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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

NOV 15, 2018 | VOL. 35

N0. 25

GRANITE’S

GHOST By Kelan Lyons

Reduced to an empty lot picked at by developers, Granite High’s historic specter still haunts South Salt Lake.


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY GET SCHOOLED

Once vibrant, South Salt Lake institution is now an empty plot of land. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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SAMANTHA SMITH

Marketing & Events Dir. Be it at one of our many rocking events—including this week’s Best of Utah party—or on the “WTF to Do in SLC” weekly video series, Smith’s smiling face is hard to miss. Her favorite part about living in the Beehive? “The people! Our community supports local businesses and stays active in the growing amount of events happening around the city.”

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Dine, Nov. 1, Spedelli’s

Mr. Springer, I enjoyed your write-up on Spedelli’s, a neighborhood place I’ve frequented for nearly two years. Something unusual, is the fact that it also serves liquor. Prior to its arrival, only a 50-year-old beer bar called the Breeze Inn was here (and looked upon somewhat askance by the majority religious). I was, however, surprised by your comment about “no competition” for pizza at the new location, given that the Big Apple Pizzeria is only four doors west, and has been here for 20-plus years serving great New York-style pies.

The compromise put in by the legislature could pose a practical problem with Prop 2. Don’t count your chickens just yet. I voted for it but Utah Legislature and the LDS church may have a few changes in mind that no one that voted for it had in mind.

REBECCA RUNNELS Via Facebook

No compromise, period!

DAVE CHRISTENSEN Via Facebook

I’m crying. And I qualify.

KELSEE HERRERA Via Facebook

Film review, Nov. 1, Bohemian Rhapsody

So incredibly happy for the many people this will help!

Let’s just hope they do not sandbag on permits/licensing.

HEATHER TALBOT WINKLER Via Facebook

ROB HALL Via Facebook

Wow, Utah. Proud of you for once!

Having a rare and painful bone disease, I’m so grateful it passed. It’s [a] step in the right direction, and I just hope Utah keeps pressing forward to enact it! Patients need access to cannabis now.

I hope not. That is exactly what they are doing in Ohio right now.

Fabulous. Now your state can look and smell like outdoor privies too.

MINDY ÜTZ Via Facebook

PHYLLIS JONES Via Facebook

I do recall other states in the past going through the same issues. I feel if so, it’s [their] last ditch effort to block it as long as possible.

Wow! Utah around?

I love how critics are all up in arms about this movie, where general public who haven’t really thought of Queen in years is all agog with praise. I doubt there’s a way to tell his story accurately unless you make a bio-epic the length of all three Lord of the Rings. Sheesh …

ANDREI MALYUCHIK Via Facebook

NATASCHA ALLEN Via Facebook

I’m pretty sure City Weekly only approves of one movie every three months.

Yeah, can’t wait to get the cannabis lotion for the neuropathy in my feet. Thank you everyone for voting “Yes” on Prop 2.

MATT MORRIS Via Facebook

DEBRA VASQUEZ Via Facebook

MERCEDES NIKOLOVA Via Facebook

I’m excited to see the changes in the bill. I voted no for the bill as it was on the ballot, but hope that both sides hold up their deal to revisit the language of the bill to make it better for all involved!

ROB HALL Via Facebook

I’ll guarantee they will, you’ll only get it if you have a week to live.

KEITH JOHNSON Via Facebook

AMANDA GREEN Via Facebook

JOSHUA KNAPTON Via Facebook

This will be blocked every chance they get. People’s choice don’t mean anything any more. Giant corporations like the LDS church run this country.

Yes, congrats. Huge milestone for Utah.

Does that mean for those who are against it, we can tell them “If you don’t like it, then leave?”

About freaking time.

Thoughts on Prop 2

(801) 738-4413 275 E 400 S Salt Lake City www.oasisgamesslc.com

ALEXANDER SPENCER Via Facebook

JOHN PAUL BROPHY, Salt Lake City

Decide for yourself. Criticism is just one person’s opinion.

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Utah Legislature are gutting it as we speak.

I’m thrilled with this.

DANETTE HELLER Via Facebook

JOHN GUGGENHEIM Via Facebook

BRANDON BRAITHWAITE Via Facebook EARTH STORM JACOBS Via Facebook

JAIME CROSS CARROLL Via Facebook

finally

coming

TRISHA HANSEN CUTLER Via Facebook Just a little bit. A lot of people still have their heads planted firmly in their asses.

STEPHAN MANLEY Via Facebook

This bill sucks ass. Big time. I don’t want edibles. Also, you have to be like on your deathbed or going to be in the next while practically to partake of said edibles.

APRIL FRENCH LEAVITT Via Facebook

Omg, the world is going to end!

ELISE RUDARMEL Via Facebook

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OPINION White House Report: Trump’s Heart Condition

Simply put, President Donald Trump’s heart is a growing concern. His condition, “Pernicious Malcardia,” was only recently diagnosed, and is considered to be the most serious non-congenital cardiac defect known to medicine. Studies over the past two years reveal it is highly contagious, and many have been infected. In fact, it’s at the top of the Center for Disease Control’s list of ominous health concerns. Researchers are unsure of where this malady has been “hiding.” Only a few verified cases were reported before Trump took office. Studies indicate that it is likely the reemergence of a highly-virulent, dormant strain dubbed “Pernicious Mussolinian Malcardia” (PMM). While scientists scramble to find PMM’s repository host, the disease is wreaking havoc around the globe. Many world leaders— ones who’ve had even the briefest exposure to Trump—are showing symptoms. PMM is considered a greater threat to the planet than ebola, cholera, MDR tuberculosis and the plague combined. Most Americans find the presidential condition shocking. They never imagined that the Rabid Orange Raccoon could have a diseased heart. They didn’t know he even had one. (That well-evidenced possibility, however, has been

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. debunked.) For Trump supporters, it’s actually a big relief. It means his previously-adjudged character problems are not really his fault: It’s a sickness. Supporters assert that there’s credible evidence Trump does have a heart. The total absence of cardiac functioning would be pretty hard to miss, and since none of his toes and fingers have turned black, we just have to assume that something inside him still is pumping blood, sending precious oxygen to his body’s cells, tissues and organs. Total heart failure, according to White House physicians, would be easily assessed by the following symptoms: n  Golf scores would fall precipitously n  All lying would cease n  Emotions, particularly hate, would totally disappear n  Nearby women would no longer have to shield their private parts n  The entire body would turn black. (That is the symptom Trump most fears, understanding that his KKK buddies would immediately disavow him.) But there’s yet another serious related symptom of a failed heart: Doctors say that impairment of blood flow is affecting the functioning of Trump’s brain—no matter how small—and the presidential medical team has also noted telltale signs of an associated memory loss. While his personal physician has remained mum on the subject, cardiac specialists have noted the president has exhibited symptoms of an advanced, but selective, form of dementia—case in point, his recent conflicting statements about his new acting U.S. attorney general. Recordings illustrate what experts call “Ischemic Mental Impairment” (IMI). For example, Trump noted, “Matt Whitaker worked for Jeff Sessions and he was always extremely highly thought of and he still is—but I didn’t know Matt Whitaker.”

In another, it was, “I can tell you Matt Whitaker’s a great guy. I mean, I know Matt Whitaker.” There’s no question: Trump’s brain is oxygen deprived, which all goes back to the insufficiency of the man’s heart. It’s the reason he’s unable to connect with his actions, like the torture of tots, his warm bonding with tyrants, his fascination with hookers and his endless trail of hurtful lies. Sadly, Trump’s cardiac “insufficiency” has spread throughout his administration and the world. A recent, tragic incident shows that our military suffers from the same malady. This summer’s USS Trenton debacle (June 12), like all the rest, was just a symptom of his malady: The ship refused help to a nearby sinking boatload of African immigrants. The captain’s refusal resulted in 76 deaths. However, as an afterthought, the ship turned around and picked up the remaining 42 survivors. This was no isolated incident; two days earlier, that same ship refused to help another capsized boatload of immigrants. It’s all a sad consequence of the commander-in-chief’s modus operandi and his lack of regard for anyone who isn’t a WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant)—and just another example of allowing a man with a tiny brain and miniscule heart to lead our nation. But there’s a solution: A quick heart transplant. I say, send him to North Korea where such operations are much more reasonably priced, and he can hold hands with his “I-fell-in-love-with-the-man” bosom-buddy Kim Jong-un. There’s an added bonus: Raccoon hearts are plentiful, and there won’t be a waiting list. CW Michel S. Robinson Sr. is a retired businessman and a former U.S. Army assistant public information officer. He lives in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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AMERICA’S PAST AND FUTURE LECTURE Worried about the fascist direction of our country? You should be, and it takes a nation to turn things around. Learn about democracy’s present perils and future prospects at “Democracy in America: Past, Present, and Future,” part of the American History, Culture and Society Lecture Series. KRCL 90.9 FM’s Lara Jones will moderate a discussion with Mark E. Button, a University of Utah professor and chair in the Department of Political Science, who has written about transformative liberalism and who teaches courses in political theory, including ancient political thought, modern political theory, democratic theory, American political thought, and ethics and public affairs. Right. Ethics and public affairs. Be there. Marmalade Branch Library, 280 W. 500 North, Thursday, Nov. 15, 7-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Fd03X3.

• •

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ANIMAL RIGHTS MARCH

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Be part of the Animal Liberation Western Convergence, a national movement in which activists will congregate at the nation’s largest factory farms to bring compassion to places of violence. Salt Lake City is hosting its very first Official Animal Rights March, and welcomes all animal lovers to participate. The march kicks off the day before when award-winning musician and animal-rights activist Moby visits Utah to speak at 3 p.m. at the Columbus Community Center, 2531 S. 400 East, South Salt Lake. “In 2016, London hosted the first Official Animal Rights March where 2,500 vegans marched demanding an end to all animal oppression,” the event’s Facebook page says. Union Pacific Depot, The Gateway, 400 W. South Temple, Saturday, Nov. 17, 4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2FdKRsU.

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There might not be snow, but the weather is cold and the homeless are colder. For the fifth year and through Monday, Nov. 19, Rico Brand is collecting winter supplies needed to survive the Utah winter. That means coats, socks, blankets and other items. After that, Warm the Homeless #SLC will deliver the items directly to the homeless in Downtown Salt Lake City, Liberty Park, Fairmont Park, Library Square, Beck Street and the 9th & 9th areas, as well as The Road Home and the Rio Grande area. “Last and most important to us, we aim to interact with the homeless community. We believe strongly in the power of face-to-face interaction and human connection,” the Facebook page says. Rico Brand, 545 W. 700 South, 801-433-9923, by Monday, Nov. 19, 5 p.m., free, bit.ly/2PkYoTV.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Libertarian Utah

It’s official. Utah is a Libertarian state. On the tax front, Utahns voted against taxing themselves just a little to fund education and, of course, roads. And then they decided it would be a great idea to allow developers to avoid taxes in new developments—probably the Inland Port. They also apparently thought, yeah, the Legislature should be able to call itself into session “in an emergency.” And it looks like about half of Utahns are happy to let legislators draw voting districts around the voters they like. After all, a Dan Jones & Associates poll in January showed that 62 percent of Utahns approve of the job legislators are doing. It wasn’t enough that the governor can do the same. “The Libertarian Party is fundamentally opposed to the use of force to coerce people into doing anything,” the party says. That mostly means taxes. We’re just fine letting the Legislature do whatever it wants to us.

10 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

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A Win for San Juan

A Great Christmas starts here

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There’s good news and bad news in San Juan County. The good news is for people who believe in fair voting that does not intentionally exclude people of color—in this case, Navajos. A federal judge ordered districts realigned and thus placed Willie Grayeyes on the ballot and another Navajo Democrat in an unopposed seat, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. That means the county commission has a Navajo majority. The bad news has to do with the rule of law and how the newly elected state representative plans to defy it. Phil Lyman, the powerful county commissioner and convicted anti-federal champion, won the open seat left by Rep. Mike Noel of Cowboy Caucus fame. He told Four Corners Free Press in May he would not comply with the redistricting order and would be “happy to be held in contempt.”

Learning Little

Have we learned nothing from the intense pushback over siting homeless shelters in Salt Lake County? Suddenly, the shelters were in “my backyard,” and people didn’t like it. Now we have a fight for the future of the old Cottonwood Mall site as voters rejected a $500-million mixed-use development. Meanwhile, the Utah Supreme Court is considering the matter, you know, because the housing shortage is so damned critical. Developer Ivory Homes is threatening to walk, according to the Deseret News, and everyone’s upset. Yes, Utah is facing a housing crisis, maybe more for lack of affordable housing than anything else. But we live in a world of authoritarian governing. Perhaps a little persuasion, education and compromise would work better than histrionics.


NEWS

HOMELESSNESS

Homeless Bound

Awaiting new resource centers, some say westside situation has improved since last year. BY RAY HOWZE rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

RAY HOWZE

O

Police respond to a call regarding a homeless woman in the parking lot at 900 West and North Temple, a hotspot for illicit activity since Operation Rio Grande started more than a year ago.

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NOVEMBER 15, 2018 | 11

Clara next tells a story where he’s worked with community members to be a little more vigilant when it comes to helping law enforcement. Neighbors called police because they heard what sounded like people beating up someone next to an overpass on 200 South. Officers drove around the area and at first didn’t see anything. The neighbors called Clara next and he told them to call police again and meet law enforcement when they show up. Clara also drove over to the area. “The cop came over and said, ‘That might be the Highway Patrol and stuff,’” Clara recalls, pointing near the soundwall along Interstate 80. “I was standing by the door and [the woman who called] looks over at me and I said, ‘Tell them to call the sergeant over here.’ So when she tells them that, he says ‘Alright, we’ll go look.’ … Luckily, the cops did walk up there and I gave them a lot of praise on Twitter because had they just driven by, who knows.” Not long after, Clara and others nearby saw police talking to a woman with a bloody face. Some like Brainerd, though, who work near North Temple’s “Ground Zero,” are losing patience. She says she used to call the non-emergency number about crime more often, but when illicit activity kept returning to the same spot, she grew tired. When she closes up for the night, Brainerd says she and other employees try to get to their cars as soon as possible to avoid being approached by anyone. “They just keep moving [drug dealers and the homeless] one way or another,” Brainerd says. “It hasn’t stopped it one bit. It did a little bit at first and everyone dispersed, but they came back because they realized they aren’t going to do anything.” CW

as much to report nuisance problems thanks to more frequent patrols. “This is a good place to hide,” he explains. “If we were to go look, we’d see needles and stuff, but we hooked up with the needle-exchange people and they come and pick up the needles. As a community organizer, I’m like, ‘Damn, I don’t have anything to complain about.’ But it’s not even about complaining; it’s what are we doing to make this place we all share a better place?” Around the block, another man walks down the sidewalk pulling a rolling bag. He shouts various times and makes swinging motions with his arms. Clara speculates it’s likely some sort of mental-health issue, something he and other homeless resource advocates are hoping to help solve by making treatment more available. The first new resource center—the Geraldine E. King Women’s Resource Center near 100 East and 700 South— is expected to open in June 2019 with others following not long after. The Road Home Shelter is expected to close sometime in 2019 as part of Operation Rio Grande’s plan. Clara and Harman say they’ve been happy with the police response in the area. Clara says he knows police are curbing some of the drug dealing, prostitution and other violence, but their reach has its limitations. Police Chief Mike Brown “told me, ‘Using the police to solve the homeless issue is the most-expensive and leasteffective way to address it,’” Clara says. “So as a community, the next step is for us to look at where is treatment going on and why is it a revolving door at the jail. That takes a little more organizing and effort for us to do that. But again, when it comes down to the police, they’ve been responsive,” he says.

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the situation has improved since this time last year, and even more in the past six months thanks to increased availability of services. Mike Harman, who serves on the Poplar Grove Neighborhood Alliance, says he’s optimistic about the future, particularly when it comes to the new homeless-resource centers expected to open around the city in 2019. “People are engaged in the neighborhood and the homeless folks are getting the services they need,” he says. “I think with the resource centers coming on line—dissipating some of that concentration in one area—I hope will be helpful, where they actually have a place to go.” “Urban camping,” as it’s known, was the first most-noticeable change to the Poplar Grove area. Homeless camps popped up along railroad tracks, the 9 Line Bike Trail and other open areas. Their numbers have been noticeably reduced, Michael Clara, community organizer with Crossroads Urban Center and former planner with the Utah Transit Authority, says. “It’s been a good experience for the neighbors; it’s been very empowering to see we were not victimized by this,” Clara says. “That was the accusation I was definitely freely throwing out there in the beginning, but every prediction I had was, ‘This is how they’re going to solve this: People [the homeless] are going to settle in our neighborhood,’ but I was proven wrong on that.” Driving around Poplar Grove, Clara stops near a park at 1000 West and South Temple and points to a man near a table with a shopping cart. The park is emptier than it used to be in early 2018, Clara explains, and months ago, you could see more homeless people around the park. But neighbors now don’t have to call in

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ne ambulance and three Salt Lake City Police cars rush into the parking lot at the corner of 900 West and North Temple. When they arrive, they find a homeless woman with what appears to be a bloody sheet and bloody clothes. Someone had seen her and called 911. But almost as soon as law enforcement arrive, they leave. False alarm. The cops talked with the woman, who then went on her way. The scene, however, is familiar for those living and working in the area. Stories like it are common ever since Operation Rio Grande commenced in August 2017, when many homeless persons sought refuge in nearby neighborhoods like Rose Park and Poplar Grove. “I call that lane the hooker pickup lane,” Kimberly Brainerd, who works at a nearby convenience store, says, pointing to the outside lane of gas pumps. “Cars will drive in slow, someone gets in, and they’re gone.” She tells City Weekly she’s seen so many drug deals in the parking lot that she probably could compile a Who’s Who of the dealers and their clientele. “I’ve got customers that don’t come back anymore, because people would be coming up to them asking, ‘Do you want some black; do you want some white,’” she says. “It gets real uncomfortable sometimes.” A light behind the shop is out. Brainerd says she’s witnessed various criminal activities there because it’s dark. She hopes the landlord—or someone— replaces the burnt-out bulb. It might sound bleak and disturbing, especially when you look across the street and see the police department’s part-time substation at an old Arctic Circle building, empty on this November afternoon. But that doesn’t mean police aren’t out patrolling the area. Police cars are seen every few minutes passing by on North Temple. Cops on bikes also ride around the neighborhoods. While the nearby intersection has turned into a hotspot for criminal activity, some neighborhood advocates say


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GRANITE’S

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Photos by Enrique Limón

of Granite High for all of my life until they tore it down,” Anderson says. “Now, where is that sense of where I live?” It’s tough to understand what razing the campus means to the community unless you live there, Anderson says. A school isn’t just a school. It’s more than books, bricks and black tops; it’s a community gathering place, a meeting spot that defines the neighborhood. “It was a loss,” she says. “It’s hard to even drive by now.” While Granite High is gone, the land remains—27 acres, to be exact. The empty space is slowly being filled, more than a year after the buildings were demolished in the summer of 2017. But for some local residents, the school’s legacy is still at stake. The raw feelings over what was lost and what could still be built spark critical questions about public versus private interests. Where some see an opportunity for housing, others see a possibility for parks. The spirit of the Farmers, it seems, lives on. “It was hard for everybody, whether you had a kid that went to Granite,” Anderson says, her voice dropping to a whisper as she recalls a difficult period in South Salt Lake’s history. “It was hard for people to see the buildings go down.”

By Kelan Lyons klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

onnie Anderson talks about the loss of Granite High School like the death of a family member. The nearly three years she spent there teaching family and consumer science was the highlight of her 17-year educational career. “I felt like I was making a difference,” she says of the 500 students she estimates were attending the school when it closed. “It just felt like a family.” The fondness is personal, not just professional. She, her dad and her daughter all graduated from Granite, three generations of “Farmers,” just like their quirky, overalls- and cowboy-hat-wearing mascot. They each spent formative teenage years at the South Salt Lake City school at 500 East and 3300 South. Later in life, she sat on the lawn with other community members watching fireworks, and walked laps around the track. Anderson recalls all this less than a mile from where the iconic school once stood, in a cozy, beige split-level house shaded by a massive London plane sycamore tree in the front yard. She’s lived close by since 1960. For more than a half-century, Granite High was how she defined her home—her place in the world. “I used to tell people that I lived south

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Reduced to an empty lot picked at by developers, Granite High’s historic specter still haunts South Salt Lake.

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GHOST


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14 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

Connie Anderson

Building A Legacy

With the buildings razed, all eyes are on the former campus as officials try to figure out what will replace them. Garbett Homes purchased slightly more than 16 acres on the southern part of the property. Eileen Whiting, the company’s director of sales and marketing, says they’re planning on building 76 single-family homes. Demand was so high, that prospective buyers camped out for a few days to land a spot in the new development. As of last month, 27 homes were under contract, going for a price between $405- and $507,000. “We’re offering home ownership in a location where you can’t typically find brand-new homes,” Whiting says. “We’ve got tax-paying dollars that will be coming into the community, as opposed to an abandoned school that was just boarded up.” The northern portion of the land—about 11 acres—is under contract with Wasatch Commercial Management. Granite School District still technically owns the space, but Wasatch has asked South Salt Lake to rezone the space they plan on buying, so they can build more than 100 townhomes. As Wasatch waits to see whether it can build high-density housing, Garbett’s section of the property is a work-in-progress. Piles of soil lay beside partially- and fullyfinished houses. A large green-and-white sign sits beside the homes, advertising the community’s new name: Granite Legacy. “That’s a little bit galling” Anderson says of the name. “To me, ‘Granite’ has a very special meaning, and it isn’t commercial, and it isn’t people trying to make money off the property.”

What Could Have Been

Before it was a fenced sea of construction and unkempt, uncut grass, before the trailer tracks and the unfinished roads and sidewalks, before the gate was erected to keep South Salt Lake residents out, the space that once housed the school was open to all. Local children played baseball or rode bikes on the asphalt, while older residents frequented the campus for exercise. Not all the public use was positive— according to some news reports, the old buildings were sites for crime and vandalism. In 2009, the Granite School Board, of which Anderson was and still is a member (though she emphasizes she speaks for herself in this article, not the board), voted to close Granite High, shuttering the buildings that were a school for 105 years. The storied structures remained standing for almost a decade until they were leveled. Anderson taught at Granite shortly before it closed. She remembers the school as

one that educated throngs of students from different backgrounds and socioeconomic statuses; it was a melting pot of immigrants and refugees that taught white, U.S.-born scholars like her daughter the value of diversity. Even then, the school wasn’t just a school, but an egalitarian experience that forced young people to engage with classmates from broad social and cultural circumstances—interactions that are all too rare later in life. “It was a gift for my daughter to be there with all those different cultures and languages and skin colors, because it taught her how to be tolerant,” Anderson muses. Ben Horsley, district spokesperson, says recollections like Anderson’s aren’t accurate. By the time the school closed, he says, there were 255 students at Granite High—not 500, as Anderson remembers—and it never served a significant number of refugee students. He acknowledges the student body was racially and ethnically diverse at the time of Granite’s closure, but the majority of students were from families with low incomes, not a socioeconomic mix of middle- and lower-class families. Demographics aside, Horsley says most of the local school-aged youth chose not to attend Granite High around the time it closed. “Roughly one-third of students boundaried to the school were not attending the school,” Horsley says, meaning they exercised their right under state law to attend a public school other than the one they live closest to. Under-enrollment was one of myriad issues that led to Granite’s closure, he adds. After the shutdown came the question of what to do with the land. In 2011, South Salt Lake tried in vain to secure a bond so the city could purchase the school. Had voters approved the $25-million price tag, the city would have opened recreation and civics centers, and the outdoor spaces would have been preserved. Only onethird of the city’s registered voters cast a ballot. The bond initiative failed by five votes. Four years later, the city tried to float a $13-million bond to acquire parks and open space, some of which could have been spent on the former Granite High. It failed by 65 votes. Given the school’s history and influence on South Salt Lake’s culture and environment, Horsley says the district initially felt selling the school to the city would be the best use for the land. “But their voters obviously felt contrary,” he says, referring to the failed bonds. “As they were tearing the buildings down, if I’d see people from South Salt Lake, especially the people in my neighborhood, they said, ‘We could have had a park,’” Anderson mourns, years later, about the failed bond initiatives. “I think that would have lessened the blow, to be able to have had a community center.” With South Salt Lake out of the picture, the school district considered its options. “We just got offers and took the one that benefitted taxpayers the most,” Horsley says.


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Jim Davis talks about the empty land that used to house Granite High like it’s an exlover, the one that got away. On an overcast November morning, the former South Salt Lake mayor and Granite alum stands behind the gate and wistfully recalls memories past. “That’s where we used to eat lunch on the lawn, underneath those trees,”

A Community’s Living Room

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Wasatch Commercial Management, the other developer planning on adding housing to the community, aims to build 113 townhomes. In order to do that, the land will have to be rezoned, as single-family homes only are allowed now. Adam Lankford, Wasatch Residential Group’s vice president of development, says the company submitted a master plan to the city in the spring that would create a new zoning—a so-called “Granite Zone”—that also would allow for construction of a 30,000-squarefoot county library. South Salt Lake Mayor Cherie Wood, who does not personally grant or deny zoning applications, stresses that the library and townhome development’s fates are intertwined; rezoning for a library means the townhomes would also be allowed. “I need to support the best project for our community, which I do think is having a library,” Wood says. Salt Lake County Library Director Jim Cooper confirmed there is a purchase agreement with the developer for space to open a library. Once that happens, the nearby Calvin S. Smith and Columbus libraries will close and combine into the new facility on the former Granite campus. Cooper says the county has developed site plans and a few initial ideas about what the facility might look like, and how they can incorporate memorabilia—yearbooks, trophies, pictures—from the historic school. “We’re trying to move forward judiciously and prudently to protect taxpayer dollars, but we think it’s the right thing to do,” Cooper says. “It’ll be a new, more modern building but we think we’ll have some elements that will respect and honor the old Granite High School.” Granite High might have been a historic building, but Cooper says it wouldn’t have been a great fit for a county library had the old edifice still been standing. “There’s just a ton of things you would have had to save and retrofit,” Cooper says of the old structure, like dealing with plumbing and HVAC issues, not to mention the cost of renovations. Starting from scratch and building anew is cheaper, he says, than appropriating Granite High, were that still an option. Should the plan be approved by South Salt Lake’s Planning and Zoning Commission, the city council then would weigh in on the rezoning, District 4 City Councilwoman Portia Mila says, estimating she and her peers could vote sometime in early 2019. Concerns abound on what high-density townhomes could mean to the city’s traffic and infrastructure. Mila likes the idea of a new gathering spot on Granite’s grounds, though she isn’t sure she’d support the rezoning if the vote were held today. “We’re not going to get a community center, which is what South Salt Lake wanted originally,” Mila says. “That is not happening no matter how much we wish, because there’s homes being built now, but so what can we live with?”

One thing many locals don’t want is a Walmart, a possibility that Wood vetoed. Citing potential crime and increased traffic, multiple people interviewed for this story adamantly opposed the retail behemoth opening a location in their neighborhood. Mila says she believes the superstore is no longer a part of the current talks. “I hope a lot of those people against having a big-box store will be able to see that reasoning, ‘OK we can live with high-density living here so that we can get a good community resource, a library,’” Mila says. Anderson is more skeptical. “I have not been impressed with the integrity of the developers,” she says. “Because now, we’re being blackmailed that if we want the library, we have to have [those] townhomes.” She likes the idea of a library, but she’s wary of Wasatch’s intentions, and she doesn’t want to see more high-density housing in a community she says already has a surplus of similar homes. “So we hold the library hostage in order to get highdensity housing?” Anderson says. “That, for me, has been one of the disillusioning things—to have to deal with developers.” Lankford says Wasatch could just try to put in all townhomes rather than talking with the county about a potential library. “Having a civic component on this site, we just think makes a great project,” he says. What’s more, Lankford says, Wasatch’s interest in purchasing the land from the school district isn’t dependent upon the rezoning. “There’s lots of options if this didn’t materialize,” he says, like putting in all single-family homes over the 11 acres and staying within the existing zoning parameters. But, he says, “to have the whole site single-family homes does not leave a legacy for Granite.” Wasatch will adjust accordingly if the county backs out of the library or if the rezoning isn’t approved, Lankford says, but he’s optimistic it’ll get done. No matter how things shake out, “We don’t plan on going away.” Steve Norr, another Granite alum who still lives in the area and who makes a living as a kitchen designer and realtor, acknowledges the “insane demand for homes” in the city, but he doesn’t know any local residents, including himself, who want to see the land zoned for high-density housing. “We just want to be respectful of the site,” he says. “That property will be in the memories of people who went to that school forever.”

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‘What Can We Live With?’

KELAN LYONS

Below: Former SoSL Mayor Jim Davis. Right: Vestiges of Granite High before it was razed.


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Anderson, a former PTA president at Granite, shows off her Bronze Farmer service award. the Class of ’63 alum says, pointing. “It was kind of [like] an idyllic college campus.” Davis, whose family called Granite their academic home for four generations, feels the same way about the land as Anderson. Granite wasn’t just a school, but a sacred site for neighborhood residents to meet and chat, a safe space for kids to play while their elders drank coffee and talked about their lives. “We’re not just talking about some bricks and mortar,” Davis says. “We’re talking about the fabric of a community.” A library would be a “great boon” to that community, Davis says, but he worries it’d require a tradeoff. “That’s not ball fields. That’s not picnic grounds,” he says. “Yes, the library could be a good thing, but what does it come at the expense of?” In Davis’ perfect world, all that land would become a park. He’s not against adding housing, but he thinks public space would benefit more people and strengthen neighborhood ties. Surveying the fallen leaves and browning grass, Davis reflects on what public spaces mean for local inhabitants. “It’s the living room of the community. It’s where people feel ownership of a place. It’s a grand opportunity for people to get together. In a way, it’s like a church,” he says. South Salt Lake agrees that it could use more open spaces. In a 2015 master plan, the city pledged to increase the number of parks within its borders, proposing to build 40.2 acres of such tracts so that all residents in the growing community live within a quarter-mile of a park. “The major weakness in the city is the limited amount of park space, and the lack of a major recreation center and gymnasium (including no private membership-based gyms). As the population grows, there are few available properties to add park space,” the document states. Davis knows getting a park is a longshot at this point, given that Garbett has purchased a part of the grounds and is already selling homes, and Wasatch is under contract with the school district, but he says if he were still mayor he’d explore the possibility of the city using eminent domain to acquire the land. “Public use always trumps a private use if it’s for the good of the community,” he says. Wood, the current mayor, says the city is not presently pursuing the property, and she has never had a conversation with anyone about using eminent domain. “It’s a reach,” Davis acknowledges, “but the big problem is coming up with whatever the money is that would be settled on to purchase it.” There are close-by parks in Salt Lake City and Murray, and South Salt Lake’s Fitts Park is less than a half-mile down 500 East, but Davis believes the more public spaces, the better. His reasoning is practical as well as philosophical—it’s a safety issue for young children to walk or ride their bikes or the bus on South Salt Lake’s busy streets. “Children are crammed in between [them],” he says, “and so small neighborhood parks become significant in those areas.” He says he harbors no ill will toward the homebuilders. Instead, his beef is with the Granite School District. From Davis’ perspective, districts have the power to strengthen the quality of life of the citizenry who live near their schools. “They should have done everything they could to support the community, because they still have schools in that area,” he says of the district, “and it’s to their own advantage to make sure South Salt Lake is building strong neighborhoods where they can support strong schools—and they gave that away.”

Horsley says the district tried to work with South Salt Lake for eight years, over multiple purchasing agreements, before putting the land on the open market. “Why would we spend all that time if we were just interested in a high bidder?” he says. Horsley has heard some residents are miffed the district didn’t just hand over the land to the city, but that wasn’t feasible. The district, he says, serves eight different cities and municipal areas, including South Salt Lake. And it would have cost an estimated $250 million to renovate the high school; roughly $100,000 per student who attended Granite at the time it closed in 2009. “To dump those kind of resources into one building that only serves this small population was not deemed to be an appropriate use of taxpayer dollars by the board,” he says. “Public perception on that issue is something I continue to battle every day here.” Still, the district did its due diligence, Horsley says. “We worked through several different variants with the city. At the end of the day, the city was unable to purchase the property, it was as simple as that.”

A Memorable Inkblot

Somewhere along the course of its century-long history, Granite High became more than a place that molded young minds. It was a space to gather and get to know your neighbor at a Friday night football game. An opportunity to be entertained and broaden your literary horizons during a theatrical play. A spot to play baseball or walk the track, a makeshift gym that helped keep local children and adults healthy. It was the common denominator among all townsfolk, regardless of color, creed or culture. “There just have not been good, positive things that uplift our community since that school closed,” Anderson says from her home, a short distance from the ongoing construction on her alma mater’s old campus. “What they put on it will never contribute what Granite contributed to this community.” Davis peers at the vacant terrain and considers what was, and what could still be. That wide-open field is more than fallen leaves and weeds, he says. “That site, to me, is sacred.” More than a year after Granite High School was obliterated, its presence remains. The large space has become a sort of Rorschach inkblot for everyone. When Davis looks at the grounds, he sees untapped potential, a possible park that could bring residents together like the school used to. When Cooper looks, he sees a library. When Mila looks, she sees a chance to salvage the city’s failed attempts to get a community center. Wood sees a pragmatic solution that would honor the school’s legacy. Garbett and Wasatch see an opportunity to earn money and address a housing shortage. It’s hard for Anderson to put into words what she sees. She talks about what was lost when Granite was demolished, the raw feelings she still has over the failed bonds, how much the school meant to her as an educator and local resident. A lot comes to her mind ... but, mostly, what she sees are memories. “We lost something that everybody in the community identified with,” Anderson says. “How do you measure what a school does for a community?” CW


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Salty Cricket: Melange Sometimes it becomes all too easy to miss the trees for the forest. With so much art of all forms being created on national stages, local art can be left to the side. The Salty Cricket Composers Collective performs the works of local Utah artists in an attempt to redirect that focus. Their final event of the year is the annual Melange concert. It couples local composers of various music styles with local performers, and is celebrating its 10th anniversary at Sugar Space Arts Warehouse this week. Victoria Petro-Eschler—executive director of Salty Cricket, a nonprofit organization and new music ensemble—explains that, outside of a university setting, it is difficult for Utah-based composers to have their music realized on Utah stages. However, “Utah has a wealth of innovative musicians,” she says. This is why Crystal Young-Otterstrom and M. Ryan Taylor founded Salty Cricket in 2008. Melange will showcase some of that wealth. “Melange was always created to be different,” Petro-Eschler says. The Composers Collective coordinates the scheduling of venues and promotes audience interest, but leaves featured composers to use their communities for the pieces’ performers. “The result has been a mix of performers, performances and somewhat unpredictable concerts to end our year,” she adds. For its 10th anniversary, Melange is going all out. Petro-Eschler says that 2018 marks the transition to a festival-concert format where, in addition to locally-grown music by local performers, the event will also include food and drink. “The event will be fun, the music will be new, and Melange will be memorable,” she says. (Casey Koldewyn) Salty Cricket: Melange 10.0 @ Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, 919-274-3845, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m., $10-$20, saltycricket.org

FRIDAY 11/16

Viva La Diva: Once Upon a Diva With the growing popularity of regular shows like “Those Bitches” at Club Try-Angles and a slew of regular performance nights at Sun Trapp and Metro Music Hall, it’s clear local drag is experiencing a well-deserved renaissance. Leading the charge is Jason CoZmo, who two years ago— aided by a makeup case and and an arsenal of Dolly Parton-approved wigs—set out to put his Viva La Diva show on the map. Endless laughs, gasps and thematic performances later, CoZmo and the crew are back with Once Upon a Diva, an all-ages storybook-themed show on Friday. As to which characters will be receiving the drag twist, the showman is cautious not to tempt Disney’s legal ire, and in a scene reminiscent of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, skirts around any copyrighted names. “A fierce snow queen, an angry sea witch, a cowgirl, a singing poodle and more,” the Magna native, who for the night will adopt the moniker “Miss CoZmoBell,” teases. The night also marks the debut of a new home for the show—The Art Factory, a mixeduse space in South Salt Lake—in anticipation of the impending sale of the troupe’s current Club X home. “It’s a beautiful space with a big stage fit for a diva,” CoZmo says of the factory. “We’re still in discussions with a couple other places, but hopefully everything will work out and we can make this stage our new home.” Could 2019 usher in a brick-and-mortar CoZmo Cabaret? Time to wish upon a star. (Enrique Limón) Viva La Diva: Once Upon a Diva @ The Art Factory, 193 W. 2100 South, South Salt Lake, 801-888-9638, Nov. 16, 8 p.m., $30, thevivaladivashow.com

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THURSDAY 11/15

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, NOV. 15-21, 2018

DANIELLE LEVITT

ESSENTIALS

the

FRIDAY 11/16

SATURDAY 11/17

There are comedians with the reputation for a naughty streak in their stand-up acts. And then there’s Nikki Glaser, who in a recent appearance on national television on Conan, described her vagina as follows: “You know how when most women stand up, it looks like a line? Mine looks like a hastily-packed suitcase.” That frank sensibility has been part of Glaser’s stage persona since she started her career as an 18-year-old, and it’s hard to believe that the fresh-faced performer has been working at her craft for more than 15 years. Her saucy willingness to dig into every possible off-color topic— but mostly into the eyebrow-raising elements of her own sex life—have made her a favorite in comedy clubs and late-night talk show appearances, as well as a season of her own Comedy Central series, Not Safe with Nikki Glaser, in 2016. So if you’re deciding to check out a Nikki Glaser show, there should be no confusion or pearl-clutching over the material she mines for her jokes. But that doesn’t mean she limits her biting observational humor to matters below the belt. In a routine about the way some women give up their last name when they get married, Glaser laments that “your name is nothing after you get married. All it is is your shithead son’s bank account security question answer. … It’s like, ‘What worthless question could we ask, that no one would ever know about this man, to protect his finances?’ ‘What about his mother’s name?’ ‘Perfect! Who gives a shit, right?’” (Scott Renshaw) Nikki Glaser @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Nov. 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

Anyone keeping count of the number of literary awards accumulated by any one author would likely have Neil Gaiman at the top of their list. He’s accumulated dozens of accolades, among them literary honors from any number of societies and organizations that recognize excellence in the realms of fantasy and graphic novels. Revered by young readers and sci-fi enthusiasts alike, his work has landed him the top spot on The New York Times bestseller list, and his comic brand, Sandman, even inspired Stephen King to describe his work as a new contemporary art form. The Los Angeles Times boldly called the Sandman series an “unmatched epic.” His efforts also earned the distinction of becoming the first comic book to be lauded as a literary triumph, confirmed by the fact that it garnered a World Fantasy Award for Best Short Story. Not surprisingly, then, the British-born author, comic book creator and screenwriter has become the object of ongoing analysis over the course of his 25-year career. To his credit, Gaiman doesn’t distance himself from the discussion. Instead, he’s frequently found tweeting, posting commentary on his blog and speaking to adoring audiences, creating a direct connection with his ardent admirers. “Everybody has a secret world inside of them,” Gaiman insists in his book The Kindly Ones, Volume 9 in the Sandman series. “I mean everybody—no matter how dull and boring they are on the outside. Inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid, amazing worlds ... Not just one world. Hundreds of them. Thousands, maybe.” That’s both generous and philosophical. Credit Gaiman for pondering that possibility. (Lee Zimmerman) An Evening With Neil Gaiman @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Nov. 17, 8 p.m., $20.50-$59.50, artsaltlake.org

Nikki Glaser

An Evening with Neil Gaiman


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20 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

A&E

The Science of Poetry— and ViceVersa

Kealoha brings the skills of both physicist and artist to The Story of Everything. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

rtists can take an infinite number of paths to finding their creative sweet spot. Not many of those paths wind their way through a career as a nuclear physicist. However, for Kealoha—the poet laureate of Hawaii, who brings his evening-length performance piece The Story of Everything to Utah this week—it has felt natural for most of his life to combine his interests in math and science with his interest in language. He recalls an occasion during a high-school assembly in Honolulu when a Hawaiian poet named Lois-Anne Yamanaka read from her first book of poems. “Before that, I’d only been exposed to writers from other worlds,” Kealoha recalls. “But I remember watching her, and I thought she was speaking for me. Her voice was my voice.” Still, he found himself drawn in his academic studies to nuclear physics, and attended MIT, where he graduated with a degree in engineering. He found particular fascination in the burgeoning science of nuclear fusion, but soon found himself frustrated with his work. “You have this viewpoint that you’re going to go out and change the world with the science you’re doing,” he says, “but then you see the reality that you’re

going to be in a basement with fluorescent lights, tooling around on Excel spreadsheets. Plus the field I was in, fusion energy, the problems were less about the technology than the politics. You become a little bit jaded, because you see this amazing technology that could change the world, and politicians are bought off by big oil interests.” Kealoha transitioned from research into consulting in the private sector after a move to the San Francisco Bay area, and it was there that he connected with the local slam poetry scene after seeing an ad in a local alt-weekly. And while the stereotype of the lab nerd might suggest a difficult transition to performing poetry on a stage, the art form immediately spoke to him. “For me, it was the perfect combination of the words with theater, movement, the musical element,” he says. “I grew up dancing and acting. I wasn’t really an introvert. This was real, it was human, it was people in a room together sharing ideas, building a community. That’s something I was needing.” The Story of Everything certainly incorporates Kealoha’s talents as a poet, but it also expands the scale to a theatrical performance piece that includes multi-media art, music and dance. It was inspired, as many singular creative works are, by a major life transition for the artist. “I found out that I was going to have a child in 2011,” he recalls. “So I did what most people do: I freaked out. What’s this fatherhood thing all about? So I took some time to gather my thoughts, … and I thought, ‘One day, this child is going to ask where we come from.’ It’s not like I have one thing I subscribe to as a creation story. But I do subscribe to science, so I set out to write from a scientific viewpoint.” The result is a narrative about the origins of the universe that transforms cosmicscale events into metaphorical stories, like the creation of the solar system becoming a love triangle between the Earth, the sun and the moon. He also reaches toward the future in talking about the need to address global climate change—a subject about which he once drafted a white paper that was presented to the Pentagon. For Kealoha, combining his art with his scientific background is a natural fit, where

RONEN ZILBERMAN

POETRY

he believes the skill set required for the latter actually helps make him a better poet. “With science, especially with physics and nuclear physics, the things you’re talking about—protons, neutrons, quarks—there’s no visual for them” he says. “You have to have a pretty decent imagination to picture all of these interactions. So having that sense of imagination feeds directly into the ability to tell a good story, and describe abstract things. The other thing I’ve found is that when I’m writing poetry, I’m usually trying to analyze an emotion, or a problem that I see within myself or the community. So I’m using the basic forms of analysis to break down these ideas into smaller parts, solving those smaller parts, then bringing them back to a conclusion.” He also realizes that one of the factors limiting the ability of the scientific community to have more people accept the reality of climate change is a reliance on data, rather than on understanding how to reach people through a story. “We need to touch people on an emotional level if you want

Kealoha

to bring about a change in perspective,” Kealoha says. “You have to strip down all the science you know and think, ‘What matters to people?’” What matters to Kealoha is using his unique mix of skills and knowledge to do exactly that—as he describes it, “being a bridge” to help laypeople understand science. “This is what my life has led up to,” he says about The Story of Everything. “It has everything I’ve ever learned in my entire life.” CW

KEALOHA: THE STORY OF EVERYTHING

Friday, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m. Kingsbury Hall 1395 E. Presidents Circle 801-581-7100 $5-$25 tickets.utah.edu


PARTY WITH THE BEST Thursday, November 15th, 2018 7:30pm-11:30pm

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you’re invited to the best party of the year featuring food, drinks & entertainment from 2018 winners

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moreESSENTIALS

BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE Supporting authors from “shithole” countries

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

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Some 50 local artists showcase gift-appropriate, smaller-sized works (Daren Young’s untitled acrylic is pictured) in Small Treasures at Art Access Gallery (230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801328-0703, accessart.org), Nov. 16-Dec. 12, with an artist reception Friday, Nov. 16, 6-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

12 Minutes Max Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Nov. 18, 2 p.m., slcpl.org The Addams Family Musical! Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, Nov. 16-24, egyptiantheatrecompany.org Afterglow Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 16-Dec. 2, dates and times vary, arttix.artsaltlake.org Anything Goes Hale Center Theatre, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Nov. 17, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Big Love Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Nov. 18, dates and times vary, tickets.utah.edu Disney on Ice: 100 Years of Magic Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, through Nov. 18, times vary, disneyonice.com Kealoha: The Story of Everything Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 20) Ruthless! Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Nov. 17, dates and times vary, weber.edu The Scarlet Pimpernel Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Wait Until Dark Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., hct.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Cyrus Chestnut Quartet Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org Even When He is Silent: Songs of Earth and Heaven All Saints Episcopal Church, 1710 Foothill Drive, Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., saltlakechoralartists.org Faculty Recital: Beethoven Piano Sonatas Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m., utah.edu Salty Cricket: Melange 10.0 Sugar Space, 132 S. 800 West, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m., saltycricket.org (see p. 18) Modigliani Quartet with Fabio Bidini Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 Presidents Circle, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

NOVA Chamber Music Series: Music by British Composers Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Nov. 18, 3-5 p.m., novaslc.org Utah Symphony: Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Nov. 16-17, 7:30 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Brad Bonar: Comedy & Magic Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Nov. 16-17, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Brave & Dandi Improv Comedy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Nov. 17, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com Jackie Kashian Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Nov. 16-17, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Nikki Glaser Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Nov. 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18)

DANCE

Ballet Showcase Brigham Young University, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 17, 2 p.m., arts.byu.edu Flight of Fancy Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 17, 2 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org Modern Dance Graduate Show Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, Nov. 15, 5:30 p.m.; Nov. 16-17, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Mosaic Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 15-17, 7:30 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

An Evening With Neil Gaiman Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Nov. 17, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Chadd VanZanten: On Fly-Fishing the Wind River Range: Essays and a List of What Not to Bring The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 17, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Christian McKay Heidicker Sweet Branch Library, 455 F St., Nov. 15, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Edward Lueders: The Salt Lake Papers: From the Years in the Earthscapes of Utah


The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 20, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Katharine Coles: Look Both Ways Gateway Crossing Barnes & Noble, 340 S. 500 West, West Bountiful, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Saryon Michael White: Roya Sands and the Bridge Between Worlds The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Goth Prom Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, Nov. 17, 9 p.m., gallerystroll.org SLUG Magazine’s Brewstillery Union Event Center, 235 N. 500 West, Nov. 17, 4-10 p.m., slugmag.com

LGBTQ EVENTS

Matrons of Mayhem Drag Queen Charity Bingo Night First Baptist Church, 777 S. 1300 East, Nov. 16, 7-9:30 p.m., facebook.com/matronsofmayhem Trans Day of Remembrance Urban Indian Center, 120 W. 1300 South., Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Viva La Diva: Once Upon a Diva Club X, 445 S. 400 West & The Art Factory, 193 W. 2100 South, Nov. 17-18 & 23, 8 p.m., thevivaladivashow.com (see p. 18)

TALKS & LECTURES

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

| CITY WEEKLY | | NOVEMBER 15, 2018 | 23

Daniel Everett: Security Questions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Dreamscapes Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Jan. 6, kimballartcenter.org Glass Art Show Red Butte Gardens, 300 Wakara Way, through Dec. 18, redbuttegarden.org Holiday Group Exhibition A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Jan. 1, agalleryonline.com Jeffory Buist: Open Spaces Anderson-Foothill Branch, 1135 S. 2100 East, through Dec. 20, slcpl.org Jeff Pugh: New Works David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, through Nov. 16, davidericson-fineart.com JP Orquiz: A Stack of Forms UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 17, utahmoca.org Kandace Steadman: Utah Art Reimagined Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org

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VISUAL ART

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Amy Hetzler: A Conversation on End-of-Life Options Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., slcpl.org David Johnston: Waste, Wildlife & Wilderness Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, Nov. 20, 7 p.m., greatsaltlakeaudubon.org David Sedaris Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Nov. 18, 7 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org Mark E. Button: Democracy in America: Past, Present, and Future Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Nathan Nielson: How the Great Russian Writers Created Meaning from Nature Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Valerie Hudson: The First Political Order: Sex, Governance and National Security Gore School of Business Auditorium, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., westminstercollege.edu The Wisdom in Deep Creativity: Bordering on Boldness with Dennis Slattery Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Nov. 16, 7 p.m., jungutah.org

Kelly Baisley & Virginia Catherall: Sense of Place, Great Salt Lake Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Jan. 11, visualarts.utah.gov Marisa Morán Jahn: Mirror / Mask Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 9, umfa.utah.edu Molly Morin: Information Density Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Naomi Owen: Unforeseen Nature Paintings Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org Park City Collects III Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Jan. 6, kimballartcenter.org Patrick Dean Hubbell: Equus Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Nov. 30, modernwestfineart.com Paul Reynolds & Deborah Durban Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Nov. 16, saltlakearts.org Photography from the East Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Dec. 2, slcpl.org Ryan Perkins: Parallel Lives, Misremembered Pasts, Revelation, Heartbreak & Lore Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org salt 14: Yang Yongliang Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., through June 2, umfa.utah.edu Seeing the Sacred Urban Arts Gallery 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Dec. 2, urbanartsgallery.org Site Lines: Recent Work by University of Utah Art Faculty Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 6, umfa.utah.edu Small Treasures Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, Nov. 16-Dec. 12, accessart.org (see p. 22) Statewide Annual Exhibition Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Jan. 11, heritage.utah.gov Stronger Ties Sweet Branch, 455 F St., through Dec. 22, slcpl.org Tom Judd & Kiki Gaffney: Point of View Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Jan. 12, modernwestfineart.com What I Brought in my Luggage: Relics of Lost Lives Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Dec. 21, slcpl.org Working Hard to Be Useless UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org


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AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 5 p.m.- 9 p.m., Friday & Saturday, 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Best bet: The curry fried chicken plate Can’t miss: Mango lassi

NOVEMBER 15, 2018 | 25

I’ve been a longtime visitor of this downtown gem, but I only recently learned that it shares a pedigree with Curry in a Hurry—both restaurants are owned by our local treasures the Nisar family. The Nisars have a knack for creating eateries that harmoniously blend their Pakistani and American heritage into warm, welcoming places to enjoy good food prepared with love. Taking something as quint-

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Fusion happens when you belly up to a bar to have your nose tingle as the smell of curry and samosas seamlessly blend with the smell of frying oil and crispy chicken. Fusion happens when a tray laden with mugs full of lassi makes its way past a trophy case full of cricket paraphernalia. In short, fusion happens at Curry Fried Chicken (660 S. State, 801-924-9188, facebook.com/cfcslc) on a regular basis.

he word “fusion” has become an interesting fixture among today’s trendy restaurants. Indo-Chinese-retro fusion. Contemporary American-Afghani fusion. FrancoFijian fusion. Whatever the cause for this gimmick, the true concept of fusion seems to be absent. But that doesn’t mean fusion in the actual meaning of the word doesn’t exist—it just happens to be much rarer than all those hyphenated upstarts would have you think.

the curry fish kabob wrap ($8.99) because it takes the curry fusion process an extra step into fish taco territory. While I’ve found wraps as a food item to be melancholy little creations, the wraps here are gigantic and stuffed to the seams—they’re definitely big enough to have for dinner. Much like the difference between those who know they’re cool and those who say they’re cool, Curry Fried Chicken is one of the few places around that knows how to pull off the fusion concept. A visit to this downtown eatery is a peek into a world where cultural and culinary identities merge to celebrate their similarities instead of criticize their differences, and it’s a breath of fresh air in a world that seems bent on impeding those relationships. Come for the fried chicken, and stay for the unexpected cultural enlightenment. CW

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Curry Fried Chicken is the fusion restaurant we deserve.

followed by the sweet succulence of the chicken itself. At some point while you let all of that goodness party in your mouth, the heat of the curry flavor starts to kick in at the back of your throat. By this time, you’re practically begging for another bite, so you dive in and repeat the process. It’s not long before you’re licking that flavor off of the bones that have arrived much more quickly than you were expecting. No matter how many times I come here, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes the fried chicken here so remarkable. My best guess is that, like Nashville hot chicken, the curry-fueled kick makes for a more exciting and flavorful bird, but that’s not the end of the riddle. Something about the smoky, aromatic richness of curry locks step with fried chicken’s natural flavor profile, and creates a savory bomb that detonates with every bite. That, and they nail the texture. Rubbery skin and a chewy crust have no place within these walls. Curry Fried Chicken does their outer layer right—they could market and sell bags of this stuff to put potato chips right out of business. For those after a less tactile dining experience, you can’t really go wrong with any of their wraps—I like

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Fried and True

essentially American as fried chicken, hitting it with an intoxicating dose of curry and spices and serving it alongside curried veggies and basmati rice is the living embodiment of such harmony. All the flavors work alongside one another—it’s not a case of a chef trying to be edgy by slapping coq au vin on a plate with banh mi and calling it fusion. The food that they’re preparing in the deep fryers and on the stovetops of Curry Fried Chicken is a culinary innovation analogous to the internal combustion engine. Each plate combines flavors and textures that completely change the way you think about fried chicken and curry. That, my friends, is why we go out to eat in the first place. As the place is called Curry Fried Chicken, the whole point of a visit is to take a deep dive into their iteration of a comfort food staple. The curry fried chicken plate ($10.99) is the ideal way to do this, because you get a little bit of everything. The dish comes with a leg and a breast, a salad, warm flatbread and a side of curried veggies. It’s a beautiful arrangement—I’ll take curried veggies and rice over coleslaw and macaroni salad any day. That first bite of fried chicken is a love letter to the senses. There’s a beautiful textural crunch


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BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER

The biggest hidden secret in the valley

@captainspringer

Brewstillery 2018

Forget the fact that SLUG Magazine’s biannual event features a keg full of local brewers and distillers that celebrate Utah’s burgeoning beer and spirits culture—this might be one of the few events that combines alcohol and axe throwing—and that’s badass. Outside of the presence of throwable sharp objects, I suppose the real reason to visit Brewstillery is to foster an appreciation of all the great work that our local brewmeisters and spirit conjurers do in Utah. In addition to samples from a wide variety of local breweries and distilleries, attendees can visit local food trucks and vendors and bob their heads to local music. The event takes place at Union Event Center (235 N. 500 West) on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 4 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $20 and are available via 24tix.com

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

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Brewstillery isn’t the only event where folks can get their drink on this weekend. The creative forces at the Leonardo (209 E. 500 South) have reinstated Libations at the Leonardo. For those new to the event, it consists of a five-course meal paired with wines curated by Jim Santangelo of the Wine Academy of Utah. The menu for the evening is French-inspired— dishes like honey smoked salmon croquettes and coq au vin make an appearance. Libations at the Leonardo takes place on Friday, Nov. 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $64 (plus a $20 drink charge at the door) and can be purchased online via bit.ly/2FkUMNs. If you’re a fan of the Leonardo, you’ve likely heard about its financial woes—this is a great way to show your support and get a tasty meal at the same time.

Thanksgiving Techniques Class

Just in time for that most awkward of family dinners, the culinary educators at the Park City Culinary Institute (1484 S. State) are hosting a class chock full of Thanksgiving cooking techniques that will leave even the most butterfingered amateur prepared. Chef Todd Gormley will take the reins as he shows attendees the basics of turkey preparation, goat cheese mashed potatoes and sage chestnut cornbread stuffing. All ingredients and cooking tools will be included—attendees need only to show up with a stout heart and a malleable mind to learn some of the tricks of the Thanksgiving trade. The class is held on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 6 to 9 p.m., and pre-registration tickets can be purchased via EventBrite. Quote of the Week: “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” —Mark Twain

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Stout, Stout, Let Them All Out These are the beers I can’t do without. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

f you were locked in an underground box, had no calendar and couldn’t see the sky, I’m pretty sure you could tell what time of year it was just by my beer selections. Like flipping a switch, the weather changed—and along with it, my hoppy and fruity palate. If you ask me, the timing couldn’t have been better. There’s a whole new batch of sticky, full-bodied beers to choose from now. As a result, I’ve found two new offerings from Epic Brewing Co. and 2 Row Brewing that you need to put on your lists ASAP. Epic Quadruple Barrel Big Bad Baptist: This is the fourth incarnation of Epic’s popular Big Bad Baptist series of Imperial stouts.

What made this brew so endearing to beer fans was its combination of exquisite coffees with oaky bourbon and rye. This version has all of those elements with the addition of rum barrels, roasted cocoa nibs, whiskeyaged coffee beans, whiskey-aged coconut and whiskey-aged almonds. The almonds are new to the series, and this is what helps separates this stout from its predecessors. Pitch black is the only color I see when I look at this ale. The head is a nice mocha color, with long, syrupy legs. The incredibly-layered nose features bourbon, coffee, vanilla and a hint of boozy rum. It’s like marshmallow and nougat dipped in chocolate liqueur. The taste brings a lot more of the same layers—again with more bourbon, rum-soaked raisins, big cocoa and dark chocolate. The coffee layer comes next, with fudge and macchiato playing off whiskey and rum. The third layer brings in more-pronounced dark fruits, with hints of port wine and baking spices. The final layer is akin to silky cookie dough. I attribute this to the almond addition; it’s such a contrast from the beginning layer and almost like adding cream to coffee. The finish lingers and sticks with an appropriate 11.5 percent amount of alcoholic warmth. Overall: I wouldn’t have thought that almond would be such a powerful finishing flavor in a full-bodied animal such as this, but it really tames this complex beast of a beer nicely.

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

2 Row Raspberry Sticks: It looks like the holidays are here early at 2 Row Brewing. One of the state’s best-kept secrets in craft beer has put together a stout that will re-create one of the favorite candies from the holidays: the raspberry stick. The small jelly-filled chocolate rods are a favorite of 2 Row’s owner and brewmaster, Brian Coleman. “I really enjoy raspberry sticks and chocolate oranges around the holidays,” Coleman says, “and have always wanted to duplicate those flavors in a stout.” Well, Coleman has managed to faithfully replicate this famous holiday candy, and it’s quite uncanny. It’s black, as you can imagine, with a tan cap of foam on top. The aromas include the chocolate and raspberry blend up front, with just a hint of roasted

malt in the background. The flavors are much as expected from the nose, but with chocolate up front and backed up strongly by the raspberries. Mingled in to the chocolatey flavor mix, tart and juicy raspberries emerge. The berries are nice and fresh tasting—an improvement versus the candy. The 8.3 percent alcohol is well concealed here, noticeable only from the slight warmth it creates after several sips. Overall, this is a very well-made beer that I’m really enjoying. My only criticism of this one is that it might not last until the holidays. This is the time for holiday beers; if you see them, buy them now. By the time Black Friday hits, the best of them might all be gone—and that goes for the hoppier holiday beers as well. As always, cheers! CW

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During my years as a college undergrad, every family gathering orchestrated by my mom always featured a gigantic box of éclairs or petit fours from Schmidt’s. As the name implies, Schmidt’s offers German pastries as well as a lineup of usual suspects. Since the pastries are all more than reasonably priced, it’s difficult to not simply ask for one of everything and be on your way. For those in need of a slightly less-caloric indulgence, I can vouch for the toscos ($1.10)—small rectangles of white cake stuffed with raspberry and bookended with chocolate. The beinenstich ($1.55) are a bit heavier on the buttercream than I like, but all in all, this is a solid pastry that isn’t as widely available as it should be. Those looking for dessert that eats like a meal will want to turn their attention to the menu of plated desserts like the Holy Schmidt ($38.99)—a 9-inch, two-layered cake topped with nine scoops of ice cream, hot fudge, caramel, whipped cream and cherries. Schmidt’s remains one of the better options for indulging your sweet tooth. Reviewed Oct. 25. Multiple locations, schmidtspastry.net

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CINEMA

FILM REVIEW

Coming of Rage

Lucas Hedges again captures the essence of troubled youth in Boy Erased. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

f there were a poster campaign to represent “Troubled 21st-Century Youth,” it would probably have Lucas Hedges’ face on it. From his Oscar-nominated role as a grieving teen in Manchester by the Sea to a closeted gay kid in last year’s Lady Bird to this year’s trio of wounded roles—Mid90s, the new Boy Erased and the upcoming Ben Is Back—the 21-year-old actor has carved out a niche as the guy who can find soulfulness in emotional pain. And the remarkable thing, for someone his age, is that none of these damaged characters feels exactly the same. That’s crucial for a film like Boy Erased, which in this year of our Lord 2018 could easily play to only one audience segment. Based on the memoir by Garrard Conley, it’s a story of Christian “gay conversion” therapy, and it’s hardly a spoiler to reveal that the film is not exactly “pro” where that kind of therapy is concerned. But rather than wallow in smug nudges to like-minded viewers that of course we understand what harmful nonsense this all is, writer/director Joel Edgerton (The Gift) wisely keeps the focus on Hedges’ performance, allowing it to become a rich character study of someone figuring out who he is, and what he’s prepared to risk in order to be that person. Boy Erased renames Conley’s surrogate as Jared Eamons, an 18-year-old Arkansas college student who, as the film opens, is being checked in by his mother, Nancy (Nicole Kidman) to a program called Love in Action. There, under the supervision of a minister named Sykes (played by Edgerton), Jared and his fellow attendees begin attempting to pray the gay away, all while working on family histories and moral inventories to help them understand the root causes of the same-sex attraction that they’re so desperate to shed.

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They’re also subjected to various activities intended to emphasize their masculinity, and it’s here that Edgerton isn’t shy about making it seem ridiculous that learning how to hit a fastball or offer a firmer handshake is expected to help straighten these boys right up. His default position as a filmmaker, however, is resolutely lowkey, so there’s rarely a moment when he goes over the top in positioning the Love in Action program as a hive of hypocritical villainy. The introduction of Jared’s peers in the group—a more effeminate boy who might be gaming the system, a true believer who has decided not to make physical contact with anyone to keep him on track, a big but sensitive football player—certainly cues up the potential for future tragedy, while not in that way that makes it clear which soldier in a war movie is going to get shot the minute he talks about his girl back home. Instead, Boy Erased allows the weight of the story to fall on Hedges’ performance, and Edgerton gives him plenty to work with. The narrative weaves back and forth in time, revealing the encounters that lead Jared beyond his mere attraction and curiosity. That choice gives Boy Erased a leg upon this year’s other Christian conversion drama, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, which focused so intently on the program itself that we never got a sense for what its protagonist had actually done, and how she felt about it. And Hedges gets to show off a wide range of colors, from tentative first

Lucas Hedges in Boy Erased

steps toward self-awareness, to a belief that he wants to change, to outrage once he begins to question the program’s effectiveness. It’s a bit disappointing that Boy Erased stumbles in trying to make its climactic emotional moment a confrontation between Jared and his father (Russell Crowe), a Baptist preacher finding it hard to accept Jared’s sexuality. There’s little time devoted to setting up the father-son relationship—and only slightly more to Kidman’s Nancy, so that she ends up feeling generically motherly—so while the screen time is heavily weighted toward the therapy program itself, it doesn’t build to the personal epiphany that would be a natural end point. That moment of clarity is powerful enough thanks to Hedges, who continues to show that there are new ways to play the process of wrestling with all the baggage that makes it hard to navigate the path to growing up. CW

BOY ERASED

BBB Lucas Hedges Nicole Kidman Russell Crowe R

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The Gift (2015) Jason Bateman Rebecca Hall R

Manchester by the Sea (2016) Casey Affleck Lucas Hedges R

Lady Bird (2017) Saoirse Ronan Laurie Metcalf R

The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2018) Chloë Grace Moretz Sasha Lane R


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NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BOY ERASED BBB See review on p. 30. Opens Nov. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD [not yet reviewed] Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) faces the threat of a dark wizard. Opens Nov. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

WIDOWS BB.5 I swear I didn’t know the source material for this crime-dramathriller from director Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave) when, at the halfway point, I thought, “Man, this really should have been a miniseries.” Indeed, McQueen and co-writer Gillian Flynn are adapting a 1983 British miniseries focusing on three Chicago women—Veronica (Viola Davis), Linda (Michelle Rodgriguez) and Alice (Elizabeth Debicki)—who get into dangerous work after the death of their criminal husbands during a heist. “Focusing” might be a bit of a stretch, however, since there’s also an election for alderman between a legacy candidate (Colin Farrell) and a crime boss (Brian Tyree Henry) looking to transition to politics. The script is dense with characters and ideas— police shootings of young black men; political corruption; victimized women; economic disparities based on race—nearly all of which get barely a moment to register before the script moves on. Although McQueen directs the hell out of this thing, from the kiss-kiss-bang-bang opening through a terrific sequence focusing on the neighborhood through which Farrell’s car is driving, it’s a sprawling narrative that clearly can’t fit in a 129-minute container. Opens Nov. 16 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE COLORADO At Main Library, Nov. 20, 7 p.m. (NR) PICK OF THE LITTER At Park City Film Series, Nov. 16-17, 8 p.m.; Nov. 18, 6 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY BB The story of Freddie Mercury should be stuff of a great character study; instead, we get a 134-minute Behind the Music installment. The narrative tracks Mercury (Rami Malek) from 1970, as he joins the band that will become Queen, through its peak and the legendary 1985 Live Aid performance. The strongest potential material is in the relationship between Mercury and his wife, Mary (Lucy Boynton), but their lifelong connection remains frustratingly underdeveloped. Malek bites into his performance—and his prosthetic overbite—with gusto, embodying Mercury’s frontman charisma. But mostly this is the kind of music biopic Walk Hard so mercilessly mocked, running through a checklist of tortured artist clichés. Any insight into Freddie Mercury as a person is sacrificed in favor of reminding us every five minutes, in the most ham-fisted manner possible, how awesome Queen was. (PG-13)—SR DR. SEUSS’ THE GRINCH BB This latest big-screen adaptation of the classic picture book is entirely superfluous, and appears to have been deliberately designed to be instantly forgettable. The Christmas curmudgeon here is almost cuddly—more Oscar the Grouch than truly Grinchy. Benedict Cumberbatch’s voice is unrecognizable as the Grinch; he might be the best and only memorable thing here, but the submerged sweetness Cumberbatch brings to this antihero makes it feel less hard-won when his heart grows three sizes. Mostly what we get is candy-colored slapstick and affable action sequences—see Cindy Lou Who racing through the snowy streets of Whoville to catch the mailman, to deliver her letter to Santa!—and gentle, kindergarten-level humor like beholding the Grinch in his tighty-whiteys. It’s perfectly suitable for small children, and perfectly bland and inoffensive to the adults accompanying them. Dr. Seuss probably wouldn’t approve. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

THE GIRL IN THE SPIDER’S WEB BB This should be a perfect moment for Lisbeth Salander— author Stieg Larsson’s super-hacker and survivor, wreaking vengeance on those who harm women—so it’s depressing to see her in a generic espionage tale. The story finds Lisbeth (Claire Foy) stealing a computer “master-key” to the world’s nuclear arsenals for its conscience-stricken creator (Stephen Merchant), which means her life is in danger again. Journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Sverrir Gudnason) returns as well in a perfunctory role, but this is squarely Lisbeth’s story, and Foy is solid enough that it would have been fine had this narrative been as concerned with her dark past as it was with car chases and fistfights. Director Fede Alvarez offers a few nice stylistic touches, until everything starts to feel like a third-rate James Bond rip-off, rather than a showcase for an utterly singular character. (R)—SR THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS BB.5 If you’ve ever wondered whether the classic Christmas tale of The Nutcracker could become a gaudy hero-journey narrative, I guess the answer is, “Sure?” In Victorian London, young Clara (Mackenzie Foy), mourning the recent passing of her mother, visits a strange land where a war instigated by Mother Ginger (Helen Mirren) looms. Ashleigh Powell’s screenplay draws from many vintage sources—notably the Narnia saga, as Clara emerges into a wintry forest where she’s hailed as royalty—and it’s satisfying to see a young female protagonist with engineering savvy. The mythology often feels fairly thin, however, and the CGI spectacle threatens to overwhelm everything on the way to the obvious life lessons. Satisfying visual tidbits—including creepy nesting-doll clowns—mix with Tchaikovsky’s beloved score for a family adventure that pushes the right buttons, but doesn’t quite achieve the desired magic. (PG)—SR

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INSTANT FAMILY BBB.5 Precious and rare is a heartstring-tugging comedy that manages to earn both its laughs and its emotion—but co-writer/director Sean Anders pulls from his own experience as a foster parent to deliver a genuinely satisfying surprise. Ellie (Rose Byrne) and Sam (Mark Wahlberg) are a childless couple heading into their 40s who somewhat impulsively decide to foster a trio of siblings: 15-year-old Lizzy (Isabela Moner), anxious Juan (Gustavo Quiroz) and tantrum terror Lita (Julianna Gamiz). Anders pitches his humor at a tart-tongued sweet spot between his bawdy comedies like Sex Drive and adorable-kid smiles, and finds great moments for supporting cast members like Tig Notaro and Octavia Spencer (as the foster-parent agency case workers) and Margo Martindale (as Wahlberg’s mom). What takes it up a notch, though, is a recognition of the roller-coaster of successes and failures in this kind of non-traditional family, captured in simple moments like Ellie awkwardly adjusting how close to Lizzy

it feels appropriate to sit. At 120 minutes, it threatens to wear out its welcome a touch; it’s also as honest and funny a publicservice announcement for foster parenting as you could hope for. Opens Nov. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw


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CONCERT PREVIEW

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17

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Julien Baker discusses energy and empowerment in her new collaboration with Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus.

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upergroups don’t just appear out of thin air. Even if their music materializes out of nowhere, feeling fully formed, you can rest assured that a lot of behind-thescenes went into said supergroup’s creation. Such is the case with boygenius, the new trio featuring rising indie rock stars Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus. Dedicated fans can easily spot the differences between each woman’s aesthetic—Baker’s raw emotion, Bridgers’ folk-inflected darkness and Dacus’ hard-rocking incision. But acolytes will be amazed to discover the depth of the trio’s friendship and creative inspiration. All three ran into each other often in 2016-17: on festival lineups, on labels (Baker and Dacus both release their music via Matador Records) and particularly in think pieces celebrating the rise of fierce young women in rock ’n’ roll. Once the three started trading emails and following each other’s careers more closely, an indelible bond was formed. “Lucy and Phoebe are very empathetic,” Baker says. “They feel very deeply. Their sensitivity to the world— their awareness of it—makes them such great songwriters, but what makes them great performers and artists is their motivation and vision.” All three artists are under age 25, but each has released two critically acclaimed and commercially successful full-length albums and sold-out tours. Yet they still found the time this spring to get together and record boygenius, a six-song EP that highlights each woman’s strengths while accentuating their collective power. “Lucy and Phoebe are both driven individuals who have very clear ideas of what they what to accomplish with their art,” Baker says. “They’re strong women—they know their worth—and I respect that. All of us getting together in the room was inspiring because, rather than butting heads, we got to combine our collective energies into this strength displayed by our peers.” Baker says that boygenius broadened her own writing capabilities, too. Because she writes organically, letting songs “distill slowly and gradually as I go through life,” experimentation can be difficult. “Writing with Lucy and Phoebe freed up some of my inhibitions about venturing into un-pioneered territory,” Baker says. “Working with them showed me how much there is to gain from taking risks, instead of planning everything out exactly. I’m a very meticulous, calculated person, but harnessing the beauty of spontaneity is something I learned from this collaboration.” Baker, Bridgers and Dacus have no problem writing from the heart: exposing their vulnerabilities, shattering their egos and highlighting their differences. Their current tour—which features all three musicians performing together as well as solo—finds them playing some of the biggest stages of their careers (both Bridgers’ and Baker’s last shows in Salt Lake City were at Kilby Court). So a sense of scope and scale is required. “That’s part of the normal obstacles you’re going to encounter as a performing artist,” Baker laughs. “You have to show some elasticity as a performer and think about how to make songs adaptable to a new context.

LERA PENTELUTE

BROTHERS BRIMM

BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

Phoebe Bridgers, left, Julien Baker, middle, and Lucy Dacus of boygenius. Personally, I love when artists change songs; I enjoy that part of live performance. As we continue on this tour, we might add amps to make it louder. We might change songs to accommodate a series of violin solos. I perform with tracks that I trigger with my feet, even though none of that is on the record.” The most important part of each artist’s evolution, however, has come as critics respond more to their music and less to their respective identities. Baker and Dacus both hail from religious Southern upbringings and identify as queer; a disproportionate amount of Bridgers’ early press focused on her professional and personal relationship with alt-country icon Ryan Adams. But Baker says she’s happy to embrace her role as a trailblazer. “I’ve been torn about that basically the entire time I’ve been a musician,” she says. “The fact that I’ve struggled with substance abuse and mental-health issues, or the fact that I’m queer, or the fact that I’m a person of faith, those are all things that I want to be open and candid about. If it contributes to the visibility or representation of the queer community, or if it makes another person feel less alone to identify with an artist in that way, then it is worth it to divulge that part of my personal life.” Baker admits that she’s pleased by the recent turn toward critical assessments of her music. But she’s also adamant that context matters—in art, in history, in politics and in life. Hinting at the fact that other artists (perhaps Bridgers and Dacus, perhaps not) have mixed feelings about being mischaracterized, she flashes the humanistic qualities that make her such a compelling voice in today’s crowded musical landscape: “Categorization is the first compulsion of human beings to make sense of our world,” she says. “Insofar as my categorization can be beneficial to other people who have been placed in this group with me, that’s a tool I can be grateful instead of resentful for.” CW

JULIEN BAKER

w/ Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus Tuesday, Nov. 20, 6:30 p.m. The Depot 13 N. 400 West $24 presale; $27 day of show all ages depotslc.com


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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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An alt-rock power duo originally from Zion, Ill., Local H formed in 1987. The band’s close adherence to a host of characteristics—the quiet-then-loud grunge formula; grimy, distorted guitars; and frontman Scott Lucas’ affinity for expressing his angst by screaming his face off—led in the early ’90s to obvious comparisons with Nirvana. But Local H stands apart from the army of imitation acts that poisoned alt-rock airwaves later that decade (here’s looking at you, Bush, Collective Soul, Creed, Live and Silverchair). Most notably, Local H doesn’t suck. And they’ve long since outlasted pretty much every single grunge band not named Pearl Jam—they’re still touring and releasing new music, mostly recently a Live in Europe album. Lucas has also been around long enough to see his brainchildren grow up: Two years ago, Local H celebrated the 20th anniversary of the release of their seminal album As Good As Dead, a gold-selling record that includes the band’s best-known singles: “Bound for the Floor,” “High-Fiving MF,” “Eddie Vedder” and “Fritz’s Corner.” Much like Kurt Cobain, Lucas was disdainful of the stump-dumb rocker dudes who made up some portion of grunge fans, a sentiment he expressed in “High-Fiving MF.” On it, he sings, “You’ve got no taste in music/ And you really love our band.” Brilliant. The band has experienced a recent resurgence, thanks in part to touring with fellow alt-rockers The Toadies and opening for Metallica during its stadium tour last year. Local H rolls through Salt Lake City this week headlining its own Pack Up the Cats tour. (Howard Hardee) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $16 presale; $18 day of show; theurbanloungeslc.com

Sure Sure

JOHN OAKES

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

Local H

FRIDAY 11/16 Sure Sure

This year has been kind to Sure Sure. Following the January release of their selftitled debut album, the Los Angeles indie outfit has steadily popped up on more radars with their newfound momentum: hitting the road with Hippo Campus, followed by their very own headlining tour and a national television debut on the ESPY Awards red carpet. Made up of Kevin Farzad (percussion), Chris Beachy (keyboards/vocals), Charlie Glick (guitar/vocals) and Michael Coleman (bass/ producer), Sure Sure breezily combines rock and pop elements, all propelled by leisurely bass lines and synths. At the core of the band’s music lies a familiar comfort: fun, warm and relatable songs that make it feel like summer still lingers in the air. Maybe it’s because they turned their home into a studio for the recording of Sure Sure, or maybe it’s an extension of their personalities, but hearing Sure Sure play is like listening to your friends dive into an all-time jam session. This vibe is present on album opener “Giants,” becoming even more palpable on their feel-good cover of Talking Heads’ classic “This Must Be the Place.” That friendliness doesn’t stop with the music, either. The boys still leave their phone number up on their website so people can reach out and say hi. Delivering nothing short of a good time, Sure Sure is a band you won’t want to miss as they continue BRITTANY O’BRIEN

4760 S 900 E, SLC

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34 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

LIVE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Local H to climb higher on indie rock’s ladder. (Isaac Biehl) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 6 p.m., $16 presale; $18 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com

SUNDAY 11/18

Municipal Waste, Toxic Holocaust, Haunt

In a perfect world, there’s no such thing as “last call.” Not one bar patron is left with those three daunting words—“You’re cut off”—and the beer flows like wine. This world would be made possible if it were up to Richmond, Va.-based crossover thrashers Municipal Waste. Known in the metal community for their hilarious Jackass-style music videos, Municipal Waste prepares to spread their beer-drinking gospel to the Beehive State. After releasing their fifth studio album, The Fatal Feast (Waste In Space), in 2012, this five-piece band worked on other side projects before releasing another album. However, the 2017 release of Slime and Punishment was worth the wait. Founding Municipal Waste-r Tony Foresta explains why that time was crucial for the band: “It finally just felt like the right time to do a new record,” he told the Full Metal Jackie radio show. “And I think people wanted it. We were getting harassing emails, like, ‘Why the hell isn’t there a new record yet?’ So here we are—we did it.” More than 12 months later, 2018 is still the year of Slime and Punishment for thrash fans. And with more than 17 years of keg stands, guitar sweeps and appearances on the Speed of the Wizard tour with thrash BFFs Toxic Holocaust, this Salt Lake City show is sure to inspire circle pits as far as the eye can see. God bless these bands


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HIGHLAND

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14 15 16 17 18 19 20

PLAY GEEKS WHO DRINK TRIVIA AT 6:30


LINDA BEECROFT

for keeping this genre fresh for younger crowds entering the underground. Thrashing is Municipal Waste’s business—and business is good. (Rachelle Fernandez) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $26 presale; $28 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 11.14 MEANDER CAT

11.16 THE POUR

11.15 MORGAN SNOW

11.17 STONEFED

Erika Wennerstrom, The Penitent Man

It takes a certain amount of courage to leave an established band and set out on your own. Yet it’s not uncommon—and in most cases, the impetus comes from a creative urge that needs to be expressed but can’t within the group’s confines. That was the case when Erika Wennerstrom felt the need to take a break from her band, Heartless Bastards, the Ohio-born/Austin-based outfit she’s helmed for the past 15 years. The time to herself led to the aptly named 2018 album Sweet Unknown, which digs deeper into Wennerstrom’s own emotions, highlighting

The Garden

11.21 FRIENDSGIVING WITH CALDER

11.23 PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

POONEH GHANA

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LIVE

Erika Wennerstrom

her stirring vocals and exposing more of her own psyche. Striking out on her own also allowed Wennerstrom to confront her past and reflect on the struggles she encountered while building a music career. Such a move makes sense; Wennerstrom’s evocative voice and gut-wrenching lyrics have always hinted at something more profound. “What the hell do I really want in my life?” she asks at one point on the new album. The answer is obvious: by asserting herself with eloquence, assurance and determination, she’s made her own desires quite clear. (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroom.com

TUESDAY 11/20

The Garden, Le1f, Machine Girl

With modern music morphing and shifting at hyper speed, it makes perfect sense that The Garden—the California duo made up of twin brothers Wyatt and Fletcher Shears—came up with their own genre name. Figuring out exactly what “Vada Vada” means, of course, is the hard part. One part rowdy proto-rap, one part experimental dance-punk and one part Instagram-ready élan, The Garden toys with streetwise hyper-realism while throwing everything they do into a gaudy glamrock blender. What else would you expect from Los Angeles-based male models? Still, there’s a sense of slacker joie de vivre inherent in everything The Garden does. Make sure you turn up early for the mangainspired madness of Machine Girl and the avant-garde trip-hop of Le1f, one of the most prominent openly gay rappers who brings a background in ballet and modern dance to his theatrical performances. (Nick McGregor) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $17 presale; $20 day of show, all ages, facebook.com/inthevenue


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kitchen open until midnight

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CITIZEN HYPOCRISY & OUTSIDE OF SOCIETY

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WEDNESDAY 11/21

CONCERTS & CLUBS

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Shallou, Japanese Wallpaper

THURSDAY 11/15 LIVE MUSIC

Ben Reener + Mia Hicken + Lyfe on Mars (The Rad Shack) Dad Bod + Adult Prom (Velour) Dead Horses + Benjamin Jaffe (Kilby Court) Doug Wintch & the Wandering Stars (Garage On Beck) Good Charlotte + Sleeping With Sirens + Knuckle Puck + The Dose (The Complex) John 5 & the Creatures + Hellzapoppin Circus Sideshow (Metro Music Hall) Law Rocks (The State Room) Library Fall Concert Series (BYU) Live Jazz (Sugar House Coffee) Local H (Urban Lounge) see p. 34 Madeline Tasquin (Lighthouse Lounge) Melange 10.0 (Sugar Space) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Tony Oros (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Justin Caruso (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 11/16 LIVE MUSIC

Air Supply (Eccles Theater) Berlin Breaks + Late Night Savior (Ice Haüs) The Boys Ranch + The Poppees + Say Hey (Urban Lounge) Caleb Gray Band (The Spur) Carrie Myers (HandleBar) Colt.46 (The Westerner) Cowboys & Indies 13 (Velour) Folk Hogan (A Bar Named Sue) Goatwhore + The Casualties + Black Tusk + Great American Ghost (Metro Music Hall) The Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Keyvin Vandyke + Brain Bingham (Harp and Hound) Low Life + The Glass House + Ten Plagues + Allies Always Lie + The Conscience (The Loading Dock) N-U-ENDO (Club 90) The Pour (Hog Wallow Pub)

Like many millennial performers, Joe Boston—who performs under the stage name Shallou—got his start in his bedroom in Chicago, where he began recording a signature mix of electronic beats and sleepy, soulful vocals. Releasing his debut EP, All Becomes Okay, under his own label in May 2017, Boston soon catapulted from bedroom beats to soldout stages, making a name for himself on Spotify playlists (where he has more than 100 million plays) and landing on Billboard’s dance/electronic charts. Now based in Los Angeles, Shallou’s current tour finds him supporting April’s Souls EP, which cemented his place in the ambient/indie atmosphere with Bon Iver-esque croons paired with gentle electronic rhythms. It’s the kind of music tailor-made for Spotify success: unobtrusive enough for study sessions and background tunes but upbeat enough for impromptu dance parties. Shallou also channels millennial worries and resentments into his music and business ethos— Souls centers on love and longing, while 2017’s All Becomes Okay was written with the earth’s natural cycles in mind. To that end, Boston donated all proceeds from his first EP to the Environmental Defense Fund. “Climate change is real,” he says on his website, but “some of our world leaders don’t accept the reality of climate change and its dire consequences.” Support for this show comes from Australian dreampop outfit Japanese Wallpaper—perfect for a very chill night of dreamy dance music. (Naomi Clegg) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $13, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

The Puscie Jones Revue (The State Room) Red Shot Pony (Brewskis) Ryan Innes (Lake Effect) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Sex Panthers (Garage On Beck) Stonefed (Lighthouse Lounge) Sure Sure (Kilby Court) see p. 34 Synthesis (Harris Fine Arts Center) Tony Oros (DeJoria Center)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ HuEx (The Red Door) DJ Jarvicious (Green Pig Pub) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Shutter Spectrum Fridays (Sun Trapp) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Prohibition After Dark (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 11/17 LIVE MUSIC

The Breakfast Klub (O.P. Rockwell) Brothers Brimm (Johnny’s on Second) Chase Atlantic + Cherry Pools + R I L E Y (In the Venue) Colt.46 (The Westerner) Cowboys & Indies 13 (Velour) Eureka O’Hara (Metro Music Hall) FEHRPLAY (Soundwell) Folk Hogan (Funk ’n’ Dive) Korene Greenwood (Harp and Hound) Leah Shoshanah (Santori Sound Garden) LHAW + Citizen Hypocrisy+ Outside Of Society (Ice Haüs) Mama Midnight & the Sweet Surrender (The State Room) Mark Dee (HandleBar) Matt Calder + Marmalade (Lake Effect) Moonshine Bandits (The Royal) N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Pray For Snow: SLC (The Commonwealth Room) The Proper Way (Garage on Beck) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) SoMo + Johnny Stimson (The Complex) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Tony Oros + Blue Divide (The Spur) Velvet Jones (Lighthouse Lounge) Young, Define + Will Cassity + Guilty Scapegoat + Heavens Serenity +


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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew + JD (Tavernacle) Flash & Flare’s Friendsgiving (Urban Lounge) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Open Mic Night (High Point Coffee) Prohibition After Dark (Prohibition) Sky Saturdays w/ Darude(Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

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KARAOKE

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 11/18

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$

The Sardines + Sorrow for Virtue + Awakening Autumn + Tyrone Post (Kilby Court) Wrong + Portrayal of Guilt (Diabolical Records) Zion Riot (Brewskis)

LIVE MUSIC

$

17

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thur, 12/20 | metro music hall

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Sunday Night Blues Jam (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

tues, 01/22 | metro music hall

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO

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LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Avoid + Afterhand (The Loading Dock) Coco Montoya (The State Room) Cyrus Chestnut Quartet (Capitol Theatre) Library Fall Concert Series (BYU)

NOVEMBER 15, 2018 | 39

MONDAY 11/19

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25

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

$

nao

Brunch and Bloodys feat. Jason Barrett Fox (Lighthouse Lounge) Erika Wennerstrom + The Penitent Man (The State Room) see p. 36 Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Municipal Waste + Toxic Holocaust + Haunt (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Sex Panthers + The Joker (Garage On Beck) Sydnie Keddington (The Spur) The Wonder Years + Have Mercy + Oso Oso + Shortly + Roxbury (The Complex)

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tues, 11/27 | urban lounge


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40 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

COPPER CREEK PUB & GRUB

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Madge + Wallfly + YA ANML (Kilby Court) Spyhop (The Beehive) Ural Thomas & The Pain + Joshy Soul & The Cool + Sarah DeGraw (Urban Lounge) Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Caviar Club (Alibi) Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 11/20 LIVE MUSIC

All Them Witches + Handsome Jack (The State Room) Daniel Torriente (The Spur) Dawnlit + Genre Zero + Spo + Stop Karen and The Unholy Ghosts (Metro Music Hall) The Garden + Le1f + Machine Girl (In the Venue) see p. 36 Julien Baker + Phoebe Bridgers + Lucy Dacus (The Depot) see p. 32 K-Bull 93 Bull Bash (The Union Event Center) Matt Calder (Lake Effect) The Nods + Lord Vox + Monster Hands Band (Urban Lounge) Ronnie Radke (The Complex) Skeletal Remains + Envenom + Winter Light (The Loading Dock) Trans-Siberian Orchestra (Vivint Arena)

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

Beer, as Jack Nicholson once put it, is “the best damn drink in the world.” So what better time for said drink than a mellow Monday night at West Valley City’s infamous Copper Creek Pub & Grub, the City Weekly champ in the late 2000s for Best Burgers and Best West Valley restaurant? My friend and I started the night with beer-battered onion rings, a Wasatch Brewing Full Suspension Ale and a Squatters Hefeweizen, all served by Copper Creek’s bartender Nana, who’s been in the business for 14 years and has heard her fair share of secrets. The low-lit atmosphere of Copper Creek, enhanced by a vintage Coors E.T. poster and football playing in the background, set the perfect stage for the topic of conversation: love. Don’t get me wrong—I usually end up crying at the bar (and then get asked to leave) whenever such a subject comes up. However, Copper Creek offered up the right amount of alcohol and the right amount of deep-fried bar food to help me maintain my composure. We ordered turkey avocado sandwiches and chatted over another round of brews about relationships, breakups and the inevitable “who gets what” arrangement. Luckily, Copper Creek acted like a Fort Knox when it came to our conversation: What was said never left the pub. Coming to that realization, I also noticed we were not the only pair of friends at the bar talking about love. Copper Creek is there for the city of West Valley to mend its broken hearts. (Rachelle Fernandez) 3451 S. 5600 West, Ste. A, 801-417-0051, coppercreekpub.com

Y La Bamba + Sally Yoo (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Burlesque and The Blues (Prohibition) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Royal) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 11/21 LIVE MUSIC

Che Zuro (The Yes Hell) John Nolan + The People’s Thieves (Kilby Court) The Lane Changers (Gracie’s)

Live Jazz (Club 90) Matt Calder (Hog Wallow Pub) Metal Gods (Liquid Joe’s) Morgan Whitney (Lake Effect) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Rachel Edwards Benefit Show feat. Talia Keys and the Femme + The Violet Temper + Stop Karen + The Midnight Babies + FTP (Urban Lounge) Royal Bliss (The Depot) Shallou + Japanese Wallpaper (The Complex) see p. 38

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Therapy Wednesday feat. Joyryde (Sky) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

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LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

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BEST OF UTAH

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THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs MUSIC GARAGE 1192 Wilmington Ave., 801-577-2263, live music O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music OUTLAW SALOON 1254 W. 2100 South, Ogden, live music, 801-334-9260 PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music ThursdaySaturday PROHIBITION 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, everything from live music to karaoke to burlesque THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music THE RUIN 1215 Wilmington Ave., 801-8693730, live music SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music SOUNDWELL 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, live music, DJs THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786, DJs, karaoke SWITCH 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-5132955, house and techno events TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music TINWELL 837 S. Main, 801-953-1769, live music THE TOUCHÉ TAVERN 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-3223200, live music THE UNDERGROUND 833 S. Main, 385645-3116, live music THE UNION TAVERN 7176 S. 900 East, Midvale, 801-938-4505, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music USANA AMPHITHEATRE 5150 Upper Ridge Road, 801-417-5343, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages VIVINT SMART HOME ARENA 301 South Temple, 801-325-2000, live music THE WALL AT BYU 1151 Wilkinson Student Center, 801-422-4470, live music WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music THE YES HELL 2430 Grant Ave, Ogden, 801-903-3671, live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

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435-649-9371, live music ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696, live music, DJs FELDMAN’S DELI 2005 E. 2700 South, 801-906-0369, live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke GARAGE ON BECK 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GOLD BLOOD COLLECTIVE 1526 S. State, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday HANDLEBAR 751 N. 300 West, 801-9530588, live music THE HARP & HOUND 2550 Washington Blvd, Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music HEAVY METAL SHOP 63 E. Exchange Place, 801-467-7071, live music HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-2127, live music INFINITY EVENT CENTER 26 E. 600 South, 385-242-7488, live music IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KAMIKAZE’S 2404 Adam’s Ave., Ogden, 801-621-9138, live music KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages KINGSBURY HALL 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, live music THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294, karaoke, pool LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597, karaoke Tuesday & Friday THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAVERIK CENTER 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, live music, 801-988-8800, live music MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs

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801 EVENT CENTER 1055 W. North Temple, 801-347-5745, live music A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, karaoke Monday & Thursday, live music Friday & Saturday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday, live music Friday & Saturday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ABRAVANEL HALL 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Utah Symphony & Opera THE ACOUSTIC SPACE 124 S. 400 West, 801-953-5586, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692, live music, dance and night club AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287, live music, craft cocktails BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday THE BEEHIVE 666 S. State, 385- 645-3116, live music BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, live music, DJs, craft cocktails BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music THE CABIN 825 S. Main, Park City, 435565-2337, karaoke, live music CHAKRA LOUNGE 364 S. tate, 801-3284037, live music, karaoke, DJs CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday THE COMMONWEALTH ROOM 195 W. 2100 South, 801-741-4200, live music CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555, karaoke Friday & Saturday CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DEJORIA CENTER 970 N. State Road, Kamas, 435-783-3113, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DIABOLICAL RECORDS 238 S. Edison St., 801-792-9204, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ECCLES CENTER 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, live music ECCLES THEATER 131 S. Main, 801-3552787, live music EGYPTIAN THEATRE 328 Main, Park City,


Š 2018

INKY MIME

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Alternatives to Nikes 2. Beethoven's symphony with "Ode to Joy" 3. Actress Blonsky or Reed 4. Dough dispenser 5. "There but for the grace of God ____" 6. Wand material in the Harry Potter books 7. Temptation location 8. "Ditto!" 9. Like a small farm, perhaps 10. Squarely

56. Open, as a toothpaste tube 57. ____ voce 58. Evidence of injury 59. Vena ____ (blood line to the heart) 60. Two of them are worth a sawbuck 61. Photo ID issuers 65. Alaskan export 66. Goat's cry 67. Slick

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

11. New York City mayor de Blasio 12. Baseball's Felipe, Matty or Jesus 13. Venetian magistrate of old 18. Yin's opposite 22. "Either you do it ____ will!" 24. Aykroyd of the Blues Brothers 25. "____ pronounce you ..." 26. Aussie "Mornin'!" 29. Kind of yoga 30. English school on the Thames 31. "I ____ dead!" 32. Minus 33. Trump portrayer Baldwin 34. Rock singer who was a Time co-Person of the Year 35. Han who's the title role of a 2018 film 39. Earn a load of money, in modern lingo 41. Soccer star Mia 42. Jacob's twin 45. Pale eye shade 47. Boston skyscraper, with "the" 50. "Ready when you are!" 51. Chemical in Drano 52. "No need to wake me" 55. Fifth category of taste with a Japanese name

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Taylor of fashion 4. Pulitzer Prize winner for "A Death in the Family" 8. "Things are not looking good" 14. 7 on a grandfather clock 15. Squealed 16. Venus ____ 17. Marcel Marceau after he's gotten a lot of tattoos in four states? 19. Where to find a bump, in a phrase 20. Aleutian island 21. "No idea" 23. Big to-do 27. Scissors topper, in a game 28. Going on hunger strikes to protest British colonialism in six states? 33. Tummy muscles 36. Operator of weather.gov 37. Cake words in "Alice in Wonderland" 38. Weaving machine 40. George who signed the Declaration of Independence 43. Order (around) 44. China's Zhou ____ 46. Padlock's place 48. Rejections 49. Prepare a Mediterranean appetizer in six states? 53. Tough to get ahold of 54. Roomy dresses 58. Shaped roughly, as stone 62. "Let me think ... yeah, that's stupid" 63. Treasonous groups 64. Agreement among May honorees in four states? 68. Many a Monopoly property 69. Perfume container 70. Welcome sight? 71. Score after dribbling, say 72. Knock 'em dead 73. Fitbit had one in 2015, for short

SUDOKU

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44 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The U.S. is the world’s top exporter of food. In second place is the Netherlands, which has 0.4 percent as much land as the U.S. How do Dutch farmers accomplish this miraculous feat? In part because of their massive greenhouses, which occupy vast areas of non-urbanized space. Another key factor is their unprecedented productivity, which dovetails with a commitment to maximum sustainability. For instance, they produce 20 tons of potatoes per acre, compared with the global average of nine. And they do it using less water and pesticides. In my long-term outlook for you Scorpios, I see you as having a metaphorical similarity to Dutch farmers. During the next 12 months, you have the potential to make huge impacts with your focused and efficient efforts. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The world is like a dropped pie most of the time,” writes author Elizabeth Gilbert. “Don’t kill yourself trying to put it back together. Just grab a fork and eat some of it off the floor. Then carry on.” From what I can tell about the state of your life, Sagittarius, the metaphorical pie has indeed fallen onto the metaphorical floor. But it hasn’t been there so long that it has spoiled. And the floor is fairly clean, so the pie won’t make you sick if you eat it. My advice is to sit down on the floor and eat as much as you want. Then carry on.

when you will derive special benefit from these five observations by poet and filmmaker Jean Cocteau. 1. “There are truths that you can only say after having won the right to say them.” 2. “True realism consists in revealing the surprising things that habit keeps covered and prevents us from seeing.” 3. “What the public criticizes in you, cultivate. It is you.” 4. “You should always talk well about yourself! The word spreads around, and in the end, no one remembers where it started.” 5. “We shelter an angel within us. We must be the guardians of that angel.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Adolescence used to be defined as a phase that lasted from ages 13 to 19. But scientists writing in the journal The Lancet say that in modern culture, the current span is from ages 10 to 24. Puberty comes earlier now, in part because of shifts in eating habits and exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals. At the same time, people hold onto their youth longer because they wait a while before diving into events associated with the initiation into adulthood, like getting married, finishing education and having children. Even if you’re well past 24, Gemini, I suggest you revisit and reignite your juvenile stage in the coming weeks. You need to reconnect with your wild innocence. You’ll benefit from immersing yourself in memories of coming of age. Be 17 or 18 again, but this time armed with all you have learned since.

Without public/legal notice, your government, judicial, and business leaders could enact important decisions without your knowledge.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian baseball pitcher Satchel Paige had a colorful career characterized by creative showmanship. On some occasions, he commanded his infielders to sit down and loll on the grass behind him, whereupon he struck out three batters in a row— ensuring no balls were hit to the spots vacated by his teammates. Paige’s success came in part because of his wide variety of tricky pitches, described by author Buck O’Neil as “the bat-dodger, the two-hump blooper, the four-day creeper, the dipsy-do, the Little Tom, the Long Tom, the bee ball, the wobbly ball, the hurry-up ball and the nothin’ ball.” I bring this to your attention, Cancerian, because now is an excellent time for you to AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Miracles come to those who risk defeat in seeking them,” writes amp up your charisma and use all your tricky pitches. author Mark Helprin. “They come to those who have exhausted themselves completely in a struggle to accomplish the impos- LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): sible.” Those descriptions could fit you well in the coming weeks, “Everyone tells a story about themselves inside their own head,” but with one caveat. You’ll have no need to take on the melo- writes fantasy author Patrick Rothfuss. “Always. All the time. dramatic, almost-desperate mood Helprin seems to imply is We build ourselves out of that story.” So what’s your story, Leo? essential. Just the opposite, in fact. Yes, risk defeat and be willing The imminent future will be an excellent time to get clear about to exhaust yourself in the struggle to accomplish the impossible; the dramatic narrative you weave. Be especially alert for demorbut do so in a spirit of exuberance, motivated by the urge to play. alizing elements in your tale that might not in fact be true, and that therefore you should purge. I think you’ll be able to draw on extra willpower and creative flair if you make an effort to reframe PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Never invoke the gods unless you really want them to appear,” the story you tell yourself so that it’s more accurate and uplifting. warned author G. K. Chesterton. “It annoys them very much.” My teachers have offered me related advice. Don’t ask the gods to VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): intervene, they say, until you have done all you can through your In describing a man she fell in love with, author Elizabeth Gilbert own efforts. Furthermore, don’t ask the gods for help unless you wrote that he was both “catnip and kryptonite to me.” If you’ve are prepared to accept their help if it’s different from what you spent time around cats, you understand that catnip can be irresistthought it should be. I bring these considerations to your atten- ible to them. As for kryptonite: it’s the one substance that weakens tion, Pisces, because you currently meet all these requirements. the fictional superhero Superman. Is there anything in your life that resembles Gilbert’s paramour? A place or situation or activity or So I say go right ahead and seek the gods’ input and assistance. person that’s both catnip and kryptonite? I suspect you now have more ability than usual to neutralize its obsessive and debilitating ARIES (March 21-April 19): Interior designer Dorothy Draper said she wished there were a effects on you. That could empower you to make a good decision single word that meant “exciting, frightfully important, irre- about the relationship you’ll have with it in the future. placeable, deeply satisfying, basic, and thrilling, all at once.” I wonder if such a word exists in the Chamicuro language spoken LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): by a few Peruvians or the Sarsi tongue spoken by the Tsuu T’ina “I had to learn very early not to limit myself due to others’ limited tribe in Alberta, Canada. In any case, I’m pleased to report that imaginations,” testifies Libran astronaut Mae Jemison. She adds, for the next few weeks, many of you Aries people will embody “I have learned these days never to limit anyone else due to my own and express that rich blend of qualities. I have coined a new word limited imagination.” Are those projects on your radar, Libra? I hope so. You now have extra power to resist being shrunk or to capture it: tremblissimo. hobbled by others’ images of you. You also have extra power to help your friends and loved ones grow and thrive as you expand your TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to my astrological intuition, you’re entering a phase images of them. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Novelist Anita Desai writes, “Isn’t it strange how life won’t flow, like a river, but moves in jumps, as if it were held back by locks that are opened now and then to let it jump forward in a kind of flood?” I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect that the locks she refers to will soon open for you. Events might not exactly flow like a flood, but I’m guessing they will at least surge and billow and gush. That could turn out to be nerve-racking and strenuous, or else fun and interesting. Which way it goes will depend on your receptivity to transformation.

What if you learned that an important decision had been made by your local officials without following due process?


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46 | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908359, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. Pesega Vaa, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO Pesega Vaa: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,367.25. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

Sr. Software Engineer @ Cox Automotive Corporate Services, LLC (South Jordan, UT) F/T. Work as part of Agile team to anlyze, dsgn, dvlp, test, doc & implmnt softw applics for Mngmnt Sols Grp. Reqts: Master’s deg (or foreign equiv) in CS, Comp Engg, IT, Info Sys or rltd + 1 yr exp in job offrd, .Net Dvlpr, Web Applic Dvlpr or rltd. Alt., empl will acpt Bach’s deg & 5 yrs prog resp exp. Must have 1 yr exp in each of fllwng skills: Dvlpng full stack applics; Web Srvcs, SQL, C# & ASP.NET; Prfrmng coding in HTML, CSS & JavaScript; & Agile methodologies. Emp will acpt any suitable combo of edu, training or exp. Send resume to: A. Davis & S. Chokshi, HR, Cox Automotive Corp Svcs, LLC; 6205 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, Atlanta, GA 30328. Indicate job title & code “RS-UT” in cvr ltr. EOE

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189917173, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. AMANDA BENSON, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO AMANDA BENSON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,480.16

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189916155, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JACOB BAKER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JACOB BAKER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,069.27

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WWI is 100

This past Veterans Day marked the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, a war that claimed 116,516 American lives in Europe. According to the Division of State History, 24,000 men from the Beehive State enlisted, 864 were wounded and 665 died. Unlike today’s conflicts, WWI was fought by men with only bullets, knives, artillery and horses. There were no drones, no night-vision goggles, no guided missiles. You were often looking your enemy in the eye and fighting hand-to-hand combat. Women served as nurses, but due to racism, only white women were allowed into the Army Nurse Corps. When the war, dubbed “The Great War,” ended, Utah folk wanted to pay tribute to those who perished. Thus, we have quite a list of memorials throughout the state. Memory Grove on the east side of the Capitol was created just after the war ended when volunteers planted 300 trees as a living memorial to veterans. There’s a marble structure surrounded by pillars that’s come to be known as “The Pagoda” and was spearheaded by women and finished in 1932. At the Ogden Cemetery, there’s a just-restored doughboy statue. “Doughboys” was the nickname given to members of the Army and Marine corps during W WI. There are statues in Mount Pleasant, Brigham City, Springville’s Victory Fountain, Vernal and Beaver, and one that was finished last year in Santa Clara. You might have noticed the Greek Veterans Memorial outside the Holy Trinity Cathedral downtown. A plaque lists the names of Greeks who died in W WI, W WII and the Korean War. Other war monuments are in American Fork, Antimony, Bear River, Beaver, Bicknell, Castle Date, Cedar City, Circleville, Copperton, Kearns, Leamington, Lehi, Loa, Magna, Midvale, Monticello, Morgan, Parowan, Price, Provo, Randolph, Taylorsville, Tooele, Vernal and West Jordan. One of the state’s most beautiful signs of respect and gratitude is in the Davis County Memorial Courthouse in Farmington. It’s a gorgeous stained glass window in memory of Davis County Veterans who died in the Civil War (1865), the Spanish American War (1898), the Black Hawk War (1867) and the Philippine-American War (1902). The most recent soldier to die is North Ogden Mayor, Maj. Brent Taylor, who was killed the first week in November in Afghanistan. The town held a vigil last week to remember him and grieve the loss of their hero. n

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Final Resting Place For some folks, Disneyland and Walt Disney World are more than amusement parks. Take Jodie Jackson Wells of Boca Raton, Fla. In 2009, after her mother died, Wells smuggled in some of her ashes to Disney World and spread them on a favorite spot of her mom’s along the It’s a Small World ride. Later, she leapt over a barricade at Cinderella’s Castle and flung ashes from both hands as she cavorted on the lawn. “Anyone who knew my mom knew Disney was her happy place,” Wells told The Wall Street Journal. However, for the theme parks, the spreading of ashes presents a constant cleanup challenge, referred to by the code “HEPA cleanup” among custodians. (Other secret signals are “Code V” for vomit and “Code U” for urine.) Alex Parone of Saratoga Springs, N.Y., sprinkled his mother’s ashes in a flowerbed, then boarded It’s a Small World. “I was still crying. That song is playing over and over again, and there are those happy little animatronic things. I remember thinking, ‘This is weird.’” But a Disney spokesperson said: “This type of behavior is strictly prohibited and unlawful,” and the Anaheim Police Department confirmed that spreading ashes without permission is a misdemeanor. To add insult to injury, when cremation residue is found on rides, they have to be shut down (riders are told there are “technical difficulties”) for cleaning.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Bright Ideas Two mothers are suing the Adventure Learning Center day care in St. Louis over an incident in December 2016 when teachers organized a “fight club” among preschoolers. According to Fox 2 in St. Louis, the idea was conceived as a way to entertain the kids while the heater was broken. The 10-year-old sibling of one of the preschoolers was in the room next door and captured video of the fights with an iPad, then texted the video to his mom, Nicole Merseal, who believes the fight was broken up only because she called the director of the center. The video shows one teacher jumping up and down in excitement as another one puts “Incredible Hulk” fists on the kids, and cameras at the center recorded more than 30 minutes of fighting. While the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office declined to prosecute, the teachers were fired and the center has been subject to increased inspections, resulting in 26 violations. The lawsuit is scheduled to go to trial in December.

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But, Why? WPVI-TV in Philadelphia reported on Oct. 30 about a new fashion accessory: the Skin Heel. These thigh-high boots feature moles, hair and uneven skin tones, and the shoes are meant to look like surgically altered feet, with toes and long, realistic-looking skin-colored spikes on the heels. Conceived by Montréal, Canada, designers Hannah Rose Dalton and Steven Raj Bhaskaran, the creepy footwear will set buyers back $10,000. Fortunately, they’ve produced only one pair so far. Animal Antics In the spirit of “be careful what you wish for,” a monkey in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh, India, shimmied down a wall and stole a venomous cobra from a snake charmer at the Barbanki temple on Oct. 26. The man had just removed the snake from a basket when the monkey grabbed it and ran back up the wall, according to United Press International. The snake charmer tried to climb on a vendor’s cart to chase the monkey, but it got away. No word on the monkey’s fate. Recurring Theme Doctors at the Hai Duong Hospital in Hai Duong Province, Vietnam, treated a man who arrived complaining of pain in his ear. Using an endoscope to look inside his ear canal, they found the cause: a live cricket digging around in the duct. United Press International reported on Oct. 26 that the doctors were able to successfully remove the cricket.

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Latest Religious Messages If “Pokémon Go” has overextended your short attention span, up your game with the Vatican’s “Follow JC Go,” a new augmented reality mobile game in which players collect saints and other notable Bible figures as they move through the world. Pope Francis has approved the game, which asks players to answer questions about the characters and donate to charities to earn game currency. The Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera reported on Oct. 21 that the app is available only in Spanish, but other languages are on the way.

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Who’s Crying Now? After the package bomb scares in New York and Florida, things were tense in Charlotte, N.C., in the early morning hours of Oct. 30 when mailroom employees at Duke Energy discovered a suspicious incoming package. They welcomed the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police and the bomb squad with “Open Arms,” and the building and surrounding roads were evacuated as officials investigated. But WBTV “Faithfully” reported that the small, hand-addressed manila envelope was “Worlds Apart” from a mail bomb: It merely contained a cassette tape with songs from the band Journey. To which we say, “Don’t Stop Believin’” in your fellow ’80s musicloving humans.

Julie “Bella” Hall

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

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What Would Your Mother Think? In what can only be described as a “shaking my head” incident, an unnamed employee of the U.S. Geological Survey invited malware into the government agency’s computer system by visiting more than 9,000 porn websites on his work computer, according to an inspector general’s report. The Washington Post reported on Oct. 30 that many of the websites were Russian, and the malware spread to the entire network at the USGS. The employee also saved images from the sites on a USB drive and personal cellphone, which also contained malware. The Office of the Inspector General made recommendations to the USGS about preventing future malware infections, and a spokesperson for the IG’s office said the employee no longer works at USGS.

Ewwwww Construction workers in Valdosta, Ga., were rattled on Oct. 30 when they tore down a second-story wall in a turn-of-the-20th-century building to find about 1,000 human teeth secreted inside. The T.B. Converse Building, constructed in 1900, was originally home to a dentist, Dr. Clarence Whittington, reported the Valdosta Daily Times. In 1911, Whittington was joined by Dr. Lester G. Youmans. Ellen Hill, director of Valdosta Main Street, said two other Georgia towns have had buildings, also home to dentists’ offices, where teeth have been found in the walls. “I’m not sure if it was a common practice” to deposit extracted teeth in the walls, she said. Valdosta police said there was no evidence of a crime.

Babs De Lay


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48 | | NOVEMBER 15, 2018

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City Weekly November 15, 2018  

Granite's Ghost

City Weekly November 15, 2018  

Granite's Ghost