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D E R H S ON L A V I R R A

OCT. 4, 2018 | VOL. 35 N0. 19

HO W I S S ON E MA H I FT G RO LE DO I NG T U P SKA WOR M I NA H E TE B LD O TE D OA F RD I NG .

BY JORDAN FLOYD


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SWEET & SOUR

Salty Bitches is their name. Shredding is their game. Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff saraharnoff.com

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 31 CINEMA 33 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

SARAH ARNOFF

Cover photography From her ace proofreading skills to stellar eye for photography, Arnoff is a jack of many trades. When not serial-watching The Great British Baking Show, the Utah County native likes to partake in rugged travel. “It’s nice to see a group of punk-ass women tearing it up and just doing what they love,” she says of this week’s subjects.

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Spencer Cox talks midterm election cybersecurity. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Andrew Zimmern praises SLC’s diverse culinary scene.

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SOAP BOX

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Supporting authors from @SLCWEEKLY “shithole” countries @CITYWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Sept. 20, “Conservation Crisis”

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The most effective conservation program you never heard of is about to go down the drain.

@BRIANMAFFLY Via Twitter

Thanks for putting this topic front and center.

@LANIKAIEGOFF Via Instagram

Opinion, Sept. 20, “On Puppies and Sneakers”

Ha, wow. This article took me for a loop through a very clever rabbit hole.

@A_RIVERRAT Via Twitter

Dine, Sept. 20, Bhutan House

This is a great place. I took my family for a birthday dinner last week. Great food and service.

@SALMO3T Via Twitter

Music, Sept. 20, “We’ve got Brad’s Back”

[Brad Collins] always will share a story or give you information with a smile every time you go into Raunch Records. Great guy!

@B.JAEZ

Via Instagram

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BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

Aimee Steinly

Butt Doctor Extraordinaire APRN, DNP-C

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Online news story, Sept. 27, Anita Hill on sexual harassment, #MeToo and Supreme Court confirmation hearings

Let’s be real. Those who are in government, left or right, always want more power and will manipulate the public in order to maintain power and get more of it. They love steering the public using totalitarian-like arguments. If the government really cared about stopping rape, it would actually teach children in school the atrocities that can occur when girls and boys spend less time around their parents and move on to college and those boys start moving into the full hormonal experimental stages of their lives and begin to team up in small mobs and consume large amounts of alcohol. I think that would be better instead of teaching people to snicker at a medical outlay of a vagina on a projector.

MATT MORRIS Via Facebook

Wish we could have gotten in. Lots of folks were turned away—no room at the inn.

ANN HOPKINS Via Facebook

Online news story, Sept. 28, Crowd gathers to support victims of sexual violence and call out Utah’s

senators for not taking allegations seriously

Socrates dealt with public ridicule. In Plato’s writings, he said something to the effect of “does an athlete seek to please the crowd or his coach?” Socrates went on to say he listens to the oracle within. From this I have a mantra. “It doesn’t matter what anyone thinks, it only matters what God thinks.”

BRIAN WILLESS

Via cityweekly.net Hatch and Lee are at the top of “The Worst Ever” list.

JO DISA STARKS Via Facebook

No one wants a sexual magical gift. Keep your genitalia to yourself, Utah. No more opening each others doors. This is Mormons new sexual harassment; it is very disruptive to the work environment. Nobody is an elder.

Online news story, Oct. 1, Cox, state officials gather at the Capitol to discuss Utah’s opioid epidemic

$3.2 million for agencies to share information? You could’ve used Google Sheets for free.

CHRIS ELROD Via Facebook

An Ode to Orrin

Odious Orrin, how long must we listen to your crap. The shit coming out of your mouth. Shut your trap. Old as shit, and never the wiser, spewing geezer nonsense like a huckleberry geyser. “OH” please, “OH” please just listen this once and refrain. If you still have any self control left or half a brain.

MARK S. HURST, Murray

CHRISTINE COHEN Via Facebook

States have genitalia? Hmmm …

BAUN JORDAN Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, JORDAN FLOYD, GEOFF GRIFFIN, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Staff Writer KELAN LYONS Music Editor NICK McGREGOR Editorial Assistant RAY HOWZE Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER


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OPINION

An Entitled Brotherhood

Last week, Americans watched their elected leaders in action, and it wasn’t pretty. The Senate, deeply committed to the matter of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, was frantic. They’d expected a slam-dunk, but the process deteriorated into a quagmire of unanswered questions about Kavanaugh’s fitness to serve. Christine Blasey Ford’s accusations were serious, and President Donald Trump’s congressional fix-it squad was feeling extreme urgency to get Kavanaugh confirmed. After all, the ever-burgeoning salvos of lawsuits and criminal complaints against the president would eventually have to be faced, and Kavanaugh was the providential Trump-card. Kavanaugh’s background made him the perfect fit; he’d made statements that a sitting president can’t be prosecuted and that a president does, indeed, have the right to pardon anyone, including himself. There was no doubt: Trump had found his man—one of unfailing Republican loyalties who would insulate the presidency from criminal and civil punishment. But when Blasey Ford gave her sworn testimony to the Senate, that dream fell apart. Even some of the most dedicated partisans were visibly shaken by her account. She provided details—the date, the place and how a drunken Kavanaugh had climbed on top of her, tried to remove her clothing and covered her mouth. She had been afraid, humiliated and hurt. Those actions were seared into her memory for a lifetime. They became a frequent flashback of her waking moments and created anxiety and fear in the most intimate parts of her life.

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. Sincere and heartfelt, Blasey Ford made no attempts at drama. When asked what part of the rape attempt stood out most in her memory, she said it had been the uproarious laughing of Kavanaugh and his friend. Senators were stunned by the cruelty of that insult-to-injury add-on. Then it was Kavanaugh’s turn. He equivocated on every answer, often redirecting the same questions at those who questioned him. He asserted that he was never there; his own diary showed there were no parties that night, and he went on and on about how his own exemplary father had kept the same meticulous records. He acknowledged that Blasey Ford probably believed her own story, but that she had confused him with someone else. Kavanaugh cried, turned red with anger, lost his cool and spouted a hateful tirade on how this accusation had destroyed his family’s life. He blamed it all on partisan politics, showing himself to be no more than a spoiled, entitled, little frat-house brat who admonishes others every day of his life to take responsibility for their acts but is unable to accept his own guilt. One would think that as a matter of procedure, the Senate would have insisted on a proper investigation. Instead, there were a number of rabid speeches by Republicans who couldn’t seem to stop playing the blame game. At a time when corporate heads are rolling, entertainment icons are being summarily axed and high officials are being dethroned over accusations of abuse, assault and inappropriate sexual behavior, Trump asked Congress to do the unthinkable: Confirm Kavanaugh—a known liar, lush and accused would-be rapist—as the high court’s newest justice. Republican senators were determined to confirm him—not on his merits but by strict partisan loyalty. They chose to discredit the victim while overlooking the pathetic histrionics of a sniveling Ivy League brat. But, voila! The GOP’s plan was derailed by Jeff Flake and the single Perry-Mason moment that breached party lines.

The formidable power of partisan mob rule had nearly prevailed, but moments in an elevator brought it to a dramatic end. Why? Because Americans have begun to understand the plight of women at the hands of predators, including the legal and emotional threats that face those who speak out. #MeToo is about education, empowerment, the freedom to fight back and the transformation of secret undeserved guilt into open dialogue and, ultimately, holding the perpetrators accountable. Change comes slowly. A man who hasn’t respected women probably never will; Trump certainly won’t. Republicans embraced Kavanaugh’s theatrical words, but rejected everything Blasey Ford said. That’s the very reason why few women have the stomach to speak out against sexual offenders; women know that such accusations open the floodgates to even more abuse, inquisitions into non-related personal experiences, public humiliation and the emotional trauma of reliving the event. In a real sense, Blasey Ford was subjected to the same “uproarious laughter” she endured so many years before. Ironically, most of the Senate was aware that Kavanaugh was accused of lying under oath during his previous confirmation as a federal judge; they knew honesty wasn’t his forte. Every one of those would-be yea-vote senators is a disgrace to our democracy, and Kavanaugh should be disbarred, impeached and removed from the federal bench. We have the right, as Americans, to insist that our president, lawmakers and jurists are people of integrity—people who believe in our country and the inalienable rights of all its people. There’s something seriously wrong when a nation’s leaders believe that laws apply only to others, and that the elite are entitled to permanent legal immunity. CW

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8 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

Fix your roof today! Call Lifetime Roofing today at (801) 928-8881

REFUGEE READINGS AND SONG

Utah is one of the most welcoming states to refugees. Come listen to An Evening of Refugee Stories and Songs. Let Me Tell You My Story, compiled by the nonprofit group Their Story is Our Story, is a collection of first-person accounts which promises to inspire and motivate change. You’ll enjoy music from China, Syria, Mexico and India as well as a multi-media presentation. You’ll also hear from the International Rescue Committee, Catholic Charity Services and spokesperson Melissa Dalton-Bradford, author and international TSOS refugee advocate. Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Thursday, Oct. 4, 6:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2OiP5Tj.

YOU AND THE WEATHER

This is the week to silence the climate deniers. To that end, more than two dozen organizations and businesses are presenting nearly 30 events from film screenings to art exhibits. Many already are sold out, showing just how many people want to take action. At The Three Tenors of Climate Change you’ll hear climatologist Ben Santer talk about his work on global warming. Santer, a scientist from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will join Milwaukee-based filmmaker Chip Duncan and global health expert Hernando Garzon from California’s Kaiser Permanente to discuss receding glaciers, global climate modeling and the long-term health consequences facing a warming world. “Using personal stories, long-term study and decades of documentation and participation, Santer, Duncan and Garzon have teamed up to bring their climate story to audiences across the U.S.,” the event’s Facebook page says. Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, 385-468-2222, Thursday, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., free, bit.ly/2zDAkCx.

ART THERAPY FOR SURVIVORS

Never mind that Congress doesn’t believe you, you know what you’ve been through. Art Therapy for Survivors of Sexual Abuse/Assault will help you process the trauma and visualize your emotions. “Participants will explore various art mediums individually and through a collective group experience. Participants will learn about intention, art-making and witness writing,” the program’s website says. This is a self-exploration because recovery is a personal journey. Art therapist Jill Johnson will lead you through this creative forum. Art Access, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, Tuesdays through Nov. 2, 5:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2OoVWuE.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 9

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Monday:

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This Mormon Moment

If ever there was a Mormon moment, this is it. No, it wasn’t when Mitt Romney ran for president or when Jon Huntsman Jr. was named ambassador to China (and Russia). While they both are Mormons, they did not hold in their palms the expression of moral righteousness broadcast by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. On the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, things are different. Four of the members are Mormon. That’s almost one-fifth of the 21 members and more than a third of its Republicans, while only 2 percent of the U.S. population is LDS. Mormon Women for Ethical Government cheered Jeff Flake. Flake “is the only Mormon on the judiciary committee who professed the slightest concern for what issues like this mean to women,” Rewire’s Holly Welker writes. “[Mike] Crapo, [Mike] Lee and [Orrin] Hatch were concerned entirely with how these issues harm men.”

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By now, the world knows that Judge Brett Kavanaugh likes beer. He probably shouldn’t come to Utah, where confusion reigns and he might just accidentally watch an R-rated movie with a cool glass of suds. But let’s talk about how our Legislature wastes taxpayer dollars on such nonsense. Salt Lake’s former mayor Rocky Anderson won nearly $500,000 for Brewvies Cinema Pub because lawmakers dissed the Constitution they purport to so love. The Salt Lake Tribune called it an “alcohol, sex and First Amendment case,” in which the state decided it was important to keep people from drinking and watching movies or plays or whatever. The case might have cost taxpayers $1 million, Anderson estimated. And now, the Legislature has slapped expensive rules on retailers as to where and how they can display beer. Obviously, the public must be warned.

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We’re not sure how much celebrating was going on in Utah during National Public Lands Day. Utah author Stephen Trimble had a few words in his Los Angeles Times op-ed “Utah’s Mormon Republican establishment is backing Trump’s assault on public lands.” Then, the Center for Biological Diversity mentioned that conservation groups have sued the Trump administration “for leasing more than 115,000 acres of public land in western Colorado and northern Utah for oil and gas development without adequate environmental protections.” That comes after the administration auctioned off 200,000 acres of public lands for fossil fuel development. As Trimble notes, the motivation is profit. While the blame might be on Republicans, in Utah it’s Mormons—their synonymous counterparts—who are feeling the heat.

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12 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

NEWS

HOMELESSNESS

Taking Clients’ Vitals

New digital survey gives homeless people a say in how five Utah organizations can better tailor their services.

T

here haven’t been doors on the bathroom stalls for the entire four years Matthew Melville has worked at Catholic Community Services of Utah’s Weigand Homeless Resource Center. “Back when I started, we had to call the paramedics every day because of people overdosing,” the director of homeless services says. The doors were removed and shower curtains taken from the showers to ensure that their clients didn’t pass out in a secluded part of the day shelter. “For the sake of safety, some privacy was lost.” A few homeless people who frequent the center weren’t happy with the trade-off. In a digital survey offered on CCS grounds since July, several clients made the same request: more privacy in the bathrooms. Someone even suggested, as a compromise, installing partial shower curtains that cover bathers’ bodies from their shoulders to their knees. There still aren’t doors on the stalls, but CCS heeded the proposal and put the compromise curtain in the women’s showers for a trial period. If things go well, Melville says, CCS will install permanent full-length curtains in the showers and toilet stalls. “We posted in the bathrooms, ‘These shower curtains are a part of your feedback from the surveys. Please help us police it so this privilege doesn’t go away,’” Melville says. “We want them to know that we’re listening.” CCS’ new feedback system comes from Pulse For Good’s homelessness survey program, started in January by six friends who work in the computersoftware field. CCS and Valley Behavioral Health’s Safe Haven are the only two organizations in Salt Lake City currently administering the digital questionnaires through iPad kiosks or in their computer labs. Ogden’s Lantern

KELAN LYONS

BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

“We hold our clients accountable, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be held accountable,” CCS’ Matthew Melville says. House, St. George’s Switchpoint and Logan’s Neighborhood Housing Solutions also are all using PFG software to receive feedback. “It gives organizations a pulse of how satisfied people are with their care,” PFG co-founder Blake Kohler says of his company’s punny name. “Most service providers have been trying to do this by hand over the last 30 years.” The services are costly—a one-time $5,000 charge installing hardware and creating the survey, and a $10,000 annual subscription fee, though discounts are available. Kohler says PFG offered the survey for free to every social service provider in the state, but only a few accepted. Several organizations, he says, told him they didn’t want to expose themselves to potentially negative feedback. “They were worried, I think, they would lose funding if they had bad scores.” Kohler hopes that, eventually, local or state governments, or sponsor foundations, foot the bill so service providers don’t have to pay. Each survey consists of at least five questions that ask respondents to rate, on a five-star scale, their overall level of satisfaction with their stay, the facility’s safety and cleanliness and the quality of their interactions with staff members. There’s also an open-ended question where clients can provide more feedback and suggest improvements. PFG owns the data but shares results with homeless organizations, which then can tailor their services accordingly—like CCS did with the shower curtains. PFG can also customize each providers’ survey, should the staff wish to collect additional data. CCS’ poll includes additional questions that ask respon-

dents for their gender, ethnicity, age, marital status, how long they’ve been homeless and which services they utilized. “We really want to give our clients a voice. A lot of times in homelessness, they’re not involved in the narrative or decision-making,” Melville says. As of Sept. 28, 535 people have taken the questionnaire from CCS’ computer lab or iPad kiosk since PFG installed the technology. According to a midSeptember breakdown of the responses that Melville showed City Weekly, respondents gave CCS a 4.2 out of 5 overall rating. Around two-thirds of people gave CCS a five-star rating for safety and staff friendliness, and just more than half gave the shelter five stars for cleanliness. More than half of those who responded had been homeless for a year or longer, and nearly a third were age 50 or older. Melville says he’s surprised by the number of five-star ratings. “If you’re here, you’re at your lowest level in life. You’ve been through something traumatic.” There’s no limit to the number of times someone can take a survey. Melville says he hopes people take it more than once, so he can see if satisfaction levels change on different days of the week or, eventually, over different seasons. “I want to be able to track your experience,” he says. “I don’t want a snapshot.” Rep. Steve Eliason, a longtime board member of the social service agency The Road Home and a Republican state representative from Sandy who regularly sponsors legislation that involves homelessness, says it’s important to gather feedback on support services, but cautions that such results should be taken with a grain of salt.

“By design, emergency homeless shelters are not typically designed to be like a bed and breakfast because the goal is to help people transition as quickly as possible to housing,” he says, adding that “the clientele are in very difficult positions in their lives, and so you need to take their frames of mind into account when you evaluate the results of a survey.” Melville says PFG’s services supplement CCS’ weekly client engagement meetings, where staff talk with clients at length about survey responses and other needs they might have. He suggests the polls are helpful for aggregated data and gauging client’s general perceptions about CCS, but the weekly meetings are better for analyzing necessities on a deeper level. “You really have to do both,” he says. David Christopher Thomas and Troy Engle sit at a black-and-white table in the courtyard outside the Weigand Center on a hot Friday afternoon. Thomas says he took the survey three times in one day because he wanted to improve his chances in a raffle for a $20 gift card to Panda Express. He gave CCS five-star marks on everything, and he asked for help getting a better job and place to stay. But he isn’t sure his suggestions will lead to any change. “It goes in one ear and out the other,” he says. Engle rolls cigarettes as he sits beside his friend. He took the survey so he could ask for more port-a-potties on the grounds outside Weigand, since the ones there now are frequently filled with people who passed out after doing drugs. After submitting his responses, he learned that the portable toilets are the city’s responsibility, not CCS’. His request proved moot, but Engle says he might take it again for one simple reason: “I’m trying to improve this place.” CW


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on Arrival UP O R E G TH E N O HOWH I FTI NG TE D IS S - DOM I NA F E MAL ORLD O I NG . W RD A O B E SKAT

By Jordan Floyd comments@cityweekly.net @jordanfloyd17 Photos by Sarah Arnoff @arnoffoto

I

f the women felt any fear, standing at the edge of the bowl’s deep end, some 20 feet above the cement bottom, skateboards by their sides, they didn’t show it—not even a little. The goal was to be the first to perform a frontside grind in the deepest part of the Park City skatepark bowl. To perform the trick, a skater faces the pool wall and grinds their back truck on the tubular coping, whether it’s made of metal or concrete, that lines the bowl’s edge. The move is relatively standard, but it becomes especially daunting on pool coping—which is harder to grind on than metal because it’s not as slick—when it lines the top of a towering, mostly vertical wall.

Nevertheless, the women dropped in, one after the other. Lily Azure completed the challenge first on a fish-shaped board, with big old-school-style wheels and wide trucks—a setup that was the standard in the vert

competitions of the ’80s. She dropped into the deep-end without any trepidation and approached the opposite wall. When she reached the top, she pivoted on her back truck, then stalled on her board’s tail. She teetered

above the bowl, while onlookers began to cheer, slapping the tails of their skateboards on the ground and letting out thunderous whoops in anticipation of a make. She steadied herself and dropped back in. The crowd erupted as she rolled away. Beneath the roar, someone asked if the trick counted, since she’d been stationary on the coping and didn’t perform a grind, at least technically. The persistent cheers answered that question. Although the challenge had been completed, fellow skater Kallie Hancock continued to slash at the pool coping as the crowd urged her on. Her wheels sounded off like

they’d hit a rumble strip as they passed over tile below the coping. The sound meant she was right there, on the edge. After a few more passes, she got it—the frontside grind. Showing the same excitement as before, the crowd cheered, shouted and slapped their boards on the ground. Any talk of technicalities was pedantic, a buzzkill. Questions of who did what first were high-schooljock bullshit. Both women got their tricks. Both of them were stoked— and so, too, was the crowd. That’s all that mattered. The bowl challenge was one of a variety of competitions at the


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Jessie Trumbo

Confirming the vein of male toxicity that runs through the sport, current Nike skateboarding pro Nyjah Huston told Thrasher in 2013 that he believed “skateboarding is

not for girls at all. Not one bit.” The then-19-year-old apologized quickly afterward, citing what he called the “wrath of the concrete” as the reasoning behind his statement. “I don’t like the thought of girls [like my little sister] getting hurt,” Huston wrote on Twitter. Five years later, Huston’s words still characterize the way women have been involved in, or kept out of, skateboarding. Regardless of recent strides, women continue to be tasteless props in skateboard companies’ ad-campaigns and product lines. Pro skater Jeremy Klein’s brand Hook-Ups sells products—ranging from decks to T-shirts—that almost exclusively feature manga-rendered women in gratuitous, bare-it-all poses. Similarly, Rob Dyrdek’s Street League Skateboarding (SLS) contest series has long employed the services of women, dressed in official Monster Energy outfits, for cheerleading-like roles.

OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 15

‘Not for girls at all’

Tori Havlik

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as a platform through which the community connects in real life. What began as low-key ladies’ skate nights has evolved into full-fledged skate days, with sponsors like Skullcandy and the sport’s premier magazine, Thrasher. During the past summer, the Salty Bitches put on four consecutive monthly skate days. Featuring games and competitions, the events attracted throngs of lady skaters of every age and ability level. As witnessed during that July day in Park City, these gatherings are one of the key ways the Salty Bitches bring women together, give them a spotlight and a judgment-free skateboarding environment.

Kylan Nanney

July ladies’ skate day, staged by the Salty Bitches, a forwomen-by-women group that during the past year and a half has helped to promote and connect women skateboarders in Utah. The group began assembling in February 2017, when Fern Hardin, Tori Havlik, Kylan Nanney, Noelle Sanders and Jessie Trumbo created an Instagram account as an easy way to connect women who wanted to skate together in a non-hostile environment. Sanders, who moved to the Beehive State about two years ago from Connecticut, says when she first arrived, she “felt like there was a decent amount of girls that skated,” and there was already a women’s skateboarding community, but “it was super loose.” “I wanted to skate with everyone,” she says, “but there was no way.” Soon that would change. The thriving account now boasts more than 1,800 followers and has become a content hub for all things specific to local women’s skateboarding. It also serves

fern hardin

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Noelle Sanders


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Ironically, the marketing ploys belittle the very nature of the sport’s origins. Since the dawn of skateboarding, women have been part of it—whether upright on a board or, yes, prostrate on the ground next to their board, having fallen off. The Jeff Ho Surfboards and Zephyr Productions skateboard team, which often is cited as the beginning of modern-day skateboarding, featured Peggy Oki, the lone female on the Z-Boys team. Elissa Steamer, who is perhaps one of the more notable pioneers in the women’s skateboarding movement, garnered a wealth of attention in the ’90s as a sponsored skater for Toy Machine skateboards—a brand that featured some of the most adept and influential skaters like Jamie Thomas, Ed Templeton and Bam Margera. Later on, Steamer even had a spot on the roster of Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater video game. At the end of Steamer’s video segment in Toy Machine’s 1996 full-length skateboard movie Welcome to Hell, she falls directly to her side, onto the bottom steps of a stair set with some six or seven steps in total. The video slows and she lets out a distorted and pained, “Fuck.”

For women, by women

Through the Salty Bitches, Sanders hopes to carry an empowering torch for the next generation. From its inception, the group and its outings, Sanders says, were designed as an opportunity “for women; for people who identify as women—no matter what [their] ability as a skateboarder is.” Sanders recalls her conversations at Milosport Snowboarding and Skateboarding, where she currently works, about why women don’t frequently attend competitions or events the shop sponsors. “Some people don’t feel comfortable skating in front of a lot of people,” she says. “Some girls feel intimidated, and honestly, a lot of the skill level is different.” Providing equal footing and a safe space for them, was key. “I wanted to create an event where [women] could compete against each other equally and still feel challenged,” Sanders says about the monthly meetups. “A lot of girls in the city are dedicated to skateboarding, and they should be recognized. They should have an environment where they feel challenged and where they can receive free things”—such as contest prizes or event giveaways—”because a lot of that opportunity isn’t there.” Sanders & Co.’s efforts are starting to gain momentum, as Salty Bitches—along with similar groups that have sprouted across the country—are starting to make a noticeable dent on the sport’s estimated $4.8-billion market. A lifetime after its “sidewalk surfing” start, women skateboarders have begun to catch corporate America’s eye. Shoe giants now feature women on their skateboarding teams: Lacey Baker (Nike), Nora Vasconcellos (Adidas), Lizzie Armanto (Vans) and Alexis Sablone (New Balance). Each also has professional skateboard decks with their own graphics and their name emblazoned on the bottom. “Women have been skating since the beginning of skateboarding, and there’s always been less recognition, though that applies everywhere,” Baker told Vogue in a 2017 feature. “Statistically speaking, people are starting to respect and appreciate our side of things. We’re going to be in the [2020 Tokyo] Olympics, so now there’s value to women as skateboarders. The progress is coming from that, and the fact that there are a lot more female skaters.” Sanders echoes Baker’s sentiment. “I’ve always believed that women can do whatever men do,” she says. She goes on to note the ample evidence that established competitions are beginning to value women’s skateboarding. The women’s portions of the X Games, Dew Tour and Street League Skateboarding, for example, have grown in size and popularity over recent years. Beginning this year, the Vans girls combi competition awarded prize money in its women’s division that was equivalent to the men’s division. Sanders calls these developments “big steps” and says she believes “women’s skateboarding right now is thriving.”

D TO E T N “I WA TE AN CREA H E RE TW EVE N N ] COU LD E [WOM M PETE H CO T EAC Y S N I AGA EQUALL R L OTH E TI LL FE E S AN D E NG E D.” LL CHA —

LLE NOE

D SAN

E RS


Rolling forward

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OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 17

During the summer skate day, there were many visible instances of what Hancock and Lou describe. Nanney said she mustered courage to drop into the deep end of the bowl for the first time, after witnessing Hancock and Azure push their own boundaries, attempting to front-side grind. Nanney completed the feat on her third try thanks to the support from women she’d never met. “Having this many girls [at the skatepark] is supreme for all of us,” she said. “I’ve barely met these girls and I’m like, ‘Dude, you just killed it; I love you so much.” Looking ahead, Sanders and crew plan to spread the feeling of connection and inclusivity by continuing the skate days, putting on other events and making tweaks to the Bitches’ brand. She says the group will soon go by the moniker Salty Skate Collective, under which the they and the newly formed Salty Buddies, which aims to cater to younger skaters, will coexist. The name change, Sanders says, will help “create a community where kids feel welcome,” given Utah’s generally conservative culture. Sanders also says the group plans to organize free skate clinics for youth regardless of gender. On the business side, Sanders says she’s working on creating a website and, in line with the group’s for-women-by-women ethos, is sourcing the design work from women developers. Additionally, Sanders aims to turn the collective into a nonprofit so it can “put money back into the community.” She plans on realizing those lofty objectives, while balancing 60-hour work weeks between her two jobs—administrative work for clinical research studies and as an associate at Milosport. “This is what I like doing best, and what I care most about,” she says, reinforcing the importance of groups like this. “I believe the women’s skateboarding scene right now is thriving,” she says. “If I can continue to help push that movement by helping the state of Utah thrive—that’s my goal.” CW

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Having experienced skateboarding’s “boys club” mentality first hand, Utah Valley University student and head of Strive Skateboards, Katie Lou, says Salty Bitches’ philosophy is in tune with her and her boyfriend’s brand, so supporting it was a no-brainer. Underscoring her company’s mission of “just really trying to help women’s presence in skateboarding,” Strive has done just that, donating a variety of merchandise from shirts to boards for prizes and giveaways at the skate-day events. Lou, who arrived in the area from Denver a year ago, can relate to that little girl, too intimidated to give it her all at the skatepark. “After moving out here, skating, and not knowing anybody, I was a little shy,” she says. When she first heard about Sanders’ initiative, she was “so stoked to meet some other girls that skateboard and like to have fun.” Along with local supporters, and making strides in disrupting the four-wheel patriarchy, Salty Bitches also have garnered the attention of larger women’s skateboarding groups like Cindy Whitehead’s “Girl Is Not a 4 Letter Word” and “Skate Like a Girl.” Both initiatives, which are devoted to bolstering the women’s skateboarding community through their own events, have sponsored one or more skate days. Kallie Hancock, a long-time skater, Brigham Young University graduate and one of the few women in the state to work at a skate shop, views the Salty Bitches’ Instagram account and ladies’ skate days as “really empowering for women.” “You could just be learning and feel like you’ll never get good. It can be very intimidating,” Hancock says. “Having another girl do something you want to learn makes it feel more possible—more doable.” Lou agrees. Having other women at a skatepark, or, perhaps, having a park filled with women for a skate day, elicits a sense of confidence in her, and allows her to think, “OK— if she’s doing it, I can.”

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‘More doable’


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ESSENTIALS

THURSDAY 10/4

The Jawbone’s Daughter When playwright Eric Paul Lyman’s The Jawbone’s Daughter premiered at the 2017 Salt Lake Fringe Festival, its absurdist strain of comedy drew comparisons to Eugène Ionesco, Samuel Beckett and Tom Stoppard (including in a City Weekly review). But Lyman himself offers a much more self-deprecating take on the play’s origins and inspirations. “I wanted to be on stage with my friends, but didn’t want to license anything,” Lyman says. “I had a first line—which didn’t ultimately make it into the play—and a couple of characters, then they ran into another character. … But then I just kept pounding at it, and I didn’t know where it was going.” The result, however, is a wonderfully funny and surreal tale in which two men—Flince (John Liddiard) and Strothe (Chris Bentley)—make their way through a possibly post-apocalyptic world, then find their one chance at shelter thwarted by an intransigent guard (played by Lyman). The original cast members all return for a special twoweekend engagement. The instinctual process that originally brought the play to life continues, according to Lyman, as he and his castmates refine the script and the direction. Yet Lyman is pleasantly surprised that this wild idea turned into something that audiences appreciated. “The response [at the Fringe Festival was much better than I expected,” Lyman says. “Up until then, nobody had seen it or read it except my friends, and you think, ‘I can’t really trust what they’re saying.’ … People were finding things in it that I didn’t even realize were in it. And I’m still finding things.” (Scott Renshaw) The Jawbone’s Daughter @ Wasatch Theatre Co., 124 S. 400 West, Oct. 4-6 & Oct. 11-13, 8 p.m., $10, wasatchtheatre.org

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, OCT. 4-10, 2018

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

FRIDAY 10/5

Peter Stone: The Perfect Candidate Given the current spate of controversies and scandals facing politicians, it’s little wonder that pundits and the public are concerned our democracy has gone astray. Every day seems to bring more stranger-than-fiction outrages, suggesting that this is our nation’s new political reality. Sadly, there’s nothing fake or fictional about news coming out of Washington these days. Consequently, the timing for author Peter Stone’s new young adult political thriller The Perfect Candidate couldn’t be better. When recent high school graduate Cameron Carter lands a prized congressional internship, his world begins to unravel after his best friend is killed, the FBI is called and he becomes entangled in a dark and deadly conspiracy. In other words, it could be today’s real life. “The summer after I graduated from high school, I was an intern for Congressman Gary Condit,” Stone explains in an email. “Soon after, he was embroiled in the media circus surrounding the death of staffer Chandra Levy. I was later a Spanish tutor for former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. These experiences provided vivid, deep and sometimes troubling inspiration for me as I created my own take on the dark side of Washington, D.C.” As Stone suggests, The Perfect Candidate is like House of Cards or Scandal, except that it draws from the perspective of young staffers and interns, rather than presidents and power brokers. He describes it as “a political activist wish fulfilment.” However, considering today’s political realities, we’d call it just plain scary. (Lee Zimmerman) Peter Stone: The Perfect Candidate @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 5, 7 p.m., free, kingsenglish.com

FRIDAY 10/5

Performance Arts Festival This weekend, the Salt Lake City Main Library becomes a canvas during its sixth annual Performance Arts Festival. “Performance art is a fairly elusive medium,” featured artist Marilyn Arsem says in the video, “Talk Like That.” “It’s a person, a live body, an artist making an action, working with materials, probably transforming them, and doing it with people watching.” Don’t let that scare you away. The festival will be “fun and engaging,” curator Kristina Lenzi says. “All the pieces are appropriate for all ages.” A performance artist herself, Lenzi is scheduled to perform a piece demonstrating how she learned to paint. Other performances feature bridges, circles and chains formed by human bodies. Don’t be surprised to find yourself part of live pieces—but you also have the chance to stand back and observe as artists perform the unexpected. Featured artist Alastair MacLennan visits from Ireland to present a work that involves location and dislocation, placement and displacement, time being and time edited. If that sounds cryptic, it’s meant to be—you have to attend to see what his performance entails. A hint: “[I’m] using a human being, the mind and the body, as a vehicle, rather than paint on canvas,” MacLennan says in the video, “Art of the Troubles.” A wide array of local and international performance artists join Lenzi, Arsem and MacLennan. From performed poems and pelican art to a physical representation of the immigrant experience and the literalization of the phrase, “If I had a nickel,” the festival offers a chance to immerse yourself in living art. (Naomi Clegg) Performance Arts Festival @ Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 5, noon-8 p.m.; Oct. 6, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., free, slcpl.org

BUD HARMON

KRISTINA LENZI

SIMON AND SCHUSTER

AMY OLLERTON

the

WEDNESDAY 10/10

UVU Presidential Lecture: Tererai Trent It’s no small achievement to have Oprah Winfrey declare you her “all-time favorite guest.” However, the life story of Tererai Trent is so compelling, anyone, Oprah included, would find her fascinating. People along the Wasatch Front have the opportunity to hear about Trent’s amazing life and accomplishments when she speaks on “The Awakened Woman: The ‘Un-Silencing’ of Women” at Utah Valley University this week for the UVU Presidential Lecture. Trent grew up in a cattle-herding family in Zimbabwe, where cultural norms didn’t allow her to go to school with the boys. She nevertheless borrowed her brother’s books at night and taught herself to read and write. Despite having to marry young and have three children by age 18, Trent never gave up on her dream of one day going to America and pursuing higher education. She has more than exceeded those dreams becoming a major advocate across the globe for universal access to quality education and the rights of women. During her extensive career, she has been an adjunct professor at Drexel University, a fellow at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at UC San Francisco, a keynote speaker at a UN Summit, worked for major humanitarian organizations on five continents, partnered with Oprah and Save the Children to create her own foundation, and won a 2018 NAACP award for her latest book, The Awakened Woman - Remembering & Reigniting Our Sacred Dreams. The lecture is part of a series sponsored by the UVU Office of the President and Office of Engaged Learning. (Geoff Griffin) UVU Presidential Lecture: Tererai Trent @ Clarke Building, Utah Valley University, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Oct. 10, noon, free, uvu.edu/president/events


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A&E

NATHAN SWEET

THEATER

Forgotten Pioneer RDT’s Spirit showcases works by Japanese choreographer Michio Ito. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

M

ost people—even those well-versed in modern dance history—have never heard the name Michio Ito. There is, after all, a reason he is called the “forgotten pioneer of American modern dance,” as Mary Jean Cowell wrote for the Dance Heritage Coalition. And it’s important to point out the qualifier “American,” because Ito was born and raised in Japan. His life as a choreographer, however, developed in New York alongside the great modern dance pioneers we so often acclaim: Doris Humphrey, Martha Graham, Mary Wigman. But, likely in large part because of his Japanese heritage and America’s discomfort with people of Asian ancestry during the early decades of the 20th century, the memory of Ito’s name and works have faded, at least here in the U.S. Without Repertory Dance Theatre, there is a chance that no one in this country would remember Ito today. Decades ago, RDT became the repository of Ito’s body of work in the U.S. As a repertory company—the first in the nation when they started in 1966—RDT has a mission to preserve and perform important works from the entire history of modern dance. As part of that pursuit, every few years they find a place for Ito. That time has now come again. For Spirit, the company’s opening performance of the 2018-19 season, RDT gathers the work of four

choreographers whose collective careers span nearly 100 years. In addition to Ito, who choreographed mainly from the 1920s through the ’40s, and the masterpiece Rainbow Round My Shoulder (1959) by Donald McKayle, Spirit presents world-premiere commissions by two contemporary choreographers: Tiffany Rea-Fisher with Her Joy, and local choreographer Natosha Washington with Say Their Names. “We are in an interesting time in our culture where all kinds of things have happened,” RDT artistic director Linda C. Smith says, “and people are talking about diversity and the lack of diversity, and immigration and racial discrimination. Modern dance has always had a wonderful convergence of music and ideas from all over the world. It mirrors the rich tapestry of the American experience. [Our dance company] wanted to recognize the benefit of that.” With all that in mind, Smith says that Spirit, with three African-American choreographers and a Japanese choreographer filling the bill, is just the beginning of a journey for RDT. Diversity is the theme of the company’s season; their next performance, in November, will feature guest performers from some of Salt Lake City’s South American, Asian and Pacific Islander dance communities. In preparation for performing Ito’s works, RDT rehearsed with master teachers Kyoko Imura and Kumiko Komine from the Association of Michio Ito Disciples in Tokyo. “They are delightful to perform with,” Smith says, “and they work wonderfully on a program even with contemporary works. You can see the movement language very clearly, like in classical ballet; you see the steps and poses and how that informs the choreography. They look fresh alongside the contemporary choreography.” Ito’s life was as fascinating as his choreography. Born into a wealthy and well-educated Japanese family, Ito sought an unconventional life when he left for Paris as a teenager to study music and opera. There, he became seduced by the emerging world of modern dance. Changing

RDT dancers perform an untitled Michio Ito piece

his artistic course, Ito, at the onset of World War I, was lured to London and then ultimately to New York City. In the U.S., he began splitting his time between New York and Hollywood, creating pieces for Broadway and for film. At the time, Americans were wild for anything exotic and “Oriental.” Ito never did use traditional Japanese movements, and he would often say, “My dancing is not Japanese, it is only myself.” But his work did create an aesthetic fusion of East and West. Ito was also the first modern choreographer to solidify his style into a body of technique that could be taught. The technique is composed of two very precise sequences of 10 gestures each. The A-series is considered masculine, while the B-series is feminine. Each is performed with a precise breathing pattern. From these gestures, Ito’s work unfolds as the maneuvers become more intricate, with movements layered on top of one another. Ito’s residency in the U.S. came to an untimely end, at a moment in our history much like today, when the politics of fear seemed to overtake the voices of reason and logic. Within hours after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Ito was arrested for espionage. Shortly before being sent to a prisoner-of-war camp, he was deported to Japan as part of a prisoner swap. Ito never returned to live in the U.S.—but, thanks to RDT, his legacy remains. CW

REPERTORY DANCE THEATRE: SPIRIT

Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 Oct. 4-6, 7:30 p.m. $5-$30 artsaltlake.org.


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Salvador Jiménez-Flores presents 3D work exploring colonization, migration and cultural appropriation at Southern Utah University Museum of Art (13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, suu.edu/pva/suma) for a one-night-only presentation with the artist on Thursday, Oct. 4, 7 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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Amanda Rawson Hill: The Three Rules of Everyday Magic The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 6, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Dan Scanlan: How to Play Ukulele: A Complete Guide for Beginners The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Julia Corbett: Out of the Woods: Seeing Nature in the Everyday Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Oct. 5, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Lindsay Eagar: The Bigfoot Files The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 9, 6:30 p.m., kingsenglish.com Molly Idle: Pearl The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 10, 6 p.m., kingsenglish.com Nevada Berg: North Wild Kitchen: Cooking from the Heart of Norway The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 6, 6 p.m., kingsenglish.com Peter Stone: The Perfect Candidate The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 5, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 18) Poetry Reading: Rock Canyon Poets Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 10, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org

Great Basin Baroque Sweet Branch Library, 455 F St., Oct. 6, 3-4:30 p.m., slcpl.org Odyssey Dance: Thriller multiple locations, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, odysseydance.com Ogden Symphony Ballet Association: BalletX Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, 3950 West Campus Drive, Ogden, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., balletx.org Repertory Dance Theatre: Spirit Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 20) Sampradaaya Leona Wagner Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Oct. 6, 3-6:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Utah Ballet Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, tickets.utah.edu

LITERATURE

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DANCE

Aries Spears Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Oct. 5, 8 p.m.; Oct. 6, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Dave Rubin Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 5, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Free Kittens: A Stand Up Comedy Show Rye Diner & Drinks, 239 S. 500 East, Oct. 5, 7 p.m., ryeslc.com Key Lewis Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Oct. 5-6, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Pump and Dump Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Shayne Smith Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 6, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

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Anything Goes Hale Center Theatre, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Nov. 17, dates and times vary, haletheater.org A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center of New York City Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 21, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Ghost the Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, Oct. 5-20, times vary, empresstheatre.com Gracias Christmas Cantata U.S. Tour Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, Oct. 9, 7 p.m., christmascantata.us The Jawbone’s Daughter Wasatch Theatre Co., 124 S. 400 West, Oct. 5-6 & Oct. 12-13, 8 p.m., wasatchtheatre.org (see p. 18) The Rocky Horror Show The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Oct. 27, dates and times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com The Scarlet Pimpernel Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Wait Until Dark Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., hct.org

COMEDY & IMPROV


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moreESSENTIALS Ransom Riggs: A Map of Days The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 10, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Steve Patrick: A Whole of the Whole Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Oct. 6, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Susan Purvis: Go Find: My Journey to Find the Lost—and Myself Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Oct. 8, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FALL EVENTS

Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, castleofchaos.com DeJoria Center Harvest Fest DeJoria Center, 970 N. State Road 32, Kamas, Oct. 6, noon-5 p.m., dejoriacenter.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, fearfactoryslc.com Harvest Festival Draper Peaks and Draper Crossing Shopping Centers 12300 S. State, Draper, Oct. 6, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The Haunted Forest 6400 N. 6000 West, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, hauntedutah.com Krishna Harvest Festival Krishna Temple, 965 E. 3375 South, Oct. 7, 5-7:30 p.m., utahkrishnas.org Nightmare on 13th 300 W. 1300 South, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, nightmareon13th.com Pumpkin Nights Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Oct. 5-Nov. 4, 5:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m., pumpkinnights.com Utah Paranormal Expo Fort Douglas Ballroom, 110 Fort Douglas Blvd., Oct. 6, 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m.

FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Basin Beer Fest Snowbasin Ski Resort, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, Oct. 7, noon-5:30 p.m., snowbasin.com Festival Latino Library Square, 500 South 300 East, Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Salt Lake City Performance Arts Festival Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 5, noon-8 p.m.; Oct. 6, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., slcpl.org (see p. 18) Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 21, Saturdays & Sundays, noon-6:30 p.m., snowbird.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Mark Matheson: Dramatic Proposals Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Oct. 4, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Alastair Maclennan Kimball Arts Building, 3850

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

University Circle, Ogden, Oct. 4, 6 p.m., weber.edu Jordan Peterson: 12 Rules for Life Tour Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Tanner Forum on Social Ethics: Van Jones Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Oct. 9, 7 p.m., slcc.edu/tanner Tererai Trent Utah Valley University Clarke Building, 800 W. University Pkwy., Orem, Oct. 10, 12 p.m., uvu.edu (see p. 18)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Back to School Special Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Oct. 12, accessart.org Daniel Everett: Security Questions Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Design Arts Utah 2018 Showcase Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, visualarts.utah.gov Emily Call: Practical Contact Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Oct. 6, utahmoca.org Fire and Light Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Oct. 15, localcolorsart.com Glow: Oil Paintings by Zachary Bowman Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Great Girls of the World: Digital Prints by Beatrice Teigen Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Nov. 14, slcpl.org John Berry Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Oct. 13, modernwestfineart.com Linnie Brown: Retrace A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Nov. 3, agalleryonline.com Marisa Morán Jahn: Mirror / Mask Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 9, umfa.utah.edu Miguel Galaz: Roots, Culture, Education Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through Oct. 5, facebook.com/sugarspaceslc Moments in Time: Paintings by Lynn Nichols Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 19, slcpl.org Paul Reynolds & Deborah Durban Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Nov. 16, saltlakearts.org Plein Air Exhibition Brigham City Museum Gallery, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, through Nov. 3, brighamcitymuseum.org Ryan Ruehlen: Georhythmic Drift Music UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 3, utahmoca.org Salvador Jiménez-Flores Southern Utah University Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., suu.edu/pva/suma (see p. 21) Site Lines: Recent Work by University of Utah Art Faculty Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 6, umfa.utah.edu Trent Alvey and Jan Andrews: On the Border of Realism Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 2, visualarts.utah.gov Utah Travels Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, through Oct. 17, culturalcelebration.org Working Hard to Be Useless Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org


On the hunt for the city’s best tacos de lengua.

El Rey del Taco

tor, carnitas and carne asada. But a course of action didn’t emerge until I wondered what a taco made with the most non-traditional ingredient (to the American palate) would taste like. I reasoned

OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 23

I’ve wandered among these rolling stands for the past few months, but I’m a traditionalist—I like to commit to a long-term relationship with my eateries. Sure, all of them make fantastic tacos al pas-

Right off the bat, El Paisa gets bonus points for putting rice and pinto beans on their tacos, even though their prices are the same as their competitors. I was also surprised to see that the tongue here is slow-roasted. Once I added my condiments and squeezed the tortilla together, the meat just crumbled into velvety pieces. El Paisa’s tacos tend to run on the salty side, and that was definitely present here. But there’s something thoughtful about this tongue—it’s marinated and roasted, which completely eliminates the rubbery texture I expected. I recommend asking for grilled onions on top of this one for a delightfully messy, beefy bite. Rating: 9/10

By the time I rolled up to Don Rafa, I was feeling pretty damn proud of myself. Not only had I already eaten a few tongue tacos, but I actually liked them. I made my order with a bit of a wink, acting like I knew what I was doing. When they presented me with my third and final taco of the day, I was immediately taken aback. This looked like a tongue that was unceremoniously ripped from the mouth of a cow and hacked apart without thinking. My confidence level drained as I began prepping the taco for consumption. Again, the flavor was there—but this one had some interesting textural notes that eerily haunt me to this very day. Sure, the tongue here might be fattier, but the first two tacos outshined (and out-licked) Don Rafa. Rating: 6/10 Up next on the trepidatious taco trek: tacos de tripa (beef tripe), cachete (cheek) and sesos (braiiins). CW

| CITY WEEKLY |

M

any consider the corner of 800 South and State Street to be SLC’s taco Lourdes. There’s the brick-and-mortar Taco Time, and surrounding it, five independent taco stand satellites. It’s a funny juxtaposition—the humble carts waging guerilla war on the Oregon-based fast food chain many could argue (along with other faux Mexi-titans Taco Bell and Del Taco) has bastardized their cuisine.

Here, I tried my first taco de lengua (pictured), and the hardest part of taking my first bite was purely psychological. The meat looks just like cubed beef, but there are some distinctive bumps and ridges that subtly remind you that, yep, that’s tongue you’re eating. The key to this first experience was to overload the meat with as much complimentary pico, hot sauce and pickled radishes as possible. It did the trick—I was rocking this tongue taco. Flavorwise, it’s a lot like pot roast stuffed between two pleasantly greasy corn tortillas. After all, at the end of the day, a cow’s tongue is a muscle

El Paisa

Tacos Don Rafa

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweely.net @captainspringer

just like its flank and sirloin. Texturally, it leans a bit too close to rubbery, but that wasn’t as alarming as I had originally thought. Rating: 7/10

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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Tongue Trifecta

that the taco stand that treated beef tongue, tripe or headcheese with the most love would have to be someplace special. Tongue seemed like the most logical transition between regular street taco fare and a more culturally expansive menu, so that’s where I started.


AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

24 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

BACK BURNER

BY CITY WEEKLY STAFF

Free Tacos at Chronic

October is filled with kooky toss-away fringe holidays—from National Moldy Cheese Day (Oct. 9) to National Be Bald and Free Day (Oct. 14). One, however, stands out from the pack: National Taco Day. Sorry, National Kale Day (Oct. 3). To celebrate this holiest of holidays, Sugar House’s Chronic Tacos (2121 S. McClelland St., Ste. 108, 801-9068411, chronictacos.com) is giving away free tacos on Thursday, Oct. 4, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Yep, you read right. Follow their social media channels for el secret password. The fine print limits one taco per customer, so leave your eatin’ bib at home. If any other local retailers want to follow suit, National Gumbo Day (which, this year, coincides with World Egg Day) takes place on Oct. 12; National Pasta Day falls on Oct. 17, and National Mincemeat Day is Oct. 26—mark your calendars!

@

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Happy Hog-oween

Summer might have given way to fall, but the quintessentially summer flavors of pork products aren’t going away. Sundance Resort celebrates all things piggy with a Hog & Beer evening at the Foundry Grill (8841 N. Alpine Loop Road, Sundance, 866-932-2295) on Saturday, Oct. 6, in partnership with Uintah Brewing Co. Beginning at 5:45 p.m., enjoy a selection of hors d’oeuvres and appetizers, accompanied by tasting pours of local beers. Then an hour later, it’s time for a three-course, pork-alicious dinner, with a beer pairing provided for each course. Tickets are $120 per person, which includes gratuity. Make reservations at sundanceresort.com, or by calling 866-734-4428.

CALL FOR RESERVATION

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4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Tradition... Tradition

the

If you rarely make your way up to Park City, you’re missing out on some of Utah’s finest restaurants. While Salt Lake City restaurants continue their Dine O’Round through Oct. 14 (dineoround.com), Park City offers the sixth annual incarnation of Dine About. From now through Oct .14, more than two dozen restaurants encourage visitors to give their menus a try by offering two-course lunches or three-course dinners for special fixed per-person prices ($10/$15 lunch; $20/$40 dinner). Participating locations include Blind Dog Sushi, 501 Main, Cafe Terigo, Glitretind at Stein Eriksen Lodge, Handle, Purple Sage and more. Visit parkcityrestaurants.com for more information or to make reservations.

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someone with no political experience who is racially insensitive and golfs … In my first 100 days, I will make Taco Tuesday the law.” —George López

Send tips to comments@cityweekly.net

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LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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2018

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OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 25

lunch • dinner • take-out • catering

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chinese • sushi bar • beer • sake • wine


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26 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

Back to the Future

Reconnect with classic Salt Lake brews in time for fall. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

A

s I keep my eyes on the newest beers, some of the older tried-and-true brews tend to get pushed out of the spotlight. There are good reasons they’re still around, though; high drinkability and solid craftsmanship make examples like these transcend generations. If you’re a beer nerd like me who is constantly on the hunt for fresh sips, consider looking to the past for something new. You might be surprised by what you’ll find. Squatters Full Suspension: A Squatters classic, this bright copper/amber-colored beer pours with two fingers of white foam that recede rapidly, while leaving a persistent pattern of lacing on the sides of the glass. The nicely balanced aromas include caramel complemented by tangerine and

pine from the hops. The flavors are much as expected from the nose, highlighting the pine needles and grapefruit as well as a noticeable caramel sweetness from the malt backbone. Malt and sweetness are balanced with bitterness—neither conceals the other and they keep each other from becoming unpleasant. In the mouth, you get a medium/light body that’s a bit prickly from the moderate carbonation. The fairly long finish begins as the caramel sweetness briefly allows the pine and grapefruit to become more prominent, even as they all slowly fade. The malt sweetness, fruity citrus and piney bitterness from the hops are present throughout the finish to the clean, crisp semi-dry lingering end. Overall: This O.G. offering from Squatters is a very drinkable beer with a wellbalanced interplay between the not overly complicated hops and malt. If you’re looking for beer that’s big on drinkability and not too fussy, consider this perennial 4 percent pale ale. It’s available at most grocery stores around the state. Desert Edge Pop Tire Porter: Autumn must really be creeping in. When it’s warm outside, I rarely look to porters to satisfy my cravings. I’m glad I started with this one, because its 4 percent ABV is the perfect transitional medium. Poured from a freshly filled growler, a foamy khaki head rises over a dark brown body with soft garnet highlights. The nose features

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

moderately roasted barley, pale and toasted toffee malts with a medium sweetness. Hints of earthy coffee and chocolate round out the aroma, and the hop profile is subtly earthy with a modest bitterness. The taste bookends with roasted malt notes, generating subtle degrees of coffee bean and bittersweet chocolate, finishing on assertively toasted malts with a subtle drag of licorice spice well after the last sip. Sweetness is moderate, but there is enough earthy bitterness from the specialty malts and roast to effectively balance out this 4-percent beer. Overall: Desert Edge’s take on the porter

style plays it simple, but effectively, with most of the flavor and depth originating from the roasted flavors of kilned barley malts. Head brewer Chad Krusell keeps this beer about as close to a textbook example of an American porter as he possibly can. The flavor range generates an impressive scope for such a highly drinkable body, which plays light yet smooth, as is characteristic of the style. These are two very good examples of beers that paved the way for the lowalcohol “session style” taking hold around the country—and they were in your backyard the whole time. As always, cheers! CW

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Italian Village italianvillageslc.com

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Wild Rose

Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT M ON -T HU 11a - 11p FRI-S AT 1 1 a - 12a / S UN 3 p-10p

Greek-American Gregory Skedros opened the doors to Mandarin in 1978, and it’s been one of Utah’s premier Chinese restaurants ever since. The kitchen is bustling with chefs from Hong Kong and San Francisco, whose woks fire up some of the best fare you’ll find in town. The family-run eatery has sustained success in its Bountiful location with a combination of well-versed chefs, loyal customers and a menu that can’t be topped. 348 E. 900 North, Bountiful, 801-298-2406, mandarinutah.com

Straw Market

★★★★★

Prost!

Growing in popularity, Straw Market is still the place to grab a quick morning bite at an unbeatable price. Breakfast burritos are packed with egg, cheese and hash, plus your choice of ham, bacon, sausage or veggies—a mix of spinach, green and red peppers, onion and mushroom. If your sweet tooth is getting the best of you, indulge in a fresh cinnamon roll slathered in white frosting. The small café also offers ham and cheese or veggie quiche (“made when we feel like it,” the chalkboard menu reads.) 390 Fourth Ave., 801-935-4420, straw-market.com

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Café Shambala

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

20 W. 200 S. SLC (801) 355-3891

OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 27

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

Salt Lake City lacks a strong presence of Tibetan food—at least so you thought. Café Shambala, embedded in the Avenues, offers a stellar lunch buffet. Patrons get unlimited access to chow mein, lentil soup, momos, spicy tofu, mixed vegetables and other healthy but delicious options. The spicy tofu alone will leave you feeling light, satisfied and longing to return. It will single-handedly convert avid tofu haters to tofu lovers. Plus, the friendly owners and workers at Café Shambala are constantly smiling and happy to share their special food with you. 382 E. Fourth Ave., 801-364-8558

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STORE

Mandarin

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801.266.4182

If operating two of the south valley’s finest whitetablecloth restaurant experiences wasn’t enough, chef Ken Rose opened The Wild Rose at The District in South Jordan. The menu differs from his other ventures (Tiburon Fine Dining, Epic Casual Dining) with a more eclectic mix for the adventurous palate. Start off with the diver scallops or steamed clams, then work your way into something that sounds as delicious as it tastes, such as the beef tenderloin with ruby-port demi-glace and a hint of dark chocolate, sliver of artisan blue cheese and creamy mashed potatoes. But you can’t really go wrong with anything at the Rose. 11516 S. District Main Drive, South Jordan, 801-790-7673, wildrose-district.com


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Delivering Attitude for 40 years! Mo’ Bettahs

It’s no surprise that Mo’ Bettahs caught on in Utah: The portions are huge and meaty, and its famous macaroni salad takes a page right out of the mayo-centric Mormon cookbook. The menu is full of gigantic, carnivorous portions, with a distinct lack of anything resembling a vegetable. A tip for first-time diners: Underestimate how hungry you are before ordering. The mini katsu chicken ($6.99), for example, consists of two large chicken breasts, battered and fried in crispy katsu fashion, served with softball-sized scoops of rice and macaroni salad—it’s anything but mini. For diners seeking the full effect, the mixed plate is a good option. The mini ekolu ($11.55) comes with three choices of meat, but the mini mixed plate ($6.85) or regular mixed plate ($10.50) are typically enough for one hungry diner. Among the three meat options, I tend to favor the teriyaki steak—a flavorful pile of sliced beef that pairs well with the rice and macaroni. If a ton of meat is right up your alley, then this place will be one of your favorite fast-casual joints; diners in search of more variety will want to scope out other pastures. Reviewed Sept. 13. Multiple locations, mobettahs.com

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: PRESENTS

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A weekly video


30 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

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CINEMA

FILM REVIEW

Everything Old Is New Again

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

A fresh take on A Star Is Born both elevates and hinders it. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga in A Star Is Born momentum, even as he shows an impressive eye behind the camera, with arresting images like Jackson in profile while Ally’s backup dancers perform in the background, reduced to alien-like dark shapes straight out of the climax of Close Encounters of the Third Kind. By the time A Star Is Born heads toward its emotional climax—slight spoiler alert for anyone who hasn’t seen any of the previous versions: They don’t live happily ever after—it’s clear that Cooper wants to stick to his guns with a spin on this story that’s grittier, more realistic and more psychologically grounded. The flip-side of such a commitment is that components that worked previously in the context of glossy melodrama feel awkward and ill-conceived here. Cooper is clearly in tune enough with the history of this story that he opts to include touchstones like an embarrassing incident at an awards show, and the “I just wanted to take another look at you” line that has already been memed to death. He simply had a unique vision for that story, and the distinctive choices that make this A Star Is Born good are inextricable from the reasons it’s not quite great. CW

A STAR IS BORN

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BBB Bradley Cooper Lady Gaga Sam Elliott R

TRY THESE A Star Is Born (1954) Judy Garland James Mason NR

A Star Is Born (1976) Barbra Streisand Kris Kristofferson R

American Sniper (2014) Bradley Cooper Sienna Miller R

OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 31

A Star Is Born (1937) Janet Gaynor Fredric March NR

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childhood, manifested most visibly in his complicated relationship with his older half-brother/de facto caretaker Bobby (Sam Elliott). Similarly, Cooper is willing to spend a lot more time on the foundations of the romance, including a terrific scene in a grocery store parking lot where mutual artistic respect and physical attraction twist and turn around their unequal status. That scene is also the first—but far from last—indication that Lady Gaga is a natural talent as a lead actor. It’s more than her ability to read a line convincingly; she nails body language at almost every opportunity, conveying from the outset a kind of incredulousness that this famous man is paying attention to her, without it ever feeling like a girlish case of being star-struck. That same physical performance shines through in Ally’s first stage appearance with Jackson, which pulses with the emotion of someone getting a chance she never thought was possible— and, it bears saying, with the effectiveness of “Shallow,” one of the many great original songs co-written by Gaga. For its first hour, A Star Is Born feels like it’s on track to leave every one of its predecessors in the dust. The downside of such a strong start is that much of the middle third of the movie feels doughy and unfocused by comparison. A key dynamic in that section becomes Ally’s transformation from budding singersongwriter to packaged-and-choreographed pop diva, with Jackson trying to keep her on course even as his own career and ability to manage his addictions deteriorate. Cooper simply finds it hard to maintain narrative

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hy do you tell a familiar story again? That’s both a rhetorical and a genuine question, especially when it comes to mainstream movies in the 21st century. Financially, there’s security in returning to reboots and remakes, as most of the name-recognition marketing work is already done for you. But for a creative person, you have to hope it’s exactly the opposite: that they see an opportunity to do something different with a familiar concept. Three previous incarnations of A Star Is Born laid the foundation for an archetypal tale of mentorship, tragic romance and the fickle nature of fame. So what would co-star/co-writer/director Bradley Cooper bring to the premise that wasn’t already there in 1937, 1954 or 1976? He sticks closest to the ’76 incarnation, choosing the music world rather than movies for his milieu. Cooper plays Jackson Maine, a popular troubadour rock star who’s wrestling with demons, substance abuse and—in a twist for this version—progressive hearing loss. After one gig, he stumbles into a bar where he finds part-time singer Ally (Lady Gaga) performing. Sparks fly, and soon Jackson is encouraging Ally to appear on stage with him, sending her career on a rising trajectory that will, inevitably, intersect with his own falling stardom. It’s clear fairly early on that Cooper has a distinct concept for building the personalities of these two characters, and their budding romance. Where earlier versions of A Star Is Born did little to explore the history behind the male protagonist’s addictions, this one digs deeper into Jackson’s troubled


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32 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS

EIGHTH GRADE At Park City Film Series, Oct. 5-6, 8 p.m.; Oct. 7, 6 p.m. (R)

NEW THIS WEEK

KUSO At Tower Theatre, Oct. 5-6, 11 p.m.; Oct. 7, noon. (NR)

Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net ARMY OF DARKNESS [not reviewed] Shop smart. Shop S-Mart. Opens Oct. 5 at Tower Theatre. (R) BEETLEJUICE [not reviewed] Happy 30th anniversary. Opens Oct. 5 at Tower Theatre. (PG) MONSTERS AND MEN [not yet reviewed] Drama about the impact of a police shooting of an AfricanAmerican man on several characters. Opens Oct. 5 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) A STAR IS BORN BBB See review on p. 44. Opens Oct. 5 at theaters valleywide. (R) VENOM [not yet reviewed] A man (Tom Hardy) is infected by a symbiotic alien organism. Opens Oct. 5 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR At Main Library, Oct. 10, 2 p.m. (PG-13) A DOG’S LIFE/THE IDLE CLASS At Edison Street Events, Oct. 4-5, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES BLAZE BBB.5 Director Ethan Hawke profiles Blaze Foley (Ben Dickey), a country-music singer-songwriter whose compositions were recorded by stars like Merle Haggard and John Prine, but who never himself found success in his lifetime. Some of the usual suspects are involved—including alcoholism—which would have made it easy to fall victim to cliché. But in adapting the memoir by Foley’s wife Sybil (Alia Shawkat), Hawke employs an achronological structure that weaves between timelines in a way that’s not just unconventional, but enthralling. Dickey, a non-professional actor, does remarkable work as Foley, capturing a lively raconteur who’s also a haunted, isolated soul. Where many films of this kind would emphasize the moment when people know they’re listening to creative genius, here we see performances where musicians are mostly ignored, with characters wandering out of frame as songs play in the distance. (R)—Scott Renshaw THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS BBB.5 Horror schlockmeister Eli Roth turns his hand to kiddie scares, and offers entry-level spookiness for budding fright fans. When a newly orphaned gradeschooler (Owen Vaccaro) is sent to live with his weird uncle (Jack Black), he discovers a haunted house, a witchy neighbor (Cate Blanchett) and mysteries galore. A few unexpectedly clever gross-outs—jack-o’-lantern vomit!—and some deeply unsettling-though-still-PG-creepy imagery meets sweetly old-fashioned foggy cemeteries in a fantasy retro 1950s

that’s just a little bit steampunk. There’s a lot of stuff crammed into this little movie, but somehow it all works together, particularly thanks to the cast. While Blanchett vamps it up deliciously, Black tones down his mania, and they meet in a comic middle that is perfectly pitched. Someone in Hollywood demanded, “Get me the next Harry Potter!” Dang if they didn’t get pretty close. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson LITTLE WOMEN B What girl who grew up sharing the dreams and disappointments of the March sisters wouldn’t want to see them in today’s world? But this modern-day retelling is embarrassingly misjudged, so earnest a transfer that these sisters feel unrecognizable as 21stcentury girls and women. The notorious yet admired temper of Jo (Sarah Davenport) appears here only as a kind of selfish cruelty, and her writerly ambitions manifest in a wildly unsophisticated sense of how modern publishing works. The other characters are a mash of blandness: eldest Meg (Melanie Stone); “boring” Beth (Allie Jennings); baby Amy (Elise Jones as a child; Taylor Murphy as a young adult); neighbor and surrogate brother Laurie (Lucas Grabeel); etc. The stiltedness of everything we endure here is a problem, mostly for the resulting bloodlessness. No adaptation of Little Women should lack passion like this one does. (PG-13)—MAJ NIGHT SCHOOL B.5 Night School  has, at most, four laughs and one heartwarming speech—a crummy ratio for 111 minutes. Teddy (Kevin Hart), trying to get his G.E.D. so a buddy can hook him up with a finance job, attends night school, where hard-ass teacher Carrie (Tiffany Haddish) is determined to make him learn. So far, so good. Unfortunately, there’s too much Hart, not enough Haddish, and she’s left to (mostly) play the straight man. The supporting players—including Romany Malco, Mary Lynn Rajskub and Taran Killam—get the wacky stuff, while Hart and Haddish are left holding the plot bag. This is what happens to a cut-and-paste-

job script with six credited writers, kids: You get a movie that doesn’t know what it is, and takes forever to get there. Stay in school, and learn to write better movies than this one. (PG-13) —David Riedel

PICK OF THE LITTER BBB Co-directors Don Hardy Jr. and Dana Nachman spend two years following five siblings from a Labrador retriever litter as they’re trained by volunteers for Northern California-based Guide Dogs for the Blind to work with vision-impaired people. There are a few mildly dramatic turns along the way—not all litter-mates turn out to have the right stuff—and some earned emotion from the work put in by trainers who become attached to the puppies, only to have to surrender them at one point or another. Mostly, it’s an intriguing study of the effort involved in preparing dogs to know not just how to obey, but when to disobey if obeying puts their vision-impaired handler in danger. It’s a solidly made paean to people who help others have more freedom in their lives—and it doesn’t hurt that the doggos are adorable. (NR)—SR

SMALLFOOT BBB How will parents feel about an animated adventure where the message is “reject well-meaning religious dogma when it foments division?” In a Himalayan community of yetis, Migo (Channing Tatum) encounters a human “smallfoot,” which rocks his world-view since yetis are taught that such creatures do not exist. Migo eventually befriends a TV nature-show host (James Corden) despite their language barrier, but the narrative focuses on how Migo and the rest of his community process empirical information contrary to their faith. The visual world-building feels thin at times, along with characterizations like the chief priest’s rebellious daughter (Zendaya). But a couple of catchy musical numbers and solid physical comedy keep the energy level high enough to be satisfying, while the story offers young viewers a much-needed lesson in realizing that facing reality is the only way to make the world better. (PG)—SR

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New City Movement celebrates 20 years of electronic music and human connection with big night at Bricks.

U

SATURDAY, OCT 6 Utah @ Stanford 8:30 pm

free game boards for prizes

BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

MNF OCT 9th WASHINGTON @ NEW ORLEANS

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BRENT ROWLAND

@ 6:15 PM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6

Jesse Walker

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OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 33

165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

| CITY WEEKLY |

Bricks 579 W. 200 South Saturday, Oct. 6 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $20 presale; $25 day of show 18+ main room only; 21+ all areas ncm.newcitymovement.com

9PM - NO COVER

NEW CITY MOVEMENT: 20 YEARS DEEP FEAT. DOC MARTIN AND MORE

YOU TOPPLE OVER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

the V School web development boot camp. On the New City Movement Main Stage, Martin, Walker and Chaseone2 will spin hours of mind-bending bass, while the breakdancing Body Roc Crew will entertain alongside drag personalities like Princess Kennedy, Willard, Lady Façade, Mona Diet, Slime Baby and Obsidian. “We all know each other because the scene’s so tight-knit here,” Walker says. “All of these artists constantly surprise me—everyone knows how to have a good time, and we all support each other.” Walker also extends major credit to his old friend Jared Gold, who collaborated on elements of 20 Years Deep’s design, along with DJ Matthew Fit, who has helped with New City Movement’s strategy in recent years. “Coming from the Detroit area, he’s brought a techno perspective to what we’re doing,” Walker says. “We’re constantly trying to adapt and learn something about ourselves and our craft in the process. But the basic reason for our existence hasn’t changed: wanting to go out, dance and play good music for people of all genders, all sexual orientations and all backgrounds. People are the key, ultimately—the more diverse the better. House and techno music has a way of breaking down the barriers. It’s a momentary utopia.” At its core, 20 Years Deep celebrates that inclusive spirit, one that Walker believes is best celebrated at night. “Growing up, I was always interested in the counterculture,” he says. “That’s when you can discover a true sense of freedom, and that’s what I’ve always wanted to do with New City Movement. If you feel something special at one of our events, reinterpret it somehow and share it, through music or art or dancing or emotion. It would be cool if people made the world a better place because of something we helped to create together.” CW

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n 1994, ambitious young fashion designer Jared Gold came up with an audacious plan: Bring in Doc Martin, a big-name West Coast DJ, to elevate Utah’s house music scene and put Salt Lake City on the international map. Gold teamed up with budding DJ Jesse Walker, then spinning under the moniker DJ Send, to help promote the Wild Planet party at The Vortex, then located at 10 Exchange Place. By attracting an esteemed Los Angeleno like Martin, who was famous for his role incubating the California warehouse rave scene, Gold and Walker made a name for themselves—one that eventually morphed into a whole new movement. “Doc was at the pinnacle of the rave/club scene,” Walker says, “and when he came through in ’94, he not only destroyed The Vortex—he changed my perception of what DJs could do. His mixing had an urgency with human imperfections that felt like a freight train barreling down the tracks. He was playing old and new music I’d never heard. He completely blew everyone’s minds. He was supportive, too, providing us with an education in the DJ life.” Walker applied those lessons to full-time work at The Vortex, followed by semi-regular gigs at Bricks, Club Manhattan and Holy Cow under the tutelage of local icons Stephen “Bam Bam” Santoro, Ryan Raddon and Jimi McCagno. By 1998, when Walker and Chicago native Sergio Hernandez started a weekly DJ night at Manhattan, they developed a concept—New City Movement—that promoted futurism and abstract thinking in underground music, design and culture. “We hoped that our sheer optimism might result in a more colorful Salt Lake City,” Walker says. “We didn’t want to just copy or follow national trends. We wanted to embrace the weirdness and freedom of this place to invent what came next.” Now, Walker has assembled what he calls “the party to end all parties”—a 20 Years Deep tribute to the past that also highlights the scene’s never-ending evolution. On Saturday, Oct. 6, Doc Martin headlines (on just his fourth trip back to Utah in a quartercentury) alongside 12 other local DJs spread across three rooms at Bricks. In recent years, the club has opened only for select events, but in the ’90s, it was “the place” for dance music, Walker says. “Bricks is where a lot of SLC found their ultimate groove. It was one of the first venues where gay and straight culture started coming together as one. That’s a huge reason we’re having this 20 Years Deep party there. We can tie back to our history and put a bow on it.” That bow will tie up several strands of Salt Lake City club culture. Local beatmakers, label heads, techno producers and City Weekly DJ contest winners UTA Trax, Flash & Flare, Finale Grand, J. Godina and Bo York will take charge in the Fice Eats Beats Lounge sponsored by downtown’s Fice Gallery. On the V School Technotronic Rooftop, party rockers Choice, Typefunk, Artemis, Serge and Easy embody the innovative spirit of Mo Reeder, who co-founded

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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 10/4

Ozzy Osbourne, Stone Sour, Zakk Wylde

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, HOWARD HARDEE, NICK McGREGOR & LEE ZIMMERMAN

It’s rare to find an artist with such a strange array of public personas. But that’s Ozzy Osbourne, fearsome frontman and wailing banshee whose stint at the helm of Black Sabbath made him an icon of heavy metal mania. Solo, Ozzy retained his trademark demonic designs—dripping gobs of fake blood, biting the heads off hapless bats, crazed campiness and more. Then there was the mumble-mouthed Ozzy, the clueless head of household on one of television’s landmark reality series, The Osbournes. However, to truly do Ozzy justice, we’d also note that he’s a Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Famer and Grammywinning singer/songwriter who professes fervent belief in a higher power. Currently making the rounds on the No More Tours 2 trek—a belated follow-up to 1992’s No More Tours tour, which itself played off of Ozzy’s solo mega-hit “No More Tears”—Ozzy can also be credited with five decades of success playing the devil’s devotee while selling some 100 million records in the process. Make no mistake: Tour title aside, this isn’t the end for Ozzy. “I’m not retiring!” he said in a statement. “I’m still doing gigs. I’m still going to do shows. I’m just not doing world tours anymore.” Thank goodness the Crazy Train hasn’t run off the rails just yet. (Lee Zimmerman) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, West Valley City, 7:30 p.m., $29.50-$350, all ages, usana-amp.com

MARK WEISS

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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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34 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

LIVE

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

FRIDAY 10/5

Cut Worms, Michael Rault

Cut Worms is the musical project of Mac Clarke, a Brooklyn-based devotee of vintage recording methods and ’60s-style pop ballads that recall the Everly Brothers and The Kinks. On his most recent album, Hollow Ground, Clarke’s songs—all recorded to 8-track tape— sound warm, grainy and scratchy, especially when his voice rises to a climax. It’s almost like Cut Worms’ music comes through a station wagon radio that can’t quite handle the decibels. Clarke’s voice lands somewhere between Bob Dylan and John Denver, and the latter comparison is reinforced by liberal use of a “Rocky Mountain High”-style reverb and a lightly strummed soft-rock aesthetic. The overall impression is ephemeral, otherworldly and timeless. But wait! There’s more retro stuff on the bill: Supporting Cut Worms is Canadian singer-songwriter and guitarist Michael Rault, a fellow nostalgic who dredges the depths of rock history to create his own multi-layered sound. His latest album, It’s a New Day Tonight, falls in line with the folk-rock of yesteryear, referencing the lush

arrangements of Paul McCartney and Wings, Badfinger and Big Star. The bass lines bounce like an old soul record—Rault recorded the album at Brooklyn’s Daptone Studios—and an admirable sense of melody pairs well with the grooves. Critics might argue that Cut Worms and Michael Rault both lean too heavily on the past, but we’re not those critics. (Howard Hardee) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 7:30 p.m., $12, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc

Trevor Powers, mmph

Don’t expect an easy go with the glitchy, eviscerated electronica of Boise resident Trevor Powers, who previously plied his trade under the name Youth Lagoon. That’s precisely the point, however: After years spent burying his high-pitched vocals under a gauze of guitars, Powers puts his voice front and center on 2018’s Mulberry Violence—alongside a few thousand after-effects and auditory glitches, of course. Finding inspiration in the graphic work of Francis Bacon, Sister Gertrude Morgan

Ozzy Osbourne and Harry Clarke, Powers spent two years pasting cut-up pictures on his wall and building a sonic library informed by traditional jazz, industrial pop and brutal noise, all before he ever wrote a note of Mulberry Violence’s 10 songs. He then released them in an equally compelling fashion, crafting couplets of interconnected tracks that ricochet from trip-hop to trance and R&B to krautrock. Seeing how Powers translates such schizophrenia to the stage should be interesting; Mulberry Violence’s vivid visuals demonstrate as much forethought as the music does. “My only concern in art is following the visions,” Powers recently told Ad Hoc. “Those rapturous flashes of imagination direct every stride. Ideas truly are phantoms, and life is far less grand and appealing if those phantoms aren’t chased.” (Nick McGregor) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $13 presale; $15 day of show; 21+, metromusichall.com


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fri: Whiskeyfish

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OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 35


LIGHTBOX REVELATION

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36 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

LIVE

SATURDAY 10/6

Suicidal Tendencies, Madball, Villain Poonhammer

There’s one word that sparks fear in the hearts of music fans everywhere: hiatus. Some bands never recover from it, but Suicidal Tendencies are survivors. After multiple breakups and almost 30 lineup changes, the group is back again—and that’s all because of frontman Mike Muir’s 40-year perseverance. From Grammy nominations and forming his own record label, to other frontman gigs for Infectious Grooves and a solo project called Cyco Miko, to being hailed as an icon by the Skateboarding Hall of Fame, Muir is an underground powerhouse. The only remaining original member of ST, Muir never considered himself a singer—and still doesn’t. Now a father, he even assures his family that he’s never been a rock star. In fact, Muir founded the band in 1980 not to get famous, but to rebel against the robotic “do what you’re told” music industry. After a dozen albums, Muir recruited living legend Dave Lombardo of Slayer to join Tendencies for 2016’s World Gone Mad—an easy decision for Lombardo. “Suicidal influenced me to step up my game as far as energy,” he told Billboard about seeing ST live in 1982. However, the godfathers of crossover thrash were reportedly on the verge of yet another hiatus last year. So in true Muir fashion, they waited until things got quiet and released another LP, Still Cyco Punk After All These Years. And with another LP comes another tour. In Salt Lake City, they share the stage with another hardest-working-band-ever candidate, NYC’s Madball. (Rachelle Fernandez)

Suicidal Tendencies The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $24.50, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

Tony Holiday & The Velvetones, Ol’ Fashion Depot

We’re losing one of our own. Tony Holiday, a Salt Lake City institution who helped integrate the blues basics into the local music scene, is making a move to Memphis. Known for his fiery harp work (and his prominent tattoos), Holiday has helmed several local outfits through the years, most notably The Velvetones. “I’m moving to Memphis to pursue the next level of my music career,” Holiday says via email, while also noting that his longtime musical partner Landon Stone will relocate as well. A founder of the Utah Blues Society and winner of 2016’s City Weekly Music Awards for Best in State Blues Artist, Holiday specializes in the funk or jump style of blues—sometimes lovingly referred to by Holiday as dirtbag blues. Still, he avoids categorization, venturing into country and rockabilly realms as well. But it’s his passion, purpose and dedication we’ll miss the most. Holiday’s performance at The State Room is being billed as his last local show, and he’s joined by a three-piece horn section and organist Jeremy Abernathy; blues protégés Ol’ Fashion Depot open. “We will miss Salt Lake City and the Utah Blues Society very much,” Holiday adds. “However, we hope to be back here as much as possible.” In the meantime, let’s plan to bid him a fond farewell. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $15, 21+, thestateroom.com


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AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

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38 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

WEDNESDAY 10/10

CONCERTS & CLUBS

WILLIAM ALEXANDER BROWN

Michael Nau & The Mighty Thread, Erin Rae, Static Replica

THURSDAY 10/4 LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman (Silver Star Cafe) The Buttertones + Prettiest Eyes (Kilby Court) Coastlands + Hemwick + I Hear Sirens + Modisa (Metro Music Hall) Eric Leadbetter Music (The Lighthouse) Gregory Alan Isakov + Joshua James (Eccles Theater) I’m With Her + The Brothers Brothers (De Jong Concert Hall) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Mehxai Jxnes + Sadida + Cambow + Troy Frescco (The Loading Dock) Ozzy Osbourne + Stone Sour + Zakk Wylde (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 32 The Oxford Comma (Beehive Social Club) Reggae at the Royal feat. Audic Empire + TreeHouse! + Bubba Love (The Royal) The Steel Wheels + The Hollering Pines (The State Room)

Nearly 10 years ago, before setting off on a long road trip, a dear friend pressed a copy of Cotton Jones’ Paranoid Cocoon into my hand. As I popped the burned CD in while the sun set slowly and the hills of North Carolina stretched for miles, Michael Nau’s rich, relaxed baritone shifted something significant in my musicloving mind. Here was melancholia and joy, languor and fear, nostalgia and hope, all mashed into one gentle psychedelic blend. Lyrical themes and acoustic riffs repeated themselves across the album, yet that surreal happenstance only added to the unmistakable aura, which has deepened on Nau’s subsequent releases (another Cotton Jones LP, two full-lengths under his given name, this year’s Michael Nau & The Mighty Thread). Call it easygoing. Call it “good vibes only.” Call it classic country filtered through a psych-folk lens. Call it boring, even—some people, shame on them, have. For me, every new song and every new tour from Michael Nau and his rotating band of supporting merry-makers leads me back to that original trip down the Paranoid Cocoon rabbit hole: sun gleaming in my eyes, future uncertain, ribbon of road unfolding ahead, and the best damn soundtrack I could think of on repeat. If that feeling sounds like one you’d like to capture, consider this laid-back Wednesday night show a must. (Nick McGregor) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $10 presale; $12 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Wicked Bears + Sunsleeper + Telesomniac + Gardenside (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

DJ Chaseone2 + Jared Hill (Lake Effect) DJ Naomi (Sun Trapp) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Live Jazz (Sugar House Coffee) Open Mic Night (Rye) Robyn Cage (Prime Piano Bar) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Green Velvet (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 10/5 Angra (Liquid Joe’s) Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons (Garage on Beck) Assuming We Survive + Riot Child (The Loading Dock) Bachata Fest (UCCU Center) Carrie Myers (Handlebar) Coldhart + Phobia the Greatest + No Soul + Nike HD (Gold Blood Collective) Colly (Lighthouse Lounge) Cut Worms + Michael Rault (Diabolical Records) see p. 32 Dubwise + Djunya + Syn.Aesthetic + illoom (Urban Lounge) Grey Glass + Kenton + The Wanna Go + Evan Sharp (Velour) Jeremy Zucker + Carlie Hanson (Kilby Court) Lorin Walker Madsen (Stockman’s Bar)

Note of Passage (The Bayou) Rick Gerber + The Bookends (The Yes Hell) Simply B (Hog Wallow Pub) Take 5 (Silver Star Cafe) Talia Keys (Harp and Hound) Trevor Powers + mmph (Metro Music Hall) see p. 32

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 + Matt Calder + Swantourage (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Dolph (Downstairs) DJ Jason Lowe (The Royal) DJ Request (Outlaw Saloon) DJ Shutter (Sun Trapp) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second)


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CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

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Guitar Center Salt Lake City Jam Night 2018 (The Ice Haus) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Local Only (Club Ibiza) Mountain West Entertainment (The Spur) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 10/6 LIVE MUSIC

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10.04 SIMPLY B

10.05 MUDDPUDDLE

10.6 BUFFALO VS. TRAIN

10.12 SCENIC BYWAY

10.13 THE J. S. LAWRENCE GROUP

OCTOBER 4, 2018 | 39

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

| CITY WEEKLY |

DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Jarvicious (The Chakra Lounge) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez + Sin City Soul (Lake Effect) DJ Request (Outlaw Saloon) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. Joe Maz (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Silver Strike (The Spur)

10.03 DYLAN ROE

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER

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Contact Eric at 801-205-8080 or eric@esoaudioarts.com

The Blushing Violets (Garage on Beck) Buffalo Vs. Train (Hog Wallow Pub) Chris Cutz (Downstairs) Doc Marten + Jesse Walker + Chaseone2 + more (Bricks) see p. 31 Harvest Fest (DeJoria Center) Latin Jazz Factory (The Bayou) Lee Roessler + Aly Aleigha (St. Catherine of Siena Newman Center) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Lorin Walker Madsen (Donkey Tails Cantina) Mark Dee (Handlebar) Mountain Arts and Music Festival (Huntsville Square) Monster Magnet + Electric Citizen + Dark Sky Choir (Urban Lounge) Rhythm Junction + Jana and The Rebels + Kid Brother (The Royal) Savage Daughters + A Deer A Horse + Eyesore (Diabolical Records) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Suicidal Tendencies + Madball + Villain Poonhammer (The Complex) see p. 34 Tom Bennett (Harp and Hound) Triggers + Slips (Hop Wallow Pub) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones + Ol’ Fashion Depot (The State Room) see p. 34 You Topple Over (Johnny’s on Second) Will Baxter Band (The Yes Hell)

Enjoy Fall on the Valley’s Best Patio!


OKTOBERFEST AT SNOWBIRD

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

40 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

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KARAOKE

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Fall is in the air—that special time of seasonal lattes and UGG boots has descended upon Utah, along with the return of Snowbird’s perennial Oktoberfest. Historians trace the original Oktoberfest back to Bavaria, Germany, in 1810 under King Ludwig. However, the roots of Snowbird’s Oktoberfest started a little later—in 1973. Almost a half-century on, I find myself wading through a lake of Hefeweizen and chatting with Oktoberfest veterans, who know that the Plaza Deck houses the real party. This is where the good German beer is sold, and this year is all about the Dunkel—the Hefeweissbier Dunkel by Weihenstephaner, to be exact. From the place that holds the title for oldest continuously operating brewery in the world—it originally opened in 1040—this hef was the perfect dessert to my smoked brisket sandwich and Ultimate Waffle covered in Nutella and vanilla ice cream. Yeah, it was a cheat day. Back off—only Judy can judge me. I mean, how could one have any regrets with a view of the beautiful soon-to-be snow-capped Wasatch Mountains in front of them while photo-bombing random people with a Dunkel in hand? After enjoying some oom-pah music, my cousin Halle (a die-hard Oktoberfest patron) and I went to pet the pups of the Wasatch Backcountry Rescue Crew. There’s never a dull moment at Snowbird’s Oktoberfest celebration of bier, from beard and mustache competitions to live music and bratwursteating competitions. Best of all, this Utah tradition runs for a whole ’nother month, every Saturday and Sunday until Oct. 21. (Rachelle Fernandez) 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, 801-933-2222, snowbird.com/oktoberfest

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Del Suelo (The Depot) Fickle Friends + Bulow + Belle Jewel (Kilby Court) Jared Hill (The Spur) Jerry Paper + Kiefer + Stimulator Jones + Prophet (Metro Music Hall) Mystic Braves + The Creation Factory + Season of The Witch (Urban Lounge) Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Owl City + Matthew Thiessen + The Earthquakes (The Complex) Reel Big Fish + Ballyhoo! + We Are the Union (The Complex) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

Saylor (Lake Effect) Jazz at The Station (Union Station) Live Jazz (Club 90) Live Jazz (Sugar House Coffee) Meg Myers + Adam Jones (The State Room) Michael Nau & The Mighty Thread + Erin Rae + Static Replica (Urban Lounge) see p. 36 Palisades + Dayseeker + Savage Hands (Kilby Court) Ritual Talk + Your Meteor + Uvluv + Fairpark Twins (Metro Music Hall) The Score + The Orphan The Poet + Birthday (The Complex)

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© 2018

OUT OF ORDER

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Month with two natl. holidays 2. The Cavaliers, on scoreboards 3. Stat for A-Rod or Hammerin' Hank 4. Prey for a barracuda 5. Clichéd company slogan 6. Reject, as a lover 7. Org. 8. Root word? 9. "Solve for x" subj. 10. Grp. with a co-pay 11. Tutti-____ 12. Fall

50. Politico Hatch 54. Schooner sail 55. Inventory at a fertility clinic 56. Gives birth to 57. Org. with millimeter wave scanners 58. Rower's blade 59. Place for salt on a margarita glass 60. Word after sports or training

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

13. It gets in hot water 18. English horn, e.g. 21. Male delivery 22. Small salmon 23. In ____ of 24. A long way off 25. Swashbuckling Flynn 26. Explore, as the Internet 27. "____ Silver, away!" 28. Get blubbery 31. "____ sera" 32. Georgia's capital: Abbr. 34. "I could ____ horse!" 35. 2004-11 Lakers forward Lamar ____ 36. Many a one-star Yelp review 37. Singer with the 4x platinum album "No Angel" 38. Italian novelist Vittorini 39. Alphabet trio 42. What a slalom path has 43. ____ training 44. Squaring (with) 45. It's nothing 46. "Je vous en ____" ("You're welcome": French) 47. Depletes 49. One-named New Ager

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. L.L. Bean competitor 6. Woman's name meaning "princess" 11. Diet of Jack Sprat's wife 14. "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" playwright 15. "The Lord is my shepherd ...," e.g. 16. Lament 17. "Mr. Supreme Court justice, sit on a corner of a Monopoly board with all your weight!" 19. Tony winner Hagen 20. Prefix with space 21. It's ripped off at the movies 22. "Pa! That Supreme Court justice pulled the trigger on your wife!" 28. Like salon customers 29. Making a mess of 30. Actress Perlman of "Cheers" 31. HBO series that won 2018 Emmys for Lead Actor and Supporting Actor 33. Accusation from a justice to a lawyer, perhaps ... or what can be said to 17-, 22-, 48- and 54-Across? 40. "Be ____ ..." ("Help me out ...") 41. Has a bug 42. Hold back 46. "Meet the Press" guest, maybe 48. "Ms. Supreme Court justice, don't forget about city chiefs, as well!" 51. Congress, with "the" 52. Grammy-winning singer India.____ 53. Three-time Frazier foe 54. "Mr. Supreme Court justice, give your sphere a break!" 61. Write 62. First in a line of Russian autocrats 63. TWA competitor 64. Printemps follower 65. Washtub 66. Italian city known for its prosciutto and cheese

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson offers this observation: “When you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. [But] the most successful people in life recognize that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation.” I think Tyson’s simple wisdom is exactly what you need to hear right now, Libra. You’re primed for a breakthrough in your ability to create your own fate. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Japanese entrepreneur Hiroki Terai has created a business that offers crying therapy. His clients watch short videos specially formulated to make them weep. A professional helper is on hand to gently wipe their tears away and provide comforting words. “Tears have relaxing and healing effects,” says an Okinawan musician who works as one of the helpers. Hiroki Terai adds, “It has been said that one drop of tear has the effect of relieving stress for a week.” I wish there were a service like this near where you live, Scorpio. The next two weeks will be a perfect time to relieve pent-up worry and sadness and anxiety through cathartic rituals like crying. What other strategies might work for you? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Fling out friendly feelers! Sling out interesting invitations! Figure out how to get noticed for all the right reasons! Make yourself so interesting that no one can resist your proposals! Use your spunky riddle-solving powers to help ease your tribe’s anxieties. Risk looking odd if that will make you smarter! Plunk yourself down in pivotal places where vitality is welling up! Send out telepathic beams that say, “I’m ready for sweet adventure. I’m ready for invigorating transformation!”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Researchers in Maryland have created a new building material with a strength-to-weight ratio that’s eight times better than steel. It’s an effective insulator, and in some forms can be bent and folded. Best of all, it’s biodegradable and cost-effective. The stuff is called nanowood, and is derived from lightweight, fast-growing trees like balsa. I propose that we make it your main metaphor for the foreseeable future. Why? Because I think you’re primed to locate or create your own version of a flexible, durable, robust building block. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The U.S. Secretary of Defense paid an official visit to Indonesia early this year. The government arranged for him to observe soldiers as they demonstrated how tough and well-trained they were. Some of the troops shimmied through broken glass, demolished bricks with their heads, walked through fire and bit heads off snakes. I hope you won’t try stunts like that in the coming weeks, Gemini. It will be a favorable time for you show off your skills and make strong impressions. You’ll be wise to impress important people with how creative and resourceful you are. But there’s no need to try too hard or resort to exaggeration.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): i confess that i have a fuzzy self-image. With odd regularity, i don’t seem to know exactly what or who i am. For example, i sometimes think i’m so nice and polite that i need to toughen up. But on other occasions i feel my views are so outrageous and controversial that i should tone myself down. Which is true? Often, i even neglect to capitalize the word “i.” You have probably experienced some of this fuzziness, my fellow Cancerian. But you’re now in a favorable phase to cultivate a more definitive self-image. Here’s a helpful AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As a young man, Aquarian poet Louis Dudek struck up a cor- tip: We Cancerians have a natural talent for inspiring people to respondence with renowned poet Ezra Pound, who was 32 years love us. This ability will come in especially handy as we work on older. Dudek “admired him immensely,” and “loved him for the making an enduring upgrade from i to I. Our allies’ support and joy and the luminosity” of his poetry, but also resented him “for feedback will fuel our inner efforts to clarify our identity. being so magnificent.” With a mix of mischief and adulation, Dudek wrote a poem to his hero. It included these lines: “For LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Christ’s sake, you didn’t invent sunlight. There was sun dazzle “I am a little afraid of love, it makes me rather stupid.” So said before you. But you talk as if you made light or discovered it.” author Simone de Beauvoir in a letter she wrote to her lover, I hope his frisky tone might inspire you to try something similar Nelson Algren. I’m happy to let you know, Leo, that during the with your own idols. It would be healthy to be more playful and next 12 months, love is likely to have the opposite effect on you. lighthearted about anything or anyone you take too seriously or According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it will tend to make you smarter and more perceptive. To the degree that give enormous power to. you expand your capacity for love, you will become more resilient and a better decision-maker. As you get the chance to express PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his book Till We Have Faces, C. S. Lewis writes, “Holy places love with utmost skill and artistry, you will awaken dormant are dark places. It is life and strength, not knowledge and words, potentials and boost your personal power. that we get in them. Holy wisdom is not clear and thin like water, but thick and dark like blood.” In that spirit, and in accordance VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): with astrological omens, I suggest you seek out dark holy places Your theme in the coming weeks is the art of attending to details. that evoke wonder and reverence, even awe. Hopefully, you will But wait! I said “the art.” That means attending to details be inspired thereby to bring new beauty into your life. You’ll with panache, not with overly meticulous fussing. For inspirabe purged of trivial concerns and become receptive to a fresh tion, meditate on St. Francis Xavier’s advice, “Be great in little things.” And let’s take his thought a step further with a quote promise from your future life. from author Richard Shivers: “Be great in little things, and you will be given opportunity to do big things.” Novelist Tom ARIES (March 21-April 19): Electra is an action-packed story written by ancient Greek play- Robbins provides us with one more nuance: “When we accept wright Sophocles. It features epic characters taking drastic small wonders, we qualify ourselves to imagine great wonders.”

What if you learned that an important decision had been made by your local officials without following due process?

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Someone spoke to me last night, told me the truth,” writes poet Doeianne Laux. “I knew I should make myself get up, write it down, but it was late, and I was exhausted from working. Now, I remember only the flavor.” I offer these thoughts, Capricorn, in the hope that they’ll help you avoid Laux’s mistake. I’m quite sure that crucial insights and revelations will be coming your way, and I want you to do whatever’s necessary to completely capture them so you can study and meditate on them at length.

action in response to extreme events. In contrast to that text is Marcel Proust’s novel In Search of Lost Time, which draws from the sensitive author’s experiences growing up, coming of age, and falling in love, all the while in quest for meaning and beauty. Author Virginia Woolfe compared the two works, writing, “In six pages of Proust we can find more complicated and varied emotions than in the whole of the Electra.” In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend that you specialize in the Proustian mode rather than the Sophoclean. Your feelings in the next five weeks could be as rich and interesting and educational as they have been in a long time. Honor them!


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46 | OCTOBER 4, 2018

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Ticket Them!

Allow me to chime in on the urban scooter phenom. I’ve owned an electric scooter for several years and ride it downtown with pleasure—in the bike lane and on the road. I carry it on Front Runner when I go to Ogden. No, I don’t wear a helmet. I am also a UTA board member and encourage people to take mass transit whenever possible. I almost had a loud argument with a friend who thought trains aren’t accessible to folks in wheelchairs (they are). I regularly stand on the stoop of my office and encourage convention attendees at the Salt Palace to hop on Trax or a bus because public transportation downtown is free. UTA has just selected 50 people from a drawing to receive a Hive Pass or a 30-day pass for Lyft or GreenBikes so that they ditch their cars. Scooter companies weren’t part of the plan. We have two scooter companies downtown. Every kind of news media has covered them and if you live or work downtown, you’ve seen fleets of electric scooters on sidewalks, up against buildings or even broken to bits. More so, you’ve probably seen idiots riding tandem with their infants strapped to their bodies or squeezed between their legs. I have no issue with them except that the riders are mostly on the sidewalks, which is completely illegal. I’ve seen scooter riders hit people as well as crash. And worse, no law enforcement appears to be ticketing these riders. Bicycles are considered vehicles in Utah, and our laws should be the same for electric scooters. According to bikeslc.com, bikes are not allowed on sidewalks in downtown Salt Lake City … nor are in-line skates and skateboards. The site has a handy map to show where wheeled transportation is and isn’t allowed in the capital city. Given that the scooters can go up to 15 mph, I think it’s only good for law enforcement to ticket these people Earlier this week, Salt Lake City drafted a set of permanent regulations for scooters. My suggestions: 1. All scooters must have a sticker and an electronic notice on the app in big bold letters that says, “Riding scooters on public sidewalks is illegal and can result in fines.” 2. Scooter companies should pay for at least 40 speed limit signs to be placed downtown where permitted. 3. Scooter companies should pay for at least four full-time scooter police via SLCPD to catch violators and ticket them. Without enforcement, there’s no hope of safety for people in wheelchairs and pedestrians on sidewalks and in crosswalks. n

Poets Corner Foray

We talked of death ‘n ernest As if death was virtues truth We lived on In spite of our misguided youth M.A. Statin

Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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Smooth Reaction A naked man opened the door to firefighters responding to a house fire in Niceville, Fla., on Aug. 27 and said “I’m sorry” before closing the door in their faces. James Cunningham, 53, later admitted to police he’d had two liters of vodka and had smoked marijuana before trying to bake cookies on his George Foreman grill, reported WPLG Local 10. The experiment went wrong when the grill and cookies caught fire, so he covered them with a dry towel, which also caught fire. Firefighters said if he’d been in the house any longer, he could have died from smoke inhalation.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Irony Lona and Joseph Johnson of Bellingham, Wash., survived the Las Vegas mass shooting last October and decided to get a dog to help with the trauma that haunted them after the incident. “We heard that dogs are good pets to help with the healing and PTSD ... and got Jax,” Joseph told the Bellingham (Washington) Herald. But on Sept. 2, neighbor Odin Maxwell, 49, shot and killed Jax, telling police the dog was chasing his chickens. An investigation showed no chickens were harmed, and Maxwell was cited for discharging a firearm.

WEIRD

Anger Management Djuan Lewis, 23, landed a new job at Benada Aluminum Products in Sanford, Fla., on Aug. 30, a Thursday. On Sunday morning, his boss fired him. WFTV reported that following his dismissal, Lewis waited for his boss for two hours outside the business, then chased him and his girlfriend for a mile and a half, shooting at their car and hitting the rear bumper, trunk and right rear tire. Neither the supervisor nor his girlfriend was hurt. Sanford police arrested Lewis and changed him with attempted murder. Questionable Judgment School resource officer and part-time police officer Maryssa Boskoski, 32, was called into a classroom at Liberty Preparatory School in Smithville, Ohio, on Aug. 30 to help rouse a sleeping student who could not be awakened by the teacher or even the principal. When Boskoski arrived, The Washington Post reported, her solution was to unholster her Taser, remove the firing cartridge and pull the trigger, causing an electric buzz that woke the student and shocked the school community. Smithville Police Chief Howard Funk placed Boskoski on unpaid leave and told WEWS news station Boskoski had been disciplined a month earlier, also for a Taserrelated incident. An investigation was ongoing.

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Bright Idea It’s one way to get a ride to lunch: Knox County (Kentucky) Sheriff’s deputies responded on Aug. 24 to a home in Corbin, where Kenneth Ray Couch, 35, had reportedly stolen a handgun. As they searched for Couch, they learned he had been transported to the hospital in an ambulance after staging a heart attack at nearby Dixon’s market. When police arrived at Corbin’s Baptist Health, WYMT reported, they found Couch in the cafeteria, which had apparently been his goal all along. Couch was arrested and charged with firstdegree burglary and falsely reporting an incident. Least-Competent Criminal Taiheem M. McKay, 23, of Riverhead, N.Y., made it easy for Suffolk County officials to track him down after suspecting him of breaking into 10 different homes over the course of seven months, stealing cash, jewelry and designer accessories. According to Newsday, the Suffolk County Department of Probation traced McKay to the burglary locations through his GPS ankle monitor, which he was wearing as a result of a February 2017 seconddegree reckless endangerment conviction. McKay has additional pending indictments in other burglaries. The Passing Parade Known for his blond mullet and numerous social media rants, zoo owner Joe Exotic (real name: Joseph Maldonado-Passage) of Wynnewood, Okla., has been cooling his heels in a Florida jail since his arrest Sept. 7 for allegedly attempting to hire two people in late 2017 to kill an unnamed woman. According to the Orlando Sentinel, one of those “killers” was an undercover FBI agent, and Exotic was indicted on federal murder-for-hire charges. It all started “many, many years” ago, said Carole Baskin of Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, who claims to be the “unnamed woman” Exotic was hoping to off. She said Exotic has threatened her repeatedly and posted online a video of himself shooting an effigy of Baskin in the head. Tangentially, Exotic was also a candidate in a three-way Libertarian primary run for governor in Oklahoma this summer. He finished third.

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Ewwww! At Kirby High School in Memphis, Tenn., things are quiet as a mouse ... or a rat. Shelby County Schools Superintendent Dorsey Hopson told the Memphis Commercial Appeal he’s looking for a temporary home for Kirby’s 800 students after closing the school Sept. 5 due to a rat infestation. The problem started in mid-August, when district personnel uncovered a rat’s nest during a renovation project. Eighty rats were trapped at the school and poison was set out. When students returned after Labor Day, poisoned rats began dying within the school’s walls and the stench became overwhelming. Calling the situation an “unavoidable act of nature,” Hopson said he expects students to return in early November.

AND UTES FANS!

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Oops New Jersey resident Gregory Lazarchick, 56, made a bad day worse on July 21 when he told greeters at Disney’s Saratoga Springs Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., he’d been sent by alQaida to “blow the place up.” According to the Orlando Sentinel, the greeters told Orange County deputies Lazarchick complained of having a bad day before issuing his threat, but deputies found no bomb-making materials in Lazarchick’s hotel room. The man’s sister reported he had suffered a head injury several years ago and sometimes said inappropriate things. The remorseful Lazarchick posted bond after his arrest for false report of a bombing.

Family Values Patricia Ann Hill, 69, of White Hall, Ark., called 911 on July 28 to report she had shot her husband, Frank, 65. But she had a motive: Patricia told Jefferson County Sheriff’s investigators she had previously disagreed with her husband’s purchase of a pornography channel on Dish Network, and she canceled the channel, telling Frank that if he reordered it, he’d have to leave. That day, reported The Pine Bluff Commercial, the Dish bill arrived, revealing that the channel had been re-added, so Patricia confronted Frank in his “man cave” and told him to go. When he refused, Patricia fetched a .22-caliber pistol from the house and shot him twice, killing him. Hill was charged with capital murder and held without bond in the Jefferson County adult detention center.

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City Weekly October 4, 2018  

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City Weekly October 4, 2018  

Shred on Arrival