festival cemented Canned Heat as purveyors of hippie cool. Part of that respect came from Canned Heat’s commemoration of the blues; “Going Up the Country” is a remake of a 1927 classic by Henry Thomas, and several other big Canned Heat numbers have their roots in the Mississippi Delta. Performing a three-night stand at Egyptian Theater in Park City will allow the band to stretch their legs playing material new and old; in addition, it will serve as the perfect kickoff to a busy 2019. Mike Judge (of Beavis and Butt-Head and King of the Hill fame) plans to direct and produce a film about the band based on de la Parra’s book, Living the Blues, and Canned Heat will be a big part of Woodstock’s 50th anniversary celebration this summer. Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m. (Friday & Saturday); 6 p.m. (Sunday), $29-$55, all ages, egyptiantheatrecompany.com

TUESDAY 1/15

Nick Moss Band feat. Dennis Gruenling

John Medeski’s Mad Skillet

MARC PAGANI

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32 | JANUARY 10, 2019

FRIDAY 1/11-SUNDAY 1/13 Canned Heat

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LIVE

Canned Heat

If Canned Heat represents one end of the generational blues spectrum, Chicago’s Nick Moss Band injects the traditional American art form with youthful zeal. Moss, who specializes in a muscular six-string attack with gravelly, deep-throated vocals, teamed up with harmonica master Dennis Gruenling in 2018 to release an album on esteemed Alligator Records. The High Cost of Low Living topped numerous year-end lists, and its forceful rendering of electric Chicago blues and old-school rock-’n’-roll is ear candy for Americana enthusiasts. It’s a collaboration that wasn’t always destined to be; although Moss and Gruenling have known each other for 20 years, they didn’t team up until 2016. Three years later, their chemistry is evident, both on record and on stage, where the two seem to communicate telepathically. Their chops are deeply baked in; Moss grew up playing with legendary Chicago characters like Jimmy “Fast Fingers” Dawkins and Willie “Big Eyes” Smith before branching out with Jimmy Rogers, all of whom descend from the Muddy Waters tree of electric blues. Gruenling, meanwhile, is a self-taught New Jersey native, but his influences come from universally acclaimed harp masters: James Cotton, Junior Wells, Little Walter and George “Harmonica” Smith. Don’t miss these two performing in the intimate environs of Soundwell under the Utah Blues Society banner, which has dedicated itself to bringing the blues to new ears. Soundwell, 149 W. 200 South, 7 p.m., $12 presale; $15 day of show, 21+, soundwellslc.com

WEDNESDAY 1/16 John Medeski’s Mad Skillet

Hailed as one of New York jazz’s most accomplished improvisers, John Medeski never seems to slow down. Tickling the keys with groundbreaking trio Medeski Martin & Wood, he helped to bring a danceable fusion of funk, jazz and jam rock to mainstream audiences. But it’s in New Orleans where the 53-year-old Kentucky native has found his most powerful muse. As a veteran of the latenight sets that go down around the periphery of the annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, Medeski often found himself drawn to the guitar fireworks of Will Bernard and the driving rhythms of Dirty Dozen Brass Band sousaphonist Kirk Joseph and drummer Terence Higgins. Last year, the new quartet recorded a loose-limbed album that blurs the lines between second line jazz, swing, AfroCuban pop and hip-hop. Although Medeski’s name draws top billing, this is a true democracy, with Sun Ra covers, spaghetti Western instrumental workouts, avant-garde funk and traditional R&B sprinkled throughout the self-titled album. “Every time we play, it really is magical,” Medeski says in a news release for the record. “We get together and this thing lifts. There’s a lot of ESP in New Orleans. Something happens there. There’s a certain feel that New Orleans guys have that you can’t get anywhere else.” Lucky for us, Medeski, Bernard, Joseph and Higgins bring the party to The State Room just a few weeks before Mardi Gras. The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $34, 21+, thestateroom.com


SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! THURSDAY: Dusty Grooves all vinyl DJ @10:00pm FRIDAY:

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32 EXCHANGE PLACE • 801-322-3200

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01/16/19

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Kris Kristofferson & The Strangers

KATE SIMON

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34 | JANUARY 10, 2019

WEDNESDAY 1/16

CONCERTS & CLUBS

THURSDAY 1/10 LIVE MUSIC

The Backyard Revival (Rye) Brent Penny + Strong Words + Sally Yoo (Urban Lounge) see p. 30 Chicago Mike (Hog Wallow Pub) Major Tom & The Moon Boys (Garage On Beck) Michelle Moonshine (Gracie’s) Remember Sports + Nadine + Housewarming Party (Kilby Court) Ryan Innes (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door)

Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage On Beck) Re:Fine (Downstairs) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Subtact (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 1/11 LIVE MUSIC

Alternator (Ice Haüs) The Better Daze + Salduro + Nuthin Special + Sabra + Helen Grace

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

At age 82, Kris Kristofferson is a walking embodiment of country music’s long, illustrious history. But his journey started in a far different place than that of compatriots Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. Kristofferson was born in Texas but grew up in Southern California, becoming a star athlete at Pomona College before earning a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University, where he finished a post-graduate degree in English literature. After that, his life took a more traditional country turn: five years in the U.S. Army, followed by stints sweeping floors in Nashville and working Louisiana oil rigs as a helicopter pilot. That’s where Kristofferson wrote his first two late ’60s hits, “Help Me Through the Night” and “Me & Bobby McGee.” He infamously landed his helicopter on Johnny Cash’s lawn with the lyrics to “Sunday Mornin’ Comin’ Down” in hand, resulting in a big enough splash that Kristofferson won Songwriter of the Year at the Country Music Awards. But the aspiring storyteller wanted to build his own career, which he successfully did as a multi-threat singer, songwriter and actor. He won a Golden Globe for the 1976 version of A Star Is Born, going toe to toe with Barbra Streisand; starting in 1998, he appeared in all three Blade movies; and the rest of his film and TV work would take up this entire issue. Although his biggest commercial success came in the mid to late ’80s with the supergroup The Highwaymen, Kristofferson remains a hardworking troubadour and tireless songwriter whose work represents a vital connection to classic Americana. “With country music, performers were songwriters,” he told American Routes in 2018. “The song was the important thing—the basis of it all. People like Hank Williams and Johnny Cash were great performers, but it was the songs that moved people. It was all from the heart and the soul … serious art for those of us that were doing it. We thought we were artists.” (Nick McGregor) Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 7:30 p.m., $35-$75, 6+, tickets.utah.edu

(Kamikazes) Big Head Todd & The Monsters + Los Colognes (The Depot) Borgeous (Park City Live) Branson Anderson (HandleBar) Canned Heat (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 32 Carrie Myers (Harp and Hound) Colt. 46 (Westerner) Darius Jackson (Garage On Beck) Emancipator + Foxtail + Brodyizm (Urban Lounge) Jacquees (The Complex) Laura Gibson + Stelth Ulvang (Kilby Court) see p. 30 Matthew Bashawl (Lake Effect) Mike Rogers (Legends) Pinguin Mofex + S2_Cool + Robert Loud + Ruble (Velour) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (The Spur) SuperBubble (Hog Wallow Pub)

Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Yo Gotti (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

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2 MONTHS TILL ST. PATTY’S DAY!

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CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE, IRISH STEW, SHEPHERD’S PIE & DRINK SPECIALS HELLCAT MAGGIE WHISKEY AND A PINT $5.

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UNION BLUES

7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS

JANUARY 10, 2019 | 35

kitchen open until midnight

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PORCUPINE PUB & GRILL

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JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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BAR FLY

SATURDAY 1/12 LIVE MUSIC

8Six Couch Party (Loading Dock) Bill n’ Diane (Harp and Hound) The Bookends (Legends) Blackfoot Gypsies + The Yawpers (Kilby Court) Brother + Grey Glass + Harpers + Lantern By Sea (Velour) Canned Heat (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 32 Chicago Mike Band (The Spur) Colt.46 (Westerner) Dead Cowboys (Umbrella Bar) Josh Wright Pianist (Viridian Center) Mountain Country + Jim Fish (Garage On Beck) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Hog Wallow Pub) The Silver Slippers + Sympathy Pain + Hoofless + No Sun (Urban Lounge) Silver Tongued Devils (Johnny’s on Second) Seth Jude Richard + LSDO + Dude Cougar + Dustin Booker + CJ Coop (Kamikaze’s) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Talia Keys & The Love + Big Blue Ox + VadaWave (The Commonwealth Room) see p. 29 Terry Burden Project (The Yes Hell)

Union Blues (Ice Haüs) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) Will Baxter Band + Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Year of the Dog (HandleBar)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Berlin: S&S 12th Anniversary Party feat. DJ Flash & Flare + Concise Kilgore + Bo York (Metro Music Hall) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Shift (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Sky Saturdays (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Tony Touch + DJ Juggy + Brisk (The Depot)

KARAOKE

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90)

SUNDAY 1/13 LIVE MUSIC

Canned Heat (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 32 Duncan Phillips (Garage On Beck)

With the calendar flipped to 2019 and the stress of a new year already bearing down on Jan. 1, Porcupine Pub & Grill’s University location provided a perfect post-holiday respite. The preponderance of Christmas decorations still on display certainly helped; from giant light-up wreaths to pine garlands wrapped around all those exposed wood beams, it felt momentarily like I was still living in that dream week between Christmas and New Year’s. My Red Rock Brewing IPA Junior helped too, its coppery taste reminding me of scented pinecones and candy canes while an Artichoke Cheese Dip app whetted my whistle for the Italian Chicken Sub to come. The festive feeling extended to Porcupine’s many big-screen TVs, all of which were screening New Year’s bowl games. Ordering my second beer, a Bohemian Cottonwood Common, provided the perfect conversation-starter to ask my bartender about Porcupine’s original location at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon. Opened in 1998 with a focus on great food, exceptional service and a commitment to the local community, that vibe extends well to this newer location. Housed in the beautifully restored Fire Station No. 8—Salt Lake City’s second-oldest faithfully restored fire station—it feels more like you’re on a family vacation to a glorious winter lodge than just out to eat for the evening. Transformations like that are integral to life in a city like ours—especially with a new year ahead of us. (Nick McGregor) 258 S. 1300 East, 801-582-5555, porcupinepub.com

Goth Dad + Uvluv + 406 In Your Coffee Pot + Sonnets (Kilby Court) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music at The Forklift Patio (Snowbird Resort) Lumberjack Fabulous (Legends) Obie Trice + Vinnie Cassius + Gloomwalkers (Urban Lounge) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Brian Koviak (The Spur) The Nick Moss Band feat. Dennis Gruenling (Soundwell) see p. 32

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Last Call w/DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 1/14 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 1/15 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 1/16 LIVE MUSIC

Elliot and Gabriel (The Spur) John Medeski’s Mad Skillet (The State Room) see p. 32 Kris Kristofferson & The Strangers (Kingsbury Hall) see p. 34


Poets Corner Don’t waste the now,

‘cuz the past is to blame. Don’t waste the now, with the fears of the ‘morrow. Keep it lite. Seek the light. But not like the moth to the flame Alan E. Wright

Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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FILM REVIEW

Law Partners

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On the Basis of Sex celebrates a mutually supportive marital partnership.

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Armie Hammer and Felicity Jones in On the Basis of Sex couple that focuses on the woman is in itself remarkable. Toss in the fact that both partners share household duties without fuss or argument and give emotional and physical room for each other’s work, and it’s nigh unprecedented. We’re so used to seeing movies about men doing important work whose onscreen wives are quiet helpmeets, or sometimes women slightly perplexed by their husbands who eventually come around to being quiet helpmeets. It’s difficult to come up with even one example of a wholly supportive husband character to a wife doing important work. It’s so unusual that Stiepleman has said in The New York Times that the movie had trouble attracting financing because its Marty was allegedly too implausible in his steadfast encouragement—even though, by all accounts, this onscreen Marty is very true to life. But that’s precisely why, however otherwise pedestrian On the Basis of Sex might be, we need to see more movies like this one. CW

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Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) James Stewart Jean Arthur NR

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as the ones Ruth Bader Ginsburg fought as remnants of the past, as if such matters have been resolved and we’re all equal today. Still, On the Basis of Sex has me clinging to the joy of seeing yet another instance of the gender-flipping of a familiar story, resulting in a gratifying busting of clichés. There is intense feminist satisfaction to be found here in the depiction of the Ginsburgs’ marriage. Whatever dramatic license Stiepleman might have taken in telling his aunt’s story does not extend to the reality—portrayed here with romantic yet also practical sweetness—of Marty as incredibly supportive of Ruth’s career, and of her life on the whole. Gently amusing scenes of domesticity here include Marty cooking dinner so Ruth can practice her lawyerly oratory in preparation for appearing before the Supreme Court. I’ll venture to guess that few people would say that Armie Hammer bustling around the kitchen isn’t sexy as hell. Ruth had, we see, previously supported Marty through a life-threatening bout with cancer in their law-school days, but there’s no sense that this is a tit-for-tat arrangement. The case that brings her to prominence—the one that allows her a Mr. Smith Goes to Washington-esque scene of speechifying conquest!—is one that he brings to her attention, one in which gender intersects with his professional wheelhouse of tax law. Marty is simply behind Ruth 100 percent, and a portrait of a heterosexual

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n the Basis of Sex’s slightly racy title fronts a just-pretty-OK cinematic experience that coasts on the awesomeness of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I might wish that Sex was, well, sexier—more adventurous, more meaty, more demanding of the viewer and of its terrific cast—but I’ll take this. Coasting on Notorious RBG is some incredible coasting indeed, and the ride here is of the solidly crowd-pleasing variety. There’s nothing wrong with that. Ginsburg, of course, is now a U.S. Supreme Court justice, but in the years where this movie is set—from the 1950s through the 1970s—she is a young law student, a university professor and ultimately, once she finds her groove, an activist for gender equality. Her story—written for the screen by her nephew, Daniel Stiepleman, and directed by Mimi Leder—is a familiar David-andGoliath tale of a dogged outsider battling her way into an entrenched, rigidly conservative system that doesn’t want her. The wonderful Felicity Jones is smartly turned out as the young Ruth; she’s already married to fellow Harvard law student Martin Ginsburg (Armie Hammer) as the movie opens. Obscene sexism is the rule at 1950s Harvard Law, where the dean, Erwin Griswold (Sam Waterston), stubbornly continues to talk about “Harvard men” even though there are, in fact, a few women in Ruth’s incoming class. Griswold’s—and America’s, and the world’s—casual misogyny is the villain here, and with Griswold’s face, will rear its ugly head again in Ruth’s career. The gender-discrimination case she will later shepherd toward the Supreme Court is, Griswold will fret, a threat to “the American family.” It’s easy to cheer against the outright, blatant, in-her-face bigotry that RBG faces, and to applaud Jones’s chinin-the-air defiance in the face of it. A little too easy, maybe: I’m frankly a bit tired of movies about sexism that cast battles such


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CINEMA CLIPS

WHY WORRY? At Edison Street Events Silent Films, Jan. 10-11, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

CURRENT RELEASES

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net A DOG’S WAY HOME (not yet reviewed) A doggo begins an incredible journey home to her owner. Opens Jan. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG) ON THE BASIS OF SEX BBB See review on p. 41. Opens Jan. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) REPLICAS (not yet reviewed) A scientist (Keanu Reeves) attempts to resurrect dead family members. Opens Jan. 11 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE UPSIDE (not yet reviewed) An ex-con (Kevin Hart) works as caregiver to a quadriplegic man (Bryan Cranston). Opens Jan. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ABOVE AND BEYOND: NASA’S JOURNEY TO TOMRROW At Main Library, Jan. 15, 7 p.m. (NR) BECOMING ASTRID At Park City Film Series, Jan. 11-12, 8 p.m.; Jan. 13, 6 p.m. (NR)

AQUAMAN BB Director James Wan serves up a flashy showcase for the seafaring superhero (Jason Momoa), who reluctantly seeks his place as heir to Atlantis after his half-brother (Patrick Wilson) pursues war with the surface world. Another villain, Black Manta, exists mostly to set up a sequel; a few images are striking rather than simply gaudy. Mostly, there’s a huge problem with the main character—who feels like pasted together snippets of Spider-Man, Thor and Harry Potter—despite Momoa’s game, charismatic attempt to provide earthy humor. It’s too busy and overstuffed a narrative, more concerned with making sure we believe Aquaman is part of their world than with making him human enough to feel like part of ours. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw BUMBLEBEE BBB When Michael Bay is kept away from Transformers, we get a funny, throwback buddy dramedy with sweet reminders of E.T. and other ’80s kiddie sci-fi. In 1987, scout Autobot B-127 is sent to Earth to prepare a new base for resistance against evil Decepticons. It doesn’t go well, and B-127 ends up in hiding, disguised as a yellow VW bug until 18-year-old Charlie (Hailee Steinfeld) uncovers his secret and befriends the damaged, voiceless Autobot she calls Bumblebee. Of course a government agent (John Cena) wants to get his hands on Bee; of course there are robot battles with the fate of the planet in the balance. But mostly, it’s a gentle girl-and-heralien-robot-car lark that hits all the right notes—including great ’80s pop and rock dropped in. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson ESCAPE ROOM BBB Escape rooms are big lately, so here’s a movie about an escape room ... of murder! This is a diet version of the Saw franchise: modestly inventive, fun rather than gruesome and featuring like-

able characters. Six strangers are invited to participate in an escape room game involving multiple connected rooms that grow increasingly lethal. One gets smaller like the Star Wars trash compactor; one is an oven; one is upside-down; etc. The participants’ backstories prove relevant, and the lead—timid but brilliant college student Zoey (Taylor Russell)—is a plucky heroine worth rooting for. The eventual explanation is disappointing as usual, and there were at least two moments where I thought it was over before it actually was. But despite its dark premise, there’s a good-natured, funhouse feel. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK BBB.5 Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel combines ideas that shouldn’t work together: a swooning romance, and institutional racism working to destroy that love. Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) plan a life together, but that commitment collides with Fonny’s arrest on trumped-up rape charges and Tish’s announcement that she’s expecting their baby. Jenkins moves between two timelines with grace and purpose, never allowing us to forget either the cruel reality of the lovers’ separation or the feelings connecting them. The fight to prove Fonny’s innocence is the central conflict, but Jenkins never builds the film into a procedural, ticking-clock thriller. A story about inhumanity works when we grasp the humanity being stripped away; a love story works when we’re as invested in the hearts involved as we are in forces that pull them apart. (R)—SR MARY POPPINS RETURNS BB.5 Twenty-five years after the events of Mary Poppins, widowed Michael Banks (Ben Whishaw) struggles to pay his bills and care for his three children—until magical Mary (Emily Blunt) returns to help the residents of 17 Cherry Tree Lane once again. When your primary goal is fanciful musical entertainment, it’s wise not to get bogged down in the problems of a bummed-out, near-destitute widower, and the new songs are fine, if predict-

ably inferior to the Sherman Brothers’ iconic tunes. The problem is how hard those songs, and the segments in which they appear, try to duplicate Poppins ’64. At every turn, you get filmmakers telling you, “Mary Poppins was awesome; here’s everything that made it awesome, only not as good, and a lot faster since we’re worried kids don’t have the attention span.” (PG)—SR

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDERVERSE BBB.5 Everyone who makes animated features should watch this and realize how much more creativity is possible, and everyone who makes superhero movies should do the same. Middle-schooler Miles Morales (Shameik Moore) gains his own unique spin on the Spider-Man powers, then battles Kingpin (Liev Schreiber) as the criminal boss tries to open a doorway to alternate universes. That doorway introduces Miles to several other Spider-heroes, and the makeshift team delivers knowing humor and riffs on the history of Spidey movies. But the filmmakers also go wonderfully nuts with their visual interpretation of this world, in a love letter to the unique form of comic-book storytelling. It’s frisky and dazzling, built on the foundation of solid character work—enough to make you forgive another Spider-Man origin story. (PG)—SR

VICE B.5 Dick Cheney was terrible; you now know everything Adam McKay’s movie has to say. The story tracks Cheney (Christian Bale) from his hard-drinking college days, through his precocious early political career, up to his crafting of an imperial vice-presidency. Along the way, McKay employs similar follow-the-bouncing-ball storytelling tricks to those he used in The Big Short, but here they mostly feel unnecessary and self-satisfied. Bale’s performance offers little besides impressive mimicry of Cheney’s half-muttered monotone, and there’s not much more nuance in any of the other roles. What remains is something determined to congratulate youfor agreeing that everything wrong with the 21st century can be traced to one heartless guy. (R)—SR

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Š 2019

SEA

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Eliciting a "meh" 2. Theater box 3. Skeptical response to a threat 4. Unexpected acts of hostility 5. Mom-and-pop org.

56. Literary character who says "I'll chase him round Good Hope" 57. Carne asada holder 59. Prefix with thesis 61. Falco of "The Sopranos" 62. Delany or Carvey 64. ____ dispenser 66. Take for better or for worse, say

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

6. Arm or leg 7. Perjurer's admission 8. It may precede a fight 9. Rainbow, for one 10. Message accompanied by red lips 11. Storied loser in an upset 12. ____ Decor (magazine) 14. Like a neat bed 21. "Oh gawd!" 23. Eke ____ living 26. Sister chain of Applebee's 28. Dos 29. '90s-'00s Britcom 30. Proselytizers push it 32. Johnny who used to cry "Come on down!" 34. Actor Willem 35. Take a potshot 37. Von Trapp girl who's "sixteen going on seventeen" 42. City east of Santa Barbara 45. A toucan has a colorful one 50. Tow job provider, in brief 53. Texting alternative 55. March Madness org.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Journalist Nellie 4. Skedaddle 9. Tennis legend Arthur 13. Machine worked in "Norma Rae" 15. Of service 16. Concrete 17. What un desierto lacks 18. Force to fit 19. Baseball legend Yastrzemski 20. Be in charge of 22. "I should ____ lucky" 24. Spike who directed "BlacKkKlansman" 25. Pola ____ of the silents 27. Two, in cards 29. Interject 31. Song syllables before "It's off to work we go" 33. Feuding (with) 36. Many a New Year's Day game 38. Spain's Costa del ____ 39. Land north of the Philippines 40. Alphabet quartet 41. ____ salts (bath supply) 43. Classic name for a poodle 44. Blob that divides 46. Eye of the tigre? 47. Quit 48. Long-eared hound 49. Grp. with a mission 51. Giggle syllable 52. Bring joy to 54. Classic toothpaste brand 56. "I'm ____ loss" 58. ____ Sutra 60. Got in illicitly 63. Symbol on an Irish euro coin 65. Enthusiastic kids' plea 67. Opera set in Egypt 68. Zenith 69. Parkgoer on a windy day, maybe 70. "Can you give an example ...?" 71. ____ II Men (R&B group) 72. Water park feature 73. One rising as a result of climate change ... or what's rising across 3-, 4-, 8- and 10-Down

SUDOKU

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1984, singer-songwriter John Fogerty released a new album whose lead single was “The Old Man Down the Road.” It sold well. But trouble arose soon afterward when Fogerty’s former record company sued him in court, claiming he stole the idea for “The Old Man Down the Road” from “Run Through the Jungle.” That was a tune Fogerty himself had written and recorded in 1970 while playing with the band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The legal process took a while, but he was ultimately vindicated. No, the courts declared, he didn’t plagiarize himself, even though there were some similarities between the two songs. In this spirit, I authorize you to borrow from a good thing you did in the past as you create a new good thing in the future. There’ll be no hell to pay if you engage in a bit of self-plagiarism. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book is a collection of fables that take place in India. Three movies have been made based on it. All of them portray the giant talking snake named Kaa as an adversary to the hero Mowgli. But in Kipling’s original stories, Kaa is a benevolent ally and teacher. I bring this to your attention to provide context for a certain situation in your life. Is there an influence with a metaphorical resemblance to Kaa: misinterpreted by some people, but actually quite supportive and nourishing to you? If so, I suggest you intensify your appreciation for it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you grow vegetables, fruits and grains on an acre of land, you can feed 12 people. If you use that acre to raise meat-producing animals, you’ll feed at most four people. But to produce the meat, you’ll need at least four times more water and 20 times more electric power than you would if you grew the plants. I offer this as a useful metaphor for you to consider in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should prioritize efficiency and value. What will provide you with the most bang for your buck? What’s the wisest use of your resources? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Modern kids don’t spend much time playing outside. They have fun in natural environments only half as often as their parents did while growing up. In fact, the average child spends less time in the open air than prison inmates. And today’s unjailed adults get even less exposure to the elements. But I hope you will avoid that fate in 2019. According to my astrological estimates, you need to allocate more than the usual amount of time to feeling the sun and wind and sky. Not just because it’s key to your physical health, but also because many of your best ideas and decisions are likely to emerge while you’re outdoors. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): NASA landed its robotic explorer Opportunity on Mars in January of 2004. The craft’s mission, which was supposed to last for 92 days, began by taking photos and collecting soil samples. More than 14 years later, the hardy machine was still in operation, continuing to send data back to Earth. It far outlived its designed lifespan. I foresee you being able to generate a comparable marvel in 2019, Virgo: a stalwart resource or influence or situation that will have more staying power than you could imagine. What could it be?

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Computer-generated special effects used in the 1993 film Jurassic Park might seem modest to us now. But at the time they were revolutionary. Inspired by the new possibilities revealed, filmmakers like Stanley Kubrick, George Lucas and Peter Jackson launched new projects they had previously thought to be beyond their ability to create. In 2019, I urge you to go in quest of your personal equivalent of Jurassic Park’s pioneering breakthroughs. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you might be able to find help and resources that enable you to get more serious SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There’s a modest, one-story office building at 1209 N. Orange about seemingly unfeasible or impractical dreams. St. in Wilmington, Del. More than 285,000 businesses from all over the U.S. claim it as their address. Why? Because the TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’m a big proponent of authenticity. I almost always advise you to state of Delaware has advantageous tax laws that enable those be yourself with bold candor and unapologetic panache. Speak the businesses to save massive amounts of money. Other buildings truth about your deepest values and clearest perceptions. Be an in Delaware house thousands of additional corporations. It’s all expert about what really moves you, and devote yourself passion- legal. No one gets in trouble for it. I bring this to your attention ately to your relationships with what really moves you. But there is in the hope of inspiring you to hunt for comparable situations: one exception to this approach. Sometimes it’s wise to employ the ethical loopholes and workarounds that will provide you with “fake it until you make it” strategy: to pretend you are what you extra benefits and advantages. want to be with such conviction that you ultimately become what SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): you want to be. I suspect now is one of those times for you. People in the Solomon Islands buy many goods and services with regular currency but use other symbols of worth to pay for GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The students’ dining hall at Michigan State University serves important cultural events such as staging weddings, settling gobs of mayonnaise. But in late 2016, a problem arose when disputes and expressing apologies. These alternate forms of 1,250 gallons of the stuff became rancid. Rather than simply currency include the teeth of flying foxes, which are the local throw it away, the school’s sustainability officer came up with species of bat. In that spirit, and in accordance with current a brilliant solution: load it into a machine called an anaerobic astrological omens, I’d love to see you expand your sense of digester, which turns biodegradable waste into energy. Problem what constitutes your wealth. In addition to material possessolved! The transformed rot provided electricity for parts of sions and funds in the bank, what else makes you valuable? In the campus. I recommend you regard this story as a metaphor what other ways do you measure your potency, your vitality, for your own use. Is there anything in your life that has begun your merit? It’s a favorable time to take inventory.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1557, Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde invented the equals sign. Historical records don’t tell us when he was born, so we don’t know his astrological sign. But I’m guessing he was a Libra. Is there any tribe more skillful at finding correlations, establishing equivalencies and creating reciprocity? In all the zodiac, who is best at crafting righteous proportions and uniting apparent opposites? Who is the genius of balance? In the coming months, my friend, I suspect you will be even more adept at these fine arts than you usually are.

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Virginia Woolf thought that her Piscean lover Vita SackvilleWest was a decent writer, but a bit too fluid and effortless. Selfexpression was so natural to Sackville-West that she didn’t work hard enough to hone her craft and discipline her flow. In a letter, Woolf wrote, “I think there are odder, deeper, more angular thoughts in your mind than you have yet let come out.” I invite you to meditate on the possibility that Woolf’s advice might be useful in 2019. Is there anything in your skill set that comes so easily that you haven’t fully ripened it? If so, develop it with more focused intention.

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This past October, a large crane lowered an original street car (think of the cable cars in San Francisco) back to its home at Trolley Square on 700 East and 500 South. It is so ironic to me that at one time, almost half the population of Salt Lake City rode trolley cars around town on 150 miles of track, and today, the Utah Transit Authority is hustling to fill the Trax trains during rush hours on less than 50 miles of rail. What was in, went out, and now we want it back. The first trolley company was started by sons of Brigham Young. Their first passenger trolley car was pulled by mules along 300 West and South Temple to 300 South and State. I found a trolley ticket in an old book of Robert Browning poems I bought years ago, and the fare was five cents. Originally, it cost 10 cents to ride, but the brothers found that by lowering the price, they’d get more riders. The first electric streetcars in Utah began operating in October 1908 and were housed in the beautiful Mission-style buildings at Trolley Square built by a notorious railroad tycoon named Edward H. Harriman. Harriman was infamous for his never-ending efforts to hunt down Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, who had robbed his trains many times. He bought the 10-acre block of Trolley Square that had originally been the Territorial fairgrounds and constructed the buildings that eventually held 144 streetcars. There were blacksmiths and carpenters, conductors and electricians working inside the buildings. The old First Security Bank stand-alone structure (now gone, previously located where Whole Foods is now) was used to store sand needed for the rail system. I was a planning and zoning commissioner for Salt Lake City when Whole Foods came to the city and wanted to put in a store smack dab in the middle of this historic block. I was definitely not a fan of the size of the project and the way its designers originally failed to fit the new in with the old. But as you can see, Whole Foods downsized its design and now fits in among the historic barns. There’s a lot of history at Trolley Square, and bringing back probably the only remaining original trolley car makes many people smile. It had been in storage for almost a decade after bulldozers came to start the food chain’s new location. The car last housed the Trolley Wing Co. The urban mall is expanding under new owner Khosrow Semnani, and we might see a return of a movie theater and a food court, in addition to the multifamily development going in across the street on 600 South. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Editor’s note: This week, we’re revisiting some of the weirdest of the weird news we enjoyed in 2018. Happy Weird New Year!

S NEofW the

WEIRD

Mystery Solved On Jan. 25, 71-year-old Alan J. Abrahamson of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., went for his regular pre-dawn walk to Starbucks. What happened on the way stumped police investigators until March, reported The Washington Post, and on July 13 they made their findings public. Images from a surveillance camera show Abrahamson walking out of his community at 5:35 a.m., and about a half-hour later, the sound of a gunshot is heard. Just before 7 a.m., a dog found Abrahamson’s body lying near a walking path. Police found no weapon, no signs of a struggle; he still had his wallet and phone. Investigators initially worked the case as a homicide, but as they dug deeper into the man’s computer searches and purchases over the past nine years, a theory developed: Abrahamson had tied a gun to a weather balloon filled with helium, shot himself, and then the gun drifted away to parts unknown. A thin line of blood on Abrahamson’s sweatshirt indicated to police that “something with the approximate width of a string passed through the blood on the outside of the shirt,” the final report says. As for the balloon, investigators said it would likely have ascended to about 100,000 feet and exploded somewhere north of the Bahamas in the Atlantic Ocean. People Different From Us Metro (U.K.) reported on Feb. 20 that travelers “remained silent” for 20 minutes while a fellow passenger on a Ural Airlines flight from Antalya, Turkey, to Moscow used the air vent above her seat to dry a pair of underwear. Witnesses reported that the woman showed no shame and that “everybody was looking with interest and confusion.” Debate raged later, however, after video of the woman was posted online, with one commenter speculating that “maybe the takeoff was sort of extreme, so now she has to dry those.”

Armed and Frustrated Linda Jean Fahn, 69, of Goodyear, Ariz., finally succumbed to a frustration many wives suffer. On Dec. 30, 2017, as her husband sat on the toilet, she barged in and “shot two bullets at the wall above his head to make him listen to me,” she told Goodyear police when they

Just. No. Words. If you’ve been wondering whatever happened to Barney the Dinosaur, the Daily Mail has the answer for you. David Joyner, 54, romped inside the big purple suit for 10 years on the 1990s “Barney & Friends” show on PBS. Today, he’s a tantric sex guru in Los Angeles who says he can unite a client’s body, mind and spirit through tantric massage and unprotected sex. Joyner credits his tantric training with helping him endure the 120-degree temperatures inside the Barney suit. While “surprised,” Stephen White, former head writer on the show, said he sees Joyner’s new vocation as the “’I love you, you love me’ deal, but different. I don’t judge or anything, but that’s a side of David I didn’t know.”

Happy New Year 2019!

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Want to Get Away? Many citizens of the world are weary of the war and strife that seem to be consuming the news, and nearly 300,000 of them have already signed up to put it all in the rear-view mirror by becoming citizens of Asgardia. This coming-soon colony on the moon is led by Igor Ashurbeyli, a Russian engineer, computer scientist and businessman who was inaugurated as its leader on June 25 in Vienna. Asgardia’s parliament plans to set up “space arks” with artificial gravity in the next 10 to 15 years, where its projected 150 million citizens can live permanently, Reuters reported, and Ashurbeyli hopes settlement on the moon will be complete within 25 years. Asgardia is named after Asgard, a “world in the sky” in Norse mythology. Its leaders hope to attract a population from among the “most creative” in humanity, perhaps using “IQ tests,” according to Ashurbeyli.

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Compelling Explanation A woman claiming to be on a mission from God led a Kentucky State Police trooper on a chase at speeds up to 120 mph on Feb. 10, stopping only when another trooper pulled in front of her car. According to the Elizabethtown (Ky.) News-Enterprise, Connie Lynn Allen, 52, of Goodlettsville, Tenn., told officers that she was Mother Mary, en route to pick up Baby Jesus, and that God had given her permission to speed. She also said that she had died six years ago. She was charged with several offenses and was held in Hardin County.

Hey, It’s Florida Indian River County (Fla.) sheriff’s officers stopped Earle Stevens Jr., 69, on June 27 after another driver called 911, complaining that Stevens’ Mercury Grand Marquis kept tapping her bumper in a McDonald’s drive-thru lane. The officers noted “a strong odor of alcoholic beverage emitting from his breath ... His speech was slurred and his eyes were red and glossy.” He also had an open bottle of Jim Beam bourbon in a brown paper bag on the passenger seat. Stevens, of Vero Beach, struggled to produce his ID and said he’s never had a valid Florida driver’s license, according to Treasure Coast Newspapers. Stevens argued that he hadn’t been drinking while driving, but when the officer asked where he had been drinking, Stevens said, “Stop signs.” After failing several field sobriety tests and a breath test, Stevens was charged with driving under the influence and driving without a license.

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n  Police in Mainz, Germany, responded to an apartment building after cries were heard from within one unit early on Feb. 17, The Associated Press reported. When they arrived, officers found two men, the 58-year-old tenant and a 61-year-old visitor, “hopelessly locked up” with a mannequin dressed as a knight and a large remote-controlled car. The men were too drunk to explain how they had become entangled, and one officer remarked that “the whole thing would have remained a funny episode” if the younger man had not become “more than impolite.” He now faces a charge of insulting officers.

News That Sounds Like a Joke In Turkmenistan’s capital, Ashgabat, drivers of black cars faced high costs to repaint their cars white or silver after President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov banned black vehicles because he thinks the color white brings good luck. Police began seizing dark-colored vehicles in late December 2017, and owners had to apply for permission to repaint and re-register them. The average wage in Ashgabat is about $300 a month (or 1,200 manats); one Turkman told Radio Free Europe that he was quoted 7,000 manats for a paint job, but was told that the price would rise within a week to 11,000 manats. “Even if I don’t spend any money anywhere, I will be forced to hand over pretty much my entire annual salary just to repaint,” the unnamed man said, adding that his black car had already been impounded.

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Wait, What? Ikea took advertising in a whole new direction with its print ad for a crib. The ad, which appeared in the Swedish magazine Amelia, invited women who think they might be pregnant to urinate on the paper to reveal a discounted price. “Peeing on this ad may change your life,” the ad read at the top of the page. “If you are expecting, you will get a surprise right here in the ad.” Adweek reported that the agency behind the gimmick adapted pregnancy test technology to work on a magazine page.

were called to the scene. Fahn said her husband “would have had to be 10 feet tall to be hit by the bullets,” ABC15 in Phoenix reported, but officers estimated the bullets struck about 7 inches over the man’s head as he ducked. She was charged with aggravated assault.

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

New World Order Taisei Corp., a construction company based in Tokyo, announced in December 2017 that it would use autonomous drones called T-Frends to combat karoshi, or overwork death, reported the Independent. The drones hover over desks of employees who have stayed at work too long and blast “Auld Lang Syne,” a tune commonly used in Japanese shops getting ready to close. A company statement said: “It will encourage employees who are present at the drone patrol time to leave, not only to promote employee health but also to conduct internal security management.” Experts are skeptical: Scott North, professor of sociology at Osaka University, told the BBC that “to cut overtime hours, it is necessary to reduce workloads.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


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City Weekly January 10, 2019  

Hobbitville's Last Days

City Weekly January 10, 2019  

Hobbitville's Last Days