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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LONG MAY THEY REIGN

Meet the local figures out to protect the western monarch butterfly. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 19 A&E 23 DINE 29 CINEMA 31 MUSIC 43 COMMUNITY

ANNA KASER

Front desk From manning our switchboard with samurai precision to coordinating volunteers at our recent Beer Fest, Kaser is a jack of many trades. An avid reader, the English grad hopes to “travel to each continent to increase my knowledge of what’s going on in the world—different types of food and culture.”

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Wildlife Board approves more cougar-hunting permits. facebook.com/slcweekly

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BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

SOAP BOX

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Supporting authors from @SLCWEEKLY “shithole” countries @CITYWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Aug. 23, “Oasis Lost”

bookedon25th.com 801-394-4891

147 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT

IMO, I don’t think referring to people as “invasive species” will help the problem.

@_MYFRIENDRYAN Via Twitter

Your recent article says the West Davis Corridor could eliminate another 2,000 acres of wetlands. In fact this number is approximately 50 acres. It’s also important to note the project will acquire and restore 1,100 acres of wetlands west of the corridor as part of our wetland and wildlife mitigation plan.

JOHN GLEASON,

UDOT public information officer Author Emma Penrod responds: I pulled the figures in the article directly from Aubin Douglas’ master’s thesis. Her methodology involved taking USGS maps of known wetlands, and overlaying them with the planned footprints of each of the three projects mentioned to determine the wetland area lost. Douglas is a young researcher, but her work was supervised by a tenured professor at USU. I was referred to her when I called USU for an academic opinion on wetland acreage. It’s likely that the reason for the disparity between the figures can be explained by dif-

ferences in UDOT and Douglas’ methodology (and/or their definition of what it means to be a wetland). But without additional information on how UDOT came up with their figure, I couldn’t say for sure.

Sprung for Springer

I have always wanted to let Alex Springer know how much I enjoy his good-hearted and unpretentious reviews. I was waiting until I was sure City Weekly had finally dumped What’s His Name. Having lived in New York City and Chicago, I was always amused at What’s His Name’s pomposity and ignorance of anything but the most obvious tourist restaurants outside of Salt Lake City. Actually, I do hope What’s His Name is OK and did not just drop dead from hyper-rich-food gluttony.

STEVE IFSHIN, Salt Lake City

Online news post, Aug. 30, “Chronic Lack of Research: Guv gets in the weeds while discussing his thoughts on medical cannabis”

His cop-out is annoying. He’s conservative and beholden to LDS Church and UDOT buddies. They don’t like it and he can’t stand the heat. So copsout with Fed excuse instead of just doing the right thing

in health care expansion and medical marijuana. [He’s] not his own man and sells the citizens of Utah out. Voters need to get rid of Herbert! We need someone who will look out for our interests not his corporate buddies.

CHERYL LANGSTON Via Facebook

Maybe he should listen to the voters and not Washington. It’s funny how they want state freedoms until it’s something they are against then want to throw it on the Feds.

MICHAEL MAEZ Via Facebook

They drug their feet too long trying to figure out a way to corner the market. Too late, Gary. The citizens of Utah have spoken and took it upon themselves to make change.

BRIAN PARDEE Via Facebook

He’s lying about the research. There’s plenty of research already to warrant support passage of the proposition.

STUART MCDONALD Via Facebook

Lol. He’s annoyed that the public is going to make a decision he doesn’t feel they should be able to make.

BRYAN ORVIS Via Facebook

Wait until his stake president talks to him. He’ll be changing his mind.

MICHAEL ADAMS Via Facebook

I loathe the Religislature.

VINCENT SEBASTIAN GREEN Via Facebook We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, MARYANN JOHANSON, KEITH L. McDONALD, MIKE RIEDEL, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION Two Funerals I’ve never been one to get caught up in the clamor of movie stars and public figures. Nor have I found myself elated with their achievements or languished in sorrow over their mishaps, struggles or demises. This week changed all that. When I heard that Sen. John McCain had passed away, I got all choked up, and unlike the inevitable future passing of our five-time draft-dodger president, there was plenty to mourn. In the moment after the announcement, I found myself silently reviewing the achievements of his life: Annapolis graduate; Vietnam-era Navy pilot; intrepid, stubborn prisoner of war who endured endless suffering at the hands of an enemy; powerful and conscientious representative of his constituents; bad chooser of vice-presidential candidates; dedicated husband and father; and, in the end, a dignified and gracious loser to the opponent nobody beats. While President Trump can berate McCain as no hero because he likes “people who weren’t captured,” our president shrinks in comparative stature. America has lost a true national hero. Now, I realize that not everyone loved John McCain; he certainly had his opponents and he made his share of bad decisions. Like the rest of Americans, I viewed McCain’s public life as imperfect, and I certainly realize that the man was not without his own flaws. More than a bit brusque at times, he could be a bit of a scrapper and his positions were often in defiance of both opponents and friends. While that might have riled many, I

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. believe history will bear out that McCain was a man guided by a sense of integrity and honor. He was determined to see and act upon the moral issues, and that meant stepping on a few toes. It is easy to see why Trump disliked him, for there is no favorable way for Trump to rationalize their essential differences: McCain had a deep commitment to the truth; Trump is the ultimate lover of the lie. It is Trump’s resentment—and, perhaps, jealousy—of McCain’s moral backbone that made the two bitter foes. Irked by both a constituency and a government who held McCain in high regard, our president refused to even give the senator the honor of flying the White House flag at half-staff. That outrageous breach of protocol made even Trump’s buddies angry. He relented grudgingly and lowered the flag. Two past presidents were honored at the invitation to eulogize McCain at the funeral. His body lay in state for four days—first in Arizona, and then in the nation’s Capitol, according to accepted protocol. Let’s take a leap into the future and see how Trump’s own demise will be handled: Throngs of revelers, both young and old, will skip happily in the streets, singing lightheartedly “The Big Bad Wolf is Dead.” Women will suddenly abandon the precaution of strategically holding handbags at the meeting of their thighs. Cities across the nation will mark the day, flying the London-built balloons of the diapered Trump sucking his binky. The Donald will lie in state for a total of four days—

first at the Kremlin and then in D.C. No expense will be spared, including the undocumented immigrants hired to do the work that most Americans would find beneath them—standing at the head of the coffin regularly wiping the accumulated sputum from Trump’s face. Two past presidents will file past, taking a few extra moments to probe the body with their canes to make sure Trump’s really dead. Security personnel will be vigilant in limiting any egregious disrespect—stepping in to stop mourners from urinating and defecating on the body. Despite last-minute pleas for compassionate treatment, Trump’s friends and immediate family members will not be released from prison to attend the funeral. Putin himself will deliver the only eulogy at the funeral, hailing Trump as a loyal friend to the Russian Republic, noting, “Comrade Trump will be sorely missed.” And, of course, the hired mourners will be paid union scale. And in reverence of Trump’s express wishes, Robert Mueller will be pushed off a bridge into the Potomac. The funeral procession will be turned away from Arlington, where signs will proclaim, “No Vacancy,” and Trump will be interred instead in his rightful place—hauled by barge out of New York Harbor, taken 25 miles into the Atlantic and dumped with the rest of the garbage. CW

“McCAIN HAD A DEEP COMMITMENT TO THE TRUTH; TRUMP IS THE ULTIMATE LOVER OF THE LIE.”

Michael S. Robinson Sr. is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He lives with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

GRAMA Queen

Lesson No. 1 on how bad laws are made: Base them on one bad person. That’s just what the Logan Municipal Council is about to do. It’s all about shutting down one man’s penchant for seeking government records. Brady Eames “has submitted 127 GRAMA requests to Logan city since July 2017, has appealed to the mayor of Logan 19 times and appealed to the State Records Committee three times (all three appeals were denied),” the Herald Journal reports. The operative word here is “denied.” The state’s Government Records Access and Management Act allows cities to charge for public records, but it never encourages them to be open, to create a public portal online, or to simply grant a request. Eames has taken the requesting business too far, but now, it’s likely the public will suffer. The city wants to create a common email address for requests, which might be a good idea. It’s where those requests go from there that’s the problem.

8 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

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Hobophobia

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You just have to wonder—if it’s this hard to develop a long-abandoned mall site, how are we ever going to site homeless shelters around the county? It’s taken a decade to finally get to the demolition stage for the old Cottonwood Mall—but not without a lot of angst, legal wrangling and public outcry. So consider the “plan” to place smaller homeless centers around the state. Yes, there are three now under construction, including one in South Salt Lake, which is none too happy about it. While there are legitimate questions, the NIMBY factor is overwhelming. Did you know that hobophobia is a real thing? “It is an irrational and persistent fear of homeless people, bums or beggars,” according PsycholoGenie. Just ask the Inn Between, a hospice for dying homeless people, what kind of welcome it’s received.

Highway to Hell

Thank you Salt Lake Tribune for counting the ways people who drink are flummoxed by the law. Things like you can’t go to your favorite “dining club” anymore because it’s now a bar, and you know, the kids will be forever altered by the sight of alcohol. And, oh, the signs! “This premise is licensed as a bar, not a restaurant.” And then there’s the Zion Curtain, designed to keep kids from seeing a drink being poured. In Utah, we must protect ourselves from ourselves. Most evident is the prominent attempts by the governor and other sadly misinformed individuals to scuttle the medical cannabis initiative. The thinking here? If you start with something non-hallucigenic that comes from something that is, well, it’s a slippery slope to hell. Stay away from booze and pot, and go for the Zanax. It will make you forget the silly laws.

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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

PEOPLE’S DAY AT THE PARK CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 08, 2018 PIONEER PARK

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PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

SEPTEMBER 08, 2018 SNOWBIRD

In case you didn’t notice, “people” means you. The People’s Day at the Park is a g reat way to meet local activ ists, candidates and political parties before the November elections. Besides the usual suspects, there are g roups such as the People’s Power A ssembly and Our Revolution—Marching Across A merica. You’ll meet political par ties you might not other w ise recog nize and f ind out why it ’s impor tant for ever yone to be involved in our democrac y. Of course, there are issues peculiar to Utah, and you’ll be able to f ind out more about them, too. Yes, that includes medical cannabis. L iber t y Park, 600 East 900 South, Saturday, Sept. 8, 4-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2C5P X8Q.

ELECT MORE WOMEN

Only 20 percent of Utah’s 104-member Legislature is female. Yes, that’s 21 lone women trying to make a difference in the white male-dominated political environment. The ElectHER Political Development Series is a nonpartisan training and networking event where you can explore the possibility of becoming a candidate and learn that the road is not as daunting as you might think—or have been told. Think of it this way: Men hardly ever think they’re not smart enough or don’t have enough time to serve their community. Women are better than that. Women’s Leadership Institute, 175 E. 400 South, Ste. 600, 801-328-5085, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $179/6 sessions, bit.ly/2Pnrj5u.

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A MATTER OF FACT

SEPTEMBER 08, 2018 AVENUES, 11TH AVE BETWEEN D ST. AND I ST.

We suppose you know that there’s a war on facts. It’s much worse than the War on Christmas, and actually, this war is far from fantasy. Weber State University is launching a series of lectures designed to engage attendees in discussion, debate, dialogue, learning and action around an issue of public concern. “The series aims to raise awareness, impact personal behavior and increase public engagement around the theme of ‘Matter of Fact?’” the event’s website says. You’ll get a primer on what facts are and why logic matters. Matter of Fact: Lands of the West will explore the urgent issues around public lands and native peoples. Weber State University, Wildcat Theater, 3848 Harrison Blvd., 801-626-7737, Tuesday, Sept. 11, noon-1:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2C0WQs2.

—KATHARINE BIELE

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NEWS

PUBLIC ART

Monumental Statement Controversial source material be damned, local artist says latest project speaks to larger goal of making good art more accessible. BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

T

o Shae Petersen, his artistic alter ego SRIL (pronounced “surreal”) is as much a feeling as it is a name or means of classifying his artwork. “I never thought I could do this for a living,” the surrealist aerosol artist says inside a dark garage, shielding his body from the sun’s harsh gaze before he has to get back to work on his latest monumental work. Petersen started experimenting with graffiti lettering when he was 11, but eventually slowed down to focus on a graphic design career. He re-committed to doing graffiti pieces in 2007, then moved onto more artistically ambitious portraits around 2012. For the next several years, he kept creating public and private works part-time. “It was extremely nerve-wracking,” Petersen says. “I had just bought a house in Las Vegas. I’ve got a family, I’ve got bills just like everyone else.” Now living as a full-time artist, Petersen reflects on the odds that were stacked against him during his start. “Being an artist and doing what I do in Salt Lake is difficult. There’s not very many people who can make a living as an artist, first of all, second of all as an aerosol artist,” he says. “It was always kind of a goal, and in the last couple years, I’ve achieved it.” Petersen’s latest mural, titled “Atlas,” has personal significance because it reminds him of that climb. Located just east of the Utah Transit Authority’s North Temple Station, the vibrantly colored, nearly 4,000-square-foot public display will adorn an otherwise gray wall on the side of a luxury apartment building. The project is a big get for the artist, a composition he thinks will be the biggest of its kind in Utah. “Previous public murals, it was me offering my time. Or basically kind of hustling the wall. Almost kind of begging for a place to paint,” he says. “And now, this

“The idea is, there’s going to be challenges along the way, but the ultimate goal is to chase your dreams,” Shae Petersen says of “Atlas.” is a large, significant mural that I was commissioned to do.” In the piece, Atlas, the mythological titan condemned by Zeus to hold up the sky for eternity, stands partially submerged in water, struggling to keep the weight of the heavens over his head as a shark lurks nearby. “For me, it basically means capturing your dreams, or chasing them,” Petersen says before identifying its inspiration: a lengthy quote from Atlas Shrugged, a politically polarizing novel written by Ayn Rand that serves as a bible for many conservative and libertarian thinkers. “Our owners just love that book,” Jenna Slaughter, project manager at Salt Development, says of its themes and emphasis on American industrialism. Hoping to spice up a wall on their Hardware Village West building, the company pitched Petersen a Rand quote after recognizing some of the artist’s public works. Slaughter says she regularly sees Petersen’s “Godlike”—another massive work that depicts mythological lore, located near 3300 South and 300 West—when she drops off her dog at a pet daycare center. “As soon as I made that connection, I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, we have to have him,’” she says. Petersen toured the building at 455 West 200 North, taking note of its refined industrial feel. He recalled his own professional trajectory after reading the short passage from Atlas Shrugged—several sentences about the importance of keeping the creative spark alive and not letting “the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration” after failing to achieve your dreams.

“It was just perfect. It kind of sparked something in me,” Petersen says. He hasn’t read the book, but he’s aware it’s a point of contention for some. Jeremy Rosen, assistant professor in the University of Utah’s English department, says the themes in Shrugged revolve around the virtues of hard work and individualism. In Rosen’s telling, Rand’s novel is an attack on the government’s regulation of businesses, arguing that captains of industry pursuing their own self interests benefits society as a whole. “My hot-take is that message has some seriously destructive consequences,” Rosen says, mentioning the 2008 financial crisis and environmental catastrophes traced back to big business. Plus, Rosen adds, the book’s message fails to take into account the unevenness of the American playing field. “It imagines that having a dream and trying to realize it, and individual effort, is the only thing holding us back from living our dreams,” he says. “It ignores that for lots of people, people who grew up in poverty, people of color, women, for much of our history, have not had the opportunity to realize their dreams.” With that analysis in mind, Rosen says paying homage to Atlas Shrugged on the exterior of a luxury apartment building—Slaughter says monthly rent for a studio starts around $1,500—validates the idea that the wealthy tenants who live there achieved success all on their own, and that society owes them something. “I would stress that it also suggests that people who can’t afford such luxury living also deserve what they get, and therefore ignores the way in which structural inequality are often responsible for their

impoverished living conditions,” he says. “It’s not surprising. But frankly, it’s rather offensive.” Petersen doesn’t see the connection between the mural and Rosen’s critiques. “For me, the piece of art is public. It has nothing to do with the people who live here and who don’t,” he says. He also believes in the general message behind the rendering. “My personal experience is, hard work does achieve your dreams,” he says. “I mean, it’s not a given, but persistence is important.” Citing some of his other public pieces scattered throughout cities like Las Vegas and Denver, the artist—who last year had a planned mural on a wall of the Exotic Kitty gentlemen’s club nixed by the city of South Salt Lake—says his job is to create something visually striking, not become involved in the controversy that could surround a particular subject. “I’ve painted things based on Neptune, or I’ve painted Breaking Bad, that wasn’t me, you know, selling drugs or anything like that. It’s pop culture and ultimately, what I want to create is something that didn’t exist before that hopefully brightens someone’s day,” he says. Petersen’s take on his new project aside, he’d prefer viewers come away with their own interpretations. One of his main drives, he says, is the democratization of meaningful, good public art in Utah, which broadens people’s artistic literacy. “I don’t think it should be something that’s just limited to galleries,” he says. “Whether or not you have money, I think this type of art is important for everyone to see and appreciate, and how they interpret it is entirely up to them.” CW


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LONG MAY THEY REIGN Once mighty, monarch butterfly numbers are dwindling across the state. Photos by Sarah Arnoff |

@rayhowze1

@arnoffoto

est of This Is the Place State Heritage Park, on Salt Lake City’s East Bench, lies a small nature preserve. Gravel walking trails and signs welcome those looking for a quick detour from the traditional sidewalk jaunt. Just feet from Sunnyside Avenue, among the sagebrush and dry grass, more than a dozen milkweed plants grow—beckoning passing monarch butterflies to land and lay their eggs. A few blocks away, Taylor inspects the much taller plants at her home for eggs. Still, none. The plants alongside her house are more than five feet tall, thanks to the benefit of a reliable water source and lots of TLC. But Taylor still hasn’t been able to lure any migrating butterflies. Even so, Taylor is relentless in her efforts guarding the plants from spiders and beetles that see the eggs as tasty monarch caviar. “They’ll eat 98 percent of them, so that’s their first hurdle,” she says of perils budding butterflies face. “If they make it past that stage and into three or four days

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 15

Pulling back the leaves on the one- to two-foot tall plants, though, nearby resident Rachel Taylor shows there are no eggs. There aren’t any caterpillars or chrysalises either, and no signs the plants have been used by the butterflies. This year, the area is not the place for monarchs. “This is just a horrible year,” Taylor says, traipsing around the milkweed she’s planted at the preserve. “The overwintering count was down significantly—Oregon, Washington, Idaho—none of us have any [butterflies] but we are seeing some in the canyons.”

worth, then they’re the tiniest little caterpillar.” Taylor’s predicament isn’t just felt on the local front. Butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains lay their eggs in states such as Utah, Idaho, Washington and Arizona, and winter in California. The annual count there—completed by scientists and volunteers—tallied just more than 192,000 monarchs last year. That number marked a five-year low, down from 300,000 the year before and 1.2 million 20 years ago. And according to a recent study funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the western monarch population has a 63 percent chance of becoming extinct if that trend continues. Contributing factors like fewer nesting areas and habitat destruction are what Taylor and hundreds of other “citizen scientists” across the West are hoping to reverse, one plant at a time.

| COVER STORY |

By Ray Howze | rhowze@cityweekly.net |


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16 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

Rachel Taylor

Rooted in Royalty

Iconic for its bold orange, black and white coloring, the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)—also known as the wanderer, common tiger and black-veined brown—has a history rooted in royalty. It’s believed the term “monarch” was given in honor of England’s King William III, whose title “Prince of Orange” references the insect’s dominant orange color. The butterfly was first described by Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus as far back as 1758 in Systema Naturae. As for its genus, “Danaus,” the name comes from the mythical king of the same name in Egypt or Libya. Danaus was the great-grandson of Zeus. And according to Greek mythology, Plexippus was one of the 50 sons of Aegyptus, a former king of Egypt. Today, the pollinator species is known for its annual migration, thousands of miles long, and its multigenerational return north. “There is a difference between our wisdom and nature’s simplicity—that reflects the burden of a complex intelligence,” poet Alison Hawthorne Deming said in an interview with Nashville Review. “A complex intelligence like ours is impotent compared to the intelligence of a monarch butterfly migrating from Canada to Mexico, or the intelligence of hummingbirds that have co-evolved with the flowers all along their migration route. That seems so simple; it just happens, it just unfolds.”

Protect Me, Maybe?

According to Tierra Curry, a senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity, people need to start paying attention to the species’ dwindling numbers. More scientists and volunteers are counting butterflies in more places, yet overall population numbers continue to decrease. Part of that, she says, is due to changes in the butterfly’s habitat. “Climate change is kind of the elephant in the room. They can be hurt by increased

severity of storms, things not blooming when they should,” Curry says, adding that milkweed’s susceptibility to drought isn’t helping. “[Butterflies] need more milkweed in the ground and need other nectaring plants, because they have to fly through the Great Basin and over the Sierras.” The Center for Biological Diversity, along with other conservation groups like the Xerces Society, petitioned the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2014 to place monarchs on the Endangered Species List. The service says it found “protection may be warranted,” and promises to conduct a “thorough assessment” to determine what the butterfly needs. A ruling on designating the monarch as endangered is expected in June 2019. The FWS could recommend it for listing; it could say protection is not warranted; or it could place it on a candidate waiting list. In the meantime, Curry says conservation efforts have to be multi-pronged, starting with education. “Everybody thinks it’s just milkweed, but adult monarchs nectar on over 100 different flowers,” she says. “They need fall flowers so they can build up their fat reserves and can fly across the desert and survive the winter.” Mindy Wheeler, the rare plant conservation coordinator for Utah’s Division of Natural Resources, has been working with Taylor and other local groups to broaden the state’s butterfly and milkweed counting efforts. Wheeler explains that “some of the buzz” is that monarchs are off to a rough start this season. However, some of the wetland areas around Utah Lake and the Wasatch Front seemed to be “harboring quite a few monarchs.” This is the first year the state has been officially involved with the latest efforts to help the monarchs. Up until now, it’s been mostly a grassroots effort to drum up support and awareness. While the butterfly’s endangered status is being decided, other efforts to help the monarchs are going full-bore. The 2014 petition “sort of elevated efforts for conservation,” Wheeler says. “Idaho, for example, has done a great job … the state did a lot of monitoring and got a lot of people


—Tierra Curry, Center for Biological Diversity senior scientist

“If they stop people from spraying Roundup and stuff, it’s just going to piss off a bunch of farmers,” Taylor says. “It’s a lot easier to get people to buy-in in other ways.”

Spreading Her Wings

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 17

Taylor has been working with monarchs for the past five years. She and her husband run a recruiting company, so the butterflies are more of a hobby—but she doesn’t show any signs of fatigue. “I grew up in rural Utah and we used to have them everywhere and it just dawned on me we don’t have them anymore, and why?” Taylor says. “So, I started researching them.” Part of her home habitat includes a mesh cage that houses chrysalises and caterpillars. Taylor hopes to involve more Utahns in searching for and planting milkweed, and tagging butterflies. With Wheeler’s help, she’s set up an online database (bit.ly/monarchsinutah) to collect and organize information across the state. Through the website, the public can contribute to data collection, tag butterflies and use smartphone apps such as iNaturalist or Monarch SOS. The online spreadsheet she and Wheeler created only has two locations listed for milkweed out of the nearly 580 data points they hope to study throughout the state. To get a complete picture, they’ll need hundreds of more submissions, so she hopes Utahns will contribute to the data collection effort and help spread the milkweed gospel. “It’s going to take a team. I think we’re doing a pretty good job at assembling that team and will welcome any more that want to join,” Wheeler says. Taylor, she points out, has also been working with prisons to grow milkweed to later distribute to folks who want it in their backyard.

| COVER STORY |

on the ground and found they have a lot of monarchs on the Snake River Plain. “I would like to emulate Idaho and get more people on the ground and see what kind of data we can generate for monarch use in Utah, and make sure our conservation efforts are being put in the right place.” If you’ve heard of butterflies migrating to Mexico for the winter, you’re correct. Monarchs still fly there. However, those butterflies represent the population east of the Rockies. And they seem to fare better than their western counterparts. As recently as 2016, scientists observed a 225 percent increase in the eastern population from 2015, but the number of western monarchs is in decline. When the eastern monarchs reach Mexico, they reside on about 12 mountain tops. If a damaging storm comes along, it could significantly hurt them. But the western monarchs find themselves at a high risk, too. The geography they have to traverse to reach California can be treacherous and long. “The western ones are even more imperiled, and it’s just as important to plant milkweed for them,” Curry says. As a result of farming and development, milkweed—seen as a mere weed by some— was elbowed out of the landscape, so eastern efforts have centered on restoring the plant and putting it back onto land where it has a chance to attract monarchs. On farms, “there used to be what people would call weedy edges,” Wheeler says. “Some of those weedy edges would harbor nectar plants or milkweed, but some of the farming practices have changed [and] they use every last piece of land for their crops. So a lot of those weedy edges have disappeared, and, the milkweed has disappeared.” Now, scientists in the west are taking a note from the east’s resurgence and encouraging the public, and farmers, to embrace milkweed. Whether the monarch receives official protection, though, might not make a difference. Taylor and Wheeler hope to drum up voluntary support for their conservation efforts before it turns into people complying with mandatory conservation rules. This goes further than just planting milkweed. They hope to educate the public on raising monarchs and how to keep the plants free from other predators.

“Climate change is kind of the elephant in the room. [Monarchs] can be hurt by increased severity of storms, things not blooming when they should.”


| COVER STORY |

18 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

Taylor’s small patch of milkweed along the Sunnyside nature preserve is one of a few she has planted and monitored around the city in hopes of helping the butterflies make their journey to the coast. “We’ve got to know what we’ve got and where we’ve got it,” she says. “In the meantime, there’s this groundswell of citizens planting milkweed, adding it back to the landscape, because if we don’t have milkweed, we don’t have monarchs. It’s the only plant caterpillars can eat.” Taylor also volunteers to teach classes about monarch conservation— dubbed “Saving the Monarchy: One Milkweed at a Time”—at Red Butte Gardens and the Swaner Nature Preserve near Park City. With the help of Salt Lake City’s Parks and Public Lands Department, Taylor planted milkweed and established a waystation—a designated patch of milkweed for passing monarchs—as part of the city’s Fairmont Park improvement project. Efforts also included dredging the park’s pond, installing boardwalks and adding fish. “We know they’re struggling,” Salt Lake City program manager Tyler Murdock says about the monarchs. “Our efforts have been to take some of these more formal designated park spaces and try to diversify them in ways we haven’t done before.” Murdock says the city has also planted milkweed in other parts of the valley, such as along the Jordan River, Emigration Creek and at the Wasatch Hollow Preserve. “We are always looking for opportunities to diversify our natural lands with vegetation and wildlife,” he says. “The opportunity to plant milkweed in these areas doesn’t have an impact on anything else and is pretty easy for us.” Changing the public’s perception of milkweed, however, is another story. “It will grow along ditch banks and can kind of be an aggressive plant,” Wheeler says.

Up and Away

Four weeks after Taylor lamented the lack of monarch eggs at the waystation along Sunnyside Avenue, she shared a post to the Facebook group “Monarchs of the Wasatch Front Utah,” a 300-member group open to those interested in monarch conservation. “They’re baaaaaaack!” she wrote. “Found 24 eggs at one of my waystations today.” The eggs were found on the new plants at Fairmont Park—a promising sign for the fall, Taylor says. They’re also very small, no bigger than a pea. That’s typical of the eggs, but Taylor says it’s important to check the plants frequently because other insects find them to be tasty snacks. “You have to beat the bugs,” she says. “Maybe 95 percent out of 100 eggs get eaten by predatory bugs—milkweed beetles, praying mantis—you have to check the milkweed daily or every other day.” A few days later, Taylor found 10 more eggs. She’ll now take the eggbearing leaves home to raise and protect the insects from would-be predators in what she calls “protective custody.” Once hatched, the caterpillars will live in her home and feast on milkweed until they’re ready to undergo metamorphosis. Once the monarch reaches adult stage, she will release them into the wild. For ones raised after mid-August, Taylor will tag them with a sticker for the conservation study and wish them luck on their journey west. Some that were tagged in Cache Valley have been identified as far as California and as close as Vernal. For the monarchs, their future is a strength-in-numbers situation. The more milkweed they have, the more chances they have to lay eggs and grow their population. “If people could just incorporate a few plants,” into their gardens, Taylor says, it would help their months-long trek tremendously. Despite finding some positive signs at Fairmont Park, Taylor hasn’t had much luck at her other locations. She hasn’t found any eggs along Sunnyside and only a few at her other designated spots. This season, she predicts, could be treacherous for monarchs. “It’s been a dry, dry year,” she says. “There’s plenty of milkweed, just no monarchs—I think it’s going to be a low-number year.” Still, Taylor and others will keep fighting the delicate battle for the monarchs because the creatures will need all the help they can get against their biggest foe: Mother Nature. “For the butterflies last year, some flew north too early and they froze,” Curry bemoans. “If they don’t get the trigger to migrate, they won’t make it all the way to Mexico or California before they freeze.”


Timpanogos Storytelling Festival

DEREK CARLISLE

Rain or shine, Usana Amphitheatre is projecting Jurassic Park on the big screen in celebration of its 25-year reign as one of the most iconic monster movies of all time. While many theaters across the country are hosting their own anniversary screenings, Usana’s is unique in that the Utah Symphony is on hand to perform the score live. Seating is available in sections with actual seats, but attendees can also purchase a cheaper lawn ticket, bring their own blankets and watch characters try to survive in a world dominated by velociraptors and T. rexes. And if we’re being honest, is there really any better way to celebrate the waning days of summer heat with the family than by watching dinosaurs chasing and eating a whole bunch of people? While not an official part of the Utah Symphony’s schedule for its 2018-19 Films in Concert Series, the evening is an extension of these popular performances where the symphony performs a movie’s score while it plays for the audience.   If you’re put off by Usana’s notoriously chaotic parking, the venue offers a premium parking pass for an additional $25 when you buy a ticket. If you miss the event, or simply can’t get enough dinosaur action in your life, tickets for other 25th Anniversary screenings are available through fathomevents.com. While the thrill of the live performance won’t be there, these select screenings will include a showing of a 17-minute fan-made Jurassic Park remake. (Kylee Ehmann) Jurassic Park In Concert @ Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, West Valley City, 801-417-5343, Sept. 8, 8 p.m., doors 6:30 p.m., $25-$80, usana-amp.com

Jurassic Park in Concert

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As architects of one of the world’s first advanced civilizations, Greeks carry a lingering legacy that combines harmony, philosophy and democracy with an inherent desire to share those gifts with others. That heritage is still alive and vital today, and there’s no more telling example than this annual local celebration of Greek culture, a vivid example of how this community generously shares its unique 2,500-year-old heritage. Indeed, the Greeks’ zest for life is contagious, an obvious reason why the festival is always so eagerly anticipated. As it has in the past, the Greek Festival allows local Hellenes to welcome visitors to a weekend of fun-filled activities that share traditions brought to Utah 120 years ago with the arrival of the first Greek immigrants. In addition, church tours afford non-Orthodox visitors the chance to encounter the beauty of the Greek Orthodox church and learn about 2,000 years of faith. “In its 43rd year, our Annual Salt Lake Greek Festival is our church’s major fundraiser that directly supports our church’s ministries and programs, but also local community charities,” the Very Rev. George Nikas says. “Moreover, it is an opportunity for us to share our rich Hellenic culture through undeniably delicious food and lively Greek music and dance with all of Utah. All are welcome to come and be Greek for a weekend!!” Indeed, everything is a little bit better when accompanied by a little baklava and kolokithokeftedes. (Lee Zimmerman) Salt Lake Greek Festival @ Greek Orthdox Church of Salt Lake, 279 S. 300 West, Sept. 7-9, Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $3, children 5 & under free, free admission with FanX wristband, saltlakegreekfestival.com

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SATURDAY 9/8

Salt Lake Greek Festival

We humans make sense of the world through stories—whether we’re trying to understand the origins of the universe, the arc of our own lives or the way we interact with one another. But a story isn’t always just the words or details of the narrative; it can be about the ability a person has to bring that narrative to life, embodying the emotion, humor, tragedy or absurdity of situations that resonate beyond their specific setting. Nearly 30 years ago, Karen Ashton—then the president of the Friends of the Orem Public Library—wanted to bring a celebration of that storytelling tradition to Utah County. From its first year, when it was staged on Ashton’s own property, the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival has grown into a weekend that attracts some of the most accomplished storytellers in the country, as well as some 25,000 spectators, to the current location at Thanksgiving Point’s Ashton Gardens. More than a dozen expert practitioners of the storytelling art from around the country (and even around the world) will keep listeners fascinated over the course of the three-day event, from personal tales to versions of classic legends. While some sessions cover general themes, other events provide specialized interest, from a “bedtime stories” evening for children to “Shivers in the Night” scary stories to get you primed for Halloween season. Between tales, enjoy music performances and puppetry, or get a chance to meet and get signed works from the participating storytellers. It’s an event that might turn into a story you’ll want to tell others. (SR) Timpanogos Storytelling Festival @ Thanksgiving Point Ashton Gardens, 3900 Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-426-8660, Sept. 6, 6-9 p.m.; Sept. 7, 10 a.m.-10:30 p.m.; Sept. 8, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $8-$50, timpfest.org

FRIDAY 9/7

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To say it’s been a challenging 12 months for the pop-culture event formerly known as Salt Lake Comic Con would be an understatement. A legal challenge from San Diego ComicCon forced a name change to FanX. Allegations of inappropriate conduct by a guest at a previous event generated controversy. And one of 2018’s high-profile announced guests, Ben Affleck, withdrew after entering rehab last month. Nevertheless, FanX soldiers on, bringing an impressive roster of famous faces, voices and names from the worlds of science-fiction and fantasy, comic books, movies, television, animation, literature, gaming and more. Guests set at press time include Jeff Goldblum (Jurassic Park, The Fly, pictured), Tim Curry (The Rocky Horror Picture Show), Dave Bautista (Guardians of the Galaxy), David Tennant (Doctor Who, Jessica Jones), Evangeline Lilly (Ant-Man and the Wasp), Gaten Matarazzo (Stranger Things), Lucy Lawless (Xena), Jason Momoa (Justice League, Game of Thrones) and Robby Benson and Paige O’Hara (the voices of Disney’s animated Beauty and the Beast). The celebrities—and the chance to get autographs and photos—might be the big draw, of course, but that’s only the tip of the FanX iceberg. The show floor offers a three-day shopping mall of geek paraphernalia, from T-shirts and pins to action figures and comics. Meanwhile, the conference rooms will be packed with fascinating panel programming, ranging from discussions focused on specific characters to big-picture conversations about issues within fandom. (Scott Renshaw) FanX Salt Lake Comic Convention @ Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Sept. 6-8, Thursday, 2 p.m.9 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., $15-$250, fanxsaltlake.com

THURSDAY 9/6

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FanX Salt Lake Comic Convention

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

EMILY BURMESTER

MARVEL STUDIOS

THURSDAY 9/6

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 6-12, 2018

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

ESSENTIALS

the


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Women of Trachis finds contemporary issues in legendary characters. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

hen you’re staging a play that dates back to before the birth of Christ, you face a challenge with engaging the audience. When that play isn’t even one of the better-known works of classical antiquity, that challenge might seem insurmountable. For director Javen Tanner, however, the opportunity to oversee Women of Trachis—a lesser-known work by Sophocles, the author of Oedipus Rex and the other “Theban plays”—for the 48th annual Classical Greek Theatre Festival became a chance to show how relevant a 2,000-year-old piece of theater can be. It’s not as though one of the central characters is a complete unknown. Women of Trachis centers on Deianeira, the wife of the famed hero Heracles (better known to modern audiences by his Roman name, Hercules). While Heracles is out adventuring, word gets back to Deianeira that he has taken a young lover, setting Deianeira on a course to try to win him back that goes tragically astray. “Heracles is this really well-known mythological figure,” Tanner says, “yet when we go see Greek tragedy, we don’t see him very much. It will be fun to work with this different group of figures.” Part of the fascination for Tanner is the way Women of Trachis addresses gender roles in a way that feels torn from contem-

porary debates. He looks at Heracles in the play as a man who sees himself as part of a vanishing era, as his son is unable to relate to the notion that his father is the warrior who battled the Hydra. “He’s this great hero who fought all of these monsters,” Tanner says, “and yet you see that it’s not just about his death, but about the end of a whole time. It’s where masculinity is in our modern discourse. I chose [the play] for much more innocent reasons, but as we went on, I saw all these parallels.” That modern sensibility is true of Deianeira as well, who remains central for most of the story in her struggle to be treated with respect. “Some of the things she’s talking about are the things we’re talking about today, in terms of what women are dealing with,” Tanner says. “She’s a powerful woman, yet through the entire play, she’s compared to slaves. … From the moment she starts talking, she feels like a person who could be alive today.” Still, bringing those concepts into focus for a 21st-century audience takes some effort, beginning with a decision as fundamental as deciding which of the many available translations should be used for the script. “You have to choose a translation where the translator understands that he or she is translating for a modern audience,” Tanner says. “All of them are a little difficult, because it’s hard to find a translator who is also a theater person. … The script we’re using, I think, is very good. It honors the poetry, and feels very accessible.” Tanner has plenty of experience taking age-old stories and giving them a modern twist—as he has directing productions based on the stories of Cinderella and Snow White—and he says he was given freedom to find his own unique take on the way this material might have been presented to an ancient Greek audience. The staging and costume presents a setting that is more medieval than classical antiquity, and the traditional use of masks gets a distinctive approach that he describes as “blending

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GAVAN NELSON

THEATER Modern Classic

sort of an ancient use with a modern use.” There are also unique challenges for this production, which takes to the road after its two weekends at Westminster College, with performances in Ogden, West Valley City and Provo. “It’s actually quite common in rehearsal right now for us to stop and say, ‘When we’re down in BYU, it’s going to be more like this,’” Tanner says. “It has made me think of keeping it simple, so that what we’re creating is adaptable. I’m also telling actors, ‘Where you’re speaking right now is working great at Westminster; at the [de Jong Concert Hall at BYU], which is much larger, you’re going to have to adjust.’” The key to a successful production, however, is clearly finding and sustaining that sense of connection between the audience and the characters, even if they’re based on legendary figures from another millennium. “When I listen to the play over and over again,” Tanner says, “I think, ‘Sophocles wrote this 2,500 years ago, and it’s very complex thinking, the kind we think

April Fossen (center) as Deianeira in Women of Trachis we only do today.’ … You just have to really focus on character, and get past platitudes and the inevitable lessons of the play. You have to make the characters real.” CW

CLASSICAL GREEK THEATRE FESTIVAL: WOMEN OF TRACHIS

Westminster College Jewett Center for the Performing Arts 1840 S. 1300 East Sept. 6-8, 13-15 7:30 p.m. $9-$18 westminstercollege.edu/greek-theatre Additional performances at Weber State University, Brigham Young University and Utah Cultural Celebration Center through Sept. 24


moreESSENTIALS

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Artist Craig Nielsen presents paintings capturing street scenes ranging from desolate to bustling in Avenues at the Corinne & Jack Sweet Library (455 F St., 801-594-8651, slcpl.org), Sept. 8-Oct. 27, with an artist reception on Saturday, Sept. 8, 3-5 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

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Classical Greek Theatre Festival: Women of Trachis Westminster College Jewett Center for the Arts, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 6-8 & 13-15, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu (see p. 20) The Curious Case of the Dog in the NightTime An Other Theater Co., 1200 Town Center Blvd., Second Floor, Provo, Sept. 7-29, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com Daddy Long Legs Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Sept. 22, dates and times vary, haletheater.org A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center of New York City Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, Sept. 12-Oct. 21, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org The Marvelous Wonderettes Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com Mopey Wrecks Ember SLC, 623 S. State, through Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., riotacttheatre.org My Son Pinocchio Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, hct.org Oliver! Egyptian Theatre Co., 325 Main, Park City,

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22 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

moreESSENTIALS Sept. 7-16, dates and times vary, parkcityshows. com Wait Until Dark Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, Sept. 12-Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., hct.org

DANCE

Beer & Ballet Fall 2018 Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 7, 6:30 p.m., balletwest.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Jurassic Park in Concert Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. 6055 West, West Valley City, Sept. 8, 8 p.m., utahsymphony.org (see p. 19)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Alex Velluto Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Sept. 7-8, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Comedy Night Central Utah Gardens, 355 W. University Parkway, Orem, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., centralutahgardens.com The Hodge Twins Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 11, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Nick Hoff Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Sept. 7-8, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Tom Segura Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 6-8, 7 & 9:45 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Amos N. Guiora: The Crime of Complicity: The Bystander in the Holocaust Wasatch Presbyterian Church, 1626 S. 1700 East, Sept. 6, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Colleen Houck: The Lantern’s Ember Barnes & Noble University Crossings, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, Wednesdays through September, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Brigham City Peach Days Downtown Brigham City, 6 N. Main, Brigham City, through Sept. 8, boxelderchamber.com FanX Salt Lake Comic Convention Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Sept. 6-8, fanxsaltlake.com (see p. 19) Get Into the River Festival Jordan River Parkway, through Sept. 30, dates and locations vary, getintotheriver.org Heritage Festival Main Street Park, 90 E. 8720

South, Sandy, Sept. 8, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., sandy.utah.gov Nitya Nritya Fesitval of Indian Classical Dance and Music Leona Wagner Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 8-9, nityanritya.com Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 21, Saturdays & Sundays, noon-6:30 p.m., snowbird.com Party Like It’s 1870: Utah Women’s History Festival The Garden Place at Heritage Park, 2601 East Sunnyside Ave., Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m., eventbrite.com Salt Lake Greek Festival Greek Orthodox Church of Salt Lake, 279 W. 300 West, Sept. 7-9, times vary, saltlakegreekfestival.com (see p. 19) SLC VegFest Library Square, 200 E. 400 South, Sept. 8, noon-8 p.m., slcveg.com Timpanogos Storytelling Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, Sept. 6-8, times vary, timpfest.org (see p. 19)

TALKS & LECTURES

TEDx SaltLakeCity Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 8, 9 a.m., tickets.utah.edu Realities of Diversity Speaker Series: Negin Farsad Quinney School of Law, University of Utah, 332 S. 1400 East, Sept. 12, 7 p.m., neginfarsad.uw.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Cara Jean Means: Grip: Conversational Portraits on Mental Health Salt Lake

Community College Eccles Gallery, 1575 S. State, through Sept. 21, slcc.edu Craig Nielsen: Avenues Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F. St., Sept. 8-Oct. 27; artist reception, Sept. 8, 3-5 p.m., slcpl.org (see p. 21) Deborah Durban: Bits and Pieces Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through Sept. 14, accessart.org Justin Chouinard: Appendages of Sense Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Sept. 21, saltlakearts.org Marisa Morán Jahn: Mirror / Mask Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 9, umfa.utah.edu Mary Pusey and Shayne Shaw: World Expressions Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Sept. 17, localcolorsart.com Miguel Galaz: Roots, Culture Education Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through Oct. 5, facebook.com/sugarspaceslc Rocking Paper & Scissors Fringe Gallery, 345 W. Pierpont Ave., through Sept. 12, thefringegallery.com Ryan Ruehlen: Georhythmic Drift Music UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 3, utahmoca.org Sculpture: New Works + Group Exhibition A Gallery/Allen + Alan Fine Art, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Sept. 29, agalleryonline.com Trent Alvey: I’m Floating in a Most Peculiar Way Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Sept. 21, saltlakearts.org Working Hard to Be Useless UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org

HARVEST BASH THE GARTEN @MTN WST 417 North 400 West, Salt Lake City

September 15, 11am - 10pm Admission $10 - $35 Local Band | Local Brews | Local Foods

Help make local fresh food accessible to all! Tickets and Info at www.thegreenurbanlunchbox.com


Eat, Geek and be Merry Three nerd-friendly locations for your dining—and drinking—needs. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

R

egardless of whether you love or hate FanX, Salt Lake’s most controversial of cons, geeks gotta eat and drink—preferably at a place where they have access to comics and video games. Whether you’re planning on visiting the convention or sitting this one out, here are three geek-approved destinations that should definitely be on your list to stay fed, hydrated and properly buzzed while navigating SLC this week—and year-round.

Quarters Arcade Bar

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 23

Those old enough to remember the frenetic sights and sounds of the nearly extinct video game arcades will feel right at home at Quarters, a bar that recaptures the magic of these old-school meccas of counter-culture. Not only can interested parties try to beat their records at classic arcade games like Mortal Kombat, Asteroids and NBA Jam, but Quarters has a huge selection of board and tabletop games, to boot. All of this gaming magnificence is available to enjoy alongside their sizable menu of craft beers, ciders and cocktails (gin and green Chartreuse-infused Hulk Smash, anyone?) Like Watchtower, Quarters is also home to local events designed to lure the introverted gamer out into the social scene. Their weekly Tuesday league night dedicated to the four-player strategy game Killer Queen has started to draw quite a crowd, and they’ve recently started a league night for pinball wizards on Sundays. Quarters was created out of the giddy high that every nerd gets when they hear the clatter of a coin shoved into a Street Fighter 2 machine, and its quality bar menu shows that you can indeed be an adult and play games at the same time. 5 E. 400 South, quartersslc.com. Open: Monday, 4 p.m.,-2 a.m.; Wednesday-Sunday, 4 p.m.-2 a.m. CW

As Salt Lake’s only hybrid comic book/coffee shop, the Watchtower is a favorite haunt for geeks of all stripes. The menu features tasty baked goods, and is known far and wide for its creative takes on ways to keep you hydrated and caffeinated. I’ve long been a fan of the Lumpy Space Princess ($5.75), a boba drink made with blueberry, taro and lavender. Looking at it, you’d think that the creamy pink beverage would be a sugar bomb, but the LSP balances its sweetness nicely. When I am in the mood for a boost of saccharine goodness, I go for the Daredevil ($5), a combination of

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Watchtower Café

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Named for the twin suns that scorch Luke Skywalker’s home planet of Tatooine, breakfast or lunch at Twin Suns Café is right up any Star Wars fan’s alley. X-Wings and TIE Fighters hang from the ceiling, locked in an eternal dogfight above a solid collection of action figures and art dedicated to the mother of all space operas. The menu is a mixture of traditional classics with Mexican flair, many of which are named after popular fixtures from a galaxy far, far away. During my last visit, I went for a Boonta Bowl ($7.50) and my wife couldn’t resist ordering something called Uncle Tommy’s Wet Burrito ($9)—who could? Although I don’t recall an Uncle Tommy (nor his wet burrito for that matter) hanging out in Mos Eisley, this is a Hutt-sized offering that wraps together eggs, queso fresco, beans, rice and sausage with a red salsa called Sith Sauce. It’s a solid way to start a morning or refuel for lunch—the sausage was my favorite part of the whole thing, and I found myself wishing more of the slightly sweet links were packed inside. Boonta Bowls are vegan-friendly food piles of chile-garlic tofu, squash, peppers, broccoli and quinoa topped with a tasty ginger-turmeric sauce. As Twin Suns tries to source locally whenever possible, some of the veggies here vary based on what’s in season. The star of this dish is the sauce— it’s smoky, velvety and makes the bowl’s flavors pop like a freshly ignited lightsaber. 2305 S. Highland Drive, 385-252-7061, facebook.com/twinsunscafe. Open: Monday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Wednesday-Sunday, 8 a.m.3 p.m.

red velvet and Red Bull that tastes like the strawberry Jell- O salads I grew up with and packs an energy-drink punch worthy of the Man Without Fear. Iced coffee fans will also dig the Tatooine Sunrise ($5.75), a frozen latte with Tongan caramel and creamy espresso affogato. It’s a flavor combo a lot like Han and Chewie—cool enough to win a starship on a bet, and bold enough to fly straight into an asteroid field. In addition to its singular geek-chic coffee shop vibe, Watchtower also is a great place to experience the talents of the local artist community. Tons of original artwork is displayed, and the establishment regularly hosts art events, podcasts and other community get-togethers. From its selection of comics and graphic novels to its menu of signature drinks and baked goods, Watchtower is a onestop shop for geeks in need of a refuel. 1588 S. State, 801-477-7671, watchtower-cafe.com. Hours vary.

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Twin Suns Café


the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Salt Lake Food and Wine Fest

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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The biggest hidden secret in the valley

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

An eclectic combination of chefs and mixologists has assembled for this year’s Food and Wine Fest, and it’s hard not to get excited. From Sept. 11-16, the event brings Salt Lake’s best and brightest together for 17 unique experiences ranging from a garden harvest dinner culled from Table X’s onsite garden (1457 E. 3350 S., tablexrestaurant.com) to a Japanese whisky tasting at Post Office Place (16 W. Market St.). The marquee event in this week-long celebration is the Meet Your Maker gathering in Salt Lake’s bustling Regent Street area. Attendees can waltz back and forth as eight local chefs prepare signature dishes that pair well with the 80 someodd wines, beers and cocktails available. Get the schedule and purchase tickets at saltlakefoodandwinefest.com

CALL FOR RESERVATION

801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM 1458 South Foothill Drive

A LA MAISON by

Tsunami Unveils Farmers Market Roll

While sushi isn’t something that comes readily to mind when I think of the Downtown Farmers Market, the folks at Tsunami (multiple locations, tsunamiutah.com) are gearing up for a tasty fundraiser to benefit local green thumbs. Throughout September, Tsunami is teaming up with Urban Food Connections of Utah (slcfarmersmarket.org) to create a Farmers Market Roll, proceeds from which go to benefit the Downtown Farmers Market. The roll consists of Anaheim peppers, shallots, heirloom tomatoes and bell peppers procured from local market vendors. Tsunami is featuring this roll at each of its four locations, and chef Drew Kawaguchi is teaching youngsters how to roll their own sushi at the market on Saturday, Sept. 8—just in time for Eat Local Week.

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived 1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

Thanksgiving’s Heroes Shrimp Boil

FREE!

For the past three years, the Bowen Adams real estate team (bowenadams.com) has worked with local school districts to organize a gigantic shrimp boil to help raise money for families that can’t afford a Thanksgiving dinner. What began as a humble effort to help 10 families get enough food to last through Thanksgiving weekend quickly expanded into an annual fundraiser that has provided enough food to feed 2,000 local families. For Thanksgiving 2018, the team is hoping to feed 2,500 families. This year’s event is held at the Luxe Auto Spa gallery (49 E. 3300 South) where attendees can enjoy their meals amid one of Utah’s finest collections of imported luxury cars. The event takes place on Friday, Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m., and tickets can be purchased in advance at thanksgivingsheroes.com for $75 or at the door for $85.

54 west 1700 south Mon-Fri 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm

Quote of the Week: “Making sushi is an art, and experience is everything.” —Nobu Matsuhisa

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Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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752 W. Blue Vista Lane Midvale, Ut 84047 801-432-7906

lunch • dinner • take-out • catering

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18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 25

L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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Weird is Good Unconventional flavor profiles make for unique drinking experiences. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

t’s weird beer time again. This week, I delve into the latest batches of cuttingedge brews from the creative minds behind Proper Brewing and 2 Row Brewing Co.’s beers. These ales have tastes and personalities all their own. 2 Row Sour IPA: Pouring a hazy amber color that turns a darker orange when held to the light, a finger-and-a-half’s worth of creamy white head graces the top of the glass. The aroma starts with a medium amount of sweetness, with the hops being the first to show up as they impart a mixture of citrus rind and dank, grassy soapiness. Next, aromas of the beer’s sour base become more evident, as notes of lemon rind and yogurt swell. The taste follows the nose, as it starts off with a medium amount of caramel and the arrival of the hops, creating a vaguely fruity hop flavor in the

background. Stone fruits begin to emerge from there, followed by the yeast, which has a slight estery flavor with a lighter degree of medium sourness. Malt sweetness lingers near the end as the tart receptors on the tongue overcompensate for its sourness. Overall: This is a nice-tasting beer, but it doesn’t exactly scream IPA. That’s not a problem with this beer, but with the style. This is one of those new beer hybrids that’s a true assault on the tongue. Your taste receptors get a full-on workout piecing together all of the extreme flavors as your brain weaves them into a cohesive palate experience. If you’re craving something tart, I’d pursue this beer immediately as a sour satisfier and as a thirst-quencher. Proper Brett Pale No. 2: You don’t see many Brettanomyces fermented beers on tap in Utah. This is due to the problematic nature of this yeast, and its tendency to linger in the draft lines, influencing the tastes of the beers that follow it. When they do pop up, it’s a wonderful thing, because you know the beer-maker cares more about getting the beer out to the public than about dealing with the inevitable line sterilization after it’s gone. Proper’s Brett Pale Ale is on draft right now at Avenues Proper, and it’s worth checking out if you happen to be brett-curious. It kinda has a tequila-sunrise-orange body—glowing red along the edges—but doesn’t quite get there. You don’t have to get your nose too

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

close to the glass before you’re hit with that brett yeast funk. Think barnyard scents with wildflower and horse blanket. Grapefruit pith rounds out the doughy aroma. The flavor is full, but it doesn’t have nearly the same intensity as the nose, and actually leans more toward pale ale. Of course, the funk is still present, but it’s much softer. Doughy malt with a drizzle of caramel lays down the base for a jammy orange-and-grapefruit hop profile. Undercurrents of brett run throughout—a little horsey up front, followed by floral notes and ends with that doughy quality. It’s certainly an easy beer to put away.

Overall: This beer will be hit or miss for many drinkers. Proper did a great job with it; bretted pale ales are all over the West, but most are not very well done. This one is a great example of the style. Now you have to go out and decide if this yeast-forward pale ale is right for you. These two unusual beers are both available at their respective breweries. While Proper’s Brett Pale Ale is exclusive to Avenues Proper Restaurant and Publik House, 2 Row’s Sour IPA can be found at beer pubs along the Wasatch Front. As with all seasonal beers, only the quick will be rewarded. As always, cheers! CW

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First

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QUICK BITES

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm & Fri-Sat 11am-10pm | www.MyCancunCafe.com

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The Other Place

First opened in the mid-’80s, The Other Place has honed its menu into an efficient hybridization of classic Greek and American cuisine you just can’t get anywhere else. On the breakfast side of the menu, pretty much any dinner-style cut of meat—steak, pork chops, veal, lamb chops—can be ordered with eggs made to order, and each option comes with a heap of shredded hash browns, and a choice of toast, muffin, one pancake or a slice of French toast. The House Breakfast ($9.25)—hash brown, eggs and choice of breakfast meat—is a tried-and-true way to enjoy some early morning staples. The gyro omelet ($8.95) was a revelation. In addition to the spicy slices of lamb in the burrito-sized dish, you get feta cheese, tomatoes, green peppers, onions and zucchini—and this flavor tag team packs a fantastic punch. The pancakes here are of the stick-to-your-bones variety, achieving a nearly perfect rate of maple syrup absorption. The Other Place has stuck around for more than three decades because it’s had the confidence to stay true to itself over the years. That’s what I call cool. Reviewed Aug. 16. 469 E. 300 South, 801-521-6567


BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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FREESTYLE RELEASING

Funerals weddings Birthdays make someone ’ s day

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 29

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City Weekly : You grew up with a mom who was an actor in local Utah theater productions. I wonder if you had a different experience from a lot of people whose parents might not have been supportive of a career in the arts. Lindsay Pulsipher: I feel very fortunate because my mom was my biggest supporter, and still is my biggest supporter. She never dissuaded me from following my passion for acting, and I definitely owe a lot of that to her. I had a lot of friends who really had to fight their parents to get that opportunity.

position. I’m fortunate enough not to have lost a loved one in a war, but hearing stories about the coping that had to take place, and the emotional toll it takes, it was really hard. The thing that was amazing for me, and I think our film portrays this, is that you’re never alone, and there definitely is hope at the end of any difficult journey, if you can persevere through the darkest times. A lot of those stories ended in a brighter way than they started. Chemistry with romantic partners is kind of a cliché of movies, but to me, it also seems really important for actors playing parent and child to have chemistry—to be convincing in that relationship. [Makenzie Moss, who plays Amber’s daughter] is such an amazing little firecracker, so luckily it was very easy for me to warm up to her and build that relationship early on. You’re right, chemistry is everything in those type of relationships. Andrew Walker, who plays the love interest in the film, is a good buddy of mine; we’ve been friends for probably five or six years. So when I found out he was playing Cody, I was really excited, then really nervous: “I hope that there’s chemistry.” I think that our friendship allowed us to go there and have fun with it. It was very comfortable and easy. What’s on your professional bucket list for the kind of role you might not have had the chance to play yet, but absolutely want to get a shot at? I would love to play a really strong, stoic cop. I usually get to play really emotional, fragile characters. Or a Western, as a ringleader of a girl gang in the 1800s. I’d really love that. CW

od Bless the Broken Road (opening in local theaters on Friday, Sept. 7) tells the story of a young mother named Amber Hill who experiences a crisis of faith after her husband is killed in action in Afghanistan. Actor Linsday Pulsipher (True Blood), a native of the Salt Lake Valley, plays Amber, and spoke to City Weekly by phone about her career and her role in the film.

Lindsay Pulsipher (right, with Jordin Sparks) in God Bless the Broken Road.

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Utah native Lindsay Pulsipher on the journey from Touched by an Angel to playing a war widow.

You started at a relatively early age, with a few credits on Touched by an Angel , which was shot in Utah. Are there ways in which starting out in your hometown was a benefit in getting your feet wet in the industry? Absolutely. I really didn’t have aspirations of leaving Salt Lake as an actor when I was first starting out. I thought, “This is something that’s really fun for me to do, it’s a great artistic outlet,” but when I originally started acting, I never thought, “Maybe this will take me to L.A. or New York.” Because of my work on Touched by an Angel and a local film in Utah called Jumping for Joy—that role actually got me an agent in Los Angeles. I feel like it was kind of fateful and instrumental in getting me a career as a professional actor. Starting out in acting with Touched by an Angel, and at the time the LDSthemed films were beginning to appear, I wonder if you recall the way audiences respond to stories with these themes. I don’t really have any recollection of the term “faith-based film” being part of my vocabulary until recently. Doing Touched by an Angel, because it was on network television, it didn’t feel like it was superspecific in its sub-genre. I definitely remember [the LDS films] being around, and it was a great opportunity for a lot of actors in Utah. To prepare for the role of Amber, did you talk with military widows, and were you concerned about doing justice to such an intense experience? It was really important for me to be authentic in my portrayal, and I wanted to give respect to women who had actually lost their husbands in wars. So I had conversations with widows, and it is extremely heartbreaking, and really difficult to hear their stories and put myself in that

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The Not-SoBroken Road to Acting

CINEMA


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30 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. CUSTODY BB French writer-director Xavier Legrand’s debut feature transforms a straightforward depiction of domestic violence into something so harrowing that it borders on the exploitive. After he loses custody of his son, Antoine (Denis Ménochet) turns terrorizing stalker toward his ex, Miriam (Léa Drucker), and 11-year-old Julien (Thomas Gioria). As his violence escalates, there’s not one whit of surprise about anything that Antoine does or says: Men like Antoine behave in real life in extremely predictable ways, almost as if they’re following a script. That Antoine is a fictional character literally following a script feels like a bad joke, particularly when the movie makes no suggestion that what we’re witnessing is simply everyday life for far too many women and children. Legrand is a talented director; tension hangs over every moment of the film. But to what end? He creates a high-toned slasher flick that ultimately diminishes terrible reality by turning it into suspense entertainment that sits too readily next to “fun” horror movies about killer clowns and masked axe murderers. Opens Sept. 7 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson GOD BLESS THE BROKEN ROAD BB Opens Sept. 7 at theaters valleywide; see feature on p. 29. (PG) THE NUN [not yet reviewed] Spinoff of The Conjuring set in a convent beset by malevolent forces. Opens Sept. 7 at theaters valleywide. (R)

PEPPERMINT [not yet reviewed] A grieving mother (Jennifer Garner) seeks revenge on those who killed her family. Opens Sept. 7 at theaters valleywide. (R) WE THE ANIMALS BBB.5 All is tranquil at the beginning, before the story evolves into a gentle, aching coming-of-age story for 10-year-old Jonah (Evan Rosado), who is learning that you have to take moments of joy wherever you can find them. Jonah, an introspective boy who keeps a secret diary that’s mostly pictures, lives with his two brothers (barely older than he is) and their parents in upstate New York circa the early ’90s. Ma (Sheila Vand) and Pops (Raúl Castillo) were high school sweethearts who got married too young, and their loving but tumultuous relationship has grown untenable. Pops moves out; Ma spirals into depression; the boys, enjoying an otherwise carefree summer, are neglected. In the midst of this, they meet a slightly older boy, Dustin (Giovanni Pacciarelli), the grandson of a neighbor, with whom Jonah becomes smitten (not that he understands his feelings). Firsttime feature director Jeremiah Zagar, adapting Justin Torres’ semi-autobiographical novel, handles sensitive subjects with discretion and grace, while Nick Zammuto’s moody electronica score and Mark Samsonovich’s simple animations contributing to the idyllic tone of this lovely, heartbreaking little gem about queer awakenings and misspent youth. Opens Sept. 7 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider

SPECIAL SCREENINGS COLLEGE (1927) At Edison Street Events Silent Films, Sept. 6-7, 7:30 p.m. (NR) LA MISMA LUNA At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. (NR)

A QUIET PLACE At Main Library, Sept. 12, 2 p.m. (PG-13)

more passionately for Tucker’s work than Tucker himself does, turning it into a kind of fan-boy statement of purpose. (R)—SR

CURRENT RELEASES

KIN BB.5 When ex-con Jimmy (Jack Reynor) is responsible for the death of the brother of crazy crime boss Taylor (James Franco), he hits the road with his 14-year-old adopted brother Eli (Myles Truitt)—unaware that Eli has found a powerful weapon of alien origin. There’s a stylish subtlety to the opening sequence that insinuates more about a dangerous interstellar war than it shows, and writer/directors Jonathan and Josh Baker tease with a notion that the setting of a dilapidated Detroit will have a thematic resonance. But the narrative simply turns into a roadtrip chase, never delivering enough thrills to be satisfying as genre adventure, or enough fraternal bonding material to make it satisfying as a character piece. Franco’s craziness provides needed energy, up until the bizarre resolution, which answers a question the movie doesn’t even consider asking until it’s almost over. (PG-13)—SR

CRAZY RICH ASIANS BBB Should audiences expect a conventional genre entertainment that happens to be about Asians, or a culturally distinctive story where Asian-ness is intrinsic to its appeal? Director Jon M. Chu and company balance those demands in the story of Rachel (Constance Wu), a New Yorker who discovers that her boyfriend Nick (Henry Golding) comes from a wealthy family in Singapore when she travels to meet his family there. Plenty of familiar genre components come together in this narrative, but Asians mostly sticks the landing on its familiar setups. There’s also a unique flavor that captures how this particular culture influences dynamics that might be familiar from a hundred romantic comedies. Satisfying wish-fulfillment stories are part of why we go to the movies, and this one delivers—even fulfilling the wish for a story that’s as singularly Asian as it is recognizably rom-com. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw JULIET, NAKED BB.5 The latest film version of a Nick Hornby novel hits one of his favorite themes—men’s relationships with their obsessions interfering with their relationships with other people. In a seaside British town, the 15-year-relationship between Annie (Rose Byrne) and Duncan (Chris O’Dowd) begins unraveling, just as Annie strikes up an email correspondence with Tucker Crowe (Ethan Hawke), the obscure, long-retired singer-songwriter Duncan reveres. Byrne makes the most of a too-rare comedic lead role, while Hawke cruises a bit on his physical embodiment of a guy who is all unfulfilled potential. Director Jesse Peretz never mines the deepest veins of looking with regret on taking the easy route, so Juliet often feels fairly disposable. But O’Dowd gets a great defense of caring

SEARCHING BB.5 Aneesh Chaganty sustains his gimmick for 100 minutes—only for his plot to sabotage the finale. That gimmick involves a story told entirely through computer and phone screens, as widowed dad David Kim (John Cho) faces the horror of having his 16-year-old daughter Margot (Michelle La) go missing. The narrative device allows for an intriguing exploration of contemporary parent/ child dynamics, with darkly funny material about performative grief, and reminders to “never read the comments” as strangers assume David must be the perpetrator himself. Then the story turns into a conventional thriller, and while it’s initially fascinating watching a savvy civilian track a missing person, the resolution becomes a disappointing exposition dump. This is a whodunnit where whodunnit doesn’t really matter, as much as exploring the scary reality of how much of our lives is now lived virtually. (PG-13)—SR

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MUSIC

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The One and Only

BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 31

KRS-ONE

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In the ’90s, KRS-One went solo, expanding his profile exponentially: a guest spot with alterna-rock heroes R.E.M.; a fawning tribute from reggae-rock icons Sublime; a hip-hop/New Wave interpolation with Blondie; a remix with Puff Daddy. But mainstream attention didn’t fit the Scholar well, and today his early solo period is more well-known for the “WOOP WOOP” refrain of racial profiling anthem “Sound of da Police,” criminal-justice reform crusade “Free Mumia” and a lengthy anti-corporate feud with the BBC. Since then, KRS has focused on promoting hip-hop at every opportunity. He founded the Temple of Hip-Hop Ministry, Archive, School and Society to perpetuate Afrika Bambaataa’s overarching idea that the art form was a deliberate attempt to effect positive change on the world. He worked as an A&R executive at Warner Brothers and Reprise to recruit young conscious rappers into the major-label fold. He wrote a 600-page religious treatise called The Gospel of Hip-Hop: The First Instrument as a blueprint for a new rap religion. Today, instead of granting interviews to publications seeking to preview his performances, he devotes his free time to lecturing at colleges, standing up for free speech and dissecting police brutality on cable news. In 2015, when the Tucson, Ariz., school system tried to ban KRS-One’s essay “An Introduction to Hip Hop,” the rap philosopher traveled there and spoke to hundreds of high school students about self-worth, cultural inclusion and ethnic solidarity. After his speech, he of course busted out an impromptu performance, including a freestyle rendition of his version of hip-hop history, where he recaps 45 years of highlights and low blows, one line per year. “I introduced the concept of being hip-hop, not just doing it,” he told The AV Club way back in 2001, when today’s SoundCloud rappers were still in diapers and the deaths of Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G. were still fresh on people’s minds. “The concept of rap is something we do, while hip-hop is something we live … That’s the single most important contribution that I can offer. I make intelligence cool. I make spirituality cool. If we can make one’s devotion to God cool, then I think I did a great thing. I can rest in peace.” CW

NEW YORK AT DETROIT LOS ANGELES AT OAKLAND

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“R

ap is something you do; hip-hop is something you live.” If Afrika Bambaataa is the Godfather of Hip-Hop, and Kool Herc is the original King, one undisputed title is still left to be claimed: the Teacha. From the beginning of his career, KRS-One— born Lawrence Parker in the Bronx in 1965—committed himself to fulfilling that role, studying, practicing and sharpening his verbal blades to the point that his first group, Boogie Down Productions, inaugurated hip-hop as more than just entertainment. They elevated it to an art form worthy of political activism and social advocacy. Of course, as a hip-hop pioneer, nothing came easy for KRSOne, which stands for Knowledge Reigns Supreme Over Nearly Everyone. He left home at age 16 to pursue his hip-hop dreams at a time when hardly anyone was making a full-time living at it. Ending up in a South Bronx homeless shelter, he met youth counselor Scott Sterling, who decided to back his bombastic new MC friend as DJ Scott La Rock. The duo’s first album as Boogie Down Productions, 1987’s Criminal Minded, set the template for hardcore hip-hop, with Scott sampling everyone from James Brown to Billy Joel to Jamaican dancehall, and KRS publicly battling hip-hop dignitaries Marley Marl and MC Shan over hip-hop’s true birthplace (Marl claimed Queens; KRS claimed the Bronx). Even more seminal, Scott and KRS appeared on the cover of Criminal Minded brandishing firearms and ammunition, a first for the popular-music world. But their posturing was meant to skewer the violence and drugs that plagued African-American communities, along with satirizing white America’s fetishization of it. In 1988, however, DJ Scott La Rock was gunned down in a random street shootout, which was followed months later by the death of a fan at a KRS-One/ Public Enemy concert. In those Republican-dominated days, such headline-stealing histrionics weren’t welcomed kindly by parents, politicians and the Christian right. With Boogie Down Productions’ future in jeopardy, Warner Brothers torpedoed BDP’s record deal, but KRS persevered, starting the nonprofit group Stop The Violence decades before Black Lives Matter rose to prominence and pivoting toward conscious, epistemological hip-hop on seminal albums Ghetto Music: The Blueprint of Hip Hop and Edutainment.

football

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Hip-hop pioneer KRS-One drops 40 years of knowledge.

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM


BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, KEITH L. McDONALD, NICK McGREGOR & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 9/6 Whether it’s ironic or planned, it’s noteworthy: The same year that the Salt Lake Community College Twilight Concert Series changes venues (again) from Pioneer Park back to Gallivan Center, it also hosts the individual who embodies the evolving rap-music scene. Snoop Dogg, aka DJ Snoopadelic, aka Calvin Broadus, has worn more hats than anyone in the business—from rapper to Rasta, adult movies to gospel hymns, youth football to game shows. There’s little room for Snoop to get any bigger, and yet he’s still regularly adding skills to his bag. Yes, now he’s taken up DJing. Some people feel like the D-O-Double-G should stick to what he’s known for: Long Beach-tinged gangster flows, G Funk-laced beats and, of course, his signature cool demeanor. With influences as diverse as The Dramatics, George Clinton, Charlie Wilson, Roger Troutman and Bootsy Collins, though, you should expect DJ Snoopadelic to mix some old-school funk and R&B into his West Coast cut. He’s probably forgotten more about music in a cloud of Purple Haze than most performers have learned in their lifetimes. And still—concertgoers should at least give Snoop a chance to prove he can hold his own behind the turntables. Will he be as bad as a Paris Hilton or a DJ Pauly D? I highly doubt it. Will he control the decks with the precision and skill of a DJ Jazzy Jeff or Kid Capri? Probably not. But with his ear, his catalogue and his history, I’d wager Snoop will impart his laid-back stoner vibe to what should be a large group of Twilight concertgoers with splendid results. Fa-shizzle! (Keith L. McDonald) Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 6 p.m., sold out at press time, all ages, twilightconcerts.com

FRIDAY 9/7

Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band

Idaho native Josh Ritter’s skills as a singer/songwriter were established early on, then fully fleshed out with a run of spectacular albums. Starting with 1999’s self-titled debut and running through 2017’s Gathering, Ritter’s records court intellect and rely on observation. Making full appreciation of his talents elusive at best—especially to those for whom a simple “moon/ June” rhyme scheme replaces real narrative acumen or insight. Ritter’s influences come from novelists like Flannery O’Connor, Philip Roth and Dennis Lehane. He even managed to reference Shakespeare in the title of 2010 LP So Runs the World Away. That love of literature clearly comes naturally to Ritter, who’s married to author Haley Tanner and is a budding writer himself: His 2011 novel Bright’s Passage, published by Dial Press, is set during World War I. Unsurprisingly, Ritter’s music is known for its novelty and flair, and his work is appreciated precisely Josh Ritter

YVETTE MORALES

DJ Snoopadelic

LAURA WILSON

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because it warrants DJ Snoopadelic repeat encounters. And such an astute auteur requires an exceptional ensemble to back him up, and The Royal City Band serves that purpose both on stage and in the studio. This alliance—both supple and assured—is welcome in these crazy days. (Lee Zimmerman) The Commonwealth Room, 195 W. Commonwealth Ave., 8 p.m., $43, 21+, thecommonwealthroom.com

SATURDAY 9/8

Mushroomhead, Powerman 5000, The Browning, Kissing Candice, Unsaid Fate, Skyburial, Earth Caller, Natas Lived

In this instance, the age-old debate of “who wore it first?” is more than just a fashion blurb. City Weekly readers hopefully know by now that your humble metal reporter sports chic hand-me-down threads with luxurious mystery stains on the sleeves. No, the question is, who wore grotesque masks on stage first: Mushroomhead or Slipknot? The answer: neither. Although Mushroomhead, the theatrical nü-metal band hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, has been rocking latex masks that give people nightmares since they formed in 1993 (Slipknot started in ’95), some say it was legendary ’60s band The Residents who first appeared in face costumes. Other mask-wearing musicians go even further, claiming that classic country acts first perfected the bandit look. We’ll never know for sure, but here’s one thing we do know: Mushroomhead is no gimmick. Touring and recording for 25 years, Mushroomhead maintained their niche audience when Slipknot stormed the mainstream in the late ’90s and early 2000s. Vocalist Jason “J Mann” Popson explained long ago that Mushroomhead donned masks to separate themselves in the Cleveland scene from their other projects. And although the masses didn’t catch on to the band’s creepy stage presence and electronic, theatrical nü-metal style, hardcore fans across the globe still throw down big money to collect Mushroomhead’s terrifying disguises. Talk about a subculture all its own. (Rachelle Fernandez) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6 p.m., $26 presale; $30 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com


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friday: West Gate Rising NIU saturday: 5:30 Utes @ PPv

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SUNDAY 9/9

Lake Street Dive, Robert Finley

What better example of the synergy between young and old than the dual diversity of Lake Street Dive and Robert Finley? The former have found themselves in the vanguard of festival favorites, with a clear populist appeal that belies their roots at the storied New England Conservatory of Music. Naming themselves after a street in one member’s hometown that’s known for a profusion of dive bars, Lake Street Dive are equally eclectic—mixing pop, swing, soul, jazz and bluegrass. Thanks to consistent touring and eight albums released over the course of 12 years, the band has garnered a solid fan base—and logged a viral hit with a street cornerrecorded cover of the Jackson 5’s “I Want You Back,” which to date has garnered more than five million YouTube views. For his part, Robert Finley provides proof that good things come to those who wait—even if it takes much longer than expected. Fifty years after Finley started playing music, he was discovered by Black Keys guitarist and producer Dan Auerbach, who was so impressed he signed him to his Easy Eye Sound record label. The title of Finley’s debut album, Age Don’t Mean A Thing, is more than meaningful given his determined delivery. Both of these acts defy description, and should produce an enjoyable evening at the Eccles Theater. (LZ) Delta Performance Hall at Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 7:30 pm, $30-$55, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

MONDAY 9/10 Slow Hollows

You might not know Austin W. Anderson’s name, but you probably know his sound. Performing, recording and writing as Slow Hollows, he’s contributed gauzy guitar licks to high-profile recent releases by Frank Ocean (Blonde) and Tyler, the Creator (Flower Boy). In addition, Slow Hollows put out two sultry singles this summer, “Selling Flowers” and “Lessons for Later,” which deploy horns, strings and synths to smooth out the abrasion of the band’s older lo-fi post-punk releases. Maturity abounds in this new material; in a news release for “Selling Flowers,” Anderson says it “follows a narrative of ignorance,” acknowledging his own sense of oblivion to the world around him. “This song simply represents a young mind that really doesn’t know what it’s looking at just yet.” Perhaps it’s just a side effect of living and working in Los Angeles, but Anderson is everywhere—in addition to loading work with the aforementioned artists, his dreamy looks recently caught the attention of YSL creative director Hedi Slimane, who selected him to walk in a recent Paris runway show. Such refinement seems to be working, though, as the hype machine begins to bubble over for Slow Hollows’ forthcoming full-length and the band’s 16-show run across the country. “For a long time, I think we wanted to grow up a little bit too fast,” Anderson recently told High Snobiety, “and now we’re settling into being ourselves. It feels like there’s definitely a new energy. We’re basing it purely on feeling, and that feeling is a good one.” (Nick McGregor) Kilby Court, 741 Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $13 presale; $15 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com


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SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 35


WEDNESDAY 9/12

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ANDREWS

Trombone Shorty’s Voodoo Threauxdown feat. Galactic, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New Breed Brass Band, Cyril Neville, Kermit Ruffins, Walter “Wolfman” Washington

In New Orleans, roots trump everything. So the average fan might look at 32-year-old musician Trombone Shorty and say, “He sure is young!” Or the traditionalist might listen to the amped-up gumbo of funk, hip-hop, alternative rock, blues, soul and R&B that Shorty and his band Orleans Avenue call “supafunkrock” and say, “Not jazz enough.” But the man born Troy Andrews is a seasoned vet with an unassailable pedigree: His grandfather, Jessie Hill, was a lifelong musician who wrote the classic R&B track “Ooh Poo Pah Doo.” Little Troy first started performing in his native Treme neighborhood at age 4 (hence the Shorty nickname). He started leading his own band by age 6, and toured with the Stooges Brass Band and his older brother James’ All-Star Brass Band as a teenager. Just two months after graduating from high school, Shorty joined Lenny Kravitz on a worldwide stint, opening for Aerosmith. But there’s much more to the man than his mainstream success. He’s a trombone, tuba and trumpet expert who’s also adept at saxophone, piano, bass and drums. Since 2005, when Hurricane Katrina walloped New Orleans, Shorty has served as a Big Easy ambassador, playing the White House and the NBA All-Star Game while working hard to pay respect to his native city’s traditions. Hence the Voodoo Threauxdown, which features old-time traditionalists like Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Cyril Neville and Walter “Wolfman” Washington alongside young polymaths like Galactic, New Breed Brass Band and Kermit Ruffins. If you want to dance, this New Orleans showcase is your jam. (Nick McGregor) Red Butte Garden Amphitheater, 2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road, 6 p.m., all ages, $62-$67, redbuttegarden.com

THURSDAY 9/6 LIVE MUSIC

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LOUNGE

Black Uhuru + Onesty + Herban Empire (The State Room) Entwood (Hog Wallow Pub) KRS-One + Eneeone + Zac Ivie + DJ Juggy (Metro Music Hall) see p. 44 The Lazlos (Gracie’s) Lyle Lovett & His Large Band (Eccles Theater) Olivia Gatwood + Joaquina Mertz (Kilby Court) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) RJ + Underground Ambitionz + Jare & Joey (The Complex) Saylo + Afterghost + Detective Deckard (Velour) Snoopadelic (aka Snoop Dogg) + DJ Erockalypze + House of Lewis + DJ Bangarang + DJ Matty Mo + DJ Logic + DJ Italia (Gallivan Center) see p. 46 Terrance Hansen (Lake Effect) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Quiet Oaks + Panthermilk + Tenkaras (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO

80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz & Blues Jam (Twist) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Robot Dream (Gracie’s) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Paul Oakenfold (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke w/ TIYB (Club 90)

FRIDAY 9/7 LIVE MUSIC

The Backyard Revival + Megan Simper (Pale Horse Sound) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Dani Star (The Loading Dock)

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825 Main Street, Park City | 11am-1am daily For Group or Table Reservations - vip@thecabinparkcity.com by Gen. Manager Junior Richard. “We pride ourselves on having a great production “We pride ourselves on having a great production at at every show whether its open mic, karaoke, or every show whether its open mic, karaoke, or John Popper with a super group”, says Richard John Popper with a super group”, says Richard Upon entering, you can immediately feel the amazing energy from the staff. They are one big family and make ome of the greatest writers knew the importance you feel the same. The crew is so solid that all 14 memof cabins to run off to, but only one novelist can be bers of the staff have unique tattoos of their mascot Al the credited for saying “write drunk edit sober.” The Cabin Park City is known for its intimate ambiance and the same Elkupine. This speaks to the devotion and respect each staff member has for creative energy that is found in rustic wooded areas is the establishment found within its four walls. and the hardworking The Cabin is located on the lower end of Main Street in Park City, just under Town Lift. The vibrant atmosphere management. Ask keeps the dance floor busy and the drafts pouring. Wheth- any staff member to see a variety of er you’re arms and legs with dropping in the notorious “Al the after a day Elkupine” tattooed of skiing, on them. Who mountain biking, or out knows, you might just be walking away for a night on the town, with a new tattoo deThe Cabin is sign yourself. There your second have been at least four non staff-related home. They offer Al tats confirmed. So grab a drink at the bar or request a table and enjoy different entertainment every night of the week - open the show! It’ll be your little cabin in the mountains where mic, karaoke, dueling pianos, bands and DJs, and great you can create your very own memories, dance, laugh and live music. The Cabin has hosted big names like Chali love. The Cabin is your home away from home (you just 2na, Lukas Nelson, G.Love, Chris Robinson, as well as member’s of Blues Traveler, and Dead and Co., all planned can’t sleep there).

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 37

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38 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

X WIFE’S PLACE

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Dubwise w/ Frank Royal + LMNL + Illoom (Urban Lounge) Green Druid + Sleeping Tigers (Kilby Court) Jalles Franca A Michael Jackson Tribute (Sandy Ampitheatre) Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band (Commonwealth Room) see p. 46 Korene Greenwood (Harp & Hound) Maroon 5 (Vivint Arena) Mimicking Birds + Lantern by Sea (Rye) Motherlorde Canyon Band (The Spur) Murphy & The Giant (The Ice Haüs) Note of Passage (The Bayou) October Rage + Riding Gravity + LHAW + Colonel Lingus (The Royal) The Pour (Lake Effect) Satin Steel (Dejoria Center) Scoundrels (Hog Wallow Pub) Southbound (The Westerner) Stacy Board (Snowbird) Summer of 89 (Gracie’s) Taylor & The Train Robbers

(Garage on Beck) Total Chaos + Press Gang Union + Endless Struggle + SL Spitfires (Liquid Joe’s) Velvet Jones (Brewskis)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Bollywood Club Invasion (Metro Music Hall) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Jpan (Downstairs) DJ Rufio (Sky) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic Night w/ DJ Courtney + DJ Mikhell (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51)

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Although the University of Utah is a dry campus, you won’t have a hard time finding a chill spot to grab a cold beer at historic X Wife’s Place. (“Historic” because of its appearance on an episode of the now-defunct Comedy Central show Insomniac with Dave Attell). This not-so-secret bar is the second closest watering hole to campus, and it’s where I ended up along with the college crowd on a recent Monday night. Winding through the maze of the bar, I take a vacant seat next to a middle-aged man named Parley. “Like the canyon,” he says as he introduces himself. “I’m Rachelle,” I respond, “pronounced like ‘Russia’.” “Today was a good day,” he says. “I worked for myself rather than ‘the man.’” He’s a craftsman by day and a stagehand by night, even though he says he doesn’t really like rock ’n’ roll. “I’d rather listen to classical music,” he says. Parley starts letting me in on the magic of YouTube, which apparently pisses off a lot of craftsmen because the website “exposes their secrets,” he laughs. You can visit YouTube, he adds, and in no time “be a Sheetrock professional.” A bartender dubbed Cuz is running back and forth behind the bar pouring shots and refilling ales as more patrons pour in off 700 East. Oddly enough, X Wife’s Place starts to feel like my grandma’s house—personable and comfortable. (Rachelle Fernandez) 465 S. 700 East, 801-532-1954, barsaltlakecity.com

Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 9/8 LIVE MUSIC

The Aquabats + Teenage Bottlerocket (The Depot) Blue Band (Avenues Street Fair) The Bones of J.R. Jones (The State Room) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Glass Eye (The Bayou) Hylian + The Archives + Mister Fister & The Sexy Studs + No Company (Kilby Court) J. Cole (Vivint Arena) Jay Martin Duo (Gracie’s) Keyvin Vandyke (Harp & Hound) Live Trio (The Red Door)

Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Matt Calder + Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Meander Cat & The Big Drops (Hog Wallow Pub) Nate Robinson (Snowbird) Patrick Sweany (Garage on Beck) Peter Breinholt (Sandy Amphitheater) Mushroomhead + Powerman 5000 + The Browning + Kissing Candice + Unsaid Fate + Skyburial + Natas Lived (The Complex) see p. 46 Southbound (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Zion Riot (Brewskis)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (Funk ’n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Latu (The Green Pig)

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WEEKNIGHTS

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| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Friday, Sept. 7th

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Caleb Gray (Park City Sunday Market) Charles Ellsworth (Garage on Beck) Christian Coleman & The Blue Zen Band (Park City Sunday Market) Irish Session Folk (Sugar House Coffee) Jackson Taylor & The Sinners + Ghostowne (Liquid Joe’s) Lake Street Dive + Robert Finley (Eccles Theater) see p. 48 Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Pacific Dub (The Royal) Sidewalk Poets + Patio + Ravenel + Fear & Loathing + Rejoin The Team + Kusama + Steamliner (Kilby Court) Summer Heat + BUHU + Divorce Court (Urban Lounge) Thomas Gabriel (Funk ’n’ Dive)

Patio Party w/ Stereo Sparks (The Cabin) Sunday Blues Night w/ Blues on First (Gracie’s)


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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40 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

TUESDAY 9/11 LIVE MUSIC

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No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

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1. Georgia's capital: Abbr. 2. "That was close!" 3. "So-o-o relaxing!" 4. "Good grief!" 5. Bellyache 6. Olympic swimmer Ryan 7. Vogue rival 8. Slanted in print: Abbr. 9. ____ the Great, detective of children's stories

51. "____ Green" (Kermit the Frog song) 52. Philosopher who asked "What is enlightenment?" 53. Lab assistant in many a horror film 54. Blue-skinned race in "Avatar" 55. News item that its subject never reads 56. Close by, in poems 57. "On cloud nine" feeling 58. Big coal-mining state: Abbr. 61. Sci-fi visitors

SUDOKU

DOWN

10. "Napoleon Dynamite" star Jon 11. Bug barrier 12. Warner ____ 13. Slangy response to "Why?" 21. "Reward" for poor service 22. Actor Kilmer 25. "You are!" retort 26. Transport that usually features sleeping cars 27. African migrators 28. Designer of Spain's Guggenheim Museum 29. Ore-____ (frozen taters brand) 30. 1921 play that introduced the word "robot" 32. In the ____ of 33. "Who am ____ judge?" 36. Tallest active volcano in Europe 37. Uganda's Amin 38. Pixar's "Monsters, ____" 39. Globe shape: Abbr. 40. Lightsaber battles 45. Org. that encourages flossing 46. Chinese revolutionary Sun ____ 47. Big to-do 49. Otherworldly

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1. *2004 Kelly Clarkson tune 5. Calvin of fashion 10. Giant banking firm founded in Hong Kong in 1865 14. Language of Bangkok 15. Italian scientist after whom an electrical unit is named 16. Beige-ish 17. ____ of faith 18. Splendor 19. Physician with a daily talk show 20. *1971 Led Zeppelin tune 23. Foliage-viewing mo. 24. "The British ____ coming!" 25. *1991 Red Hot Chili Peppers tune 31. Name placeholder in govt. records 34. Small 35. Follower of Brown. or Rice. 36. Move text here and there 37. *1962 Neil Sedaka tune 41. Homer Simpson outbursts 42. "Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!" airer 43. Juan's ones 44. Cousin ____ of 1960s TV 45. *1992 Billy Ray Cyrus tune 48. Danson of "The Good Place" 50. Co. acquired by Verizon in 2015 51. What actors in musicals often do ... or what's needed in each of this puzzle's starred clues 58. Have on 59. Audibly floored 60. Liver secretion 62. IV + IV 63. It's no short story 64. "What do ____ in return?" 65. Actress Hathaway 66. Female rapper with the 2005 hit "Here We Go" 67. *1980 Kurtis Blow tune


LEGAL NOTICES

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

44 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189910644, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MATHEW CASTRO, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MATHEW CASTRO: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,101.64.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908238, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. BRITTNIE K COLEMAN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO BRITTNIE K COLEMAN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,500.00.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189912048, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. CASEY RON CHRISTENSEN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO CASEY RON CHRISTENSEN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,268.32.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189911028, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. AMBER MARIE JORGENSEN and JON JORGENSEN, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO AMBER MARIE JORGENSEN and JON JORGENSEN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,500.00.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908228, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. GREGORY S LARSEN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO GREGORY S LARSEN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114,and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,500.00.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908217, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. TROY MCTEER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO TROY MCTEER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $3,485.64.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189904743, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JOSH MILLER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JOSH MILLER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $3,184.57.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189909035, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. WYATT NICHOLS CHRISTENSEN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO WYATT NICHOLS CHRISTENSEN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,500.00.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189910912, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JENNIFER WEBB, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JENNIFER WEBB: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $2,761.32.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189911153, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ERIN ROWLEY TURNER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO ERIN ROWLEY TURNER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,583.90.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189911152, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. FREDRICK MCWILLIAMS, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO FREDRICK MCWILLIAMS: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,562.49.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189908903, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. TITANIUM FUNDS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. IVONNE WORKMAN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO IVONNE WORKMAN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S STATE ST., SALT LAKE, UT 84114, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney J. Benson Miller at 3081 South State Street – 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84115. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,679.66.

DRIVER WANTED

City Weekly is looking for a Driver for the SALT LAKE CITY DOWNTOWN Drivers must use their own vehicle, be available Wed. & Thur.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): By volume, the Amazon is the largest river in the world. But where does it originate? Scientists have squabbled about that issue for more than 300 years. Everyone agrees the source is in southwestern Peru. But is it the Apurímac River? The Marañón? The Mantaro? There are good arguments in favor of each. Let’s use this question as a poetic subtext as we wonder and meditate about the origin of your life force, Virgo. As is the case for the Amazon, your source has long been mysterious. But I suspect that’s going to change during the next 14 months. And the clarification process begins soon. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When Warsan Shire was a child, she immigrated to the U.K. with her Somalian parents. Now she’s a renowned poet who writes vividly about refugees, immigrants and other marginalized people. To provide support and inspiration for the part of you that feels like an exile or fugitive or displaced person, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I offer you two quotes by Shire. 1. “I belong deeply to myself.” 2. “Document the moments you feel most in love with yourself—what you’re wearing, who you’re around, what you’re doing. Re-create and repeat.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Once in a while came a moment when everything seemed to have something to say to you.” So says a character in Alice Munro’s short story “Jakarta.” Now I’m using that message as the key theme of your horoscope. Why? Because you’re at the peak of your ability to be reached, to be touched, to be communicated with. You’re willing to be keenly receptive. You’re strong enough to be deeply influenced. Is it because you’re so firmly anchored in your understanding and acceptance of who you are?

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Now is an excellent time to feel and explore and understand and even appreciate your sadness. To get you in the mood, here’s a list of sadnesses from novelist Jonathan Safran Foer: sadness of the couldhave-been; sadness of being misunderstood; sadness of having too many options; sadness of being smart; sadness of awkward conversations; sadness of feeling the need to create beautiful things; sadness of going unnoticed; sadness of domesticated birds; sadness of arousal being an unordinary physical state; sadness of wanting sadness.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have any feral qualities lurking deep down inside you? Have you ever felt a mad yearning to communicate using howls and yips instead of words? When you’re alone, do you sometimes dispense with your utensils and scoop the food off your plate with your fingers? Have you dreamed of running through a damp meadow under the full moon for the sheer ecstasy of it? Do you on occasion experience such strong erotic urges that you feel like you could weave your body and soul together with the color green or the sound of a rain-soaked river or the moon rising over the hills? I ask these questions, Taurus, because now is an excellent time to draw on the instinctual wisdom of your feral qualities.

NOW OPEN IN SUGARHOUSE

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Close some doors today,” writes novelist Paulo Coelho. “Not because of pride, incapacity, or arrogance, but simply because they lead you nowhere.” I endorse his advice for your use, Gemini. In my astrological opinion, you’ll be wise to practice the rough but fine art of saying “no.” It’s time for you to make crisp decisions about where you belong and where you don’t; about where your future fulfillment is likely to thrive and where it won’t; about which relationships deserve your sage intimacy and which tend to push you in the direction of mediocrity. CANCER (June 21-July 22): To casual observers, you might seem to be an amorphous hodgepodge, or a simmering mess of semi-interesting confusion, or an amiable dabbler headed in too many directions at once. But in my opinion, casual observers would be wrong in that assessment. What’s closer to the symbolic truth about you is an image described by poet Carolyn Forché: grapes that are ripening in the fog. Here’s another image that resonates with your current state: sea turtle eggs gestating beneath the sand on a misty ocean beach. One further metaphor for you: the bright yellow flowers of the evening primrose plant, which only bloom at night. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I want to make sure that the groove you’re in doesn’t devolve into a rut. So I’ll ask you unexpected questions to spur your imagination in unpredictable directions. Ready? 1. How would you describe the untapped riches in the shadowy part of your personality? 2. Is there a rare object you’d like to own because it would foster your feeling that the world has magic and miracles? 3. Imagine the perfect party you’d love to attend and how it might change your life for the better. 4. What bird most reminds you of yourself? 5. What’s your most evocative and inspiring taboo daydream? 6. In your past, were there ever experiences that made you cry for joy in ways that felt almost orgasmic? How might you attract or induce a catharsis like that sometime soon?

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): From 49-45 B.C., civil war wracked the Roman Republic. Julius Caesar led forces representing the common people against armies fighting for the aristocracy’s interests. In 45 B.C., Caesar brought a contingent of soldiers to Roman territory in North Africa, intent on launching a campaign against the enemy. As the general disembarked from his ship, he accidentally slipped and fell. Thinking fast, he exclaimed, “Africa, I have tight hold of you!” and clasped the ground, thus implying he had lowered himself on purpose in a ritual gesture of conquest. In this way, he converted an apparent bad omen into a positive one. And indeed, he won the ensuing battle, which was the turning point that led to ultimate victory and the war’s end. That’s good role modeling for you right now.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Not many goats can climb trees, but there are daredevils in Morocco that do. They go in quest of the delicious olive-like berries that grow on argan trees. The branches on which they perch might be 30 feet off the ground. I’m naming them as your power creature for the coming weeks. I think you’re ready to ascend higher in search of goodies. You have the soulful agility necessary to transcend your previous level of accomplishment.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1928, novelist Virginia Woolf wrote a letter to her friend Saxon Sidney Turner. “I am reading six books at once, the only way of reading,” she confided, “since one book is only a single unaccompanied note, and to get the full sound, one needs 10 others at the same time.” My usual inclination is to counsel you Sagittarians to focus on one or two important matters rather than on a multitude of semi-important matters. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I’m departing from tradition to suggest you adopt Woolf’s approach to books as your approach to everything. Your life in the coming weeks should be less like an acoustic ballad and more like a symphony for 35 instruments.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Below are sweet words I’ve borrowed from poets I love. I invite you to use them to communicate with anyone who is primed to become more lyrically intimate with you. The time is right for you to reach out! 1. “You look like a sea of gems.” —Qahar Aasi; 2. “I love you with what in me is unfinished.” —Robert Bly; 3. “Yours is the light by which my spirit’s born.” —E. E. Cummings; 4. “Tell me the most exquisite truths you know.” —Barry Hannah; 5. “It’s very rare to know you, very strange and wonderful.” —F. Scott Fitzgerald; 6. “When you smile like that you are as beautiful as all my secrets.” —Anne Carson; 7. Everything you say is “like a secret voice speaking straight out of my own bones.” —Sylvia Plath

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

EE FR ARE C L Y ! DA O AL NTS T LIE C W NE


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46 | SEPTEMBER 6, 2018

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Tax Time

When Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin died a few weeks ago, I was both devastated and happy. She had been battling pancreatic cancer since 2010, and her pain was finally over. I grew up on her music and played her songs on public radio for nearly 28 years. I think I own every vinyl album she ever recorded. She was the voice that made me happy. The music she sang was the Red Bull in my low-energy days, and her sass gave me the R-E-S-P-E-C-T I needed when I experienced discrimination. Although born in Memphis, she was raised in Detroit and lived there for most of her life. Detroit has had severe economic problems in the past decade—it’s not known as a city of affluence to begin with. According to the Detroit News, from 2011 through 2015, almost 100,000 properties (about a quarter of all the parcels) foreclosed because of unpaid property taxes. The problem? Two Chicago professors claim that the tax assessor overinflated property values in the city’s lowest-valued neighborhoods, which resulted in thousands of the poorest homeowners losing their homes. The newspaper reported that the average property had been assessed at 7.5 times its actual sales price. If you own property in Utah, you should have received your property-tax notice by now. We generally pay below the national average in taxes, somewhere between .9461.539 percent, according to smartasset.com. Utah’s average effective property-tax rate for the entire state is .67 percent, which is the 10th lowest in the country. As an example, a homeowner in Salt Lake City with a property worth $250,000 would pay $1,875 (.75 percent) in annual property taxes. In the rest of the state, they’d shell out $1,720 on average, or $3,028 nationally per year. Many homeowners believe the property value calculated by the tax assessor is the true value of your home, land, condo, investment property or commercial building. It is not. The value is calculated by a computer, and there’s a form attached to your tax notice that you can easily fill out to notify the county’s Board of Equalization that you disagree. Provide sales data or an appraisal, send it in and wait to hear if the local assessor agrees or disagrees with you. Also, you can meet them in person to explain why your property is not worth what’s appearing on your tax notice. You don’t need to hire a CPA or an attorney to fight taxes. And know that the assessor can’t sell your property at a public auction for lack of payment of property taxes for five years. Sadly, too many people in Detroit lost their homes because they failed to understand the system, were afraid to fight the system, or didn’t know they had options. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner 2018

Truth is not truth Lie is not a lie

Right is not right Left is not left Up is not up Down is not down White is not white Black is not black Good is not good Bad is not bad

Terry Brinkman Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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Mmm, Tastes Like Chicken In Plymouth, Mass., on Aug. 17, a friendly game at Southers Marsh Golf Club turned ugly when Derek Harkins, 46, and an unnamed 57-year-old man got into a brawl on the 18th hole. But you gotta hand it to Harkins: The Patriot Ledger reported that he pointedly ended the fight by biting off the other man’s finger up to the knuckle, according to Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri. The victim, from Marshfield, was taken to the hospital, but his finger could not be reattached. Harkins was arrested at the scene and charged with assault and battery, mayhem and disturbing the peace.

WEIRD

Undignified Death The happiest place on earth couldn’t work its magic on Aug. 15 when a worker at nearby Harvest Power fell into a vat of oil and grease from Walt Disney World. The plant in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., recycles the resort’s food waste, then converts it into renewable energy and fertilizer. John Korody, 61, and another worker were emptying the contents of a semitruck into a vat when Korody slipped on a grate and fell into the vat. His coworker tried to pull him out, but the fumes overtook them both, and Korody slid farther in, according to The Washington Post. The Reedy Creek Fire Department responded, but Korody was pronounced dead at the scene.

n A pothole in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, got a new life as a vegetable garden this summer after area residents grew weary of waiting for the city to repair it. The hole, which is several feet deep, had been expanding for months, neighbors said. So they filled it with tomato plants, which are now ripening and

Inexplicable On an Aug. 17 flight between Chicago and Narita International Airport in Tokyo, a 24-year-old American man, who was reportedly unprovoked, urinated on a 50-year-old Japanese man sitting two rows behind him. The younger man had consumed at least four glasses of champagne and one cup of sake before the incident, police told Japan Today, and claimed not to remember what he had done. He was restrained aboard the remainder of the flight and turned over to police in Tokyo.

Babs De Lay

Selling homes for 34 years in the Land of Zion

Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Selling homes for 5 years

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Compelling Explanation Near Mason City, Iowa, on Aug. 20, the Iowa State Patrol pulled over a Ferrari 488 Spider that was clocked going 137 mph during a rainstorm. “Not a great idea to drive this fast in the rain,” the trooper posted on Facebook with a photo of the radar readout. The unnamed driver, however, wasn’t fazed; she thought she was going “around 100.” Fox News reported that if ticketed in a 70-mph zone (the highest speed limit in Iowa), her fine would be $335.

• Moses Lanham, 57, fell 18 feet from a rope in gym class when he was 14 years old. As a result, the Michigan man is now known as “Mr. Elastic.” Lanham has double cartilage and extra tissue in his knee joints, hips and ankles, which makes it possible for him to turn his feet 180 degrees backward and walk. In fact, he tells Metro News, walking with his feet pointed behind him is more comfortable than walking normally. “I’ve heard one other (person) can turn his feet, but not walk,” Lanham said of his fame. “When I perform this in front of people, I love the reactions,” he said. “One time, I actually had a person throw up after I turned my feet around.”

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Oops Pennsylvania State Police told Lehigh Valley Live that Evan T. Kasick, 52, of Upper Milford Township, was injured on Aug. 16 when he wrecked his motorcycle—in his own driveway. Kasick sped into his driveway around 7:30 p.m. and struck a concrete barrier, causing him to be thrown from the Honda bike. He was taken to an area hospital with undisclosed injuries, and police issued a ticket for driving at an unsafe speed.

Superpowers Phoenix teenager Josiah Wiedman, 13, was walking home through a park in early August with a friend when he was struck by lightning, “sending me 9 feet into the air, making me bounce on my head and then flip over to my back,” he told ABC News. Afterward, doctors put Josiah into a medically induced coma for three days, and when he came to, he made a speedy recovery. His mother, who didn’t expect her son to survive, dubbed him “Superman”—and indeed, Josiah said he’s waiting for his special powers to kick in. “I haven’t felt my powers yet, but I will soon,” he said.

Julie “Bella” De Lay

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 | 47

Annoying After 16 years, neighbors of “Eva N.” in Sturovo, Slovakia, have gotten relief from her particular brand of torment, reported the BBC. From morning until night, the woman had played a fourminute aria from Giuseppe Verdi’s “La Traviata” over and over, with her speakers on full blast. “The whole street is suffering,” complained one resident. At first, the music-lover played the music to drown out a neighbor’s barking dog, but continued the practice until Aug. 6, when she was arrested for harassment and malicious persecution. If found guilty, she could face between six months and three years in prison.

Unexpected Hazard An unnamed Irish teenager’s hiking outing became fodder for any number of bad punsters after the boy was hit by a falling sheep while walking in Northern Ireland’s Mourne Mountains. The sheep fell from a crag on Aug. 17 and landed on the boy, who was treated for potential injuries to his head, neck, back, abdomen and leg. “It is believed the sheep was uninjured and left the scene unaided,” reported Metro News. Punny comments on a social media post made by the Mourne Mountain Rescue Team included: “Mutton been looking where he was going, I bet he’s feeling a little sheepish now” and “Ewe want to be careful on the mountains!”

BUT NEVER DUB STEPPERS!

| COMMUNITY |

Weird Science United Press International reported that a 42-year-old British woman saw her eye doctor after experiencing swelling and drooping of her eyelid earlier this year. After performing an MRI, doctors discovered a cyst and performed surgery, during which they found a hard contact lens embedded in the eyelid. It turns out that the patient had suffered a blow to the eye 28 years ago and had assumed the lens fell out. She experienced no symptoms until the recent discomfort.

getting so tall they require wire cages for support. Now, “It’s sort of, like, become the community garden,” resident Bryan Link told CBC Radio. Finally, Mayor John Tory has agreed to not only fill the pothole, but to move the tomato plants to a community garden.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Smooth Reaction Debbie L. McCulley, 57, of Salem, Va., has been banned from all future Floyd County High School sporting events but, on the bright side, her indecent exposure case might eventually be dropped, following an incident area lawyers are calling “moon over Floyd.” McCulley’s husband, Mark, is the JV softball coach for Glenvar High School, and the charges resulted from Debbie’s unusual reaction to her husband’s team’s loss to Floyd County in May. She “stood on or close to the pitcher’s mound and pulled down her pants with her right hand to expose her right butt cheek,” according to Floyd County Sheriff’s Deputy G.H. Scott. But Debbie told the officer that her husband had confronted the opposing coach after the game, and she was afraid he would be “attacked,” so she was trying to divert attention from the two men. The Roanoke Times reported that Debbie wrote a letter of apology and will be performing community service. Chris Robinson of the Virginia High School League noted that crowd behavior at games is “probably leaning a little bit in the wrong direction.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


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City Weekly September 6, 2018  

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City Weekly September 6, 2018  

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