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2018 BEER ISSUE

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T A U G U ST 9 , 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 5 N 0 . 1 1


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY WE HAVE THE LAGERS!

Is that a Power Sword in your pocket or are you just hoppy to see us? Cover illustration by John de Campos ghostbatart.com

23

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 12 A&E 17 DINE 47 CINEMA 49 MUSIC 60 COMMUNITY

MIKE RIEDEL

Cover package, p. 28 Much has happened since the man behind the the Utah Beer Blog started writing for us last year. Namely, an explosion of local breweries that oddly enough is cementing the Beehive as a growing microbrew leader in the American West. Cheers to that—and cheers to our resident Beer Nerd!

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

MUSIC

Commemorating the Hiroshima And the City Weekly Battle and Nagasaki bombings. of the DJs winner is ... facebook.com/slcweekly

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Get in the FAST LANE at the Utah Beer Festival by swapping your ticket for a wristband in advance. Swaps available Monday—Friday, 9a.m.-5p.m., at the City Weekly office (248 S. Main) through Friday, Aug. 17.


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BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

SOAP BOX

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET Supporting authors from @SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY “shithole” countries Cover story, July 26, The Cannabis Issue

Yay get the word out. Cannabis is medicine. Change is needed in [Utah Politics].

@CORBINC7 Via Twitter

bookedon25th.com 801-394-4891

147 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT

Certainly contained information I was unaware of and prodded me to cogitate on!

C.J. SOUTHWORTH Via Facebook

Moved out of Utah to Oregon on wait for it ... 4/20. Wasn’t on purpose. Moved for my health and husband’s job. I’m working on getting a job at a dispensary and help others in pain. Is there any chance you could mail me a hard copy of this issue. Thanks so much, always loved you guys.

@SEASICKSHEEP Via Twitter

Opinion, July 26, “The Sump Trummit”

More Trump Derangement Syndrome. Whoever [sic] wrote that article? Was probably the shit, in the room, that the fly was sitting on eating every juicy morsel of it. HAHAHA A A Liberals! PROGRESSIVE PROPAGANDA. Like they’d let anyone lower than themselves in on that conversation. [This] only proves how low the media machine will go!

DAVID MELLEN Via Facebook

Online news post, July 25, Secretary Zinke comes to Utah for the Days of ‘47 rodeo

The claim is that Zinke/ Trump’s actions will bring

@SLCWEEKLY

jobs and prosperity to the local people. Has anyone asked Mike Noel or Rob Bennett to show us a study as to how many jobs or how much prosperity comes from the great patriot and a great friend of Utah? I understand how this move will benefit Mike Noel and his ranch but how does it benefit the county in general?

SARA PITTMAN Via Facebook

Zinke needs to learn the difference between religious freedom and being free to join someone’s religion. In fact, a great many people need to learn that difference.

DUSTIN CLARK Via Facebook

Why does he have to come to Utah to tell those lies? Don’t the people of Montana want more of the piece of crap they created?

MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook

Make America a Champion of Human Rights! How we are currently treating human beings is horrendous under the trump regime.

CATHERINE MATTHEWS Via Facebook

Zinke should go back to being a geologist.

RYAN NORTHROP Via Facebook

He made it possible for the sale of public lands to the fuel industry. Everything is for sale in Trump’s America.

SARA RICHARDSON WILLIAMS Via Facebook They both suck.

DEANNA BISHOFF GARCIA Via Facebook

Online news post, July 27, MormonLeaks team puts its transparency crusade into historical context

Non too damn sacred any longer.

MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook

Mormon policy: If it is good, show it, if it is bad, don’t let anyone know it. Hide the bad but advertise, yes, proclaim anything that might be good, but work just as hard to erase the bad. Their image is more important than the lives of its members. Disgusting! When fellow Mormons kill other Mormons then you can be sure the LDS work(s) hard to make it a hushhush secret. The LDS church must be trying hard to make it a secret that John O’Connor was an active Mormon when this past Sunday [July 22] he shot up his Ward. Many articles are glaringly absent of this most unusual, unique, and very newsworthy point. Church shootings are rare, especially in the U.S., but for a member to shoot at his own fellow believers is unheard of. However, many articles seem to hide that the shooter was also a “good” Mormon. Had it been the other way around and “Bert”

shot and killed O’Connor, you can be sure the church would then glorify John O’Connor as a hero, who was a “good Mormon” that helped the community in so many areas. It is all for show, but things like this allow others to see their true colors. The crazy thing is that for many decades the Mormon church promoted the belief that black people were cursed for Cain’s murder of his brother until the “prophet” got a new vision from one of their gods that god changed his mind and blacks are not second-rate humans after all. If a fellow Mormon like O’Connor killed another fellow Mormon then maybe it is the Mormons that are cursed? 10 In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil: whosoever doeth not righteousness is not of God, neither he that loveth not his brother. 11 For this is the message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one another. 12 Not as Cain, who was of that wicked one, and slew his brother—1 John 3:10-12

WILLIAM KELLY

Via cityweekly.net We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, DARBY DOYLE, HOWARD HARDEE, RICH KANE, CASEY KOLDEWYN, ASPEN PERRY, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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OPINION Crafting Culture

It’s no secret times are a-changin’ in the quirky, green jello-loving state we all call home. And while construction cranes signal changes on the skyline, hops and barley might herald a broader cultural shift, as craft beer appears to be teasing more palates and opening more minds. From dispelling the myth women don’t like beer to doubling down on Utah’s counter-culture, the burgeoning local craft-beer scene is generating the kind of posititve news our little mountain town desperately needs. Prior to my stint as a server at Fiddler’s Elbow with some 20 microbrews on tap, I didn’t much care for beer—though to be fair, who actually enjoys shotgunning a warm Natty Light? Tasting microbrews and having them explained by brewmaster Al Dieffenbach helped me step up my beer game, and truly appreciate the art of creating craft beer. Had it not been for my time there, I, too, might have written myself off as just another female who preferred a wine buzz. The reality was I just hadn’t met a beer I liked. Despite the majority of beer ads targeting male consumers (especially at the mass production level), I’m far from being the first female beer convert. If anything, I’ve yet to take my brew-love to the next level. Such is the case for Julia Shuler, president of the local Pink Boots Society chapter and brewery assistant at Strap Tank Brewing Co. Similar to the path of other women I’ve chatted up, Shuler realized beer wasn’t just for the boys when she started home brewing. Through Pink Boots Society, Shuler now

BY ASPEN PERRY helps other women realize their potential in the widening world of local craft beer. In better acquainting myself with Utah’s beer scene— beyond the realm of consumption—I was surprised to discover both the existence and popularity of ladies-only drinking groups. Whether women wish to master home brewing with the Hop Bombshells, expand craft careers with Pink Boots Society, or sip the night away with Salt City Girls Pint Out and Barley’s Angels, the options for female bonding aren’t your mother’s book club. Discovering the existence of these groups warmed my cold heart, especially considering bonding with friends is what lured me into beer drinking in the first place. Growing up with a bit of a rebellious streak naturally lent itself to trying beer at an age I won’t divulge in print. And I didn’t drink it for the taste. My B.C. (before craft) years, consisted of sneaking beers in the garage of a friend’s house and playing the card game, “Presidents and Assholes,” until dawn—a game that, above all, taught me the slightest bit of power goes straight to your head. Throughout college, my crew and I favored Desert Edge Pub, initially for the half-priced student pitchers, and in the end for their bravery in replacing porters and stouts on nitro for lighter ambers and ryes during the spring and summer months. At the time, it seemed as though we were part of a small population of hopped-up sinners in our Salt Valley suburb, a belief that followed me into my 30s. It wasn’t until looking over statistics on the Brewers Association website that I became aware of just how much Utahns drink on an annual basis, indulging in more than 206,000 barrels in 2017.

I was even more shocked to learn Utah ranks 17th in the nation for gallons consumed per adult. With more breweries expected to open before the end of the year, there will be more opportunities for Utah to transform its reputation as home to a few thirsty gentiles into a craft beer mecca. Interestingly, in contrast of our top 20 spot for partaking, our breweries per capita remains low (ranking 44th in the nation), meaning there’s plenty of room for Utah’s beer scene to grow. Nicole Dicou, the new executive director of Utah Brewers Guild, is excited about the current buzz surrounding the Beehive’s beer scene. During a recent phone chat, Dicou discussed the projected population growth and the potential for folks already in the beer industry, as well as those contemplating throwing their hats in the ring, especially in regard to females interested in further exploring craft careers—crafts that don’t involve a hot glue gun, that is. “There’s a lot of opportunities to get in from the ground floor and really make your mark,” Dicou rejoiced—while my exuberance might have been from the voices in my head, shouting, “Must get paid to drink beer!” Regardless, if the merriment was Dicou’s, my own, or both of our minds syncing across the same cosmic brainwave, one thing is clear: Tasty and creative craft concoctions are changing the way neighboring states view our celestial town. More importantly, the brew might just be altering the way we see ourselves. CW

Aspen Perry is an SLC-based aspiring author, beer enthusiast and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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Join HEAL Utah in its effort to get out the vote and change the world. Yes, you! Don’t fall for the line that voting doesn’t matter because it obviously does. Every vote should count, but if you don’t exercise your constitutional right, then it won’t count. HEAL is one of many organizations focusing on voter registration before the midterms. If you can’t make it to HEAL’s There’s a Lot at Stake: Register to Vote, they’re at almost every popular event—concerts, festivals, lectures. You also can register on many websites including rockthevote.org. In the primaries, voter turnout was a pitiful 29 percent. Guess who gets to make the decisions? It’s the people who vote. Patagonia Outlet, 2292 S. Highland Drive, 801-355-5055, Saturday, Aug. 11, noon-4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2LTEPkc.

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Did you know that during the 1980s, an estimated 100,000 elephants were killed each year, and up to 80 percent of herds were lost in some regions? The World Wildlife organization calls this a risk of extinction. Come hear Kartick Satyanarayan and Geeta Seshamani, co-founders of Wildlife SOS, a wildlife conservation group based in India. They helped put an end to the country’s weird dancing bear practice and at the same time advanced social-welfare issues. At this Wildlife SOS public lecture, they will speak about how Hogle Zoo has become an important piece of worldwide wildlife conservation practices. “Their important work continues as they now focus on shaping a new national ethos of elephant care and conservation while continuing their wildlife rescue operations across the country,” the event’s website says. Hogle Zoo, Conservation Resource Center, 2575 E. Wasatch Drive, 801-584-1700, Monday, Aug. 13, 7-8:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2OEoc9D.

TAKE ACTION AT CAPITOL HILL

You live in Utah, so what better way to affect change than to get involved with your local representatives? Action Utah takes you on an Interim Tour & Talk: Civic Engagement on the Hill and Beyond to help you understand what the hell is going on in the name of the people. You’ll get Civil Engagement 101 training, tips and tools to impact policy decisions and an overview of Interim Session. This is often where the real decisions are made—before the annual legislative session begins. Bring a sack lunch. You’ll enjoy the action and find that it’s really not all that difficult to be a citizen activist. Utah State Capitol, 350 N. State, Wednesday, Aug. 15, noon-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2OHOnMT.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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Sour Taste

Just about everyone—except readers of the Deseret News— know about the bait-andswitch tactics of Taste of the Wasatch. This is a public event where people pay a lot to eat and drink a lot and support those who aren’t eating enough. Proceeds from the event have gone to Utahns Against Hunger, which describes itself as “Utah’s only statewide anti-hunger non-profit organization working on public policy and advocacy for federal nutrition programs.” Not this time. The Salt Lake Tribune reported that UAH got stiffed out of some $50,000 last year. That’s because 3 Squares executive director Karen Zabriskie wanted to fund some cute little children’s cooking classes, but the effort failed, and Zabriskie decided to keep on trying by using proceeds from Taste. Some donors and providers who feel deceived withdrew from last week’s event, while others are pledging directly to UAH. Zabriskie, who makes more than $42,000, needs to rethink her priorities.

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Maybe you’re not a math genius and the carbon tax idea is a bit much to digest. But let’s talk capitalism and the Utah Way. The plan is to tax pollution with “a fee on the production, distribution or use of fossil fuels based on how much carbon their combustion emits,” according to How Stuff Works. You pay more if you pollute ... so maybe you don’t pollute. You’d think this was a cool idea in a state that won’t shut down polluters and encourages coal production. Even U.S. Rep. Mia Love has become a darling of the Citizens Climate Lobby, voting against anti-carbon tax legislation. But then there’s the Utah Taxpayers Association and Billy Hesterman who warned in a Trib editorial that Utah citizens will be, boo-hoo, paying more for their energy. The carbon tax just encourages people to make good decisions.

Ports and Trade Wars

The Deseret News’ Jay Evensen is at it again, though we’re not quite sure what he’s getting at. He does say proudly that he supports the Inland Port and he favors free trade, and ain’t it all great? Then he takes a swipe at Inland Port opponents, saying they’re ignoring Donald Trump’s trade war, which would hurt the port. Evensen goes off on a partisan rant, blaming Democrats and bringing in Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton. Like they have any sway in the debate! We think he’s saying that port opponents are the same people who should oppose the trade wars. But wait. He wants them to run off to Washington, D.C., to tell the president they don’t like his trade war? Or is he pointing out some weird hypocrisy? Evensen thinks the port would be a boon to Utah—despite the pollution, traffic and wildlife and wetlands destruction. And that’s what opponents are opposing.

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NEWS

R E A L E S TAT E

House Hunting

The five most expensive houses in Utah all have one thing in common: dead animals.

BY RICH KANE comments@cityweekly.net @rkane29

A

Woodland Woodsplosion

Price: $25 million Location: 8272 E. Left Hand Fork Hobble Creek, Springville. What you get: six beds, 12 baths and 49,568 square feet on 165 acres. Fun fact: It’s actually super cheap! “PRICE HAS BEEN SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED FOR A QUICK SALE!” the listing says, and yeah, in all caps. How rich is rich?: “Plenty of room to build your own equestrian facility.” So, pretty rich. Décor: Must-have domestic staples your friends already have, like a lazy river, a spa, a sauna, a movie theater, a bowling alley and an indoor basketball court. Of the Frou-Frou Five, this is the most elaborate of the bunch—imagine living in what Rihanna wore to the Met Gala. There are giant chandeliers everywhere, as well as an Egyptian sarcophagus and an armored knight in the main entryway, so the owner is either way into history or way into cosplay. Animal body count: There’s an entire room filled with carnage: a marlin, a school of fish, two moose, at least six deer and one ram.

Price: $19.5 million Location: 1886 S. Geneva Road, Orem. What you get: nine beds, 20 baths and 21,988 square feet on a freeway-close 20 acres. Fun fact: “It began as one family’s dream to create a place where memories could be made to last a lifetime,” the property’s listing reads. Must’ve been a dream deferred, since the place was only built in 2003 and has been on the market for nearly three years. Also, with a whopping 20 bathrooms, you could shit in a different toilet every day for three weeks (#lifegoals). How rich is rich?: A boathouse, a motocross course with a maintenance shop, the largest private grove of Sequoia trees in Utah (they’ve got wood) and a pond with trophysized fish to make up for your lack of … size. Also a “little red schoolhouse,” a flashback to a long-ago era before the librul godless commies took over public edumacation. Décor: Lots of wood and stone, but not terribly ostentatious. It’s the million-dollar home for the 99 percent! The main house also has a nickname: The Barn. How cute! How gross! Animal body count: Surprisingly no animal heads, possibly a nod to the property’s more urban locale. There are lovely rooster sculptures adorning the interiors, though. Consider your holiday shopping done early! CW

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 11

Price: $30 million Location: “Southeast of Mount Pleasant in Central Utah.” So it’s hidden, like the Bat Cave. What you get: The Bear Mountain Ranch, with six beds, seven baths and 8,424 square feet on 7,973 acres. That’s 12 square miles. Perfect for hiding from the zombie apocalypse … until it’s not! Fun fact: The home is “built with massive logs” that “makes you feel you are in the heart of the Old West.” Or on fire. Seriously, one photo of the place is so overlit that it looks like the house is fully engulfed. How rich is rich?: There are “exceptional trophy elk and

Provo-Orem Pony Palace-Priced to Sell!

Spacious Shitter-Upper

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Ritzy Zombie Enclave

deer hunting opportunities,” so you can enjoy the lush scenery and be out in nature … and kill it. Décor: The kitchen lights are antler-shaped. There are moose antler lights in a bedroom, along with a bearskin rug with its head attached. Animal body count: One living room has a whopping six deer heads—or Bambi’s mom adorning the walls. There’s also one lonely-looking antelope.

Price: $30 million Location: 4343 E. Weber Canyon Road, Kamas. What you get: eight beds, nine baths and 16,800 square feet on 1,918 acres. Fun fact: It features “forged custom ironwork, mostly created on an Amish farm.” The beards, the lo-fi aesthetic … those sneaky Amish are the original hipsters. How rich is rich?: “Land your helicopter on the helipad,” the listing says. Helicopter sold separately. Décor: It’s right on the Weber River, so close you could get wet with a decent runoff. Also a wine room, home theater … yup, wood everywhere. Animal body count: A deer skull on the wall, a deer head overlooking a cavernous living room, a deer head over a fireplace and a deer head in the barn. You will develop in intense craving for venison.

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Alluring Amish Abode

Price: $19.9 million Location: 1943 N. Wolf Creek Ranch Road, Woodland. What you get: eight beds, 11 baths and 17,861 square feet on 320 acres. Fun fact: The estate, called Wolf Creek Ranch, comes with a pond stocked with rainbow trout, so you can go fishing anytime you like. But since they’re your fish, you could just skip all that time-consuming nonsense and just mow them down with an AR-15. How rich is rich?: There’s a big movie theater so you can watch NatGeo docs instead of going outside and deal with real nature. Also, there’s a barn with a parked snowplow—or is that where the servants sleep? Décor: Wood everywhere! A woodsplosion! Weirdly, though, we noticed a portable air conditioner in one room, with a hose running out the window. Really? For $20 mil, this shack had better come with central A/C. Animal body count: One ginormous deer head in a living room. And mounted antlers in the bathroom, which you hope are nailed securely to the wall, because you don’t want those falling on you when you’re getting out of the shower.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

pparently there’s an unwritten law among Utah’s uber-rich that if you own a house worth zillions, then you absolutely must have the head of a dead animal mounted on one of your walls. Or several dead animals on several walls. That’s what we gleaned from flipping through the online photos of what are currently Utah’s five most-expensive properties, according to UtahRealEstate.com. The estates range from a pair of $30-million palaces to a nearly $20-million ranch. No word if you can buy one using Apple Pay. Also common is a design aesthetic that can be described as “rustic hipster chic,” which is basically wood, wood and more wood. Here, we break down the Frou-Frou Five. (All listing information taken from Utah Real Estate. Snark provided by the author.)


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Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

FRIDAY 8/10

FRIDAY 8/10

SATURDAY 8/11

These days, it’s difficult to find many areas of common ground between Russia and the U.S.—other than the bromance shared by their respective presidents. However, it’s interesting that the 1812 Overture evokes such patriotic pride for both nations. Written in 1880 by composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, the composition commemorated Russia’s defeat of Napoleon’s French army in 1812. When it debuted in 1882, it was ceremoniously pronounced Russia’s new national anthem, and though it went through various permutations over the years, it returned to prominence after the fall of the Soviet Union. It’s also become one of America’s unofficial Independence Day theme songs, a tradition that started in 1974 when Arthur Fiedler included it in a July 4 Boston Pops performance. That “dada dada dada dum dum dum” refrain is now an indelible part of the classical music hit parade, prompting rock renditions, film-score sequences and even an intro to the video game Farscape. “Deer Valley Music Festival audiences have, by popular demand, made our 1812 Overture concert an annual tradition,” says Toby Tolokan, the symphony’s vice president of artistic planning. “While other orchestras may program a shortened version, our audience will hear every note composed by Tchaikovsky in a truly complete performance. And, thanks to Cannoneers of the Wasatch, the audience will also experience the thundering cannon shots that Tchaikovsky wrote into the grand finale.” Tolokan also notes that Ben Beilman, a violinist who has earned acclaim with other orchestras, makes his Utah Symphony debut with this latest rendition. (Lee Zimmerman) Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture @ Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, Aug. 5, $15-$75, deervalleymusicfestival.org

Salt Lake City is a complicated place, and people intimately familiar with the city often have complex relationships with it. Craft Lake City’s DIY Festival is all about this synergy—channeling what’s already inspiring about SLC into an even more beautiful, diverse and creative place. The DIY Festival was founded 10 years ago by SLUG Magazine Executive Editor Angela Brown. As she says, “It’s not just me. It’s the community. It’s people who have loved the festival, who have attended, who have wanted to be part of something bigger than themselves and to encourage the creative community that wants to thrive here in Utah.” Anyone is invited to be part of the DIY community, whether as new artisans brought on board via the festival’s mentorship program or those who have attended for years. A sponsored-family program will help folks with attendance costs, and Kid Row targets young artisans’ creativity. At the West Elm Workshop Area, after reserving space in advance online, anyone can learn new crafting skills and take home a few creations they put together themselves. Partnering with several local artistans, workshops include botanical watercolors with Laura Muir, journal making with the University of Utah’s Book Arts Program, and sun-printed cyanotypes with photographer Chris Blackburn. Be part of the community making SLC a place we can all be proud of. “We have an incredible pool of beautiful, interesting and unique individuals here that are doing unique and interesting things,” Brown says. “I want someone of that mindset to come [to the festival] and think, ‘Maybe Utah is different.’” (Casey Koldewyn) DIY Festival @ Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Aug. 10, 5 p.m.-10 p.m.; Aug. 11, noon-10 p.m.; Aug. 12, noon-7 p.m., $5-$26, craftlakecity.com

On her most recent comedy CD, 2017’s I Am Not the Hero of This Story—recorded just a few months into the Trump administration—Jackie Kashian (pronounced KAY-shen) recounts that much of her originally planned jokes went out the window. “I don’t do political material,” Kashian says, “but I do now, I guess, because I’m human. Because I’m alive, and in America. … Did anyone else call it that we would be the bad guys in World War III?” That ability to re-invent herself and adapt to a changing world is part of what has allowed Kashian to enjoy a career in comedy for 30 years, including four full-length recordings, multiple appearances on late-night talk shows and a Comedy Central special. She was even an early player in the comedy podcast game, and is now in her 13th year of recording The Dork Forest, in which she brings on celebrity guests—including fellow comedians and comedy writers like Karen Rontowski, Mike Drucker and Al Madrigal—to discuss their most cherished obsessions, from music to games to weird mythology. Still, it’s at the stand-up game that the Milwaukee native excels, using personal storytelling to find the laughs in everything from sexual experimentation to impending menopause to her grandmother’s survival of the Armenian genocide. But she’s at her best when skewering herself, including her relatively late marriage and subsequent unlikelihood of having babies: “I have, like, four eggs left, and they’re marinating in extra chromosomes. … We are not what Jeff Goldblum was thinking of when he said, ‘Life finds a way.’” (Scott Renshaw) Jackie Kashian @ Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Aug. 10-11, 8 p.m., $15, wiseguyscomedy.com

1812 Overture

Craft Lake City DIY Festival

Jackie Kashian

DEBRA HURST

JAKE VIVORI

RENEE HUANG

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, AUG. 9-15, 2018

MICHAEL HELMS

ESSENTIALS

the

SATURDAY 8/11

Salt Lake City Pagan Pride Festival In an interview with City Weekly leading up to last year’s Salt Lake City Pagan Pride, festival director Debra Hurst noted the ongoing challenges of erasing misconceptions about paganism, especially in a state as steeped in mainstream religion as Utah. Nevertheless, she’s been able to identify a gradual shift in people becoming more tolerant. “I’ve seen positive change,” Hurst says this time around. “More and more people are coming out of the closet, so to speak. When I’m teaching a class, there are those questions that will come up: ‘I’ve heard that [paganism] was this.’ Things do get twisted around. But over the last few years, I’ve had less of that type of questioning.” Education—both for those who are curious about exploring earth-centered spirituality themselves, and for those who just want to be better-informed—is one component of the annual Pagan Pride Festival, but certainly not the only one. Thirty vendors offer a wide range of items and supplies, practitioners conduct workshops and worship services, and live music and spoken-word performances provide entertainment. Most important, however, is the chance to show visitors of all kinds that “pagan” doesn’t need to be a dirty word. “People need to realize, we’re just like they are,” Hurst says. “We just think outside the box. And sometimes it’s very hard for people to think outside a box. … But I got a really cool message from someone last year, saying, ‘Thank you very much for the opportunity that I learned so much more than I did before.’” (SR) Utah Pagan Pride Festival @ Liberty Park, 600 East 900 South, Aug. 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free; non-perishable donations to Utah Food Bank and Humane Society of Northern Utah appreciated, saltlakecitypaganpride.org


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BOOKS

Beer-fore and After

A&E

The author of Beer in the Beehive discusses the local brewery boom in the decade since his book. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

Where did the idea to do the book originally come from?

The two major reasons for doing the book were 1. I like beer, and, 2. I like history. When I found out there was actually a history of brewing in the state of Utah—when most people think you can’t even get an alcoholic beverage, let alone produce alcohol—I was amazed. So I just started digging around, looking at old papers and old photographs, and started to find out some of the actual history of the brewing industry here. I was just amazed to find out how big it was.

What happened to these businesses during Prohibition?

Businesses that had been around for 100 years were suddenly gone in a day. … The ones that did survive had a little bit of a head start [when Prohibition was repealed], had the equipment, the recipes and the know-how for getting the product out into the market. Most mothballed their breweries and went into an entirely different kind of business. Fisher went into real estate; Becker went into poultry and pork products. Those were the only two that survived Prohibition in Utah, and when Prohibition ended, they had the most success until the resurgence of the craft breweries.

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Del Vance, owner of the Beerhive Pub, wrote about the history of brewing in Utah in his book Beer in the Beehive, originally published in 2006 with a revised second edition in 2008. A lot has changed in the local beer economy in the intervening decade, so we sat down with Vance to ask about the book, and how local brewing has evolved.

What was the initial response to the book?

The first edition sold out quickly, and then there were so many breweries opening, by the time I finished the first one, there were already three more breweries. Then I did a second edition in 2008, and that one’s already completely out of date, with so many more breweries and distilleries. It was not even 15 years ago, and it’s already completely out of date. So you can get it at a good rate now; I’m selling it at a hot price.

If you’re honest with yourself, could you see this surge in local craft breweries coming?

At first I thought, like everybody else, that it was just a trend. Like most fads, it would kind of go away. Then after everybody kept saying that, but more breweries kept opening, and the craft beer market was growing 30 percent per year and the big domestic breweries were having negative growth, then I started thinking, maybe it isn’t a fad. The business plans are different now. The guys who opened Fisher, they haven’t sold anything off-premises yet. Their emphasis

is selling it right there and enjoying it right there at the brewery. That’s the new trend. There’s also a trend not to offer food, so the race is to see who can get the best food truck to park at their brewery.

What were the key changes to make this kind of growth in local craft brewing possible?

I’ve seen some articles where the Mormon population is slowly declining. But most of the growth is coming at the expense of the big guys: Bud, Coors, Miller. Their sales are declining, and craft beer is increasing. Some of it might have to do with more drinkers, but I think it’s more that the people who do drink are just drinking better. They’re tired of Wonder Bread beer. It’s fun to explore how many different types of beer there are. For years, there was one type, and then the craft breweries came along, and people were like, “My God, beer actually has flavor.”

Like with coffee, is it a factor that American’s tastes have gotten more sophisticated?

There were always good restaurants, and

Author and pub owner Del Vance

there was always good coffee, but it was always targeted at an upscale market. Now, all of those high-end local cuisines, breweries, coffees are targeting everybody. They figured out that charging a lot doesn’t mean you’re necessarily going to make a lot more money. In years past, if you wanted a high-end alcohol, you had to pay a ton of money for it. Now there’s so much competition, it brings down the price.

If you were going to do a new edition of your book now, what area would you focus on to emphasize what has changed in the last decade?

Well, first of all, it would be the size of the freaking Yellow Pages—there are so many breweries. And it would be out of date within another couple of months after printing it. But the main emphasis now is local and quality. People like supporting their local businesses. And beer is best fresh—it’s not like wine or liquor, where you want it to age. It’s kind of like going to the bakery where the bread is baked—it’s so much better when it’s fresh. CW


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Utah Symphony: The Music of Pink Floyd Deer Valley Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Aug. 11, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Brad Williams Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Aug. 10-11, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Front Row Film Roast: National Treasure Brewvies, 677 S. 200 West, Aug. 11, 10 p.m., brewvies.com Jackie Kashian Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Aug. 10-11, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 12) Todd Johnson Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Aug. 10-11, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Artist Cindy McConkie employs digitally enhanced photography to explore the joy of running— in a world where that liberating experience diminishes with age, sedentary lifestyle or change in abilities—in Run Happy at Day-Riverside Library (1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, slcpl.org), through Sept. 12, with an artist reception on Thursday, Aug. 9, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Annie Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, hct.org Disney’s Newsies Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, hct.org The Drag An Other Theater Co., Provo Towne Centre, second floor, 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through Aug. 18, dates and times vary, anothertheatercompany.com Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival The Gateway, 400 W. 100 South, through Aug. 12, dates and times vary, greatsaltlakefringe.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Sandy Amphitheater, 9400 S. 1300 East, Sandy, through Aug. 11, 8 p.m., sandyarts.org My Boy Pinocchio Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 8, dates and

times vary, hct.org Oliver! Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, Aug. 10-Sept. 1, dates and times vary, zigarts.com Othello Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur 2018 Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 2, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Thoroughly Modern Millie Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Aug. 24, dates vary, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org Wait Until Dark CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, centerpointtheatre.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture and Violin Concerto Deer Valley Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 12)

Bill Humbert: Employee 5.0: Secrets Of A Successful Job Search In The New World Order Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Aug. 11, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Emily R. King: The Warrior Queen Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, Aug. 14, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Mary E. Pearson: Dance of Thieves The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 9, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jason Heller: Strange Stars Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Aug. 12, 4 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Cache Valley Gardeners’ Market Historic Cache County Courthouse, 199 N. Main, Logan, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., gardenersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco.org Park City Farmers Market Silver King Resort, 1845 Empire Ave., Park City, Wednesdays through Oct. 25, parkcityfarmersmarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market Main Street, Park City, Sundays through Sept. 23, parksillysundaymarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, Wednesdays through September, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays through Oct. 17, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm.

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Craft Lake City DIY Festival Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Aug. 10, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 11, noon10 p.m.; Aug. 12, noon-7 p.m., craftlakecity.com (see p. 12) Sandy City Hot Air Balloon Festival Storm Mountain Park, 11400 S. 1000 East, Sandy, Aug. 10-11, 6 a.m.-10 a.m., sandy.utah.gov Pagan Pride Festival Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Aug. 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., saltlakecitypaganpride.org (see p. 12) Science of Invention Festival Natural History

Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-5816927, Aug. 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu Yappy Hour Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Aug. 15, 6-9 p.m., slc.gov

TALKS & LECTURES

Scott Graham & Chip Ward: Fiction as a Force for the Environment The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Anne Gregerson & Elizabeth Crowe: The Nature of Clay Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 10, accessart.org Building Blocks: Arts & Letters Draw Inc. Gallery, 752 Sixth Ave., through Aug. 10, drawinc.org Buster Graybill: Informalism UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 8, utahmoca.org Chiura Obata: An American Modern Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Sept. 2, umfa.utah.edu Cindy McConkie: Run Happy Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Sept. 12; artist reception Aug. 9, 6:30-7:30 p.m., slcpl.org (see left) Concentrated Curated Mess: A Visual Study of the Accumulation, Arranging, and Layering of Seemingly Random Things Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, through Aug. 12, downtownartistcollective.org Denise Duong J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, through Aug. 27, jgogallery.com Erin Westenskow Berrett: Reclaimed Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Sept. 2, kimballartcenter.com Etsuko Kato: I am ... Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 10, accessart.org Face of Utah Sculpture XIV Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Aug. 29, culturalcelebration.org Hot! Hot! Hot! Summer Group Show Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Aug. 10, artatthemain.com Jennifer Rasmusson: New Abstracts “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Aug. 18, agalleryonline.com Jim Woodward: A Celebration of Light and Color Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Aug. 13, localcolorsart.com Lauren K. Woodward: Movement, Balance and Refracted Light Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Aug. 18, slcpl.org Lego City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Lucia Volker: Temporary Solution Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 10, accessart.org Nathan Mulford: Reflections on Bonneville Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Aug. 10, accessart.org Pia E. Van Nuland: A Second Moon Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, through Aug. 10, evolutionaryhealthcare.com Postmodernposh Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Aug. 31, heritage.utah.gov Recent Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Sept. 7, heritage.utah.gov Sel Heidel 777: China Minoyki Art Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Aug. 30, slcpl.org Summer Group Show Phllips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Sept. 14, phillips-gallery.com West: The Effect of Land and Space Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through Aug. 31, modernwestfineart.com Working Hard to Be Useless UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org


NIKI CHAN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Friday, noon-midnight Saturday, 11 a.m.- midnight Sunday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Best bet: The Tap House Burger Can’t miss: The tart lime parfait

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 17

The space is yet another testament to Evans’ unique conceptual eye: It combines elegance with accessibility, the sum total of which is an unexpected sense of calm that hits you the moment you walk in—or stay out, if patio seating is more your thing. Both are cozy options for those in need of some craft brews or locally

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ELTH opened at the tail end of 2014, and since then, it has been a welcome spot for neighborhood visitors and residents alike. It’s owned and operated by Scott Evans, whose fingerprints can be found within distinguished SLC restaurants like Hub & Spoke, Finca and Pago, ELTH’s neighbor to the north.

G

iven the fact that 9th & 9th is one of Salt Lake’s trendiest neighborhoods, it’s surprising that a place like East Liberty Tap House (850 E. 900 South, 801441-2845, eastlibertytaphouse.com) didn’t open decades ago. Perhaps the proper stars (and zoning laws) had to align, but the established hipness of 9th & 9th was definitely missing something without a dedicated pub fitting snugly within the area’s trendy aesthetic.

posset—which Google tells me has its origins in a hot British drink that consists of milk curdled with spiced wine—topped with plump macerated strawberries and an almond brownbutter crumble. It’s a gorgeously composed ombré of flavors, starting with tart lime, tempered with the sweet strawberries and capped off by the brown butter crumble. My biggest beef with this dessert was that it comes cruelly packaged in the tiniest mason jar I’ve ever seen. Despite a few minor speed bumps, ELTH remains the gastropub that 9th and 9th has needed for a long time, and it’s become a classic neighborhood staple. It’s got a solid menu, a rotating list of craft beers and an extensive selection of hard ciders, making it the perfect spot for a bite to eat before taking in a flick at the Tower, or a quick lunch amid a day full of shopping. CW

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East Liberty Tap House is the gastropub 9th & 9th deserves.

duo of pork and beef. Instead, the burger had a spongy texture, and the heat arrived independent of the flavor, both of which threw me a little. For future reference, I’ll stick with the Tap House Burger ($12), which is a solid representation of a hamburger’s natural grace. On the taco side of town, things are a bit more vibrant. ELTH is all about a minimalist approach, and nothing quite reflects that like the chicken tacos ($11): two flour tortillas stuffed with gobs of delectable marinated chicken that pack a sidearm of spice. On top of this flavorful foundation, a housemade pico of cubed jícama and watermelon radish was piled high. The radish on the chorizo burger was a nice change of pace, but it makes these chicken tacos absolutely sing. The dish comes with a generous portion of tortilla chips sprinkled with cotija cheese, and it made me eager to try out the other Mexican-inspired dishes on the menu. Once diners have satisfied their hunger for burgers and tacos, the dessert menu at is definitely worth a look. The sweltering summer heat had me in the mood for something light and chilled, so I went with the lime parfait ($5). It starts with a lime

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Tap That

sourced pub fare. The small-plates section of the menu has dispensed with popular items like popcorn and chicken wings for the time being, making room for more complex bites like shrimp ceviche ($12) and crispy pork lettuce wraps ($11). As skipping the salad section of a menu is pretty onbrand for me, I dove right into the large-plates. It’s a realm dominated by burgers and tacos, which is always a good sign. I opted for the chorizo burger ($15), because combining my most beloved of Mexican sausages with the customization options of a burger gave me the vapors. The burger arrived on a small cookie sheet, three quarters of which was piled high with handcut fries. I appreciate a place that doesn’t skimp on the fries as a side, and ELTH does not disappoint. The mammoth portion was nicely complemented with two dipping options—ketchup and a tasty peppercorn aioli. The burger itself was a bit of a mixed bag. Don’t get me wrong, these guys know what they’re doing, but seeing chorizo before burger on the menu had me expecting a patty that was going to melt in my mouth with a juicy


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER

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Buy one entree

Wasatch International Food Festival

For three years, The Wasatch International Food Festival has brought some of Utah’s finest purveyors of international cuisine into the limelight. The festival prides itself on being a celebration of food in all its iterations— not only can attendees sample dishes from all over the world thanks to vendors like Mama Africa, Curry Pizza and Namash Swahili Cuisine, but professional chefs teach culinary demos. If kimchi and mofongo strike your fancy but you’ve lacked the courage to tackle them at home, let these demos guide your gastronomic awakening. A lineup of local musicians complement each dish with music from around the world—from reggae to hair metal. Tickets are available at foodfestutah.org and cost $5 for adults. A “tasty ticket” is $20 and includes a souvenir tumbler and access to the festival’s secret menu. The event takes place at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center (1355 W. 3100 South) on Friday, Aug. 10 (5 p.m-10 p.m.) and Saturday, Aug. 11 (noon.-8 p.m.).

Second Annual Tacofest

On its own, the average taco has the power to bring joy to one hungry soul. When this power is harnessed for the good of a program like Meals on Wheels, miracles can happen. Salt Lake’s second annual Tacofest raised $7,500 for Meals on Wheels last year, and the event celebrating everyone’s favorite filled tortilla is back. This year’s vendors include taco champions like Chronic Tacos, Jurassic Street Tacos and Asadero Rio Sonora. Tickets are only $5—they can be purchased via Eventbrite—and kids’ tickets are free. Not only can attendees answer the often-asked question “how many tacos can I actually eat,” but they’ll help Meals on Wheels provide food for underprivileged families. It all happens at the Mexican Civic Center (155 S. 600 West) from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 11.

Prost!

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A LA MAISON

@captainspringer

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Breakfast with the Birds

Tracy Aviary’s Bird Feeder Café (589 E. 1300 South, 801-596-8500, tracyaviary.org) is a bit underplayed, but the place is well worth a visit. It’s also the backdrop for the 14th annual Breakfast with the Birds, a fundraiser for the aviary’s education department, which teaches local children how to develop curiosity and compassion for our hollow-boned friends. The event includes a tasty breakfast buffet, an exclusive bird show, live music and access to the general aviary exhibits. Purchase tickets on the aviary website; adults are $40, children are $15, and toddlers two and under get in free. The breakfast is Saturday, Aug. 11, from 8-10:30 a.m. It’s a great way help maintain Tracy Aviary’s community outreach programs that help hundreds of local children foster a love and respect for our environment. Quote of the Week: “When it’s done properly, taco should be a verb.” –Jonathan Gold Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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Craft your own pizza

In Utah!

Organic & home made ingredients prepared fresh daily Vegan & gluten free options and classic pizzas available Order online currypizzautah.com WEST VALLEY 2927 SOUTH 5600 WEST (801) 890-0415

SOUTHERN UTAH 125 NORTH STATE RD. 24 BICKNELL, UT 84715

This Sandy restaurant celebrates Asian street food by preparing a cultural mixtape of dishes from across the continent. A heaping bowl of laksa—a curry-based soup, playing with a heartier, almost stew-like texture—is a great place to start. Perhaps the most intriguing item on the menu is gulai kambing, which consists of yellow curry served with bone-in chunks of goat meat. Starter items such as Martabak telur (a square pancake stuffed with scallions, ground beef and eggs) transport the diner to a Singaporean market. The thoughtfully crafted menu allows hardcore foodies and casual diners to bond with Asian street delicacies. 33 E. 11400 South, Sandy, 801-251-0967, makanmakansandy.com

Cucina Deli

This quaint gourmet deli in the Avenues offers a wide selection of inventive pasta, fruit and veggie salads, fresh sandwiches and entrées including bourbon salmon and pepper steak. The store also carries imported chocolate, cheese and candy. Among Cucina’s specialties are Thai beef salad, chicken scaloppine, lamb burgers, linguini carbonara, crab cakes, confit duck tostada and macaroni and cheese with roasted jalapeños and smoked bacon. Cucina makes it easy to dine in or take out, with its “executive” box lunches to go. 1026 E. Second Ave., 801-322-3055, cucinadeli.com

Spitz

You’d be nuts not to try Spitz’ street-cart döner, which is available as a sandwich with focaccia or as a lavash wrap, with a choice of beef and lamb, chicken, falafel, mixed meats or veggies. The restaurant’s beef and lamb shawarma-style mixture is outstanding: perfectly spiced and generously portioned. Ditto for the falafel. It’s a popular destination no matter the time of day. When you visit, order from the excellent selection of craft cocktails, sangria, wine or beer right off the bat, because you might be there awhile. The service is very friendly, and the vibe is funky and fun, with eclectic music. Multiple locations, spitzslc.com

STORE

★★★★★

Argentine Corner

Tucked away in Clearfield behind a car-inspection station and a barber shop is this gem specializing in home-style Argentine cuisine. Back when the restaurant first opened in 2005, they had a maximum capacity of 12. But don’t worry, they can now accommodate many more. Once you’ve cozied up to a table, tuck in to one of their many family recipes like milanesa and empanadas. Their chimichurri sauce is revered and not to be missed—luckily, it’s incorporated into many dishes. It might take a little time to find, but once you’ve discovered Argentine Corner, you’ll know exactly where to go for your South American fix. 442 N. Main, Clearfield, 801-773-9909, argentinecorner.com

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM


LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

KING BUFFET

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Contemporary Japanese Dining

L U N C H B U F F E T • D I N N E R B U F F E T • S U N D AY A L L D AY B U F F E T TEL: 801.969.6666 5668 S REDWOOD RD TAYLORSVILLE, UT

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 21

TEL: 801.960.9669 123 S. STATE OREM, UT

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CHINESE SEAFOOD | SUSHI | MONGOLIAN


MARGARIT AS!

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22 | AUGUST 9, 2018

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

TACO

YS! TUESDntAow n

$ *Only at dow - close 3pm location |

123 E 200 S 801-355-0343 Salt Lake City

1891 Fort Union Blvd 885 E 3900 S 801-942-1333 801-269-1177 Cottonwood Heights Murray

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm & Fri-Sat 11am-10pm | www.MyCancunCafe.com

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

AUG 10TH

paul Boruff

AUG 11TH

crossfire

ALEX SPRINGER

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

Vertical Diner

I used to believe that vegan food was flavorless and unimaginative, but my first visit to Vertical Diner changed that perception. Rookies are going to want to hang out in the burger section of the menu. The Ian MacKaye ($10) is my personal favorite—a patty made from lentils topped with grilled mac and “cheese,” served with lettuce, tomato and onions. It’s a prime example of the decadence and restraint that Vertical Diner does so well. Once you’ve built up enough of an appetite, consider summiting The Mountain ($10.25), a glorious food pile of hash browns, grilled peppers and onions, along with the diner’s famous tofu scramble, topped off with “cheese” sauce and a choice of grilled mushrooms, tempeh sausage or bacon. The Dude Cakes are two gigantic pancakes stuffed with sausage, caramelized onions, grilled peppers and mushrooms, topped with a fistful of fries and slathered in gravy. For desert, the banana split ($7)—made with coconut milk-based ice cream—is a solid pick. Regardless of your gastronomic ideology, Vertical Diner is a safe place for those who enjoy good food prepared with love. Reviewed July 19. 234 W. 900 South, 801-484-8378, verticaldiner.com

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3

$

100% gluten-free

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com


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rews, glorious brews! As anxiety over the precious few remaining days of summer rises, so do temperatures (what global warming?) and the need for a tall one—or seven. Luckily for everyone in the realm, this year’s Utah Beer Festival—happening over two days, Aug. 18 and 19—is here to deliver the frosty goods. Fabulous secret powers were revealed to our publisher the day he held aloft his magic pint and said: “By the power of the DABC, what Utah needs is a damn Beer Fest!” A small intervention (and some serious planning) later, City Weekly’s fantastic beer bash is the largest in the land, and nearing its 10-year anniversary, an unlikely success story that keeps the thirsty masses coming back for more. Taking a page from that defiant spirit, we’ve put together this ode to all things local beer—from an investigation into aluminum tariffs that have many brewers shaking in their cans to a look into the market’s more design-forward ales and a follow-up exposé on the disturbing #FakeBeer trend. We also asked staffers and contributors to cull from their earliest, darkest beer-drinking memories. The result is a cautionary tale filled with boozy bomb shelter-digging, ruined bathroom fixtures and a failed attempt at hair-lightening only an enabling grandma would tolerate. With craft beer quickly gaining terrain across the land, we also tip our Power Sword to the fairer masters of our hoppy universe. Namely, those She-Ras behind Hop Bombshells—Utah’s only all-women homebrew club. Along the trek, we dive into the benefits of wood barrel-aged beer, pen a love letter to the ultimate beer sidekick, pretzels, and speak to the mastermind behind the state’s next brewery sure to make a sudsy splash. By the power of Grayskull, we have the lagers! (and the sours, IPAs, stouts, pilsners and saisons, too). —Enrique Limón, Brewer-in-chief

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My First Swig City Weekly staffers reminisce on their maiden taste of beer.

I was such a good boy, even through my freshman year of college; never touched a drop of anything. Then I went through a breakup, and decided I was coming back for my sophomore year with a new party-guy personality. It must have been some ridiculous fraternity party I went to with some friends, where they would have been serving the cheapest keg of who-the-hellknows-what-brand available, so I’m sure my first taste was “merciful God, how do people drink this stuff on a regular basis?” But I was damned if I was going to give up, and by the end of the second Solo cup of the pale American swill, it was easier to ignore how bad it was—although the next morning, it was not easy to ignore how much of it I’d had. It was several months before I had an experience where I thought, “Hey, this stuff can actually have flavor.” —Scott Renshaw, A&E editor

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ho doesn’t remember their first sip of beer? For me, it came after my trio of sisters employed the OG nectar known as Tecate as a natural hair lightener while sunbathing (Sun-In was a pricey commodity back then). Curious, I went in for a taste. I still remember the revolting, warm fizz. “Adults are weird,” I thought. “Who on earth would willingly drink this?” A few decades later, as evidenced by the clinking of cans meeting bottles when I take out my recycling, this is who. On the plus side, the encounter launched my love affair with the stuff. On the not-so-great side, I’m pretty sure the lightning technique gave me childhood alopecia and one memorable yearbook pic. —Enrique Limón, editor

I don’t actually remember my first beer. Maybe growing up in Utah County has something to do with that. But I do remember learning how to drink beer properly at 19 years old while I was studying and teaching in the Czech Republic. Drinking in a country where a stein costs 75 cents and whose population consumes the most beer in the world (142.6 liters per capita vs. the States’ 75.8) provided the perfect curriculum. I lived on a cow farm in a village with 15 houses, so drinking was pretty much the only thing to do after the chores were done. And beer helped me bond with my host parents, who had very limited English skills (conversations after work mostly went like this: “Hello! Your day good? Good! You beer?). Needless to say, after experiencing the birthplace of the Pilsner, coming home to Utah was a bit of a disappointment. —Sarah Arnoff, proofreader


“I remember my first beer,” I’ll say sarcastically as I tease a friend or two while they nurse their cold brews. In fact, I don’t actually remember my first sudsy sip. But, my very first night of college was where I truly felt I had my first legitimate beer—as legitimate as an 18-year-old can find. My parents helped me move into my dorm room at the University of Missouri and then they left—I was free to explore the world and that came sooner than expected. One of the guys on our floor had an older brother who knew his way around the college town and was game for showing a few of us innocent freshman around downtown. We ended up at a now out-of-business local dive bar where this older brother knew the bartender. We walked into the bar and headed to the back tables. I couldn’t believe we could walk into the place without someone asking for an ID at the door but this wasn’t Utah, baby! This was the wild (Mid)west of the Show-Me State. This older brother, as I’m sure he explained to his friend at the establishment, was giving us a rite of passage. Before we knew it, a pitcher of Bud Light showed up at the table and to my still innocent surprise, he poured us each a glass. There we were, drinking a beer straight from the tap at an actual bar. Of course, I wasn’t able to return until age 21, but I never forget that brief moment of feeling like I’d grown up only hours after moving into college. —Ray Howze, editorial assistant

Frankly, I’m too old to remember my first beer. Who knows? I might have grown up on beer, except that my parents were more the hard-liquor types. If they had wine around the house, inevitably it had gone to vinegar. That said, I do remember a raucous high-school graduation party where we went from house to house and keg to keg. One of the boys in my class tried to climb over a wooden fence and broke it. A girl in the class was so blitzed that she pulled the toilet-paper roll out of the wall. And then there was the dad who ran into the streetlight in front of the house. Good times, but not the best to remember a good beer. That came in college where we had more discriminating tastes and in those days, joined the growing boycott of Coors. —Kathy Biele, columnist

A late-bloomer, I didn’t taste my first beer until the end of my freshman year of college. As I stood in line in the basement of a dilapidated frat house in Pittsburgh circa 2010, I asked my friend to explain in great detail how to work the keg so my cup would be filled not with foam, but with the fruit of the gods known as “Natty Light.” Mimicking a pushing and pulling motion, she told me how to pump the keg, telling me I’d be fine—I wasn’t. I held that cup of foam for a while, sharing cups of actual beer with friends who were kind enough to let me contaminate their cups with my germs. Eight years later, I can work a keg with the best of ’em. Just don’t ask me to tap it myself, or we’ll all be drinking foam. —Kelan Lyons, staff writer

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I’d just turned 21 and landed a summer job on a newspaper in Rexburg, Idaho— home of Ricks College (now BYU-Idaho). A couple of buddies and I spent one hot afternoon spying on a right-wing professor as he dug a backyard bomb shelter. Sitting on a pile of dirt, David offered me a bottled beer. Mysterious and ominous—but what the hell? It was … nasty. I almost barfed. Not wanting to look like a wuss, I took another sip: Semi-nasty, now. Then another gulp. Two hours later, I awoke and the three of us stumbled down the dirt pile. The professor wasn’t amused. “Tough shit,” I smiled to myself. —Lance Gudmundsen, proofreader

In what I now see as a stroke of teenage parenting genius on my mom’s part, I spent most of every summer break away from home helping out on my grandparents’ farm in the Midwest. After one particularly long, hot, bug-swarming, miserably humid day spent mowing from sunup to suppertime, my grandma Audra Belle said to me, “Well, that was pretty shitty. I could do with a beer.” Without batting an eye at my decidedly under-21 self, she cracked open a can of cold Miller Lite, handed it to me, then did the same for herself. I thought the beer tasted pretty “meh,” but kicking our feet up on that farmstead porch and being treated as an equal after a grueling day is one of my fondest memories of my gram, who respected hard work and taking absolutely no bullshit above all else. Several years later, she introduced me to gin and tonics, which I took to with much greater enthusiasm than watery domestic brew. —Darby Doyle, drinks writer extraordinaire


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DEREK CARLISLE

Tariff Tension

Utahns in the beer industry are worried craft brews will soon be pricier—and drinkers might have to pick up the tab.

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fter winning the U.S. presidential election in November 2016, Donald Trump pledged to unite a fractured country whose political parties were deeply split. Almost two years later, he could end up bringing together another diverse group of partygoers—beer drinkers. Whether they prefer saisons or lagers, ambers or IPAs, pale ales or porters, drinking buddies with arrays of alcoholic preferences might soon be united by their disdain of higher prices for their brews of choice. In March, Trump announced a 25 percent tariff on steel and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum, but he issued temporary exemptions for Canada, the European Union and Mexico. On the last day of May, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said those allies would also be subjected to the trade penalties as of June 1. A few months in, the metallic trade war’s results are already being felt nationwide—Coca-Cola recently said there would be a hike on its canned products, and Boston Beer, brewer of Sam Adams, could raise prices by up to 2 percent in the year’s second half thanks to the tariffs. A short passage posted on the White House website cites two recent reports that suggest such imports could hurt national security “because further closures of domestic production capacity would result in a situation where the United States would be unable to meet demand for national defense and critical infrastructure in a national emergency.” “It’s a huge concern. I have not seen it hit quite yet, but I know it’s coming,” Richard Noel, co-owner and manager of Beer Bar, says of the effects of Trump’s economic ploy. Noel’s downtown watering hole sells more than 100 canned beers, and he says the ramifications of the trade penalties could make their way down the supply line—vendors could raise the price of aluminum before selling to beer makers, who would raise the fee for products they sell to distributors, which, in turn, would crank up what bars would have to pay. The end result, Noel says, is likely the same. “It’s mainly a tax on the consumer. Because the industry wouldn’t eat it,” he says. “It’s almost impossible to explain that to somebody who just is looking for a cheap beer, but that’s the reality of the situation.”

By Kelan Lyons “We really hope this gets solved before the tariffs hit the beer industry,” he adds. In a statement, Jim McGreevy, president and CEO of the Beer Institute, cited third-party analyses that estimated the aluminum tariff could impose a $347.7 million tax on the country’s beverage industry—which includes brewers—and cause 20,291 Americans to lose their jobs. It’s unclear how all this will affect local drinkers’ wallets, as Trump’s protectionist policies are constantly changing. “It’s definitely on everyone’s mind,” Nicole Dicou, executive director of the Utah Brewers’ Guild, says of the potential increase in production prices, a concern lurking in the heads of employees in the Beehive State’s burgeoning beer industry. The guild has yet to take a position on the tariffs, Dicou says, but she hopes the nonprofit trade organization will take a formal stance after its Aug. 28 meeting. Dicou estimates the tariff could raise the price of each can by one or two cents. “It’s up to them to either eat the cost or pass them on to the consumers,” Dicou says of Utah brewers. Rob Phillips, co-owner of RoHa Brewing Project, says his business hasn’t yet seen a price rise in the aluminum it purchases, though it’s only been a few months since the taxes went into effect. But that doesn’t mean the threat of a prolonged and escalating trade war isn’t troubling—especially for small breweries like his. “We don’t have the buying power or buying history that maybe a Squatters or Wasatch has with a vendor,” Phillips says, making it difficult for smaller brewers to negotiate more favorable contract terms, since they make up such a small part of a vendors’ business. James Soares, Wasatch Brewery operation manager, says he doesn’t think Wasatch and Squatters have seen a price increase either. “For the smaller guys, I think it’ll impact them quicker because they don’t have a contract, or they buy smaller volume,” Soares says. “Our contract kind of extends out.” Another issue, Phillips explains, lies with smaller outfits looking to move up in the craft marketplace. “We’re growing, so as we look to add brewing equipment, that

equipment is much more expensive based on these tariffs,” Phillips says of steel machinery potentially subjected to the 25 percent tax. “It’s going to be really challenging for us to justify to a consumer why our prices are going up,” Phillips says, half-joking that he wishes he could erect signs next to RoHa beer in grocery stores that would show a cost breakdown. “Initially, I think we’ll try to absorb that increase,” he projects. Eleanor Lewis, marketing director at Proper Brewing, says her brewery might be a bit better insulated against the tariffs, since their alcohol comes in 22-ounce glass bottles, not cans. “The only aluminum we purchase is for our crowler machine, and it’s not a huge machine,” she says of the equipment that fills a 32-ounce can with beer from taps. “Who knows? Give it six months and we’ll see,” Lewis says. Andrew Dasenbrock, president of Kiitos Brewing Co., says production costs have already gone up. Kiitos buys from an American vendor, he says, but the aluminum is mined overseas. But Dasenbrock’s concern isn’t just with his bottom line. “The supply chain has been dramatically altered,” he says, because the manufacturer Kiitos contracts with—he wouldn’t specify which one—is one billion cans behind schedule. “That’s billion, with a ‘B.’” That creates a delay in Kiitos getting its containers, which Dasenbrock says are delivered first to bigger breweries and regional producers because they have older, larger contracts. “All the rest of us just kind of get whatever scraps fall from the table right now.” Then there’s the issue of kegs, which Dasenbrock says are pricier because most come from China. (There’s only one American keg manufacturer, and they might struggle, not thrive, because of these taxes, a Philadelphia media outlet reports.) “A tariff is just an obnoxiously fancy name for taxes we put on our own citizens,” an exasperated Dasenbrock says. Kiitos will absorb the financial burden for now, Dasenbrock concludes. It will cut into their profits, but they won’t hike prices if cans only are a cent or two more expensive. “If it gets to a nickel or a dime, we’ll have to reassess that.” ✦


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28 | AUGUST 9, 2018

Hoppy Hour

Inside Utah’s only all-women homebrew club.

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By Sarah Arnoff

ounded in 2012, the Hop Bombshells Homebrew Club is Utah’s first and only all-female homebrewing club. Club vice president Becky Peterson is one of the original founders and helped build the group after getting into homebrewing, finding that beer prices in Utah were much more expensive than in her native Colorado. President Emily Kleber joined Hop Bombshells after moving to Utah from San Diego in 2016 while searching for a homebrewing group to share her interests with. The club’s monthly meetings are closed to the public, but they encourage women interested in homebrewing to attend their Hoppy Hour social gatherings that rotate to a different brewery or bar on the third Wednesday of each month. They announce the location on Facebook at facebook.com/hopbombshellshomebrew.

What prompted the start of Hop Bombshells?

MIKE RIEDEL

Emily Kleber: Clubs are very male-dominated. A lot of women in our club seem to be in maledominated fields professionally. It’s just a breath of fresh air, to be honest. After a hard day at work, you can get better at something with people who care about the beer. Becky Peterson: Jamie Burnham, who worked at the Beer Nut as a manager, noticed people coming into the store and she noticed the interest in jointing a homebrew club. So she started it.

All in the Family

COURTESY HOP BOMBSHELLS

New brewery will make a sudsy splash.

What kind of atmosphere are you trying to create?

EK: It’s not a very intimidating atmosphere. The focus of our club is not being all women; it’s about the brewing process and becoming better brewers. There are a lot of scientists in our club. It’s all about how to make our beer better. A lot of our women do really well in competitions. It’s about creating a healthy atmosphere as brewers and as women.

What happens at club meetings?

EK: Women will bring their beers that they’re trying to make or they want to send to competitions or they want to share. Or if someone goes out of town and brings back an interesting beer, they can share. Then we have a topic to discuss during the meeting. We have a discussion that’s led by one of the Hop Bomshells about beer styles or sometimes we have an experiment where we try to learn about something different like hop varieties. We’ve had people from Solstice Chocolate come and do a pairing and we’ve done stuff on fermenting vegetables, etc.

What are the advantages to joining a homebrew club?

EK: The biggest advantage is that you have people to learn from. Some of the crazy things you tend to do by yourself you see other people are doing, too, and that’s kind of fun. It’s inspiring to see other people being interested in what you are because it’s kind of a weird thing to be interested in. BP: It’s nice to find other like-minded women. You find women who are interested in building and making things. There’s camaraderie. We have equipment, if you’re a beginner. We have a lot of resources.

How do you know when your beer is ready for a competition?

BP: You don’t have to be awesome or have ever entered a beer in a homebrew competition. Really, the point of a homebrew competition is to get feedback from people who aren’t your friends. It’s a blind tasting. EK: We as a club really encourage our members to enter their beers in competitions because there’s a severe underrepresentation of women in competitions. So we pay for the fees to send it out to the brew people. There’s some women who do really well in competitions and you can be like, ‘Hey, can you try this? It smells a little weird, is it good?’ You can get feedback from the club or just be like, screw it, I’ll just send it off and see what happens. ✦

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By Mike Riedel

e’ve seen a lot of growth in the local craft-beer scene over the past few years. Breweries are opening left and right and Utah is beginning to look like a legitimate player in the national craft-beer movement. Last year alone, we witnessed four new breweries pop up along the Wasatch Front, and this year we will likely see another four—maybe five. The next craft brewery to make its Utah debut likely will be Templin Family Brewery. If the name sounds familiar, it should. Owner/ brewmaster Kevin Templin, pictured, has been a longtime veteran of the state’s craft-beer scene, and recently helmed Red Rock Brewing Co. Templin’s approach to beer has always been to keep it simple—no matter how complicated the recipe can be. It’s that straightforward approach to brewing that led me and many others to believe Templin’s time at Red Rock would culminate in a lifelong career. But he and his family had other plans. “I didn’t want to be that guy that always thought, ‘What if?’” Templin says right out the gate. “I mean, what’s the worst thing that could happen? I could go broke, right? That’s not that bad,” he says. “If it all crashes, I’m sure I could find someone to give me a job washing kegs.” Templin’s Zen attitude doesn’t just apply to his life philosophy, but also to his brewing. As we walked around the burgeoning brew space, I couldn’t help but notice there was a lot of money being spent on the Tempilin Family dream. “It’s expensive to do it right,” Templin proclaims. But what exactly is “right?” “It’s all about time, consistency, not trying to be macho, pretending to be the cool kid on the block,” Templin muses. “Just make drinkable, consistent beer like people have been making for thousands of years. That’s all I want to do.” Who can argue with an attitude like that? A good disposition is one thing, but if you don’t have beer and atmosphere to back it up, how are you going to get asses on those stools? “We’ve got 30 different recipes that are all new,” Templin boasts. “I don’t want to remake beers that I’ve made in the past; my customers deserve better than that.” Part of Templin’s recipes draw on his love of German beers. “My heart has been with German lagers for most of my brewing career,” he says, perhaps acknowledging his own Germanic heritage. “Mostly, it’s because I think those are the hardest beers in the world to make,” he says. And he’s right. Most brewers I talk to give the same response. The in-house selection, however, will look past Deutschland. “We’ll always have the traditional ales—porters, stouts, pale ales, etc.,” he says. “But we’re also going to make what the people want. If you want a chocolate pale ale, let’s discuss it.” The brewery Templin designed is well thought out, with a dedicated bar for the all-important imbibing time, a state-of-the-art brewery with canning line and a barrelhouse for aging beers and hosting special events. So, when will it be ready? “When we’re ready,” Templin says. “The first time you try our beer is the most important time for me. If I miss the mark on your first visit, there’s a chance that I may lose you forever, so the beer has got to be perfect.” Once officially launched, the Templin Family Brewery will produce beers in a wide range of alcohol levels in draft and 16-ounce cans. Look for the opening in late autumn in Salt Lake City’s exploding Granary District. Till then, as always, cheers! ✦


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Roll out the Barrel

Brewers across the land are ditching kegs for something a tad more refined.

MIKE RIEDEL

B Fertile Ground

rewers and distillers have a lot in common. Almost every distiller I’ve met has spent some serious time homebrewing beer. And the distiller’s mash—basically the different types of grain that go into a particular booze recipe, mixed with yeast and water—is essentially beer that’ll go into the still to become booze. Look no further than SLC’s own Waterpocket Distillery (2084 W. 2200 South, waterpocket.co) for a collaboration using Belgian White IPA from local Toasted Barrel Brewery (412 W. 600 North, toastedbarrelbrewery.com) to make a unique beer schnapps. Schnapps made in Utah! What a time to be alive. Historically, brewers and distillers have utilized wood barrels to age and transport their respective spirits. A bit about the barrel: Although much of whiskey’s flavor comes from the mash recipe and type of yeast used in fermentation, a big chunk of what you taste and see in the final product comes from the wood barrel itself. As whiskey ages, alcohol soaks into the wood, and that back-and-forth relationship between the wood’s vanillin and tannins and the liquid creates whiskey’s distinct flavors. It imbues the amber color versus the “white dog” colorless base spirit that originally was poured into the barrel. Oxygen also comes in to play. As the spirits slowly evaporate over time, a greater percentage of oxygen enters the barrel, taking the bite out of whiskey, mellowing and rounding it out. Bourbon, for example, must be barreled in charred new (never-before used) American oak, and it’s believed that the carbon from bourbon barrels’ heavy original char helps filter and soften the whiskey, as well.

Solstice Malting Co. puts the “craft” in craft beer. By Mike Riedel

And, yes, if you’re thinking the bourbon industry goes through a helluva lot of brand-spankin’new barrels if they’re disposing of them after one use (even though that might take anywhere from two to 25 years), you’d be right. Those once-used barrels go out in the world to age Irish whiskey, Canadian whisky, rum and malt whiskies of all stripes. More to our issue: Quite a few of ’em are used by the beer industry. Check out local options like Wasatch Brewery’s Bourbon Barrel Polygamy Porter, or Red Rock Brewery’s Furlong Bourbon Barrel Aged Stout. Epic Brewing has incorporated several barrel finishing iterations in its program, like the Triple Barrel Big Bad Baptist (Imperial Stout aged in both rum and whiskey barrels, with aged coconut and Columbian coffee beans aged in fresh whiskey barrels—hot damn!) and Whiskey Barrel Aged Barley Wine, an English-style Ale. So, some things to keep in mind when you hear the term “barrel-aged.” Every time a used barrel is filled again, that back-and-forth wood absorption/oxygen transfer saps some of the barrel’s potency, but it also adds back into the wood staves whatever is added next—whether that be sherry, beer or another type of whiskey. Some barrels might house many types of spirits before they start to fall apart and become someone’s garden planter box. Breweries keep this trend of diminishing flavor returns (or, to spin it another way: increased subtlety) in mind when they’re using whiskey barrels for aging, maybe starting with a heavy stout for the first round then refilling with lighter styles in subsequent uses. In a delicious turn on the trend, local grain-to-glass booze-maker Sugar House Distillery has collaborated with a couple of Utah breweries on its Boilermaker series of beer barrel-finished bourbons. While it’s not a new concept—check out the tasty Caskmate series from Irish whiskey magnate Jameson—it’s always exciting to see more local options available on the shelf, and both of these 92 proof bottlings showcase some pretty bold ambition that’s paid off in badass flavors. The No.1 Boilermaker used SHD’s housemade bourbon and finished the booze in Uinta Brewing Co. Cockeyed Cooper beer barrels. Offering No.2 took the same small batch bourbon base and entered it into used Epic Brewing Smoked & Oaked barrels. “Over the years, many of our barrels have migrated to local breweries. The Boilermaker series completes the circle,” SHD owner James Fowler says. —Darby Doyle

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 31

onsumers like things local. No matter if it’s bread, cheese or sausage—if they can get their paws on that homegrown goodness, their tables and tummies will be in territorial bliss. Beer is no exception. Right now, craft beer is huge; people can’t get enough of brews made right in their own neighborhoods, and that behavior has fueled a local-beer renaissance never before seen in our little corner of the universe. One local guy has found a way to make those civic-minded suds even more provincial by malting the grains right here in the 801. James Weed, owner and head maltster of Solstice Malting Co., hopes his Old World methods will enhance the local beer scene. A finance guy by trade, Weed, pictured, enjoyed success as a stockbroker and investment advisor. Still, he yearned for something more. “My wife said that I needed a hobby, so I found home brewing,” he reminisces. As often happens with perfectionists, that first dip soon became the tip of the iceberg. “Eventually, I began growing my own hops and even started malting my own barley,” Weed notes. Trust me, as someone who has tried this in my own kitchen, malting is a huge pain in the ass. “I wanted to look into more efficient ways of malting my grains,” Weed says. “Then I came across the North American Malting Guild and I found a few companies that supported making malt on a local level.” Weed then decided that malting was his game and Utah was fertile ground to begin. It was no small feat. As far as I can surmise, there has only been one malting plant in the state’s entire history: the Becker Brewing and Malting Co. For 75 years, Becker operated along the banks of the Ogden River, weathering Prohibition and two world wars. Sadly, production costs and competition from larger breweries forced the once-bustling operation to shut its doors. “Nobody in Utah has ever tried this after they closed,” Weed says. “I spoke with members of the Becker family and they said the malting part of their business shut down around 1953. I want to bring the malting industry back to Utah.” But what is malting? Essentially, it’s the process of germinating and drying the grain. In the germination process, starches in the grains begin to convert to sugars (this is where the fermentables in beer come from). “The trick is to stunt that process by kiln drying,” Weed says. “Different flavors can be achieved by changing the drying/toasting schedule, and that’s how it’s basically done.” Weed takes that old-school process a step further by “floor malting” the grains. “I basically spread the wet grains out in a large climate-controlled room and allow the germination process to take hold until it’s done,” he explains. “It’s the same way breweries and distilleries have been malting grains for centuries.” Solstice Malting Co. churns out about four tons of malt a week. “That may sound like a lot,” Weed warns, “but compared to the big guys? They’ll do more in one batch than I’ll do in an entire year.” That’s fine by us. We like our batches small and our comfort food and drinks homegrown. For now, Weed is producing base malts for local breweries. As revenue builds, he’ll look into buying a roasting machine that’ll be able to produce malts that will flavor darker and more rounded beer styles. If you’d like to sample some of the most locally made beers around, look to Squatters, Proper and Strap Tank breweries (to name a few). Their small-batch beers currently feature Weed’s homespun malts, thus solidifying the craft in Utah craft beer. ✦


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Designer Brews

reweries are hip these days. That shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone, especially if you see someone around Salt Lake City wearing swag from one of the area’s newest brewhouses. But the logos they parade involved some careful thought—and even a few trips back to the drawing board. Here’s a look at five Salt Lake City brewing operations and some insights into why their emblems look the way they do:

Diving into the look of 5 soon-to-be iconic brews. By Ray Howze

1. Roha Brewing Project

1.

2.

The folks at Roha Brewing Project (30 E. Kensington Ave., 385-227-8982, rohabrewing.com) deal in cans, and wanted to create something with an “outdoorsy feel,” according to co-owner Rob Phillips. But they also had and education-based focus— teaching consumers about its brews—and pushed for a design that involved both. “We started with this concept of a scientific, hexagon shape that represented the alcohol chemical build, and it looked way complex and confusing,” Phillips says. “But it had this hexagon shape in it and we thought, ‘Hey, we kind of like that.’” As a result, Roha ended up with its tree-like logo placed inside a hexagon that wraps on the can nicely. Phillips says they had a number of other options, including one reminiscent of REI’s logo, but wanted something simple and a design that could eventually stand on its own. “Someday, as our brand develops and grows, that symbol alone will represent Roha,” he says. “We wanted that simplicity.”

2. Kiitos Brewing

3.

4.

Speaking of logos that can stand on their own, Kiitos Brewing (608 W. 700 South, 801-215-9165, kiitosbrewing.com) and its president, Andrew Dasenbrock, have developed one of the area’s most recognizable designs—the blue circle with a “K” inside. The symbol invokes a look and color scheme similar to the Finnish flag—Dasenbrock’s family emigrated from Finland—and it was almost immediately noticed when the company opened in 2017. As Dasenbrock tells City Weekly, his brewing operation wasn’t even open a week when he walked into a bar in Park City wearing a hat emblazoned with the logo and a customer asked if he was with Kiitos. At that point, he says he knew they found something that worked. But it wasn’t easy getting to that point, despite how simple the brand might appear. In the company’s initial stages, Dasenbrock and others spent nearly 100 hours poring over various looks, crossing off some and circling others they liked. They even considered a rendition of the stonework on the outside of Helsinki’s train station, but eventually, settled on the “K.” “I’m a logical person, I like ones and zeros,” Dasenbrock says. “And I’m not that great at [design], but we did some mild tweaking on it and I’ve been in love with it ever since.” If you’ve noticed some animals on Kiitos’ cans, those are creatures found in Finland, including endangered ones such as the Saimaa Ringed Seal. Dasenbrock hopes to eventually partner with a wildlife conservation group.

3. Shades of Pale Brewery

4. SaltFire Brewing Co. Have you noticed the angler fish on SaltFire Brewing Co.’s (2199 S. West Temple, 801-661-1947, saltfirebrewing.com) bottles? Chances are you have, but look a little closer and you’ll see a hop dangling in front of it. That’s just one of the details SaltFire owner Ryan Miller says he loves about the debut look. The newly opened brewery in South Salt Lake has added some flair to the brewing scene with its bottle labels and angler fish. However, SaltFire almost wasn’t SaltFire. Miller says he had a few names in mind, but some were already taken by other breweries around the country. “Finding a name for your brewery or your beers especially is so hard,” Miller says. “They’re all taken and copyrighted.” After a lot of “going back and forth” on designs and names, Miller says it was “really helpful to have a lot of people to bounce ideas off of and take the criticism.” Eventually, he says, he just had to settle on one—and it’s since grown on him. When it came to the actual name, he says it not only originated from the city’s name, but from other practices, such as a method of firing pottery known as salt firing. “You can put the pottery in the kiln and then you throw salt in there and it creates some really fantastic colors on the pottery,” he says.

5. Salt Flats Brewing If you aren’t too familiar with Salt Flats Brewing (saltflatsbeer.com), that might be because the company changed its name from its original RPM Brewing in May. As a brewing company with close ties to the racing world—and particularly, the Bonneville Salt Flats—operations director Jeremy Floyd says they wanted to create a new brand that had a stronger local connection. “The actual logo is supposed to be very simplistic of the reflection of the Salt Flats,” Floyd says. “The colors are white and black because that’s what you see when you’re looking out at the Salt Flats.” As RPM Brewing, they mostly operated out of the Garage Grill in Draper, but decided they wanted to get in the distribution business as well. Currently, they have a minimalistic black-and-white logo. Floyd, though, says it might morph a bit soon as they work on a complete branding overhaul. The initial design, he says, was something put together in a “quick, two-week process.” They also want to stay connected to their automotive history. Salt Flats’ owners previously operated a race team and still own a race car they can drive on the Salt Flats. “We want to connect a little of our automotive heritage to the local Salt Flats market,” he says. “And to emphasize the surroundings we have—a lot of people tend to look east instead of west and there’s a lot of cool stuff out there.” ✦

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 37

5.

Shades of Pale Brewery (154 W. Utopia Ave., 435200-3009, shadesofpale.com) has been around for nearly a decade, so it’s no surprise the company’s logo is familiar to many Utahns. But that doesn’t mean is can’t use an update. General manager Adam Wiggins says they’re currently undergoing a rebrand they hope to fully unveil next year. While some plans are still fluid, one change customers might notice moving forward is more emphasis on the word “Shades” instead of its full

name. “One word is always better than two. But that won’t get lost on them [the customer]. We are always Shades of Pale,” Wiggins says. Shades of Pale still will package its beer in bottles, but instead of the “SP” logo, you might start seeing just the “S” along with Shades Brewing. The company’s bottle labels can range from intricate, old-timey art to a more-simple logo and text. They even used to put trail maps on labels but have shied away from that in recent years. But whatever they settle on next, don’t expect their beer mission to change. “We are taking some classic recipes and adding some twists to it—a whimsical flair to it, if you will,” Wiggins says. “Our head brewer is a microbiologist that allows us to do that.”


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s l e z t e r P Pretzels: A Retrospective

Despite their unassuming snack presence, pretzels will be here long after we’re dead.

T

he pretzel has been around for more than 1,300 years, and there’s a lot we can learn from the Robin to beer’s Batman. The story of the pretzel is one of conflict, drama and no shortage of divine intervention. Thanks to the salty snack’s trademark design, as well as its comforting flavor, it’s no stranger to the art of reinvention. It’s seen the rise and fall of empires, it’s lived through countless international conflicts and it still occupies a pivotal position in bars and beer fests the world over. Despite the fact that modern iterations of pretzels include braids, rolls, hamburger buns, pizza crusts and even the breading for chicken fries at Burger King, the traditional loopy twists might just be the secret to the humble pretzel’s success. Credit for this design breakthrough goes to a group of Catholic monks in Europe—some say they were from Italy; some say Germany—who baked the little treats for sustenance during Lent. Not content with simply rolling the simple mixture of water, flour and salt into sticks or squashing them into balls, these inventive monks arranged their creations into the twisty shape that we know today. According to tradition, the pretzel was designed to look like arms folded in prayer, and the monastic brass liked the fact that the design created three holes that could easily represent the Holy Trinity. With a design that carried a papal stamp of approval, the pretzel became a popular proselytizing tool for the Catholic church. Monks would distribute pretzels to their younger pupils for correctly reciting prayers, and pretzels became one of the primary tools that clergy would use to feed the poor—the pretzel’s design reminded the recipient of things spiritual, while the doughy twists provided physical sustenance.

By Alex Springer The pretzel had a pretty sweet gig as a symbol of the church’s community outreach, but it achieved rock star status in the early 1500s. A contingent of soldiers from the Ottoman Empire had sneakily dug a series of tunnels beneath the walls of Vienna, Austria, in an attempt to capture the city. A group of monks busy baking pretzels in a monastery basement heard the clatter of the Turks’ sneak-attack and sounded the alarm. This effectively prepared the city, whose military fought off the invading Turks. To show his gratitude to the monks and their baked goods, the emperor of Austria awarded the heroes with their own unique coat of arms. From then on, the pretzels’ popularity soared throughout Europe. It was immortalized in paintings and sculpture, and became a staple of bakeries all over the continent. Pretzels eventually made their way to America by way of the European settlers who set sail for the East Coast in the 1700s. Pennsylvania then became—and still is—the heart of American pretzel production. It was there that an enterprising baker named Julius Sturgis created the first commercial pretzel bakery this side of the Atlantic. Popularity of the treat, which would keep its crunch during long ship journeys, soon took off—and a snacking legend was born. So how did this once-revered symbol of restraint and spirituality become associated with the Dionysian sensibility of beer and breweries? A common theory is that bar and pub owners knew that salty snacks like pretzels made beer go down smoothly and also made customers thirstier. Serving small bowls of pretzels and peanuts became a common practice among barkeeps that saw the cheap, salty snacks as great ways to maximize their drink sales. While this rudimentary capitalist practice might have brought

beer and pretzels together, the bond that formed between them transcends the machinations of these early business owners. Nowadays, beer festivals the world over are incomplete without pretzels in some form or another—though I’m given to understand that pretzel necklaces are akin to going to a concert clad in a T-shirt that features the headlining act, and should be avoided at all costs. Still, I have to admit they have flair. For those who are looking for gourmet pretzels outside of Oktoberfest, I’d wager that the best around are baked and twisted by the folks at Vosen’s Bread Paradise (328 W. 200 South, 801-322-2424, vosen.com). While Vosen’s is most well-known for its croliner—a cross between a croissant and a Berliner doughnut—their soft-baked pretzels are the best link to the centuries-old recipe. You know you’re getting something of quality because these pretzels lack the uniformity and each is rolled and twisted by hand. They sometimes offer experimental toppings, but usually you can find an original and a cheese pretzel whenever you go in. The original is everything you need in a soft pretzel. It’s got the golden brown suntan of an exterior that is bejeweled with thick grains of salt, and it’s perfectly soft and chewy on the inside. Their cheese pretzel lacks the traditional shape, but that’s just because the ovoid design works better to capture the layer of post-melt Swiss cheese that fits like a dreamcatcher in between the doughy foundation. Between the pretzel’s surprisingly eventful history and its current role as beer’s favorite sidekick, the unassuming, carb-and-salt-loaded morsel is a true renaissance snack. As we go into our upcoming beerrelated endeavors, let’s not overlook the silent majesty that is the common pretzel. ✦


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Almost Ales

Orrin’douls

A throwback to Orrin Hatch’s senior year at BYU, when the now longest-serving Republican senator in history accidentally took a swig of Coca-Cola, resulting in what he referred to at the time as “the light-headed woozies.” Never mind that this is a non-alcoholic brew; one taste and you’ll be reaching for your invisible glasses in no time.

Supermarket Stout

This refreshing beverage will undoubtedly quench your thirst, rejuvenate your body and replenish crucial nutrients lost over the course of your hard day at work. Sound too good to be true? This miracle-in-a-can works because, like all beers sold in Utah grocery stores, it’s closer to water than alcohol.

We take a look at the alarming #FakeBeer trend with these extra hoppy, extra woke, extra bubbly brews. By CityBeat and City Weekly staff | Illustrations by Carolyn Ramos and Derek Carlisle

Ironic Sexism Ale

“Don’t worry about the label. We’re actually very woke. We’re just making fun of other beer labels. We totally support women. We actually have a girl employee at our brewery, and she thought the label was cool. It’s the beer that matters! Stop being so sensitive! Fuck you then! Eat a dick!”

Pioneer Haze

Adjust your bonnet and hop on your buggy to the nearest State Liquor Store to get your hands on this one. A limited-release New England IPA-style offering, the buzz from this aggressively hopped beer will leave you conjuring crazy thoughts—like how women will be eternally pregnant in the afterlife. Comes in packs of 47 cans.

if he you ar me

Speaker’s Own IPA

Brewery Bubble Burst IIIPA Matcha Brew About Nothing CBD IPA WTFLOL GTFO* “This mostly alcohol hop explosion is our lastditch attempt to one-up the hundreds of other IPAs in town. No really, it’s so hoppy and bitter it might actually taste the same coming up as it does going down. Perfect for bearded dudes who like waiting in lines to drink beer. For real though, please drink this or our brewery will fail.”

With a noticeably earthy taste and a selfie-worthy mouthfeel, this beer is rich in antioxidants and catechins. Don’t know what either of those things are? That’s OK, because they’re, like, totally good for you. Like, so what if it tastes like dirt. It, like, totally fights cancer or something.

IDK. DGMW, DIY IMO.BTW, BFF, BYOB. ROTFL! K? K. *Available in limited-release beginning Nov. 7 (maybe). ✦

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 41

Much like Republican Speaker of the House Greg Hughes and the Inland Port Authority, don’t let paltry ethics and so-called “laws” get in the way of your dreams and preclude you from drinking this brew. And remember, if you’re imbibing, don’t appoint yourself designated driver!


42 | AUGUST 9, 2018


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WRITE-IN Best thing we forgot and where to find it:

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FILM REVIEW

Undercover Racist

CINEMA

PHOTO

Spike Lee delivers a searing, timely look at American hate in BlacKkKlansman.

TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY FOCUS FEATURES

N

Adam Driver and John David Washington in BlacKkKlansman

BLACKKKLANSMAN

BBBB John David Washington Adam Driver Topher Grace R

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Do the Right Thing (1989) Spike Lee Danny Aiello R

Chi-Raq (2015) Nick Cannon Teyonah Parris R

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 47

The Klansman (1974) Lee Marvin Richard Burton R

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As entertaining as BlacKkKlansman is, Lee spends a good deal of screen time showing how draining and, ultimately, dangerous the assignment is for everyone. Stallworth accidentally involves his sort of-girlfriend Patrice (Laura Harrier), a student activist, when an especially psychotic Klan member shows up at his apartment unannounced. Meanwhile, Zimmerman, a non-practicing Jew (“Passing,” Ron tells him), first sees the assignment simply as a job, but the more he witnesses the Klan’s hate, the more important his Jewish identity becomes to him. Then there’s the poison of racism bubbling up from under the front-loaded laughs, as Lee juxtaposes scenes of “Ron”/Zimmerman’s Klan initiation (after which they watch D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation), with scenes of a witness (played by Harry Belafonte) recounting a lynching to Patrice and other student activists. If you didn’t get the point, the movie ends with real-life scenes from Charlottesville in 2017. And if you did get the point … well, we could probably all stand to get it again. CW

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fellow officers have all turned around in their seats, not believing what they’re hearing. When Stallworth hangs up the phone, pleased at having made contact, his fellow undercover officer Phil Zimmerman (Adam Driver) says, “You didn’t use your real name, did you?” Rookie mistake. But the joke’s on Zimmerman, who has to play “Ron” when meeting local Klan members in person. The real Stallworth’s infiltration is a smashing success. He’s so good at playing a racist white guy on the phone that when he calls the Klan’s national headquarters to expedite his membership, he impresses national director David Duke (Topher Grace), who can’t wait to meet him in person. If you asked me to name the least threatening actor alive, I’d say, “Topher Grace. I mean, the guy’s name is Topher.” But that’s the idea, right? The national director for a group of racists can’t be a muscle-bound He-Man who looks as if he could crush you with his bare hands; he has to be your non-threatening neighbor who loves barbecues, ball games, and quietly (and politely) seeks to eradicate “inferior” races. It’s a testament to Lee’s strengths as a writer and director that he makes all the disparate elements of the story work so well: One moment we’re laughing nervously as Zimmerman (as “Ron”) and the Klansman are target shooting. The next, we’re cringing as the real Stallworth sneaks in afterword to pick up spent shell casings for evidence—and sees that the targets are racist black caricatures.

TRY THESE The Birth of a Nation (1915) Lillian Gish Mae Marsh NR

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BY DAVID RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @daveseesmovies ow this is a Spike Lee Joint: searing drama, hilarious comedy, a touch of tonal messiness, occasionally angry as hell. In short, BlacKkKlansman is great, and Lee is firing on all thrusters. And lest ye think the joint, about Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), a black police officer in Colorado Springs becoming a member of the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, is a little too hard to believe, the words on screen—“Based on some fo’ real, fo’ real shit”—suggest otherwise. How fo’ real? I dunno; I haven’t read Stallworth’s memoir. But given how outrageous our current national situation is—in which America is again openly wearing its racism on its hip—I have little reason to doubt the authenticity of BlacKkKlansman, or even care whether it’s exaggerated. It’s a poignant and entertaining story at a time when many big national releases just aren’t poignant or entertaining. In the late 1970s, Stallworth, CSPD’s first black cop, is stuck in the records room. One day, the chief (Robert John Burke, the character actor you’ve seen a million times but can’t quite place), assigns Stallworth to go undercover at a Stokely Carmichael speech, wanting to know whether Carmichael is giving the local black populace any revolutionary ideas. Stallworth knows it’s a bullshit assignment, but he does it, and does it well, so the chief makes Stallworth an undercover officer fulltime. One day at the new gig, he comes across a want ad for the Ku Klux Klan and, on impulse, calls and leaves a message. To his surprise, he’s called back instantly by Walter (Ryan Eggold), the local chapter president. Before long, Stallworth has launched into a racist tirade about how he hates every group under the sun, but especially blacks. Meanwhile, Stallworth’s

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48 | AUGUST 9, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BLACKKKLANSMAN BBBB See review on p. 47. Opens Aug. 10 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE CAKEMAKER BB.5 You can tart up a predictable plot arc with distinctive cultural or thematic components, but when push comes to shove, you’ve still got a predictable plot arc. Thomas (Tim Kalkhof), a baker at a Berlin café, begins an affair with Oren (Roy Miller), a married Jerusalem-based businessman; when Oren dies in an accident, Thomas moves to Jerusalem and insinuates himself into the life of Anat (Sarah Adler), Oren’s widow. Writer/director Ofir Raul Graizer dips his toes into interesting material about trying to replace the missing people in your life, as even Oren’s mother begins treating Thomas as a surrogate son. But both Thomas and Anat remain frustratingly enigmatic as their relationship develops, offering too little in their performances to carry the characters beyond the basic plot dynamics. And perhaps if you’ve never seen another movie of this kind before, you won’t recognize where those plot dynamics must inevitably go. The enigmatic conclusion might be the exception, except that it becomes yet another reminder that just because you don’t understand why people are making the choices they make, it doesn’t make the experience profound. Opens Aug. 10 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw DOG DAYS [not yet reviewed] Various Los Angeles residents find their lives connected by their canine friends. Opens Aug. 8 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

THE MEG [not yet reviewed] A huge-ass prehistoric shark vs. Jason Statham. My money is on Statham. Opens Aug. 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) SLENDER MAN [not yet reviewed] The boogeyman figure terrorizes youngsters. Opens Aug. 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BLACK PANTHER At Thanksgiving Point, Aug. 10, 8:30 p.m. (PG-13) COFFY At Tower Theatre, Aug. 10-11, 11 p.m. & Aug. 12, noon. (R) LIFE IN THE DOGHOUSE At Main Library, Aug. 14, 7 p.m. (NR) THE LION KING At Ed Kenley Amphitheater, Layton, Aug. 10, 7 p.m. (G) WONDERSTRUCK At Peery’s Egyptian Theatre, Aug. 15, 7 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES CHRISTOPHER ROBIN BB.5 Surprisingly, Disney gives one of its most beloved characters a story that’s an odd mix of deeply weird and thoroughly predictable. Here, Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) isn’t A.A. Milne’s son, but instead a harried businessman in post-WWII England who is neglecting his wife (Hayley Atwell) and daughter when he gets a visit from his childhood stuffed animals Pooh (Jim Cummings) and

the gang. Yes, it’s the default What Really Matters premise for so much high-concept fantasy, with McGregor gamely trying to find a new note to play for this old song. But then there’s the long, melancholy mid-section, jammed up against a third act filled with frantic chases. The impressive design of the CGI critters leaves bald patches on the aging toys’ fur—an apt metaphor for a movie that tries to combine the edgy with the well-worn. (PG)—SR THE DARKEST MINDS BB Or, Children of (X-)Men. A dozen familiar young-adult and postapocalypse tropes get thrown into a blender to adapt Alexandra Bracken’s novel, mostly set six years after a virus wipes out 90 percent of the world’s children and leaves survivors with heightened, often dangerous abilities. Powerful telepath Ruby (Amandla Stenberg) escapes from her youth internment camp, eventually hooking up with other young people trying to survive. Stenberg continues to impress as a central presence, and the of-course romance between her and telekinetic Liam (Harris Dickinson) offers a few satisfying moments. But director Jennifer Yuh Nelson’s inability to make the specifics of this brave new world feel fully fleshed-out results in a jumble of touchstones from other, more successful genre fare—everything from Star Wars to Harry Potter to Hunger Games—trying unsuccessfully to convince you it could stand on its own. (PG-13)—SR EIGHTH GRADE BBB.5 Comedian Bo Burnham’s feature filmmaking debut stars Elsie Fisher as Kayla, trying to change her identity as a nearly invisible, deeply insecure girl during her final week of middle school. While there might be nothing earth-shaking about suggesting that middle school is a psychological hellscape, Burnham’s direction captures the unique challenges of a generation immersed in social media, where popularity is instantly quantifiable. Mostly, though, he commits fully to Kayla as a character, allowing Fisher’s natural charms to permeate a young woman who covers her bathroom mirror in affirmations, yet finds her days filled with reminders that she’s never as funny, desirable or cool as she wants to be. It’s a lovely piece of acting, in which Kayla’s attempt at

being friendly with the popular girls fails miserably, but her “nailed it” smile makes you cheer for her anyway. (R)—SR

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – FALLOUT BBB.5 Over the course of 20 years, M:I has become the most reliably thrilling popcorn-movie franchise going. Writer/director Christopher McQuarrie returns for a more-or-less direct sequel to 2015’s Rogue Nation, as Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise), Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) and the IMF team take on followers of Solomon Lane (Sean Harris), who want to disrupt the world with nuclear terrorist attacks. The mostly enigmatic Hunt is given a few more shades to play, but the series remains mostly an excuse for great action set pieces in exotic international locations. And between a single-take freefall through stormy skies, Cruise dashing across the rooftops of London and a helicopter dogfight that winds up on a mountain precipice, McQuarrie delivers the goods in giddy-making fashion. It’s the kind of spectacle that somehow manages to make 2-1/2 hours zip by like a breeze. (PG-13)—SR

TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIES BBB This adaptation of the Cartoon Network animated series manages to get in some decent shots at Hollywood’s comic-book franchise obsession in a tale that finds Teen Titans team leader Robin (Scott Menville) super-bummed because he’s one of the last super-heroes left who hasn’t gotten his own big-screen movie. The basic set-up allows for light-hearted, kid-friendly action shenanigans, where a battle is less likely to end with an explosion than with a fart. But the real entertainment comes from the digs not just at more-boxoffice-successful rival Marvel, but at DC’s own movie franchises, from in-joke cameos to post-credits sequences. The filmmakers sometimes resort to easy “I understood that reference” jokes, but they make up for it by with comprehensive skewering of the genre, and having Michael Bolton sing an upbeat, inspirational song about life titled “Upbeat Inspirational Song About Life.” (PG)—SR

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MUSIC

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Arkansas,” she says. “There’s a musicality about it that’s probably in me in ways I can’t even describe. If you’re going to hear it anywhere, it’s in my voice and my vocal phrasings.” And, oh, what a voice. Its resonant timbre recalls The Cranberries’ Dolores O’Riordan, swooping and soaring from a whisper to a fullthroated rage, feather light in some moments and ferocious in others. Every review of Supergiant has focused on Carol’s pipes, to the point that I wonder whether it’s all too much for a singer/ songwriter just getting her career started. “I definitely made a conscious effort on this record to sing my ass off,” she laughs, “so I totally appreciate the praise.” Deflecting some of that admiration toward her bandmates, she adds, “Everybody put everything they had into the album, but we made a point to put the vocals up front in the mix.” Reminiscing on her childhood in the South, Carol says her favorite moments came while sitting in her closet or a bathroom, fantasizing about singing to hundreds of people. “That was my dream as a kid,” she recalls, “but nobody I knew in Arkansas was pursuing music. My dad is a surgeon, my mom is an anesthesiologist, my brother is a vascular surgeon and his wife is an ER doctor, so I just assumed I was going to do medicine.” She actually scrubbed into the operating room for a while until deciding to pursue her dream on the West Coast. Thank goodness she did—one listen to Valley Queen’s new album, with Carol’s voice front and center, is enough to make you realize that the future holds something special for this band. “Los Angeles is where I really fell in love with music,” Carol finishes. “Maybe it was just from being around musical people, or maybe it was finally having the chance to be anonymous. Either way, that belting voice you hear on the record? That started coming out when I moved to L.A.” CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

os Angeles rockers Valley Queen released their debut album, Supergiant, in May, earning rave reviews from Rolling Stone. But the band’s ascent might have been preordained: In 2016, with nothing but a few Bandcamp singles to their name, Natalie Carol, Neil Wogensen, Shawn Morones and Gerry Doot played NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert, wowing host Bob Boilen with a winning blend of Laurel Canyon folk, classic rock chops and Southern roots. Nonstop touring ensued, with the band crisscrossing the country opening for established acts like Thao & The Get Down Stay Down and Laura Marling. That time on the road solidified the band’s chemistry and deepened its groove. Carol’s booming voice resonated with fans while the band gelled, ultimately earning Valley Queen a hard-fought record deal with Roll Call Records. The pressure sent two of the original four band members (Morones and Doot) packing, however, forcing Carol and Wogensen to slow down, reassess their trajectory and focus on making the material that eventually became Supergiant as sharp as it could be. “I believed in myself,” Carol says, “but I had also believed in the people around me. Valley Queen is not my solo project. I thrived in the collaboration. I knew nobody else could make this record with me but our original lineup.” Doot couldn’t come back, so Mike DeLuccia stepped in on drums. But two months of discussions convinced Morones to return, and in November 2017 a reinforced Valley Queen entered the studio to lay down Supergiant, whose wistful moments (“Chasing the Muse” and “Gems and Rubies”) mix effortlessly with epic powerpop (“Supergiant”) and Zeppelin-esque hard rock (“Bedroom”). “We’re so proud of the album,” Carol says. “We finished it in February and it came out in May, and since this was our first time ever putting a full-length record out, it felt like a long time to wait. Going on tour will be a cool way to revisit our relationship with the songs. You go through a lot of phases—I’m excited to let them live again.” Although introspection is baked into Supergiant’s lyrics, which document Carol’s years of struggle to find a community in her adopted hometown of Los Angeles, it’s also markedly a group effort. From the first hot licks of opener “Silver Tongue” to the final ringing peals of closer “Highway Pearls,” raw emotion and visceral power drips from the album. “I love shredding on guitar, and I love how loud the band gets sometimes,” Carol says. “But I also love the communication and dialogue required to turn songs written in very quiet, personal moments into a full band experience. It works a different muscle; I like playing with those lines, crossing those lines and figuring it out.” That patience reflects Carol’s long journey from Arkansas, where she grew up in a family of doctors, to California for college, to a place in the ever-expanding firmament of Los Angeles’ music scene. Her first band, formed when she was just 18, played music that she describes as “much more Arkansas-influenced.” Over time, she says her environment began to seep into her sound, with California guitar rock a la Neil Young and Grace Slick becoming touchstones. “There’s still something special about the state of


THURSDAY 8/9 I’m With Her

THE TALBOTT BROTHERS THURSDAY 8/09/18 DOORS 7:00PM SHOW 8:00PM

MYSTIC BOWIE’S TALKING DREADS

FRIDAY 8/10/18 DOORS 7:00PM SHOW 9:00PM

HUNTER AND THE DIRTY JACKS

FRIDAY 8/17/18 DOORS 8:00PM SHOW 9:00PM

Angélique Kidjo

THE LONG RUN AN EAGLES TRIBUTE

FRIDAY 8/25/18 DOORS 8:00PM SHOW 9:00PM

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT

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CITYWEEKLY.NET BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, NICK McGREGOR, & LEE ZIMMERMAN

FRIDAY 8/10

Angélique Kidjo, Femi Kuti

Angélique Kidjo’s music spans continents. Born in Benin of Fon and Yoruba ancestry, she became famous in her native West Africa before moving to France in the 1980s. Her first few solo albums were recorded in Paris, Miami, Prince’s Paisley Park Studio in Minneapolis, Brazil and New York, with Kidjo proudly mixing Afro-beat, Caribbean zouk, Congolese rumba, jazz, gospel and Latin styles sung in a blend of the five languages in which she’s fluent. She’s collaborated with the Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra, renowned minimalist composer Philip Glass, jazz legends like Herbie Hancock and modern pop stars like Bono, Alicia Keys, Dave Matthews and Josh Groban. Alternately described as Africa’s premier diva (Time) and one of the 100 Most Inspiring Women in the World (The Guardian), Kidjo’s latest project is also one of her most focused: a complete re-imagination of Talking Heads’ landmark 1980 album Remain in Light. Meant to honor David Byrne and company’s embrace of world music while also reclaiming Westernized rock for the African continent, it’s a radical celebration of cross-cultural pollination and multi-lingual euphoria. Hailed by critics at Pitchfork as one of the year’s “most daring records,” it should lead to one of the summer’s most celebratory concerts—especially since fellow Afro-beat icon Femi Kuti, son of the genre’s founder, Fela, is along for the ride. (Nick McGregor) Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre, 2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road, 7:30 p.m., $45 advance; $52 day of show, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

I’m With Her and nine ASCAP Country Awards, he’s accumulated more kudos than many artists with résumés far more ample than his. The reason for that is obvious: Stapleton is a throwback to a ’70s sound that blends diehard country, Southern rock and seasoned soul in equal measure. The influence of several iconic artists also finds its way into that brew, from Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings to Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Marshall Tucker Band and Derek & the Dominos. Not surprisingly, Stapleton has become a fan favorite thanks to his gritty Everyman approach and a blue-collar sensibility that’s rugged and resilient, tough and tenacious, even tender and touching. After establishing himself with his band The Steeldrivers, Stapleton went on to pen approximately 150 songs for other artists, scoring hits with Kenny Chesney, George Strait, Luke Bryan and Darius Rucker. That doesn’t even include Stapleton’s collaborations with Tim McGraw, Dierks Bentley, Brad Paisley, Vince Gill, Justin Timberlake, Peter Frampton and Sheryl Crow. With his bulky frame, straggly locks and woolly beard, Stapleton might resemble an intimidating outlaw, but he’s still an exceptional artist. (LZ) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, 7 p.m., $34.75-$89.75, usana-amp.com

Chris Stapleton

SATURDAY 8/11

BLACKALICIOUS

FRIDAY 8/30/18 DOORS 7:00PM SHOW 8:00PM

Chris Stapleton, Marty Stuart, Brent Cobb

Three albums and five years into a spectacular solo career, Chris Stapleton has clearly attained superstar status. The winner of five Grammys, seven Academy of Country Music Awards, seven Country Music Association Awards, five Billboard Music Awards, two iHeartRadio Music Awards

ANDY BARRON

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Given that Sarah Jarosz, Sara Watkins and Aoife O’Donovan are each exceptional artists in their own right, I’m With Her is a supergroup of sorts. Their promising debut album, See You Around, might seem modest, but it proves that this collaboration makes for a potent blend. Not surprisingly, the band’s combined talents— as songwriters and adept musicians— make their live appearances effortlessly engaging. The three take turns sharing lead vocals, singing precise harmonies and switching instruments. Although they eschew the support of a big backing band, their sound is rich, resonant, alluring and captivating all at the same time. Watkins focuses mainly on fiddle, while O’Donovan primarily plays guitar. But it’s Jarosz, the youngest of the three, who serves as the main multi-tasker. Plying her skills on guitar, banjo and mandolin, she also plays lead and often provides sole accompaniment. Borrowing their handle from the feminist motto inspired by the Hillary Clinton campaign, I’m With Her affirm their own independence. Along with their album tracks, they throw in occasional covers—John Hiatt’s “Crossing Muddy Waters,” Jim Croce’s “Walkin’ Back to Georgia,” Adele’s “Send My Love (To Your New Lover),” Gillian Welch’s “A Hundred Miles” and Bill Monroe’s “Lord Lead Me On” among them—which are more than enough reasons to catch these gals at their upcoming Ogden Nature Center show. (Lee Zimmerman) Ogden Nature Center, 966 W. 12th St., Ogden, 7 p.m., sold out as of press time, call 801-621-7595 for wait list, all ages, ogdennaturecenter.org

DANNY CLINCH

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50 | AUGUST 9, 2018

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52 | AUGUST 9, 2018

MACKIE OSBORNE

LIVE

MONDAY 8/13 Melvins

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER 8.8 LUKE BENSON

8.9 MYTHIC VALLEY

8.10 SUPERBUBBLE

8.11 GORGEOUS GOURDS

8.13 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

8.18 GROOVEMENT

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

There are a number of ways to get back at a horrible boss—for example, stealing their lunch from the company fridge. Or, if you’re feeling brave, you could mail 100 bags of penis-shaped gummies to their address (yes, there’s a website for that). Or, for those that really hate their boss, just do what Buzz Osborne, Mike Dillard and Matt Lukin of the Melvins did: Name your band after said horrible boss. The historic sludge-rock band hailing from Montesano, Wash., (or Aberdeen, depending on your love/hate relationship with Kurt Cobain) came about thanks to a real-life Melvin—a supervisor at a Thriftway grocery store who was, to put it nicely, loathed by his employees. Fast forward 35 years, and no one knows how the Thriftway Melvin is doing or how he feels about his inadvertent legacy. Whether he likes it or not is incidental at this point, though: Melvins is responsible for shaping the world of grunge and alt-rock that we are blessed by today. In that process, Buzz Osborne has become a legendary weirdo. Although he’s the only original member left and he’s lived in Los Angeles for years—recording almost all of Melvins’ albums in that sunny atmosphere—it’s still easy to link the band to the rainy state of Washington. Perhaps that’s because the Pacific Northwest of the 1990s remained in the Melvins’ influential vice grip. From their first EP, 1986’s Six Songs (which later grew to 26 songs), to 2016’s Basses Loaded, which featured six bass players, to 2018 full-length Pinkus Abortion Technician, the Melvins have done things their own weird, slow way. Pinkus Abortion Technician was recorded with Jeff Pinkus of fellow revolutionary weirdos Butthole Surfers, and it rules. Having two bass players is sludge as fuck. (Rachelle Fernandez) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $20 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Melvins

TUESDAY 8/14

Yelawolf, Waylon & Willie, Struggle Jennings, Jelly Roll

An association with Kid Rock might be the kiss of death for many artists, but Southern rapper Yelawolf (né Michael Wayne Atha) boasts a complex history that can’t be reduced by simple jingoism. Born in Alabama to a Cherokee father and a white mother, Yelawolf spent time in Nashville’s projects, where he connected with hip-hop and the genre’s rags-to-riches roots in a crucial way. His first big break came on short-lived reality show The Road to Stardom with Missy Elliott, but after his independently released debut album, Creek Water, Yelawolf ran into the usual troubles experienced by a daring, undaunted artist trying to make it in Hollywood: a record deal with Columbia resulted in a fiery studio album, Fearin’ and Loathin’ in Smalltown, U.S.A., that was so ahead of its time label execs shelved it and refused to release it. Yelawolf tinkered with down-home rap-rock tropes on mixtapes like The Ballad of Slick Rick E. Bobby and Hip Hop Tribute to Classic Rock, but it was 2010’s Trunk Muzik that really broke him big. In 2011, he signed with Eminem’s Shady Records, falling in with the no-holds-barred Detroit crew that included Kid Rock. But 2011’s Radioactive earned a rare 4.5 out of 5 mic rating from hip-hop bible The Source. Even better were its follow-ups, which defined Yelawolf as an unsparing voice on the combination of Southern poverty and urban despair—Heart of Dixie, Trunk Muzik Returns, Love Story and last year’s Trial by Fire. Now, Yelawolf has expanded his efforts, opening a barber shop/tattoo shop/retail store in Nashville and appearing in a movie he also scored with producer T-Bone Burnett. After a year off the road in 2017, Yelawolf’s 2018 concerts should be fierce, so don’t miss this one. (NM) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $25, all ages, thecomplexslc.com


PINKY’S CABARET

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

GOOD FOOD GOOD FUN 4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

Satuday, August 18th

DJ GHENGIS TOINE

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Salt Lake’s 18 and over

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PAJAMA JAMMY JAM PAJAMA PARTY

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2630 S. 300 W. SLC

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 53

801.467.0700


TUESDAY 8/14

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Beach House is the rare band that sounds pretty much the same on all of its albums, but sounds really good every damn time. On their seventh record, appropriately titled 7, the dream-pop duo from Baltimore still makes hypnotically sensual music that’s creepy but comfortable—like dozing off in sunlight slanting through a dusty attic window. Their familiar bottom-heavy sound is driven by frontwoman/keyboardist Victoria Legrand’s big, dirty synthesizer and organ textures, and guitarist Alex Scally’s sounds are built on the same jangly tone as always. In terms of emotions evoked, Legrand’s singularly rich, spacious voice is melancholic and nostalgic all at once, tugging at the listener’s heartstrings in precisely the same way it has since the band formed in 2004. And, as always, sugary-sweet pieces of ear candy are hidden throughout 7, like the trippy shoegaze synth on single “Lemon Glow” and the waterfall of descending octave guitars on “L’Inconnue.” Yet these amount to new irregularities in the same soundscape. Returning to this highdefinition dream world is, despite its familiarity, overwhelmingly exciting each and every time—somehow every Beach House concert sounds more deeply immersive than the one before it. It’s about time for the widespread acknowledgement of Beach House’s music as the highest caliber of art; not only has the duo found a niche and filled it to perfection, they have continually proved themselves as one of the most venerable independent bands working in the 21st century. (Howard Hardee) The Depot, 13 N. 400 West, 8 p.m., sold out as of press time, all ages, depotslc.com

54 | AUGUST 9, 2018

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SHAWN BRACKBRILL

Beach House, Sound of Ceres

herban empire whiskey fish

fat candice nick passey and the perpetual sadness


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 8/9 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dusty Grooves (Twist) Dueling Pianos: South & JD (Tavernacle) Jazz & Blues Jam (Twist) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Stanton Warriors (Sky) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 8/10 LIVE MUSIC

Adelitas Way + Larusso + Citizen Soldier (Club X) AM Bump (Lake Effect) American Hitmen + Riding Gravity (The Ice Haüs) Angélique Kidjo + Femi Kuti (Red Butte Garden) see p. 50

THURSDAY:

TWIST JAZZ JAM on the patio @ 7:00 DUSTY GROOVES dj collective ALL VINYL NIGHT @ 10:00 FRIDAY: SATURDAY: DJ Sneaky Long @ 9:00 pm. DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

TUESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

PATIO IS OPEN!

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 EXCHANGE PLACE • 801-322-3200

WWW.TWISTSLC.COM • 11:00AM - 1:00AM

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 55

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

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MONDAY:

Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

SUNDAY: Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,850

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SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS!

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Alice Merton (The Complex) Chvrches + Pale Waves + Tishmal (Ogden Amphitheater) Depths Of Hatred + Ophidian + Chronic Trigger + Stormhaven (The Loading Dock) Dusty Boxcars (DeJoria Center) Edgar Winter Band (Egyptian Theatre) Gavin DeGraw + Philip Philips (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) I’m With Her (Ogden Nature Center) see p. 50 Jack White + Tyler Childers (The Great Saltair) Katastro + Tyrone’s Jacket + Aloha Radio (Soundwell) Kirk Dath (The Yes Hell) Lost ’80s Live (Red Butte Garden) Mipso + The Hollering Pines (Urban Lounge) Mythic Valley (The Hog Wallow Pub) Santoros + Spo (Kilby Court) The Talbott Brothers (O.P. Rockwell) Tony Oros (Lake Effect)


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56 | AUGUST 9, 2018

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

BAR FLY

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TRADITION

From the outside, Tradition sort of looks like a physical-therapy center—which, if you get all philosophical, it kind of is. Tradition offers therapy from a long week of work, school or whatever it is that Salt Lake folk do. This therapy comes in the form of a cocktail and, dare I say, soul food. Now, soul food isn’t as easy to pull off as one might think. There’s an art to it, and Brett, an Army officer, and his girlfriend Dana, whom I met at Tradition, agree. Brett made the move from Jacksonville, Fla., to Salt Lake City, going from oxtail and red beans and rice to funeral potatoes and depressing green Jell-O. He starts reminiscing on Southern potlucks: “We had a master sergeant from Atlanta—best collard greens ever. Every time we did a potluck, he didn’t even have a choice. We were like, ‘So you’re bringing collard greens, right?’” Brett, the undercover “foodie” in his and Dana’s relationship, ended up at Tradition for a Sunday evening date, proving that soul food can be the staple in any loving relationship. I’m always curious how military people and significant others meet, so between the fried chicken and craft drinks, I ask Dana. “We met playing Beehive Sport and Club kickball. Have you heard of Beehive at all?” Reluctant to answer, I try to play down the fact that despite living here for most of my life, I have no idea about anything hip around Salt Lake City. The fact that Dana can say she met her boyfriend during a game of kickball beats all of my failed pof.com relationships. So look out, Beehive Sport and Social Club—here I come. (Rachelle Fernandez) 501 E. 900 South, 385-202-7167, traditionslc.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS Brother + Child Ivory (Velour) Corinne Bailey Rae (Eccles Center) Cutthroat Mode + David Rhythm + Uso Vandross (Metro Music Hall) Double Helix (The Bayou) Edgar Winter Band (Egyptian Theatre) English & Hareza (Legends at Park City Mountain) Gene Loves Jezebel (Liquid Joe’s) Givers + Naughty Palace (Kilby Court) Josh Warburton (The Harp & Hound) Morgan Whitney + Spencer Nielsen + Braden Waiters + Walter James (The Royal) Muddpuddle (Park City Mountain) Mystic Bowie’s Talking Dreads (O.P. Rockwell) N-U-Endo (Club 90) Pixie and the Partygrass Boys (The Spur) Rail Town (The Westerner) Red Sun Rising + Slow Caves + Sunsleeper (Urban Lounge) Scott Rogers (Snowbird) Superbubble (The Hog Wallow Pub)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Kickass Karaoke (Flanagan’s on Main)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ “Sneeky” Long (Twist) DJ Juggy + DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & South (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Kyle Haze (Downstairs) Mi Cielo w/ DJ Dynamiq (Sky) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Wet Hot ’80s Summer w/ DJ Birdman (The Depot)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 57

Aaron Lee Tasjan (Canyons Village at Park City Mountain) Aquacodiene & OvaDose (The Loading Dock) Big Blue Ox (Snowbird) Caleb Gray Band (The Spur) Cherry Thomas (The Harp & Hound) Chris Stapleton + Marty Stuart + Brent Cobb (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 50 Chromium3 (The Bayou) Crescent Super Band (Holladay CIty Hall Park)

| CITY WEEKLY |

SATURDAY 8/11


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58 | AUGUST 9, 2018

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

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wednesday 8/8

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friDAY 8/10

Live Music

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saturday 8/11

Live Music

end of man

sleeping tigers kapix • capitals Tuesday 8/14 open mic night YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM coming soon 8/17

retro riot dance party rocker night!

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY BAD BOY BRIAN

8/24

w/ ginger and the gents otherwise  Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

165 E 200 S SLC 801.746.3334

Corb Lund + Branson Anderson (Urban Lounge) Don Felder (Eccles Center) Edgar Winter Band (Egyptian Theatre) End of Man + Sleeping Tigers + Kapix + Capitals (The Royal) Erasure + Reed & Caroline (Kingsbury Hall) Gorgeous Gourds (The Hog Wallow Pub) Jeff Lawrence (The Yes Hell) Life Has a Way + Riksha + Citizen Hypocrisy (The Ice Haüs) Mullet Hatchet (Brewskis) N-U-Endo (Club 90) Rail Town (The Westerner) Say Hey + Kenton + Star Crossed Loners (Velour) Singer-Songwriter Showcase (DeJoria Center) Sin City Soul + Matt Calder (Lake Effect Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Syndicate + Govinda + Syn.Aesthetic + NamasteeZ (Soundwell) Timpanogos Big Band (Viridian Center) Witch Mountain + Turtleneck Wedding Dress + Eagle Twin (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules + JC (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Gray (Snowbird) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Montgomery (Flanagan’s on Main) DJ Mr. Ramirez DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ Bangarang (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 8/12 LIVE MUSIC

Brooke Macintosh + Kirk Dath (Lake Effect) Desafio Show (Quarry Village Stage) D&A (Snowbird) Erasure + Reed & Caroline (Kingsbury Hall) Grateful Shred + Mapache (Urban Lounge) Hickoids + The Swinging Lights + Pick Pocket (Metro Music Hall) Insane Clown Posse + ESHAM + Andrew W Boss + Shadow D + Marijuana Mafia (The Complex) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Lash LaRue (Copper Moose Farms) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Nate Robinson (Legends at Park City Mountain) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Robert Earl Keen (Commonwealth Room) Valley Queen + Cherry Thomas + Halogyns (Kilby Court) see p. 49

MONDAY 8/13 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Fish + Kansas City Blues (Lake Effect) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Brandi Carlile + The Secret Sisters (Red Butte Garden) Emery + Comrades + Rough Start + Oxford Grey (Club X) Father John Misty + Lucy Dacus (The Union Event Center) Melvins (Urban Lounge) see p. 52


Night Demon + Blood Star (Metro Music Hall) Punch Brothers + Madison Cunningham (Commonwealth Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues & More Jam (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

TUESDAY 8/14 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

WEDNESDAY 8/15 LIVE MUSIC

Eric McFadden (Brewskis) Katrina Cannon (Gallivan Center) Lil Ugly Mane + Spirit Adrift + Liar’s Tongue (Urban Lounge) Lorin Walker Madsen (The Hog Wallow Pub) Nick Nash + The Verb Garden + Michael Hinkley (Kilby Court) Ophidian + Artificial Aliens + Phaedrus (The Loading Dock) Riley McDonald (The Spur) The Sea The Sea (Rye) Sydney Keddington (Lake Effect) Through N through + Black mass + Flatlined + In Unison (The Underground) The Victor Wooten Trio (Commonwealth Room) WINO + Xasthur + Malady (Metro Music Hall) Yolanda Arrey (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos w/ Dave & Arian (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

2PM

HIGHLAND

weekly lineup Thursdays

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG $2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

KARAOKE

saturdays

Mondays

SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

75¢

WINGS ALL DAY

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO $500 POT-8PM

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

Saturday, August 11th

AMERICAN HITMAN W/ RIDING GRAVITY

LHAW (LIFE HAS A WAY) W/ RIKSHA & CITIZEN HYPOCRISY

Friday, August 10th

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NO COVER!

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

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Beach House + Sound of Ceres (The Depot) see p. 54 Candace + Atomic Arcade + The Dream Tapes (Kilby Court) Katie Herzig + William Wild (Urban Lounge) Little Big Band + Voodoo Orchestra (The Gallivan Center) Matt Weneger (Lake Effect) Shannon Runyan (The Spur) Toke + Machines of Man + Kapix (Metro Music Hall) Yelawolf + Waylon & Willie + Struggle Jennings + Jelly Roll (The Complex) see p. 52

DJ Battleship (Brewskis) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House)

COLUMBIA JONES SAT, AUG 11TH

kitchen open until midnight

1492 S STATE ST, SALT LAKE CITY 801.468.1492

7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS

AUGUST 9, 2018 | 59

PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

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SUN DIVIDE W/ TWO PEACE FRI, AUG 10TH


REGISTER TODAY TO ENTER TO WIN

$100 MAVERIK GAS CARD

ACROSS

1. Random guess 5. iPad purchases 9. Wolfgang Puck restaurant 14. Firehouse fixture 15. ____ Mix 16. Tribe with a lake named after it 17. Give ____ of approval 18. ____ sci (coll. major) 19. Shade of green 20. “It’s okay ... you didn’t mean anything by it” 23. Hindu teacher 24. Preschooler 25. Preschooler’s break 28. A breeze to use, in adspeak 33. “Roman J. Israel, ____” (2017 Denzel Washington movie) 36. It’s mined 37. Some paid rides 38. They’re often frowned upon by grammarians ... or a good title for this puzzle 43. Actress Donovan of “Clueless” 44. Cookie holder 45. “Spring forward” hrs. in NYC 46. Bodybuilder’s mantra 51. Air-escaping-from-a-tire sound 52. Susan of “L.A. Law” 53. Tree houses? 57. It’s #37 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time 61. When Otello dies in “Otello” 64. Salmon variety 65. “The Big Lebowski” director 66. “That was awesome of me!” 67. Smooth-talking 68. Oil grp. 69. “Copy that” 70. Bookies give them 71. Loch ____ monster

13. ____ Direction (boy band) 21. “Her name is ____ and she dances on the sand” (1983 pop lyric) 22. Suffix with ball or bass 25. Cuatro + cinco 26. Comparable to a beet? 27. “Hey! … yeah, you!” 29. Cartoon seller of Duff Beer 30. Coffee container 31. Manage 32. Former org. for James Comey 33. Utopias 34. Performs unaccompanied 35. Many Conan O’Brien lines 39. Youth org. since 1910 DOWN 40. Had a break between 1. Bridges flights 2. Thus far 41. Musician’s booking 3. Warm welcome? 42. Funnywoman 4. Curse Gasteyer 5. Clock radio toggle switch 47. Just-made 6. Unpaid intern, jocularly 48. “Black Panther” 7. Game in which it’s illegal to play left-handed actress Lupita 8. Jonathan and Taylor 49. Business with a 9. Public recognition guestbook 10. Word on a door handle 50. The Weekly Standard 11. The Diamondbacks, on scoreboards reader, perhaps 12. WhiteHouse.____

54. Listerine alternative 55. For whom the Lorax speaks 56. Matches up 57. One with a big mouth in Africa? 58. Gross growth 59. Gung-ho 60. Slaps the cuffs on 61. It’s thin on top of Everest 62. ____-Magnon man 63. Yank (on)

Last week’s answers

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Not even 5 percent of the world’s population lives in a complete democracy. Congratulations to Norway, Canada, Australia, Finland, Ireland, Iceland, Denmark, New Zealand, Switzerland and Sweden. Sadly, three countries where my column is published—the U.S., Italy, and France—are categorized as “flawed democracies.” Yet they’re far better than the authoritarian regimes in China and Russia. (Source: The Economist.) I offer this public service announcement as a prelude to your homework assignment. According to my astrological analysis, you will personally benefit from working to bring more democracy into your personal sphere. How can you ensure that people you care about feel equal to you, and have confiVIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her poem “Dogfish,” Virgo poet Mary Oliver writes, “I want- dence that you will listen to and consider their needs, and believe they ed the past to go away, I wanted to leave it.” Why? Because she have a strong say in shaping your shared experiences? wanted her life “to open like a hinge, like a wing.” I’m happy to tell you, Virgo, that you now have more power than usual to PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): make your past go away. I’m also pleased to speculate that as Mystic poet Kabir wrote, “The flower blooms for the fruit: you perform this service for yourself, you’ll be skillful enough when the fruit comes, the flower withers.” He was invoking a to preserve the parts of your past that inspire you, even as you metaphor to describe his spiritual practice and reward. The hard shrink and neutralize memories that drain you. In response inner work he did to identify himself with God was the blooming to this good work, I bet your life will open like a hinge, like a flower that eventually made way for the fruit. The fruit was wing—no later than your birthday, and most likely before that. his conscious, deeply felt union with God. I see this scenario as applicable to your life, Pisces. Should you feel sadness about the flower’s withering? It’s fine to do so. But the important thing is LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran fashion writer Diana Vreeland (1903-1989) championed that you now have the fruit. Celebrate it! Enjoy it! the beauty of the strong nose. She didn’t approve of women wanting to look like “piglets and kittens.” If she were alive today, ARIES (March 21-April 19): she’d be pleased that nose jobs in the U.S. have declined 43 Palestinian American writer Susan Abulhawa writes that in the percent since 2000. According to journalist Madeleine Schwartz Arab world, to say a mere “thank you” is regarded as spiritless and writing in Garage magazine, historians of rhinoplasty say there ungenerous. The point of communicating gratitude is to light up has been a revival of appreciation for the distinctive character with lively and expressive emotions that respond in kind to the kindrevealed in an unaltered nose. I propose, Libra, that in accordance ness bestowed. For instance, a recipient might exclaim, “May Allah with current astrological omens, we extrapolate some even big- bless the hands that give me this blessing,” or “Beauty is in the ger inspiration from that marvelous fact. The coming weeks will eyes that find me beautiful.” In accordance with current astrologibe an excellent time for you to celebrate and honor and express cal omens, I propose that you experiment with this approach. Be specific in your praise. Be exact in your appreciation. Acknowledge pride in your idiosyncratic natural magnificence. the unique mood and meaning of each rich exchange. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be else- TAURUS (April 20-May 20): where, doing something else, being someone else.” This defini- According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you need tion, articulated by author Isaac Asimov, will be an excellent fit this advice from mythologist Joseph Campbell: “Your sacred for you between now and Sept. 20. I suspect you’ll be unusually space is where you can find yourself again and again.” He says likely to feel at peace with yourself and at home in the world. it’s “a rescue land . . . some field of action where there is a spring I don’t mean to imply that every event will make you cheerful of ambrosia—a joy that comes from inside, not something and calm. What I’m saying is that you will have an extraordinary external that puts joy into you—a place that lets you experience capacity to make clear decisions based on accurate appraisals of your own will and your own intention and your own wish.” Do you have such a place, Taurus? If not, now is a great time to what’s best for you. find one. If you do, now is a great time to go there for a spell and renew the hell out of yourself. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’ve compiled a list of new blessings you need and deserve during the next 14 months. To the best of my ability, I will assist you GEMINI (May 21-June 20): to procure them. Here they are: a practical freedom song and When he was 20 years old, future U.S. President Thomas a mature love song; an exciting plaything and a renaissance of Jefferson had an awkward encounter with a young woman who innocence; an evocative new symbol that helps mobilize your piqued his interest. He was embarrassed by the gracelessness he evolving desires; escape from the influence of a pest you no displayed. For two days afterward, he endured a terrible headlonger want to answer to; insights about how to close the gap ache. We might speculate that it was a psychosomatic reaction. between the richest and poorest parts of yourself; and cutting a I bring this up because I’m wondering if your emotions are also trying to send coded messages to you via your body. Are you knot that has hindered you for years. aware of unusual symptoms or mysterious sensations? See if you can trace them back to their source in your soul. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “It has become clear to me that I must either find a willing nurturer to cuddle and nuzzle and whisper sweet truths with me CANCER (June 21-July 22): for six hours or else seek sumptuous solace through the aid of There’s a zone in your psyche where selfishness overlaps genereight shots of whiskey.” My Capricorn friend Tammuz confided osity, where the line between being emotionally manipulative that message to me. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were feeling a and gracefully magnanimous almost disappears. With both comparable tug. According to my assessment of the Capricorn hope and trepidation for the people in your life, I advise you to zeitgeist, you acutely need the revelations that would become hang out in that grey area for now. Yes, it’s a risk. You could end available to you through altered states of emotional intelli- up finessing people mostly for your own good and making them gence. A lavish whoosh of alcohol might do the trick, but a more think it’s mostly for their own good. But the more likely outcome reliable and effective method would be through immersions in is that you will employ ethical abracadabra to bring out the best in others, even as you get what you want, too. intricate, affectionate intimacy. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You probably gaze at the sky enough to realize when there’s a full moon. But you might not monitor the heavenly cycles closely enough to tune in to the new moon, that phase each month when the lunar orb is invisible. We astrologers regard it as a ripe time to formulate fresh intentions. We understand it to be a propitious moment to plant metaphorical seeds for the desires you want to fulfill in the coming four weeks. When this phenomenon happens during the astrological month of Leo, the potency is intensified for you. Your next appointment with this holiday is Aug. 10 and 11.

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Rose Park to Magna

I’ve tried to hype up Rose Park to buyers for decades, and people always look at me like I’m crazy. When first-time buyers couldn’t afford bungalows in Sugar House, I’ve verbally blindfold them and headed out to American Beauty Drive, just six minutes from downtown. The area was originally settled by railroad workers, laying lines that physically split the east and the west sides of Salt Lake. First known as Oakley Park, it consisted of wetlands, cow pastures and even some smelly hot springs. Buyers didn’t consider homes there until after W WII when developers began building subdivisions for newly married war vets and their brides. Sadly, these cute new homes were sold to whites only, and the deeds had restrictive covenants clearly stating that any resale of a home had to be sold to other Caucasians. Those kinds of deed restrictions became illegal shortly after I got my real estate license. State law now says that if a title company finds such language on a deed, they can automatically remove it when recording the documents into a new buyer’s name. Rose Park is one of the more diverse areas in Salt Lake City. It has great history and homeowners and renters from countries all over the world call it home. Most of the W WII veterans have died or gone to assisted living, and their homes have been sold or flipped. The area has gentrified with a swell mix of African immigrants, Mexicans, Russians, LGBTQ residents and so many more. But now Rose Park is getting pricey. The Trax line along North Temple has helped pique interest in the area, and affordable prices have attracted first-time buyers. What sold for $49,000 in 1984 (when I got my license) is now going for $325,000, though the home’s been gutted and updated. Now where am I telling people to look for affordable housing? Where’s the next frontier for real estate gentrification? Magna. There, I said it. It’s a 12-minute drive from Colosimo’s Standard Market (famous for making their own Italian sausages and salami) on Magna’s Main Street to downtown Salt Lake City. I just sold a three-bedroom, one-bathroom home there for $169,000. Magna’s always been a place of diversity as a town created by white farmers, mine owners and miners—a notoriously immigrant workforce. You can still have cows and livestock in this little town that will be exploding soon. The new prison is coming, as is the inland port and main transportation hub. I’ve seen many maps and plans over the years as a Salt Lake City planning and zoning commissioner and as UTA trustee. Look west young buyers, look west! n

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Recent Alarming Headline Infamous South Beach street artist Jonathan Crenshaw, 46, attracts a lot of attention in Miami among tourists, who watch him paint on a canvas—using his feet. Crenshaw does not have arms and is homeless. Profiled in a local newspaper in 2011, Crenshaw told of a difficult childhood (he also claimed Gloria Estefan had given birth to 200 of his children). He landed in the headlines again after stabbing a Chicago man with a pair of scissors on July 10. According to the Miami Herald, Cesar Coronado, 22, told police he had approached Crenshaw to ask for directions, when Crenshaw jumped up and, using his feet, stabbed Coronado. Crenshaw’s story is that as he lay on the pavement, Coronado punched him in the head—so he stabbed him, tucked the scissors into his waistband and walked away. Police found Crenshaw, who has a lengthy record, nearby and arrested him.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Biscuits managed to tick off a whole generation of baseball fans. The Biscuits announced Millennial Night on July 21, featuring participation ribbons just for showing up, a napping area, selfie stations and lots of avocados, reported Fox News. While some Twitter users thought the promotion was insensitive, others were more philosophical. Dallas Godshall, 21, said, “More than targeting millennials, it’s sort of targeting older generations who like to make fun of millennials.” Pitcher Benton Ross weighed in: “If it’s insensitive, maybe they should just have thicker skin.”

WEIRD

Bold Move Faith Pugh of Memphis, Tenn., had a date to remember on July 14 with Kelton Griffin. Her casual acquaintance from high school “just out of the blue texted me and asked me to go out,” Pugh told WREG-TV. They took her car and stopped at a gas station, where Griffin asked Pugh to go inside and buy him a cigar. But while she was inside, “He drove off. I came outside and my car was gone,” Pugh said. Shortly, Pugh received a text from her godsister, telling her Griffin had just asked her out on a date. He picked up the godsister in Pugh’s car and headed to a drive-in movie. “He didn’t even have any money,” Pugh said. “She actually paid their way to get in the drive-in just so I could get my car back.” Pugh alerted the police to the car’s location, and they arrested Griffin for theft of property. “I hope he’s in jail for a long time,” Pugh said.

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People and Their Pets Tina Ballard, 56, of Okeechobee County, Fla., was arrested in North Carolina by Linville Land Harbor police on July 16 after fleeing there to “hide (her pet) monkey so that state officials could not take that monkey from her,” assistant state attorney Ashley Albright told WPBF News. Ballard’s troubles began in May, when the spider monkey, Spanky, jumped out of a shopping cart in an Okeechobee Home Depot and grabbed a cashier’s shirt, “leaving red marks on the cashier’s shoulder and back.” In June, Fox News reported, another Home Depot employee spotted Spanky in the parking lot, having escaped Ballard’s truck and dragging a leash. Spanky was spooked by the store’s sliding doors and bit the employee on the arm, grabbing her hair and running away. The employee gave chase and eventually caught Spanky, but not before suffering more bites and scratches. Spanky was in the car when Ballard was arrested and extradited back to Florida; the monkey will be placed in a primate sanctuary. People Different From Us A Russian man who has covered more than 90 percent of his body—including his eyeballs—with black-ink tattoos underwent surgery on July 14 at Jardines Hospital in Guadalajara, Mexico, to remove his penis, testicles and nipples because they spoiled his body art. Adam Curlykale, 32, of Kaliningrad, an albino, was diagnosed with cancer and started the tattooing process 12 years ago to cover scars left behind from the disease. “I always knew that I was different from the rest of society,” Curlykale told The Daily Mail. “My favorite color, for example, has always been gray, in different tones, and that’s why my current skin color is graphite.” He plans to finish the process by inking his remaining un-tattooed skin.

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Bright Idea It’s time once again for minor league baseball promotion fun and games! This time, however, the Montgomery (Alabama)

VETERINARIANS

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Mystery Solved On Jan. 25, 71-year-old Alan J. Abrahamson of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., went for his regular pre-dawn walk to Starbucks. What happened on the way stumped police investigators until March, reported The Washington Post, and on July 13 they made their findings public. Images from a surveillance camera show Abrahamson walking out of his community at 5:35 a.m. and about a half-hour later, the sound of a gunshot is heard. Just before 7 a.m., a dog found Abrahamson’s body, lying near a walking path. Police found no weapon, no signs of a struggle; he still had his wallet and phone. Investigators initially worked the case as a homicide, but as they dug deeper into the man’s computer searches and purchases over the past nine years, a theory developed: Abrahamson had tied a gun to a weather balloon filled with helium, shot himself, and then the gun drifted away to parts unknown. A thin line of blood on Abrahamson’s sweatshirt indicated to police that “something with the approximate width of a string passed through the blood on the outside of the shirt,” the final report says. As for the balloon, investigators said it would likely have ascended to about 100,000 feet and exploded somewhere north of the Bahamas in the Atlantic Ocean.

Revenge, Texas-Style The Austin American-Statesman reported that on June 17, RV park neighbors and longtime adversaries Ryan Felton Sauter, 39, and Keith Monroe got into a heated dispute about an undisclosed subject. Later that day, Monroe saw Sauter leaving Monroe’s RV and asked him why he had gone in without permission, to which Sauter replied, “You’ll see why.” Going inside, Monroe soon spotted a 3-foot-long rattlesnake. “I freaked out,” he said. He used a machete to kill the snake, which strangely was missing its rattles. Turns out Sauter had bitten off the snake’s tail, with its signature warning sound. Sauter has been charged with deadly conduct and criminal trespass.

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City Weekly August 9, 2018  

We Have The Lagers!

City Weekly August 9, 2018  

We Have The Lagers!