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SEPT. 27, 2018 | VOL. 35 N0. 18

Dying and Living in Utah

Death is a topic most avoid talking or thinking about. But some are trying to change that. By Rich Kane


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2 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY TAKE ME TO THE OTHER SIDE

Local death doulas strive to give those in need a peaceful transition. Cover: Jude Higgins photographed by Steven Vargo, stevenvargo.com

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CONTRIBUTOR

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STEVEN VARGO

Cover image “The thing I like best about photography is the social aspect—I get to meet all different types of people,” Vargo says. Shooting death doulas for this week’s issue was “humbling and equally satisfying,” he adds. “Death is inevitable for everyone, and I’m grateful to have met people who help others face it gracefully.”

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4 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

SOAP BOX Cover package, Sept. 13, “Tour of Utah: Bookstore Edition”

Mr. Ferry, I am a true bibliophile—40,000 books! Your article failed to list some of Utah’s largest (Eborn Books) and oldest (Pete Marshall’s Utah Book & Magazine) bookstores. Eborn Books on Main Street is huge! And has three other locations (Ogden, Layton, Provo). Utah Book has been around for more than 100 years. How could you not include them in your article?

JOHN HEINERMAN, Salt Lake City

Opinion, Sept. 13, “Pot for a Prophet”

Author Michael Robinson Sr. expressed very eloquently my personal feelings in a way that was captivating. Thank you!

SURANGI DEVIDASI Via CW comments

Time for City Weekly to go out of business. Piece of liberal filth paper!

BOB ERICKSON Via Facebook

This is what I dislike about people who think that, because somebody has an opinion other than [theirs], they are liberal. I’m not a liberal; I’m not a conservative;

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

I’m not a Republican; I’m not a Democrat. I am an American and a veteran. I vote for what does America good, and lately it has not been the Republican Party. You may be wrong, but I defended your right to be wrong—and defended the right to have your opinion—but Republicans don’t give a shit about your rights and they don’t care about your opinion. Vote for your country, not your political party. Have a good day.

CHRISTOPHER LANE Via Facebook

My mom died seven years ago from the same sort of brain cancer that recently killed Sen. John McCain. It’s called glioblastoma multiforme and people do not get better from it. A CBD-heavy strain worked exceeding well to calm her seizures, lessen the strange effects of regular radiation treatments to the brain and ease pain in her final days. Compared to using morphine that left her a fuzzed-out babbling zombie, she remained a coherent person who could speak and listen. I was able to spend a lot of her last month of life with my mom instead of just being in a room beside her. I bought it illegally in Michigan and transported it across a few state lines to Pennsylvania and it was totally worth the effectiveness. Is cannabis a miracle drug?

@SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

No, but it is a lot more useful than its current DEA categorization which is the product of simple ignorance, racism and political manipulation.

BOB ERICKSON Via Facebook

News, Sept. 13, “Green Machine”

Good, we need to root out the garbage CBD oil. If you can buy it cheap in Utah, it’s probably snake oil.

JASON HUFF Via Facebook

Anywhere there is money, corruption is sure to follow.

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News, Sept. 13, “Condiments with a Side of Condoms” I love it!

SHANNON WALKER HICKMAN Via Facebook Yuck.

ANTHONY PACHECO Via Facebook I could take him. Mustard belongs on everything.

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Just the smell of mustard makes me puke.

ED TATE Via Facebook

Why? I love mustard but that is disgusting.

@CHELSEARACHAEL_816 Via Instagram

I once skipped school by drinking mustard water. Good way to throw up.

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This guy’s gunna poop gold.

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Beer Nerd, Sept. 13, “Getting Fresh” Everything Kiitos Brewing does is gold.

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Open letter to Rep. Chris Stewart

On Nov. 21 of last year, three members of Utahns for a Just Peace in the Holy Land met with Rep. Chris Stewart’s district director with concerns regarding U.S. relations with Israel. One of our concerns was with Rep. Stewart’s co-sponsorship of the Israel AntiBoycott Act. We wanted to know why Stewart supports erosion of American free speech rights in favor of a foreign power. We also asked that Stewart co-sponsor the Promoting Human Rights by Ending Israeli Military Detention of Palestinian Children Act. It seemed to us that opposition to child abuse should not be a partisan issue. We asked Rep. Stewart his opinion of Israeli nuclear weapons and the prospect of a Middle East nuclear weapons-free zone. We wanted to know his opinion as to whether Israel should sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and submit to inspections like Iran does. The only non-signatories besides Israel are India, Pakistan, South Sudan and North Korea (which withdrew from the treaty). After several follow-up inquiries and 10 months later, we finally got a letter from Rep. Stewart which was vacuous and dodged our questions. Stewart certainly has no obligation to share our political views nor support or oppose any particular piece of legislation. But like any elected official, Stewart does have an obligation, as our representative in Congress, to directly and honestly answer our questions on matters before the House of Representatives. Just why he cannot or will not meet that obligation, we do not know. Unfortunately, we cannot ask him directly because he will not meet with us in person. Utahns deserve better representation than that.

BOB BRISTER, Salt Lake City


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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, GEOFF GRIFFIN, MARYANN JOHANSON, RICH KANE, KEITH L. McDONALD, MIKE RIEDEL, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION

Cure America, One Surgery at a Time

Owing largely to big pharma’s predatory gouging and the exorbitant charges of doctors and hospitals, U.S. health care costs have soared into the stratosphere. The Rabid Orange Raccoon hasn’t improved the situation by partially dismantling Obamacare. In fact, President Trump’s selfavowed destructive agenda has escalated health care pricing, fueled in part by the added burden of millions of citizens who’ve elected not to buy insurance and have instead become charity cases. In an effort to take control of the ever-worsening situation, many Americans have chosen non-domestic medical providers as a money-saving alternative. For prescription drugs, they’ve tapped into the discounts of India and Canada. And for medical and surgical procedures, thousands have flocked to other countries in search of better prices— discovering that some of the best surgical care in the world is not necessarily statewide. The price difference is really a jaw-dropper; surgical candidates are often so shocked at the disparity that their own friends confuse them with Jay Leno. Take, for instance, the cost of an aortic valve replacement. In the U.S., you’ll pay around $170K, including surgeon, anesthesiologist and hospitalization. But wait a minute. You could book reservations for you and your spouse and take a medical vacation instead. In India, you can have the same procedure, done by U.S.-trained heart

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. surgeons, for a mere $9,500, and it’s only $5,300 if you decide to go to Warsaw instead. Think about the fun you can have with the leftover money. It’s mind blowing, and a sad indictment of American health care. Medical tourism has brought the reality poignantly home: It’s not about the cost of medical services; it’s about the price. As a service to supporters of our Clown President, I’ve compiled a list of useful medical procedures and pricing for the adventurous medical tourist. n  Corrective rhinoplasty for Republicans: U.S. price is $6,500, but it’s only $3,600 in Singapore. Expect remarkable results: The olfactoryimpaired will suddenly be able to smell a rat. n  Lasik eye correction special for Trump lovers: U.S. price is $4,000, but it’s only $1,000 in Delhi, India. Anticipated benefit: The refraction-created illusion of Trump’s wings will disappear and his halo will sink to his midriff. As an added bonus, Biblical text regarding the treatment of others will become clear and crisp. n  Knee replacement special for the Christian right: U.S. price is $35,000, but only $7,700 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Anticipated benefit: “Get down on your knees and pray” will suddenly be a viable option. n  Anal sphincter repair: U.S. price is $13,500, but it’s only $2,500 in Mexico. Anticipated benefit: The

accompanying brown trails that occur simultaneously with the “OMG” and “WTF” responses to Trump’s frequent verbal abortions will abruptly cease. (Sadly, carpet sales are likely to decline.) Note: All ASRs will include a complimentary rectocephalectomy if required. n  Fusion of lumbar vertebrae (Congressional special fall sale): U.S price is $110,000, but in Amman, Jordan, you can have it done for $10,000. Anticipated benefit: Senators and representatives will be able to stand and be counted, thus ending their existence as spineless invertebrates. n  Lingual nerve repair: Here, it costs $8,700, but you can have it done in Pyongyang, North Korea, for only $57.95. Benefit: Relief from epidemic tongue-biting and the joy of finally having your voice heard. “If you can’t say anything nice,” as Thumper entreated us in Bambi, “shout it.” So go ahead, my friends. If this list of discounted medical procedures has reminded you of what’s wrong, launch yourself into the real world and get yourself fixed at a bargain price. It’s a chance to cure America, one procedure at a time, and restore the health of an ailing democracy, Trump be damned. CW

IN AN EFFORT TO TAKE CONTROL OF THE EVER-WORSENING SITUATION, MANY AMERICANS HAVE CHOSEN NONDOMESTIC MEDICAL PROVIDERS.

Michael S. Robinson Sr. is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He lives in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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8 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

RUN AGAINST GERRYMANDERING

Here’s your chance to have some fun and learn about why fair redistricting is important to you. The nonpartisan League of Women Voters of Salt Lake is leading the charge in this Gerry-Meander 5K Fun Run, taking you through the four Utah House legislative districts nine times. If you don’t totally understand gerrymandering, you’ll find out from volunteers dressed in district costumes, from Better Boundaries leaders and from the eye-opening meander you take. There’ll be music, vendors and candidates, not to mention prizes and gerrymander puzzles. Proposition 4 is on the November ballot to give you, the voter, the right to choose your representatives. Right now, the politicians are choosing their voters. Rowland Hall Soccer Field, 843 S. Lincoln St., Saturday, Sept. 29, 7 a.m., $20, kids and dogs free, bit.ly/2Nw3vQl.

PROP 2 SUPPORTERS PROTEST

By now, most Utahns know The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints doesn’t like the medical cannabis ballot initiative. Proposition 2 has been denounced at news conferences and in LDS ward houses, and the church somehow believes the Legislature will address the issue down the road. Anonymous supporters have even bought billboards asking what’s behind the church’s opposition and point to its investments in pharmaceutical companies. Now it’s your chance to turn out in righteous indignation at the Temple Square Protest to Stop LDS Church Involvement in Prop 2. “This protest is to show solidarity and support for medical cannabis in Utah and opposition to church involvement,” the protest’s Facebook page says. This is a people’s initiative to end suffering. Church Office Building, 50 E. North Temple, Saturday, Sept. 29, 5-6:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2I5HCkQ.

D.A. DEBATES

Now’s the time to get up close and personal with the people who one day might be prosecuting you or someone you know. The District Attorney race has been heating up over whether incumbent Sim Gill, well known for his thoughtful and topical Facebook posts, is tough enough on crime. Enter prosecutor and Republican Nathan Evershed. The two will face off at the Salt Lake County District Attorney Debate, which promises to be an important look at the county’s legal future. S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, 383 S. University St., 801-5816833, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Dlyk5I.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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10 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

@kathybiele

Lifesavers

Have you heard of the Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment? They’re the people who want you to be able to breathe in a state whose natural beauty is surpassed only by its polluted air. “Clean Air, Clean Energy and a Clean Future for Utah!” is UPHE’s motto. To celebrate 10 years of activism, Dr. Arden Pope rolled out scientific studies last week about how pollution causes deaths—lots of deaths. Board president Dr. Brian Moench said, “You are all ‘sensitive populations.’” Turns out they’re really serious about saving us from death. No fault of the presentation, but I collapsed without a pulse. I awoke on the floor with a gaggle of doctors surrounding me. Dr. Nathan Buck had done chest compressions. You know it worked because it broke my ribs—and saved my life. “You’re lucky in that I came within about five seconds of having to give you mouth to mouth,” Moench said. “In case you want to know any more about being lucky, or how special you are, only about 10 percent of people who have a cardiac arrest survive if no one gives them CPR.” The lesson here: Learn CPR now and donate to UPHE.

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More Not Less

Shocking! Oh, the school fees that keep kids from participating in the fun stuff—like cheerleading. We are so glad the Office of the Legislative Auditor General is drawing attention to this terrible state of extracurricular affairs. But wait. We’re talking school, aren’t we? You know, the place where Utah says we do better with less than any state. Not. The website for Question 1 on the November ballot is downright frightening: Half of our kids aren’t proficient in English, math and science; teacher salaries are the sixth lowest in the nation, and our class sizes are the third largest. And Gov. Gary Herbert is pleading with teachers to come back to Utah, according to the Associated Press. Yes, half of new teachers leave the profession in five years. If this disturbs you, then you should vote for Question 1 to add 10 cents to the gas tax. If not, you need to worry about the cost of cheerleading.

OF THE WEEK

Risk factors include: • • • • • •

Multiple sexual partners Anal sex recipient History of STD Prior HPV infection Immunocompromised Male to male sex

What Are Rules?

Not to give little Jason Chaffetz any more press, but really? “I’m kind of offended by the idea that somebody thinks they can renegotiate the rules of the Senate,” he told Fox & Friends. Of course, he’s talking about the Kavanaugh-Ford testimony. You know— how dare they try to renegotiate Senate rules. Chaffetz says he “thinks” it was Thomas Jefferson who made those rules for just such an instance. In fact, Jefferson’s Manual of Parliamentary Practice, according to the U.S. Senate, was more about order and decorum—people not hissing and spitting at the speakers.

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12 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

NEWS

PUBLIC ART

New Americans

Local photographer’s project shows Utah immigrants’ and refugees’ “struggle, spirit and inspiration.” BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A

dhal Awan’s eyes filled with tears the first time she saw her portrait. Twenty years ago, she’d been living in Khartoum, the capital of the Republic of Sudan, hoping that one day she’d be able to leave the wartorn country and live somewhere that offered her more opportunities. Now, her photograph hangs on the wall of a car wash in Salt Lake City’s Granary District. “If they can see this and smile and know that there is a light somewhere, there are opportunities,” Awan says of the connection she hopes people make after seeing her likeness. “There is a life somewhere. Don’t let your weaknesses define you.” Awan’s portrait was taken by local photographer and graphic artist Nick Sokoloff, and is part of a far-reaching project to heighten public awareness of local immigrants. Sokoloff began taking portraits of immigrants and refugees in May 2017, but came up with the idea for his project the week after Nov. 8, 2016. “The election was the impetus to get off my ass,” Sokoloff says of the day Donald Trump was elected president. He’d spent much of the past year worried about Trump’s xenophobic, authoritarian speeches that portrayed immigrants and refugees as criminal maniacs. But it wasn’t until Trump won the presidency that Sokoloff felt impelled to do something to support Salt Lake City’s immigrant communities. “It was just the time to stand up,” he says. Sokoloff has posted about 40 of the pictures on “The New Americans of Salt Lake” Facebook page. Each is accompanied by a few paragraphs that recount each person’s journey or explains what life in the U.S. means to them, giving immigrants and refugees a space to advocate for themselves and show others that Utah isn’t the white, homogenous state it’s stereotyped to be. “We do have a lot of Mormon, white

“I wanted to do something that showed that Salt Lake City supports refugees and immigrants,” Nick Sokoloff says of his photos. people, but we also have this beautiful multicultural community in our own backyard,” Amy Dott Harmer, executive director of the Utah Refugee Connection, says. Harmer is a collaborator on Sokoloff’s project. She helps manage The New Americans of Salt Lake’s Facebook and Instagram pages, and sometimes writes the text that accompanies each subject’s picture. She says Sokoloff’s art is especially important in light of the Trump administration’s recent announcement that the number of refugees resettled in the U.S. next year would be capped at 30,000, the lowest since the start of the U.S. Refugee Act of 1980. “People seem to think they take more from us than they ever give,” Harmer says. But that’s not how she sees it— refugees are innovative, creative thinkers, a mindset honed from struggle that can make powerful, positive contributions to local economies. “The reality is they contribute much more than they ever take from us.” Some of Sokoloff’s pictures recently made their way off the computer screen and onto the walls of local businesses. He was one of 15 artists awarded a total of $147,060 by the Redevelopment Authority of Salt Lake City. They are creating 11 public-facing murals on the exteriors of private businesses in the Granary District Project Area—roughly located between Interstate 15 and 300 West, and 600 South and 1000 South. A public gathering to celebrate the artworks’ completion is scheduled in the area from 5 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29. Art enthusiasts will be able to reflect on how the new pieces add to the

community’s identity as they walk or bike around the neighborhood. In addition to being visually engaging, all the designs commissioned for the Granary District Mural Grant Program reflect the community’s character, as well as the diversity of Salt Lake City’s artistic community, RDA Project Coordinator Corinne Piazza says. The hope is that such public artwork will lead to even more investment in the district, a part of the city that has experienced economic revitalization in recent years thanks to more businesses opening within its boundaries. “Art really inspires engagement and investment,” Piazza believes. Sokoloff’s piece is located on the exterior of Kenny’s Car Wash and Paw Paws, a self-service dog wash at 624 S. 300 West. Photographs of five women’s faces are pictured on three banners that hang on the brick buildings’ exteriors. Each subject is a refugee from Nepal, South Sudan, Somalia, Pakistan or Oromia, an ethnically based state within Ethiopia. Similar to the format on social media, there’s a quote beside each picture, giving viewers a glimpse, as the project’s tagline suggests, into each subject’s “struggle, spirit and inspiration.” Sokoloff credits Ali Gempeler, Paw Paws’ owner, for embracing the photos adorning her business’ walls. Sokoloff had a hard time finding owners willing to be part of the project, and approached four other establishments before Paw Paws and Kenny’s. “There’s so much going on in the world today that you have to support what you believe in,” Gempeler says. “All the refugees are real people trying to make a living and support the community.”

Twenty more Sokoloff portraits will be displayed for three months at the City and County Building starting Thursday, Sept. 27. The photographer also is seeking funding to allow him to place large public banners on the sides of public and private buildings throughout the city. “They’ll be more prominent spaces and they’ll be bigger,” Sokoloff says of the larger-scale placement. Jojo Beyene is one of the persons Sokoloff photographed. She and her family came to the U.S. 17 years ago after her father won a green card in the federal government’s diversity lottery program. Her parents never had the opportunity to get an education in Ethiopia, but each of their children has either earned a bachelor’s or master’s degree, is working toward finishing school, or has a stable and successful career, all achievements Beyene doesn’t think possible if they hadn’t come to the U.S. Beyene says she hopes Sokoloff’s project demonstrates a simple fact to citizens lucky enough to be born in the U.S.: “We’re just trying to survive and live our life, too.” Awan, whose likeness now hangs outside Kenny’s Car Wash, has not only survived, but thrived, since moving to Salt Lake City from South Sudan. Checking off the things that might have altered her life’s path and stopped her from achieving her dreams—“I’m a mother of five. A second-language student. Not from this country.”—Awan says none of that will stop her from graduating next year with a master’s of social work from the University of Utah. “I don’t believe something is going to be impossible for me. I believe that everything is possible.” CW


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14 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

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Dying & Living in Utah

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Death is a topic most avoid talking or thinking about. But some in Utah are trying to change that. By Rich Kane

J

eane Martha Kane didn’t get everything she wanted in life, but she was absolutely going to get everything in death. When she was diagnosed with terminal cancer at age 84, she decided against chemotherapy, which could have extended her life but would have left her feeling miserable—a cure perhaps worse than the disease.

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | 15

often humorously, about what’s usually considered an uncomfortable, even taboo, subject—and finding out it doesn’t really have to be. What’s going on here? Higgins thinks she knows. “I really think we’re moving toward a more death-positive culture,” she says. “People are living longer and they want more control over the end of their life, and that includes doula work and creating sacred spaces. We help them in that in-between transition space that family members usually aren’t comfortable with, helping them cope with their emotions and giving power back to the family instead of doctors and nurses in a hospital.” “We honor the end of life for our pets more than we do for loved ones,” says Michelle Marthia, who became a doula through Higgins’ HELD program. “Our medical system is not geared toward a dignified death where people get to make their own choices. American culture is behind in a lot of ways, like how we

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to her apartment and was inside for about a minute when she whispered, as if about to do something naughty, “Did you get my Mary Jane?” I also told her what I would do with her ashes: take small amounts and scatter them in her favorite places where we’d traveled or spent time together. And I’d shoot a video of each toss to preserve the moments for her other kids. She seemed to really like that. “You were her death doula,” Jude Higgins says to me after I tell her Mom’s story. I was … what? I don’t know about that. But Higgins would know a doula when she sees one. A cultural anthropology

professor at Salt Lake Community College and founder of HELD (Help from an End-ofLife Doula), she says doulas are transitional coaches who assist people moving toward death. (There are also more-common birth doulas.) They can do anything from helping the dying person make a photo album or scrapbook to leave their children, to guiding them through any lingering feelings of grief, regret or guilt, to giving families a break from holding vigil so they can sleep, to simply washing the dishes. Unlike hospice workers, doulas aren’t medical providers, but they’re often just as important. Just their mere presence and availability can be invaluable. And more people are becoming doulas. (“Doula” is Greek for “female servant,” but men can be doulas, too.) Last year, Money magazine called death doulas and other “death care” occupations a “viable career track.” In Utah, new programs at hospitals are designed to comfort the dying, and new monthly groups where people talk freely,

I accepted this, but she still tried to console me in her usual witty way. “I’ve lived a long life, Rich,” she said. “I’ve outlived my expiration date!” She wanted no funeral, no memorial service. “Too expensive! Such a waste of money!” And definitely no burial in a cemetery surrounded by strangers and Republicans. “Just stick me in the oven and burn me up!” About halfway through her fivemonth illness, she told me she wanted to try marijuana for the first time, to see if it made her feel better or gave her an appetite. I scored some, went

STEVEN VARGO

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operate our health care system. We’re less connected to the Earth than other cultures. But I think this is a conversation that’s rising more and more to the surface right now.” Marthia came to doula work through her own cancer diagnosis, when she recognized she had an ability to be a safe, calming presence for people going through similar crises. “It’s a very spiritual experience,” she says. “We get to create a space where a patient’s wishes are honored in the best way possible. Anything we can do to alleviate some of the burden the family is carrying during that time, we need to be there. If they need someone to talk to in the kitchen over a cup of tea, that’s what we do. If they need us to wash the body after they have passed, that’s what we do. If they need us to call a funeral home, that’s what we do. It’s emotionally fraught, but it’s also this beautiful thing to be a witness to. We’re invited into these spaces with these families who are strangers until we meet them.” From her cancer experience, Marthia founded Heal Courageously, a nonprofit that helps people deal with life-changing illness through free photo portraits—a way to frame their stories as something larger than a diagnosis or statistic. She was inspired to create the project after the death of a close friend. “I was with him two days before he died, and that experience gutted me,” Marthia says. “There was this keen sense of wanting to have been able to do more. He had fought so hard for so many years and beat so many odds. He was a hero. I experienced the honor of being with him at the end and I think he was the catalyst for me wanting to help people in a different way.”

No One Dies Alone

“We have this preconceived notion that dying is going to be a hell on earth,” death doula Mindy Relyea says, “but that hasn’t been my experience with those that I’ve sat with. Especially if there’s some dialogue created beforehand. It can be loving, intimate and nurturing, it doesn’t have to be this shocking, disruptive thing. There’ll always be grief and sadness when we lose somebody we love, but the process doesn’t have to be so jolting.” Relyea isn’t only a doula, she’s also a volunteer in the University of Utah Hospital’s No One Dies Alone program, where people sit and spend time with actively dying patients who don’t have any family or friends who can be with them. (A similar program is running at Intermountain Medical Center.) NODA began in Oregon in 2001 and has grown internationally. University Hospital’s

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Mindy Relyea

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Michelle Marthia

program started last year and now has more than 50 volunteers, who each take threehour shifts sitting with as many as five patients a month. Relyea says she used to be petrified of dying, but she experienced something profound following the death of her stepmother. “It was kind of unexpected,” she says. “My dad and I just sat alone with her body after her passing. But I was so comfortable and felt so grateful for having that time. She was dead, but her body was with us and it felt, for me, very honoring and supporting for my dad. It was super intimate to be there.” The people who NODA volunteers attend might have family or friends who want to be with them, Relyea says, but individual circumstances don’t always make it possible. “Sometimes they’ve been sick for a really long time and family members have used up all of their leave from work. They were here waiting for that person to pass away, but they don’t pass, so they had to go home. There was one man here whose brother was watching him. He had to work all day, but he didn’t want his brother to be alone; he could only be here evenings. So we had volunteers sitting with him during the day and it gave him so much peace to know that his brother wasn’t alone.” Relyea has also bonded closely with some of the patients, making it emotionally difficult when they eventually die. One gentleman, in particular, stands out. “He had really high anxiety and none of his family could be there in time to be with him,” she recalls. “I met him when he was awake and alert, but he was really scared and he just kept saying, ‘Please don’t leave me, I don’t want to be alone.’ We actually got to kind of hang out, because he was a musician who lived by Jimi Hendrix growing up, and my sons all love Jimi Hendrix, so we had this really great rapport. Then when he died, I had a lot of the same emotions that people who loved him had.” Sometimes, not all NODA shifts can be covered 24/7. Relyea was particularly guiltridden when she arrived late for a sitting only to find out that the patient had passed. “I had barely gotten back from San Francisco and during the time that I should have been there, he died. And I was devastated,” she says. “I remember sitting with one of the chaplains and she just let me cry. I told her he died alone; we’re supposed to be here and he died alone. I just felt so horrible.” But Relyea reflects that it was a deeply profound learning experience, something that didn’t have anything to do with her. “Even those people who have loved ones who are right by their side, they might have to go to the bathroom and they come back and they’ve died, and that person feels


We’re providing human connection during the death process that makes that patient not feel alone, even if they are physically alone when they die.

Life is on the Menu at the Death Café

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It’s a cool summer evening in a Sugar House backyard. Tiki torches are blazing. Empty patio chairs are set up in a circle. On a large serving table, there’s cheese, rice crackers, a tasty broccoli salad, lemon water, chocolate fudge and plenty of wine. Guests start arriving, bringing more food, more wine. Name tags are slapped on shirts. It’s an age- and gender-diverse group that eventually grows to 12—the most offthe-hook party you could go to if you want to talk about death. Such is the point of the Death Café, a movement that started in London then migrated Stateside. This Utah group has been active since 2014, and on this night, there are hospice workers, NODA volunteers, philosophy professors and ordinary folks who are all in agreement that not enough people talk about dying. So they will. Anyone can come to these once-a-month gatherings—there’s a Facebook page, of course, and you can find updates at deathcafe.com. The talk quickly becomes free-flowing, even fun: “I don’t like not knowing the end of stories. Will my grandkids get married? I won’t ever know. They’re only 5.” “Death could just be the next adventure, like a rocket ride to another place. Or the flame could just go out and that’s that.” “I want to be the rock in my family, but when my kids ask me questions about this, I don’t know how to answer them.” “My children won’t talk about it … they just won’t.” “I would love my vet to come give me a shot and I’d be gone in seconds.”

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As a student nurse, Gray was invited to go to the funeral of a cystic fibrosis patient, something she wasn’t taught how to deal with in school. “Quite the opposite,” she remembers. “We were told we’re the professionals, keep it professional, don’t get emotionally involved. You are here and the family is over there. But I learned I could be a much better nurse if I became a little personally involved instead of going by the textbook. I had no problem letting go of that old way of thinking early on. That was just not going to be me as a nurse. To not get to know about them, their likes and dislikes, didn’t make any sense to me. It made me more human.”

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so awful that they weren’t there. So even though it’s called No One Dies Alone, death comes when death comes. And that’s just the way it is.” Brian Zenger, co-director of University Hospital’s NODA program, says that although volunteers might not always be present at the actual time of a patient’s death, they are present during the dying process. “That’s what’s important,” Zenger says. “We’re providing human connection during the death process that makes that patient not feel alone, even if they are physically alone when they die. There are countless stories from family members saying they were with their dad, then they left the room and they died. And while there are guilt feelings, the one thing I will hit home is that those patients are choosing to do that. Maybe they don’t want you to see that. That’s their choice, they are really making those decisions. Which is a much more powerful way of thinking about it—that it’s not you, it never was, even if you feel that way.” Zenger says NODA programs reflect a growing change in attitudes about death, making it more personal, more human and less clinical. “A lot of physicians, in my opinion, are pretty bad at sitting and being present with suffering and pain,” Zenger, who’s also a medical student at the hospital, says. “But death is becoming more predictable in terms of years and life expectancy, so people are having to think about what they really want if they get diagnosed with a terminal disease. It’s a fundamental shift in the way people think about death because it’s become a much more controlled part of life.” Cathy Gray worked at University Hospital as a nurse for 34 years before her recent retirement and is now a NODA volunteer. “When I was in school, people would be referred to by their diagnosis—the cancer patient in bed 9, or whatever. It wouldn’t be, Jim Smith who has cancer. No name or face, just a diagnosis and a room number. Nurses would do their treatments and medications and that’s it.” Gray has seen an evolution in approaches to dying at the medical level. Early in her career, she worked in the pediatric unit, where “kids died all the time,” she says. “That’s where I gained my first interest in trying to make death an OK experience for the child and more importantly for their family,” she says. “It turned out to be one of the things I enjoyed doing the most. I really felt a connection to those kids. For them, death wasn’t a scary thing. They talked about what they might experience and we let them know they would be kept as comfortable and safe as possible. We also broke hospital rules, like when kids wanted to have their pets with them. We let their dogs stay all the time.”

STEVEN VARGO

—Brian Zenger, co-director of University Hospital’s NODA program


ALEX ADAMS

JACKELIN SLACK

ALEX ADAMS

“This image reflects pure joy. A young mother has finished cancer treatment and is enjoying the simplest of moments with her family.”

“We faded into the background while this family gathered around their father who had Alzheimer’s. This tender moment between him and his wife is filled with love.”

“Knowing this man and his family has changed the way I exist in the world. He was real and funny and kind. He was irreverent and open and honest. He was brave and angry and clawing for every moment.” “This delightful young boy and his parents spent nearly one year living at the Ronald McDonald House while he endured surgeries and chemo. His face reflects the inherent joy and resiliency of children.”

“This sweet boy was born with a complicated heart that couldn’t be repaired. His family decided to return home so he could pass peacefully, but not before celebrating his life with the many who had supported them in his care.” “This photo was taken shortly before an extraordinary woman was taken too soon by cancer. This represents love, family, care, comfort and grief all at once. The moment is stunning and beautiful.” n —Ray Howze

RICH KANE

NATA STONE AND JESS DOWNER

“This is both nostalgic and emotional and leaves me stretched by my gratitude and grief,” Marthia says about curating the project. “These images aren’t intended for the public, but many families allow us to share a glimpse of their private lives so we can connect to our community and reach more families.”

JACKELIN SLACK

Heal Courageously’s founder, Michelle Marthia, takes great care to help capture people’s beauty as they deal with life-threatening illnesses. Marthia fought cancer in 2010 and had the words “Heal Courageously” inscribed on a necklace during her treatment. A few years later, she founded the photo project to provide a gift to others.

WILL MICHAEL

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HEALING SHOTS

Local organizer Liana Teteberg, far right, talks to attendees during a recent Death Café. “I think most people aren’t afraid of dying as much as dying miserably. That’s why we have to have assisted suicide.” “I’ve heard of women plaster-casting their husband’s ashes into the shape of a dildo.” Organizer Liana Teteberg, who owns a hospice in Summit Park, says people need to get more comfortable with the subject of dying, and Death Cafés are a great, informal way of doing that. They’ve had as many as 20 show up, and the food and wine is always a nice incentive. “It’s one of the things I look forward to every month and we’ve all become friends,” she says. “We always have someone new. Some of the most interesting ones are when people describe what they would like their own death to look like, and they’re so different from one to the other. Some wanted to go in their sleep, some wanted very elaborate ceremonies, some hadn’t really thought about it.” Death and dying have always been hushed topics, Teteberg says, not just in Utah but elsewhere. “People have questions and concerns; they want to just be able to talk about it. They want to express themselves and hear what other people have to say. And like anything, when you put it on the table and start to have conversations about it, it becomes not such a heavy thing after all.” Teteberg believes there’s a strong delusion that dying of a terminal illness automatically means something went wrong—that a doctor missed a diagnosis or didn’t treat the patient early enough. That’s part of a long list of negatives about fatal illness stretching back a century, when the dead were displayed in the parlors of homes for days before burial. That’s where the term “living room” comes from, a neat rebranding so people would feel comfortable being in that room again. But one way or another, of course, the Great Equalizer visits every one. And Teteberg knows that the more people accept that, the better off we’ll be. “Our body has got so many miles, then its over. We have to start asking ourselves what

quality of death are we interested in having? What would you like to see happen? How much pain are you willing to tolerate? How much discomfort do you want to deal with? What do you want done after you’re gone? These are the kind of talks we need to have and they’re finally becoming more prevalent.”

Ashes to Ashes

A year after she died, I stood on a Southern California beach where Mom and I spent late summer afternoons in the ’70s. She always liked the ocean, so I dug a small hole near the surf break, made sure nobody was looking—I doubt that leaving human cremains in public spaces is very legal—and poured out a small Ziploc of her ashes, just like I told her I’d do. Another year, another baggie, this time emptied into a river in a park where she spent a couple summers working in the 1950s, in a hidden, quiet area lined with gigantic pine trees. Then this year, the Deep South, in a region lush with plant life, drenched in history and ghosts, where she could now be among them. And New Orleans, which we first saw on a 1991 vacation. She went into the Mississippi, near a spot off the French Quarter where there’s a Mardi Gras tradition of people spreading ashes of relatives in the river during the St. Anne’s parade. More later still, but just a sprinkling, into a red brick planter in the magnolia-treed courtyard of our favorite hotel. There will be more places. There’s a list. New England. Europe. Québec. Just not a desert. Mom hated the desert. “What you’re doing is beautiful,” Higgins tells me. “You’re turning grief and reframing it into memories, and that’s what death doulas do. You did legacy and vigil work for her. She was taking you through the steps of what she wanted done and you were honoring her wishes.” Yes. n


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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 27-OCT. 3, 2018

THURSDAY 9/27

THURSDAY 9/27

FRIDAY 9/28

FRIDAY 9/28

Odyssey Dance Theatre is getting spooky for the 22nd year of its seasonal classic Thriller, where skeletons, monsters and mummies captivate the audience with their frightening dance performance. Thriller has become one of many families’ favorite Halloween traditions, and for good reason. The two-hour program includes perennial favorites, such as Thriller, The Curse of the Mummy, Dem Bones, Frankenstein, Jason Jam, Salem’s Mass, The Lost Boys and the River of Blood Dance. New surprises for this year’s show include the return of Giggle Girl after nine years, an Ode to The Nightmare Before Christmas and a multimedia piece featuring Harry Potter. “People really appreciate and enjoy the humor,” Odyssey Dance Artistic Director Derryl Yeager says. “A lot of dance pieces are just people fighting their demons on stage. People love to come to Thriller and have a good laugh. It’s a serious vignette of your Halloween favorites. It really helps people get into the Halloween spirit. People come back year after year. It’s a fun show; come see what the fuss is about!” This year, the show’s popularity takes two dance companies throughout Utah, and also outside of it for the first time. Pocatello, Idaho, will experience this spectacular spook, along with six locations in Utah. Get your tickets soon, because performances usually sell out quickly. If you like to laugh, be frightened and also completely entertained, Thriller is the show for you. (Kara Rhodes) Odyssey Dance Theatre: Thriller @ various locations, through Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m., $18$40, odysseydance.com

Like a lot of modern art, contemporary dance can seem a little strange and hard to understand. But the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.’s upcoming repertory production Splice offers a perfect way for a layperson to wade into this sometimesintimidating world. The four pieces represent the diversity of contemporary dance, ranging from straightforward pieces to multimedia works integrating video technology. Each of the dances has been performed by the company in previous years. Daniel Charon, artistic director and choreographer, says the works were not only chosen to showcase the talent of performers, but also to give new and unfamiliar audiences a modern-dance sampler platter. “It’s not so esoteric, and you don’t have to do it to get it,” Charon says. “There’s so many levels to take in dance that are beautiful.” The variety also includes musical selections ranging from 1970s pop to music created by local composer Michael Wall. Despite the pieces’ differences, at the core of each one lies the theme of trying to understand who we are, where we come from and how we fit into the world at large. For those who want to attend but can’t find a babysitter, the company has a condensed, onehour matinee performance on Saturday that’s built with families in mind. In addition to allowing and encouraging children to attend, a spoken narrative will accompany the dances. (Kylee Ehmann) Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company: Splice  @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, Sept. 27-29, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 29, 1 p.m., $35-40, ririewoodbury.com

While today’s modern-music lover might tend to ignore the contributions of American composers active before rock ’n’ roll took root, there’s no denying the influence of one of the world’s great musical artisans: George Gershwin. His remarkable body of work, which spans the early 20th century, was noted for its innovation, and is still revered by scholars and musicologists more than 80 years after his death. From his early career as a Tin Pan Alley songwriter and the success of his first popular hit, “Swanee” (made famous by Al Jolson), through his ascent to Broadway musicals and popular film scores written with his brother Ira, Gershwin is widely recognized for his exceptional contribution to popular music. Any of Gershwin’s compositions could cement him as an icon, but it’s three works in particular—Porgy and Bess, Rhapsody in Blue and An American in Paris—that helped solidify his legacy. It’s his celebration of that unique fusion of jazz and classical concepts that the Utah Symphony will celebrate as it performs An American in Paris, part of a program that also includes Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G and Schubert’s Symphony No. 9. Those unsure about the classical connection would be best advised to note Gershwin’s comments to his critics. “It’s not a Beethoven Symphony, you know,” he once said in a Cincinnati Post interview. “It’s a humorous piece, nothing solemn about it. It’s not intended to draw tears. If it pleases symphony audiences as a light, jolly piece, a series of impressions musically expressed, it succeeds.” (Lee Zimmerman) Utah Symphony: An American in Paris @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Sept. 28-29, 7:30 p.m., $15-$70, utahsymphony.org

It starts off as the kind of office party most people would typically dread: dollar store decor, microwave popcorn, a host trying way too hard to get everybody involved by mixing drinks or singing karaoke. The evening takes a turn when the host gets called away, and suddenly two men in suits crash the party. The “guys” in question are actually dancers Monica Bill Barnes and Anna Bass, playing characters who are equal parts bro-ness and blind spots. The result is an evening that mixes dance, humor and performance in an environment where the audience is not only part of the party, but also possibly involved in the hijinks. As Barnes and Bass take control of the room, Happy Hour pinballs between awkwardness, amazement and laughter. Throwing two dancers into an office party is just one example of the ways in which Monica Bill Barnes & Co. pursue the credo of “bringing dance where it doesn’t belong.” Other pursuits by the New York City-based troupe have included a guided exercise tour of an art museum, dance as a live sporting event complete with performers in eye black, or an evening with Ira Glass of This American Life. Two of the shows—Thursday at 7 p.m. and Friday at 6 p.m.—are for all ages and feature karaoke, while the 8 p.m. closer on Friday is for ages 21 and up, with adult beverages available. (Geoff Griffin) Monica Bill Barnes: Happy Hour @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-8100, Sept. 27, 7 p.m.; Sept. 28, 6 & 8 p.m., $5-$35, tickets.utah.edu

Odyssey Dance Theatre: Thriller

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Splice

Utah Symphony: Gershwin’s An American in Paris

Monica Bill Barnes: Happy Hour


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Not Going By the Book Two playwrights take a unique approach to adapting The World’s Strongest Librarian. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

s a chronicle of perseverance in the face of obstacles, The World’s Strongest Librarian—the 2013 memoir by Salt Lake City public librarian Josh Hanagarne—is uniquely inspirational. That doesn’t mean it seemed like the most obvious candidate to turn into a play aimed at kids— one that has its world premiere through the BYU Theater Department’s Young Co. But play wright Jeff Gottesfeld saw something in the book—which describes Utah native Hanagarne’s lifelong struggle with Tourette’s Syndrome, and the way books and weightlifting became his personal therapy for his condition—when he read a review of The World’s Strongest Librarian in The New Yorker. A veteran author of books for children and young adults, as well as a one-time Salt Lake City resident, Gottesfeld was sure he wouldn’t be able to get the rights to the book. “It was too good,” Gottesfeld remembers thinking, “there was no chance I’m going to be able to do anything with it. Someone was going to option it.” A year or so later, however, Gottesfeld reached out to the book’s publisher, and was able to secure stage rights. He then contacted Elizabeth Wong, with whom Gottesfeld had been acquainted for several years and with whom he had collaborated previously. “When Jeff rang me up and said, ‘Hey! Let’s write a play together, read this book,’ I bought it toute suite, dove into

it on my Kindle, and read it in a day. I rang him up ASAP and said, ‘Hella yeah, let’s turn this into a play!’” Then came the hard part: finding a narrative in Hanagarne’s story that would make an appealing kids’ play, as commissioned by Dramatic Publishing Co. Their answer was to move away from Hanagarne’s true story entirely, and craft a narrative inspired by his struggles—including a young boy with Tourette’s Syndrome as a main character—that also revolved around the importance of the local library in the lives of a group of kids, and their activism when it is threatened with closure. “We took the words ‘creative license’ and carved up the book like we were skiing on it,” Wong says. “We told Josh’s story by focusing on his effect on the young people who came into daily contact with him. [The kids in the play] use their minds by figuring out a way to bring attention to the closing of their library, then they put their bodies on the line in support of their cause—mind and body working together. Which is the opposite of Tourette’s, when mind and body are sometimes at odds.” Both playwrights say their adaptation was a chance to celebrate the importance of libraries, and, in Wong’s words, “sound the alarm about the quiet extinction of libraries. … For me, the library was a place of refuge from bullies; it was a place of happy accidents and impulsive discoveries … and a window into worlds different from Chinatown, where I grew up.” “I’m drenched in the world of children, children’s reading and children’s librarians—who are heroes, working their asses off,” Gottesfeld adds. “It’s getting harder for librarians, and for libraries, to justify their existence, [but] in many ways, they are the great equalizers of society.” Ultimately, despite creating a narrative all their own inspired by Hanagarne’s story, both writers were determined to remain faithful to the essence of their source material. “It was important to us to preserve the tenacious spirit of [the book],” Wong says, “and to honor the humor in the book. Also, we felt it was crucial to manifest Josh’s Tourette’s as he did in his book, making it a character in the play, too.”

JAREN WILKEY

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Gottesfeld and Wong took their completed play to the 2017 national conference of the American Alliance for Theatre & Education, where The World’s Strongest Librarian won a Distinguished Play award. It was at that conference that Julia Ashworth— artistic director for BYU’s Young Co., which trains educators both in creating theater for young audiences and instructing those audiences about theater—found out about the play. “[Julia] said, ‘Wait a minute, that’s the guy [Josh Hanagarne] from where I’m from,’” says Megan Sanborn Jones, artistic director for BYU Theater. “It just seemed like a really good fit.” “What’s really fascinating is, we spend a lot of time as educators and parents saying, ‘Read books, improve your mind,’” Jones adds. “But we’re also telling them to get outside and be active. This story, with its setting and the emphasis on physical fitness, combines both of those things.”

Ty Hawton in BYU Young Co.’s production of The World’s Strongest Librarian

The Young Co. production will tour several Utah schools after its three-week theatrical run, and make other stops including at the Salt Lake City Main Library. It’s a surprising journey for a story that started at that same library, thanks to two playwrights who were able to do some of their own creative heavy lifting. CW

THE WORLD’S STRONGEST LIBRARIAN

BYU Franklin S. Harris Fine Arts Center 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo Sept. 28-Oct. 13 Dates and times vary $5-$8 arts.byu.edu


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

New works by Jimmi Toro, showcasing his signature drip-painting technique, are on display in Urban Abstract Paintings and Portraits at Fringe Gallery (345 W. Pierpont Ave., 385-2027511, thefringegallery.com), through Friday, Oct. 12.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

COMEDY & IMPROV

Bengt Washburn Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Sept. 28-29, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Erik Griffin Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 27, 7 p.m.; Sept. 28-29, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus & Guy Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 S. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Sept. 28-29, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Pump and Dump Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 3-4, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Andrea Hollander: Blue Mistaken for Sky The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 27, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Authorpalooza Orem Barnes & Noble, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Sept. 29, 2-4 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Brenda Stanley: The Treasure of Cedar Creek Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 29, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Chris Chambers Sweet Library, 455 F St., Sept. 27, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Deborah Reed: The Days When Birds Come

FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

4th West Oktoberfest Mountain West Cider, 425 N. 400 West, Sept. 30-Oct. 1, times vary, mountainwestcider.com Dogtoberfest Brewvies Cinema Pub, 677 S. 200 West, Oct. 2, 6-10 p.m., brewvies.com Get Into the River Festival Jordan River Parkway, through Sept. 30, dates and locations vary, getintotheriver.org Harvest Festival Water Tower Plaza, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org Light the Water Lantern Festival Lindon Marina, 4400 W. Vineyard Road, Orem, Sept. 29, 4:30-8:30 p.m., lightthewater.com Living Traditions’ Fall Garden Party International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Sept. 29, noon-4 p.m., livingtraditionsfestival.com Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 21, Saturdays & Sundays, noon-6:30 p.m., snowbird.com Rumi Poetry Festival Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, Sept. 29, 2-4:30 p.m., slcpl.org

TALKS & LECTURES

Brian McInerney: Every Last Drop: Climate Change Jeopardizes Utah’s Water Security Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 29, 2 p.m., yaleclubofutah.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Back to School Special Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Oct. 12, accessart.org The Blocks SLC: Urban Plein Air UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 29, utahmoca.org Daniel Everett: Security Questions UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 12, utahmoca.org Design Arts Utah 2018 Showcase Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, visualarts.utah.gov Emily Call: Practical Contact UMOCA Art, 20 S. West Temple, through Oct. 6, utahmoca.org Glow: Oil Paintings by Zachary Bowman Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Great Girls of the World: Digital Prints by Beatrice Teigen Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Nov. 14, slcpl.org Jimmi Toro: Urban Abstract Paintings and Portraits Fringe Gallery, 345 W. Pierpont Ave., through Oct. 12, thefringegallery.com (see above left) John Berry Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Oct. 13, modernwestfineart.com Marisa Morán Jahn: Mirror / Mask Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 9, umfa.utah.edu Miguel Galaz: Roots, Culture, Education Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through Oct. 5, facebook.com/sugarspaceslc Moments in Time: Paintings by Lynn Nichols Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 19, slcpl.org Plein Air Exhibition Brigham City Museum Gallery, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, through Nov. 3, brighamcitymuseum.org Ryan Ruehlen: Georhythmic Drift Music UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 3, utahmoca.org Sculpture: New Works + Group Exhibition A Gallery / Allen + Alan Fine Art, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Sept. 29, agalleryonline.com Site Lines: Recent Work by University of Utah Art Faculty Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Sept. 28-Jan. 6, umfa.utah.edu Trent Alvey and Jan Andrews: On the Border of Realism Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 2, visualarts.utah.gov Utah Travels Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, through Oct. 17, culturalcelebration.org

| CITY WEEKLY | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | 23

LITERATURE

SPECIAL EVENTS

Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, castleofchaos.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, fearfactoryslc.com The Haunted Forest 6400 N. 6000 West, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, hauntedutah.com Nightmare on 13th 300 W. 1300 South, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, nightmareon13th.com Wizards & Witches Jubilee South Jordan Community Center, 10778 S. Redwood Road, Oct. 2, 6-8 p.m., sjc.utah.gov

Diamantes de Color Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, Sept. 28, 8 p.m., savannahf.com Odyssey Dance: Thriller multiple locations, through Oct. 31, dates and times vary, odysseydance.com (see p. 20)

Chamber Orchestra Ogden: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., chamberorchestraogden.org Salt Lake Symphony: Rhythm, Passion, Fate! Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org Utah Symphony: Gershwin’s An American in Paris Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Sept. 28-29, times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 20)

HALLOWEEN

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DANCE

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Nuevas Voces: Re-examining Mexico Through its Art Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 29, 11 a.m., slcpl.org American History, Culture, and Society Lecture Series: Boston Massacre Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., slcpl.org

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Cirque du Soleil: Corteo Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Sept. 30, times vary, maverikcenter.com The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightTime An Other Theater Co., 1200 Town Center Blvd., second floor, Provo, through Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center of New York City Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 21, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Monica Bill Barnes & Co.: Happy Hour Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, through Sept. 28, times vary, tickets.utah.edu (see p. 20) Oslo Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 South 1400 East, through Sept. 29, Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., pioneertheatre.org Ragtime CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, Sept. 28-Oct. 27, dates and times vary, centerpointtheatre.org The Scarlet Pimpernel Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Waitress Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Sept. 30, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Wait Until Dark Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., hct.org The World’s Strongest Librarian BYU Franklin S. Harris Fine Arts Center, 800 E. Campus Drive, Provo, Sept. 28-Oct. 13, times vary, arts.byu.edu (see p. 22) You Got Older Wasatch Theatre Co., 124 S. 400 West, through Sept. 29, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m., wasatchtheatre.org

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Splice Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through Sept. 29, times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 20) Tablado Flamenco Dance Co.: Andalucia Rose Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 28-29, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

Back Booked on 25th, 147 25th St., Ogden, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., bookedon25th.com Deeton Charles: Memoirs of a Fallen Angel Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 27, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Heather Hansen: Wildfire: On the Front Lines With Station 8 The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 2, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com James A. McLaughlin: Bearskin Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Oct. 3, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com John Flanagan: The Red Fox Clan Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 2, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Kiersten White: The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 1, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com; Barnes & Noble University Crossings, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Oct. 2, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Nicole Walker & Julia Corbett Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Taran Matharu: The Summoner’s Handbook The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Todd Robert Petersen: It Needs To Look Like We Tried Finch Lane Art Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, Sept. 27, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com V.E. Schwab: Vengeful The King’s English, 1551 S. 1500 East, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com V.M. Karren: The Deceit of Riches The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 29, 2 p.m., kingsenglish. com


24 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | CITY WEEKLY |

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Best bet: Any or all of the handmade pupusas Can’t miss: The plátanos con crema y frijoles

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | 25

corn tortilla typically stuffed with all manner of deliciousness—eggs, rice, beans, cheese, shredded pork—and is traditionally topped with a thin tomato sauce and a vinegary cabbage salad spiked with red pepper. While it’s easy to be deceived by the pupusa’s unassuming exterior, its balanced texture, flavor and portability have made it a Salvadoran mainstay.

| CITY WEEKLY |

It’s a cozy little spot that’s easy to miss when you’re cruising through the Central Ninth neighborhood, but it’s definitely a good excuse to stop and smell the loroco. If you’re in the mood for some comfort food that’ll broaden your horizons with some Central American staples, this is the place for you. For novices to the food of El Salvador, all roads lead to the pupusa. It’s a pancake-sized

C

onsidering the foundational aspects of Salvadoran cuisine include dishes I hold near and dear (overfilled sandwiches, fried starches and stuffed tortillas), it’s not surprising that I eventually sniffed out Juanita Restaurant (271 W. 900 South, 385-259-0144).

perfect for mixing and matching. I love getting a dish like the plátanos with a few pupusas on the side and combining the various flavors and textures with each bite. It’s a snapshot of how versatile Salvadoran food can be—each dish on its own has simple flavor combinations that transcend the individual ingredients, but it’s fun to throw some other menu items into the mix and see what happens. Whichever combo you decide on creating, I must advise you order a bottle of Kolashampan ($2), a nuclear-orange Salvadoran soda made with cane sugar, to round out your meal. Nothing quite refreshes the palate like this vaguely bananaflavored, ultra-sweet beverage. Salvadoran food is as comforting as comfort food can get, and Juanita’s attention to detail and made-toorder menu is what makes it a welcome fixture in the Central Ninth neighborhood. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Salvadoran hole-in-the-wall Juanita Restaurant fills the pupusa-shaped hole in your stomach.

entrée territory. My go-to is a the plátanos con crema y frijoles ($6). It’s traditionally eaten for breakfast— Juanita also offers a combo that comes with scrambled eggs cooked with peppers ($11)—and it’s possibly one of the most crave-worthy breakfast dishes on the market. It’s a hefty portion of plantains, sliced and fried to perfection, topped with velvety crema and pinto beans that have been puréed into a sauce of their own. Like the pupusas, this dish is a prime example of doing something simple extremely well. The sweet starchiness of the plantains meshes seamlessly with the salty creaminess of its companions; the combo’s scrambled eggs and side of tortillas ups the ante to redefine the term “breakfast of champions.” My only gripe about the place is that the menu lacks Salvadoran sandwiches like panes rellenos and pan con chumpe—I’ve wanted to add these bad boys to my international sandwich repertoire for some time now. But, there’s no sense in complaining about what the menu doesn’t have, when what it does have is more than enough to satisfy. In fact, the most attractive thing about Juanita’s menu is that it’s

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Pupusa Perfection

Pupusas are essential to Salvadoran cuisine, so Juanita takes their creation very seriously. Each one is lovingly prepared on the spot—one of the first things that I noticed when I popped in for lunch was the bilingual signage letting customers know their food is made to order, which can add to the wait time. If that’s a turn-off, then these golden rounds of crispy gooeyness are too good for you. Juanita sticks to the traditional fillings—cheese, beans, pork chicharrón and loroco, an edible flower native to El Salvador. Pupusas run from $1.75 to $2, which is a great deal for the amount of flavor you get. As far as picking a favorite goes, it’s hard to choose between the chicharrón and the loroco. The term chicharrón might make you think of crispy fried cracklins, but the Salvadoran version is far from it. The chicharrón here is tender, slow-cooked pork that melts in your mouth. Loroco is reminiscent of cruciferous veggies like Brussels sprouts—they have a wonderful bitterness that complements the melty cheese interior. It’s totally understandable if pupusas are the only thing you order here, but it’s also worth venturing into


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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26 | SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | CITY WEEKLY |

the

BACK BURNER

serving breakfast lunch and dinner

BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

@

Thanksgiving Point Harvest Festival

If gigantic melons tickle your fancy, then hightail it to Thanksgiving Point’s (3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, thanksgivingpoint.com) annual Harvest Festival. It’s a free event that invites attendees to visit a wide variety of local vendors, purchase local produce and enjoy family-friendly arts, crafts and live music. Festival goers won’t want to miss the pumpkin weigh-off during which the Utah Giant Pumpkin Growers Association rolls out their most bulbous gourds for the audience’s viewing pleasure. Pumpkins aren’t the only thing weighed and measured for unnatural girth—expect to see similar competitions for tomatoes, watermelons and other autumnal produce. The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29.

Rock ’n’ Ribs Festival

On the other hand, thick smoked sausage might be more your thing. In that case, Gallivan Center (239 S. Main, thegallivancenter.com) is hosting the 2018 Rock ’n’ Ribs Festival. It’s a gathering of local pit masters, grill gurus and smoke sultans offering $3 sample plates of their finest smoked meats. In addition to the delectable aromas of hickory wood smoke, dry rub and slowly cooking protein wafting back and forth throughout the plaza, the event features activities for kids and live music. Admission is free, and it all starts on Saturday, Sept. 29, from noon to 7 p.m. Don’t forget your bib and wet wipes!

Competitive Fundraiser

Maybe you’re after more of a double team this weekend. If so, consider checking out the Salt Lake Institute of Culinary Education (2233 S. 300 East, saltlakeculinarycenter.com), which is hosting a competition based on Food Network’s Chopped on Saturday, Sept. 29, from 2 to 4 p.m. Two teams of chefs (Tanner Freed and Sam Ball vs. Chris Henry and Joshua Cornell) each receive two mystery baskets of ingredients and compete against each other to create the most inventive dishes in a limited amount of time. To watch the culinary fisticuffs, purchase tickets for $15 via EventBrite. While these pros whip up some creative eats, they also help a good cause in the process. Proceeds benefit Fit 2 Recover, a local organization that helps people recover from drug and alcohol addiction.

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chinese • sushi bar • beer • sake • wine


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Around the Campfire

Pairing beer with smoky smells of autumn. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

A

s of this writing, the air outside is thick, acrid and a little sweet from the fires burning around the West. My insufferable inner beer nerd noticed that some beers in these smoky conditions seem to be tasting better, and that others are suffering greatly. Now, before you start thinking this dipshit is about to start pairing beers with the destructive wildfires, I’d like to reign you in a little. Think instead about the wonderful aromatics of innocent campfires. Your backyard fire pits are finding more use every day as the temperatures drop, and some of you might head to favorite hunting spots for real bonding time this season. As you sit around intentional fires in the coming weeks, I invite you to think about beers like these:

Moab Dead Horse Amber: It pours a very clear, light copper color, like a shiny new penny held against a smoky sunset. On top, there’s two fingers of foamy light tan head that’s full of bubbles and fades slowly, leaving good lacing and a thick creamy layer. Aromas of dark fruit, caramel, tea leaf, floral hops, caramel, toffee, candy and bread pudding abound; it’s very sweet, with the malty and bready notes almost desert-like with caramel drizzled on top. The taste starts out sweet and malty overall, with a mix of caramel, toffee and muted dark fruit. Hints of plum and black tea come next, paving the way for the floral and piney hops. The result is very sweet, with the malty and bready notes mixing well with the hoppy bitterness and fruity aftertaste that almost balance it, but still let it lean on the malty side with a variety of lingering sweet flavors like graham cracker or molasses cookies. The finish has some lingering sweetness akin to pear or apple, and is semi-dry. In the mouth, it has a medium to light feel, with carbonation that is almost spritzy. Overall: This malty treat is fruity, hoppy and pretty easy to drink if you are looking for the malt-forward qualities of an amber ale. The flavorful brew showcases malt, caramel and fruit-like qualities that can be coaxed from the grains, making for a very enjoyable 4-percent beer. Bonneville Redline: This Irish red pours a slightly dark, but clear, ruby red color with

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

a two-finger dense and rocky light khaki head with great retention. Grapefruit, tangerine and mango perfumes play off of toasted biscuit, presenting a light nuttiness and a slight earthiness. The taste starts off with some muted tangerine and peach flavors, which come courtesy of the caramel and toasted biscuit that push the hops flavors to the forefront. Moderate pine/citrus peel and grassy bitterness begin to build next creating a balance that keeps all of the flavors in check. There’s a nice complexity and balance for a simple 4-percent beer that leaves minimal hop astringency after the finish. With medium carbonation and body, it has a very smooth, moderately creamy mouthfeel that’s

extremely satisfying. Overall: This is an outstanding red ale, full of all-around awesome complexity, robustness and balance of citrus and pine with malt. A very smooth and easy-to-drink offering from our brothers and sisters in Tooele County. You might be asking, why not pair beers that are smokier, or have more roasted qualities? These would be too overwhelming, like binge-eating cookies and cola. The malt character and the subtle hop bitterness in these beers provide just enough sweet to counter tendrils of smoke that will always follow you, no matter where you’re sitting around the fire. As always, cheers! CW

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Chocolate

Any place that brands itself as a dessert café definitely appeals to the masses. While The Chocolate’s gigantic layer cakes are mouth-watering, You might want to consider the Cazookie. The Cazookie is so named because the cookie dough is baked more like a cake—in a nice, deep ramekin that keeps it warm and melty while a pile of ice cream drizzles its way into the dessert. It’s a cookie that eats like a cake, and that is never a bad thing. 212 S. State, 801-2247334; 9120 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-5330, thechocolatedc.com

Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT M ON -T HU 11a - 11p FRI-S AT 1 1 a - 12a / S UN 3 p-10p

This classic drive-in started in an old tin shack in 1951, and has been satisfying West Valley City folks’ cravings for old-fashioned hamburgers, hand-cut french fries and thick milkshakes ever since. The specialty at Ab’s is the Fat Boy burger, which always tastes best with a thick, peanut butter shake next to it. Beyond burgers, Ab’s also serves up grilled chicken, corn dogs, chili dogs, fish & chips and tasty onion rings. 4591 S. 5600 West, West Valley City, 801-968-2130, absdrivein.com

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

Prost!

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801.266.4182

Ab’s Drive-In

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

20 W. 200 S. SLC (801) 355-3891

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

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Delivering Attitude for 40 years! Twin Suns Café

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Craft your own pizza

In Utah!

ALEX SPRINGER

First

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Named for the twin suns that scorch Luke Skywalker’s home planet of Tatooine, breakfast or lunch at Twin Suns Café is right up any Star Wars fan’s alley; X-Wings and TIE Fighters hang from the ceiling, locked in an eternal dogfight above a solid collection of action figures and art dedicated to the mother of all space operas. The menu is a mixture of traditional classics with Mexican flair, many named after popular fixtures from a galaxy far, far away. Uncle Tommy’s Wet Burrito ($9) is a Hutt-sized offering that wraps together eggs, queso fresco, beans, rice and sausage with a red salsa called Sith Sauce. The sausage was my favorite part of the whole thing, and I found myself wishing more of the slightly sweet links were packed inside. The Boonta Bowl ($7.50, pictured) is a vegan-friendly medley of chile-garlic tofu, squash, peppers, broccoli and quinoa topped with a tasty ginger-turmeric sauce. As Twin Suns tries to source locally whenever possible, some of the veggies vary based on what’s in season. The star of this dish is the sauce—it’s smoky, velvety and makes the flavors pop like a freshly-ignited lightsaber. Reviewed Sept. 6. 2305 S. Highland Drive, 385-252 7061, facebook.com/twinsunscafe

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CINEMA

FILM REVIEW

Kangaroo Court

We sell tickets!

check us first! low or no fees

The Children Act keeps bouncing from one idea to the next.

upcoming shows Crucial fest

BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

$

125

A24 FILMS

W

the buttertones

Stanley Tucci and Emma Thompson in The Children Act Fiona’s situation would ever do, but we never understand why she deviated from standard practice, or what it means for her to have to done so. Ian McEwan adapted his own novel for the screen here, and that is rarely a good idea: a bit of distance from the material is needed, as well as a bit of ruthlessness in deciding what belongs onscreen and what doesn’t. Things that work on the page don’t necessarily translate to cinema. I haven’t read the book, so perhaps the book doesn’t work, either, but McEwan’s self-adapted On Chesil Beach suffers from similar issues. The script is constantly picking up ideas, emotions and even entire plot tangents—a stalking sub-plot pops up at one point— only to turn them over once or twice and then discard them as uninteresting, or in the mistaken belief that it has said all it wants to say about them. But whatever The Children Act thinks it’s about, I cannot fathom. CW

$

13

thurs, 10/04 | kilby court

robotaki $

13

wed, 10/17 | kilby court

$

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Emma Thompson Stanley Tucci Fionn Whitehead R

17

TRY THESE Enduring Love (2004) Rhys Ifans Daniel Craig R

Notes on a Scandal (2006) Cate Blanchett Judi Dench R

On Chesil Beach (2017) Saoirse Ronan Billy Howle R

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Sense and Sensibility (1995) Emma Thompson Kate Winslet PG

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THE CHILDREN ACT BB.5

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comfortable balance between career and personal life comes with many more obstacles than for our male peers. But at least it’s not a film that condemns women—or even this one woman—for daring to do a man’s job, or for not being emotional “enough,” or for failing to perform femininity better, which is so often the undercurrent of movies like this one. So that is no small thing. And kudos, too, to the film for giving Fiona a male law clerk (the lovely Jason Watkins) who is ultra-attentive to her needs in a way that will be seen as traditionally feminine—he brings her biscuits and coffee, he mends her courtroom wig, he’s gentle and solicitous of her moods and weathers her tantrums with dignified aplomb. But this character study is nevertheless a frustratingly random and disorderly one, in spite of Thompson’s tremendous efforts. (She’s the only reason to see this movie, though she’s enough.) It’s simply never clear what The Children Act is trying to say about her as a person, or as an adjudicator of weighty matters. Is she too rigid to be humane in her judgments? Are her personal problems at home impacting her ability to be impartial? Is she, in fact, actually not that bothered about her husband leaving? Why does the film refrain from helping us appreciate just how radical and unusual it is for Fiona to visit the Jehovah’s Witness boy (Fionn Whitehead) in the hospital? Apparently this is not a thing a judge in

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hat kind of movie is The Children Act, anyway? It’s not a courtroom drama, even if it does revolve around a legal battle to allow a London hospital to administer a life-saving blood transfusion to an underage patient, whose Jehovah’s Witness parents are refusing permission because they oppose such treatment as matter of faith. (The title refers to a 1989 British law pertaining to the welfare of children.) It’s not a reckoning with religion in a secular age, or with antiscientific beliefs that are downright deadly; it invokes such notions, but leaves them mostly unexplored, and leaves poor Ben Chaplin, as the devout father, dangling after an impassioned defense of his beliefs. It’s not even exactly a story about a troubled marriage, though it does feature the always marvelous Stanley Tucci walking out on his wife—the case’s work-obsessed judge, Fiona Maye (Emma Thompson)—because she emotionally walked out of the marriage years ago. The closest The Children Act comes to a coherent kind of tale is as a character study of Fiona. By some minor miracle, director Richard Eyre (Notes on a Scandal) manages to give us a portrait of a messed-up woman without making it feel like a judgment on her as a woman, nor does the film seem to make sweeping judgments about women in general, either. Thompson’s palpable empathy for Fiona, and her ability to subtly convey that to us, with oceans of confused and conflicted emotion roiling just under her placid surface, makes her not only beautifully real but specifically individual. Yes, this is yet another movie about a workaholic professional woman who cannot cope with it all, one that fails to even acknowledge that for women, achieving a


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CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BLAZE BBB.5 Director Ethan Hawke offers a cure for the common biopic in the life of Blaze Foley (Ben Dickey), a country-music singer-songwriter whose compositions were recorded by stars like Merle Haggard and John Prine, but who never himself managed any success in his lifetime. Some of the usual suspects are involved—including alcoholism—which would have made it easy for Blaze to fall victim to cliché. But in adapting the memoir by Foley’s wife, Sybil Rosen, Hawke employs an achronological structure that weaves between Foley’s life with Sybil (Alia Shawkat), a late live performance and a radio interview given by his friends after his death. The result isn’t simply unconventional, but enthralling, allowing us to watch Foley during happy times even as we know the fate awaiting him. Dickey, a non-professional actor, does remarkable work as Foley, capturing a lively raconteur who’s also a haunted, isolated soul. Where many films of this kind would emphasize the moment when people know they’re listening to creative genius, the defining shots here involve performances where musicians are mostly ignored, with characters wandering out of frame as songs play somewhere in the distance. Opens Sept. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

LITTLE WOMEN [not yet reviewed] The latest adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott classic gets a contemporary setting. Opens Sept. 28 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) NIGHT SCHOOL [not yet reviewed] A motley crew—including Kevin Hart—preps for their GED with a no-nonsense teacher (Tiffany Haddish). Opens Sept. 28 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

THE CHILDREN ACT BB.5 See review on p. 31. Opens Sept. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)

PICK OF THE LITTER BBB Plenty of people might enjoy this documentary if it were nothing more than OMG Adorable Doggos: The Motion Picture, but codirectors Don Hardy Jr. and Dana Nachman (Batkid Begins) offer more than that. For two years, they follow five siblings from a Labrador retriever litter as they’re trained by volunteers for the Northern California-based Guide Dogs for the Blind to see if they’re up to the job of working with vision-impaired people. There are a few mildly dramatic turns along the way—not all of the litter-mates turn out to have the right stuff—and some earned emotion from the work put in by trainers who work with and become attached to the puppies, only to have to surrender them at one point or another. Mostly, it’s an intriguing study of the hard work involved in preparing dogs to know not just how to obey, but when to disobey when it puts their vision-impaired handler in danger. It’s a solidly made paean to people who put in hard work to help others have more freedom in their lives—and yes, it doesn’t hurt that the doggos are adorable. Opens Sept. 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR

HELL FEST [not yet reviewed] A real killer attacks the guests at a horror-themed amusement park. Opens Sept. 28 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SMALLFOOT BBB I wonder how parents will feel about taking their kids to this animated adventure when they discover its message is “question and reject well-meaning religious dogma when it foments

division.” High in a Himalayan community of yetis, good-natured Migo (Channing Tatum) encounters a human—dubbed a “smallfoot” in local mythology—which rocks his world-view since yetis are taught that such creatures do not exist. Migo eventually crosses paths with a TV nature-show host (James Corden), with the two forming a friendship despite their language barrier, but the narrative focuses on how Migo and the rest of his community processes empirical information that runs contrary to the teachings of the Stonekeeper (Common). The visual world-building feels on the thin side at times, along with characterizations like the Stonekeeper’s rebellious daughter (Zendaya). But a couple of catchy musical numbers and solid physical comedy from director Karey Kirkpatrick (Over the Hedge) keep the energy level high enough to be satisfying, while the story offers young viewers a much-needed lesson in realizing that facing reality is the only way to make the world better. Opens Sept. 28 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS FRONT ROW FILM ROAST: TWILIGHT At Brewvies, Sept. 29, 9 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES FAHRENHEIT 11/9 BB.5 Michael Moore takes on the Trump era in a documentary that’s noteworthy primarily for its atypical optimism. That’s not to say that Moore is happy about the Trump presidency, tracking POTUS from his improbable ascendancy and addressing the way media entities played softball with or benefited from Trump and his surrogates. It’s all filtered through Moore’s trademark focus on corporate greed, as Moore takes swipes at both parties. But unlike many recent “issue docs” that spend 80 minutes terrifying you before offering 10 minutes of hope, this one spends plenty of time on positive action, from ordinary folks inspired to run for office, to the inspiring teens behind March for Our Lives. Moore is still his grandstanding self, unfortu-

nately, and his wide-ranging agitprop could use more focus. It is nice, though, to be equal parts alarmed and motivated. (R)—SR

THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS BBB.5 Horror schlockmeister Eli Roth turns his hand to kiddie scares, and offers entry-level spookiness for budding fright fans. When a newly orphaned gradeschooler (Owen Vaccaro) is sent to live with his weird uncle (Jack Black), he discovers a haunted house, a witchy neighbor (Cate Blanchett) and mysteries galore. A few unexpectedly clever gross-outs—jack-o’-lantern vomit!—and some deeply unsettlingthough-still-PG creepy imagery meets sweetly old-fashioned foggy cemeteries in a fantasy retro 1950s that’s just a little bit steampunk. There’s a lot of stuff crammed into this little movie, but somehow it all works together, particularly thanks to the cast. While Blanchett vamps it up deliciously, Black tones down his mania, and they meet in a comic middle that is perfectly pitched. Someone in Hollywood demanded, “Get me the next Harry Potter!” Dang if they didn’t get pretty close. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

LIFE ITSELF B.5 Rarely has a motion picture so shamelessly insisted “You will know the majesty of the entire human experience, so help me God, or else.” Writer/director Dan Fogelman (This Is Us) weaves between multiple time periods, exploring the lives and loves of characters played by Oscar Isaac, Olivia Wilde, Antonio Banderas and more. It rapidly morphs into the kind of movie that will stop at nothing to tug at your heartstrings, including an incalculable number of character deaths and an improbably even-more-incalculable number of meet-cutes involving florid professions of eternal love. Perhaps the most baffling thing is that the concept almost pleads to be a musical, yet is desperately earnest about making us understand it’s about the unpredictability of “real life.” This is more than mere optimism; it’s an attempt to shovel 10 pounds of “all the feels” into a 5-pound bag. (PG-13)—SR

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Crucialfest 8 brings grindcore pioneers Pig Destroyer to shred Utah for the first time.

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FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

CRUCIALFEST 8

Utah State Fairpark, 1000 W. North Temple Friday, Sept. 28, 2 p.m.-1 a.m Saturday, Sept. 29, noon-1 a.m. $35-$145 All ages until 10:30 p.m. each night; 21+ thereafter crucialfest.com

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goth/folk-rocker Chelsea Wolfe, whose latest record Hiss Spun, recorded by Converge’s Kurt Ballou, has been winning over metal fans since its 2017 release. Chicago’s Russian Circles bring instrumental rock to the table, while Pig Destroyer’s second day co-headliners are legendary doom-metal veterans Neurosis, who evolved from the Bay Area punk squall of 1987’s Pain of Mind to pioneering sludgy post-metal. Bischoff says booking Neurosis in particular has been a personal goal for years, and local metalheads agree: “Each year, I ask the question, ‘If you could see anyone at Crucialfest, who would it be?’” Bischoff says. “Neurosis always makes the list.” With four decades of ego-free exploration, Neurosis’ founding trio of Scott Kelly, Dave Edwardson and Jason Roeder still push metal boundaries. Other musical highlights of the two-day festival include the metalcore of Black Tusk, Mutoid Man and Cult Leader; the psychedelia of Earthless and Royal Thunder; the folk-tinged Americana of Chuck Ragan and Amigo the Devil; the aggressive hip-hop of Dem Atlas, Dalëk and Shredders; the electronic experimentation of Dance with the Dead, Magic Sword and Dan Terminus; the hardcore punk of Slaves (U.K.), Street Sects and Zig Zags; and at least 15 local bands. As Bischoff says, “You’re not into metal? Me neither. This is not a metal festival. Crucialfest is true to the spirit of underground Salt Lake City music and culture.” Crucialfest 8 also marks the debut of Crucialdrag, featuring Biqtch Puddin’ (reigning queen of The Boulet Brothers’ Dragula reality show), fellow Dragula competitor Ursula Major and many more local and national killer queens. At the end of the day, Crucialfest not only represents Utah’s diverse community, but also displays a different side of Salt Lake City that goes beyond the boring, clean-cut vanilla stereotype. And extremity is equally as important as the status quo. CW

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hat started as Crucialfest founder Jarom Bischoff’s dream of bridging the gap between heav y music and the general public is now a force to be reckoned with. What began as the baby mutant dinosaurs of small venues across town has now grown into a Godzilla-sized music festival gracing the Beehive State, and this year sports its most important lineup of extreme, alternative music. Crucialfest 8 is turning heads like The Exorcist—and what better location for two straight days of headbanging, day-drinking and food-trucking than Utah State Fairpark? Out of the 40 bands and artists on this year’s bill, one stands out for making their Utah debut: grindcore pioneers Pig Destroyer. “On stage, for us, is the best part of being in a band,” says Blake Harrison, who’s best known for Pig Destroyer’s eerie and sometimes playful electronics and samples. His latest work—peppered into the band’s sixth studio album, Head Cage, released Sept. 7— creates a theatrical atmosphere mixed with adrenaline and adventure. “It’s not always about a violent line or necessarily something aggressive sounding—you gotta listen, hear dialogue and sound, and take it out of context,” he says. Explaining more about the inspirations for his dark samples, Harrison adds, “There’s this Sam Neill movie that I love called Possession—I’ve got maybe 20 samples from that I’ve been trying to wedge in on [2012’s] Book Burner and Head Cage.” For those unaccustomed to Pig Destroyer (or grindcore in general), the meaning behind the band’s name is simple: destroying cops. But before going all aggro and #MAGA, remember that Pig Destroyer’s music eviscerates many topics—everything from religion and serial stranglers to former Vice President Dick Cheney taking out bystanders on a Halliburton jetpack. Formed in Alexandria, Va., in 1997 by vocalist J.R. Hayes, guitarist Scott Hull and drummer John Evans, the band stuck to that lineup until Harrison joined the fold on 2007’s Phantom Limb, taking Pig Destroyer in a noisy, aggressive direction. “Grindcore and extreme music has been the bastard child of the music industry,” Harrison says. “I was having a conversation with my buddy the other day, and he said, ‘One of the great things about metal is when you get into it, you’re basically into it for life.’ The fans are very rabid—extreme music is not a casual thing. It’s not like picking up a Keith Urban record and going, ‘This is cool, I guess.’” After releasing five studio albums, Pig Destroyer added bassist John Jarvis in 2013. Five years later, Head Cage hit the streets, and Pig Destroyer is now ready to blow up the stage with new tunes. Still, it’s no secret that the grindcore influencers take their time with each record and don’t tour very often, which makes this year’s Crucialfest one for the books. “It’s hard,” Harrison says. “We all have day jobs; Scott’s got a wife and a family. A lot of people think it’s financial, but a lot of it’s just time. We can’t be on the road for months straight. It’s how the band is set up and how we function.” Joining Pig Destroyer as Crucialfest headliners are explosive

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BY NICK McGREGOR AND KEITH L. McDONALD

FRIDAY 9/28

In an era when it’s normal to place MCs under the age of 25 in the mumble-rap category, Denzel Curry offers a forceful rebuttal of such an inaccurate slant. In less than 10 years, the 23-year-old Florida native has hit his mark with the precision of the Golden State Warriors point guard who shares his last name, developing a solid fan base through meaningful lyrics and a unique, versatile style. Curry started out with fellow Florida spitter SpaceGhostPurrp and his crew, Raider Klan. After that collective disbanded, Curry flourished by blazing his own path. His debut studio album, 2013’s Nostalgic 64, came out while he was still in high school—coincidentally, the same school as Trayvon Martin, whose tragic death spawned Curry’s 2012 mixtape Strictly for My R.V.I.D.X.R.Z. But it’s Curry’s newly released third studio album, Ta13oo, that has fans and music-industry veterans buzzing. A Jekyll-and-Hyde contrast of Curry’s depressing and gleeful psyche, Ta13oo (pronounced “taboo”) includes social commentary, party cuts and sharp self-assessments. Before you attend Curry’s local show at The Complex, give the album’s three acts— “Light,” “Gray” and “Dark”—a listen. There’s something here for both new ears looking to keep up with hip-hop’s ever-changing popularity and old hair-sprouting ears that are always annoyed at the kids on “their” lawn. (Keith L. McDonald) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $19.50, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

Gary Numan

RENATA RAKSHA

Denzel Curry, Kid Trunks

JOSEPH CULTICE

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SATURDAY 9/29 Gary Numan

This West London native is an industrial icon, revered for his uncompromising approach by everyone from Depeche Mode and Marilyn Manson to Beck and Nine Inch Nails. Numan’s early hits “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” and “Cars” were hailed for pushing pop forward; Talking Heads founder David Byrne even once called them “two of the finest songs” in British music. But Numan never backed down when it came to his intuition, skipping music-biz stardom in favor of cultivating his own frigid form of crushing electronica. The proof of his success? Twenty-two full-length albums in, he’s still fiercely independent—a focus he adopted from his wife, Gemma Webb. Managing, promoting and booking himself, he also writes, records, produces and performs all of his music. Forty years after signing his first record deal, he maintains a raw perspective on the indignities of today—his latest album, Savage (Songs from a Broken World), is a post-apocalyptic look at life on Earth in the not-too-distant, climatechange-ravaged future—while remembering the rebellion from which his career sprung. “I am very proud of the fact that as I’ve got to the more precarious latter part of my career, the music’s got progressively darker and even less radio friendly,” Numan says in his 2017 website bio. “I’ve done the opposite of playing it safe.” (Nick McGregor) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $32 presale; $35 day of, 21+, depotslc.com

Denzel Curry

Guerrilla Toss, Black Belt Eagle Scout, Savage Daughters

If art rock went through a schizophrenic spell, using analog synths to recreate the sound of distorted dolphins and craft a clavichord out of a honey-baked ham, the end result would be New York quintet Guerrilla Toss. The band’s new LP, Twisted Crystal, stirs psychpop, avant-garde electronica and classic riffs into its punk rock milkshake, constructing a sonically exuberant foundation for frontwoman Kassie Carlson’s manic vocals. Anyone can channel the New Wave energy of The Slits and the smoky surrealism of Laurie Anderson; doing so while dashing off danceable ditties that skewer modern society is a rare feat. Give credit to resident guitar guru Arian Shafiee, hypnotic bassist Stephen Cooper, polyglot drummer/producer Peter Negroponte and keyboard whisperer Sam Lisabeth for grounding Guerrilla Toss’ madness in Middle Eastern tunings, polyrhythmic pop and staccato krautrock, all of which encourages listeners to abide by the band’s motto: “Magic is easy. Hypnotize yourself well.” Equally hypnotic is opener Black Belt Eagle Scout, Katherine Paul’s personal/political mash-up of Native American folk tradition and modern rock mourning. Written while Paul’s Swinomish Indian Tribe friends and family protested at Standing Rock in 2017, her new album Mother of My Children is a moving meditation on queer romance, indigenous suffering and the codeswitched emotions required to navigate such intersections. (NM) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 7 p.m., $12, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc


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While her breakthrough LP, 2016’s Honest Life, detailed the loneliness of a singer/songwriter’s time on the road, Courtney Marie Andrews’ new album, May Your Kindness Remain, craves connection and healing. Full of empathetic lyricism and incisive character studies that tackle mental illness, poverty and the ragged reality of the so-called American Dream, May Your Kindness Remain was the first of Andrews’ eight albums produced by an outside contributor: Mark Howard, who’s worked with Bob Dylan, Tom Waits and Emmylou Harris. That last reference serves as a lodestar for Andrews; hailed by The Fader as “a punk-steeped folkie casting sideways glances at mainstream country,” Andrews earned an Emerging Artist of the Year nomination at the 2018 Americana Awards for her raw approach. Searing guitar riffs and gospel vocals kick MYKR into high gear; together with quivering organ and raw percussion, the final product lives up to the blues pedigree of Andrews’ label, Mississippi’s Fat Possum Records. She remains true to herself, however: Once a staple in her hometown Phoenix punk scene, she’s resisted the urge to tie herself to any particular city since getting burned by a local record label. She landed in Los Angeles to record MYKR but, up until last year, would still return to the Pacific Northwest to bartend and wait tables between tours. That might change now that Rolling Stone, NPR and the music establishment have caught on to her storytelling prowess. “You can find songs anywhere,” she told Telegraph in February. “I look for stories in my family and the people I meet”—the “down home America” she loves and elegizes so beautifully. “The working class of America I’m optimistic about.” (NM) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $12 presale; $14 day of, all ages, kilbycourt.com

Too Many Zooz

MONDAY 10/1

Too Many Zooz, Honeycomb

Remember that crazy trio you saw busking in the Union Square subway station on your last trip to New York City? The same ones who appeared onstage with Beyoncé at the 2016 Country Music Association Awards? Yeah, those guys—saxophonist Leo Pellegrino, trumpeter Matt Doe and drummer David “King of Sludge” Parks, whose Too Many Zooz collective has gone from gutter punk to high class in just four years. After a video of Pellegrino spinning like a swing dancer while blaring to the brass band beat of Doe and Parks went viral on TMZ, Too Many Zooz transformed themselves from self-described “brass house” street performers to session musicians with Beyoncé, recording two of Lemonade’s most prominent tracks: “Daddy Lessons” and “Formation.” Now, the trio’s mind-bending musical ability is wowing audiences around North America. Pellegrino’s baritone sax blasts, Doe’s harmonic peals and Parks’ staccato eighthnote rhythms pull from funk, punk and jazz— Pellegrino recently paid tribute to Charles Mingus for a BBC concert at London’s Royal Albert Hall—but in reality, Too Many Zooz operates in a land all its own. “Not to sound existential,” Doe says in a news release for the band’s current Pug in a Tub Tour, “but I don’t like using standardized terms when describing our music. We’re all doing things that are out of the ordinary for our instruments and our roles. Someone from Cuba can hear Cuban music in the cowbells. Someone into death metal will enjoy it next to a grandmother who hears it as old swing music. Nearly every person of every color, creed, background and upbringing can find something to relate to.” (NM) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $16 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com


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WEDNESDAY 10/3

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

THURSDAY 9/27 LIVE MUSIC

Actors + Nite + Rare Fracture + SkyInverted (Metro Music Hall) Breakfast in Silence + Curse League + The Salt the Sea and the Sun God + Emma Park (The Underground) Graham Nash (Commonwealth Room) Jam Now (The Royal) Madeline Finn (Hotel RL) Mythic Valley (Hog Wallow Pub) Nymph (Velour Live Music Gallery) Peter Bradley Adams (The State Room) Seasoned Amnesia (Liquid Joe’s) The Sweet Lillies (Gracies) Reggae at the Royal feat. Fayuca + Of Good Nature (The Royal) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Caviar Club Presents Dusty Grooves (Twist) Destructo (Sky) DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House)

DJ Naomi (Sun Trapp) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos feat. Drew & Jules (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz & Blues Jam (Twist) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Robyn Cage (Prime Piano Bar) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Destructo (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 9/28 LIVE MUSIC

Amorphis + Dark Tranquility + Moonspell + Omnium Gatherum (Liquid Joe’s) Ashley Broder (Wasatch Wiggle) Bob Moses + Mansionair (Metro Music Hall) Channel Z (Club 90) Crucialfest 8 feat. Russian Circles +

Screaming Females, Kitten Forever, Rebel Rebel Very few bands sound like their name—but New Jersey’s Screaming Females have mostly lived up to that lofty task. Frontwoman Marissa Paternoster delivers her shouted lyrics and serrated guitar chops without mercy, while bassist Michael Abbate and drummer Jarret Dougherty pummel their rhythms into sonic submission. But a weird thing happened 10 years into this band’s fiercely DIY existence: For their sixth LP Rose Mountain, released in 2015, Screaming Females migrated toward clarity, concision and melody. Paternoster’s vocals, which address the pain of living with chronic mononucleosis, rang out with unabashed purity instead of redlining out of the mix, while the precision of her playing transformed her legendary guitar licks from those of a brutish battleaxe to a more refined paintbrush. It’s an aesthetic that carries over onto 2018’s double album All at Once, which skews closer to pop than anything these unapologetic punks have ever produced. Instead of living up to everyone’s expectations of what a band called Screaming Females should sound like, All at Once incorporates organ and cello and detours into the so-called heresy of ska—seriously, who plays ska anymore? Still, the sum of all these parts is indispensable in today’s ADD-addled musical world: a long-running band sticking to its shred-at-all-cost guns while somehow finding a new overdrive gear to shift into. In February, Paternoster told Ghetto Blaster Magazine, “We’re more interested in maintaining our integrity [than] caring about whatever ‘success’ is supposed to be.” (Nick McGregor) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $12 presale; $14 day of, all ages, kilbycourt.com

Chelsea Wolfe + Dance with the Dead + more (Utah State Fairpark) seep. 33 Blazin Aces (Outlaw Saloon) Dead Prez + Kool Keith + Scenic Byway + DJ Juggy (Urban Lounge) Denzel Curry + Kid Trunks (The Complex) see p. 34 Folk Hogan (The Garten) Greta Van Fleet + Dorothy (The Union Event Center) Grisha Goryachev (Eccles Theater) Julian Lage Trio (The State Room) Janna and the Rebels (A. Beuford Gifford’s) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Local Women Who Rock feat. Talia Keys & The Love + Michelle Moonshine & Co. + Sarah DeGraw & The OddJobs + Vada Wave (The Depot) The Moves Collective (Hog Wallow Pub) Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Ranges + Man Mountain (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Riding Gravity (A Bar Named Sue) Royal Bliss (Tipsy Cow Saloon) Ryley Walker + Health & Beauty (Kilby Court) Sebastian Bach + Monte Pitman + One Bad Son (Commonwealth Room) When You Were Bigger (Jordan Landing)

Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Audition (Mod Gym)

SATURDAY 9/29 LIVE MUSIC

Blessthefall + The World Alive + Ded (The Complex) Crucialfest 8 feat. Pig Destroyer + Neurosis + Chuck Ragan + more (Utah State Fairpark) see p. 33 Dark Rooms + Sister Adolescent (Velour Live Music Gallery) Felicia Kalini & Her Barrel House Boys (Brewskis)

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ALIBI BAR & PLACE

NICK McGREGOR

BAR FLY

Flint Eastwood + Somme + Halogyns (Kilby Court) The Garcia Project (The State Room) Gary Numan (The Depot) see p. 34 George Nelson and Friends (Johnny’s on Second) Glue Fest feat. Skys Like Rockets + Xavier + Noble Bodies + Something Like Seduction + more (Thanksgiving Point Electric Park) Guerilla Toss + Black Belt Eagle Scout + Savage Daughters (Diabolical Records) see p. 34

Bustling bars like Whiskey Street and White Horse have traditionally dominated the 300 South block of Main Street, but recent addition Alibi adds a touch of class to the strip. With its prodigious indoor foliage, soft blue color scheme and exposed brick, Alibi is particularly appealing—and that’s before you start obsessing over artist Dan Christofferson’s tigers-and-tropicalia wall mural. It made perfect sense that the handful of patrons lazing away a recent Tuesday afternoon were talking graphic design and the challenges of starting a new business: Bar X alumni Chase Worthen, Jacob Hall and Fernando Lazalde opened Alibi less than a month ago, but the aesthetics of the former check-cashing and payday-loan space are thoughtfully arranged. The varied geometric tile patterns hypnotize, while an appealing mix of low-slung blonde wood tables and chairs, dark backless stools and black steel offers a study in the power of contrasts (shout out to interior designer and woodworker Oliver Lewis). Back at the bar, Alibi’s drink menu showcases a subtle twist on old favorites—my Toronto, made with Dickel Rye, Fernet and sugar was straightforward but satisfying, while the Paloma, the Cracklin’ Rosie, the Roller Derby and the special Aperol Spritz all helped us keep our clutches on summer just a little while longer. The beer and wine selection goes in some intriguing directions, too; Worthen recommended a Great Basin Icky IPA straight out of his Elko, Nev., hometown, and I can’t wait to bring my partner back for some House Sparkling Rosé and a platter of salsa and chips from local favorites Salsa Del Diablo. But oh, all those plants: Ivy and spider plants and philodendron abound, lending an aura of intimacy to Alibi’s high ceilings, while a row of succulents above the bar invite closer examination. Come winter, when inversion grips Salt Lake City, we’ll be dying for some of this chlorophyll therapy. (Nick McGregor) 369 S. Main, 801-532-2707, facebook.com/alibislc

Hot House West (Silver Star Cafe) Jenny Oaks Baker (Utah Valley Convention Center) Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Michelle Moonshine Trio (Hog Wallow Pub) Piping in the Desert (Layton City Park) RaVeNeL (The Rise) Rougarou (Bill’s Warehouse) Royal Bliss (Kamikazes) Samba with Gabby (Salt Lake City Arts Hub) Slim Chance and His Psychobilly Playboys (Scorez S. Bar) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tobi Lou (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

’90s Dance Party feat. Flash & Flare + Bo York (Urban Lounge) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Soul Pause (Twist) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Fetish Ball (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Bangarang (Sky)

MONDAY 10/1

Open Mic (High Point Coffee)

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 9/30 LIVE MUSIC

Beach Death + Glume (Gold Blood Collective) Blessthefall + The World Alive + Ded (The Complex) Courtney Marie Andrews + Samantha Crain (Kilby Court) see p. 36 Jenny Oaks Baker (Ogden Utah Tabernacle) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) The Presets + Blood Red Shoes (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

TH

OPAL HILL DRIVE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH

MORGAN WHITNEY

WE CARRY THE NFL PACKAGE

At the Heart of the World + Hyde Park + Carl (The Underground) Cloven Hoof + Vicious Rumors + Visigoth (Metro Music Hall) Doja Cat + Wes Period (Kilby Court) The Glitch Mob + Elohim (The Complex) Too Many Zooz + Honeycomb (Urban Lounge) see p. 36

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

TUESDAY 10/2 LIVE MUSIC

The Boxer Rebellion + Small Lake City (Urban Lounge) Wintersun + Ne Obliviscaris + Sarah Longfield (Metro Music Hall) The Wombats + Barns Courtney (The Complex) Yungblud + Arrested Youth (Kilby Court)

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Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)


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DAILY ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28

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grand theft audio all the best hits of the 90's hear and now damn dirty vultures

saturday 9/29

Live Music

LIVE MUSIC

Clutch + Sevendust (The Depot) Counterparts + Being As An Ocean (The Complex) Dead Sara + Welles (The State Room) Evanoff (Soundwell) Fall Out Boy + Machine Gun Kelly + State Champs (Vivint Smart Home Arena) Killing Joke + <PIG> + Tragic Black + Impxvii (Urban Lounge) Live Jazz (Club 90) Screaming Females + Kitten Forever + Rebel Rebel (Kilby Court) see p. 38 Zeal & Ardor + Astronoid (Metro Music Hall)

Enjoy Fall on the Valley’s Best Patio!

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER 9.26 BEN BRINTON

9.27 MYTHIC VALLEY

9.28 THE MOVES COLLECTIVE

9.29 MICHELLE MOONSHINE TRIO

10.1 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

10.6 BUFFALO VS. TRAIN

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke (The Wall at BYU) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down)

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friDAY 9/28

WEDNESDAY 10/3

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at the Royal

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ KJ “Wesley Snipes” (Club 90)

TUESDAY 10/2

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

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10/26

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3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

SEPTEMBER 27, 2018 | 43

10/5

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w/ ginger and the gents late night savior


OCTOBER 19 - 20

MOUNTAIN AMERICA EXPO CENTER · Exhibition Hall · Lecture Hall · Family Night Friday Night · Utah All-Star Political Panel · Utah All-Star Medical Panel

ACROSS

1. Game in which one yells 36-Across 4. Drink 10. They're used for storage 14. DuVernay who directed "Selma" 15. Meeting around lunchtime 16. Stuntman Knievel 17. Top of a clock 18. Mediterranean capital 19. Morning joe 20. 2004 Olympics swimming star 22. Core belief 23. Sausage served with kraut 24. Norton AntiVirus target 25. Many winter vacationers 28. Beginning 29. Anesthetized 30. Leave at the altar 32. ____ Hubbard of Scientology 35. Mauna ____ Observatory 36. Exclamation during a game of 1-Across that, read a different way, could apply to 20-Across, 53-Across, 11-Down or 27-Down 39. It's nearly nada 40. Memo heading abbr. 42. Photo ID issuers 43. Biceps-flexing guys 45. "The Tortoise and the Hare" fabulist 47. Place of worship 48. "The Last O.G." star Tracy 50. Face With Tears of Joy, e.g. 52. Not getting along (with) 53. Laurence Fishburne's "What's Love Got to Do With It" role 57. Tech review site 58. Like some biology majors 59. Terminate 60. Offering from a casting director 61. Sportscaster Dick 62. Racket 63. Messengers at Hogwarts 64. Bully's response 65. Breakfasted or lunched

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9. Some TV drama settings 10. Decorate fancily 11. She says "Don't get mad, get everything" during a cameo in the 1996 movie "The First Wives Club" 12. "When pigs fly!" 13. Roof material 21. Overly precious 22. QB stat 24. Prefix with discrimination 25. 1973 Toni Morrison novel 26. Garden hose annoyance 27. Early 20th-century writer/reformer nicknamed "The Terror of the Trusts" 28. Plaza de toros cries 30. Stalled driver's request 31. Music producer Gotti 33. First-year law student 34. Zilch 37. Binge-watch, maybe 38. 2014 Robert Duvall/ Robert Downey Jr. legal drama 41. Nixes 44. Kuwaiti leader 46. Like this emoticon: :-( 47. How a baby may be carried

48. Smaller than small 49. Currently airing 50. Barely manage 51. Ideas spreading virally 53. ____ Phillips, "The Queen of Soap Operas" 54. Zilch 55. Way out 56. Actress Russo 58. Foot, to a zoologist

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Hosted by

YOU'RE IT

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

MEDICAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE

© 2018

SUDOKU

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Utah’s frist

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Biologists are constantly unearthing new species, though not new in the sense of having just appeared on our planet. In fact, they’re animals and plants that have existed for millennia. But they’ve never before been noticed and identified by science. Among recent additions to our ever-growing knowledge are an orchid in Madagascar that smells like champagne, an electric blue tarantula in the Guyana rain forest, and a Western Australian grass that has a flavor resembling salt and vinegar potato chips. I suspect you’ll be making metaphorically comparable discoveries in the coming weeks, Libra: evocative beauty that you’ve been blind to and interesting phenomena that have been hiding in plain sight.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you have any skills at living on the edge between the light and the dark? Are you curious about what the world might look like and how people would treat you if you refused to divide everything up into that which helps you and that which doesn’t help you? Can you imagine how it would feel if you loved your life just the way it is and not wish it were different from what it is? Please note: People less courageous than you might prefer you to be less courageous. But I hope you’ll stay true to the experiment of living on the edge between the light and the dark.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to popbitch.com, most top-charting pop songs are in a minor key. In light of this fact, I encourage you to avoid listenSCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There is no such thing as a plant that blooms continuously. ing to pop songs for the next three weeks. In my astrological Phases of withering and dormancy are just as natural as phases opinion, it’s essential that you surround yourself with stimuli that of growth. I bring this fact to your attention to help you remain don’t tend to make you sad and blue, that don’t influence you to poised as you go through your own period of withering followed interpret your experience through a melancholic, mournful filter. by dormancy. You should accept life’s demand that you slow To accomplish the assignments that life will be sending you, you down and explore the mysteries of fallowness. You should sur- need to at least temporarily cultivate a mood of crafty optimism. render sweetly to stasis and enjoy your time of rest and recharging. That’s the best way to prepare for the new cycle of growth GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini regent Queen Victoria (1819–1901) wore crotchless that will begin in a few weeks. underwear made of linen. A few years ago, Britain’s Museums, Libraries and Archives Council accorded them “national desigSAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you were ever going to win a contest that awarded you a free nated status,” an official notice that means they are a national vacation to an exotic sanctuary, it would probably happen during treasure. If I had the power, I would give your undergarments an the next three weeks. If a toy company would ever approach you equivalent acknowledgment. The only evidence I would need to about developing a line of action figures and kids’ books based on make this bold move would be the intelligence and expressiveyour life, it might also be sometime soon. And if you have ever had ness with which you are going to wield your erotic sensibilities hopes of converting your adversaries into allies, or getting support in the coming weeks. and backing for your good original ideas, or finding unexpected inspiration to fix one of your not-so-good habits, those oppor- CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve taken a break from socializing, my fellow Cancerian. In tunities are now more likely than they have been for some time. fact, I’m on sabbatical from my regular rhythm. My goal for the coming days is to commune with my past and review the story CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): An 81-year-old Capricorn man named James Harrison has donat- of my life. Rather than fill my brain up with the latest news ed his unique blood on 1,173 occasions. Scientists have used it to and celebrity gossip, I am meditating on my own deep dark make medicine that prevents Rhesus disease in unborn babies, mysteries. I’m mining for secrets that I might be concealing from thereby healing more than 2.4 million kids and literally saving myself. In accordance with the astrological omens, I suggest thousands of lives. I don’t expect you to do anything nearly as that you follow my lead. You might want to delve into boxes of remarkable. But I do want to let you know that the coming weeks old mementos or reread emails from years ago. You could get will be a favorable time to lift your generosity and compassion in touch with people who are no longer part of your life even though they were once important to you. How else could you get to the next level. Harrison would serve well as your patron saint. into intimate contact with your eternal self? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): On a spring morning some years ago, a smoky aroma woke me from LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): a deep sleep. Peering out my bedroom window into the backyard, I Here’s a quote from A Map of Misreading, a book by renowned saw that my trickster girlfriend Anastasia had built a bonfire. When literary critic Harold Bloom: “Where the synecdoche of tessera I stumbled to my closet to get dressed, I found my clothes missing. made a totality, however illusive, the metonymy of kenosis There were no garments in my dresser, either. In my groggy haze, I breaks this up into discontinuous fragments.” What the cluck realized that my entire wardrobe had become fuel for Anastasia’s did Harold Bloom just say?! I’m not being anti-intellectual conflagration. It was too late to intervene, and I was still quite when I declare this passage to be pretentious drivel. In the comdrowsy, so I crawled back in bed to resume snoozing. A while later, I ing days, I urge you Leos to draw inspiration from my response woke to find her standing next to the bed bearing a luxurious break- to Bloom. Tell the truth about nonsense. Don’t pretend to fast she said she’d cooked over the flames of my burning clothes. appreciate jumbled or over-complicated ideas. Expose bunk and After our meal, we stayed in bed all day, indulging in a variety of bombast. Be kind, if you can, but be firm. You’re primed to be a riotous fun. I’m not predicting that similar events will unfold in champion of down-to-earth communication. your life, Aquarius. But you might experience adventures that are VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): almost equally boisterous, hilarious and mysterious. A data research company, Priceonomics, suggests that Monday is the most productive day of the week and that October is the PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve got three teachings for you: 1. Was there a time in your past most productive month of the year. My research suggests that when bad romance wounded your talent for love? Yes, but you while Capricorns tend to be the most consistently productive of now have more power to heal that wound than you’ve ever had all the signs in the zodiac, Virgos often outstrip them for a sixbefore. 2. Is it possible you’re ready to shed a semi-delicious week period during the end of each September and throughout addiction to a chaotic magic? Yes. Clarity is poised to trump October. Furthermore, my intuition tells me that you Virgos melodrama. Joyous decisiveness is primed to vanquish ingrained now have an extraordinary capacity to turn good ideas into sadness. 3. Has there ever been a better time than now to resolve practical action. I conclude, therefore, that you are about to and graduate from past events that have bothered and drained embark on a surge of industrious and high-quality work. (P.S.: This October has five Mondays.) you for a long time? No. This is the best time ever.

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WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Dig It

It’s not often you see an archeological dig going on in the capital city. I remember in 1986 there was a hubbub downtown when construction workers unearthed human bones along 200 West between 300 and 400 South. Oops, that was the original pioneer burial site for the first white settlers in the valley. The remains were reburied at This Is The Place State Heritage Park across from Hogle Zoo. However, the pioneer graveyard was on top of a Fremont Indian burial ground where workers found the bodies of three Native Americans and two pit houses. Head just north of the zoo and you’ll find the Fort Douglas Cemetery above the University of Utah campus near the entrance to Red Butte Gardens. Fort Douglas was originally a military supply center for the cavalry during the 1870s known as Camp Douglas. As more people began moving west after the Civil War, and as more battles between Native Americans and whites increased, so did the traffic at the camp. It was renamed Fort Douglas in 1878. During a construction project a few years ago, a backhoe uneartherd the original foundations of Camp Douglas’ barracks and commissary. Jump to the present and the University of Utah has hired two private archaeological consultants to conduct specific excavations under Potter Street (just across from the Fort Douglas Museum). The cool part is that anyone can visit the site from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday until Saturday, Sept. 29. This is your only chance to watch the excavating process. While there, visit the free museum (it’s also an old enlisted men’s barracks) that is fully wheelchair accessible and within a block of a UTA stop. The museum houses military artifacts, dusty dioramas and story boards and a special World War I exhibit commemorating the conflict’s centennial. Outside, there are helicopters, tanks and artillery displays, a piece of the slurry wall from the Twin Towers and the Utah Women’s Service Memorial. If you want to learn about the Fort Douglas Cemetery, there’s a tour open to the public at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27. It’s one of Utah’s most historic cemeteries. A governor and Civil-War-era soldiers who died in the Battle of Bear River (later renamed the Bear River Massacre) are buried there. There’s a section of WWI and WWII graves of prisoners of war from Germany (replete with swastikas), Italy and Japan and the burial place of the guy who killed Lakota Chief Crazy Horse. n

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908359, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. Pesega Vaa, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO Pesega Vaa: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,367.25. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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WEIRD

a computer, at which he “spent hours,” said one unnamed source. “This is what killed him.”

Easy Marks Three men in Westborough, Mass., are out $306,000 after falling victim to a scam, masslive.com reported on Aug. 29. Joseph Boakye, 31, of Worcester is one of two suspects wanted by Westborough police for allegedly selling 15 kilograms of counterfeit gold dust. In July, the victims met Boakye and his accomplice at an Extended Stay America hotel and tested the gold dust for authenticity. Apparently satisfied, they paid $26,000 in cash and transferred $280,000 into a Bank of America account, after which they received a locked Sentry safe that supposedly held the gold dust. Boakye told them they would get the combination to the safe after the transfer cleared. But two days later, when they were unable to open the safe, the victims called a locksmith. Inside—shocking!—was counterfeit gold.

Oops! An Orlando, Fla., home will need more than roof repairs after a crane parked outside tipped over on Sept. 4, splitting the house in half so cleanly daylight could be seen through it. United Press International reported the roof was under construction when the machinery fell over, likely because the ground underneath it was wet, said Ivan Fogarty, corporate safety director for crane operator Beyel Brothers Crane & Rigging. No one was inside the home at the time, and no one on the roofing crew was injured, but the house has been declared unlivable.

n A homeowner in Toluca Lake, Calif., looked at video from his surveillance camera late on Aug. 29 and saw a person on the property, but it wasn’t until the next day, when he looked around for any damage, that a man was discovered stuck between a wall and a garage. KCAL TV reported that it took firefighters more than an hour to free the unnamed man, a suspect wanted in connection with a burglary the night before. Los Angeles police arrested him for trespassing as he was transported to the hospital with minor injuries.

n Pavel Matveev, 15, of Mogochino village in the Tomsk region of Russia, apparently despairing of having lost a video game, was found in his yard Sept. 4 after committing suicide by decapitating himself with a chain saw. According to the Daily Mail, Russian media reported the teen’s single mother had bought him

Inexplicable On Sept. 3, as an unnamed woman drove through Columbia Park, Wash., she witnessed a beaver being struck by a car. She stopped and tried to help the animal, wrapping it in a towel before going home to find a container to put it in. When she returned to the scene about 30 minutes later, YakTriNews reported, she found 35-year-old Richard Delp sexually assaulting the dying beaver. Unsurprisingly, Delp was also found to be in possession of methamphetamine; police charged him with possession and animal cruelty. The beaver didn’t survive. Questionable Judgment Billy Warren Pierce Jr., 44, an inmate of the Pasco County (Florida) Jail, already awaiting trial on charges of capital sexual battery of a child, compounded his problems by trying to hire a fellow inmate to kill his victim and her family. WFTS reported the unnamed inmate told detectives Aug. 22 that Pierce offered him $9,000 and instructed him about how to get into the house, even suggesting using a gas line fed through a window as the murder method. Jail staff also obtained a contract signed by Pierce, detailing the targets of the killing and the agreed-upon price. When told on Sept. 4 he would be charged with solicitation of murder, Pierce objected, “But I haven’t paid him any money yet.” Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Overreactions Bryan Tucker of Sandston, Va., was fed up to here! with kids littering his lawn as they waited at the Henrico County school bus stop adjacent to his property. So on Sept. 4, he installed a battery-powered electric fence. “They don’t respect other people’s land,” Tucker told WTVR TV. “I pick up trash every day.” Officials informed him later that day that the fence was placed on county property, not his own, so Tucker took it down. But he still thinks he made a point: “The message has gotten across,” Tucker said. “Parents are posting and talking about it.”

Fooled Ya! University of Houston student Jehv M. looked at a blank wall in his local McDonald’s and saw opportunity. Hoping to boost Asian representation in the burger chain’s advertising, Jehv created a poster featuring himself and a friend touting McDonald’s french fries. They bought used McDonald’s uniforms at a thrift store as disguises, then boldly hung the poster in a Pearland, Texas, location as customers ordered and ate around them. United Press International reported that 51 days later, the poster still hung on the wall unnoticed, as shown in a photo on Jehv’s Twitter feed. As of Sept. 4, it was not clear whether management at McDonald’s knew of the poster’s origins.

Babs De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

Least-Competent Criminals Thieves in Roanoke County, Va., hit the same shoe store twice in July and August, according to The Roanoke Times, stealing shirts, hoodies, jackets—and right shoes. Thirteen shoes meant for a right foot were taken from Clean Soles, where store operator Rob Wickham said he typically displays right shoes and keeps the mates behind the counter. They’re “not much good unless you have two right feet,” said Wickham. A 17-year-old suspect has been charged with the July break-in.

n Monica Walley of Holden Heights, Fla., wrote a negative online review Aug. 20 about the Daybreak Diner in Orlando, accusing the restaurant of refusing service to her disabled mother. The negative review didn’t sit well with the diner owner’s son, Michael Johnson, or his housemates, Jesse Martin and Norman Auvil, WFTV reported. That evening, as the three sat drinking beer, Martin looked up Walley’s address, then they drove to her home, where Auvil, 42, shot three rounds into the house. “I actually could feel the air from the bullet as it passed by me,” said Ken Walley, Monica’s father. “I didn’t think anybody was crazy enough to do something like this over something so small,” Monica Walley said. Auvil was arrested Aug. 30 and charged with shooting into a dwelling, according to the Orange County Sheriff’s Office.

AND UTES FANS!

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New World Order Kimberel Eventide, 36, believes her purpose here on earth is to help other humans become elves, just like herself. A resident of Illinois, Eventide identifies as a Pleiadian Starseed, an Otherkin who first realized she was an elf after reading and watching the “Lord of the Rings” series by J.R.R. Tolkien. She spends her time dressing as an elf in silk, velvet or nature-inspired clothing and pointed elf ears—but she doesn’t wear them all the time because “my own ears have a slight point to them.” Eventide’s husband supports her elfdom but “he does not understand it and does not watch many of my videos,” she said. “I am an Elven spiritual teacher who offers personal Skype online sessions to help individual souls,” she explained to the Daily Mail. Her mission, called “Projectelvenstar,” is specifically to help humans transform themselves into High Elves—”ears are optional but can become a byproduct of becoming extrasensory and hearing better over time.”

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City Weekly September 27, 2018