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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T N O V. 1 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 5 N 0 . 2 3

★ PRESENTS

MIDTERM

MAYHEM

ROMNEY ★ WILSON ELECTION

PLUS; PROP 2 MADNESS, AWFUL POLITICAL ADS, AN ODE TO ORRIN AND MORE!


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY MIDTERM MAYHEM

Experiencing political burnout syndrome? We can help. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 21 A&E 31 DINE 37 CINEMA 39 MUSIC 52 COMMUNITY

DEREK CARLISLE

Art Director Shake hands with the Southern gentleman responsible for City Weekly’s (and our sister-wife publications’) look. Inspired by Andy Warhol and JeanMichel Basquiat, Carlisle infuses our midterm elections issue with a cool dose of pop. His artistic idols? “Salvador Dalí and Vladimir Kush gots to top the list.”

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News, Oct. 18, “Bigger, Better People”

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Irresponsible Leadership

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The Land of Gods and Opinion, Oct. 18, “A Lesson Monsters It’s been nearly a year of lies, harassment and threats by the Naon Slimy Lubrication” @VALENTINE4USA

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What will it take for our elected officials to recognize the disastrous path they and their violent right-wing extremists are taking us down? Trump and the irresponsible Republican leadership are without any doubt, responsible for the hate and violence surfacing nationwide! I was proud to become an officer in the Navy during the Vietnam conflict and proud to defend this great nation, which makes it even more disappointing to watch Trump, with the help of the Republican leadership, trash America’s democracy and promote the lies and false propaganda Trump and Fox News constantly spew to his followers! I urge Senators [Orrin] Hatch and [Mike] Lee and my Representative [Chris] Stewart to recognize the danger they are subjecting all Americans to. It’s time for Congress to step up and put a stop to Trump’s

zi-mafia-GOP, Mormon church leaders’ controlled, SLC cops to me (and even to my landlords), usually in the middle of the night, with the goal of forcing me to move out of my home, the neighborhood, the city and the state. And they have controlled the spigot of harassment and threats, including death threats, from others—including rabidly anti-gay neighbors who have been harassing and threatening me for years. All to silence me because these Nazis claim that my public speech is negative and divisive, even though truthful and not illegal or unlawful in any way. At least until now. They tried every trick in the book, all illegal, to force me out and shut me up. Well, now their politics-driven agenda has decided that because I’m able to go on exercise walks that I’m a criminal defrauding the U.S. government and taxpayers by faking disability and thereby getting Social Security disability and Medicare. I walk for exercise every day I’m able and have been doing so for years. There are periods when I can and periods when I can’t. The reasons for granting and continuing my disability status have nothing to do with my ability to go on walks and doing other things involving physical exercise when my physical and/or mental health is better than at other times. These Nazi-mafia-GOP thug whores of their own antiChrist are doing this solely for political reasons in an effort to destroy me completely because I disturb the tranquility of these brainwashed useful idiots of the amoral, ever-greedy, thieving, narcissistic, sociopathic, sadistic and nihilistic filthy rich and powerful they serve. And these many minions of their beloved emperor, godfather and anti-

Christ Putin and his Trump/ filthy-rich/GOP/religionists/ Fox News U.S. lackeys may get away with this evil—among all the other evils they engage in their goal of destroying all decent human society, the human species and all life on Earth. These Nazis are the real criminals, not me. Oh, and I had a security system installed today with cameras focused outside to prove the ongoing harassment and threats— now an all night thing. This really is the Mormon church leaders’ created and maintained real-life version of the completely fictional Sodom and Gomorrah. If there was a real God or gods, this place would be incinerated in a heartbeat. The fact this place continues to exist is absolute proof there is no God or gods.

STUART McDONALD, Salt Lake City

A Plea for Prop 3

If you were offered $9 in exchange for $1 would you take the deal? The vast majority of us would say yes. That is the offer on the table in Proposition 3—and better yet, the investment in Proposition 3 pays dividends, too. Proposition 3, the initiative to expand Medicaid, is a prudent, long-term investment in Utah. It represents an investment in our state’s greatest asset: our people, our workforce. For too long, thousands of our friends, family and neighbors have gone without health coverage. Too many Utahns have avoided or delayed seeking care. Too many Utahns have filed bankruptcy due to medical bills. And when

a large part of our workforce is grappling with unresolved health care problems or crippling debt, they are not working at their full potential. So, our entire economy suffers. Proposition 3 not only brings $800 million (annually) in our taxpayer dollars back to the state, it promotes a healthier workforce, which means a more sustainable workforce. Thirty-two states that have already expanded Medicaid are ahead of Utah. They have lower uninsured rates, and as a direct result, they have a healthier workforce. Much like we need to invest in infrastructure and education, we need to invest in the health care of Utahns. Utah’s economy and our economic competitiveness depends on it. Since Jan. 1, 2014, Utah has rejected returning around $1.4 billion back to the state of Utah. We can’t afford to ship another dime off to Washington, D.C., and get nothing in return. Vote ‘yes’ on Proposition 3.

MATT SLONAKER,

Executive director, Utah Health Policy Project

E-scooter Blues

I’ve reached my limit on tolerance. This dangerous behavior must stop. I’ve asked the city why there’s no enforcement.

CHUCK LIPARI

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OPINION

Birds of a Feather

While the world reels at the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, our own fuzzy-warm president is wishing he could eliminate his own critics so easily. President Donald Trump has gone as far as vocally embracing the concept that physical attacks on journalists are entirely justified. He recently publicly applauded last year’s body-slam attack by incumbent Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-Mont.) on Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs, actually energizing a group of Montanaredneck-lemmings with the words, “Any guy that can do a body-slam—he’s my kind of guy.” Gianforte was found guilty and sentenced, but he’s still ending up on Trump’s hero list and might win on Tuesday. Tit-for-tat, maybe someone else should get body-slammed—and you all know who. Showing his true colors, Trump declared of Khashoggi’s assassins: “They had a very bad original concept, it was carried out poorly and the cover-up was one of the worst in the history of cover-ups. Whoever thought of that idea, I think is in big trouble. And they should be in big trouble.” I silently gasped as Trump said it; there wasn’t even a hint of compassion. Wow. One doesn’t have to be an astute observer to grasp Trump’s meaning: “If I’d had him killed, it would have been done in a very professional way.” True to form, Trump is carefully avoiding the fundamental moral question of Khashoggi’s murder—the value of a human life—instead, focusing on what he sees as the practical realities of the modern world. To him, the only value is the road that leads to the greatest good, and that means, simply, the path to the dollars. After all, this isn’t just about the silencing of a notably

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. outspoken journalist—one passionately motivated by the frank delivery of truth; it’s about jobs; it’s about maintaining friendship with a murderer; it’s about keeping a vital ally in a region that threatens to be the site of a final Armageddon; and it’s about birds of a feather flocking together. Trump’s response is not at all an uncharacteristic position. Although applauded as the visible leader of the Christian Right, no American can voice surprise that their leader’s only god is money. He’s become so much more than the Clown President. It’s no longer even remotely a laughing matter. The initial horror of his election has worn off, and it’s no longer adequate to roll our eyes and try to overlook this WTF-abortion of a man. The saddest part of this is that Americans have finally gotten the president we deserve. At first, I viewed the election of the Rabid Orange Raccoon as an unfortunate accident. I’m seeing it differently now. Think about it—isn’t his total absence of conscience-driven morality what today’s America is all about? Have we not either subscribed to his morally-vacuous (and often pernicious) leadership, or at least abdicated the righteous cry of conscience? After all, condemning the actions of a Saudi prince shouldn’t interfere with the consummation of billions in military and business deals, should it? It seems that we’re all growing comfortably accustomed to the notion that America doesn’t have to stand on the moral high ground. The idea that acquisition of wealth should be Machiavellian in nature—and that there should be no holds barred in our reach for the dollar—is exactly the model that Trump embodies. As a nation, it’s hard to tell if anyone still gives a damn about the sometimes-rather-complicated concept of right and wrong. The sheer daily magnitude of what’s wrong is crushing us all. “Wrong” is what’s happening in

our world, and America is becoming the center of it all. It’s no surprise that King Trump has a whopping level of empathy for Prince Mohammed bin Salman. They share so much in common, i.e. their humble beginnings and the fact that they are both self-made billionaires. Yeah, right! Oh, yes, it’s true: They hefted themselves to their current statuses by their own bootstraps, and they’re not about to allow the truth to unseat them. Responsible, accurate journalism is, after all, a looming threat to any demagogue. As we know from Trump’s historical dealings with Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong-un and Benjamin Netanyahu, the more vicious the leader, the more Trump expresses his hero-worship. “I fell in love with the guy.” And it’s the king-of-themountain approach that led to Khashoggi being cut into little pieces. In a nutshell, it’s the categorical imperative for a leader to kill anyone who threatens their throne. I’m sure some of you are shaking your heads and asking, “So what?” Here’s my answer: If we fail ourselves and our country by buying into the might-makes-right mantra of a morally defective leader, we will only have ourselves to blame. What’s going to be here for our children and grandchildren who inherit a world in which money is the supreme being? While the Khashoggi murder is only a symptom of the growing corruption of our world and its sick fixation on wealth, generations hence might find that the democracy we believed in is only a fleeting reference in a history book. Don’t forget who Trump is. Stand up for the moral high ground, for the minorities, for the women and the disadvantaged. Take back our nation by making a decisive stand in the midterm elections. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

WITNESSING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

When you live in a monolithic and largely naïve state like Utah, it’s hard to understand the reach of human trafficking. But fun fact: Nationwide, 87 percent of the population believes human trafficking is a problem, but only 23 percent believe it happens in their own communities. In 2013, Utah was considered one of the worst states in the fight against human trafficking. In Migrant Crossings: Witnessing Human Trafficking in the U.S., you learn the startling facts and hear stories from Annie Fukushima, an assistant professor at the University of Utah’s Division of Ethnic Studies, School for Cultural & Social Transformation. Gardner Commons—Hinckley Institute of Politics, 260 S. Central Campus Drive, Ste. 2018, Monday, Nov. 5, noon-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Asqdkb.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU CAN DO

Vote! The Utah Will Vote Rally is not only about reminding you to vote, but getting you hyped to do it. The rally is brought to you by the kids who intend to make a difference—March For Our Lives Utah. Millennials have been more motivated to vote since 2016, but still some 42 percent of all eligible voters didn’t go to the polls. And here’s a shocker: 300,000 Utahns are eligible to vote but haven’t registered. Do you think your vote doesn’t matter? Think again and join people of all ages who will make a difference. State Capitol, 350 N. State, Monday, Nov. 5, 6 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Sn7A8v.

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ISLAM AND TERRORISM

What better time to talk about terrorism than now when the president of the United States proclaims that they are mixed into the thousands of emigrants headed to the U.S. border? Be afraid, be very afraid. That’s the message getting out, but the truth is more complicated. At Islam & Terrorism: Let’s Talk About It, discussions focus on terrorism, its roots and the role of Islam. Host group the Emerald Project seeks to dispel common misrepresentations and to hear your comments and questions. University of Utah David S. Eccles School of Business, 1655 E. Campus Center Drive, Spencer Fox Business Building, Room 1110, Monday, Nov. 5, 6-9 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Rg5JAH.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 9


HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

High Times

Thanks, Sen. Jim Dabakis, but you really didn’t help. Dabakis, the “fun” senator, the gay Democrat who gets even the rightest-wing Republicans to like him, decided to give marijuana a try. Dabakis traveled to Las Vegas, where pot is legal, and decided to become the first Utah senator (whom we know of) to try marijuana. He chose gummies and just “felt a little high.” But, hey, this is not the issue on the ballot. Utahns are considering Proposition 2 to legalize medical marijuana, and opponents have been stretching the effort into fear of recreational pot. They even had a pot-shop van roll up near schools to frighten parents into believing weed would be widely available. So it might have been great fun, but the good senator now has the nation thinking that Utah is voting on recreational weed.

A Nuclear Waste

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Just when you thought there was no hope, Utah bureaucrats came through. The Department of Environmental Quality unanimously denied EnergySolutions’ bid to fast-track bringing depleted uranium into the state. Depleted uranium, they noted, “is chemically unstable, relatively mobile and pyrophoric, or able to ignite spontaneously,” according to a KSL Channel 5 report. It’s waste that comes from nuclear fuel and weapons, and that means we’ll all be dead and gone by the time it actually depletes. ES didn’t want to wait for those pesky performance assessments to be completed. And eventually, they will be. The company might lose a contract or two in the meantime, but they will still be fighting to bring more nuclear waste into the state next year. Environmental groups like Heal Utah and the Sierra Club will be on the other side—the side of public health.

Farcical Care

Before we talk about what a farce this all is, can we all agree that health care is a complicated and emotional issue? Not so for “the president,” who likes to rally the troops with diatribes about “socialist health care.” It doesn’t matter that it’s not true, but let’s focus on drug costs. Yeah, they’re high. If you want to talk about that socialistic Medicare, well, drug prices are high because the feds aren’t allowed to negotiate for lower prices. Now, we have Utah insurer PEHP that covers 160,000 public employees and their families, “offering plane tickets to San Diego, transportation to Tijuana, and a $500 cash payout to patients who need certain expensive drugs for multiple sclerosis, cancer and autoimmune disorders,” according to a Salt Lake Tribune report. If you have to ask why, then you’re not paying attention.

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NEWS

PUBLIC LANDS

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

What Does Wilderness Mean—and What Does It Take To Protect It?

Five questions with Shelley Silbert, executive director of advocacy group Great Old Broads for Wilderness. BY THE REVELATOR comments@cityweekly.net @revelator_news

W

hat is the value of wilderness? And what threat is posed by the current administration’s attacks on U.S. public lands, which encompasses hundreds of millions of acres of the nation’s wilderness? We wanted the long view. So for answers, we went to Shelley Silbert, executive director of Great Old Broads for Wilderness, a national grassroots organization led by women that engages and inspires activism to preserve and protect wilderness and wild lands. The organization was conceived in 1989 by older women motivated by their love of wilderness and has spent decades advocating for public access to protected spaces, including longstanding efforts to hold agencies and elected officials accountable for maintaining natural wilderness. What great old wilderness did you visit recently—and what did that visit tell you about the threats to public land? This summer, Great Old Broads held a five-day camping event (we call them “Broadwalks”) in Idaho’s Sawtooth Wilderness. We spent our days hiking in the beauty of rugged peaks, clear rivers, grassy meadows and conifer forests. In the evenings, we gathered to discuss the unabated threats to the Endangered Species Act and the future of some of the region’s most threatened fauna. Public lands and waters that provide habitat for these species face immediate and urgent threats. The Chinook salmon population in the Salmon River’s Middle

Founded in 1989, Great Old Broads for Wilderness is a grassroots advocacy group that aims to inspire the voices and activism of elders to preserve and protect wilderness and wild lands. Fork is severely impacted by climate change and habitat alteration. The species is uniquely wild, indigenous and genetically unaltered by hatchery fish. As the world’s highest-elevation spawning area for Chinook salmon, the Salmon River’s Middle Fork is critical habitat—doubly valuable on a warming planet. But four dams on the lower Snake River, into which the Salmon River flows, prevent adult salmon from returning to spawn. These dams produce very little hydropower. Their removal is crucial to salmon survival, and we only have a few years before these salmon populations crash. We must be active, strategic and vigilant in the fight to protect public lands and waters that serve as home to these and other species. Great Old Broads has been fighting for public lands since 1989. How do the current dangers to these sites compare to what existed nearly 30 years ago? The threats have never been more severe. This administration and Congress are hell-bent on extracting oil, gas, coal, lumber and more from our public lands. At the same time, our ecological systems are under inordinate stress from climate change, population growth and habitat degradation: pressures that can only be reduced through strong protective laws and policies. These factors are culminating in a perfect storm that’s heading toward our public lands. A vocal, active and demanding citizenry is the only chance we have of stemming this wave of destruction.

Has the perception that wilderness isn’t for women or elders shifted at all during that time frame? More women and older people hike and camp in the wilderness than 30 years ago. What hasn’t changed is the assertion made by anti-wilderness politicians that since “older people can’t access wilderness,” it shouldn’t be protected. That claim rang false 30 years ago when used by Sen. Orrin Hatch, and it still falls flat today. Great Old Broads want wilderness protected even if we can’t always get out to enjoy it. We know wilderness is critical for wildlife, water, air and the very survival of Earth. Its value goes far beyond the selfish desire to recreate. Your previous associate director, Rose Chilcoat, just finished fighting what could be called a nuisance lawsuit for closing a gate on public land, although the case is still pending against her husband. What does this case illustrate about public lands in America today? Rose worked with Great Old Broads for over 15 years advocating for protection of our wildlands. She documented and exposed abuses of public lands— from unauthorized off-road vehicle use … to violations of grazing permits and trespass livestock. She led many of our efforts to designate wilderness and national monuments. When Utah’s San Juan County criminally charged Rose for trespass, endangerment of cattle and witness retaliation for writing the Bureau of Land Management, it was clearly an attempt to silence her and make an example of her to outspoken public-land

advocates. In these divisive times, that’s a chilling testament to the venom of those who oppose conservation. When the Utah Court of Appeals threw out the case for lack of merit, it showed that even with the current political insanity we’re experiencing, justice can still prevail in the courts. It gives some confidence that unfounded litigation against conservation advocates will not succeed. We all have the right to protect our nation’s land, water and heritage, and we won’t be silenced. What issues will you be watching in the final few months of 2018—and do you have any predictions for 2019? Our most fundamental laws and policies are under attack in Congress, including the Wilderness Act, Antiquities Act and National Environmental Policy Act. The current administration is dead set on ignoring or getting rid of laws that protect public lands (and people) from the effects of rampant oil, gas and coal extraction. As a result, agencies are running roughshod over democratic principles, such as public involvement and input. The administration’s policies wreak havoc on forests, rivers, oceans and habitats along our southern border. We are watching closely and using grassroots activism to defend against these attacks, including litigation as warranted. We hope to see a Congress inaugurated in 2019 that is serious about its moral and legal obligation to protect public lands and the climate for future generations. CW A version of this Q&A originally appeared in The Revelator.


MIDTERM

MAYHEM

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 13

so you’ll talk about what’s on your mind. Because, jokes aside, all elections are important, including this one. The midterms will come and go, and the talk will soon turn to who’s running in 2020. We can’t escape the chaos. But do we really want to? Has everyday life become more political, or are people just waking up, seeing the writing on the wall and understanding that it’s no longer acceptable to be a passive participant in the democratic process? As you’ll see inside, Utahns have an opportunity to elect candidates who aren’t stodgy, old white men. We can make our representatives look more like the people they represent. More than 40 women are running for offices involving Salt Lake County, Jenny Wilson could be the first Utah woman in the U.S. Senate and James Singer might be the first Native American congressman in Utah’s history. Representation matters. Voters can send a message that just because the majority of elected officials don’t look like them, it doesn’t mean you need to be a straight caucasian male in order to hold public office in this state. So, please vote. Thanks to same-day registration, you can even register and vote on Election Day. And once you submit that ballot, consider why so many of your peers chose to sit this one out and turn a blind eye toward improving the Beehive State. Then gently urge them to reconsider before the next election. After all, everything is political. —Kelan Lyons, staff writer

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verything is political. That truism has never been more clear than now, when politics is in the air we breathe (thanks, climate change), the water we drink (there’s still lead in the water in Flint, Mich.) and the food we eat (our consumption of meat isn’t exactly helping heal Mother Earth). Your next chance to have a say in our elected leadership comes Tuesday, Nov. 6. By this point, you might have already voted, or you’re so tired of all the constant chattering about the midterms that you can’t bring yourself to fill out a ballot. That’s where we come in. In this special midterm election issue, we say goodbye to Sen. Orrin Hatch and help you figure out how to vote on each ballot initiative, in a fun, gently mocking, alt-weekly way. We take you behind the scenes on Jenny Wilson’s campaign for Hatch’s seat, and tell you what the hell gerrymandering is and why Prop 4 is so important. And we cut through the complexity and report the cold, hard numbers on how a 10-cent gas tax could help Utah’s students. We also fill you in on the latest twists and turns in the medical cannabis chronicles, and analyze the funniest, dumbest and most absurd moments of this election season’s political ads. Some of this coverage is light-hearted, meant to give you a break from the constant onslaught of negative, stress-inducing news that’s published daily in national and local outlets, including this one. But don’t think of us as the punks who sit in the back of a political science classroom and hurl spitballs at the professor—think of us as the old friend who buys you beers


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14 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

JENNY’S LAST STAND

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KELAN LYONS

Inside Jenny Wilson’s uphill battle against Mitt Romney for a seat in the U.S. Senate. BY KELAN LYONS

t’s a hazy Saturday morning in September, but Jenny Wilson is spending it outside, breathing in the noxious gases and smoke as she canvasses a neighborhood in Riverton. A half-hour earlier, she’d told a handful of volunteers gathered in her Salt Lake City HQ that she and the team can’t afford to take any days off, even when the air quality sucks. A statewide campaign requires discipline and sacrifice, especially when you’re the Democrat running against Mitt Romney. Canvassing involves meandering around neighborhoods to confer with voters who might be persuaded to vote for Wilson. It’s a common staple of political campaigning, but Wilson doesn’t just farm out the grunt work to volunteers or professionals. She’s there on the front lines, walking up to strangers to tell them why she wants to be their senator. “They’re absolutely happy to talk to me,” she says of potential voters as she approaches someone’s home. “They don’t expect a candidate for the U.S. Senate to be out knocking on doors.”

Christopher Smith answers Wilson’s tapping and steps onto his patio to chat. She tells him who she is and what office she’s pursuing. “That’s a tough race,” Smith says before explaining his family’s political breakdown. “We have a split household,” he says, meaning he’s the lone Republican who lives there. Political differences aside, Smith and Wilson talk for 20 minutes. They bond over the sports their children play, then get deep into the weeds on health care and Social Security. The amiable conversation reaches a natural conclusion after they gab about that afternoon’s BYU football game, and Wilson asks if she’s earned his vote. “I’ll definitely consider it,” Smith says. “I wish I’d get the chance for a one-on-one with Romney, as well.” In 2004, Wilson became the first woman elected to the Salt Lake County Council, where she’s currently serving her second term. If she beats Romney, she’ll be the first woman elected in Utah to serve on the U.S. Senate. “I’m not running on the platform of becoming the first woman senator from the state of Utah, but that would be a first, and maybe at some level would encourage young women to live their dreams, no matter what they may be,” she says. Politics is in Wilson’s blood. Her father, Ted, unsuccessfully ran as a Democrat against Orrin Hatch for his U.S. Senate seat in 1982. He was also a well-liked Salt Lake City mayor for almost a decade, from 1976 to 1985. “My dad is the ultimate consensus-builder,” Wilson says. People from all different political affiliations are constantly telling her what a good man he is. Watching him work when she was young gave

u o Y n i g? n Orr i v a e L m ’ I d Remembering Gla Orrin Hatch’s reign at the (merciful) end of his 41-year senatorial career.

By Kelan Lyons

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Wilson a framework for her own political career, teaching her the importance of collaborating with members of other political parties in order to achieve real, lasting change. “I think we see good government when both sides of the aisle engage and come up with solutions, especially in this day and age when we’re so divided,” Wilson says. In the ’90s, Wilson was the chief of staff for Bill Orton, a Democrat U.S. congressman who represented Utah’s 3rd District, one of the most conservative in the state. Working with Orton added to the wisdom she gained from observing her father’s career, helping her learn how to compromise and reach across party lines. It also instilled a deep understanding of the value of balanced representation in government, a message she’s spreading in her campaign. “I look around, I look at the dominant gender, the dominant religion, the dominant party, and I think we should make change,” Wilson says. “I think I represent something very different. Clearly, returning a Democrat to a statewideelected position in Utah I think would go a long way to support the families in this state.” The problem is, the change Wilson envisions is a longshot. A recent Salt Lake Tribune-Hinckley Institute of Politics poll lists Romney as having a commanding 36-point lead. “Mitt Romney is a juggernaut,” Hinckley Institute of Politics associate director Morgan Lyon Cotti says. “He has universal name recognition. He knows how to run a campaign.” But it’s also a matter of the “R” next to his name. Utah, after all, is a Republican stronghold. According to its election website, Democrats make up about 12 percent of active

n his first U.S. Senate campaign, Orrin Hatch castigated his incumbent opponent with a joke: “What do you call a senator who’s served in office for 18 years? You call him home.” Hatch won that race in 1976. More than four decades later, he’s still serving. Hatch—a walking, breathing, living (?) argument for term limits—is calling himself home at the end of this year, ending the political career of the longest-serving Republican senator in U.S. history. It’s difficult to conceptualize just how long 41 years is, so City Weekly is eulogizing Hatch’s run with a list of fads, inventions and cultural touchstones that his politicking has outlived.

Thing: Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Year: 1977 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 4 months Notable event from that year: Elvis’ death.


BURN

BURN

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e should all aspire to be respectful when we engage in civic discourse. But sometimes the cracks show, and candidates find inventive ways to tell their opponents to shove off. Here are a few noteworthy examples:

Ben McAdams, to Rep. Mia Love “... I did something I’ve never seen Rep. Love do: I held a town hall meeting.”

Rep. Mia Love, to Ben McAdams “We’ve seen Mayor McAdams, with the help of D.C. Democrat allies, come after and try to destroy a fellow American in pursuit of political power.”

Jenny Wilson, to Mitt Romney “I guess we’re gonna play MultipleChoice Mitt, because you’ve said one thing when you went to run for governor, another thing as governor, then you went off to run for president, and now you’re seeking to serve us in the U.S. Senate from Utah. I don’t know if it’s A, B, C or D, but I see that it does change.”

Eric Eliason, to Rep. Rob Bishop “I’m glad, as of 2017, that Mr. Bishop has acknowledged climate change. Upton Sinclair said, ‘It’s difficult for man to understand something when his salary depends on not understanding it.’”

A debate heckler, to Shireen Ghorbani and Chris Stewart “Vaccines cause autism. Autism is caused by vaccines.”

—Kelan Lyons

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 15

Thing: Nintendo Entertainment System Year: Released in North America in 1985 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 8 years Notable event from that year: Route 66 is removed from the U.S. highway system.

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Thing: Care Bears Year: First painted in 1981 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 4 years Notable event from that year: Sandra Day O’Connor becomes first female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

BABY, !

The sickest disses candidates have landed during this election season’s debates.

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Thing: Sony Walkman Year: First released in 1979 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 2 years Notable event from that year: Iran Hostage Crisis.

with ghastly decorations as he strategically places skeletons and ghouls on his lawn. “The neighborhood kids demand it,” the man says when Wilson asks him why he’s setting up for Halloween in mid-September. “You’re that Wilson lady,” he says before she can introduce herself. “You’re gonna make me a Democrat.” Wilson thanks him for his time, recognizing that he’s solidly in Romney’s camp. “We can’t get every vote, but we’ll try,” she says. As the day winds down, Wilson comes across two LDS missionaries. She runs through her usual elevator pitch and introduces herself. The two young men don’t look like they recognize her. “My opponent is Mitt Romney, have you heard of him?” Wilson asks. “I think so,” one of them says, smiling. In some ways, talking to Wilson is like talking to a charismatic college professor. One minute she’s talking about holiday decorations or making a joke, the next she’s explaining the intersection between the criminal justice system, health care and the opioid epidemic. As a candidate, she’s traveled the whole state, and as a member of the Utah Association of Counties, she has a firm understanding of many issues facing Utahns in rural and urban communities. But in Republican Utah, that only goes so far. Wilson still is getting clobbered in the polls. At age 71, it’s unclear whether Romney would be able to serve more than two six-year terms. And maybe that’s not such a bad thing. “I think for a lot of Republicans in this state, they’re perfectly happy Mitt Romney is not going to be there for as long as Orrin Hatch was,” Burbank says. Wilson, who will be 53 years old come Election Day, isn’t sure she would run for Senate again if she loses on Nov. 6. Campaigning statewide is grueling. But she vows to participate, in one way or another, in every federal election, even if she isn’t the Democrat who’s on the ballot. The limelight isn’t what’s important—it’s fielding a new generation of leaders who will fight for values that Utah Democrats share and give a voice to on the other side of the aisle. “I do this because I want this state to remain as special as it is, and I think there are things worth fighting for,” Wilson says. Driving back to Salt Lake City from Riverton, Wilson opines about the future of Utah’s politics. Win or lose, she’s optimistic. “Change in this state is tangible. You can feel it in this murky air.” ■

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voters in the state. Republicans make up 48 percent. “Partisanship is a big driver in a race like this,” Matthew Burbank, an associate professor in the U’s Department of Political Science, says. He thinks Romney and Wilson share a lot of similarities, despite belonging to different parties. Both candidates have campaigned on their abilities to cut through partisan bickering to reach a bipartisan consensus, and they have similar takes on governing. “They both have a sense that politics is about, broadly speaking, trying to help people,” Burbank says. But there are key differences in each candidate’s positions. To name a few: Romney backs enhanced background checks for guns and a ban on bump stocks but, ultimately, believes gun legislation should be passed at the state level, whereas Wilson supports a ban on assault-style weapons and enhanced background checks for purchases made online or at a gun show; Romney thinks states should have the right to approve national monument designations, Wilson is against shrinking monument borders; Romney is a fan of tax reform, Wilson calls it “a giveaway to the very wealthy and corporations.” Like an old red sweater, Romney’s political preferences are comfortable for Utah voters. His politics align with “common sense conservative policies and values that a lot of Utahns are familiar with and a lot of Utahns like,” Cotti says. “He’s an easy vote for a lot of Utah Republicans.” Uphill battle aside, Wilson and her team have put up a good fight. She’s traveled to all of Utah’s 29 counties over the past 20 months, talking to voters about her diplomatic skills in working with Republicans to get things done. “Jenny has run a really great statewide campaign. Democrats do better when they hit the streets,” Cotti says. A fifth-generation Utahn who’s now raising a family of her own, Wilson is used to packing up her car and heading to a national park or campground. “And when you do that, you gas up, you get your Diet Coke, you fill the cooler and you move on. When you go out as a candidate, you engage with people,” she says. “It doesn’t take long for the tears to well up.” No tears are visible as she canvasses in Riverton. That day, Wilson winds up knocking on more than 10 doors and speaks with pretty much everyone who happens to be outside while she walks around the community. At one point, she comes across an elderly man wrangling


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16 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

GO

WOMEN GO

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CARRIE COX

Meet the women destroying the Beehive patriarchy one run at a time. BY RAY HOWZE

ou’ve probably heard it before: Utah is a male-dominated state; the patriarchy makes the big decisions. What about the women? Well, if you’re voting Nov. 6, you might find the answer. Utah voters’ ballots are replete with female candidates for the midterm election this year, and it’s not exactly new news. Names like Jenny Wilson (running against Mitt Romney), Shireen Ghorbani (running against Rep. Chris Stewart), and Rep. Mia Love (running against Ben McAdams) likely are familiar if you’ve been around town for awhile. They’re just a few of the growing number of female candidates running for public office. In races involving Salt Lake City and county, more than 40 women are running for some type of office, from Congress all the way down at the county council. If you include school board races, that number is even higher. On the state level, women who filed for House seats increased from 50 to 67 from 2016 to 2018 and doubled from nine to 18 for the Senate. Three weeks before the midterm, Womenpreneurs, a local female leadership group, gathered nine women candidates to speak to small groups of voters.

You n i r r O Glad I ’m g? Leavin

Rose Maizner, co-founder, says that while her group’s goal is not entirely politically motivated, she understands the need for representation. “We don’t focus specifically to train women to be politically engaged,” Rose says. “But we also know it’s a hell of a lot harder to access business and leadership positions if we don’t have policies that have been crafted to support, protect and empower women in leadership. “We also know that for those policies to be crafted, we need a seat at the table.” The number of seats at the table has been growing for women in Utah politics since 1971, according to a 2017 study by Utah Valley University’s Utah Women & Leadership Project. In 1971, 8.2 percent of state legislators were women. Now, that number has risen to 19.2 percent and includes 12 Democrats and 8 Republicans. The number of women in the Legislature actually was highest in 2001, at 22.1 percent, with 12 Democrats and 11 Republicans. Erin Jemison, director of public policy at the Utah YWCA chapter, which operates Real Women Run, foresees more women in political office. Since Real Women Run started in 2011, two-thirds of its candidates have won, she says. Three counties in the Beehive State—Davis, Utah and Washington—have all-male representation in their county-level elected offices. Despite the high number of men, Jemison and Maizner both said their goal isn’t just to elect women, but to evaluate all candidates’ positions on public policy, not gender. “We’re not about voting for every woman candidate over every male candidate,” Jemison says. “But we are about decreasing barriers and trying to make sure our

Thing: Straight Outta Compton, NWA’s first album Year: 1988 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 11 years (he probably hasn’t listened to it) Notable event from that year: George H.W. Bush is elected president.

Thing: Friends TV show Year: Premiered in 1994 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 17 years Notable event from that year: Nelson Mandela becomes president of South Africa.

communities are represented as effectively as possible— we know that when women have roles at the table, different issues get talked about, more collaboration happens and more work gets done.” Later that night, when Wilson addressed the Womenpreneurs’ crowd, she acknowledged the elephant in the room. “I am the woman running against Mitt Romney,” she said to a few cheers. “That has not always been my identity, but I’m happy to lose it one way or the other in two weeks.” The race is a long shot for the Salt Lake County councilwoman, according to numerous polls, but she and other candidates say they don’t let that deter them from running. Stephanie Pitcher, a Democrat running in House District 40, which encompasses parts of Millcreek, Holladay and Sugar House, says while she is “cognizant we need more women” in office, she wants people to see that she’s the “better candidate” because of her qualifications and experience. Pitcher, running against Republican Peter Kraus, is currently a deputy district attorney who previously worked as an associate city prosecutor in Salt Lake City. “I prefer to be recognized for my merits, but I see the frustration as well, because seeing the type of policies coming out of a male-dominated Legislature … our policies do reflect that to some extent,” Pitcher tells City Weekly. “If more women are there, we would see more focus on child care and education issues and parental leave.” And while it might look like man vs. woman on your ballot, the Womenpreneurs hope that idea changes, if it hasn’t already. “If we can talk honestly and [be] open about it, we can solve it,” Maizner concludes. “We don’t want it to be us vs. them.” ■

Thing: Pokémon cards Year: Released in the U.S. in 1999 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 22 years Notable event from that year: Senate acquits Bill Clinton.


L

PIVOTING TO VIDEO

Inside the election season’s best ads, announcements and diatribes.

BY KELAN LYONS

ove ’em or hate ’em, campaign commercials and announcements are the lifeblood of election season. Following is a breakdown of this year’s most cringeworthy, head-scratching and downright funny political ads and ramblings:

SHIREEN AND THE BEAR

COX VOTES UTAH

What happens: Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox laments Utah being ranked 39th in national voter turnout in the 2016 election and urges residents to “get registered, get educated, get voting.” Best part: When Cox employs a host of U.S. clichés—catching a football, lighting a firecracker— to inspire Utahns to get off their asses and participate in our democratic republic. If Uncle Sam on stilts doesn’t inspire you to cast a ballot, nothing will.

What happens: Reed Clair McCandless, a little-known candidate vying with Jenny Wilson and Romney for Orrin Hatch’s seat in the U.S. Senate, uses a YouTube Channel to ramble to voters about his political opinions. Best parts: McCandless’ tiny nuggets of wisdom: “A spoiled spouse really wreaks havoc on a companionship,” he says in one video. “Finances are tough, dreams are not always met, but we stay positive and we move forward,” he says in another.

#REALREPUBLICAN

What happens: Tim Aalders, a conservative radio host and U.S. Senate candidate whose website tells voters they “don’t have to be stuck with progressive Mitt Romney in this upcoming election,” pledges to represent all Utahns. Best part: Two words: prairie dogs. Aalders says the diseasecarrying ground squirrels invade farmers’ lands because they’re “smart,” then implies a cull might be needed: “There’s more prairie dogs out there than need to be protected.” ■

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 17

Thing: Straight Outta Compton, the movie Year: Released in 2015 How Long Hatch had been in office by that time: 38 years Notable event from that year: Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage.

Thing: Pokémon Go Year: Released in 2016 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 39 years Notable event from that year: Donald Trump is the 45th man elected president of the United States.

What happens: Rob Bishop employs the tired “Vote for me because I represent Utah values” shtick while using a lot of baseball metaphors. Best part: Romney’s cameo. He appears out of nowhere on the ole baseball diamond, to throw his support behind Bishop, “a well-respected all-star and a team player who shares Utah values.” What values? A love of watereddown beer?

REED’S RANTS

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Thing: Crocs foam clogs Year: First public appearance in 2002 How long Hatch had been in office by that time: 25 years Notable event from that year: Salt Lake City hosts the Winter Olympics.

What happens: Utah 1st Congressional District third-party candidate Eric Eliason encourages voters to “Release the Bishop,” referencing the 16-year incumbent Rob Bishop. Best part: Because Bishop’s not being held hostage, this must be a swipe at the congressman’s and voters’ religion. Only in Utah.

What happens: The Salt Lake County mayor and Rep. Mia Love challenger uses an elaborate bathing metaphor to explain that Washington, D.C., needs to be cleaned up so special interests don’t run U.S. politics. Best part: The moment McAdams’ four kids kick their dad out of the bathroom so they, too, can shower, presumably all at the same time. Why are they all washing themselves, fully clothed, just like Ben? Is this how they do laundry?

SWEET RELEASE

MITT TO BISHOP: PUT ME IN, COACH

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

BEN MCADAMS’ RUB-A-DUB-DUBBING

What happens: Friends of Mia Love tries to connect Ben McAdams to the Clintons by simulating a voicemail from Bill on Ben’s phone. Best part: The “Actor Portrayal” disclaimer beside the picture of Clinton’s voicemail. If any voter believes that recording was actually Clinton, the Russians should hire Friends of Mia Love to spread disinformation in the 2020 presidential election.

What happens: Mitt Romney declares he’s running for U.S. Senate in a glossy vid that hits all the classic campaign staples: standing alone in a large room, telling people their state is awesome and, of course, hanging out in a diner. Best part: When Mitt posts a selfie he took with young voters. Problem is, it only depicts the top half of his face, making it look more like a ransom demand than an earnest showing of how down young people are with his politics.

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BILL AND BEN: BFFS?

MITT’S MEDALS

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What happens: Shireen Ghorbani goes after opponent Chris Stewart, U.S. representative for Utah’s 2nd Congressional District, for not protecting national monuments like Grand Staircase-Escalante, located in his jurisdiction. Best part: When Ghorbani says, “We need someone who will stand up for our public lands” as a grizzly bear balances on its hind legs, implying the majestic predator will eat anyone who wants to privatize national monuments located in Utah.

What happens: Friends of Mia Love mocks Ben McAdams’ campaign bus in a nonsensical video that accuses “Big Spendin’ McAdams” of extravagantly paying his aides and opposing tax cuts. Best part: “Ben is not my friend,” one gray-haired man declares, as if he and the congressional candidate were locked in a schoolyard squabble, not a political disagreement.

ANNIE EDWARDS

AS THE WHEELS TURN


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18 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

DIVIDED

Will an independent commission help Utah’s political boundaries?

A

BY RAY HOWZE

re our political boundaries gerrymandered? That might depend who you ask. But take one look at Holladay and you might get an idea. The city of about 30,000 is split up into four state House seats, two Senate seats and two congressional seats. “It [the city] could fit into one district,” Blake Moore, Republican co-chair for the Better Boundaries initiative, says. “But why? That’s the question. I believe that has been done in order to unduly favor a potential candidate, creating a safe district … you’re not going to keep Salt Lake together but there’s no reason for a place like Holladay to be cut up.” The Better Boundaries initiative, also known as Proposition 4, would create an independent citizen-led commission to recommend new political boundaries to the Legislature following the 2020 federal census.

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE, MIDTERM EDITION

Overwhelmed by the complexity of each initiative on your ballot? City Weekly made these handy reference guides to help you make your decision. Just answer the questions and follow the arrows to see how you should vote.

The hope is that it would encourage transparency and avoid gerrymandering, Natalie Gohnour, director of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah, told a votereducation panel in October. “I think there’s considerable evidence that political bodies draw these boundaries in ways that favor people they like,” she said at the panel. “Better Boundaries is saying, ‘Let’s not try to cut out Summit County; let’s let it stay whole rather than divide up all the Democrats’—this is the kind of nonsense that goes on.” That “nonsense” could be diminished by the seven-member redistricting commission, proponents say. Members from both political parties would be appointed by lawmakers. But the Legislature would have the final say in drawing any new boundaries. Would that create better boundaries? Moore, who acknowledges he’s in the majority when it comes to Utah politics, says the change would reduce public criticism of the Legislature. “You’ve removed the conflict and you’ve added in governing principles,” Moore tells City Weekly. “You’re doing the opposite of eight years ago or what’s been done for the last century.” Following the 2010 census, Utah’s four congressional districts were cut into what some describe as a pizza or pie, splitting up Salt Lake County and effectively diminishing Democrats’ ability to win a district in the heavily-red state. In September, the Salt Lake Chapter of the League of Women Voters held a “Gerry-Meander” 5K that crossed Utah’s four congressional districts nine times, trying to show people how the city has been divvied up. While Moore says the

PROPOSITION 4 HELL YES

commission would still be predominantly Republican, Rep. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, has said he thinks it’s a way for Democrats to gain a U.S. House seat. “I don’t think this is about political gerrymandering. I think this is about the Democrats getting a seat in Congress—a guaranteed seat that they can’t lose every election cycle,” Weiler told KUER 90.1 FM. (Meanwhile, Democrat Ben McAdams could beat Rep. Mia Love for a congressional seat Nov. 6) Frank Pignanelli, a Democrat and political advisor, however, told the October panel that idea can go both ways. “It’s not just Republican or Democrat,” Pignanelli said. “What it is is that the state is changing—Salt Lake City is a Democratic city and the east bench tends to vote predominantly democrat—but I don’t care what commission you have, I don’t care what happens, they’re [Democrats] going to get nailed.” Whether the new boundaries result in a Democrat winning a congressional seat state-level office, though, might not be known for years and it will come down to Utah’s changing population, as Pignanelli points out. And as Moore says, “Republicans are in control of everything statewide.” But he emphasizes Prop 4 would at least add more input to the process. “I want voters to know that the group behind this is nonpartisan and bipartisan,” Moore concludes. “What we literally just care going forward is that we can be proud about what’s going to be done [to boundaries] in 2021 and 2031 and say a state like Utah was definitely willing to do this.” ■ With information from Kelan Lyons

Do you believe Utah is gerrymandered? Nah (You’re kinda wrong, see “Divided.”)

Would you prefer an independent commission recommend boundaries? HELL YES VOTE YES

No (Are you a Republican holding elected office?)

Vo t e ye s, anyway. What ’s wro ng wit h more input?

Vote yes, anyway. What’s so bad about an independent commission drawing districts instead of the Republicans currently in power?


DENIAL AND ISOLATION

Remember former Sen. Mark Madsen? He’s the state lawmaker who proposed a whole-plant medical cannabis bill more than two years ago. That bill went nowhere at the Capitol. “I was never able to have a substantive conversation with anyone in authority or anyone ordained, so I had no idea what their positions were on these issues,” Madsen told City Weekly in July.

Angry by political thwarting? Upset by Utah’s definition of separation of church and state? You might be experiencing these feelings.

ANGER

The inability for the state to make any progress on medical cannabis left many upset, including Madsen. He soon retired from public office and decided it was time to leave the country altogether, moving to Peru earlier this year. Some Utah families with members who benefitted from medical cannabis moved out of state to Colorado and other areas.

Yes (Or no. Does it matter?)

Have you ever tried cannabis?

y? ba d, mm ka e

ar

of

—Ray Howze

Do you worry it will lead to recreational marijuana? No, the state makes it hard to drink. It will probably be similar for cannabis.

!!

en r il d ch

No, they’ve historically failed to do this in the past VOTE YES

VOTE YES Wait, I thought this was a people’s initiative. Why are we mentioning lawmakers?

Are you optimistic lawmakers will pass legislation to allow sick Utahns to use medical cannabis? Vote yes just to be Yes, they sure seem genuine.

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 19

VOTE NO

, es Y

ink h t

e th

Last month, lawmakers, representatives with the Utah Medical Association and others including Madsen, gathered at the Capitol to announce a medical cannabis compromise bill. The announcement included news of a special session after the election to discuss a medical cannabis plan slightly different from Prop 2, possibly signaling medical cannabis is on its way to Utah. But to be sure, Madsen says, voters still need to vote on Prop 2. “I hope people will vote for Prop 2,” he says. “Because 1. It’s a better bill. 2. It’s an insurance policy. And 3. It sends a message that ‘Yes’ on Prop 2 is a ‘No’ to business as usual. Send the message.” ■

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Yes, my church tells me so.

No, you’re right, I should do some “studying.”

Yes

ACCEPTANCE

Do you feel like you should have a say?

Do you think sick people should have access to medical cannabis?

No ,d ru gs

No

If there was a silver lining from the failures on the lawmaker level, it might be what you see on the ballot with Proposition 2, the Utah Medical Cannabis Act. Groups worked endless hours to gather more than 130,000 signatures across the state and get it on the ballot. The people were essentially fed

of Utah voters approved of Prop 2, opponents started using propaganda campaigns to turn the tide. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also came out in opposition to the proposition. Until ...

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PROPOSITION 2

BARGAINING

Mark Madsen, second from right, DEPRESSION With some polls showing in his new home country , Peru. that as many as 66 percent

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V

oters, rejoice! The time has finally come to let the Legislature know how you really feel. For years, it’s dragged its feet on medical cannabis but finally, you get a chance to vote on it with Proposition 2. There’ve been radio ads sharing iffy information, accusations of shady tactics to remove signatures during the approval process and even an 11th-hour “compromise” with lawmakers. How did we get here and how best to handle the situation? Here are Utah’s five steps of acceptance:

up with any negotiations on Capitol Hill and took the issue into their own hands.

COURTESY MARK MADSEN

PROP 2 GRIEF FIVE STAGES OF


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20 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

GASSIN’ UP UTAH’S SCHOOLS

Breaking down Question 1, a statewide ballot query that would recommend legislators pass a law adding a small tax to each gallon of gas so the state has more funding for education:

$

.10¢ The new tax’s cost, per gallon of gas

4

How much per month the new tax would cost the average Utah driver

125 MILLION

$

Amount that would be invested in Utah education

55 150 MILL $

$

Sum that would be invested in repairing city and county roads

Annual per-student funding increase for children in grades K-12 Percentage of Utah students who aren’t proficient in English, math and science

50 %

Where the state’s classroom sizes stack up compared to the rest of the country

LARGEST

6LOWEST $ th

50 PERCENT

Where Utah teachers’ salaries sit compared to educators in other states

Percentage of Utah teachers who quit within their first five years in the classroom

I’m Out

Sources: q1facts.com, ourschoolsnow.com

PROPOSITION 3 Are you supportive of the ACA?

Yes, expanded health care is a good idea.

No, I don’t like anything Obama-related.

Are you OK with raising sales tax from 4.70 to 4. 85 percent? No, keep your hands off my wallet.

Do you think low-income Utahns should have access to health care? Yes, it’s for the greater good.

VOTE NO

Wait, didn’t we already do this? Kind of, Utah legislators tried expanding it partially. VOTE YES

Yes, health care is a human right.

Are you wary of the federal government paying for Medicaid expansion?

Yes, what if Utah taxpayers are on the hook or the state has to foot the bill?

VOTE NO

No, pull yourself up by your bootstraps.

VOTE NO

No, they’re bound by law.

VOTE YES


Taylor Mac: A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged)

The Lucas Bros. There are many different roads that people can take into an artistic career. For Keith and Kenny Lucas—the twin stand-up comedians who perform together as the Lucas Bros.—that road involved both of them dropping out of law school to chase a different dream. “I was at NYU law, and Keith was at Duke,” Kenny says. “I think we were having a sort of similar response to the prospect of being lawyers for an indefinite amount of years. … I was always fascinated by [comedy], but didn’t think I’d ever have the confidence to stand on a stage and make a fool out of myself.” But the brothers did jump together circa 2009, and began a career that has taken them to latenight talk show appearances, a season of the animated series Lucas Bros. Moving Company on Fox, roles in 22 Jump Street and a 2017 Netflix special, On Drugs. Through that process, they’ve perfected a performing style that has them applying their unique, often deadpan voices to everything from pop culture to hot-button social issues, capitalizing on their sibling chemistry. “We were influenced by a lot of the same individual performers: [Chris] Rock, [Dave] Chapelle, [Jerry] Seinfeld,” Keith says. “But in terms of how we’re going to do it on stage, we looked a lot to television pairs: Jerry & George, Lucy & Ethel …” “Beavis & Butthead,” Kenny adds. “We also explored classic vaudeville stuff like Abbot & Costello.” “It’s like a team sport,” Kenny says of the selflessness required in performing as a comedy duo. “If one person gets hot, you keep passing them the ball.” (Scott Renshaw) The Lucas Bros. @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Nov. 2-3, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15, wiseguyscomedy.com

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 21

Music can serve as a signpost for times both good and bad, underscoring our collective identity and providing comfort during tragedy and turmoil. That’s the premise for Taylor Mac’s grand and garish spectacular A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged). Don’t be mistaken; this isn’t some stiff, stodgy history lesson. It’s a daringly experimental stage show that spans an entire history of American popular music, from 1776 through the present. Originally 24 hours in duration—with each hour dedicated to a specific decade in that era—the show visits Utah in its more manageable 2-1/2 hour “abridged” version. Nevertheless, it doesn’t sacrifice the insight, entertainment and intelligence offered in the original. Mac—an actor, playwright, singer, songwriter, performance artist and graduate of the American Academy of Dramatic Art—has been called “a cross between Ziggy Stardust and Tiny Tim.” He draws on the influences of classical Greek theater, drag queens and traditional musicals in creating multi-dimensional, one-man shows that have reaped numerous awards and kudos, including a finalist nod for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Still, even in its abridged version, 24-Decade History is easily Mac’s most-ambitious project. It combines a vast selection of songs, multiple costume changes and a solo performance that morphs between crucial characters throughout. In so doing, he uses popular art to illustrate the mores, absurdities and incongruities that have defined America since its inception. And for this particular version, a pre-show snooze isn’t even required. (Lee Zimmerman) Taylor Mac: A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged) @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., $25-$40, tickets.utah.edu

FRIDAY 11/2

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First performed in 1967, Jewels was developed by George Balanchine, a man often credited with being “the father of American ballet.” Inspired by his relationship with jeweler Arpels, Jewels has no plot, and instead centers around the dancers’ skills intermingling with the musicality of the piece. Ballet West kicks off its 55th season with a dazzling celebration of dance in Jewels, a threeact abstract ballet. The rest of the company’s season will tackle everything from classics like The Nutcracker and Swan Lake to more recent and dramatic works like Onegin. Adam Sklute, Ballet West artistic director, says though Jewels is plotless, it presents a magical world that anyone can enjoy by focusing on the skill of its dancers. “You don’t have to know anything about ballet to enjoy the show. If you just want to see a great show, this is it,” Sklute says. “It’s athletic and dynamic. And it’s amazing how hard the dancers work and how they don’t show it.” Each of the ballet’s three acts tells a selfcontained narrative that explores the essences of precious stone. “Emeralds,” the first act, conveys French elegance, with the dancers performing an incredibly demanding routine making it seem effortless. “Rubies,” Sklute says, is a marathon, with dancers going intensely and nonstop throughout the act. The final act, “Diamonds,” evokes the bygone grandeur of imperial Russia. This marks the second time Ballet West has performed Jewels, and Sklute believes that the company’s dancers have made this production their own. “Energy just pours off the stage,” Sklute says. (Kylee Ehmann) Ballet West: Jewels @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-869-6900, Nov. 2-3 & 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 10, 2 & 7:30 p.m., $30-$87, balletwest.org

FRIDAY 11/2

The year is 2118. Climate change has ravaged the earth, leading to a complete technological breakdown. The social order has collapsed and, fed up with the failure of male leadership, women have assumed power. Cut to Rome. Our heroine, Julius Caesar, is returning from victorious battle. The University of Utah Department of Theatre’s production of Julius Caesar, guest directed by David Carey, asks audiences to consider what happens when women hold power, and how citizens and leaders should react when faced with political uncertainty. Although Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar 400 years ago—and the play is based on events from than 2,000 years ago— Carey believes the play remains relevant today. “The play deals with the consequences of authoritarianism and idealism in the political sphere. At a time when populism, authoritarianism and the idealisms of left and right are threatening the basic tenets of democracy, it feels right to be mounting a production of Julius Caesar.” Can we defend democracy by undemocratic means? The play suggests an answer. To bring the script to life, the crew designed a futuristic set and costumes, and for months, the cast of 13 women and five men has practiced carefully choreographed fight scenes. Carey’s gender-flipped casting led to the development of its 22nd-century setting, in which Caesar proclaims herself “Mother of the Motherland.” Join professor of theatre and gender studies Lynn Deboeck and dramaturg Alia Richards after the Friday evening performance for a discussion on the dynamics of power and the dominance of women—something we might want to consider, if and when things go south. (Naomi Clegg) Julius Caesar @ Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-7100, Nov. 1-3, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 3-4, 2 p.m., $8.50-$18, tickets.utah.edu

Ballet West: Jewels

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THURSDAY 11/1

RYAN MILLER

TODD COLLINS

BEAU PEARSON

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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THURSDAY 11/1

Studio 115: Julius Caesar

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, NOV. 1-7, 2018

LINDSEY BYRNES

ESSENTIALS

the


Teach the Children

Tanner Dance kicks off a 70th anniversary celebration of its influential program. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

:

PRESENTS

group of 40 young children, dressed in simple tunics, peek out from behind the black curtains lining the wings of the Kingsbury Hall stage. The excited energy of the young bodies is palpable. When the music begins, they take to the stage dancing to poetic verses by Ernest Bloch. Their movements are swooping and graceful. The year is 1949 and, though this is Salt Lake City, and though these modern dancers are children, the world is watching. Doris Humphrey is a guest of honor at this inaugural performance of the Children’s Dance Theater (CDT). Dance Magazine publishes an article about the event. Four years later, the children, led by their teacher Virginia Tanner, perform at the renowned Jacob’s Pillow dance festival in Massachusetts and at the American Dance Festival in Connecticut. Critics applaud the children’s troupe. The dancers are featured in Life and Newsweek and on national television. Walter Terry, in his review of the Jacob’s Pillow performance for the New York Herald Tribune, writes, “Other children have danced such themes … but none, I think, have conveyed so perfectly the bright (not pallid) purity of child-dance. It is difficult to describe even the most potent intangibles and the best I can do is to say that the children danced as if they had faith in themselves, had love for those of us who were seeing them.” While Tanner Dance and the Children’s

Current students at Tanner Dance

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Sponsored by:

JOHAN GEERTZ

A

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A&E

DANCE

Dance Theater might no longer excite the same national attention that it did at the start of Tanner’s career, the work she began continues to grow in importance within our local community. As they head toward the 70th anniversary of their ground-breaking debut, Tanner Dance invites the community to join in a year-long celebration of the life and work of Miss Virginia (as she was known affectionately), and who passed away in 1979. Kicking off festivities are two screenings of the Tanner Dance documentary Building Center, this weekend; later events will include a speaker series and the annual CDT spring performance at Capitol Theater. “It’s amazing to look at the breadth of Tanner Dance programming and consider just how much it has grown from the seeds of dance and that initial performance in 1949,” says Tanner Dance artistic director Mary Ann Lee. These days, the umbrella of Tanner Dance spreads far across the community. According to Lee, the organization serves nearly 5,000 children each week. In addition to the performing group, CDT, Tanner Dance leads arts in education and Dancers With Disabilities classes, the Tanner Fine Arts preschool and other programs. And it all started with a young Salt Lake City girl who preferred dancing on her front lawn in black bloomers to standing at a barre in ballet class. Virginia Tanner, born on April 25, 1915, always had a natural attraction to movement. Her connection to some of modern dance’s greatest choreographers, however, began when she left home at the age of 18. While working as a governess in Washington, D.C., Tanner began attending evening dance classes with Evelyn Davis, a contemporary of Martha Graham and Doris Humphrey. Though Tanner moved back home two years later, she continued studying dance during summer programs in Colorado, including at the Perrty-Mansfield summer dance program in Steamboat Springs where Humphrey taught. Tanner became an important student of Humphrey’s, and was eventually persuaded to move to New York where Tanner continued studying at the HumphreyWeidman studio, performing Humphrey’s work and taking over many of Humphrey and

Virginia Tanner and students at Jacob’s Pillow, 1953

Charles Weidman’s teaching appointments at a number of universities and schools. But the struggling life of a professional dancer was not the path for Virginia Tanner. After a two-year stay in New York, Tanner returned home. She reentered the education program at the University of Utah and in the fall of 1940 at the age of 25 completed her undergraduate degree. During the next decade, Tanner directed the dance department of the McCune School of Music and Art in Salt Lake City and, by the end of the decade, she staged that first Children’s Dance Theater performance that captured the nation’s attention. Tanner’s gift, explains Ann Dils, a teacher of dance history at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, was her unique ability to see children’s need and ability for creative expression. “Tanner did not disentangle the education of young people from the training of dancers,” writes Dils in Dance With Us: Virginia Tanner, Mormonism, and Humphrey’s Utah Legacy. “Dancing was a means of belonging, of learning to cooperate, of giving to community. Being a Tanner dancer gave children a valued place in the Salt Lake City community, but it also set them apart and connected them to a world beyond the boundaries of home and hometown.” Lee, who as a youngster trained with Miss Virginia, couldn’t agree more. “I think that dance allows children to find their voice in so many ways,” she says. “It becomes a channel to see the world in a new way and make the world your own, to live your life in an alive and curious way.” CW

TANNER DANCE 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION: BUILDING CENTER

Sorenson Arts and Education Center 1721 Campus Center Drive Nov 3, 3 p.m. & 5 p.m.; reception between screenings 801-581-7374 $5-$10 tannerdance.utah.edu


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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

West Side Theatre Co.: The 39 Steps Garden near the Green, 3700 E. Campus Drive, Eagle Mountain, Nov. 2-5, dates and times vary, westsidetheatreco.org The Wolves Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Nov. 11, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

The pop-up Bleed Gallery presents Condensed Rights, an exhibition exploring women’s rights curated by Shadna Aum at Studio Elevn (435 W. 400 South, Ste. 301, bleed.ltd), Nov. 2 & 3, 7 p.m.-10 p.m.; the free event encourages donations to Planned Parenthood Association of Utah.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Anything Goes Hale Center Theatre, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Nov. 17, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Blithe Spirit Highland City Community Center, 5378 W. 10400 North, Highland, through Nov. 5, 7 p.m., highlandcityarts.org Come From Away Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Nov. 6-11, dates and times vary, arttix.artsaltlake.org Dracula vs. Henry Botter The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Nov. 3, dates and times vary, theobt.org Eurydice Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through Nov. 4, dates and times vary, goodcotheatre.com How I Became A Pirate Scera, 745 S. State, Orem, through Nov. 2, dates and times vary, scera.org Julius Caesar Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, through Nov. 3, dates and times vary, tickets.utah.edu (see p. 21) Pygmalion Theatre Co.: Tigers Be Still Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through Nov. 3, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Scarlet Pimpernel Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Sweeney Todd Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, through Nov. 10, pioneertheatre.org The Velveteen Rabbit Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m., haletheater.org Wait Until Dark Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., hct.org

Chamber Music Series: Zach Buie Alpine Church Layton Campus, 254 W. 2675 North, Layton, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., davisarts.org Percussion UVU’s British Invasion Grand Ballroom, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m., utahvalley.com Stars of American Ballet WSU Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., symphonyballet.org Between War & Here Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., arttix.artsaltlake.org Utah Symphony: Ghostbusters in Concert Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Nov. 2-3, 7 p.m., utahsymphony.org Triumphs & Fanfares Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Nov. 3, 7:30 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org Wind Ensemble Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu WSU Chamber Orchestra Fall Concert St. Joseph Church, 514 24th St., Ogden, Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., weber.edu

COMEDY & IMPROV

Bone Hampton Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Nov. 2-3, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com The Lucas Bros. Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Nov. 2-3, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Russ Nagel Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Nov. 2-3, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

DANCE

Ballet West: Jewels Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Nov. 2-3, 7-9, 7:30 p.m., balletwest.org (see p. 21) Tanner Dance 70th Anniversary Celebration: Building Center Sorenson Arts and Education Center, 1721 Campus Center Drive, Nov. 3, 3 & 5 p.m., tannerdance.utah.edu (see p. 22)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Abby Huntsman: Who Will I Be? The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 3, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Brandon Sanderson: Skyward University Crossing Barnes & Noble, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Nov. 6, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Epic Reads Meetup The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 3, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Guest Writers Series: Jericho Brown & Heather June Gibbons Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Nov. 1, 7 p.m., english.utah.edu Jennifer L. Armentrout: The Darkest Star The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 5, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com


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PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

PHOTO

OF THE WEEK

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY ING ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOM TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY

moreESSENTIALS Jordan Matter: Born to Dance: Celebrating the Wonder of Childhood Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Kathryn Purdie: Frozen Reign Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Nov. 6, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Richard Paul Evans: The Noel Stranger Layton Barnes & Noble 1780 N. Woodland Park Drive, Layton, Nov. 5, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Orson Scott Card: A Town Divided by Christmas University Crossings Barnes & Noble, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Nov. 3, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Vince Vawter: Copyboy The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 3, 3 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FALL EVENTS

Day of the Dead Family Fiesta The Old Grantsville Church, 297 W. Clark St., Grantsville, Nov. 2, 6 p.m. Pumpkin Nights Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through Nov. 4, 5:30-10:30 p.m., pumpkinnights.com Rose Park Día de los Muertos Festival DayRiverside Branch, 1575 W. 1000 North, Nov. 2, 4-9 p.m., slcpl.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Reel Rock 13 Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 5-6, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Winter Whiteout Festival Jim Santy Auditorium, 1255 Park Ave., Park City, Nov. 7, 6 p.m.

LGBTQ EVENTS

NIH “All of Us” National Tour Utah Pride Center, 1380 Main St., Oct. 30-Nov. 2, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Taylor Mac: A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged) Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 21)

TALKS & LECTURES

Between War and Here Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., egmusic.com Maria Parilla de Kokal: Discussion of When I was Puerto Rican Brigham City Carnegie Library, 26 E. Forest St., Nov. 1, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Art Show Benefit: Salt Lake Print Collective Maud’s Cafe, 422A W. 900 South, Nov. 2, 5-8 p.m., maudscafe.com Alexis Rausch: The Sinners We Are Bountiful Davis Art Center, 745 S. Main, Bountiful, through Nov. 2, bdac.org Anne Ruth Isaacson: Narrative Portraiture Michael Berry Gallery, 163 E. 300 South, through Nov. 9 Ars Moriendi: The Art of Dying Bountiful Davis Art Center, 745 S. Main, Bountiful, through Nov. 2, bdac.org Beatrice Teigen: Great Girls of the World DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Nov. 14, slcpl.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Body and Soul Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Nov. 4, kimballartcenter.org Condensed Rights Studio Elevn, 435 W. 400 South, Ste. 301, Nov. 2-3, bleed.ltd (see p. 24) Daniel Everett: Security Questions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Downy Doxey-Marshall: The Stitching Years Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 4, kimballartcenter.org Great Girls of the World: Digital Prints by Beatrice Teigen Day-Riverside Branch Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Nov. 14, slcpl.org Jeff Pugh: New Works David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, through Nov. 16, davidericson-fineart.com JP Orquiz: A Stack of Forms UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 17, utahmoca.org Kandace Steadman: Utah Art Reimagined Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org Linnie Brown: Retrace A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Nov. 3, agalleryonline.com Marisa Morán Jahn: Mirror / Mask Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 9, umfa.utah.edu Molly Morin: Information Density Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org My Lai Fifty Years After Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Nov. 9, accessart.org Naomi Owen: Unforeseen Nature Paintings Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org Patrick Dean Hubbell: Equus Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Nov. 30, modernwestfineart.com Paul Reynolds & Deborah Durban Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Nov. 16, saltlakearts.org Photography from the East Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Dec. 2, slcpl.org Plein Air Exhibition Brigham City Museum Gallery, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, through Nov. 3, brighamcitymuseum.org Ryan Perkins: Parallel Lives, Misremembered Pasts, Revelation, Heartbreak & Lore Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 30, slcpl.org Ryan Ruehlen: Georhythmic Drift Music UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 3, utahmoca.org salt 14: Yang Yongliang Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through June 2, umfa.utah.edu Science + Art Bountiful Davis Art Center, 745 S. Main, Bountiful, through Nov. 2, bdac.org Shadow Realms Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Nov. 4, urbanartsgallery.org Site Lines: Recent Work by University of Utah Art Faculty Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 6, umfa.utah.edu Susan Cramer Stein: Turn of the Tide Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Nov. 9, localcolorsart.com Tactilis Salt Lake Community College South City Campus, 1575 S. State, through Nov. 9, slcc.edu Trent Alvey and Jan Andrews: On the Border of Realism Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 2, visualarts.utah.gov Whoop Dee Doo UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Working Hard to Be Useless UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org


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JOSH SCHEUERMAN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

E

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Sunday, noon-9 p.m. Best bet: A thin, foldable slice of pepperoni Can’t miss: Eating brunch with the Wake’N’Bake

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 31

good slice just as much as the rest of us. They don’t call them the upper crust for nothing. A few years back, the whole business complex was demolished to make way for a new hotel, which made me think that Spedelli’s had moved on to the great pizza parlor in the sky. When I realized that the place was still around, I grew curious about its survival. A relocation of that magnitude

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I first visited Spedelli’s when it was on the top level of a small, two-story business park where Foothill Drive meets I-215. It was an odd location for a dine-in pizza place, but its delivery game put it well within range of a swank, east bench clientele. Don’t be fooled by the Bentleys and boob jobs—those socialites in the Harvard and Yale neighborhoods love a

ven though we live in a state that loves thick slabs of carbs doused in heavy, cream-based substances, our roster of pizza joints mysteriously tends to veer toward the thin crust variety. With several New York-inspired pizza places nearby, you might have overlooked Spedelli’s (2991 E. 3300 South, Millcreek, 385-528-0181, spedellis.com). If that’s the case, then it’s time to take notice—this is a place that has risen like a pepperoni phoenix from the ashes following a forced relocation. Lesser purveyors of the planet’s most perfect food might have been crippled.

($9)—carne asada, pulled pork and fried fish—and while I loved the fresh salsa, spinach and peppers that came stuffed inside each one, the proteins involved were a bit flat. The fish tacos were perhaps the most disappointing. Where I was expecting a juicy filet of fried fish, I was met with something dry and overly chewy. It’s great that I can get tacos and pizza in one place, but when push comes to shove, it’s all about the pizza. Sorry, tacos. I’m glad that Spedelli’s stuck around after the ignominious demolition of its original location. It’s got a unique stable of pies that you can’t really get anywhere else, it consistently cranks out picture perfect pizza by the slice, and its supporting cast of tacos, burgers and sides is versatile enough to sample when you’re not in the mood for pizza. But I mean, come on. We’re always in the mood for pizza, right? CW

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Despite sudden relocation, Spedelli’s continues to deliver the goods.

signature pizzas, the most tempting of which is a pie called the Wake’N’Bake ($19-$23). It fools you into thinking that its name is purely dedicated to the breakfast flavors of bacon and eggs—which are definitely present and accounted for—but it actually comes from the Sriracha pizza sauce and sliced jalapeño peppers that have been invited to the party. The meat has a smoky sweetness that complements the scrambled eggs, and the peppers pack just enough wallop to get you through an unforgiving workday. It’s no secret that pizza is what you should get at Spedelli’s, but the fact that I can get poutine, tacos and pizza under one roof is a rarity that everyone should take advantage of. Spedelli’s poutine ($6) tests the boundaries of what the dish actually is, but it’s tough to care about culinary nuances when they present you with a plate of house-cut fries drowning in brown gravy and mozzarella cheese. It’s good stuff—pretty hard to mess up fries, cheese and gravy—though this plate of decadent starchy gooeyness might not be the best appetizer if a hot pizza is in your future. On the taco front, the offerings at Spedelli’s are solid, but they definitely play second fiddle to the daily pizza-palooza. I went for a trio of tacos

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In Pizza We Trust

would end a local pizza joint that was even moderately successful—so what was the secret that kept Spedelli’s on the radar? Part of this magic equation is a keen eye for location. The current and previous locations are well within delivery-friendly residential areas, and neither spot had much pizza-based competition. The interior of Spedelli’s Millcreek digs captures the restaurant’s laid back, almost-beachy vibe. I’m a huge fan of the subway tile tables at each of Spedelli’s booths, and its patio seating is great for checking out the comings and goings of downtown Millcreek—when the weather is a bit warmer. The biggest part of Spedelli’s success, is, of course, its pizza. It’s as thin-crust as thin-crust pizza can get. Each slice begs to be folded in half and downed on the go. I’m always satisfied with one or two slices of the pepperoni pizza ($3). It hits all the right notes: a chewy, foldable crust that has just enough outer crunch to make me appreciate the pizza oven, layered with slightly tangy tomato sauce, melted cheese and then a hit of acidic heat from the slices of pepperoni. Those who are feeling a bit more punk rock about their pies will want to check out a few of Spedelli’s


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32 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

The biggest hidden secret in the valley

the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

James Beard Foundation Celebrity Chef Tour

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Any time the James Beard Foundation assembles a cadre of professional chefs like the ones appearing at Park City’s Riverhorse on Main (540 Main), culinary magic is in the air. Chefs from all over the country try tocreate a legendary meal, hosted by Riverhorse on Main’s own Seth Adams. The event captures the vibe of New York’s James Beard House dinners and brings it to restaurants across the country. Festivities begin with a cocktail reception, followed by a six-course dinner crafted by visiting chefs Holly Smith, Gregory Gourdet, Ryan Poli and Eric Skokan, along with Chef Adams himself. The evening concludes with a Q&A session where diners can delve a bit deeper into some of our country’s finest culinary minds. The event takes place on Saturday, Nov. 3, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased via riverhorseparkcity.com

CALL FOR RESERVATION

801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive

Brunch and Bingo with the Matrons of Mayhem

The Matrons of Mayhem are one of Salt Lake’s best kept secrets, and if you’ve never had the pleasure of attending one of their charity Bingo events, you need to fix your life. Join Miss Petunia Pap Smear, Poundcake and the whole gang as they kick off November with a charity Bingo event to celebrate Daylight Savings Time at Off Trax (259 W. 900 South) on Sunday, Nov. 4. In addition to catching the Matrons’ famous antics, attendees can enjoy brunch prepared by Jesse Dowhaniuk, co-owner of Off Trax and Club Try-Angles (251 W. 900 South), which is where the event wraps up over cocktails. Off Trax opens at 11 a.m. and bingo starts at 1 p.m. The Matrons of Mayhem bingo events are family-friendly, so feel free to bring the little ones if you are so inclined.

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Day of the Dead Pop-Up Market

Tradition... Tradition

For the past few weeks, Square Kitchen (751 W. 800 South) has been hosting a Day of the Dead pop-up market from 5 to 9 p.m., and Friday, Nov. 2, will be its last day. Vendors are made up primarily of Square Kitchen members, who are up-and-coming restaurateurs themselves. The Day of the Dead pop-up market is a great way to work out some post-Halloween blues—pick up some vibrantly painted sugar skulls and some pan de muerto for delivery to the grave of your favorite departed loved one to keep your sense of spookiness fresh for a few more days. Quote of the Week: “Give a drag queen a fish and you feed her for a day; show her how to be fishy and you feed her for a lifetime.” —RuPaul Charles Back Burner tips: comments@cityweekly.net

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail

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18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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Utah’s New Brewery Preview

The Beehive’s beer renaissance continues to shine. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

D

id you know that Cedar City has now opened its first brewery in more than a century? Policy Kings Brewery debuted on Oct. 16 to thirsty Southern Utah beer lovers. But its reign was inordinately brief. Just 10 days after Policy Kings debuted, The Templin Family (TF) Brewing Co. opened its doors, becoming the state’s 31st brewery/brewpub. Kevin Templin, the former brewmaster at Red Rock, has gone out on his own, and is serving new brews for a “family style” experience based around small batches of barrel-aged, draft and packaged beers. Meanwhile, here are several more breweries ready to become

the latest newest Utah brewery: Silver Reef Brewing Co.: I first became aware of St. George’s first brewery last February when it showed up in some of my research. The name changed a few months ago, but plans for this brewery have not. Silver Reef will supply the Las Vegas/Mesquite area along with Southern Utah. The production brewery will have a tap room and beer store as well. Look for Silver Reef to go online in the coming weeks. Utah Ogden (UTOG) Brewing Co.: Likely to be our third up-and-coming brewery, this new Ogden brewery is currently renovating and modifying its facility across from Ogden’s Lindquist Field on Grant Avenue. The multi-level layout includes a kitchen, outdoor seating and a spacious pub. Look for it in early 2019. Rooster’s B Street Brewery: This is Roosters’ third brewery/brewpub and second in Ogden. Primarily a production brewery, it will include a small kitchen and pub. This enterprise is a “from the ground up project” featuring a new canning line with brand-new beers to go in those cans. Look for the B Street Brewery in early 2019. Grid City Beer Works: Originally planned for the northwest part of downtown Salt Lake City, Grid City has signed a new lease in South Salt Lake in the old Tile For Less Building at 333 W. 2100 South. The previous plan was based on more of a hybrid brewery/brewpub concept; we’ll

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

see if their new location and high-traffic street changes that. The opening date is still pending. Level Crossing Brewing: The brewery itself is at 2496 S. West Temple, next to the iconic South Salt Lake City water tower. Head brewer Chris Detrick and owner Mark Medura (former vice president at High West Distillery) will craft a combination of high- and low-point beers with several barrel-aged brews. Opening date is projected to be in the first quarter of 2019. Strap Tank—Lehi: Strap Tank’s Springville location has proven so successful that owner Rick Salisbury already has plans in motion to see if lightning can strike twice. Utah County’s second brewery will be an

independent brewpub from the original brewery, with its own brew house and vibe. Opening date is still to be determined. Ogden River Brewing: Ogden’s wouldbe fifth brewery is the brainchild of home brewer Pat Winslow. His successful crowdfunding venture ensured the future of the brewery on the Ogden River, in the area of Park Boulevard. Look for a wide array of high- and low-point brews. Opening date is still to be determined. The approval process and licensing for new breweries moves at a less-than-brisk pace, so projected opening dates are soft at best. Stay close for updates on these and other new breweries still in the planning stages. As always, cheers! CW

O Y U L C AN E L A A OVER 2 T 00 ITEMS KING BUFFET CHINESE SEAFOOD | SUSHI | MONGOLIAN

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Italian Village italianvillageslc.com

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Apollo Burger

The local chain opened its first location on Salt Lake City’s North Temple back in 1984. Since then, the chain has grown to include a dozen locations around the state and as far away as St. George. Of course, the classic Apollo burger is the main draw here. But there’s much more to experience than just the burgers, like the Philly cheesesteak, barbecue beef, Reuben, Greek gyro, chicken souvlaki, corn dog, tuna melt and more. Or, if you’re on a health kick, get one of their hearty salads. Oh, and you’ll definitely want to order the baklava for dessert. Multiple locations, apolloburgersonline.com

Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT M ON -T HU 11a - 11p FRI-S AT 1 1 a - 12a / S UN 3 p-10p

Leave your expectations for hand-held gyros at the door: Owner Aristides Boutsikakis has brought a taste of Greece to Salt Lake City. The mezedakia (Greek smallplates) are as sensational as they come—there’s sautéed baby octopus and thick cuts of battered and flash-fried calamari, baked eggplant whipped with olive oil, Greek meatballs, sautéed shrimp in marinara and more. 244 S. 1300 East, 801-581-0888, aristosslc.com

Brewvies

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 35

Located in Kimball Junction, Park City Pizza Co. serves up delicious, old-fashioned pizza—the kind you can’t get from chains. You can eat in, get a pizza to go, or have your meal delivered. Popular handtossed pizzas include the Weed Eater (mushrooms, olives, peppers and onion), the Mexican (jalapeños), Greek (spinach, artichokes and tomatoes), Santa Fe (chicken, cilantro and tomatoes) and, of course, good old pepperoni. There is also an entire menu of glutenfree options. In addition to pizza, there are also salads, sandwiches and calzones. 1612 W. Ute Blvd., Park City, 435-649-1591, parkcitypizzaco.com

If you love ceviche, you’ll love this Peruvian restaurant. Try the ceviche de mero, made with tender grouper, mussels, octopus, calamari and more, served with sweet corn and onions that complement the zesty spices. Portions are generous, and plates seem designed to be shared, so don’t keep that lomo saltado (strips of beef marinated in soy sauce, vinegar and spices, stir-fried with onions and tomatoes and served with steamed rice and french fries) to yourself. The restaurant is clean and airy, with an open kitchen where you can see your meal being prepared. 310 W. Bugatti Ave., 801-467-2890

Park City Pizza Co.

ninth & ninth 254 south main

3370 State Street #8 South Salt Lake, UT

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Del Mar al Lago

year

11:00am - 9:30pm 11:00am - 10:30pm 12:00pm - 9:00pm

Aristo’s

When you combine beer and movies in one convenient downtown SLC location, you get Brewvies Cinema Pub. What’s not to love about kicking back with a flick, a frothy pint and some hearty bar grub? The theater offers showings of the latest blockbusters and independent films, plus a separate bar area lined with pool tables, video games and TVs. 677 S. 200 West, 801-355-5500, brewvies.com

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net


F O O D H E AV E N N A M R E G man Delicatessen & Restaura Ger

A sample of our critic’s reviews

SARAH ARNOFF

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm siegfriedsdelicatessen.com

Sapa Sushi Bar & Grill

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If a restaurateur debuts by building an Asian fusion bistro out of 100-year-old teahouses shipped from Vietnam, you’re in for something special. Mai Nguyen’s restaurant takes you to a different time and place, and the menu is fully stocked with curries, a full lineup of pho and their extensive selection of sushi rolls. Dishes like massaman beef ($12) or short ribs ($13) arrive in thoughtfully packaged bento boxes, each containing potstickers, a few California rolls and a flavorful salad with sesame dressing. The pho options include the real deal in all its tripey glory, but I went with a small bowl of the steak and meatball pho ($10); its beef flavor profile is slightly lighter than other phos I’ve known, but that lightness makes it ideal for a lunchtime visit. As far as sushi, the best way to experience the vast menu is to fast for a few days and go bonkers with the Monday-Thursday all-you-can-eat option ($28.95); standouts include the spicy yellowtail and the sunset roll. Sapa’s beautiful interior and equally beautiful take on Asian fusion are welcome distractions from stale, fluorescent-lit workdays. Originally reviewed on Oct. 11. 722 S. State, 801-363-7272, sapabarandgrill.com

BREAKFAST and LUNCH

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36 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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FILM REVIEW

CINEMA

No, Queen

The life of Freddie Mercury deserves better than Bohemian Rhapsody’s tedious music-biz clichés. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

20TH CENTURY FOX

N

Rami Malek in Bohemian Rhapsody

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

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Mr. Robot (2015) Rami Malek Christian Slater NR

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Flash Gordon (1980) Sam J. Jones Max von Sydow PG

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BB Rami Malek Lucy Boynton PG-13

Free Press Isn’t Free

recording sessions. And there’s the clash with an oblivious record company exec (Mike Myers), which in this case seems to exist only for a nudging joke in which the Wayne’s World star argues that the operatic 6-minute “Bohemian Rhapsody” will never be a song that “kids sit in a car and bang their head to.” It all builds once again to that climactic Live Aid performance, re-created down to the position of Pepsi cups on the piano— and like most of the concert sequences in Bohemian Rhapsody, it’s given an unusual amount of time to breathe and showcase the music permitted by May and Taylor’s participation in this authorized biography. But even as we see Malek’s Freddie holding thousands of Wembley Stadium fans in the palm of his hand, that moment doesn’t quite play as a bittersweet triumph for a man who has finally found love, even as he faces the grim diagnosis of AIDS. A bolder movie would have been willing to commit fully to the story of Freddie Mercury as a person, without needing to remind us every five minutes, in the most ham-fisted manner possible, how awesome Queen was. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

metaphorical Yoko role of the character who threatens to break up the band. Malek bites into his performance with nearly as much gusto as he rolls his tongue around his prosthetic overbite, embodying both Freddie’s natural charisma and his difficulty getting comfortable in his own skin. While the vocal performances in the film employ a mix of Malek’s own voice and other voices (including the original Queen performances), it’s clear that Malek is at least trying to craft a character here that’s more than a mere impersonation of Freddie Mercury’s on-stage theatrics, leaving aside the awkward attempt to fashion an “origin” scene for Mercury’s trademark truncated microphone stand. The problem is that for the majority of Bohemian Rhapsody, Anthony McCarten’s script makes it feel like exactly the kind of movie that Walk Hard so mercilessly mocked, practically running through a checklist of tortured-artist clichés. Over and over again, we get scenes of band members coming up with now-iconic bits from familiar songs—the stomp-stomp-clap rhythm of “We Will Rock You”; the strutting bass line from “Another One Bites the Dust”—as everyone stops dead with an immediate realization that they are in the presence of musical history being made. There’s the scene of a rebellious Freddie clashing with his tradition-minded father, extended touring montages with city names flying by to convey the dizzying road life, and a scene of the perfectionist Freddie infuriating his bandmates during

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ot every famous popular-music figure has a life that warrants a film biography—but Bohemian Rhapsody absolutely makes the case that Freddie Mercury is such a figure. The artist, born Farrokh Bulsara to Parsi parents in Zanzibar, takes a path from immigrant airport baggage handler to arena-rock frontman phenomenon, all while trying to come to terms with his sexuality as one of the many ways he feels like he doesn’t fit in anywhere. This is the stuff of a great character study—assuming that what you want to do is actually make a character study, and not a 134-minute Behind the Music installment. Backtracking from a prologue set in the moments before Queen’s 1985 Live Aid performance, the primary narrative begins in 1970, as young Freddie (Rami Malek) introduces himself to the members of a pub band called Smile—guitarist Brian May (Gwilym Lee) and drummer Roger Taylor (Ben Hardy)—on the same night that the band’s lead singer quits. The newlyrenamed Queen—with new bassist John Deacon (Joe Mazzello)—takes flight soon thereafter, as we watch a 15-year journey into hit records, sold-out concerts and the inevitable internecine personal and artistic squabbles. Freddie meets his eventual wife, Mary (Lucy Boynton), on that same night that he connects with May and Taylor, and it’s here that Bohemian Rhapsody at least has the potential to explore some complicated territory. We see virtually nothing explaining what connects them, which is a huge frustration given their ongoing real-life friendship even after he comes out to her. Yet it’s still at least the foundation for digging into Freddie’s almost desperate quest to find people who will love and validate him, whether it’s Mary, his bandmates, his fans, or his lover/enabler Paul Prenter (Allen Leech), who serves the


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38 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BEAUTIFUL BOY BBB Sure, it’s a bit Hollywoodized; Timothée Chalamet’s masculine beauty is never diminished, even as his teen character Nic is ravaged by crystal meth. But this uncompromising drama is unpretty where it counts: emotionally, particularly in its focus less on the addict than on his family’s coping. Based on real-life father-andson memoirs, this is more the tale of Nic’s journalist father, David Sheff (Steve Carell), as he struggles to support his son the best he can. The inescapable tragedy here, the awful conclusion that David comes to, is that sometimes there is nothing you can do to help someone you love, nothing and no one to blame for addiction except the quirks of brain chemistry. Carell is heartbreaking in a spare, tough performance about keeping fear under tight rein lest it get the better of him, while Chalamet is full of helpless fury and fragile vulnerability. The film may be sleek and smooth, but the authenticity is in the empathetic struggle to understand an issue that is too often dismissed as a matter of personal weakness. Opens Nov. 2 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY BB See review on p. 37. Opens Nov. 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME? BBB.5 This dark-tinged comedy tells the fact-based story of what happened when prickly writer Lee Israel’s career stalled: She started forging letters from literary figures to sell to collectors. We meet Lee

(Melissa McCarthy) at age 51, living in depressed, boozy squalor in Manhattan. Desperate for income, she sells a letter she once received from Katharine Hepburn; then it’s a Fanny Brice letter, goosing the value by adding a self-effacing P.S. The ruse evolves, with Lee assisted by Jack (Richard E. Grant), a flamboyant gadabout who shares her misanthropy and alcoholism. Directed by Marielle Heller (Diary of a Teenage Girl), the story is about Lee’s halting efforts to become a less off-putting person, so it doesn’t end with her scam being discovered, but continues through the aftermath so we can see her arc completed. McCarthy gives Lee emotional depth, channeling her outsized comic sensibilities into a three-dimensional character, while Grant proves a fine counterpart. It’s a pleasure to see these broken characters help one another get better, but Heller makes sure the warm moments never interfere with the movie’s curmudgeonly heart. Opens Nov. 2 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS [not yet reviewed] A young girl is transported to a magical world far too early for Christmas. Opens Nov. 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG) SUSPIRIA BB.5 It’s so common to find remakes that simply regurgitate the original, that it feels churlish to knock one that swings for the fences, even if the attempt goes just foul. Luca Guadagnino revisits the Dario Argento 1977 horror classic, and keeps the basic set-up of an American dancer (Dakota Johnson) newly-arrived in Germany. Here, Johnson’s Susie Bannion is an aspiring professional, joining the professional company led by Mme. Blanc (Tilda Swinton) and discovering mysterious goings-on. Unlike the original, this version doesn’t play coy about the dark conspiracy afoot, and while Guadagnino doesn’t opt for Argento’s early-and-often spilling of fluorescent blood, there is some deeply disturbing body horror. This is also a story that mines its 1977 Berlin setting for a tale of reckoning with the legacy of fascism, while simultaneously hinting at an allegory for the need to believe women

about tales of abuse. Where does that potentially rich vein of social commentary fit in with the weird and deeply grotesque grand finale? Hell if I could tell you, but maybe it’s enough that Guadagnino crafts a remake that feels wildly—if unevenly—original. Opens Nov. 2 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Scott Renshaw VIPER CLUB BBB While the title and the subject matter—involving efforts to secure the release of an American journalist held hostage in Syria—might suggest a suspense thriller, the mournful silence of director/co-writer Maryam Keshavarz’s drama makes it work. At the center is the mother of that kidnapped journalist, ER nurse Helen Sterling (Susan Sarandon), who moves dutifully through her days keeping fears for her son Andy’s safety secret, per the instruction of the FBI and State Department. Eventually Helen finds support from an organization working around governmental restrictions, but the financial trickery and media strategizing are almost a red herring. At its heart, this is simply a story about a mother, with Sarandon capturing the tension between the seen-it-all nurse’s steely fatalism and her need to believe that something can be done. The fragmented narrative sometimes drifts into too many sub-plots, yet Keshavarz’s potent flashbacks convey the fear and second-guessing that live in every parent’s heart the moment they push their child out into the world. Opens Nov. 2 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS FAHRENHEIT 11/9 At Park City Film Series, Nov. 2-3, 8 p.m.; Nov. 4, 6 p.m. (R) INVENTING TOMORROW At Rose Wagner Center, Nov. 3, 11 a.m. (NR) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1925) At Edison Street Events, Nov. 1-2, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

RAMS At Rose Wagner Center, Nov. 7, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

JOHNNY ENGLISH STRIKES AGAIN BB.5 A doofus is out to save the dregs of the British Empire while wallowing in unwarranted nostalgia for a past that wasn’t as awesome as he would like to think. A bit of anti-Brexit bite gives this cheerfully dumb third-in-the-franchise spy spoof some heft, as Johnny English (Rowan Atkinson) is called back into service when fellow agents are outed in a cyberattack. All that follows allows Atkinson to celebrate male fatuousness as a good thing, which is slightly more amusing here than movies generally presume it to be. English refuses modern tech, but the “good old British technology” Johnny favors is depicted as laughably outmoded. Retro vintage is nonsense, as seen in the electric smartcar–vs.–gasguzzler Aston Martin chase sequence. Johnny’s preference for old-school is buffoonish. Laugh until you cry! (PG-13)—MAJ

MID90S BB.5 Jonah Hill’s debut feature as writer/director has several interesting scenes, but too little that holds together as a movie. In Bill Clinton-era Los Angeles, 13-year-old Stevie (Sunny Suljic) seeks escape from his bullying older brother Ian (Lucas Hedges), and finds it with a multi-ethnic group of teen skateboarders. There’s an effective awkwardness to scenes of Stevie trying to fit in—though Hill achieves Tarantino-esque levels of “white writer dropping n-words to give him street cred”—and appealing performances from the young, largely inexperienced cast members. It’s simply hard to get a handle on the dynamics of Stevie’s home life, as both Ian and Stevie’s single mom (Katherine Waterston) remain frustrating ciphers. Filmmakers seem to think there’s an authenticity to episodic tales of near-feral adolescents, but it should add up to more than a collection of coming-of-age greatest hits. (R)—SR

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Transformative Stew Tank and the Bangas stir a mix of New Orleans flavors into their boisterous, versatile sound.

L

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 39

w/ Big Freedia, Naughty Professor Saturday, Nov. 3, 8 p.m. The Depot, 13 N. 400 West $25 presale; $28 day of show All ages, depotslc.com

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TANK AND THE BANGAS

and presence into audio form. She’s that theater kid who has all these characters and this sense of drama that she generates, in the best way possible, all the time—no matter what she does.” Allenback credits Tank and the Bangas’ unpredictable energy to his fellow bandmates: Norman Spence, Merrell Burkett and Josh Johnson, the latter of whom plays drums and is musical director. “Tank is the centerpiece of our performances, and Josh models everything off of the connections to her. He makes very conscious decisions to treat this like a stage show or a theater performance that flows together. We want our fans to think, ‘Was that a single from the record? A new song? A poem? An improvisation?’ It’s pleasantly disorienting.” That flair has helped Tank and the Bangas cultivate a fervent fan base, one that’s followed them from their first performance at Liberation Lounge in New Orleans’ Algiers neighborhood to the top of NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert heap, where they stood out against more than 6,000 other entries with a video that looks like it was filmed in a high school classroom. Ball and her frequent singing collaborator, Anjelika “Jelly” Joseph, slap mechanical pencils together and use random office props to tell their story of revenge, while The Bangas flow seamlessly from smooth jazz to bouncing funk. Host Bob Boilen described their sound as “organic and on the spot,” raving when the band came to Washington, D.C., to perform at NPR headquarters about “the depth of their lyricism” and “their own idiosyncratic flair and humor.” Referencing James Brown’s legendary April 5, 1968, concert at the Boston Garden, where Brown and his band put on an impassioned performance and gave the angry, distraught crowd an outlet for their frustration in the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, Allenback says live music still has the power to transport and transform. That effect is only amplified when a band puts body positivity, racial harmony and the joy of earthly pleasures like love and dancing at the forefront of its songs and sensibility. “We’ve learned to be more genuinely, fearlessly ourselves,” Allenback says about the band’s evolution. “Doing that onstage helps other people do that in their lives; if you’re present, other people are present. And if you amass 300 or 400 people together, all in that same moment, it creates a very powerful field of human community.” CW

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ike a sumptuous bowl of gumbo, Tank and the Bangas combine the best of New Orleans music: a heaping helping of classic funk, a dash of modern R&B, a pinch of soul and a substantial dose of hip-hop. But it’s their extra flavors—frontwoman Tarriona “Tank” Ball’s spoken-word philosophizing and livewire theatricality, her backup band’s mix of technical expertise and call-and-response alchemy—that make Tank and the Bangas’ musical concoction so tasty. First rising to prominence as the winners of NPR’s 2017 Tiny Desk Concert contest, Tank and the Bangas quickly made the road their home, touring hard to perfect their live show. Equal parts explosive and introspective, political and party-starting, it’s a performance that saxophonist and flautist Albert Allenback says is even richer in 2018. “We have a bunch of new music to perform live,” he says, “including new interludes, old songs done differently and new connections between songs. We’re totally ready to play for people again and create these amazing shared spaces where everybody can be completely present. It’s the best part of what we do.” Although they self-produced their first studio album, 2013’s Think Tank, Tank and the Bangas have benefitted from a relationship with revered label Verve Forecast for their forthcoming 2019 full-length. Lead single “Spaceships” mines modern hip-hop trends while maintaining Tank’s boisterous personality—and giving the band the resources to film a surreal music video. “We did a lot on our own,” Allenback says, “but we also got to work with talented producers and engineers who were coaches and sixth men, guiding us through the recording process and putting their own spin on our sound. It’s a solid body of work and we’re super excited to put it out in 2019.” While the band’s profile obviously has grown, Allenback adds that its day-to-day operations haven’t changed much. They still land on most new ideas during sound check, organically writing riffs and bits that become songs and interludes when they flex their road-weary muscles. Capturing that naturalistic approach is still hard, too, which explains why Tank and the Bangas are a band best savored on stage. “Bottling our live energy is the whole challenge,” Allenback says. “It’s very difficult to put Tank’s radiance

Left to right: Josh Johnson, Albert Allenback, Tarriona “Tank” Ball, Merrell Burkett and Norman Spence of Tank and the Bangas

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BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

MUSIC

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CONCERT PREVIEW


BY HOWARD HARDEE, NICK McGREGOR & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 11/1 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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Live Music

If you drew a straight line through Chicago’s hip-hop lineage—from Common to Kanye to Chance the Rapper to Chief Keef—the natural endpoint would be Nnamdi Ogbonnaya. Synthesizing decades of influences, from blues to jazz to experimental rock to DIY punk, Ogbonnaya specializes in a cerebral brand of rap music that’s as comfortable exploring complex time signatures as it is launching into pop-ready choruses. Equally diverse are the lyrical inquisitions into Ogbonnaya’s own multi-hyphenated history: He’s a first-generation Nigerian-American who was raised with both traditional Jewish and eccentric Christian mores, but he’s also a typical big-city 20-something whose musical taste skews toward the oddball and whose fashion sense is all over the map. Onstage, he sometimes performs with a nine-piece band; sometimes he carts a basketball hoop up and asks the crowd to take shots. Don’t miss a dose of his frenetic energy here in the intimate environs of Kilby Court, with support from Sen Morimoto, part of Ogbonnaya’s Sooper Records family, and local rhymesayer Rahz. (Nick McGregor) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $10 presale; $12 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com

FRIDAY 11/2

Lina Tullgren, Wax Chattels, Drahla

In tight-knit industry circles, Captured Tracks is considered an iconic record label. Partially

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lush string section that Tatum undoubtedly would have replicated with a shoddy-sounding synth pad back in the day. It’s a familiar story: Bedroom musician gets popular, gets money and gets access to fancy studio equipment. And, of course, it’s eternally debatable whether access to greater resources makes for better music, or working within rigid parameters actually fosters creativity. The answer is that it depends on the context for the musician. “My entire 20s have been spent on this project, and in that sense you inherently find the limitations in what you make,” Tatum says in a news release for the album. “With the last record I was trying to stretch out as far as I could, but

Wild Nothing

Wild Nothing, Men I Trust

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responsible for the meteoric rise of indie rock jokester Mac DeMarco, they’ve also discovered offbeat, underground talent from all corners of the musical stratosphere, helping everyone from Uruguayan folk singers to Canadian punks to Danish DJs reach a wider audience. To celebrate its 10th anniversary, Captured Tracks decided to stick with that forward-thinking approach, focusing on where the label is headed rather than where it’s been. To that end, three developmental artists with one or fewer records— Maine-born, Swedish-folk trained fiddle player Lina Tullgren; menacing New Zealand rockers Wax Chattels; and dark, wiry UK post-punks Drahla—have loaded up in the Captured Tracks van for a nationwide tour. Perhaps you’ll walk away from Tullgren’s stoic, forceful set with a new appreciation for the potential of solo performance. Maybe Wax Chattels’ pummeling, precise set will reset your definition of a power trio. Could Drahla be the next Parquet Courts, combining smarmy lyrics with razor-wire-tight instrumentation to devastating effect? You’ll only know if you catch this rare combination of up-and-coming bands. (NM) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $10, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc

Jack Tatum’s dream-pop project Wild Nothing debuted in 2010 with Gemini, an album praised for its lo-fi charm and indie accessibility. Tatum has produced three more albums since, most recently Indigo, which is strikingly similar to Wild Nothing’s first LP—the jangly guitars, twinkling synthesizer and aspirational vocal melodies all remain intact. The most noticeable difference is in production values, as second track “Oscillation” is wreathed in a

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with Indigo I’ve created something that has homed in on its own identity.” In this case, it feels like he’s still working in his bedroom, except his bed has been replaced by a giant, Justin Timberlake-style mixing board. Support comes from Men I Trust, an indie-dance band from Quebec City, Canada. (Howard Hardee) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $25, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Black Lips, Surfbort

Are their guitars out of tune? Are they singing out of key? Probably—shut up. After nearly two decades of touring and recording, it’s clear that Black Lips don’t give a rat’s fanny about pretty much anything. Formed by highschool dropouts—er, more like kick-outs—from a sleepy suburb of Atlanta, Ga., the five-piece garage-rock band has established a piss-off attitude and a penchant for absolutely crazy live shows. Get this: In 2009, Black Lips caused an international incident in Chennai, India, when guitarist Cole Alexander stripped naked, dove into the crowd and then reemerged for make-out sessions with his fellow band members. (No wonder he got kicked out of high school.) Apparently, that sort of

Chuck Prophet

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42 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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Black Lips

thing doesn’t fly in Chennai, either, because the show’s financial backers furiously threw the Lips off the entire Indian tour. But that was then. They’re all grown up now, as demonstrated by 2017 album Satan’s Graffiti or God’s Art?, produced by none other than Sean Lennon (yes, John Lennon’s son). It’s a mature and focused record—wait, what’s that? You’re not buying it? Yeah, you’re right. Bodily fluids will probably still fly when Black Lips play SLC with an opening set from Surfbort, a fourperson, female-fronted Brooklyn punk band known for its nihilistic attitude and affinity for nasty, shrieking guitars. (HH) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, metromusichall.com

WEDNESDAY 11/7

Chuck Prophet & The Mission Express, Paul Jacobsen

The quintessential California singer, songwriter and guitar shredder, Chuck Prophet initially rose to prominence at the helm of ’80s neo-psychedelic outfit Green on Red. In the three decades since striking out on his own, Prophet has released a series of singular solo albums that have defined him as a dedicated Americana auteur. His latest record, Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins, was inspired in part by the unsolved murder of seminal rocker Bobby “I Fought the Law” Fuller. But in a larger sense, the album represents the mystique of the Golden State itself. “California has always represented the golden dream,” Prophet says in a news release for the album. “It’s the tension between romance and reality that lurks underneath the surface in all noir films and paperbacks that connects these songs.” That distinct divide marks most of Prophet’s work, either on his own or with other artists—and the results are consistently fascinating. Oddball eccentric Jonathan Richman once described Prophet’s signature style as “gasoline in the sand, like a motorcycle at a hot dog stand.” We’re not sure what that means either, but Prophet is that rarest of rockers: one whose darkened gaze remains hopeful and astute. (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $22, the stateroom.com


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SUNDAY 11/4

CONCERTS & CLUBS

KELLY GIARROCCO

Molly Burch, Jesse Woods

A first listen to Austin, Texas, singer-songwriter Molly Burch reveals a smoky, languorous voice well-versed in professional jazz and classic country. But deeper examination finds Burch’s voice intertwined effortlessly with the high-pitched guitar of Dailey Toliver, her longtime artistic and personal partner. Some might say it’s their chemistry that allows for such dexterity, but the perspectives on Burch’s albums—2016’s Please Be Mine and 2018’s First Flower—are decidedly, unabashedly hers. On new single “To the Boys,” she chastises the male gaze and derides standard-order chauvinism with gentle authority, flexing a decidedly feminine strength. On “Wild,” Burch examines her often-debilitating anxiety, lamenting her careful nature before embracing the fact that timidity can lead to its own sense of spontaneity. Still, this is a sound that’s undeniably alluring for anyone nostalgic for the power of a torch-lit ballad. Swoon if you must, dance if you want, but don’t sleep on the quiet power of Molly Burch. (Nick McGregor) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $10 presale; $12 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com

THURSDAY 11/1

FRIDAY 11/2

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Foghat (Egyptian Theatre) Goo Goo Dolls (The Depot) Le Voir + Divorce Court (Urban Lounge) Live Jazz (Sugarhouse Coffee) Maria Muldaur (The State Room) Nnamdi Ogbonnaya + Sen Morimoto + Rahz (Kilby Court) see p. 40 Outside of Society + Sugar Bone + Too Dark for Shade (Metro Music Hall) Patio + Greenmont + Sidewalk Poets + 406 IYCM (The Beehive) Reggae at the Royal feat. Tnertle + A-Mac & The Height (The Royal) Silent Planet + Stray From the Path + Kublai Khan + Greyhaven + No Company (The Complex) Spite + Falsifier + Depths of Hatred + Dethrone the Sovereign (The Loading Dock) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cumbia De Los Muertos feat. J Style + Fuego Skilz + Jesus De La Calle + DJ Drew + Leemont + Deyjuice (Tinwell) Dueling Pianos: Dave & JD (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Ookay (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

3OH!3 + Emo Nite + Lil Aaron (The Depot) After The Burial + The Acacia Strain + Erra + Make Them Suffer + A Traitor’s Last Breath (The Complex) The Alarm (The Commonwealth Room) A-Mac & The Height (Brewskis) Barefoot John Whipple + Erin Stout (HandleBar) Brother Chunky (Black Jacks Bar) Channel Z (Club 90) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Crook & The Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) The David Luning Band + Night Marcher (The State Room) Debra Fotheringham (Pale Horse Sound) Dubwise + Bukka + illoom + spik3 + Strick_9 (Urban Lounge) Entwood (Lighthouse Lounge) Foghat (Egyptian Theatre) Lina Tullgren + Wax Chattels + Drahla (Diabolical Records) see p. 40 Live Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Lake Effect) Mister Sister (DeJoria Center) Mountain West Entertainment (The Spur) Mouse on the Keys + Tera Melos + Gloe (Kilby Court) Of Montreal + Reptaliens (Metro Music Hall) Outside Infinity (Liquid Joe’s) OverTime + Austin Martin + Who TF Is Justin Time? (The Beehive) Peter Bernstein (Abravanel Hall) Phangs + The Wldlife + Acid Cvlt + Totem City (The Loading Dock) Red Desert Ramblers (Feldman’s Deli) Scott Rogers (Harp and Hound) The Signal Sound (The Ice Haüs) Southbound (The Westerner)


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RYE DINER & DRINKS

NICK McGREGOR

BAR FLY

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) DJ Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew + Mike (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Mi Cielo feat. DJ Santarosa (Sky) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Prohibition After Dark (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 11/3 LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen + Late Night Savior (The Royal) Ardalan + Morgan Hays + Nvia (Soundwell) Ben Major + Sauce Boys + Whoisjorden + Vegan Cemetery (Gold Blood Collective) Billy Strings + Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (The Commonwealth Room) Black Lips + Surfbort (Metro Music Hall) see p. 42 Brother Chunky (HandleBar) Chali 2na (Urban Arts Gallery) Channel Z (Club 90) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Donna the Buffalo + Raye Zaragoza (The State Room) Fighting the Phoenix + The Sonder Complex + Path of the Haunted + Threar (The Loading Dock)

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A night spent imbibing at Rye is a special night indeed. That’s not just because this hip diner and industrial-themed dive, connected to The Urban Lounge on 500 South, is only open for dinner two nights a week, on Friday and Saturday. What really sets a round of drinks at Rye into the next level of nightlife enjoyment is catching an intimate, acoustic show there. My latest experience came on Oct. 11, when local outlaw country troubadour Lorin Walker Madsen regaled the small crowd with tales from the road plying his “high desert honky punk” trade around the Mountain West. Sidling up to the bar for a few well-crafted drinks—in this case, Toast Makes a Comebacks, made with rye, Waterpocket Oread, angostura and Regan’s orange bitters—while enjoying live music is downright transcendent. And forgive me for letting my Music Editor side bleed into this BarFly, but you shouldn’t miss the chance to catch local standout Joshua James during his December residency (tickets are sold out for Dec. 6 and Dec. 13, but still available for Dec. 20). No matter who’s playing at Rye, it’s worth the $5-$10 ticket price to sip on some sumptuous libations and catch your new favorite artist unplugged and stripped down. If you can’t? Well, Rye’s day drinks, served Monday-Sunday with a damn fine Southern-inspired brunch, will do the trick, too. Where else can you pick your particular poison between 9 a.m. and 11 p.m., depending on the day? (Nick McGregor) 239 S. 500 East, 801-364-4655, ryeslc.com

Foghat (Egyptian Theatre) Jacoby + SeasOnSapphire + Karl Ricky (Kilby Court) Live Band (Johnny’s on Second) Live Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Lake Effect) Live Trio (The Red Door) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Mark Dee (Harp and Hound) Michael Barclay (HandleBar) Mykola Suk (Center for the Arts in Kayenta) October Rage + American Hitmen + Late Night Savior (The Royal) Rittz + King Lil G + Zac Ivie + JR Trill (The Complex) The Solarists + Indigo Waves + Ruble (Velour) Southbound (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tank and the Bangas + Big Freedia + Naughty Professor (The Depot) see p. 39 The Tenors (Eccles Theater)

When Johnny Comes Marching Home (Union Grill) Wild Nothing + Men I Trust (Urban Lounge) see p. 40

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CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

SUNDAY 11/4 LIVE MUSIC

Americas + Reptoid + Holy Pinto + Storm Harbor Point + Fountain View (The Underground) Between War and Here (Jeanne Wagner Theatre) Dirtball + Shadow D + Marijuana Mafia + Red Ninja + Phatso + Kendrik Notsa + Aquacodeine + OvaDose (Liquid Joe’s) Foghat (Egyptian Theatre) Lily Allen (The Complex) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Meditations + Herban Empire (Urban Lounge) Mewithoutyou + Smidley + Davey and the Chains (Metro Music Hall) Molly Burch + Jesse Woods (Kilby Court) see p. 44 Patrick Ryan (The Spur) The Proper Way (Garage on Beck) Russ (Vivint Smart Home Arena) XdivsionX + Jewnie + Nosrac + Pheonix Child + 2020 Vandal Vizionariez (The Loading Dock)

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KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 11/5 LIVE MUSIC

Aaron Elliot (Vivint Smart Home Arena) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Cherub + Maddy O’Neal (Soundwell) Desert Oceans + Roseburg + The Housecats + Heaven’s Serenity (Kilby Court) Jim James + Alynda Segarra (The Commonwealth Room) Joshy Soul & The Cool (Peery’s Egyptian Theater) The Story So Far + Turnover + Citizens + Movements (The Complex)

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UTAH CANN SAYS

VOTE YES! ON

PROPOSITION 2

Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

WEDNESDAY 11/7

KARAOKE

Acid Dad + Beachmen (Kilby Court) Bloodletting + Arsis + Decrepit Birth + Internal Bleeding + Pyrexia + AngelMaker + Within Destruction + Dezecration (Metro Music Hall) Chuck Prophet & The Mission Express + Paul Jacobsen (The State Room) see p. 42 Circa Survive + La Dispute + Queen of Jeans (The Union Event Center) Elliot & Gabriel (The Spur) Ghostemane + Zubin (The Complex) Good Morning Bedlam (Gracie’s) Joywave + Sir Sly + Fehrplay (Soundwell) Lil Xan + Steven Cannon + Phem (The Depot) Live Jazz (Club 90) Mr Twin Sister + Sateen (Urban Lounge)

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 11/6 LIVE MUSIC

Calvin Johnson + Teenage Sport + Head Portals (Kilby Court) Daniel Torriente (The Spur) The Contortionist + Intervals (Metro Music Hall) The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band + Jacob T. Skeen (Urban Lounge) Thrice + The Bronx (The Complex) Yung Pinch + Lost At Sea (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Burlesque & The Blues (Prohibition) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Behind the Zion Curtain Cabaret (The Beehive) Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Energi Wednesdays feat. Peekaboo (Sky) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

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2018

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 51


Š 2018

ENCYCLOPEDIA

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Bit of parental buck-passing 2. "Certainly, Monsieur!" 3. Investor's desire 4. "Rock of Love" star Michaels 5. Neighbor of Djibouti 6. Wouldn't shut up

52. Pippi Longstocking creator Lindgren 54. "Ri-i-i-ight ..." 55. Perplexed 56. Rank above maj. 59. Vex 60. This, in Tijuana 61. Freudian area of study 62. King who died in his late teens 63. ____-Magnon man

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

7. Meaning of Caesar's "Veni" 8. Vegas numbers game 9. Total 10. It may involve dukes 11. Reply at the altar 12. Plead 13. ____ Paulo, Brazil 21. ____ sapiens 22. Anti-rash powder 26. Answer to the riddle "What cheese is made backward?" 27. Snack (on) 28. Dorothy's dog 30. Frozen drink brand 31. Lead-in to girl or boy 34. Wedge or pump 35. Identify on Facebook 36. Like unwashed hair 37. "Zounds!" 38. Smooth, in a way 39. Actress ____ Rachel Wood 43. Miner's strike 44. Trample 45. "Get lost!" 46. "In the Valley of ____" (2007 film) 50. Absorb thoroughly 51. Backhand or forehand, e.g.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Simplest of choices 5. Eleniak of "Baywatch" 10. Bits of baloney 14. One going before a judge 15. Hurried along 16. It's just in your head 17. Toy on a string 18. ____ of itself 19. Kind of dancer 20. Good name for an EMT's autobiography but a terrible encyclopedia volume? 23. "____ House," 1970 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young hit 24. Writer Sarah ____ Jewett 25. Inventor's desire 29. Dr. Evil's sidekick in Austin Powers movies 31. CNN's home: Abbr. 32. ____-wop 33. Good name for a U.S. travel book but a terrible encyclopedia volume? 37. One-on-one Olympics event 40. Fashion item you can always find in midManhattan? 41. "If you ask me," to texters 42. Good name for a history of the U.S. Supreme Court but a terrible encyclopedia volume? 47. Actress Gardner 48. Rock with valuable nuggets 49. Actress Milano of "Charmed" 53. Strip bare 55. ____ mater 57. Extra NBA periods 58. Good name for a book on human interaction but a terrible encyclopedia volume? 61. Leave a permanent mark on 64. "Boogie Oogie Oogie" music genre 65. Hershey toffee bar 66. Expert 67. Bread spreads 68. Kind of torch on "Survivor" 69. Texter's "Alternatively ..." 70. Writer Zora ____ Hurston 71. Lacking width and depth

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Penetralia” is a word that means the innermost or most private parts, the most secret and mysterious places. It’s derived from the same Latin term that evolved into the word “penetrate.” You Scorpios are of course the zodiac’s masters of penetralia. More than any other sign, you’re likely to know where the penetralia are, as well as how to get to them and what to do when you get to them. I suspect that this tricky skill will come in extra handy during the coming weeks. I bet your intimate adeptness with penetralia will bring you power, fun and knowledge.

Blaise Pascal referred to this emptiness as “a God-shaped hole.” Bono adds that “you can never completely fill that hole,” but you might find partial fixes through love and sex, creative expression, family, meaningful work, parenting, activism and spiritual devotion. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I have a strong suspicion that in the coming weeks you will have more power to fill your God-shaped hole than you’ve had in a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Most of our desires are clichés, right? Ready to wear, one size fits all. I doubt if it’s even possible to have an original desire anymore.” So says a character in Gemini author Tobias Wolff’s short story “Sanity.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Gemini, is to refute and rebel against this notion. The cosmic rhythms will work in your favor to the degree that you cultivate innovative yearnings and unique urges. I hope you’ll make it your goal to have the experiences necessary to stir up an outbreak of original desires.

What if you learned that an important decision had been made by your local officials without following due process? Without public/legal notice, your government, judicial, and business leaders could enact important decisions without your knowledge.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2018 | 53

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke suggested that we cultivate an alertness for the ever-present possibility of germination and gestation. On a regular basis, he advised, we should send probes down into the darkness, into our unconscious minds, to explore for early signs of awakening. And when we discover the forces of renewal stirring there in the depths, we should be humble and reverent toward them, understanding that they are as-yet beyond the reach of our ability to understand. We shouldn’t seek to explain and define them at first, CANCER (June 21-July 22): but simply devote ourselves to nurturing them. Everything I just said If you’re a typical member of the Cancerian tribe, you’re skilled at responding constructively when things go wrong. Your intelis your top assignment in the coming weeks. ligence rises up hot and strong when you get sick or rejected or burned. But if you’re a classic Crab, you have less savvy in dealing CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’re in a phase of your cycle when your influence is at a peak. with triumphs. You might sputter when faced with splashy joy, People are more receptive than usual to your ideas and more likely to smart praise, or lucky breaks. But everything I just said is meant want the same things you do. Given these conditions, I think the best to be a challenge, not a curse. One of the best reasons to study information I can offer you is the following meditation by Capricorn astrology is to be aware of the potential shortcomings of your activist Martin Luther King Jr. “Power without love is reckless and sign so you can outwit and overcome them. That’s why I think abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power that eventually you’ll evolve to the point where you won’t be a at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice bit flustered when blessings arrive. And the immediate future at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.” will bring you excellent opportunities to upgrade your response to good fortune. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey spent much of his life LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): rambling around in the great outdoors. He was an emancipated “Each of us needs something of an island in her life,” said poet spirit who regarded the natural world as the only church he needed. John Keats. “If not an actual island, at least some place, or In an eruption of ecstatic appreciation, he once testified that “Life is a space in time, in which to be herself, free to cultivate her differjoyous dance through daffodils beneath cerulean blue skies and then, ences from others.” According to my reading of the astrological then what? I forget what happens next.” And yet the truth is, Abbey omens, Leo, you’ll be wise to spend extra time on your own was more than a wild-hearted Dionysian explorer in the wilderness. island in the next two weeks. Solitude is unlikely to breed He found the discipline and diligence to write 23 books! I mention unpleasant loneliness, but will instead inspire creative power this, Aquarius, because now is a perfect time for you to be like the and evoke inner strength. If you don’t have an island yet, go in search! (P.S.: I translated Keats’ pronouns into the feminine disciplined and diligent and productive version of Abbey. gender.) PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): For renowned Piscean visual artist Anne Truitt (1921–2004), VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): creating her work was high adventure. She testified that artists I’m rooting for you to engage in experimental intimacy, Virgo. like her had “to catapult themselves wholly, without holding I hope you’ll have an affinity for sweet blends and incandescent back one bit, into a course of action without having any idea mixtures and arousing juxtapositions. To get in the right mood where they will end up. They are like riders who gallop into for this playful work, you could read love poetry and listen to the night, eagerly leaning on their horse’s neck, peering into a uplifting songs that potentize your urge to merge. Here are a blinding rain.” Whether or not you’re an artist, Pisces, I suspect few lyrical passages to get you warmed up. 1. “Your flesh quivers your life in the coming weeks might feel like the process she against mine like moonlight on the sea.” —Julio Cortázar; 2. described. And that’s a good thing! A fun thing! Enjoy your ride. “When she smiles like that she is as beautiful as all my secrets. —Anne Carson; 3. “My soul is alight with your infinitude of stars . . . The flowers of your garden blossom in my body.” — ARIES (March 21-April 19): You have officially arrived at the heart of the most therapeutic Rabindranath Tagore; 4. “I can only find you by looking deeper, phase of your cycle. Congratulations! It’s an excellent time to that’s how love leads us into the world.” —Anne Michaels. fix what’s wrong, hurt, or distorted. You will attract more help than you can imagine if you summon an aggressive approach LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): toward finding antidotes and cures. A good way to set the tone Of course I want you to have more money. I’d love for you to for your aggressive determination to feel better is to heed this buy experiences that expand your mind, deepen your emotional advice from poet Maya Angelou: “Take a day to heal from the intelligence and foster your ability to create inspiring forms of lies you’ve told yourself and the ones that have been told to you.” togetherness. My soul would celebrate if you got access to new wealth that enabled you to go in quest of spiritual fun and educational adventures. On the other hand, I wouldn’t be thrilled TAURUS (April 20-May 20): U2’s singer Bono, born under the sign of Taurus, says that all of about you spending extra cash on trivial desires or fancy junk you us suffer from the sense that something’s missing from our lives. don’t really need. Here’s why I feel this way: to the extent that We imagine that we lack an essential quality or experience, and you seek more money to pursue your most righteous cravings, its absence makes us feel sad and insufficient. French philosopher you’re likely to get more money.


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54 | NOVEMBER 1, 2018

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189916155, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JACOB BAKER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JACOB BAKER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,069.27

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189917613, JUDGE SU CHON. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MELINDA PADILLA, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MELINDA PADILLA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $4,683.48. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189917173, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. AMANDA BENSON, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO AMANDA BENSON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,480.16

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801.214.2169 Not an agency

I’ve just ended my volunteer term on the Utah Transit Authority Board of Trustees because the Legislature eliminated that system of oversight. I was appointed by House Speaker Greg Hughes. The day that happened, a majority of people in the state gagged on their Postum because I’m a screaming liberal, Democrat, socialist member of the LGBTQ community and he’s a screaming, heterosexual, cisgender, married Republican male. Shortly after the announcement, a married couple and past clients of mine called about selling their home. It was odd because we usually meet at the home, but they insisted they come to my office. These liberal, treehugging, crystal-licking hippies walked in with faces red and arms crossed and told me they were severing their relationship with me because I was “bosom buddies” and “played golf” with someone they believed to be nothing short of Satan. Well, I’ve never considered a male a “bosom buddy” and I don’t know if Hughes plays golf, but I do know that I gladly reach across the aisle and shake his hand at least half of the time when he’s legislating up on the hill. I met him and his business partner years ago when all of us were pioneers in The Gateway district and small-office neighbors. He’s the product of a big town back East and was reared by a single mom. He was a trouble child who got into boxing and cleaned up his young life … and well, the rest is history. I am grateful for our random friendship and the positive things I learned from him about the other side of the fence from people who don’t usually vote the same way I do. What did I learn as a board member during the past two years? 1. We are blessed with a really great mass transit system along the Wasatch Front compared with other cities our same size; 2. The trustees I served with were a group made up of volunteer citizens like me and mayors/officials from along the UTA routes who cared just as much as I did that our employees were treated fairly and the public got the best transit system; 3. That most of the public does not use mass transit, and few, if any, make comments in person or online to the board or staff; 4. UTA and Salt Lake City could do a better job at letting visitors, convention-goers and locals know that mass transit is always free downtown; and 5. If we taxed evil polluting gas correctly, we could pay for free public transit in this state. Thanks for the opportunity to learn and serve and I will forever be an advocate for the people who work at UTA and for free mass transit in this state! n

Storage Location is: West Valley Storage 4667 S. 4800 W. West Valley City, UT 84120 West Valley Storage is hereby giving public notice to the following individuals who are delinquent on their payments that their storage units are going to public auction which will be held online from November 5th 10am to November 20th 11 am MDT. Renters of the delinquent units have until 5pm on November 19th to settle the debt owed on the unit. All delinquent units will then be sold off to the highest bidder to satisfy the lien. Danny Owen - Unit 028 Daron Breinholt - Unit 094 Troy Ortiz-Unit 118 Nicole Jim - Unit 167 Brent Babb - Unit 175 Enrique Arciga - Unit 218 Jared Hurlich - Unit 235

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You Can’t Say He Wasn’t Warned Some people can get pretty territorial about their food. So it appeared in Colleton County, S.C., on Sept. 29, when Ryan Dean Langdale, 19, warned his 17-year-old cousin not to eat his salt-and-vinegar potato chips. “Do not touch my chips, or I’ll shoot you,” Langdale told his cousin, according to a sheriff’s incident report. The Charleston Post and Courier reported Langdale then went into another room, retrieved a rifle and “the rifle went off,” according to the sheriff’s document. Langdale summoned help but told police his cousin had accidentally shot himself while cleaning the rifle. Officers didn’t think the story held up: The pathway of the bullet through the victim’s chest was “impossible” if he had mistakenly shot himself, said sheriff’s Maj. J.W. Chapman. Sure enough, when the victim was questioned after undergoing surgery, he told officers the savory snacks were at the center of the dispute. Langdale surrendered on Oct. 10 and was charged with, among other crimes, attempted murder.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

“But we found some parts of the plane, like an antenna, on the ground,” the director said. Finally, about two hours into the flight, ground control convinced the pilot to return to India, where the plane landed in Mumbai. Indeed, there was a huge gash in the plane’s underbelly, and mesh fencing was wrapped around the landing gear. All 130 passengers arrived unharmed and were booked on other flights, and the pilot and co-pilot have been grounded pending a review.

WEIRD

Compelling Explanations Yury Zhokhov, 41, a factory worker in Donetsk, Russia, was found kneeling in a field in early October with a knife handle sticking out of the top of his head. Zhokhov was conscious, and when questioned by police, he revealed he had stuck the 8-inch blade in himself. He was having trouble breathing through his nose, he explained, and hoped to make another hole he could breathe through. But the knife became stuck, and he couldn’t remove it. Odditycentral.com reports doctors at the local hospital were afraid to touch the knife for fear of killing Zhokhov or causing brain damage. “It was horrific,” a hospital spokesperson told local media. X-rays showed the blade “exactly between the two hemispheres of the brain.” Specialists were called and Zhokhov survived the surgery without apparent brain damage, though surgeons are concerned about infection.

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People With Issues As Hermes Callijas-Gasperin’s mother cooked his dinner on Oct. 8 in Bradenton, Fla., she accidentally bumped into her 22-year-old son. That’s when he lost it, the New York Post reported, pelting her with the sausages she was frying and putting his hands on her neck. The Manatee County Sheriff’s Office said Callijas-Gasperin told officers he just wanted his mom to apologize, but he was arrested and charged with misdemeanor domestic battery. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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The Continuing Crisis In an apparent attempt to destroy what little brainpower he had left, 26-year-old Brandon McVay of Council Bluffs, Iowa, ate a Tide Pod, prompting a trip to the hospital. But while he was being treated in the critical care unit, McVay went on a rampage early on Oct. 4, causing thousands of dollars of damage to medical equipment, according to the Omaha World-Herald. A nurse told the responding police officer that McVay “was yelling loudly” as he broke objects in his room before proceeding to the hallway. Keyboards, computer monitors and glass valued at more than $7,500 were found littering the hallway, where McVay was subdued by security before police arrived. McVay was arrested and held at the hospital on charges of second-degree criminal mischief and disorderly conduct in a place of business. People Different From Us West Virginia MetroNews reported that, for Jackie Fullmer, 37, of Fairmont, W.Va., Oct. 9 started with trying to steal car keys from a woman at knife point. When police caught up to her, she ran toward their car with a hatchet and knife, prompting a deputy to shoot her with a stun gun. Fullmer turned to verbal attacks while being transported to the Fairmont Police Department, warning officers she was going to stab them in the neck and watch their “blood drain as she drank it”—which, as it turns out, she could have done, because she had a knife hidden between her buttocks. That weapon was found during booking, and Fullmer admitted she had slashed the seat belt in the police cruiser with it before threatening to slit the officers’ throats. She was charged with threats of terrorist acts and attempted robbery.

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Smooth Reaction On Oct. 12, an Air India Express pilot guided a Boeing 737 up and away from Tiruchirappalli International Airport in Tamil Nadu, India—but not enough up and away. As the plane took off shortly after midnight, it hit the top of a 5-foot-tall perimeter wall and destroyed a small landing guide tower. The Washington Post reported that, despite the audible collision, the pilot told the airport director the plane’s systems were functioning normally and he was continuing toward Dubai, across the Indian Ocean.

Babs De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

Weird Science In Olympic National Park in Washington, the mountain goat population has baaa-llooned to an unnatural 700 or more animals. The park is also becoming more popular with humans, which has led to an unsavory consequence: In their constant quest for salt and other minerals, the goats have developed a strong taste for human urine and sweat left behind by hikers and campers. Goats will lick clothing and paw at the ground where people have urinated or disposed of cooking water, making them a nuisance, according to the National Park Service. Popular Mechanics also reports that the increased likelihood of humangoat interactions has park officials worried, especially since a goat gored a hiker to death in 2010. The answer: Park officials are tagging, blindfolding and airlifting mountain goats to nearby Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, which should be more hospitable to their needs.

AND GHOSTS!

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Just Kidding An alert (or nosy) passerby called police on Oct. 10 after seeing staff through the window of a Natwest bank in Birmingham, England, hiding and cowering under their desks. Officers arrived at the bank in hopes of catching a robber red-handed, but instead were told the workers were participating in a teambuilding game of hide-and-seek. West Midlands Police Chief Inspector Dave Keen tweeted that, though the incident was a misunderstanding, the citizen made “the right call,” reported Metro News.

Questionable Judgment Hatam Hamad, 56, a Palestinian and American dual citizen, made a name for himself on Oct. 10 as he flew from New Orleans to Heathrow Airport in London, reported Fox News. Six hours into the flight, after swigging five servings of wine, Hamad approached New Orleans TV executive Joel Vilmenay, who was sitting with his wife and two children. “This man had his penis out and exposed within 3 inches of my face,” Vilmenay said in his statement to the Uxbridge Magistrates Court prosecutor, Wendy Barrett. Vilmenay said he stood up and asked Hamad what he was doing, whereupon Hamad “responded by grunting” and exposed himself to another passenger. At that moment, Hamad “slapped (Vilmenay) in the chest with some force.” The cabin crew were alerted, and Hamad was removed to the back of the plane, where he was guarded for the remainder of the flight. Hamad, who has no previous convictions, at first denied having assaulted anyone, but later admitted his guilt, saying he had not drunk alcohol for three months but was a nervous flyer. His prison sentence was suspended, but he was ordered to pay Vilmenay $789.

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