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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY MAKE GSL GREAT AGAIN

As urbanization spreads west, the Great Salt Lake’s wetlands are at risk of disappearing. Cover by Derek Carlisle

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Cover story, p. 13 The independent science writer and author has covered water regulation and policy for nearly a decade. Always working on several investigative projects, she hopes to one day have the time to develop an air freshener that’ll make her house smell like afternoon thunderstorms in the high desert.

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Cover story, Aug. 9, The Beer Issue Bravo.

@THE1JUSTIN Via Twitter Awesome artwork!

@MCGETTIGAN_ Via Instagram

Beer and He-Man seems like a pretty legit combo.

CODY MCCOOLNESS

@SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY @SLCWEEKLY

Via Facebook Omg. Is that She-Ra?

@X_JANE_DOE Via Twitter

That cover is amazing! #80sbaby

@SLCFOODIE Via Instagram

News, Aug. 9, “House Hunting”

Lol, man. How many bathrooms do rich people need?!

NICOLE PASALAGUA Via Facebook

In fire-infested Utah, the wooden architecture is not a plus.

SHAUN ANDERSON Via cityweekly.net

Music Live, Aug. 9, Melvins

Please tell [the author] that saying Dale Crover is not an “original member” of Melvins is like saying #CharlieDontTweet isn’t an original member of the Rolling Stones. Technically correct, but c’mon, don’t scare me like that.

@HIPMRBULLY Via Twitter

Gold standard?

The Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Popular Film isn’t winning many popularity contests itself. The announcement on Aug. 8 of the newest “Oscar” has been received with far less enthusiasm than this year’s megahit movies like Black Panther and Mission: Impossible-Fallout that will vie for the statuette. The new award’s intended purpose is to supplement a Best Picture trophy consistently won over the last decade by films appealing mainly to the Academy’s insider circle, despite popular movies being included in an expanded slate of nominees. After all, the big bucks spent by mainstream moviegoers are what not only turn big-budget movies into blockbusters but—via advertisers—pay for the Oscars telecast. Instead, both industry professionals and the general public have made it overwhelmingly clear that they’re more insulted than intrigued. As populist outreach, it comes off as phony as Nurse Ratched rigging the vote on which TV program her patients can watch in the Oscar-winning One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. The misfire exemplifies what syndicated cartoonist Jules Feiffer called the “ignorance of authority,” satirized in his Best Animated Short winner Munro, in which officials maintain that the 4-year-old of the title is a diminutive adult. In Karl Hess: Toward Liberty, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject in 1981, Hess observed that “if energy can be picked up from any point on the Earth, it sort of suggests to you that you don’t need central mechanisms, that you can produce important things at a local level.” This applies just as much to creative energies that inspire filmmaking as to the solar energy that powered Hess’ house. Film critic Jonathan Rosenbaum noted the irony of Hess’ message

being “delivered courtesy of the Academy and AT&T’s Bell System” while the one time political insider talked of leaving such “big organizations” behind. Yet film production and distribution have already been steadily evolving in Hess’ decentralist direction; even the major studios have moved on from the era shown in Hail, Caesar! of filming their Biblical epics, musicals and Westerns all within the same backlot. While Guillermo del Toro won the most recent Best Director award for the esoteric The Shape of Water rather than for one of his crowd-pleasers like Blade II or Pacific Rim, his arthouse and multiplex fare both illustrate the contention in his acceptance speech that “the greatest thing our art does, and our industry does, is to erase the lines in the sand. We should continue doing that when

the world tells us to make them deeper.” Maybe the real issue, is the notion that the Academy Awards, or any one award ceremony, should or even can be the ultimate arbiter of quality in a diverse world. The assumption that other film awards are merely lead-ins to (or the Razzie’s caricature of) the Oscars does a disservice to both. The venerable ceremony would do better competing on an equal footing with newer awards taken just as seriously than as the center of attention by default.

TOM KNAPP Via CW comments

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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OPINION Silver Lining Inventions As the world welcomed in the 1900s, Italian Guglielmo Marconi successfully sent the first transoceanic radio transmission message. It was only a single Morse Code letter, “S,” but it marked the dawning of a new age. For his remarkable accomplishment, he and German Karl Ferdinand Braun were awarded the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics. The use of radio waves quickly evolved into voice radio, and soon after, television. Since Marconi’s first experiments, the public has slowly grasped the concept of how radio and television transmission works. Stated in the simplest words, radio-magnetic waves are sent into the atmosphere where they travel at the speed of light. Captured by antennas, those waves are subsequently recombobulated into intelligibly reproduced sound. That technology is the basis of all modern radio and television and is now being used for a variety of expanded applications. In an amazing twist of the usual uses of radio waves, Werner Gufenauf, a German scientist, has come up with a plan to use antennas and traditional radio theory to collect “radio-frequency brown matter” (RFBM) from the sky. Labeled by its inventor as the brown-energy radio retrieval system (BERRS), it will soon be commercially available to all Americans. When fully operational and

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. widely distributed, these systems will eliminate most of the airborne BS broadcast by the White House and its Fox News affiliates each day, officials with the Environmental Protection Agency predict. Since the 2016 presidential election, atmospheric RFBM has reached dangerous levels—as high as 1,206 ppm which is far in excess of what the EPA allows. (680 ppm is the current standard—even lower in California—and that is expected to drop to a mere 170 ppm by the year 2025.) But voilà! Using the BERRS system, the RFBM is simply concentrated, using a large antenna, combined with small amounts of water, and then drained through a hose into a storage vessel. The resulting liquid concentrate, LqBS, can be used to fertilize trees and gardens, increase the availability of atmospheric respiratory oxygen and clean up the dirty air. The LqBS also will be a great blessing for the impoverished farmers now being gouged by tariffs on fertilizers formerly imported from China. The BERRS inventor says his device will virtually eliminate the circulating atmospheric RFBS which has been pouring into the D.C. sky at an increasingly alarming rate. In other science-related news, Yakov Propuli, a Russian/ Greek inventor, has developed a reliable Tele-Polygraph capable of detecting lies from thousands of miles away. The simple electronic device uses a single button-cell battery and is just larger than a pack of filter cigarettes. Propuli stated, “I developed the system specifically for veracity verification of our president, but I believe it will work equally well on cabinet members, congressmen and Sarah Huckabee Sanders.”

I was fortunate enough to do field testing on the TelePolygraph, and I found its reliability to be truly amazing. Here’s how it works: Any time President Trump or one of his cronies talks, the operator merely turns the on/off switch to the “on” position. An LCD display immediately shows a readout of the veracity of the speaker. I asked the inventor about its accuracy and Propuli told me, “It utilizes a complex algorithm to verify truth. When used according to the directions, it will accurately nail those who are lying.” During the two days I had the device, I tested it on President Trump, members of his White House staff, senators, congressmen and Sanders. It worked perfectly, without a glitch. I took the liberty of disassembling the device and I was shocked at what I found. There was no microphone nor any circuitry except for the battery and readout, which always read, “Lie.” It seems that Propuli’s algorithm is, indeed, very sophisticated, and he defends it as “extremely reliable technology.” “The algorithm,” Propuli says, “is the result of complex statistical sampling. If Trump and his buddies are talking, there’s a 99.9999 percent chance that what they’re saying is a lie.” Needless to say, I love the Tele-Polygraph and its potential role in keeping Americans accurately informed. You will, too. This product is going to be a great success. CW

Michael S. Robinson Sr. is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He lives with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

PROPOSITION 3 TOWN HALL

You’re going to be hearing a lot of pushback from opponents of the three ballot initiatives that you, the people of Utah, have agreed to vote on. Proposition 3, expanding Medicaid to 150,000 Utahns, would help the economy as well as individuals who need care, according to a study by the Utah Health Policy Project. The state would benefit from more than $800,000 in federal funds each year and the Utah economy would grow by nearly $1.7 billion. If you wonder why the Legislature is hesitant to expand Medicaid and why you should vote for Prop 3, join the Prop 3 Midvale Town Hall where you can ask questions and get the answers you need. Mid-Valley Health Clinic, 8446 S. Harrison St., Midvale, 801706-7831, Monday, Aug. 27, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2nM3Qzb.

8 | AUGUST 23, 2018

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A SWELL HEARING

Fix your roof today! Call Lifetime Roofing today at (801) 928-8881

It might not surprise you to hear that U.S. Rep. John Curtis and Sen. Orrin Hatch are all about putting Emery County on the map—the development map. You will have a chance to speak out, for what it’s worth, at The People’s Hearing on the San Rafael Swell. “They falsely portray the bill as a ‘win for all stakeholders.’ In reality, it is a loss for everyone who values the Swell for its vast wild spaces,” the event’s Facebook page says. The Emery County Public Land Management Act would leave unprotected 900,000 acres. You would see ORVs ravaging 800 miles of roads. And of course, the legislation facilitates coal mining. Go to speak up or volunteer. Salt Lake City Main Public Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-647-1540, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 6:30-8:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Pgp0C3.

ROHINGYA REFUGEE CRISIS

All over the world, people are fleeing their home countries for fear of their lives. The Rohingya Refugee Crisis in Burma has been called a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing,” and should give us pause. The mass violence has displaced more than 600,000 Rohingyas, according to the United Nations, and many, along with other Burmese populations, have resettled in Salt Lake City. At the Human Rights in Burma and the Rohingya Refugee Crisis, you can hear from refugees, local and international experts during an interactive panel discussion. Marmalade Branch Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 7 p.m., free, bit.ly/2MURcsB.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Ditto for Truth

Well, that didn’t work, did it? The Deseret News, after much angst and forethought, published a one-word editorial, “Ditto,” that should have said it all: The press is not the enemy of the people; it is the people. That came after the elegant wording of the First Amendment. But let’s forget elegance. Let’s even forget our personal responsibility to “freedom of religion, speech or press, assembly and petition.” The editorial was meant to join newspapers in decrying the president’s favorite insult, calling the press “the enemy of the people” and #FakeNews. Editor Doug Wilks tried to explain in a later column, and mentioned the concept of “media literacy,” something the public needs now. Then came the online comments about Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and how the press says Donald Trump is lying. Good on the D-News for trying, but we live in an era where “truth isn’t truth” anymore.

Seeing Clara

UTA should have known better than to mess with Michael Clara, perhaps Utah’s most prolific and exasperating social activist. But Utah knows its favorite transit agency has been less than trustworthy, so we’ll start with that. Clara had been a UTA employee for more than 20 years when he identified what he perceived was an unsafe bus stop shelter along the 200 South corridor. Reporting that led to a years-long fight with the transit authority and, ultimately, his termination. Now, Administrative Law Judge Lee J. Romero Jr. has found in his favor—to the tune of $300,000 and Clara’s reinstatement. “In particular, I found [Clara’s] testimony regarding the improper installation of the bus stop shelters … to be very credible,” the judge said. Will he return? Stay tuned.

Best of Luck

Just to belabor two stories that have had plenty of press, here goes: First, San Juan County, the beauteous home of Bears Ears National Monument and a political miasma born of a hunger for development. While the county and its federal government partner seek to downsize the monument and thumb their noses at environmentalists, San Juan has now engaged in what many call irony, The Salt Lake Tribune reports. Yes, it wants tourists to come for the pristine landscape. The second much-reported story deals with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has no nickname and like Voldemort, must not be named. The church’s pronouncement set off massive gnashing of teeth, people complaining that they are no longer “Mormon,” and a great concern about all the websites and entities with that name or simply “LDS.” The church has tried this before, and all we can say is good luck with that.


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NEWS

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Citizenship Purgatory

Longtime undocumented immigrants struggle to convince judges to cancel deportation orders. BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

KELAN LYONS

T

“It is moronic the way the system works,” Salt Lake City-based immigration attorney Adam Crayk says.

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AUGUST 23, 2018 | 11

says. “I am a parent. Can you imagine losing one child as you get older?” Flores believes immigration judges often lack a full understanding of Latin American and Spanish cultures. “We never take care of our parents in hospice or nursing homes,” he points out. “There’s always one child who is special for that, and that is always ignored.” Crayk predicts that more cancellationof-removal cases will be tried in the Utah immigration court, considering the Trump administration’s broadening of the scope of deportable offenses. That means more people like FloresCervantes—undocumented immigrants who haven’t committed any serious crimes and who support their families— will have to argue they should be allowed to stay in the country. Considering the difficult legal standards, that likely means more immigrants will be forced to leave the U.S. (the Syracuse database projects 1,575 immigrants will be ordered deported from the Utah court during its 2018 fiscal year—a 97 percent increase from the previous year.) “Almost all the cases I have like this have been denied because the judges believe there’s no case law to support these facts,” Flores says. In the quiet halls of the Salt Lake City immigration court, moments after Anderson’s ruling, Flores considers his client’s situation and his 2002 precedent-setting case. “That’s why we’ve got to take these cases to appeal,” he tells City Weekly. “Perhaps we can have a different scenario, to change the law again.” CW

you don’t have a case, I’m sorry,’” immigration attorney Adam Crayk says. “I think you win maybe 15 to 20 percent of the cases you try.” Crayk says, thanks to the law, immigrants who are upstanding members of their communities—who pay taxes and care for their families—can find themselves forced into immigration court proceedings because of minor infractions like receiving a speeding ticket. Often, they’re ordered to leave the country because their circumstances don’t qualify them for relief from deportation. “It is moronic the way the system works,” Crayk says. Flores has experience setting legal precedent for cancellation-of-removal cases. In 2002, the judges on the Board of Immigration Appeals ruled in favor of Flores’ client, a mother of six children—four of whom are U.S. citizens— despite the fact that none of them had serious health issues. The judges approved the application because, if sent back to Mexico, the respondent would have been the sole financial and familial source of support for her children, who also don’t speak Spanish. The case is cited by attorneys arguing cases that aren’t based on medical hardship. Flores and another attorney are representing Flores-Cervantes as he appeals Anderson’s ruling. “What the judges are doing is, ‘Well, the other children are here, they can take responsibility for their parents,’” Flores says. “My argument is going to be, ‘Why is it that U.S. citizen parents who are senior, old and sick, why is it that we’re going to exacerbate their condition by losing one of their children?’” Flores

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University, there are 2,460 cases pending in the local court. Immigrants— called “respondents” in immigration court parlance—wait an average of 496 days for a judge to issue a ruling, not including an appeal. Judges preside over immigrants’ initial appearances and rule on whether they will be allowed to stay in the country, based on their applications for relief that would spare them from deportation. City Weekly has previously reported on the high burden that must be met in order to be granted asylum. Successfully arguing a cancellation-of-removal case for an undocumented immigrant is similarly difficult. Respondents are granted cancellation of removal if they demonstrate to a judge that they’ve lived in the U.S. for at least a decade, are a “person of good moral character” and have not been convicted of certain crimes. But the hardest standard to meet is showing that a deportation would cause inordinate duress to the respondent’s spouse, parent or child younger than 21, provided those family members are lawful permanent residents or American citizens. “It’s very difficult to win,” immigration attorney Brian Lofgren says. “The law is written so that very few cases qualify.” Generally, having elderly parents or very young children isn’t enough to successfully argue a case. “You have to prove this super-high level of hardship,” Lofgren says. “You get rewarded if your U.S. citizen children are severely ill or disabled,” he adds. “That the perverse reality of it.” “It’s so difficult to look at a family of four kids and say, ‘You’re all healthy,

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ears in her eyes, Reinalda Flores issued a plea to Immigration Judge David C. Anderson. “If they expel my son, I believe I’m going to die,” she told Anderson through a translator on a May morning. One of six children, Serafin FloresCervantes, age 43, is Flores’ youngest. He came to the U.S. from Sonora, Mexico, in 1994. Almost a quarter-century later, he sat in Anderson’s courtroom in the Salt Lake City immigration court in West Valley City, hoping the judge would grant his application for a “cancellation of removal”—or voiding an earlier deportation order. If so, he’d be allowed to stay in the country and take care of his aging mother and father, an elderly couple legally living in the U.S. who are plagued by health issues like high blood pressure, anemia and heart problems. “I do more because I’m single,” FloresCervantes said, explaining how he sent about $500—an amount he can afford because, unlike his siblings, he doesn’t have a family to support—to his parents every month when they were living with his sister in New Jersey. Now, they’re living with him in Utah, so he can keep an eye on them while continuing to help them stay financially afloat. In his closing argument, Germán Flores, Flores-Cervantes’ attorney, reiterated that the whole family lives in the U.S. “Think about how difficult it would be, especially for the mother,” he told the judge, noting his client’s financial contributions. “He’s made his task on this earth to take care of his parents.” Anderson left his courtroom to ponder the family’s fate. Seven minutes later, he returned and denied Flores-Cervantes’ application. Anderson stated all the burdens had been met except one—“a showing of exceptional and extremely unusual hardship resulting upon removal.” “The standard of proof is so high,” Germán Flores said after the ruling. The three judges at the Salt Lake City immigration court hear the cases of immigrants living in Utah, Washington, Idaho and Montana. According to a database maintained at Syracuse


12 | AUGUST 23, 2018

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SARAH ARNOFF

D

espite the fact that they had vowed not to go near the site where work on the new Utah State Prison has begun, the two ecologists stop to stare as we drive by the heavy construction machinery. It’s not the construction work itself that has caught the eye of Ella Sorensen, who oversees the nearby Gillmor Audobon Sanctuary. It’s what Ann Neville, a regional director for The Nature Conservancy, has spotted in the foreground: a nest of burrowing owls. The nest itself is barely visible—it’s just a bare patch of dirt between some scrubby bushes. But a few feet away, an adult owl is perched atop a tree, guarding its nest against the encroaching construction.

AUGUST 23, 2018 | 13

Immediately south of the prison site, signs advertising Utah’s planned inland port already have sprung up—prompting more disgust from Neville and Sorensen. Opposition from environmental groups, and from Salt Lake City officials, prompted the Utah Legislature to expand protections for wetlands in the city’s Northwest Quadrant during a special session in July. But, according to Derek Miller, the newly appointed chairman of the Inland Port Authority Board, it’s too early to say for sure whether wetlands exist in areas still slated for development. The current protections, Miller says, are based on Salt Lake City’s original master plan for the Northwest Quadrant—but that plan, according to Utah ecologists, doesn’t capture all of the area’s known wetland habitat. About 30 percent of the Salt Lake City plan overlaps with 4,500 acres of known wetlands, says Aubin Douglas, a graduate student at Utah State University who is working to quantify the impact of urbanization on Utah’s wetlands. Because of the rezone, she says, it’s difficult to say for sure how much habitat will be lost during the construction of the inland port. But she described

her projection of 4,500 acres as a likely “best-case scenario in terms of habitat that could be lost.” It’s not just development in the Northwest Quadrant that threatens Utah’s wetlands. The West Davis Corridor—a new highway to be built through Clinton, West Point, Syracuse, Layton and Farmington—could eliminate another 2,000 acres of wetlands. General urban development, as planned according to the Wasatch Choice for 2040 Vision, could result in another 9,000 acres lost. Altogether, Douglas says, the Farmington Bay area alone stands to lose between 11,000 and 15,000 acres of wetlands to development in the next few decades. By comparison, roughly 20,000 acres of private and protected wetlands are in that vicinity, according to Heidi Hoven, a wetland ecologist and assistant manager of Gillmor Sanctuary, which encompasses about 3,000 acres of protected habitat. The reality is that the majority of the Great Salt Lake’s wetlands no longer function on their own, Hoven says. The lake’s size has shrunk, disconnecting many wetlands from their natural water source. And humans have been draining wetlands to build irrigation canals since the arrival of the pioneers.

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wetlands remain untouched. But due to the unique nature of the lake and its shoreline, remaining wetland areas don’t always qualify for traditional protections against development. So Utahns continue to pave over them—with the potential destruction of tens of thousands of acres of habitat already slated for the next 20 to 30 years. If the development continues unabated, starvation could wipe out entire species of birds, Sorensen says. But it’s not just the birds that are at risk—the Great Salt Lake’s wetlands play an important role in the quality, and quantity, of water along the Wasatch Front. Water and wildlife advocates alike say it’s time for Utah to draw a line in the sand and stop future development in the state’s wetlands. But getting the public on board has proven difficult. Despite a plethora of outreach programs, Neville says, many Utahns remain entirely unaware that the wetlands exist.

This land is not your land

“The prison people wanted me to go see what they were doing—the bird-friendly construction,” Sorensen, pictured above, said earlier. “I will never go on that site. There is no way I can go onto this land that I love and see what they are doing. There is just no way.” “It makes me sick,” Neville agrees, watching the burrowing owls through her binoculars. The wetlands around them are largely dry, and have been for much of the season. Landscape managers have temporarily drained the area to try to starve out an invasive species of reed that has plagued the Great Salt Lake since the floods of the 1980s. But while the phragmites remain a major challenge for Utah’s wetlands, Neville and Sorensen are bracing for an influx of perhaps the most invasive species on Earth: humans. According to Neville, humans began modifying the Great Salt Lake’s wetlands almost as soon as they arrived on the scene, and very few of Utah’s

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With urbanization sprawling west, one of the most important landscapes in the western hemisphere—the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake—is at risk of disappearing.


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SARAH ARNOFF

Thousands of acres of protected wetlands in Farmington Bay were actually conceived by Utah ecologists, Hoven says. The Gillmor Sanctuary, as well as the Inland Sea Shorelands Preserve, which is managed by Kennecott, both are “natural” in the sense that the Jordan River once fed thousands of acres of wetlands in those areas. The river shifted upward some 2,600 years ago, but the lowland areas it carved remained, and conservationists now use water owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and other parties to create “managed” wetland habitat to replace natural areas lost to development.

Fowl play The problem with these managed wetlands is that they largely represent only one kind of wetland habitat, Hoven says. Most of these protected and private wetlands are managed for ducks and other waterfowl, which like deep, fresh water. But the Great Salt Lake once featured vast swaths of brackish landscapes covered with shallow, salty pools that evaporated to form dry salt pans or playas in the summer. These ephemeral wetlands provide critical habitat for millions of shorebirds such as the white-faced ibis, the species whose habitat is most threatened by development in the Northwest Quadrant and elsewhere in Davis and Salt Lake counties, according to Hoven. To maintain the health of the entire Great Salt Lake ecosystem, Hoven says, Utah needs a “wetland matrix” that includes saline meadows and mud flats as well as freshwater marshes. Outside the Gillmor and Inland Sea preserves, Utah’s ephemeral wetlands are among the habitats most at risk. Because they aren’t wet year-round, Neville said, they aren’t always recognized as wetlands and, consequently, aren’t protected from development. “It’s not the obvious wetlands that are not preserved,” Sorensen agrees. “It’s all this stuff that is wet part of the time—all of Foxboro [a housing development in North Salt Lake] was built on, it was playas.” To make matters more difficult, according to a study published last year in the journal Nature, the Great Salt Lake itself has shrunk to nearly half its natural size. This has caused pockets of wetlands to become disconnected from natural waterways. Like ephemeral wetlands, these “stranded” wetlands are typically overlooked when it comes to habitat protection, Leland Myers, executive director of the Wasatch Front Water Quality Council, says.

If you’re going to protect stranded wetlands for habitat purposes, Myers says, you also have to protect the upland areas between the wetlands and the lake. The millions of birds associated with the lake and its wetlands typically nest in drier upland areas, Sorensen says. The chicks can’t fly when they hatch, but they know the safest place for them is open water, beyond the reach of predators. So they walk. Stranded and ephemeral wetlands provide a network for these chicks so they can reach the lake safely, Sorensen says. When pockets of wetlands are developed, it forces the chicks to walk farther to get to safety. “I’ve seen them walk across I-80,” she says. Upland habitat is also critical when the Great Salt Lake enters a period of flooding, Neville said. In 2011, when much of the wetland areas were under water, birds had to nest farther upland— including on the current site of the inland port. “If the lake were to come up,” Sorensen says, “all these areas they are going to develop would be covered in birds’ nests.” This is why protections that single out wetland areas exclusively aren’t effective on the Great Salt Lake, Hoven says. “The uplands provide an important part of that system. You can’t just subtract out the wetlands and see that they function by themselves.”

Amazing and scary But upland areas, Sorensen notes, especially those “further away from the lake are gone, or fast being built on—just like the port.” As habitats become increasingly concentrated in a few key areas because of the loss of these “spillover sites,” Douglas says, competition between species—and even within species—increases. Several different species are already increasingly dependent on Great Salt Lake wetlands for habitat, Sorensen said. The lake was once a part of a network of similar, but small, saline lakes scattered throughout the western U.S. where migrating birds could stop off to refuel or nest. Many of these lakes, however, face similar challenges as the Great Salt Lake and are increasingly unfit as a habitat for birds, which has caused the number of birds that rely on the Great Salt Lake to increase. Even within the local ecosystem, urban sprawl has concentrated some species at a few key locations. “To see the majority of a world’s population [of a certain bird] in one spot is amazing, but also scary,” Sorensen said. One mishap and “you’re going to wipe out a whole species.”

According to a report prepared for the Utah Division of Facilities Construction and Management, the Great Salt Lake might play host to three-fourths of all tundra swans in the Western Hemisphere at various points throughout the year. Similarly, more than half of North America’s eared grebes stop by the Great Salt Lake, as do nearly a quarter of all of North America’s whitefaced ibis. A quarter of the world’s entire snowy plover population relies on Great Salt Lake wetlands. The primary reason all these birds are attracted to wetlands? Food. Wetlands are full of microorganisms, Myers says, and those microorganisms feed swarms of hungry insects. The insects, in turn, become a food source for millions of birds that would otherwise have nothing to eat during their long seasonal journeys across the continents. It’s not just birds, either. Farmington Bay wetlands provide a food source for hundreds of animals—diverse rodents and rabbits on one end of the food chain; coyotes on the other. A herd of Pronghorn currently lives on the inland port and prison sites. When those upland habitats are gone, Neville says, it’s not clear what will happen to them. Humans, too, have used the wetlands as a source of food. Edible plants such as pickleweed grow there in abundance, and when pioneer settlers first arrived in the valley, Neville says, they harvested ducks and eggs from the wetlands. In fact, that’s one of the reasons why there are so few natural wetland areas left, Neville says—plentiful water and food attracted humans, just as it does the birds.

Expunging ecosystem

Few, if any, Utahns today subsist on a diet of duck and pickleweed, but the wetlands still play important roles in modern societies. Although early settlers were quick to drain wetlands in favor of using canals to manage the flow of water, wetlands are nature’s means of controlling where water flows, Hoven says. Wetlands provide a barrier between open waterways and flood-prone lowlands, and they help to reduce the danger of the flash flooding that can occur when water is forced into channels. But even more important, Hoven says, wetlands are critical to groundwater recharge. The soils beneath a wetland typically are made up of fine silts and clays, which don’t allow water to seep through as quickly. A channeled waterway directs water toward an eventual endpoint,


“We don’t want to see any more encroachment to the west. There needs to be a line in the sand.”

Make the GSL great again

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Douglas came to a similar conclusion in her recent master’s degree thesis: New housing developments along the Wasatch Front need to increase in density, thereby reducing urban sprawl which impacts wetlands on the west side of the valley. But Neville is increasingly pessimistic about the odds of convincing Utah residents to rally behind the Great Salt Lake’s wetlands. Despite the importance of this habitat to the entire Western Hemisphere, and despite the fact that it’s approaching a precipitous point, she says state leaders all seem to be stuck with a mantra of “grow, grow, grow.” For all of Utah’s love for the great outdoors, Neville adds, state officials and residents don’t seem to value or appreciate wetlands. They’re drawn to flashier landscapes in pursuit of instant gratification. But the beauty of the wetlands is more subtle. “If they’re not instantly wowed, it’s not valued,” she said. Despite ongoing outreach efforts by the Audubon Society, The Nature Conservancy, Friends of Great Salt Lake, the Great Salt Lake Institute and others, when Neville takes locals out to the wetlands, it’s usually the first time they’ve ever encountered the landscape. Attempts to promote the Great Salt Lake as a tourist destination have proven a hard sell, and the few successful promotions have nearly backfired. “As soon as you think you’re getting someplace,” Neville says, “someone starts talking about a trail ... it’s hard to put in a trail when everything out here nests on the ground, and as soon as you go off the tail, you’ve messed it up.” What Neville wants to impress upon Utahns is the wetlands’ intrinsic value. The value of a clear view of the sunset over the Great Salt Lake. The value of dozens of species of birds. The value of a sense of place and history. Like the wetlands themselves, once any of these things are gone, humans won’t be able to bring it back. “We’re playing God here,” Neville says, “and we don’t have His capacity.” CW

The Great Salt Lake isn’t just responsible—on multiple fronts— for generating water used along the Wasatch Front. It’s also the main catchment basin for nearly everything Northern Utahns dispose of as liquid waste. Nearly three-fourths of all wastewater generated in Utah ends up, eventually, in the Great Salt Lake. That includes household sewage, which is treated before being released into the natural system, as well as treated industrial wastes. Storm water—which can contain oils and other wastes associated with vehicles and industry, also eventually flows there. Even water involved in current environmental cleanup projects sooner or later ends up in the Great Salt Lake, according to Myers. One current project involves remediating groundwater contamination associated with past mining operations in the area. Even after the cleanup process, a portion of the water remains unusable—so it’s discharged into the Great Salt Lake. The main reason why the lake isn’t a complete cesspool, Neville says, is because the wetlands surrounding it have so far done a fairly good job of sequestering the massive quantities of pollution humans have sent its way—though, she admits, it’s difficult to compare the current health of the wetlands to its condition before the days of the pioneers. Wetlands are nature’s water filters. But for the most part,

Nobody knows where the tipping point is, Myers says, but it’s coming, and it’s why Utah can’t afford to lose any more of its wetlands. “We don’t want to see any more encroachment to the west,” he says. “There needs to be a line in the sand: where there are wetlands, don’t encroach; if you’re not built there, don’t build.”

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Nature’s Brita

Hoven says, they break down and assimilate pollutants into their own systems. They can’t make most pollutants disappear, which means that when wetlands dry up or are developed, they can release contaminants back into the environment. There is, however, an exception to this rule with respect to one specific category of pollutants: nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. The microorganisms that are naturally abundant within wetlands consume these nutrients as food—the presence of nutrients, which accumulate in the form of leaf litter and other debris in low-lying areas is the main reason why the microorganisms are there to begin with. When there are too many nutrients in a water system, perhaps because of runoff containing fertilizers, or high levels of nutrients within treated wastewater, certain kinds of algae can multiply to the point that the algae themselves begin to produce potentially deadly toxins in order to compete with one another. The presence of healthy, natural wetlands can help to reduce the frequency and severity of the toxic algal blooms because the naturally-occurring algae help keep nutrient levels low. Take Provo Bay, a wetland south of the Great Salt Lake on Utah Lake, which has become known for its severe, recurring algal blooms. Discharge from the Provo City wastewater treatment plant, which tends to be very high in nutrients, is released into a small stream just above Provo Bay, Myers says. By the time it exits the bay and enters the body of Utah Lake, most of those nutrients are gone. While the Great Salt Lake has thus far proven too salty to experience harmful algal blooms, some of its less-saline bays have not been spared. Farmington Bay, itself the discharge point for wastewater from Davis and Salt Lake counties, has experienced blooms that have become far more toxic than anything recorded on Utah Lake, according to Myers, who has overseen research on the algal blooms in the bay. Between the loss of wetlands and the ongoing population growth that is driving nutrient pollution on the Wasatch Front, Myers fears Great Salt Lake’s ecosystem might be approaching a tipping point. Over the decades, untold quantities of pollution has been dumped into the lake. Wastewater has been discharged to it since the valley was settled, and even basic sewage treatment didn’t begin in Utah until the 1950s. Eventually, Myers says, someone is going to add the last teaspoon of pollution that the system can handle. When that day comes, he says, the entire Great Salt Lake ecosystem will change—permanently.

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such as a lake or ocean, where it eventually evaporates. But water backs up within wetlands, allowing the water to soak into the ground, providing a source for springs and wells upslope. Wetlands, Hoven says, “act like a sponge. You need them to retain water … if you don’t have a wetland at the bottom of that system, you’re not going to be able to recharge or retain groundwater storage upslope of the wetlands. Few people pay attention to wetlands’ ability to promote groundwater recharge, Hoven said, despite its importance, especially in areas where planners are looking for additional water resources they can tap. Hoven is reluctant to speculate about the degree to which drinking-water supplies throughout the Wasatch Front rely on wetland-promoted recharge—that’s a job for the water system modelers, she says. But one could formulate some theories, she says, based on the reality that large portions of Northern Utah’s drinking water originate upslope of the Great Salt Lake.

SARAH ARNOFF

—Leland Myers, Wasatch Front Water Quality Council executive director


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ADAM WELKER

Jacksepticeye: How Did We Get Here? Show business insiders once touted “overnight sensations”—performers who would appear out of the blue and win public acclaim. Of course, most didn’t show up suddenly at all, but gained celebrity only after years of honing their craft. Not so in today’s world. A single posting on YouTube can garner millions of hits and turn an anonymous nobody into an instant star. Take Jacksepticeye, for example. The 28-year-old Irishman—born Seán William McLoughlin— initiated his career simply by uploading daily videos to YouTube, including Let’s Play videos focused on his fascination for gaming. He now claims some 9 billion views and more than 19 million subscribers. In past interviews, he’s described his antics as “an attempt to keep people together,” an “assault on the senses” that people “either love or hate.” He’s been so successful that he inked a contract with Polaris, a Walt Disney company, and became a playable character in the video game The Escapist 2. However, his career hasn’t been without controversy. A YouTube program he participated in called “Scare PewDieDie” was canceled before its second season, and he’s frequently feuded with YouTube about sudden shifts in policy. “This is people’s careers,” he railed earlier this year. “To completely switch how you do things and not tell anybody is a shitty thing to do.” Jack’s upcoming local appearance finds him sharing his success and playing favorite clips. And, since he’s a remarkable example of a true overnight sensation, hearing him share how he got there should make this an insightful encounter. (LZ) Jacksepticeye: How Did We Get Here? @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Aug. 28, 8 p.m., $20-$100, artsaltlake.org

AUGUST 23, 2018 | 21

They say that a dog is man’s best friend. We would add that cats make great pet pals, too. If you’re one of a growing legion of individuals who tend to favor animals over people— especially given the lack of civility we humans are responsible for lately—then that old adage takes on a deeper meaning. Of course, there’s another reason to introduce a furry creature to your family: It’s the humane thing to do. Giving an animal a loving home is not only an act of charity, but it pays you back with dividends for many years to come. Salt Lake County Animal Services annual adoption event, Petapalooza, offers an ideal opportunity to find an animal friend. Sponsored by Realtor Tracy Thomas (Your Dog’s Friendly Agent) and pet food supplier Pet Wants in Sandy, this fifth annual extravaganza also features food trucks, vendors, live music, pet psychics, a pet photo booth and a beer garden. “This event keeps growing every year,” Callista Pearson, communications manager for Salt Lake County Animal Services, says. “It connects people in the community with other pet lovers looking to adopt a new pet or just wanting to bring their current dog out to a fun event.” Indeed, the effort has paid off. The 2017, Petapalooza resulted in the adoption of 100 pets. “Salt Lake has an amazing pet community,” Pearson adds. “They love all pets—dogs, cats, rabbits, reptiles, etc. Their passion for animals is what makes this a memorable event every year.” (Lee Zimmerman) Petapapalooza @ Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1830 West, West Jordan, Aug. 25, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., free, slco.org/animal-services

TUESDAY 8/28

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We should be permitted a moment to mourn: On Aug. 6, comedian Chris Gethard announced via social media that The Chris Gethard Show— which journeyed over the course of a decade from live performance to public access to Fusion to truTV—had been canceled, and would not be continued. “We were, after all, the lowest rated show on the network,” Gethard wrote with typical self-deprecation, “something that I take no small amount of pride in.” The weird, ever-changing and entirely distinctive show—the kind where Paul Rudd could show up on the series finale not to promote Ant-Man and the Wasp, but to give an expectant mother a pep talk, or Gethard might attempt to host the show after being awake for 36 consecutive hours—is only part of the singular talents of Chris Gethard. His experience as a member of the legendary Upright Citizens Brigade comedy troupe schooled him in the finer points of improvisation, and made him a perfect choice for the ensemble of Mike Birbiglia’s film Don’t Think Twice, set in the world of improv comedy. It only makes sense that he would allow his show to end rather than have it be anything other than the strange beast it was at its best. Yet, he’s also the kind of versatile performer who can open up about his struggles with depression in his one-man show Career Suicide, turning that pain into comedic stories. “I think people are still scared to talk about this stuff,” Gethard noted on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in 2016, “and I want to laugh about it, and see if that can help a little bit.” (SR) Chris Gethard @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 24-25, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15, wiseguyscomedy.com

Petapalooza

SATURDAY 8/25

Chris Gethard

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You might be the most die-hard of Utah Jazz fans and still not know Michael Snarr’s name. That’s because while John Stockton, Karl Malone and Jeff Hornacek were fighting for NBA championships on the court, Snarr was in the team’s front office, beginning with sponsorship sales and eventually becoming vice president for strategic partnerships. Those roles gave him a unique perspective, not just on the behind-the-scenes stories of the team’s most successful seasons in the 1990s, but the overlap between lessons for a successful sports team and lessons for a successful business. Snarr’s book Long Shots and Layups is part memoir, part team history and part management manual. Interspersed with the nearly 40-year history of the Utah Jazz, Snarr includes his own professional journey from advertising to the ill-fated Triad America to the Jazz. Along the way, he features “takeaways” that offer tips for finding success in whatever field of endeavor you’re working in, whether you’re wearing a jersey or a suit and tie. Rather than providing a tell-all filled with locker-room dustups and behind-the-scenes gossip, Snarr mostly crafts a reminder of the long, hard road to building a championshipcaliber team, and the efforts off the court— from preparing for a draft to finding the perfect coach—that contribute to that success. Striking the deal for naming rights to the team’s arena becomes part of the bigger picture of a team growing from struggling transplant to title contender. (Scott Renshaw) Michael G. Snarr: Long Shots and Layups: Memories and Stories from the Golden Era of the Utah Jazz @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Aug. 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

FRIDAY 8/24

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Michael G. Snarr: Long Shots and Layups

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The Rose Exposed brings arts organizations together. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

L

iving under the same roof doesn’t automatically make for a happy family. When those “family members” are six arts organizations sharing a building, it would be easy to think that the relationships would involve as much competition and jealousy as mutual affection. For seven years, however, the six resident companies at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center—the Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, Plan-B Theatre Co., Pygmalion Productions, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co., Repertory Dance Theatre (RDT) and SB Dance—have made it an annual tradition to showcase all of their talents on one night. The Rose Exposed production serves up offerings from each company, providing a sampler platter of the amazing performances that take place in the building throughout the year. According to Plan-B Artistic Director Jerry Rapier, the concept behind The Rose Exposed began simply as a way to bring people into the facility that was still trying to establish its identity. RDT ’s Linda Smith had attended a community meeting about promoting the “Broadway Mile,” Rapier says, “where she had to explain to a few people what the Rose was—and these were people whose businesses were just on the other side of State Street.” Initially, the idea was to create a full-day event in which attendees could watch the companies develop and rehearse the pieces they would perform. Over time, that concept evolved, as Rapier states, because “we discovered that stuff didn’t really work; people were more interested in the performance itself.” Subsequently, performances have focused on short pieces by each of the companies or, in some cases, collaborations such as a Gina Bachauer pianist accompanying the theatrical and dance works. In recent years, those performances have been connected by a single overarching

STEPHANIE PERKINS

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DANCE

theme. The 2018 concept is Breaking News, which Rapier describes as focusing on how “it’s kind of hard to keep up with the way information swirls around us. Our goal wasn’t necessarily to be overtly political, but simply to reflect what’s going on around us. No matter where you are on the political spectrum, there’s a sense of unease. This seemed to be the best way to put an artistic umbrella over that.” Beyond that broad concept, individual organizations have tremendous freedom in the way they interpret it—and for some of them, The Rose Exposed is an opportunity to be playful and creative in a way that’s not always possible for other productions. Choreographer Nick Cendese, who is working on RDT ’s Rose Exposed contribution, describes the whirlwind process that begins at 9 a.m. with a warm-up class, followed by a twohour rehearsal chunk, an hour of time with the pianist, an afternoon break, full runthrough by about 5 p.m. and curtain at 8 p.m. Cendese is also finding a particular challenge in that their piece “will be kind of the interstitial glue between the other companies. And I have literally no idea what’s going to happen. … I get tasked with showing up on that day, putting something together in four hours. The only way to work that fast is to stop thinking and work

spontaneously. You don’t have time to second-guess.” SB Dance’s Stephen Brown adds, “I always like doing the Iron Chef kind of things. You come in and you’re told, ‘ You’re going to have live piano music, and here are your choices.’ The piece I chose originally was a kind of exuberant version of “My Favorite Things” … so I got a group together and an idea based on this piece of music. And then the music changed. So I kept all the stuff I was doing, and well, let’s do it with Mozart then. I like being able to string things together like that.” For the audience, the result is a rapidfire chance to explore the creative work all of the companies do, perhaps discovering a kind of performance they might not have attended otherwise. “I think it’s such a great snapshot,” Cendese says. “If people like one of our organizations, but they don’t know the others, it’s a great chance to experience something new. “And,” he adds with a laugh, “the pieces are only 10 minutes, so if you don’t like something, it will be over very soon.” What’s interesting to all the participants, however, is how an idea that began as a way to get patrons to know the companies better has also developed into a way for the com-

Participants in 2018’s The Rose Exposed: Breaking News!

panies to know one another better. Rapier mentions as one example a collaboration with Gina Bachauer on a production of Peter and the Wolf, which evolved into Plan-B’s annual elementary school tour. “ What has happened over this seven years,” Rapier says, “is that we’ve become incredibly aware of each other’s work, looking for ways to support each other, and we’re much more of a community than we were before. … What we’re all really understanding is, the more we assist each other, it’s helping each of our missions. The barrier is gone to reach literally next door.” Like they say: The family that plays together, stays together. CW

THE ROSE EXPOSED: BREAKING NEWS!

Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 Saturday, Aug. 25 8 p.m., $15 artsaltlake.org


moreESSENTIALS

Othello Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org The Rose Exposed: Breaking News Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Aug. 25, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 22) Saturday’s Voyeur 2018 Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 2, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Thoroughly Modern Millie Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Aug. 24, dates vary, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org Wait Until Dark CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, centerpointtheatre.org

DANCE

Deborah Durban employs a digital mixedmedia collage technique developed to allow her to work after a diagnosis with transverse myelitis (“Unnamed 6” is pictured) in Bits and Pieces at Art Access Gallery II (230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, accessart.org), through Sept. 14.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

SLC Jazz Orchestra Murray Amphitheater, 296 E. Murray Park Ave, Murray, Aug. 25, 8 p.m.

COMEDY & IMPROV

Chris Gethard Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Aug. 24-25, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Nick Guerra Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, 801-463-2909, Aug. 24-25, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, Aug. 24-25, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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Jennifer A. Nielsen: Resistance Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Aug. 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jennifer Wolfe: Watch the Girls The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 28, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Michael G. Snarr: Long Shots and Layups: Memories and Stories from the Golden Age of the Utah Jazz The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 21)

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Daddy Long Legs Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Sept. 22, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Disney’s Newsies Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, hct.org Green Day’s American Idiot Ogden Amphitheater, 343 25th St., Ogden, through Aug. 27, Thursday-Monday, 8 p.m., goodcotheatre.com The Marvelous Wonderettes Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com Mopey Wrecks Ember SLC, 623 S. State, Aug. 28-Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., riotacttheatre.org My Son Pinocchio Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, hct.org Oliver! Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, zigarts.com

Municipal Ballet Co.: The River Speaks Plainly Fisher Brewing Co., 320 W. 800 South, Aug. 23, 8 p.m., municipalballet.com The Rose Exposed: Breaking News Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Aug. 25, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 22)

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AUGUST 23, 2018 | 23


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SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, Wednesdays through September, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays through Oct. 17, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm.

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Made in Utah Festival The Gateway, 400 W. 100 South, Aug. 25, noon-8 p.m., madeinutahfest.com Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, through Oct. 21, Saturdays & Sundays, noon-6:30 p.m., snowbird.com Petapalooza Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, Aug. 25, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., slco.org (see p. 21) Salt Lake Climbing Festival Alpine Rose Lodge, 8302 S. Brighton Loop Road, Brighton, Aug. 24-26, saltlakeclimbingfestival.com

Utah Renaissance Faire Thanksgiving Point Electric Park, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, Aug. 24-25, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., utahrenfaire.org

TALKS & LECTURES

Jacksepticeye: How Did We Get Here? Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Aug. 28, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 21) The Realities of Diversity Speaker Series: Jelani Cobb Quinney College of Law, 383 E. University St., Aug. 29, 7 p.m., speakerseries.uw.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Buster Graybill: Informalism UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 8, utahmoca.org Cara Jean Means: Grip: Conversational Portraits on Mental Health Salt Lake Community College Eccles Gallery, 1575 S. State, through Sept. 21, slcc.edu Chiura Obata: An American Modern Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Sept. 2, umfa.utah.edu Cindy McConkie: Run Happy Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Sept. 12, slcpl.org Deborah Durban: Bits and Pieces Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through Sept. 14, accessart.org (see p. 23) Denise Duong J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, through Aug. 27, jgogallery.com Erin Westenskow Berrett: Reclaimed Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Sept. 2, kimballartcenter.com Face of Utah Sculpture XIV Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Aug. 29, culturalcelebration.org


ALEX SPRINGER

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

R

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Best bet: The skewered pork shashlik Can’t miss: The hearty goulash

AUGUST 23, 2018 | 25

art remains. Russian cuisine isn’t particularly emphatic on seafood, so don’t let the decorative fishing nets and fake starfish convince you otherwise. Instead, let the Russian pop music in the background or the Slavic game shows on the flat screen take you to the environs of the former USSR.

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It’s difficult to know what to expect from a restaurant full of ramshackle naval décor juxtaposed against laminated prints of vintage Russian advertisements. As it turns out, The Galley Grill sprang from the bones of a defunct seafood restaurant, and some of the original wall

ussian cuisine often gets overshadowed by its flashier Western European neighbors. It might not have the flair of the French or the universal appeal of the Italians, but by damn, it’ll keep you warm while you endure a psychologically and physically punishing winter. That’s something I experienced first hand—in another life, I spent two years in Ukraine as an LDS missionary—and I’ve never forgotten it. The cuisine of Eastern Europe is designed to sustain life through the same winter that defeated Napoleon and Hitler. It’s not enough for the food to be nourishing—it’s got to keep one’s mind and spirit satisfied as well. For a firsthand taste of what I’m talking about, check out The Galley Grill (1295 E. Miller Ave., 801-466-9224).

spread with equally slim layers of buttercream and creamed honey. And I have to mention kvass, a trademark Russian beverage that’s essentially nonalcoholic beer made through an unholy process of letting rye bread ferment in water for a few days. The result is something singular and bizarre. I can’t say that I like the stuff—it pretty much tastes like kombucha made from Wonder Bread—but it’s definitely a must for people seeking an authentic Russian experience. I’ll admit I indulge in sentimentality when it comes to The Galley Grill. The music, the sour cream, the cabbage—it all holds a special place in my heart because of the time I spent in Ukraine. But even as I’ve expanded my culinary horizons into other geographical locales, I still think Russian food holds its own in the international food scene. The Galley Grill serves the kind of food that provides a direct conduit to the history, culture and people who created it, and that’s the kind of place that makes going out to eat a true adventure. CW

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The Galley Grill is kicking kvass and taking names.

accommodates those who can’t choose just one variety with the shashlik platter ($32.29), which is a glorious mosh pit of all three skewers. If meat skewers aren’t really your thing, then the cabbage rolls ($12.99) or goulash ($13.49) are solid bets. I have fond memories of learning to make cabbage rolls with a salty babushka while a horrendous snowstorm raged outside, so they always make me a tad sentimental. They’re a bit like Greek dolmas, but the grape leaves are replaced by boiled cabbage and they’re cooked in a tomato-and-onion sauce. They arrive slathered in sour cream and dill, and are a nice way to open up the palate to traditional Russian flavors. The goulash is a dish tailor made to get you through a Westeroscaliber winter. It’s a piping hot plate of sliced beef and veggies stewed in a brown grav y you can feel in your bones. It’s served with a giant side of rice, and mixing the two elements together is comfort food at its finest. Venturing into the fringes of the Galley’s menu, it’s definitely worth noting that their borscht ($5.99), a hearty crimson soup made with stewed beets and cabbage, is another tasty way to heat up when it’s cold outside. The honeycake ($6.79) is a towering testament to the Russian tendency of crafting desserts that emphasize flavor and texture over pure sweetness. It’s a beautifully arranged slice of thin cake layers,

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From Russia With Love

While the naval aesthetic doesn’t quite match the rustic, stick-toyour-ribs combo of carbs, meat, fresh dill and pickled veggies that makes Russian food so tasty, rest assured that the Galley serves up the good stuff. If it’s your first time sampling Russian food, I suggest starting with a bowl of tasty little beef-filled dumplings called pelmeni ($7.79 for a half order; $10.99 for a full) or the potato-filled vareniki ($7.49/$10.69), served with a lot of sour cream and topped with dill. Personally, I tend to lean toward the vareniki, but it’s an absolute necessity to sample these Russian equivalents of ravioli or gyoza. The outer dough is slightly thicker than other dumplings you might have tasted, and the texture always packs the right amount of toothsome chew. For the main course, there are a number of paths to take. Those in the mood for a strict meat-and-potatoes kind of gastronomic journey should consider the pork shashlik ($12.79). Shashlik is a skewer of meat cooked over an open flame and served on a bed of fresh veggies, boiled potatoes and a side of adjika, an herbaceous salsa that hearkens to South American chimichurri. Galley offers chicken and lamb varieties, but the pork is the way to go. Its texture and flavor are enhanced by the cooking process, making the meat tender and juicy. It goes extremely well with the adjika. The Galley also


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Buy one entree

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If I could single out a restaurant that exemplifies the growing trend toward more healthy organic foods, it’d be CoreLife Eatery. Fast casual? Check. A menu of various bowlcentric entrées? Check. An overabundance of kale and quinoa? Check. Their rapid expansion throughout the country proves that the average restaurant patron is becoming a bit more discerning about their quick eats, and CoreLife is there to provide protein, brown rice and Brussels sprouts. With four locations along the Wasatch Front, CoreLife has recently opened a fifth in the City Creek Center (51 S. Main, Ste. 153, 385-259-0395), adding to its already eclectic list of dining options there. Anyone looking for a lot of “power” food can check out the new eatery daily from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. My eyes tend to glaze over if someone mentions the words “Major League.” While it’s the name of a mediocre movie, it’s most often associated with sports. In the case of Snowbird’s second annual Bratwurst Eating Contest, however, major league means something a bit closer to my heart. Each year, Major League Eating—yes, it’s a national organization and it’s tremendous—gathers the country’s finest professional eaters and tests their mettle in gastronomical combat. This year, reigning champion Gideon Oji defends his title against four challengers at the picturesque backdrop of Snowbird Ski Resort in Little Cottonwood Canyon during Oktoberfest festivities. Will Oji retain his crown? Or will another competitor walk away with the $2,000 first prize? Only time will tell. Brats will be consumed at 1:45 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25, in the Snowbird Center Event Tent.

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CoreLife Eatery Opens at City Creek

Bratwurst Eating Championship

Birds and Brews

Prost!

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Speaking of beer-centric events, Tracy Aviary (589 E. 1300 South, 801-596-8500, tracyaviary.org) hosts an evening of education and drinking—two activities that are seldom paired. Fisher Brewing Co. provides the adultsonly beverages while Jess Dwyer of the International Dark Sky Association discusses dark skies, energy conservation and avian migration patterns. Attendees will also rub elbows with members of Tracy Aviary’s conservation team and astronomers from the University of Utah while using high-powered telescopes to marvel at the cosmic ballet beyond our atmosphere. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at tracyaviary.org. A portion of all beer sales support the aviary. The event runs from 7 to 10 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 31. Quote of the Week: “I started eating competitively because I was talentless in all other realms of competition.” —Pat Bertoletti Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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Contemporary Japanese Dining

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chinese • sushi bar • beer • sake • wine


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An Acquired Taste

You don’t hate beer; you just haven’t met the right one. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

f you’ve tried beer in the past and didn’t enjoy it, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re not a beer person. You might just need to find the right beer that works for your particular palate. Beer is not like wine, where all you’re getting is flavor variations on multiple varieties of grape. Ales and lagers possess a wide range of flavors that can appeal to any adult drinker. I found a couple locally made examples of lighter beer styles that show off just some of those differences to help transform the reluctant beer sipper into an enthusiast. Fisher Triplet: The guys over at Fisher Brewing Co. aren’t big on the term “session IPA,” so base-style pale ale is all you’ll see in the way of hoppy ales. This new pale ale

is a golden-amber color, with some nice orange highlights when it’s held to the light. Like many of their beers, this one is unfiltered; it’s not hazy by any means, but it has a natural old-school look. There’s a good amount of white and billow y froth up top that leaves a lot of lacing to the bottom of the glass. The aroma is fantastic. It’s not all citrus and grapefruit; there are notes of pine, along with an aromatic floral bouquet. The taste starts with delightful citrus, but not just grapefruit. It’s more of a balanced citrus fruit salad. The malt complements the flavors from the hops with a subtle backbone suggesting graham crackers and cereal. The end is unbalanced (as it should be) with a good dose of Citra, Mosaic and Galaxy hops. Overall: it’s a very refreshing, easy-todrink 4 percent American pale ale. The quality malt is in perfect proportion to the aggressive hop profile. The mouthfeel is substantial, which makes it a winner in this hot weather. Salt Flats Hefeweizen: This is a good example of a German-style wheat ale. The “hefe” prefix means “with yeast,” and this beer lets that yeast shine. Pouring from a can produces a white, foamy two fingers of head that dissipates quickly, leaving thin head lacing. Carbonation is moderate in a cloudy gold body—looks quite appealing so far. There’s a moderate aroma of grainy wheat (no surprise) with a light whiff of

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

yeast and a hint of banana and lemon peel, providing a clean, gentle aroma overall. The taste takes some of its cues from the nose; wheat dominates with toasted bread and crackers and a small dose of bananaish yeast esters. Some bubblegum sneaks in with lemon-like hops and a clean but assertive floral finish. There’s a light-tomedium body with a smooth texture that hides any hint of alcohol. Overall: This is a good 4 percent session beer, especially for a hot day. I liked the initial blast of banana and gum followed by the wheat breadiness that carries through half way and stays. It provides

good bang for the buck and is easy to drink. I’d definitely buy it again—perhaps another six-pack come Oktoberfest time. Fortunately, you can learn about beers like these while having fun trying a rainbow of different styles along the way. Because demand is so high, the Fisher Triplet (like all of Fisher’s beer, for that matter) is only available at their Granary Neighborhood Brewery (320 W. 800 South). The Salt Flats hefeweizen is another story. It’s available at most grocery and convenience stores along the Wasatch Front and Back. As always, cheers! CW

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Moab Garage Co.

This Main Street attraction in Utah’s recreation capital offers a great chance to fuel up for a day outside or even refuel after a hot summer outing around Moab and Arches National Park. No, we’re not talking about refueling that car or fourwheeler. Moab Garage Co. offers patrons creative spins on coffee and even ice cream. Started by Salt Lake City natives Erin and Ryan Bird, the spacious restaurant has a wide selection of craft coffee and espresso options along with a flavorful and entertaining way to make ice cream with liquid nitrogen. It really is an edible science experiment. The place also has beer options at its back bar known as The Parlor and is open Wednesday through Saturday until 10 p.m. Be sure to stop by one of Moab’s newest hip establishments in the city’s ever-evolving hospitality landscape. 78 N. Main, Moab, 435-554-8467, facebook.com/moabgarageco

make someone ’ s day

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

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AUGUST 23, 2018 | 29

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

The concept behind this upscale Asian eatery is Shanghai in the 1930s: all Art Deco and Victorian, with imported Asian screens, an ebony fireplace, private dining rooms reminiscent of Orient Express sleeper cars—in other words, it’s an eye-popping restaurant filled with a collection of Asian artifacts from around the world. The food here elegantly matches the lofty ambience. Make a light meal out of selections from the appetizer and salad menus, such as the Bincho albacore sashimi with blood-orange ponzu. More substantial entrées include koji pork short rib, diver scallop and caramelized Japanese eggplant. If you’re in the mood for romance, request the table known affectionately as “the love shack.” 577 Main, Park City, 435-615-0300, wahso.com

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

Art l a r o Fl

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Funerals weddings Birthdays

Whenever a new location opens, customers been rave about Pizzeria Limone’s menu of Neapolitan pizza with a twist, premium gelato and fresh salads. Try artisan pies such as the Viola with blackberries, Parmigiano-Reggiano, prosciutto, house marinara and fresh mozzarella; the caprese with fresh and aged mozzarella, fresh red onions and garlic, balsamic and tomatoes; or a classic Margherita. Salad options include the Tre Sorelle with pear and pistachios, Italiano with pepperoncinis, Caesar and caprese. All of the salads come with crosta, which is crispy, chewy pizza crust served with olive oil and Parmesan. There is also a great selection of European sparkling waters and sodas. Try the fantastic limone, raspberry, vanilla or chocolate gelato for dessert. Multiple locations, pizzerialimone.net

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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Pizzeria Limone

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”


1

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

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MARGARIT AS!

Pho 33

While authentic pho is served with thinly sliced ribbons of tripe, I’ve always avoided that option because tripe freaked me out. A bowl of the namesake Pho 33 ($8.50, pictured) showcases the roots of all the different iterations of this soup. The broth is characteristically deep russet in color, with flecks of finely chopped green onions and cilantro and a fist-sized chunk of oxtail that sits like an uncharted island within a sea of heady broth. The tripe is sliced so thinly that it becomes virtually indistinguishable from the noodles, and provides just enough textural contrast to make me glad it’s there. Venturing away from its wide variety of noodle soups is a little hit-and-miss. I’ve got a pot-sticker addiction, and those at ones here ($4.95) are more on the deep-fried end of the spectrum, with the outer shell a bit overdone. The filling, however, was juicy and flavorful, once again proving that Pho 33 knows its beef. Stick to the pho section of the menu; the variety is hard to beat, and it’s a great place to revisit the historical roots of an item that has become a lunchtime staple of the urban diner. Reviewed Aug. 2. 7640 S. State, Midvale, 801-889-4090, pho33utah.com

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32 | AUGUST 23, 2018

FILM REVIEW

Small Gestures

CINEMA

Two nuanced performances elevate familiar elements in Puzzle. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

B

ack in the 1980s, Michael Caine appeared in a BBC series titled Acting in Film, which focused on the finer points of how working for the camera differs from working on a stage. I’ve always remembered one of those lessons in particular, in which Caine reveals the way a simple roll of the eyes can convey one character’s attitude toward another. The reading of a line might be a consistent thing, but subtlety of expression and gesture are what make a wonderful cinematic performance sing. That sort of subtlety is at the center of what makes Puzzle so much more effective than its familiar plot dynamics. Kelly Macdonald plays Agnes, a Connecticut housewife who devotes herself to caring for her husband Louie (David Denman) and two sons (Bubba Weiler and Austin Abrams), and whom we meet while she’s running through the details of preparing for a birthday party—a birthday party that turns out to be for herself. One of her gifts is a 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle, which she completes with surprising speed. While searching for more puzzles, she finds a posted ad for a man named Robert (Irrfan Khan) searching for a partner for a national puzzle competition, and soon puzzling is the part of her week she looks forward to most. It’s hardly a groundbreaking character arc at work in the script by Polly Mann and Oren Moverman, which is itself an Englishlanguage remake of Natalia Smirnoff’s 2009 Argentinian drama Rompecabezas. Agnes is in many ways a familiar type—like the housewife protagonist of The Bridges of Madison County— who begins to consider new possibilities at a moment in life where she was resigned to sameness. That character is complicated, and not always in a good way, by her Roman Catholicism and her family history as the child of Hungarian immigrants; the script sets the sto-

ry’s time frame explicitly during Lent, making the self-abnegation that defines her feel like an Old World throwback in which her faith is the villain. Yet, the journey Agnes takes is made more fascinating by the way Macdonald plays the earliest scenes. There’s no sense that Agnes is discontented in her life at the outset, as she goes through the tasks of her day with a sense of accomplishment. There’s a wonderfully telling moment in the beginning as Agnes reacts to Louie’s mumbled request for “five more minutes” after the morning alarm goes off; she mouths the anticipated plea along with him, and gives a faint smile; she’s not annoyed by Louie’s predictability, but finds it comforting that she knows him so well. Macdonald plays those kind of small moments beautifully throughout the film, whether it’s her satisfied stretch upon completing that first puzzle, or conveying through her body language the reality of her comment to Robert that “I’m not comfortable, generally.” That awkwardness with Robert—an engineer living off the ample income from his one successful invention—gets an added spark from a performance by the great Khan that’s just as rich in detail. The scene in which Agnes and Robert meet immediately introduces Robert’s obsession with news items about disasters and geopolitical strife, but something that could have been merely a neurotic quirk becomes completely different through Khan’s bewildered exhalation. A small twist of the mouth or an unexpected

Kelly Macdonald and Irrfan Khan in Puzzle.

way of delivering simple expository dialogue gives Robert a unique quality that makes him more than simply the exotic guy who could tempt this simple woman. This guy is just as weird and uncomfortable in his skin as Agnes is, which makes their pairing considerably more interesting to watch than just waiting to see whether they’ll hook up. Although the meetings between Agnes and Robert are preparation for a big tournament, Puzzle never treats that competition as the centerpiece for some kind of underdog sports movie; the event itself takes place almost entirely off screen. Even when tension starts to bubble between Agnes and Louie, and the confused husband says things like “Who’s filling your head with all of these crazy ideas?”, it feels like more than a paint-by-numbers stroll through a repressed woman’s awakening. That’s what can happen when two actors understand that the way you bring a character alive for a movie can be as simple as when, and how, you smile. CW

PUZZLE

BBB Kelly Macdonald Irrfan Khan David Denman PG-13

TRY THESE The Bridges of Madison County (1995) Meryl Streep Clint Eastwood PG-13

The Merry Gentleman (2008) Michael Keaton Kelly Macdonald R

Rompecabezas (2009) María Onetto Gabriel Goity NR

Life of Pi (2012) Suraj Sharma Irrfan Khan PG


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. More reviews online at cityweekly.net/utah/movietimes A-X-L [not yet reviewed] The adventures of a boy and his robot dog. Opens Aug. 24 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

PAPILLON BB.5 Director Micheal Noer certain takes a different approach to the real-life story of Henri “Papillon” Carrière than Franklin J. Schaffner did in the magnificent 1973 adptation, resulting in something considerably more conventional. This story opens in 1931 Paris before Papillon (Charlie Hunnam) is framed for murder and sent to the penal colony in French Guiana, where he befriends—and protects—the mild-mannered counterfeiter Louie Dega (Rami Malek). Noer and screenwriter Aaron Guzikowski keep the focus even more firmly on the relationship between Papillon and Dega, condensing huge chunks of the third act to avoid separating them. While the performances by Hunnam and Malek are perfectly solid in trying to stand up to the iconic work of Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman, the tone of this version feels pitched much more for conventional action beats—with drawn-out sequences of fights between inmates— instead of a story of resilience and survival. The prologue and epilogue, including the now-seemingly-obligatory closing shot of the real Papillon, frame the narrative as one about a man, rather than as a stark chronicle of a horrifying place and time. Opens Aug. 24 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR PUZZLE BBB See review on p. 32. Opens Aug. 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)

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FAR FROM THE TREE BBB Rachel Dretzin adapts the non-fiction book by Andrew Solomon in a way that comes perilously close to ignoring the source material’s compelling premise. Inspired by his own experience with parents who struggled to accept his homosexuality, Solomon explored how parents dealt with children who turn out far different than they expected. Dretzin follows several families facing such challenges—Down syndrome, autism, dwarfism, even a son who commits murder—while also circling back to Solomon’s own story. The stories provide unique perspectives on how diagnoses fraught with initial heartbreak evolve as the child does, yet the focus on how the children can live happy lives often steers the emphasis away from how their parents adjust and cope with guilt, anger and fear. There are valuable lessons here about societal expectations for “normalcy”—as Solomon puts it at one point, deciding “what to cure, and what to celebrate”—but the film is never more compelling than when its subject is a mother awakening to the mind trapped in her son’s autistic body, or parents grappling with how the smiling child in family pictures could become a killer. Opens Aug. 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

THE HAPPYTIME MURDERS [not yet reviewed] A private eye (Melissa McCarthy) investigates the killings of the puppet cast members of a beloved children’s television show. Opens Aug. 24 at theaters valleywide. (R)


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Upending Expectations

MUSIC

Shakey Graves returns with darker, deeper take on his suitcase blues. BY NICK MCGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

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n his new album, Can’t Wake Up, Alejandro Rose-Garcia happily upends expectations of his Shakey Graves project. Toying with mood, form, perspective and cinematic intimacy, he discards the groove he adopted circa 2015, when Shakey Graves’ sound revolved around an acoustic guitar and an old suitcase, outfitted one-manband style with a kick pedal. As Rose-Garcia said last winter when he announced Can’t Wake Up, “Next album. New sound. Sell your suspenders.” It’s not an overblown interpretation. Instead of stomp-folk and country blues, songs like “Aibohphobia” sound as psychedelic on record as they do on paper. “Kids These Days” skewers the “young dumb chosen one” that might just be Rose-Garcia himself. “Dining Alone” twists lounge pop into a Fantasia-inspired slice of schizophrenia, while “My Neighbor” scurries from one unexplored sonic rabbit hole to another. “Climb on the Cross” features the devastating line, “I never listened to my teacher/ Trusted every word my preacher would say/ Always thought the crosshair was simply the sun on my face,” along with a chorus that still perplexes me months after first hearing it: “If nothing dies tomorrow/ Why remember yesterday?” “To a certain degree, music is mood,” Rose-Garcia says. “It’s the umami of life. A lot of memory is tied to music. Sometimes a song instantly transports you somewhere whether you want it to or not.” As an experienced songwriter with two full-lengths—2011’s Roll the Bones and 2014’s And the War Came—and multiple EPs under his belt, he’s still not sure whether that’s a nature or nurture thing. Reflecting his fascination with the spiritual, sometimes cosmic forces at work around us, he adds, “Certain music, notes and auditory experiences are designed to help open a star gate,” with only a hint of a smirk. Defining Can’t Wake Up’s thesis statement as an exploration of dreams, fantasies and madness, Rose-Garcia says its most straightforward analogy is a battle against “feeling trapped in a repetitive loop you can’t get out of or feel helpless to adjust.” Referencing his time touring endlessly on the strength of hit single “Dearly Departed” from And the War Came—he performed on Conan O’Brien, David Letterman and Seth Meyers in the space of one season and played more sold-out shows in 2015 than he can remember—he says, “Everybody goes through it: ‘Is this all life has to offer? Am I doing anything? Do I need to be doing anything?’ Those endless questions have no one answer. They’re the equation of life. In the searching is the purpose.” Rose-Garcia hand-built a ramshackle diorama for Can’t Wake Up’s cover—suffused purple and pink light silhouettes teetering city buildings, with a lone searcher at the middle of it. And he and his backing band adeptly capture that vibe on stage in joyous, sometimes bewildering, ways. (Billboard called it “Disney characters listening to Pet Sounds at a corner dive in the afterlife, as rendered by Salvador Dalí.”) Rose-Garcia says he took a deliberate approach to building the current stage show, using

GREG GIANNUKOS

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CONCERT PREVIEW

Alejandro Rose-Garcia stage lights, props and set pieces to eliminate any feeling of new material haphazardly stuffed into or tacked onto his old set. “We do a lot with light and mood to present the songs in an interesting way, which took a bit of pre-production work,” he says. “Once we started experimenting at the beginning of this tour, we were like, ‘This will probably work!’ A couple months in, it’s beginning to hit its stride; we’re feeling a little more elastic and able to pivot more as a band.” That band approach is crucial to Rose-Garcia, who insists that Shakey Graves is not just about him. Instead, he prefers acting as a sort of disembodied narrator taking listeners on a surrealist journey. “I usually don’t write candidly about my own life,” he says. “I lean away from musicians who do that. At the same time, I don’t think you have to make fun of everything. The new Father John Misty record drives me crazy—his tongue is blasted all the way through his cheek at this point. I’m like, ‘I get it, dog!’” Somewhere in the middle lies Shakey Graves’ sweet spot, RoseGarcia says. “I don’t want to not put myself in the songs, but I also don’t feel like I need to use it as some confessional therapy. I can masturbate for myself—music is meant to be shared. Too much of me clogs that purpose. I want to make it an emptier thing that you can pour yourself into.” Laughing, he says he and his band embraced the cinematic nature of Can’t Wake Up by coming up with a name for its main character. “We refer to all these songs as the life and times of Garth Nazarth, who’s had lots of ups and downs and ultimately dies in the electric chair after selling weed in Mexico,” Rose-Garcia laughs. Providing perhaps the best summation of Shakey Graves, he adds, “That’s the quick and easy way to summarize what might as well be a disassembled movie.” CW

SHAKEY GRAVES

w/ José González & The Brite Lites, Rayland Baxter Friday, Aug. 24 7 p.m., all ages Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre, 2155 Red Butte Canyon Road Sold out at press time


West Gate Rising

WITH PROPER BREWING-7 LS! SWAG AND PROPER BEER SPECIA

Folk Hogan

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WATCH PARTY rOCKY MOUNTAIN CUP PM FREE TICKETS,

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AUGUST 23, 2018 | 35


LIVE

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, NICK McGREGOR & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 8/23

Melvin Seals & JGB

uses a custom 8-string. I digress. The point is, 7-strings were virtually off the radar until Dead Crown came out swinging with their 2018 debut EP Come Hell. Featuring plenty of songs you can two-step and windmill to, Come Hell even landed on Billboard’s radar at No. 11 for hard rock album sales. Touring the nation with Denver shredders Apotheon and a host of other bands, Dead Crown is exploding on the metal scene and making a name for the 7-string movement. (Rachelle Fernandez) The Loading Dock, 445 S. 400 West, 7 p.m., $12, all ages, loadingdockslc.com

FRIDAY 8/24- SUNDAY 8/26

Reggae Rise Up Festival feat. Rebelution, Stephen Marley, Atmosphere, Steel Pulse and more

Man-bun and XXL T-shirt lovers rejoice! Nü-metal is making a comeback, and djent leaders Dead Crown are strumming to the beat of their own 7-string guitars. With a familiar sound comparable to bands like Emmure and Gideon, the Portland, Ore., four-piece conjure up mean two-steps in the pit with songs like “South Side” and “The Seven.” The 6-string versus 7-string debate goes all the way back to the ’90s, when Korn went multi-platinum with Follow the Leader. It’s hard not to associate 7-string with that overblown era of nü-metal, but these days, the once-maligned genre sounds heavier and even more aggressive. “We like to get the crowd involved and create an experience for everyone in the room,” Dead Crown vocalist Kendall Johns says. “We bring a lot of energy and do our best to put on an entertaining show.” That’s easy with the novelty 7-string guitar, but I prefer Pig Destroyer’s Scott Hull, who

It’s been several decades since reggae found its way into the musical mainstream. Credit Bob Marley & The Wailers and Jimmy Cliff for early inspiration, along with seminal hits like Millie Small’s “My Boy Lollipop,” Johnny Nash’s “I Can See Clearly Now” and Dekker’s “Israelites.” Bolstered by the successful film The Harder They Come, a commitment from Island Records and Eric Clapton’s cover of Marley’s insurgent anthem “I Shot the Sheriff,” reggae rose up in the ’70s and hasn’t receded since. Later infused with rap, rock and dub, a new generation of reggae artists have joined the old guard in carrying the torch forward. It’s appropriate, then, that the eighth annual Reggae Rise Up festival presents traditionalist stars like Steel Pulse, Stephen Marley and the Original Wailers, modern interpreters like Rebelution, J Boog and Soja, and reggae-influenced rappers like Atmosphere and Del the Funky Homosapien. Granted, Heber City is a long way from Jamaica’s sunswept beaches, but the percolating rhythms bring hints of those idyllic environs to Utah’s own backyard. With two stages, camping and a variety of vendors, music and merriment, it’s sure to be an exceptional experience. (Lee Zimmerman) River’s Edge at Deer Park, 7000 Old Highway 40, Heber, Friday, 2-11 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, noon11 p.m., $55-$170, all ages, reggaeriseuputah.com

ALAN HESS

We’ve just passed through The Days Between, what hardcore Grateful Dead fans call the week between Jerry Garcia’s birthday (Aug. 1, 1942) and the day of his death (Aug. 9, 1995). So it’s fitting that Melvin Seals, longtime organist in the Jerry Garcia Band, comes to town with the current version of JGB. Garcia always imagined that side project as an earthier, bar bandinfluenced version of Grateful Dead, and over his 18-year tenure, Seals added the soulful funk, R&B and gospel touches that Garcia yearned for. That helped to usher in the multi-faceted modern jam-band era, with tunes that pull from every corner of Americana, putting them through an improvisational filter. Calling themselves the “keepers of the flame,” Seals and his bandmates—Zach Nugent on guitar, Shirley Starks and Cheryl Rucker on vocals, Pete Lavezzoli on drums and John-Paul McLean on bass—hew to Garcia’s more organic, intuitive side, playing the staples but also digging into JGB’s discography to trot out some super-rare deep cuts. In that sense, Melvin Seals and JGB might represent a through line to the past that’s more honest and direct than many of the starstudded arena shows propagated by Dead alumni Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann. (Nick McGregor) The Commonwealth Room, 195 W. Commonwealth Ave., 8 p.m., $27, 21+, thecommonwealthroom.com

BOB MINKIN

Melvin Seals & JGB

BRUCE MCMURRY

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT

CITYWEEKLY.NET

FRIDAY 8/24

Dead Crown, Hollow I Am, Apotheon, Increate, Founders of Ruin

Dead Crown

Steel Pulse


GRAB A BITE

TONIGHT

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! EVERY TUESDAY BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM

AUGUST 23

AUGUST 24

DJ GODINA 10PM

AUGUST 25

DJ CHASEONE2 10PM-1AM

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

AUGUST 27

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

AUGUST 28

TUESDAY NIGHT BLUEGRASS JAM WITH PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM SATURDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

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ROBOT DREAM PLAYING THE TWILIGHT AFTER PARTY 10PM-1AM

AUGUST 26

BLUEGRASS ON THE PATIO WITH RED DESERT RAMBLERS 3PM SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES JAM 7PM

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AUGUST 22

NATE ROBINSON TRIO ON THE PATIO 7PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

AUGUST 23, 2018 | 37

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

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*Dine-In Only

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.


YUNO

MONDAY 8/27

Yuno

Yuno

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 8.22 MEANDER CAT

8.23 SLINGS AND ARROWS

8.24 & 25 STONEFED

8.27 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

Those who are passionate about music have one of two dreams. If you make your own music, you hope the right person will notice your talent and connect you with the resources that can transform a hobby into a career. On the other hand, if you’re not blessed with the gift of creativity (your humble reporter will now take a bow), you relish the opportunity to discover a promising artist at the beginning of his or her career and then follow them as they earn their overdue acclaim. Both scenarios fit for 27-year-old Jacksonville, Fla., native Yuno. After spending a few years quietly crafting exquisite emo-pop nuggets in his home studio, Ishmael Butler—frontman of avant-garde hip-hop groups like Digable Planets and Shabazz Palaces—discovered Yuno’s tunes on Soundcloud. After corresponding digitally for a year, Butler then introduced Yuno to the folks at Seattle’s Sub Pop Records, who snapped him up and earlier this summer released his debut full-length, Moodie, which is full of shiny, yet cathartic, post-break-up declarations. Yuno is a self-contained artist: In addition to writing, performing, recording and engineering all of his own music, he creates all of the attendant visuals, taking his

Infernal Coil

8.28 JELLY BREAD

8.31 TONY HOLIDAY HOG WALLOW FAREWELL BASH

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

TEDDIE TAYLOR

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LIVE

own promotional photos, drawing his own album covers and directing his own music videos. Catch him here on his first nationwide tour, with lead single “No Going Back” serving as the perfect end-of-summer antidote. (NM) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $12, all ages, kilbycourt.com

WEDNESDAY 8/29

Infernal Coil, Rare Form, 2 Headed Whale, Sister Missionary

The more illegible the font your death metal band’s name employs, the more death metal you are. That was the case with legendary acts like Enslaved and Averse Sefira, and partially with Boise shredders Infernal Coil. However, there is a method behind the madness of these unreadable monikers. Metal historians (meaning this guy I found on Quora named Merin) state that death metal bands do this to keep outsiders away from their music, maintaining a sense of scene purity. Whether the unreadability is linked to anti-conformity or not, guitarist/vocalist Folús (aka Blake Connally) of Infernal Coil reinforces said purity by drawing inspiration for his band’s 2018 album, Within a World Forgotten, from “a compulsion to express the voice of the voiceless.” Explaining more, he says, “Our hope is that our words and suffocating sound will be the mirror to the much-needed self-reflection/realization of our disgusting existence.” Since the release of their 2016 demo Burning Prayer of Infinite Hatred, the band has stayed true to that dark and “disgusting” sound—sure to keep any outsider away. “We treat our live performance much like an athlete,” Folús says. “It is punishment in every aspect of the word, for us, as well as the individuals who attend, for the crimes we have all committed.” Come to Diabolical Records for the punishment, and stay for Infernal Coil as they share the stage with Rare From, 2 Headed Whale and Sister Missionary. (RF) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5-$10 suggested donation, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc


SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! THURSDAY: TWIST JAZZ & BLUES JAM on the patio @ 7:30

Clusterphoque Cabaret presents:

TWISTed Cabaret - burlesque, drag, and magic @ 10:30 followed by Dusty Grooves all vinyl

FRIDAY:

DJ Sneaky Long @ 9:00 pm.

SATURDAY:

DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY: Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,900

MONDAY:

Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 EXCHANGE PLACE • 801-322-3200

WWW.TWISTSLC.COM • 11:00AM - 1:00AM

2PM

HIGHLAND Monday

WINGS 75¢ALL DAY Wednesday BREAKING BINGO $500 POT 8PM

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KARAOKE SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

AUGUST 23, 2018 | 39

Saturday


LARRY BUSACCA

Rooney, Mating Ritual, Ugly Boys

Rooney is a pop band—and an exceptional one at that. While there’s no shortage of groups trying to resurrect the sun-dappled sounds of the ’60s and ’70s, few do it with so much aplomb and yet so little appreciation. With four albums and two EPs released since 2003, the Los Angeles-based quintet, helmed by founder and stalwart Robert Schwartzman, has garnered comparisons to The Cars, Jellyfish, Eisley, Weezer, Queen and others with a sound that’s supremely powerful. Naming themselves after Ed Rooney—the befuddled principal in the cult favorite Ferris Bueller’s Day Off—Rooney have a history of false starts, record company reversals and a shifting assortment of musicians that have drifted in and out of the fold. Even so, Schwartzman has ensured that quality control is always well maintained and that Rooney’s effusive intents remain well served. With a penchant for riveting rock ’n’ roll, their live shows reflect that commitment to cause. Likewise, let’s give kudos to Mating Ritual, a solo synth pop project by Ryan Marshall Lawhon that’s flush with the same high degree of exhilaration and exuberance. Lawhon, a veteran of several previous outfits, is considered a visionary in his own right, and any bill featuring both bands on the same stage ought to ensure an evening of unbridled energy. (Lee Zimmerman) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, theurbanloungeslc.com

THURSDAY 8/23 LIVE MUSIC

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FRIDAY 8/24

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Alicia Stockman (Lake Effect) Ambrosia (Egyptian Theatre) Bad Bad Hats + Cumulus + The Sardines (Kilby Court) Brother’s Brimm (O.P. Rockwell) Bobaflex (Liquid Joe’s) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Lash LaRue (Dejoria Center) Melvin Seals & JGB (Commonwealth Room) see p. 36 Mia Grace + Matt Hooper + Seth Brown (Velour) Ol’ Fashion Depot (Garage on Beck) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Robert DeLong (Gallivan Center) Sarah DeGraw (Gateway) Slings & Arrows (Hog Wallow Pub) Slug Localized w/ Mortigi Tempo + Lord Vox + Sunsleeper (Urban Lounge) Tom Bennett (The Yes Hell) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) YYNOT + Advent Horizon (Metro Music Hall) Zander (Canyons Village Park City)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Salt Lake’s 18 and over

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dusty Grooves (Twist) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos w/ South & Jules (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz & Blues Jam (Twist) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays w/ Getter (Sky)

FRIDAY 8/24 LIVE MUSIC

801.467.0700

2630 S. 300 W. SLC

Ambrosia (Egyptian Theatre) Banda MS (Maverick Center)

Boy Hits Car (Liquid Joe’s) Buck Battle (Snowbird) The Cadillac Three (The Depot) Changing Lanes Experience (Gallivan Center) Colt .46 (The Westerner) Dead Crown + Apotheon + Hollow I Am + Increate + Founders of Ruin (The Loading Dock) see p. 36 Divisions + Low Life + Charlatan + Classic Jack + Anxxiety + Burn The Gallows + Allies Always Lie (The Complex) Foreign Figures (Kilby Court) The Greyhounds (Pat’s BBQ) Hazzard County (Outlaw Saloon) Hot House West (Piper Down) Inside Job + Stop Karen + XLR8 (The Beehive) Ivie Brie (Harp & Hound) Junction City Blues Band (The Yes Hell) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Matt Calder + Bonanza Town (Lake Effect) Mikael Lewis (Legends Park City) Mr. Lucky Blues (The Bayou) OhGr + Lead Into Gold + Omniflux + DJ Daemon Chadeau (Metro Music Hall) Pipes + Harpers w/ Little Moon (Velour) Quinn Brown Project (Brewskis) Reggae Rise Up Festival (River’s Edge at Deer Park) see p. 36 Rooney + Mating Ritual + Ugly Boys (Urban Lounge) see above Royal Bliss + Otherwise + Ginger & The Gents (The Royal) Shakey Graves + José González & The Brite Lites + Rayland Baxter (Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre) see p. 34 Something Like Seduction w/ Vann Moon + Morgan & The Mountain (Funk ’n’ Dive) The Stratmores + Joyful Whiskey (The Ice Haüs) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Superbubble (Garage on Beck)


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Main Street and 300 South is quite busy on a Sunday night as I stroll down Broadway on my way to historic Whiskey Street. Street musician Jeff is finger-tapping away on his acoustic, paramedics are helping an elderly woman and crowds of 30-somethings drift in and out of the bars and restaurants that pepper Main. When I arrive at Whiskey Street, the scene is more to my liking: mellow and low-lit. The charismatic bartender Cory Dudis is a salesman at heart, selling me a veggie sandwich as he reveals he’s been working at Whiskey Street since their first night open. “We started with 130 whiskeys,” he says. “We’re at about 410 now.” Eavesdropping on a woman’s conversation, I hear her talking about her recent completion of a bucket-list item and ask for more details. Joy says she just got back from a month-long motorcycle journey before tying up some loose ends in Salt Lake. We start talking about everything from bikes to the BBC’s Planet Earth and my big dream of going on my own motorcycle bucket list trip around Vietnam. I try to impress her with my random knowledge of Harley-Davidson shares and sales, and it works—she scoots her chair closer to me and continues chatting. Joy’s advice is: “Do it! Get out of here.” My wanderlust flame feels stoked enough for the night thanks to Joy’s advice, which was the push that I needed. I mean, if I can venture all the way out to Whiskey Street, going to Ho Chi Minh City should be easy enough, right? (Rachelle Fernandez) 323 S. Main, 801-433-1371, whiskeystreet.com The Number Ones w/ David Halliday (The Bayou) Reggae Rise Up Festival (River’s Edge at Deer Park) see p. 36 Ryan Innes + Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Shuffle (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Tishmal + Small Lake City + Ugly Boys (The Depot) White City Township Days (Big Bear Park)

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© 2017

MORE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Forces afloat 2. Winslow Homer’s painting style 3. Emmy-nominated lead actress of HBO’s “Insecure” 4. Finger wagger’s cry 5. Pulitzer winner Welty 6. Symbol in the middle of a Scrabble board 7. Honeybunch or snookums, e.g.

46. Land 48. Radio ____ (“Do the Right Thing” character) 49. New Hampshire city home to Daniel Webster College 54. Sycophant’s quality 56. Walked (on) 57. Prefix with byte 58. Abbr. on many a cornerstone 59. Sallie ____ (student loan offerer)

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

8. Oscar-winning foreign film of 2005 set in South Africa 9. It’s a long story 10. Like some people’s citizenships 11. God, with “the” 12. Mondale’s 1984 running mate 13. “____ scale from 1 to 10 ...” 21. Jump for joy 22. Tent tenant 26. ____-Mex 29. Rope in a Wild West show 30. “Taxi” character Elaine 31. Longtime inits. in newswires 33. Greet from afar 37. Dweller in a virtual “City” 38. One going off on somebody? 39. Org. that offers Precheck enrollment 40. Enjoyed unfettered freedom 41. High-pH substances 42. Attached, as a patch 44. Queens neighborhood in which “All in the Family” was set 45. Match-up

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Stems (from) 7. War vet’s affliction, for short 11. Co. money manager 14. Close again 15. Biblical twin 16. Kylo ____ of “The Force Awakens” 17. Israeli tourist attraction on the Dead Sea 18. Outfit in Caesar’s senate 19. #MeToo ____ 20. Something a person might pick up at the airport 23. More grim 24. ____ in xylophone 25. Rat-____ 27. Fresh ____ daisy 28. Bauxite, e.g. 32. Eurasian duck 34. Sierra Nevada, for one 35. Or so: Abbr. 36. No. 2 38. ____-dieu 39. Tritt who sang “T-R-O-U-B-L-E” 42. Crestfallen 43. ____ Nui (Easter Island) 47. Capital city about 50 miles south of Portland on the Willamette river 50. Cul-de-____ 51. Symbol of life in ancient Egypt 52. Partner of shock 53. Up and about 55. Classic infomercial line ... or something said when looking closely at 20-, 28- or 47-Across 59. “Cool” amount of money 60. Clarinetist’s need 61. Islamic law 62. 2001 Will Smith title role 63. Treat you might bite or lick 64. “The Imitation Game” subject 65. Mag. staffers 66. “Aw, hell!” 67. Mar

SUDOKU

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44 | AUGUST 23, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I think you’ve done enough rehearsals. At this point, the apparent quest for a little extra readiness is beginning to lapse into procrastination. So I’ll suggest that you set a date for opening night. I’ll nudge you to have a cordial talk with yourself about the value of emphasizing soulfulness over perfectionism. What? You say you’re waiting until your heart stops fluttering and your bones stop chattering? I’ve got good news: The greater your stage fright, the more moving your performance will be. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In all the time we’ve worked on diminishing your suffering, we might have not focused enough on the fine art of resolving unfinished business. So let’s do that now, just in time for the arrival of your Season of Completion. Are you ready to start drawing the old cycle to a close so you’ll be fresh when the new cycle begins? Are you in the mood to conclude this chapter of your life story and earn the relaxing hiatus you will need before launching the next chapter? Even if you don’t feel ready, even if you’re not in the mood, I suggest you do the work anyway. Any business you leave unfinished now will only return to haunt you later. So don’t leave any business unfinished!

greats. Renowned for his luminous landscapes, he specialized in depicting the power of nature and the atmospheric drama of light and color. Modern poet Mary Ruefle tells us that though he “painted his own sea monsters,” he engaged assistants “to do small animals.” She writes that “he could do a great sky, but not rabbits.” I’m hoping that unlike Turner, you Piscean folks will go both ways in the coming weeks. Give as much of your creative potency and loving intelligence to the modest details as to the sweeping vistas. ARIES (March 21-April 19): The two pieces of advice I have for you might initially seem contradictory, but they are in fact complementary. Together they’ll help guide you through the next three weeks. The first comes from herbalist and wise woman Susun Weed. She suggests that when you face a dilemma, you should ask yourself how you can make it your ally and how you can learn the lesson it has for you. Your second burst of wisdom is from writer Yasmin Mogahed: “Study the hurtful patterns of your life. Then don’t repeat them.”

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speak the following declaration aloud and see how it feels: “I want strong soft kisses and tender unruly kisses and secret truth SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Are you ready to mix more business with pleasure and more kisses and surprise elixir kisses. I deserve them, too.” If that puts pleasure with business than you have ever mixed? I predict you in a brave mood, Taurus, add a further affirmation: “I want that in the coming weeks, your social opportunities will serve ingenious affectionate amazements and deep dark appreciation your professional ambitions and your professional ambitions and brisk mirthful lessons and crazy sweet cuddle wrestles. I will serve your social opportunities. You will have more than deserve them, too.” What do you think? Do these formulas work your usual amount of power to forge new alliances and expand for you? Do they put you in the proper frame of mind to co-create your web of connections. Here’s my advice: Be extra charming, transformative intimacy? I hope so. You’re entering a phase but not grossly opportunistic. Sell yourself, but with grace when you have maximum power to enchant and to be enchanted. and integrity, not with obsequiousness. Express yourself like a gorgeous force of nature, and encourage others to express GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As you map out your master plan for the next 14 months, I invite themselves like gorgeous forces of nature, too. you to include the following considerations: an intention to purge pretend feelings and artificial motivations; a promise to SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “When I picture a perfect reader,” wrote philosopher Friedrich change your relationship with old secrets so that they no longer Nietzsche, “I picture a monster of courage and curiosity, also impinge on your room to maneuver; a pledge to explore evocasomething supple, cunning, cautious, a born adventurer and tive mysteries that will enhance your courage; a vow to be kinder discoverer.” I suspect he was using the term “monster” with a toward aspects of yourself that you haven’t loved well enough; roguish affection. I am certainly doing that as I direct these same and a search for an additional source of stability that will inspire words toward you, dear Sagittarian reader. Of course, I am always you to seek more freedom. appreciative of your courage, curiosity, cunning, suppleness and adventurousness. But I’m especially excited about those qualities CANCER (June 21-July 22): now, because the coming weeks will be a time when they will be If you have been communing with my horoscopes for a while, you’ve gotten a decent education—for free! Nonetheless, you both most necessary and most available to you. shouldn’t depend on me for all of your learning needs. Due to my tendency to emphasize the best in you and focus on healing your CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You do not yet have access to maps of the places where you need wounds, I might neglect some aspects of your training. With to go next. That fact might tempt you to turn around and head that as caveat, I’ll offer a few meditations about future posback to familiar territory. But I hope you’ll press forward even sibilities. 1. What new subjects or skills do you want to master in without the maps. Out there in the frontier, adventures await the next three years? 2. What’s the single most important thing you that will prepare you well for the rest of your long life. And you can do to augment your intelligence? 3. Are there dogmas being without maps, at least in the early going, might actually you believe in so fixedly and rely on so heavily that they obstruct enhance your learning opportunities. Here’s another thing you the arrival of fresh ideas? If so, are you willing to at least temposhould know: your intuitive navigational sense will keep improv- rarily set them aside? ing the farther you get from recognizable landmarks. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “All the world’s a stage,” wrote Shakespeare, “And all the AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Healing isn’t impossible. You might not be stuck with your pain for- men and women merely players.” In other words, we’re all ever. The crookedness in your soul and the twist in your heart might performers. Whenever we emerge from solitude and encounter not always define who you are. There might come a time when you’ll other people, we choose to express certain aspects of our inner no longer be plagued by obsessive thoughts that keep returning you experience even as we hide others. Our personalities are façades to the tormenting memories. But if you hope to find the kind of that display a colorful mix of authenticity and fantasy. Many liberation I’m describing here, I advise you to start with these two wise people over the centuries have deprecated this central guidelines: 1. The healing might not happen the way you think it aspect of human behavior as superficial and dishonest. Author should or imagine it will. 2. The best way to sprout the seeds that Neil Gaiman thinks otherwise: “We are all wearing masks,” he says. “That is what makes us interesting.” Invoking his view— will ultimately bloom with the cures is to tell the complete truth. and in accordance with current astrological omens—I urge you to celebrate your masks and disguises in the coming weeks. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Nineteenth-century British painter J. M. W. Turner was one of the Enjoy the show you present. Dare to entertain your audiences.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189912090, JUDGE VERNICE TREASE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JAMIE FABIAN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JAMIE FABIAN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $6,451.68. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


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Let’s turn the clock back 25 years and revisit a gentler time. OK, I had to laugh. When I checked the interwebs for great things that happened in 1993, I got: 1. The north tower of the World Trade Center was bombed, killing six people and injuring more than 1,000; 2. the Feds attempted to raid the compound of the Branch Davidians led by David Koresh in Waco, Texas. After a 51-day siege, 76 members of the religious cult died as their compound caught or was set on fire; 3. a ferry boat in Haiti sank, drowning 900 people; 4. thousands were killed around the world by earthquakes; 5. Bill Clinton was president. People back then had to go to the library to look up facts and maps because the internet was barely up and running. The only way you could find phone numbers for family, friends or businesses was in huge paper books that were delivered to your doorstep once a year. Smart phones and tablets weren’t around to stream Netflix, and computers were pretty basic. An average house in the U.S. cost $113,200, incomes averaged $31,2300 per year and monthly rent averaged $532. Nirvana was hugely popular, as was Snoop Doggy Dogg, Garth Brooks and Whitney Houston. Police were beginning to investigate allegations that Michael Jackson was abusing children. Why go back 25 years? Well, a little movie called The Sandlot was released in 1993, and the anniversary of this flick brings smiles to many. Cast members and players on the Salt Lake Bees baseball team celebrated the cult classic Aug. 11 by visiting the site of the original lot where the kids in the movie played their baseball games. Today, it’s a weedy plot in Glendale at 1388 Glenrose Drive that’s not a keptup ball field or a location quite as famous as, say, the ball field from Field of Dreams outside Dyersville, Iowa. Yet people from all over the world make pilgrimages to the Sandlot locations in Utah. The movie is a G-rated success about kids coming of age in the summer of 1962. If you want to roll down memory lane, the main film locations are: Lorin Farr Community Pool (1691 Gramercy Ave., Ogden), private residences in Sugar House (2005 E. Bryan Ave.; 1556 S. 2000 East, and 1571 S. 2000 East), Liberty Park and Riverside Park in Rose Park. Now, say it with me: “You’re killin’ me, Smalls!” n

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Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow Armed thieves in New Delhi, India, left a craftsman deep in debt after they made off with 500 pounds of wigs and raw hair worth more than $20,000 on July 27, according to the Associated Press. “People think wigs are cheap, but they cost a fortune to make,” wig-maker Jahangir Hussain said. In fact, he had borrowed more than $17,000 to buy hair last month from South Indian wholesalers. India exports wigs and hair extensions to the tune of $300 million a year; much of the raw materials are collected at Hindu temples where people shave their heads as a religious sacrifice, a practice called tonsuring.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

to attend a rap concert in another state, so on July 4 he executed his plan to get there: Scott was seen by Texarkana Regional Airport security officers around 2:30 a.m. jumping a fence and trying to get into an American Eagle twin-engine jet parked there. When police arrived, Scott was inside the cockpit, sitting in the pilot’s seat, the Texarkana Gazette reported. Scott, not a licensed pilot, told officers he thought there wasn’t much more to flying a plane than pushing buttons and pulling levers. On July 31, he was charged with commercial burglary and attempted theft; he’s been grounded at the Miller County jail.

WEIRD

The (Im)perfect Seatmate Chicago cellist Jingjing Hu, a student at the DePaul University School of Music, found herself being escorted off an American Airlines flight on Aug. 2 after trying to return to Chicago from Miami with her instrument. Hu paid in advance for an extra seat for her cello, worth almost $30,000 and housed in a hard case, and had no trouble on her flight from Chicago to Miami, where she participated in a music festival. But on her return trip, after boarding the Boeing 737 and settling herself and her cello into their seats, a flight attendant approached her and told her she would have to leave the plane because the aircraft was too small for her instrument. Hu was booked on a flight the next day on a 767. American blamed the incident on a “miscommunication,” according to WBBM TV, but Hu’s husband, Jay Tang, said, “I don’t think we did anything wrong here, and I think the way they handled it was humiliating.”

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Ripe West Valley City, Utah, has a malodorous mystery on its hands. The community stinks, and for the past year, officials have been fielding complaints about the smell, which city communications director Sam Johnson described as “a musty sewer smell ... that you can smell in certain parts of the city stronger,” according to FOX 13. The city has now launched a campaign recruiting residents to help pinpoint the source of the odor: “If you smell something, say something.” They’re hoping more complaints will spur Salt Lake County and Utah’s Department of Environmental Quality to investigate and take action.

Suspicions Confirmed Airport security at Berlin’s Schonefeld Airport evacuated a terminal on Aug. 7 after spotting “suspicious content in a luggage piece” during a routine X-ray, according to CNN. The bag’s unnamed owner was summoned, but he was reluctant to identify the mysterious items, calling them just “technical stuff.” After an hourlong investigation involving the bomb squad, the 31-year-old traveler admitted to federal police that the items were sex toys, including a vibrator, he had brought along for his girlfriend. He was allowed to proceed with his trip, and the terminal reopened shortly afterward.

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Questionable Judgment Farah Hashi, 25, of Newport, Wales, is “mad about cars,” so while he was visiting friends in Dubai, they arranged for him to drive a $350,000 Lamborghini Huracan. Hashi, who has one leg shorter than the other and typically drives a custom Vauxhall Corsa mobility car, took full advantage: He was caught on roadside cameras 33 times in less than four hours on Aug. 7 as he reached a top speed of 150 mph and racked up more than $47,000 in speeding fines. Farah’s brother, Adnan Hashi, said the rental company went to Hashi’s hotel room and seized his passport after the fines were issued, so Hashi is stuck in Dubai until the mess can be sorted out. “There is no way he has that money,” Adnan told the BBC. “He is out of work at the minute and went to Dubai to visit friends.”

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So Many Questions When an employee of Sarabeth’s restaurant in New York City opened the walk-in freezer door on Aug. 5, a man jumped out, yelling, “Away from me, Satan!” and grabbed a knife from the kitchen, which he used to threaten restaurant staff. Carlton Henderson, 54, of Cave Creek, Ariz., struggled with workers but eventually fell unconscious and was transported to Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, the New York Post reported. Authorities don’t know (1) why and how he entered the freezer and (2) why he died, but they did determine he was charged last year with two 1988 cold-case murders in Boston. He had been released on bail the week before the freezer incident and was scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 14.

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

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n The Baltimore Sun reported that a driver’s license examiner in Glen Burnie, Md., got a whiff of something illegal on Aug. 6 when she approached a car about to be used in a driving test. She called Maryland State Police, who found Reginald D. Wooding Jr., 22, of Baltimore waiting in his mother’s car to take his test. But he never got the chance: Wooding was in possession of marijuana, a scale, more than $15,000 in suspected drug-related money and a 9mm Glock handgun with a loaded 30-round magazine.

Compelling Explanation In Bluffton, South Carolina, 32-year-old Lauren Elizabeth Cutshaw informed police officers she was a former cheerleader, sorority girl, good student and National Honor Society member after they pulled her over at 1:45 a.m. on Aug. 4 for running a stop sign at 30 mph over the speed limit. According to The Island Packet, she also told officers she shouldn’t be arrested because she’s a “very clean, thoroughbred, white girl.” She said she’d had only two glasses of wine, but then allowed, “I mean, I was celebrating my birthday.” Police arrested her anyway and booked her into the Beaufort County Detention Center.

Julie “Bella” De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

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Problem-Solver The list of offenses was long when Franklyn Williams, 32, appeared in Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Common Pleas Court on July 31 to be sentenced for aggravated robbery, kidnapping, theft, misuse of credit cards and more—including cutting off his ankle bracelet late last year and fleeing to Nebraska, where he claimed he was hit over the head and lost his memory. But it was his courtroom behavior that spurred Judge John Russo to call for an extreme measure: During the hearing, Williams would not stop talking, even interrupting his own lawyers repeatedly over about 30 minutes. Finally, Russo ordered deputies to tape the defendant’s mouth shut, reported FOX 8 in Cleveland. Williams continued to talk until deputies applied more tape, and finally Russo sentenced him to 24 years in prison.

Nerd Alert Who knew? Apparently the unofficial “uniform” for Bay Area techies and venture capital investors is a vest, so the Japanese company Uniqlo is cashing in with a vest vending machine at the San Francisco International Airport. The airport’s public information officer, Doug Yakel, says the machine is no joke; it earns $10,000 a month on average. Do the math: At $49.90 apiece, the company is selling about 200 of its ultra-light down vests each month. “This is the first time we’ve had clothing available for sale from a vending machine, which we thought was very unique,” Yakel told Business Insider.

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City Weekly August 23, 2018  

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City Weekly August 23, 2018  

Oasis Lost