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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY “I” IS FOR IMBIBE

Lock the doors, lower the blinds, fire up the smoke machine and bust out your martini shaker—our annual A-Z cocktail guide is here! Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 25 A&E 30 DINE 37 CINEMA 40 MUSIC 52 COMMUNITY

DARBY DOYLE

Cover story, p. 13 Doyle has earned many titles: cocktail connoisseur, mixology maven, booze baroness and kickass mom. Leading up to this feature, her daredevil son Connor was in a mountain bike crash, and though drama and doctor and dentist visits followed, she didn’t skip a beat in compiling this boozy compendium. Cheers to that!

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Former LDS bishop aims to strengthen LGBTQ ties.

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Cover story, July 5, “Latter-day Leaks” Mormophobia.

CRAIG SCHROERLUCKE Via Facebook Why do you losers care? I have Mormon neighbors who I like way better than you left-wing lunatics.

KERRY KNOWLES Via Facebook

Shine that light, baby. Let the truth free. Whatever is left can crawl back under a rock.

AMI ADKINS Via Facebook

Thank you for this incredible cover story!

CHRISTINA ROBOHM Via Instagram

Before going at length about the evils of religion, and religious believers (implied), I would remind readers that Pol Pot, Joseph Stalin, Vladimir Lenin, Mao Zedong and Adolf Hitler—who collectively killed about 30 million people—were atheists and pure evil.

@MGHTYPRT Via Twitter

Firstly, atheism is merely the lack of belief in the existence of a deity. It doesn’t mandate anything whatsoever; it doesn’t command anything.

@PHYSICALITIES Via Twitter

If [MormonLeaks founder Ryan McKnight] doesn’t believe in [Mormonism], why doesn’t he just move on with his life like a normal person? I did.

RUSSELL GREER Via Facebook

Private Eye, July 5, “Headlines Matter”

Dear John, (now there is a headline!) I’m writing to say how much I appreciate the Private Eye slot in CW. Very much like the addition of Aspen Perry’s new eccentric voice, yours and all the other contributors. I do miss Stephen Dark’s articles, though. I do literally relate to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, as my father was production design on the original version of the film and I was on the set a number of times. In fact, this is actually a completely true headline: “Teenager Makes the First ‘Pod.’’’ And there is a story that isn’t revealed in the headline, nor herein. The film is aptly mentioned as quintessential capturing of faux that has been the grail of my work as an artist—and at the same time interesting to grab that for your purpose re. headlines, when so much of our news is not news but blather gossip without substance. We wonder where has truth gone, as little Jimmy says in Body Snatchers: “My mother is not my mother!” There’s a good headline for an article about plastic surgery, transexual parenting or …

JANN HAWORTH, Salt Lake City

Hits & Misses, July 5, “Renewable Savings”

Coal is cheap and plentiful. Without subsidies, renewables are a shitshow. Maybe you could start a GoFundMe page?

KERRY KNOWLES Via Facebook

Straight Dope, July 5, “Brain Drain”

It’s always a good idea to do a little research on your meds and supplements that you put into your body.

LINDA PHILLIPS NEWMAN Via Facebook

Brain supplements? Well, they help detoxify your wallet a little.

DUSTIN CLARK Via Facebook

Dine, July 5, “Get These Cookies!”

The homemade chocolate chip cookies sold by a boy in the 900 South Caffé Expresso driveway are really hard to beat. He sets up a card table there most Saturdays.

DANIEL LOVE

Via cityweekly.net

You missed the best in town by not mentioning Goodly Cookies.

RON HENSON Via Facebook

Online news post, July 6, More than 100 immigrants and refugees are naturalized

Hey, liberal filth paper! It’s ILLEGAL immigration at the border that matters, not legal immigrants or war-torn refugees becoming U.S. Citizens. That’s great, but illegal filth is not!

BOB ERICKSON Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

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STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Contributors KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, DARBY DOYLE, KYLEE EHMANN, CADEN MARK GARDNER, HOWARD HARDEE, SAMANTHA HERZOG, CRAIG D. LINDSEY, SAMANTHA PUC, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR., ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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OPINION Pandemonium

While his mini-ninnies huddle beneath the White House tables like a Midwest clan awaiting the touchdown of an EF5 tornado, the storm of President Donald Trump’s verbal and behavioral abortions continues to wreak havoc in the civilized world. I find myself asking, “Why couldn’t he have just stopped at the familiar boundaries of his sick little world—grabbing pussies and frolicking with hookers in his Moscow hotel room while his “stellar” art-of-the-deal business interests crumbled and burned in the bankruptcy courts? That’s what Trump was; that’s what he is today. The only thing that’s changed is his title, expanding the audience for his theatrics and inviting the scrutiny of 300 million Americans and the duly-disgusted billions around the world. At least he was in his own element back then, before his Soviet buddies got him launched into shoes too big to fill. For Trump, there’s no growing into that mantle of presidential dignity. He needs to go back where he belongs. The most disturbing truth is not that he is a monster. That’s bad enough, sure. He doesn’t seem to be able to do anything but stir controversy and sow misery and pain. But, even more horrific, is the matter of inexcusable congressional abdication in dealing with a president who has become the worst blow to America since its inception. Trump’s reckless diplomatic missteps and his bull-in-the-china-shop antics have precipitated international tragedy, tortured the innocent young, insulted all of our friends, threatened the demise of our democracy and ensured highly-predictable

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. political and economic repercussions for our allies. We elected our senators and representatives—not to kowtow to their suspected Russian-operative-president, but to take stands on issues that are important to the future of our country. Well, Orrin, Mike, Rob, Chris, John, Mia, now’s a good time to take the appropriate action for your constituents. Somehow transformed into a sorryass bunch of deaf-mutes, even the otherwise seeminglyrespectable most honorable congressmen aren’t saying “boo.” You’d think that, in an organization so large, at least a few would stand up and be heard. That simply isn’t happening. Congress is a disgrace to the values of our Founding Fathers, and Utah’s own senators and representatives are as bad as they get. Instead of forging ahead to drain Washington’s ugly swamp, they are swimming with the crocodiles and mating with the swamp’s ugliest residents. Every one of them should be sent packing in the November elections for failing to stop Trump’s ongoing carnage. Stuck in the clear understanding that their country is now led by a gigantic juvenile ego driven by a pea-sized brain, Congress is silently hoping, like the rest of us, that this hideous nightmare will somehow end. It has the power but lacks the integrity to rein in the president. Even the eternal optimists’ hopes are being dashed by the events of the past month—a time during which Trump has solidly completed the alienation of other world powers. While the matter of NATO countries underfunding the defense coffers is largely legitimate, Trump essentially told our allies to go fuck themselves. In his usual Whack-A-Mole style, he offered no suggestions for compromise. He seeks no resolution. (I guess that’s the art of the deal.)

Late and truant from some of his scheduled meetings, he didn’t even have the decency to apologize. Trump’s meetings at NATO and his badly mannered height-of-rudeness visits with British Prime Minister Theresa May and Queen Elizabeth II, demonstrated that, just when we think we’ve seen the worst of his behavior, he is soaring to new heights as the ultimate negative superlative. True to form, Trump insulted May, broke every protocol during his audience with the Queen and managed to get caught in yet another of his well-documented lies. While he claimed #FakeNews over a London newspaper report of his demeaning censure of May, his denials were derailed. This time he can’t point his finger, accusing the American press of alleged dishonesty. The publication responded with a tape of Trump’s interview. Bingo, gotcha! And, in Trump’s characteristic worship of Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin, he muzzled the mainstream American press at a briefing, claiming that he would only respond to questions from his own news service: Fox. The week’s steady faux pas stream was crowned by his bungled and abrasive visit to the U.K., but the damage Trump did at NATO will live in infamy for years to come. While I quite like the moniker, “The Rabid Orange Raccoon,” his awful behavior has inspired yet one more: From now on I’m going to call him “The Dictator,” but I’m dropping the last two syllables. I can’t wait until Americans finally take action, delivering Trump’s favorite line to the man himself: “You’re fired!” CW

Retired business owner Michael S. Robinson Sr. lives in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Rule of Convenience

Here’s one of the favorite catchphrases of the new Republican Party: “the rule of law.” It is part of the Utah Rules of Professional Conduct for lawyers, who should “further the public’s understanding of and confidence in the rule of law and the justice system because legal institutions in a constitutional democracy depend on popular participation and support to maintain their authority.” But wait. Confidence? Moving away from the celebrity-inspired pardons, there are two in our neck of the woods—Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio and those wacky ranchers who set fires on public lands and inspired the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Now, President Trump wants America to believe he really, really loves the “rule of law” and wants his guy put on the Supreme Court. “The Rule of Law is our nation’s proud heritage. It is the cornerstone of our freedom. It is what guarantees equal justice,” he said. When it’s convenient.

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It’s hard to understand why a simple public records request takes years to accomplish. Let’s just say it’s pushback. A Utah judge just ruled—after two years—that the BYU Police Department is a public entity and needs to turn over emails and other information requested by The Salt Lake Tribune. The paper was examining how students who report sex crimes are treated. “State-sanctioned BYU Police like to say they follow #GRAMA, except when it’s controversial or not convenient,” BYU journalism professor Joel Campbell tweeted. But keep your ears to the ground. At a recent legislative committee hearing, lawmakers were told the number of GRAMA requests was on the rise, and they need to staunch the flow. In other words, slow public access.

It’s Mike Lee’s Land

Uh-oh. Now that Sen. Mike Lee is out of contention for the Supreme Court job, he’ll be tirelessly working to get the public out of public lands. According to the Deseret News, Lee has introduced a bill to prohibit presidents from expanding or creating national monuments in Utah without congressional and legislative approval. “Unfortunately, what was once a narrowly targeted tool for preventing looting on federal lands has become a weapon urban elites use against hard-working rural Americans,” Lee said. And there you have it: the urban elite. Yes, by all means the rural 20 percent of the U.S. population should take over the public lands from the elitist majority. Indeed, Utah is right up there with Alaska and Nevada with the highest percentage of public lands within its borders—and Utah is at the greatest risk of losing these lands.

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Here’s your chance to sit down with tribal leaders to hear the story of Bears Ears and why it’s so deeply spiritual to Native Americans. At the Lummi Bear Totem Reception, the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coaltion will welcome a gift of a bear totem from the Lummi Nation. “Tribal leaders will speak to the importance of unity and healing in our work to protect ancestral lands,” according to the event’s Facebook page. Bring food to share and dine with the people who want to protect this stunning and meaningful national monument. The Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake, 120 W. 1300 South, 801-486-4877, Thursday, July 19, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Jf W88B.

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MEET TO STOP POLICE BRUTALITY

What does community mean to you? Is it OK for police to target immigrants, African Americans, Native Americans—or you? At We Demand Protection, We Demand Control, you’ll hear strategies and ideas for legislation to help stop racial profiling and police brutality. If you think the violence needs to end now and that police officers should be held accountable, then join the movement. “We won’t allow police who target the black and brown people of our communities to remain unaccountable,” the event’s Facebook page says. “We won’t allow police who abuse their power to remain unaccountable. We won’t allow police to continue policing themselves. The violence ends now.” Salt Lake City and County Building, 451 S. State, Saturday, July 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2N8doz5.

MEDICAID PAMPHLETING

Oh yes, your penny wise state government just can’t bring itself to scoop up $800 million in federal Medicaid funds because, you know, you can’t be sure it will last. If you’re wondering what in the world they’re thinking, so are a majority of Utahns who will be voting in November to expand health care coverage to more than 150,000 needy patients and their families. Now, Utah Decides Healthcare—the initiative to let you vote on Medicaid expansion—is looking for volunteers to wear “Yes on 3” T-shirts and pass out stickers and fliers at the Pioneer Day Parade with Utah Decides. This is a great way to show your activism for an issue that is literally a matter of life and death. Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, 801718-6130, Tuesday, July 24, 8 a.m.1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2NMjQNp.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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NEWS

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Techie Teachers

Online mentorship program opens virtual doors for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS/DEREK CARLISLE

BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

S

ummer Devotchka was nervous. She’d only been talking to 15-year-old Ashley online for a month before they met in person at Cottonwood High School one weeknight last October. “My go-to is humor,” Devotchka says. “So, I’m just, like, ‘Whenever things get awkward, make a bunch of jokes.’” Left to their own devices for a halfhour of small talk before they partook in an activity, Devotchka and Ashley, a sophomore at the Murray-based high school, bonded over their love of dogs and Black Butler, a Japanese anime series, reinforcing in person the common interests and hobbies they previously discussed over the internet. “I wanted her to make sure she liked me,” Devotchka, who is also a marketing coordinator at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah, says. Devotchka and Ashley were matched through BBBS’s Mentor 2.0, a largely remote, volunteer program for professionals who want to help Cottonwood High students be as prepared as possible for life after graduation. Mentor 2.0 began in fall 2015. Of those who participated in its inaugural class, 90 percent graduated from high school in 2017, according to Nancy Winemiller-Basinger, president and CEO of the nonprofit’s Utah office. The following year, 100 percent graduated. Utah’s 2016 high school graduation rate was only 85 percent, according to a blog maintained by the Utah Board of Education Office. Shannon Atkinson, program coordinator, says Cottonwood High was a prime location to launch Mentor 2.0 because once Granite High School closed in 2009, the majority of the diverse student body started attending Cottonwood. He says BBBSU hopes to one day expand the initiative to Kearns, a west side Salt Lake City high school where the demographic makeup is similar, but they’ll need to secure more funding. Mentors and students communicate weekly through a text-based, emaillike secure platform, answering prompts that deal with topics like

Big Brothers Big Sisters’ digital program finds new ways to reach students and helps them achieve their college dreams. professionalism, perseverance and self-advocacy, among others. Mentors respond on their own schedules, while mentees are given time in the class— taught by Atkinson—to complete the lessons. Once a month, the pairs meet in person at Cottonwood High, where they work together on activities that reinforce the curriculum. “I like the program because you have someone who you can talk to about college or other things if you don’t have anyone in your personal life to talk to about [that] stuff,” Ashley wrote in a text message to City Weekly, communicating through a medium similar to how she talks to her mentor. Winemiller-Basinger says Mentor 2.0 currently serves 220 high schoolers, many of whom are from families who earn low or moderate incomes. “For many of these high school students, they would be the first in their family to go to college,” she says. This year, BBBSU plans to enroll 130 freshmen, meaning it’s looking to add the same amount of “Bigs” to maintain the 1:1 mentor-to-mentee ratio allowing for individualized attention and support. “We constantly need mentors,” Winemiller-Basinger says, noting that volunteers must have an advanced degree (usually a bachelor’s, but they do accept people in some circumstances who have earned an associate degree). The program also asks for a 12-month commitment, though ideally mentors will work with the student for all four years of high school. “The ultimate goal is to help them become the best people they can be,” Devotchka says. For most, that means

college—Atkinson says more than 80 percent of the students who graduated in May are pursuing some form of higher education at places like Utah Valley, Weber State and Stanford universities, as well as Westminster College. “For people who really have an interest in helping kids graduate from high school, and decide what they want to do after high school and prepare for that goal, I think this is a great fit,” Winemiller-Basinger says. The first remote project that Devotchka remembers doing is a virtual poster she and Ashley made about themselves. “It was really fun because it was the first time we got to know a lot about each other,” Devotchka says. As they would in person, the pair clicked when they realized they both liked art and zombies. They also bonded over a shared struggle: anxiety. “It comes out in different ways, but we’re able to learn a lot from each other on how to handle it and how to get through it,” Devotchka says. Some of the remote activities are pretty basic, she adds, but the poster allowed for her and Ashley to flex their creative muscles and inject their personalities into it. “So she didn’t think I’m just some stern adult coming into her life, telling her what to do.” Devotchka, who was already raising four children, initially didn’t know if she’d have time to be a mentor. “I believe that people think they’re going to come into a situation like this and think they’re going to be a secondary parent,” she says. But that’s not the case, not even for her and Ashley, who have grown close despite interacting more

through text-based communications than meeting in person. “I’m not her parent. I’m not someone who’s coming into her life and taking over,” Devotchka says. “It’s really just an email once a week. You text once in a while, then you meet once a month.” More than six months removed from their first in-person meeting, Devotchka and Ashley now exchange text messages in the summer months before they’ll meet again at Cottonwood High when school starts. Devotchka sends Ashley pictures of her dog, and the teen texts pictures of drawings she’s working on, strengthening their relationship outside of the projects they complete in front of their respective screens during the school year. Like Ashley, should she go on to college after high school, Devotchka was the first in her family to earn a fouryear degree. “I didn’t necessarily have all the help that I needed when I was growing up,” Devotchka says. Sure, her family loved and supported her, but she never really had a mentor. “I think the most rewarding part for me is knowing I can be there for somebody who is like me.” A 13-year instructor at Salt Lake Community College, Atkinson has been molding young minds for a long time. But one Mentor 2.0 class stands out in particular, where all of the students were refugees from war-torn countries. They overcame violence, famine and language barriers, he says, crossing oceans and surviving unimaginable hardships. “These kids are incredible.” CW


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t seems like just yesterday when this intrepid booze writer was contacted by City Weekly’s fearless editor and asked to assemble a comprehensive A-to-Z guide of all the goodly drinks action going down in Deseret. Now in its third year, this directory of delicious drinkables is a testament to how Zion’s spirits culture has not only grown but is thriving with a capital T. No olive or maraschino cherry was left unturned in prepping this compendium, so hunker down with your favorite summertime drink and give it a go. If it’s a truly immersive experience you’re after, you might want to also crank up some tunes. In the spirit of so many retro ’80s and ’90s trends making a cocktail comeback, might we suggest you crank up C+C Music Factory’s “Gonna Make You Sweat,” and let the rhythm move you (get it?) on over to your neighborhood distillery, brewery or bar.

S PIR

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A-Z Cocktail

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By Darby Doyle comments@cityweekly.com @abourbongal

A is for Agave

Spirits 101: More than 200 varieties of agave plants grow wild throughout Mexico and the Southwest, and alcoholic products from this species include, yes, tequila, but also mezcal, bacanora, raicilla, sotol and a lower-ABV fermented agave nectar beverage called pulque. Distinctively smoky mezcal can legally be made with a bunch of different agave options, however, only the Weber blue (agave tequilana) plant may be used to make tequila. And much like Champagne or Cognac in France must be made in those eponymous regions with specific varietals, authentic tequila can only be produced in a small area of Mexico centered around the state of Jalisco. For a local connection, try top-shelf premium brand VIDA Tequila (vidatequila.com), a company owned by Utahbased Lisa Barlow, who’s a huge supporter of our craftcocktail scene or, head up 50 miles north to Eden’s New World Distillery (4795 E. 2600 North, Eden, 385-244-0144, newworlddistillery.com) and see how 100 percent agave spirits are fermented and distilled on site by artisans Chris and Ashley Cross to make their distinctive Rabbit and Grass Agave Spirit and (a rarity) agave-based vodka.

Let the spyioriut!s move


Blue Curaçao

Digestif

COURTESY WATERPOCKET DISTILERY

Huge-ass hair, leg-warmers, shoulder-baring slouchy sweaters, heavy eyeliner for everyone. Apartheid, the Cold War, Reaganomics. Oh, the ’80s: how we love and loathe the era of Me First. Whether your early clubbing years started out in this incubator of neon-bathed nightlife or you’re young enough to consider the scene “retro,” SLC’s beloved Area 51 nightclub has been the go-to spot for New Wave and Alternative nostalgia, pop and a helluva lot of fun. If you can’t wait for Thursday night to get your cocktail fashion fix, pick up a bottle of that sticky sweet synthetic wonder known as Blue Curaçao, and add it to your vodka-soda highball for that singularly ’80s appeal to the outrageous. Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, 801-534-0819, area51slc.com

COURTESY EATDRINKSLC

Eat Drink SLC

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DARBY DOYLE

Cannabis

Cannabis-infused cocktails seem like the next big trend, right? Looking to our Left Coast neighbors for inspiration, it became immediately apparent that imbibing cannabis as an ingredient should be approached with a good dose of caution. Even recreational-use states have pretty strict rules about separating their marijuana and booze services. In an article parsing out the pros and cons of cannabis cocktails, bar industry mag Imbibe notes the biggest challenge (and this is talking in terms of home mixology) is that calibrating appropriate dosing still is a work in progress. Due to the solvent nature of alcohol and varying levels of cannabis strength found in the wild, you could be amplifying the sedative and psychoactive qualities of both ingredients. No bueno. But not to worry, the buzz in the bar scene indicates that there are plenty of bartenders out there doing the tough work of experimentation (note: several books on the subject are available on Amazon) to make sure that by the time Utah gets the green light on ganja, we’ll know what’s what. Until then, when in West Hollywood, check out non-alcoholic cannabis mocktails like the one at Gracias Madre (graciasmadreweho. com): their “On The Wagon” drinks menu includes a CBD Snowcone ($15) made with lemon, hibiscus, agave and non-psychoactive cannabidiol oil.

Held each July among the cool tree canopy and entertaining fowl at Tracy Aviary, Eat Drink SLC (eatdrinkSLC.com) is one of our perennial favorite fundraiser/drinks events in a city brimming with great boozy fests. Looking for more opportunities to meet and sample sips from our state’s growing cadre of brewers, distillers and winemakers? Mark your calendars for the ever-popular Taste of the Wasatch at Solitude Resort (tasteofwasatch.com) on Aug. 5, the fourth annual Made in Utah Festival (madeinutahfest.com) at the Gateway on Aug. 25 and Food & Wine Fest (saltlakefoodandwinefest.com) presented by the Salt Lake Area Restaurant Association takes over our salty city Sept. 13-16.

Flower

DARBY DOYLE

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… or apéritif: What’s the diff? They’re French terms describing when certain spirits are consumed while dining; in Italian, it’s aperitivo and digestivo. Traditionally, European meals begin with an apéritif like sherry, vermouth or a lower alcohol cocktail served to stimulate the appetite. Digestifs, as their name implies, are imbibed following a meal to aid digestion (the beverages most synonymous with a classic digestivo are bracing Italian amari like Cynar, Fernet and luscious Averna). SLC’s own Waterpocket Distillery makes a distinctive and complex digestif called Toadstool Notom Amari that’s become an underground (and over-the-bar) hit with tipplers all over the state. “Like coffee to a kid, many hate bitter digestifs at first, but then find it’s a standard adult pleasure they couldn’t live without,” Waterpocket owner/distiller Alan Scott, says. “Our senses signal warning with bitter flavors at first. But once you’ve crossed over, it’s like realizing you’ve been looking at rainbows with only half the colors ... Finishing a meal with a classic bitter digestif like our Notom Amaro completes the picture.” Scott recommends it as a classic pairing for a rich meal. I like it pretty much any time. Head to the distillery (2084 W. 2200 South, 385-2025725, waterpocket.co) for the full experience.

Gin

Flowery garnishes continue to grace both plates and cocktails with edible flair. Restaurants across the Wasatch Front have been fortunate since 2012 to source gorgeous veggies, fruits and flowers directly from Frog Bench Farms (frogbenchfarms.com), a private cheforiented farm on SLC’s East Bench foothills. Owners Paula and Joe Sargetakis and farm manager Stacy Semborski make a point that appearance has equal priority as flavor in everything they grow at the sustainable farm, which includes more than a dozen flower varieties like borage, marigold, lavender, nasturtium and viola.

… for the win! Only a handful of years ago, there was no such thing as Utah gin. Boy howdy, has that changed for the better! Within the popular spirits category, you can source local juniper-forward juice from all over the state. At the Beehive state’s northern reaches, find Oomaw Gin from New World Distillery in Eden and Madam Pattirini from the 5 Wives Vodka bottlers at Ogden’s Own. In SLC, Chris Barlow of Beehive Distilling has been batching up awardwinning Jackrabbit and aged Old Tom-style Barrel Reserve (look for their brand-spanking-new distillery space off of West Temple in South Salt Lake opening for business soon!), and relatively new kids on the distilling block Hammer Spring Distillers have just released their first runs of Hammer Spring Gin, a botanical spirit with nice notes of sage and white peppercorn. Dented Brick Distillery now has two gins on distilling rotation, with a craft well gin that’s as easy drinking as it is affordable, and their premium line Great Basin Bristlecone already is raking in critical praise in its first year of production. Thirsty for more? When in Park City, visit Alpine Distilling and pick up a bottle of their Summit gin for a pleasant surprise. And in recent years, Utah distilling has expanded south, with the fine folks at Moab Brewery throwing their hats into the hard-spirits pool with their latest venture, Moab Distillery. When at the shop (next door to the popular brewery) purchase a bottle of Spot On, made with crisp botanicals and water from the La Sal Mountains.


Kiitos

It’s been brewed in the Americas since long before Johnny Appleseed embarked on his apocryphal mission of fruit propagation. In fact, hard apple cider was the most popular beverage quaffed in our nation’s Colonial era, even more so than beer, wine or whiskey. In recent years, the refreshing beverage has made a big-time comeback, with fermented fruit ciders produced from coast to coast. Salt Lake’s Mountain West Hard Cider (425 N. 400 West, 801-935-4147, mountainwestcider.com) makes a few delicious varieties of hard apple ciders, available by the bottle at state liquor stores, or try the whole lineup right at the source at Mountain West Cider’s dog-friendly outdoor patio, The Garten, shared with the fine folks at Red Rock Brewing. For something unusual—with a nice citrusy zing and sweet melon notes—check out their Desolation Prickly Pear Hard Cider, infused with purée from the eponymous cactus fruit.

COURTESY MT WEST DISTILLERY

Hard Cider

The fresh-faced brewery joined Utah’s growing ranks of Beehive breweries last year, giving some serious cred to our cadre of craft brewers kickin’ ass, takin’ names and generally showing that our brewski-lovin’ populace has cheerfully adopted a “more the merrier” sensibility. Hot out of the gate, the A. Fisher Brewing revival, as well as new ventures RoHa Brewing Project and 2 Row Brewing have added some diversity to the brewing buzz. Shameless plug alert: You can meet the folks from Kiitos and other stellar Beehive state breweries at City Weekly’s own Utah Beer Festival (utahbeerfestival.com) Saturday and Sunday Aug. 18-19. Tickets sell out every year, so act quick.

DARBY DOYLE

Low ABV Judging

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Specifically that hailing from Baja’s Valle de Guadalupe have made a huge splash in the wine world in recent years. At just 90 miles south of San Diego, the region’s wine geography has been compared to California’s Napa Valley for both culinary experiences and access to estate varietals, with more than 150 wineries now operating. And it’s fucking gorgeous. “It’s just like being in Italy, except you’re speaking Spanish,” CW editor Enrique Limón says. And you don’t have jet lag or, let’s face it, the sticker shock of either Napa or Naples. Win-win. State liquor store brass: Start stocking it, please?

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Woodford Bourbgeois 1 1/2 ounces Woodford Reserve Bourbon 1 ounce pineapple juice 3/4 ounce matcha syrup 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice Shake all ingredients with ice. Strain into a cucumbershrub rinsed glass; garnish with an edible orchid and fresh ground cinnamon.

Mexican Wine

… 24 cocktails in two hours and living to tell the tale. Last April, the Utah chapter of the U.S. Bartenders’ Guild held its annual cocktail competition, hosted this year at the gorgeous Utah Museum of Contemporary Art and sponsored by Woodford Reserve whiskey. Along with UMOCA president Kristian Anderson and Brown-Forman sales manager Mark Kuehn (who knows a thing or two about whiskey), I was invited to be a guest judge to evaluate eight bartenders’ drinks in three rounds. That’s right. Twenty-four cocktails in just about two hours. Now, that doesn’t mean we finished all those concoctions, but it was a nice night’s work for my liver. Peep the USBG Utah Instagram feed @usbgutah for the 411 on this and future events, many of which are open to the public. Competition winner Christian Saez shared one of his three cocktail recipes from the showdown, telling me, “The idea came from a smoothie I had in Manhattan, which was pineapple, cucumber and matcha. I thought it was super bourgeois and I paid $7 for it, so I named this cocktail the ‘Woodford Bourbgeois.’” This whiskey sour variation was one of my favorites from the night (such as I remember it):

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Upscale sippers with reduced or no alcohol continue to gain ground. Although folks still use the term “mocktail,” many bars have changed their selections to embrace the middle way, so to speak, including lighter aperitif cocktails like those popular in Europe at lunchtime on their menus; a nice option when you’d still like a pretty potion but don’t want to return to work plastered—à la a liquid lunch. A while back, I spoke with Under Current Bar (279 E. 300 South, 801-574-2556, undercurrentbar.com) managing partner Amy Eldredge about the trend, and she said there are many reasons why bar patrons choose to eliminate entirely or limit their alcohol consumption and that, “the customer experience and the drink presentation should absolutely be of the same quality” as full-strength cocktails. Whether it’s a completely booze-free juice spritzer or a lower-ABV vermouth aperitif cocktail, the experience is equally elegant as that of our friends who are ordering barrel-strength bourbon.

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Reading is fundamental, and this tome by David Wondrich, is one of the top 10 drinks-history books for any self-respecting home bar bookshelf. Part drinks history, part cocktail cookbook plus all sass and badass bravado, Wondrich’s books are the boozy bridge between vintage bar guides and the rest of a geeked-out collection of global mixology guidance. As John Waters said, “Don’t sleep with people who don’t read.” The cocktail corollary? Don’t drink with people who don’t have interesting stories; pick up (or download, you techie bastards) a copy of any of Wondrich’s books and you’ll be chock full of cocktailparty drinks knowledge.

MIKE REIDEL

Imbibe!


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No Nonsense

Bartenders and bars that keep it real hold a special place in our hearts (and livers). For those times when we want our beverages served with a side order of zero fucks, here are some of CW staff’s favorite watering holes: 1. Enrique Limón, editor Greg Arata at Junior’s Tavern (30 E. 300 South, 801-322-0318) is the real deal. He’s shared more stories with local media types than he has collectible hooch cans behind protective glass. The man knows how to pour a frosty one—and how to keep a secret, to boot. 2. Kelan Lyons, staff writer I love the dimly lit backroom speakeasy at Bar X (155 E. 200 South, 801-355-2287), where bartenders will make you a mystery drink if you aren’t feeling a more classic cocktail. Initially skeptical because Utah laws prevent bartenders from having heavy hands, I was pleasantly surprised by the taste and strength of each adult beverage. That is, until I had a few and couldn’t taste them anymore.

3. Sarah Arnoff, proofreader One face familiar to me since the wee age of 21 is that of bartender Ed at the Tap Room (2021 E. Windsor St., 801-484-6692). He prefers just Ed, and his mix of surly and friendly demeanor has presided over the haunt for years. I spent many a long afternoon sipping a draft and playing Medieval Madness pinball in their narrow basement digs at their old Highland Drive location. That lovably dingy basement is long gone, paved over by the plan of progress. But the Tap’s Windsor Street home has the same vibe, with just Ed still slinging drinks behind the much more spacious bar. 4. Ray Howze, editorial assistant Everyone needs a go-to bartender in their life. When they walk into a place and the bartender knows your name and your drink of choice. Megan Brown and Marley Bramble at Murphy’s Bar & Grill (160 S. Main, 801-359-7271) have kept our beverages flowing for years and sometimes all it takes is a nod of the head. As an Irish bar, they also know their way around an Irish Car Bomb or two. The dimly lit dive-bar salt-of-the-earth feel offers a chance for you to be yourself while Brown and Bramble—who don’t take shit from anyone—and others keep your libations coming.

DEREK CARLISLE

NIKI CHAN

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LUCKY 13 HAS A ROTATING VARIETY OF 20 MEZCALS. WE FOCUS ON SMALL PRODUCERS THAT USE RESPONSIBLE HARVESTING AND PRODUCTION METHODS. OH, WE ALSO SERVE AWARD WINNING BURGERS.

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On Tap

Quickles

TRACY GOMEZ

Rimming

As in specialty salts and sugars. Move over, margarita, there’s more to coating the rim of a glass with salt for that something extra to take your summer beverage to the next level. Whether it’s bacon-infused salts for your Bloody Mary brunch or citrus-packed sugar for boozy lemonade, a sparkly sassy rim on the glass kicks the whole experience up a notch. For some local flair, source your salts and sugars from our favorite Spice Gal at Aimee’s Home Cookin’ (aimeeshomecookin.com). You’ll find her goods at the Downtown Farmers Market (slcfarmersmarket.org), at many local distilleries’ package stores and at her pop-up market in Sugar House (2157 E. 2100 South, Ste. B).

GREGORY HANSEN

AIMEESHOMECOKIN.COM

The brandy distilled in Peru and Chile from white muscat grapes is here to mix it up. In Utah liquor stores, the most popularly-exported brand is easily identified on the shelf by its famous black “Easter Island head” bottle shape. It’s no surprise that cocktails hailing from pisco’s countries of origin use bright, fresh flavors and quite a bit of citrus, such as the classic Pisco Sour. For a local spin on pisco mixology, head to Lake Effect (155 W. 200 South, 801-532-2068, lakeeffectslc.com) and try their Zion cocktail with Logia pisco, a touch of serrano pepper and lots of fruit-forward yumminess like pineapple gomme, mango and fresh lime juice.

RICARDO VASQUEZ

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Aka quick pickles. In addition to being a fun word to say five times fast, you can add this technique to your Bloody Mary or Dirty Martini garnish repertoire for some serious cocktail cred (or, I guess, could spruce up a sandwich— your call). Rather than letting those fragile thin-skinned cucumbers turn to moldy mush in the fridge veggie drawer, make a few Iron Chef-worthy pretty knife cuts to make bias-cut thin ovals, or get out your mandolin or Y-peeler to create long wide strips of cucumber. No need to peel ’em first. Plop those in a clean glass-lidded jar with equal parts boiling water and vinegar (white, apple cider, champagne, rice, red wine, whatevs), plenty of kosher salt to taste, and the herbal profile of your choice. My faves? A few cloves of fresh crushed garlic, fresh dill, some black peppercorns and dill seed. Cool to room temperature, add the jar lid, shake well, refrigerate for at least four hours and shazam! You’ve got a pretty quick pickle (quickle!) that looks amazing threaded on a skewer accordion-style. Keep refrigerated for up to a week.

Pisco

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DARBY DOYLE

At bars and restaurants all over town, you’ll now find more than beer on tap. For example, Current Fish & Oyster (currentfishandoyster.com) has developed a delightful wine-on-tap program, with seasonally changing selections pairing with the popular restaurant’s seafood-forward menu. At the lobby bar of the sleek and modern AC Hotel (225 W. 200 South, 385-722-9600, marriott.com/slcad), drinks manager Tracy Gomez has worked within prescribed DABC service rules to create an on-tap cocktail, which is part of the hotel’s brand. During a recent visit to what’s become one of my favorite new downtown spots to sip on a blistering summer afternoon, Gomez pulled from the tap a zippy spin on a classic Negroni, which she batches with Wahaka Espadin mezcal, Campari and Lustau Vermut. “It’s definitely an assertive cocktail, smoky mezcal goes toe-to-toe with the bitter Campari but it’s softened beautifully by the Spanish vermouth,” Gomez says. She anticipates they’ll be changing the on-tap cocktail every two months or so to keep things lively. Cheers to that!

Straws Suck

Caveat: There are some legit reasons why some people need straws; after all the bendy-straw was invented to allow bedridden patients, especially those with jaw injuries, an easier way to slurp. But do you really need the two black stirring straws that for decades seem to have been served de-facto with every highball? Nope, and neither do our landfills or oceans, let alone the environmental cost of producing more plastic shit. Other options abound, just ask the folks at East Liberty Tap House (850 E. 900 South, 801-4412845, eastlibertytaphouse.com). “If a drink needs a straw, we use paper,” owner Scott Evans says. Hop on the straw-ditching trend now, that way you won’t gasp as hard come 2020, when Starbucks ditches the pesky tubes for good.


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DARBY DOYLE

Utah’s Badass Women Bartenders

DARBY DOYLE

Variety

Tiki Time!

I’ll preface by saying tiki drinks have somewhat of a complicated history. They’re this close to feeling like there might be some dubious cultural appropriation going on, but for the most part, the spirit of tiki is a pretty benign celebration of pan-Polynesian ingredients and American wackiness. So says a middle-aged white woman living in Utah (send your rage to comments@cityweekly.com). Longing for a taste of the South Pacific closer to home? Central 9th’s Water Witch (163 W. 900 South, 801-462-0967, linktr.ee/waterwitchslc.com) has you covered. “Sunday has become a great drinking day in SLC, and it’s evolved into a big tiki party at the Witch,” bar co-owner Sean Neves says. If you can’t make it over there yourself, the hilarious videos they post to their @waterwitchslc Instagram feed show these guys might be serious about their drinks, but they don’t take themselves seriously. At all. I asked barman Mike Wright to throw together a drink that he thinks represents Tiki Sundays at the Witch and I was not disappointed with his “The Blue Bird” tiki tipple. The Blue Bird 1 ounce El Dorado 3 year rum 1/2 ounce Don Q coconut rum 3/4 ounce pineapple juice 3/4 ounce Blue Curaçao 1/2 ounce lime 1/2 ounce coconut simple syrup Buzz with crushed ice and serve in wine glass. Garnish with lemon wedge and a paper flower. “The lemon is a color-contrast garnish. It looks cooler,” Wright says, “it’s gotta look cool.” Damn right it does.

It is the spice of life after all, which is why it’s becoming more difficult every year to pick a “favorite” Utah whiskey brand. As mentioned before in these pages, the local/regional booze world is a pretty spot-on slice representing the spirits industry overall, with some brands purchasing spirits distilled in Kentucky and Indiana and re-bottling with their own labels (a common practice that still blows people’s minds), whereas other brands choose to monitor the entire process from milling the grain for their whiskey on-site, fermenting with custom yeast and aging the distillate in their warehouses (bless their OCD hearts). Some brands do a bit of each strategy, depending on the spirit. In addition to

now-established whiskey makers High West, Sugar House Distillery and Outlaw Distillery, last year, Waterpocket Distillery bottled a really delightful Robber’s Roost Light Whiskey. For those palates that prefer sweet fruit-flavored whiskies, Alpine Distillery in Park City makes Lafayette spiced whiskey with apricot, primrose and cinnamon. From the folks at Ogden’s Own, they’re bottling three flavored whiskey options in the “Porter’s” line-up: Porter’s Peach, Apple and spicy Fire Canadian whiskey. In the classic easy-sipping bourbon category, look for Utah-owned brand Black Feather Whiskey, a super-smooth sauce that goes down easy neat. It’s also equally nice on a sweltering night with a bigass ice cube, dash of bitters and splash of soda.

Wine & Mines

COURTESY FOX SCHOOL OF WINE

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A while back, a cover story in City Weekly (“Speed Racers,” Jan. 25), profiled the feisty Utah contingent of 10 female bartenders who traveled to Phoenix last spring for the annual Speed Rack bartender competition. Started in 2011 as a fundraising event in NYC to champion professional women bartenders’ skills, the competition has taken a badass fundraising/ advocacy turn. “They raise a shit-ton of money for breast cancer programs,” homegrown Speed Rack competitor Jessica Sandberg says, noting that the now-international events exceeds $100,000 in raised funds each year. As expected, the Utah posse kicked boozy booty in the speed rounds where each contestant prepared four cocktails on the fly in head-to-head (or shaker-to-shaker) elimination, with Sandberg making it to the quarter-finals. She shook up an Irish Rose that one of the judges said was the best she’d ever had. And she did it in just more than a minute while also making three other on-point cocktails. No biggie.

This quirky tour at the hands of Park City’s Fox School of Wine (foxschoolofwine.com) should move to the top of anyone’s “entertain the visiting relatives for an afternoon” list. The threehour chauffeured trip around the historic mining sites of Park City starts at the Montage at Deer Valley and ends beside what was once the mining boomtown’s red light district. Along the way, “Headmistress of Wine” sommelier Kirsten Fox narrates an entertaining af and informative tour of the mountain town’s history, with six thematic wine pairings—and snacks to boot.


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Exploded on the scene co-writing with Zac Brown. Hits include “Chicken Fried” “Colder Weather” & “Toes”

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Credits on more than He has written singles 25 million records for Randy Travis, including “Just Got Kenny Chesney, The Started Loving You” Judds, and Blake Shelton.

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

DARBY DOYLE

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… and a bottle of rum. There are times when a quick and easy highball (liquor + fizzy something over ice = highball) is about all the creative cocktail energy that a weary wordsmith can muster on a hot-as-blazes afternoon. Enter the Cuba Libre. Essentially, it’s a rum and coke with a squeeze of lime, you know, to keep it classy. Ideally, you’ll be using a local white rum like one bearing the cleverest name in all the land: Brigham Rum from those masterminds at Distillery 36 (2374 S. Redwood Road, 801983-7303, distillery36.com). Seal the deal with a fullstrength Mexican Coke from a glass bottle and say, “Ahoy!” to good times.

DARBY DOYLE

Yo-ho-ho

XXX

It’s about time locally produced moonshine gets some love. Did you know that Utah’s first and largest-producing distiller back in the day, Hugh Moon, was one of Brigham Young’s famous band of bodyguards, The Sons of Dan? That is until Young decided the church needed to get out of the distilling business and he basically backstabbed Moon by sending him on an extended mission. The legend goes that while Moon was in exile, Young confiscated all of his hooch-making equipment and supplies, essentially bankrupting the family. Dented Brick Distillery is built on one of Moon’s old properties containing the original well used to make whiskey, and released Hugh Moon White Whiskey, an unaged spirit made with 100-percent locally-sourced unmalted rye in honor of his great history in Utah distilling. With a little searching, you’ll find quite a few Utah distilleries making limited releases of “white dog” unaged whiskey, which is basically whiskey before it hits a barrel (resting in barrels is what turns whiskey it’s distinctive amber color). Sugar House Distillery makes a grainto-glass New Make Whiskey with the same mash and process used to make their bourbon. Up in Wanship, High West Distillery bottles Silver Western Oat Whiskey, an oat and barley whiskey that barely touches the barrel.

Zion’s Foibles

Oh, Utah. Just when we thought things were starting to be a little more “normal” around the restaurant/ bar world—with those weird Zion curtains coming down and restaurants getting to pitch their confusing “this is not a bar” signs—the state throws a whole new set of WTF variables in the mix. I followed up with my favorite liquor lawyer Tanner Lenart with the firm Christensen & Jensen about what she considers to be the head-scratching highlights of her work. Two of the biggest misses of the season? “The multiple meetings I had about the definition of a wall, and whether a wall can have a door, or a window, or be glass, or made out of lattice.” Sounds like a big waste of a lot of people’s time. Lenart also finds issue with the arbitrary way some state legislators have defined restaurant spaces, saying, “I’ve never heard any rationale behind the 10-foot rule for where minors can sit in a restaurant. There’s no basis for that number, or any evidence that minors sitting at different seats in a restaurant have a propensity to drink any more or less when they come of age.” Amen, sister. Now, we hope our representatives will hear our perspective, too. You can read more about the attorney in a profile by CW staff writer Kelan Lyons (“Her Best Shot,” May 3) regarding the latest liquor lunacy at the legislative session and Lenart’s collaborative art project using recycled “This is a restaurant” signs. To all the fine folks of our frequently befuddled Beehive, let’s raise a toast to the weird, wacky and wonderful world of Utah’s spirits. And, to the people who make, serve and imbibe them, we say a hearty cheers! CW


THE BEST in the west

By Jim Burton Rocky Mountain Raceways

— Available In Local Liquor Stores & Distillery —Tours & Tastings —

Lynn Hardy

There are a couple of “old timers” near the top of the Maverik Modifieds point standings: none other than Lynn Hardy and Jimmy Waters.

outlawdistillery.com

Going into the June 30 oval races, Hardy and Waters were the top two points leaders. In that day’s races, Nick Parker, Shawn Price and John Grandjean finished one, two and three. Waters finished in sixth and Hardy was eighth. “I’m sure it’s the same with him, but I’d sure like to make a real hard run at a championship,” Hardy said. “It means something extra special being that it’s the last year. I’d sure be a great way to go out.” Yes, it sure would be nice to see those two finish fast.

Jimmy Waters

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Considering we’re in the middle of RMR’s final, historic season – and Jimmy and Lynn have been here from the start – it’s especially cool to see them having some success on the oval. “I was one of the first ones to get on the racetrack,” Waters said. And when asked about his and Lynn’s seniority at the track, he said: “I’m sure we are (the oldest). We are the old guys, ain’t no doubt that,” Hardy said with a smile. “He’s older than me though.”

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The two old guys – let’s kindly refer to them as “veteran racers” – have been racing at Rocky Mountain Raceways since the beginning and so it’s kind of fun to see their names so high in the Modifieds standings. Even better, the two finished Nos. 1 and 2 in the June 16 “Modified Shootout” on the America First Credit Union Super Oval. Hardy took the checkered flag, and Waters wasn’t far behind.

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CAL NEZ

Despite the fractions and fissures that have divided the nation of late, the U.S. is still a land that basks in diversity, with individuals of all races and ethnicities playing a part in what makes this nation great. Yet, at the core of it all, there are the First Nations who occupied this land long before settlers and explorers made their way west. Often displaced, their culture under siege, Native Americans seek to remind others of their rich identity, which continues to flourish even today. It’s appropriate, then, that the annual event known as the NACIP Powwow & Festival continues to serve as a reminder of the remarkable heritage America’s original residents—and those of Utah in particular—bring to this state, even as it celebrates Pioneer Day. In retrospect, the importance of asserting that identity can’t be overstated. Hollywood often portrayed Native Americans as bloodthirsty savages, whose only intent was to exact revenge on unwelcome intruders and murder the innocent. It’s important, then, to learn about their contributions to this country and how their legacy adds to the rich fabric of this nation, and our state. This year’s NACIP celebration, its 24th annual intertribal gathering, offers an array of events for visitors of all ages. Music, storytelling and native dancers representing tribes from throughout the country will provide entertainment, with arts and crafts, interactive exhibits and food booths. A fireworks exhibition will take place at 10 p.m., capping a day of shared fun and festivities. (Lee Zimmerman) Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow & Festival @ Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, 801-688-9297, July 24, noon-10 p.m., free, facebook.com/nacippowwowfestival

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If you find that “mindfulness” has become a blasé buzzword and the minimalist lifestyle feels like an unrealistic platitude that fails to move you, then Brooke McAlary’s latest book—Slow: Simple Living for a Frantic World—promises to deliver the real-world application you need to bring ease back into your life. McAlary supplements her written works with weekly lessons hosted on her podcast Slow Your Home, where she slings interviews, experiments and kernels of wisdom with her husband and co-host, Ben, to help you reclaim peace through humor and a more gentle pace. This Sydney native is slowly winding her way through the U.S. this summer, and will find herself in conversation with Salt Lake City-based blogger Courtney Carver at The King’s English Bookshop for a discussion about cultivating a personal philosophy of simplicity. “Carver is the blogger behind Be More with Less, a prominent minimalist blog where she writes about the benefits of decluttering and living simply,” explains event marketing specialist for the Slow book tour Lizzie Lewandowski. “The common themes of their writing make Brooke and Courtney natural conversation partners. Folks attending the event can expect a warm, honest discussion of their minimalist lifestyles, the benefits and beauty of living purposefully and simple ways we can all enjoy those same benefits.” The Slow life is a day-by-day exploration of the balance between flexibility and perfection. Simplicity comes from well-placed priorities. You don’t have to do everything to live a life of meaning—so slow down, stop the struggle and let yourself wobble a little. (Samantha Herzog) Brooke McAlary: Slow: Simple Living for a Frantic World @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 20, 7 p.m., free, kingsenglish.com

What does a woman’s rage and joy look like when depicted by a female artist? What does political art look like when in the hands of a woman breaking away from social norms? Kimball Art Center’s newest exhibit explores these questions and more through the work of the late French-American sculptor, painter and filmmaker Niki de Saint Phalle. Saint Phalle catapulted her way into the art world in the 1960s with her “Shooting Paintings,” paint-filled assemblages she shot with paint that made them “bleed.” These marked the beginning of a long, intensely political career that explored feminism, anti-war activism, AIDS awareness and more. Nancy Stoaks, curator for Kimball Art Center, says though Saint Phalle was prolific and one of the foremost artists of the 20th century, her work was and still is overlooked because of her gender. Her work, Stoaks says, took women’s roles, their bodies, and their place in society seriously, ideas that still feel revolutionary today. “Niki’s rebellious work demonstrates how art can promote dialogue, questioning and change,” Stoaks says. If people are familiar with Saint Phalle’s work at all, they probably think of her Nanas, a French slang term that roughly translates to “babe.” These large, vibrantly-colored sculptures depict the female form in a lively, voluptuous and loving way (“Jaune” is pictured). While it will have one Nana on display, Stoaks says the exhibit will feature a variety of assemblages and paintings, from the beginnings of her career to works from the 1990s. (Kylee Ehmann) Niki de Saint Phalle: Freedom Would Be Mine @ Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-649-8882, July 21-Sept. 16, Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m., free, kimballartcenter.org

Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow & Festival

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TUESDAY 7/24

Niki de Saint Phalle: Freedom Would Be Mine

SATURDAY 7/21

Brooke McAlary in Conversation with Courtney Carver: Slow: Simple Living for a Frantic World

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SALT Contemporary Dance has carved out a unique local niche with its site-specific dance performances, but one locale from 2017 proved to be so special that they couldn’t resist returning. Last summer’s production of Pan—an inventive version of the Peter Pan story—comes back for two weekends on the shores of Utah Lake. “This location was made for this show. It’s so magical,” says company artistic director Michelle Nielsen. “Everyone came away feeling that Peter Pan magic. It was the combination of being a few feet away from the performers, under the tiki torches, on the beach, with the Lost Boys in the trees, mermaids in the water.” SALT’s interpretation of the beloved character combines familiar components from the original text as well as stage and screen interpretations, while adding depth to the character of Peter Pan himself. This narrative explores Peter’s origins, including his own parentage, and the events that might have turned him into the little boy who never grew up. “I wanted to create a story that resonates with the magic of childhood,” Nielsen says, “but also the reality of our family lives that are all complicated.” Mostly, however, it’s a family-friendly opportunity to enjoy a performance on a beach, with an evening breeze, and an optional picnic dinner provided by Mo’Bettah Hawai’ian. Nielsen plans to take what the company learned from last year’s show, and give it even more enchantment in this unique setting. “It was created in a studio then performed on the beach,” she says. “Now that we’ve performed on the sand, we’ve sort of re-created it, to use that location even more.” (Scott Renshaw) SALT Contemporary Dance: Pan @ American Fork Boat Harbor, July 18-21 & 25-28, 7:30 p.m., $15-$50, saltdance.com

FRIDAY 7/20

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BY JOHN R. PLATT comments@cityweekly.net @johnrplatt

A

merica’s national parks are the perfect setting for a murder or two— just ask novelist Scott Graham, whose National Park Mystery series has been slaying readers since 2015. The series stars archaeologist Chuck Bender, who gets in a lot more trouble than your typical national parks visitor. In the latest book, Yosemite Fall, released in June, Bender starts out trying to solve the 150-year-old murders of a pair of indigenous gold prospectors, only to be implicated in the modernday murder of one of his own friends. We spoke with Graham—an avid outdoorsman and former journalist—about why he thinks America’s national parks are so special, why it’s important to set his novels in these iconic areas, what they can tell us about environmental and social-justice issues, what we’d risk by losing them and other protected spaces around the country and how Utah inspired his forthcoming book. Q: What inspired you to set your novels in America’s national parks? A: For a number of years, my wife and I thoroughly enjoyed exploring new-to-us national parks across the West with our two sons—until we decided, one fateful spring break, to visit Big Bend National Park in far southern Texas. We set off as we always did, with a camper full of food and the plan to pull off the road to explore public lands as we passed through them. But we didn’t know our American history well enough. As an enticement to lure Texas into statehood, public lands in the Republic of Texas were turned

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26 | JULY 19, 2018

Arches inspires Scott Graham’s next novel.

issues of monkeywrenching and development on public lands come to the fore. What, to you, has been the hardest thing about national parks to convey in writing—or the most satisfying? As self-professed national park groupies, my parents piled my three siblings and me into our Ford Galaxie 500 station wagon and set off to explore a new batch of Western parks each summer. Through them, I came to cherish America’s national parks. In the five years I’ve been writing my series, I’ve found great satisfaction in conveying to readers my love of and appreciation for national parks and all of America’s public lands. As we move beyond the 100th anniversary year, in 2016, of the National Park Service, it’s worth noting that tens of millions of visitors will enjoy America’s publiclyowned national parks and monuments across the West this year and in the years ahead, while untold millions more will hunt, fish, hike, backpack, camp and laze about on national forest and BLM lands. It gives me great satisfaction to know that I’m doing what I can, through my books, to help ensure those lands will remain forever available and accessible to those visitors and their children and grandchildren. CW

A version of this article appeared in The Revelator.

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Stories chapbook was critical to the 2016 decision by the Obama administration to establish Bears Ears National Monument. Torrey House is now at the forefront of the fight to preserve Bears Ears in the face of the effort by the Trump administration to reduce the size of the monument, and the sacred Native American lands it protects. While the bulk of Torrey House’s releases preach to the environmentalist choir, my mysteries, in contrast, aim to introduce newcomers to environmental and social-justice issues through the mystery genre. My books are, first and foremost, entertaining. But in the face of concerted efforts such as those currently underway by the Trump administration to take public lands from the public and, essentially, auction them off to the highest bidders, the environmental and social justice aspects of my books absolutely have gained additional meaning to me, and make me proud of what I’m working to accomplish. Do you know what national park you’ll be visiting next—either in person or in your writing? Arches Enemy, book five in my series, is set for release in June 2019. In it, archaeologist Chuck Bender and his family are staying in Devil’s Garden Campground, deep in Arches National Park, when a natural sandstone arch collapses, taking a person atop it to her death. While questions surrounding the death mount, Chuck and his family find their lives in peril as the intertwined

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Murder! Intrigue! Hiking!

over to state ownership upon the creation of the state in 1845. The Texas state government promptly sold off more than 216 million acres of those newly-acquired lands to ranchers and speculators. Despite its massive size, Texas today has one of the lowest percentages of public lands of any state in the nation. Modern-day rural Texas is a seeming paradise of vast and beautiful expanses, yet the thousand-mile drive south through the state was far from paradisiacal for me and my family. Magnificent mountain ranges and windswept plains were fenced off from us, side roads gated and locked, rural highways lined with “No Trespassing” signs. All the way to Big Bend and back, we spent our nights in crowded, edge-of-town commercial campgrounds, boxed in by recreational vehicles. The frustration of our Texas fence-out led my wife and me to an even greater appreciation of public lands, showcased especially by America’s open-to-all-comers national parks. When I turned to writing fiction, I resolved to dedicate my new murder mystery series to celebrating “America’s best idea”—its publicly owned national parks. Aside from being great locations for murders, what do you feel more people need to understand about these fabulous sites? Each book in my series is set in a specific park, and seeks to capture and share with readers that park’s unique sense of place. … In addition, woven into the plot of each of my books is the story of an environmental or social-justice issue specific to that book’s park and regional setting, including the desecration of burial grounds in Canyon Sacrifice, climate-related forest decline in Mountain Rampage and species eradication in Yellowstone Standoff. Yosemite Fall addresses the modern-day repercussions associated with the 1850s genocide of indigenous peoples in post-Gold Rush California through a murder mystery set in legendary Camp 4, in the heart of Yosemite Valley. Speaking of murders, now that some politicians are seeking to effectively “kill off” some of America’s public lands, have these books gained any additional meaning to you? My publisher, Torrey House Press, is a respected nonprofit environmental publisher specializing in activist-oriented nonfiction; the Torrey House-published Red Rock


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PERFORMANCE

THEATER

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JULY 19, 2018 | 27

Amazing Grace Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 4, dates and times vary, cachearts.org Annie Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, hct.org Disney’s Newsies Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 1, hct.org Gala of the Royal Horses Salt Lake County Equestrian Park, 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan, July 21, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; July 22, 3 p.m., galaoftheroyalhorses.com Hidden Hollow Concert Series Hidden Hollow Nature Preserve, 1229 E. Wilmington Ave., July 20 & 27, 6 p.m., utahopenlands.org Hindsight various locations announced via email, downtown Salt Lake City, through July 28, Friday & Saturday, 6:30 p.m., hindsightslc.com Into the Woods Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 3, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Matilda: The Musical Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Oct. 18, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org

Million Dollar Quartet Hafen Theater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org My Boy Pinocchio Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, hct.org Othello Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org Quiet Heroes Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, July 20-22, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Rocky Mountain Puppets North Logan City Library, 475 E. 2500 North, Logan, July 20, 6:30 p.m., northloganlibrary.org Saturday’s Voyeur 2018 Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 2, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Snow White Regent Street Black Box, 131 S. Main, through July 28, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Barber of Seville Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 3, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Foreigner Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org

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Jamie Wayman commemorates the 15th anniversary of the original SPLASH! exhibit at Horne Fine Art (142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, hornefineart.com) with an artist reception from 6-9 p.m. on Friday, July 20. The exhibition remains on display through July 28.


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West Valley Symphony of Utah Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley, July 23, 8 p.m., culturalcelebration.org

SPECIAL EVENTS

DANCE

COMEDY & IMPROV

FARMERS MARKETS

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

LITERATURE

moreESSENTIALS The Merchant of Venice Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, through Sept. 7, dates and times vary, bard.org The Merry Wives of Windsor Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, bard.org The Phantom of the Opera Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through July 22, dates and times vary, broadway-at-the-eccles.com The Prince of Egypt Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org The Secret Garden Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 4, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Who’s Tommy Egyptian Theatre, 325 Main, Park City, through July 29, dates and times vary, parkcityshows.com You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Utah Theatre, 18 W. Center St., Logan, through Aug. 1, dates and times vary, utahfestival.org

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Ballet West Academy Choreographic Workshop: New Works Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, July 19, 7 p.m., balletwestacademy.org Salt Contemporary Dance: Pan American Fork Boat Harbor, 100 West, American Fork, July 18-21 & July 25-28, 7:30 p.m., saltdance.com (see p. 25) Utah Symphony: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City, July 25, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org Music for a Summer Evening: 2018 Pioneer Day Concert Salt Lake Tabernacle, 15 E. South Temple, July 20 & 21, 8 p.m. Ricky Springfield with the Utah Symphony Deer Valley, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, July 20, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Sutton Foster with the Utah Symphony Deer Valley, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, July 21, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

Adam Ray Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, July 20, 8 p.m. & July 21, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, July 20 & 21, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Brooke McAlary: SLOW: Simple Living for a Frantic World The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, July 20, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 25) James A. McLaughlin: Bearskin Provo City Library at Academy Square, 550 N. University Ave., July 25, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Timothy Zahn: Thrawn: Alliances Barnes & Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, July 25, 6 p.m., barnesandnoble.com

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1 p.m.-3 p.m., slco.org Park City Farmers Market Silver King Resort, 1845 Empire Ave., Park City, Wednesdays through Oct. 25, parkcityfarmersmarket.com Park Silly Main Street, Park City, Sundays through Sept. 23, parksillysundaymarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, Wednesdays through September, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays through Oct. 17, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org


Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm.

FESTIVALS AND FAIRS

Native American Celebration in the Park Powwow & Festival Liberty Park, 600 East 900 South, July 24, noon-10:30 p.m., facebook.com/nacippowwowfestival (see p. 25)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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Alison Neville: M.A.D. Utah Museum of Contemporary Art AIR Space, 20 S. West Temple, through July 28, utahmoca.org Buster Graybill: Informalism UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 8, utahmoca.org Chase Westfall: Control UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Aug. 9, utahmoca.org Chiura Obata: An American Modern Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Sept. 2, umfa.utah.edu Erin Westenskow Berrett: Reclaimed Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Sept. 2, kimballartcenter.com Face of Utah Sculpture XIV Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Aug. 29, culturalcelebration.org Niki de Saint Phalle:Â Freedom Would Be Mine Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, July 21-Sept. 16, kimballartcenter.org (see p. 25) Fuhst/Floating World Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through July 29, urbanartsgallery.org Jim Woodward: A Celebration of Light and Color Local Colors of Utah Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, through Aug. 13, localcolorsart.com

Lauren K. Woodward: Movement, Balance and Refracted Light Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Aug. 18, slcpl.org Mark Santos: The Spirit of Dance Main Library, Lower Urban Room Gallery, 210 E. 400 South, through July 20, slcpl.org Postmodernposh Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Aug. 31, heritage.utah.gov Recent Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Sept. 7, heritage.utah.gov Ron Russon and Cristall Harper: Affirmations Gallery MAR, 436 Main St., Park City, July 20-Aug. 3, gallerymar.com Sel Heidel 777: China Minoyki Art Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Aug. 30, slcpl.org Jamie Wayman SPLASH! Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, through July 28, hornefineart.com (see p. 27) Summer Group Show Phllips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, July 20-Sept. 14, phillips-gallery.com The Spirit of Dance: Photographs by Mark Santos Main Library, Lower Urban Room Gallery, 210 E. 400 South, through July 20, slcpl.org Vanessa Romo: The Practice of Standing Still Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Aug. 3, saltlakearts.org Virginia Catherall: Wearable Landscapes Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Aug. 3, saltlakearts.org Working Hard to Be Useless Utah Museum of Contemporary Art Main Gallery, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 29, utahmoca.org Wren Ross: The Summons Has Reached Us Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Aug. 3, saltlakearts.org

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Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

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AT A GLANCE

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JULY 19, 2018 | 31

that maxim has guided the Vertical Diner since Day 1. It’s no secret that Salt Lake’s vegan restaurant scene is exploding, and a huge part of that comes from the fuse Vertical ignited back in the day. It originated as the sister restaurant to Sage’s Café, which chef Ian Brandt opened in 1998. But it wasn’t long before the two entities merged, creating the culinary colossus of today. Now, the restaurant

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I was surprised to be welcomed into a cozy neighborhood diner and peruse a menu that included hamburgers, breakfast burritos and ice cream. At the time, I suppose I thought vegans were a lot like Todd Ingram from Scott Pilgrim vs. the World—aloof, powerful and somehow better than me. But then I tried a plate of Dude Cakes ($12.50) and it all made sense. Good food is just good food, and

espite my carnivorous tendencies, Utah’s vegan restaurants and I are simpatico. Nothing quite revs up my culinary engine like trying plant-based cheesecake and learning what vegan magic went into creating such a tantalizing dessert. But this wasn’t always the case. I used to believe that vegan food was flavorless and unimaginative—the kind of thing people ate for fuel rather than for pleasure. My first visit to Vertical Diner (234 W. 900 South, 801-484-8378, verticaldiner.com) back when it was on West Temple changed that perception.

since my first visit, but it wasn’t until later on in our relationship that I started to explore their dessert menu. The banana split ($7), made with coconut milk-based ice cream, is a solid pick—it’s huge, gooey and complements just about everything on the menu. During my last visit, the waitress recommended the tiramisu ($7, pictured), which piqued my curiosity. It arrived drizzled with chocolate sauce, and it bewitched me from the very first bite. Maybe it was the fact that outside temperature was pushing 100 degrees, but the cool, silken texture of the treat before me was exactly what I needed at that point in my life—and I can see it being exactly what I need at other points in my life coming very soon. Regardless of your gastronomic ideology, Vertical Diner is a safe place for those who enjoy good food prepared with love. The Vertical crew has been creating food from the heart going on two decades, and here’s hoping it continues to do so for the next 20 years and beyond. I truly can’t conceive of a world devoid of delectable Dude Cakes. CW

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Vertical Diner continues its plant-based comfort-food legacy.

toward this particular dish. The patty is more of a launchpad for the surrounding flavors and textures, but this is a burger I love just as much as any ground beef variety. It’s hearty, filling and extremely fun to eat. Once you’ve built up enough of an appetite, consider summiting The Mountain ($10.25), a glorious food pile of hash browns, grilled peppers and onions, along with the diner’s famous tofu scramble, a riff on classic scrambled eggs. As if that wasn’t mouthwatering enough, they top it all off with some of their stellar cheese sauce and a choice of grilled mushrooms, tempeh sausage or bacon. The sheer size of this monument to breakfast food is jaw-dropping enough, but it combines all of the flavors that make the most important meal of the day so memorable. If this isn’t extreme enough for you, then let’s take a moment to revisit my beloved Dude Cakes. I ordered these for the first time solely because of the name—I paid scant attention to the kitchen-sink level of their list of ingredients. They start with two gigantic pancakes stuffed with sausage, caramelized onions, grilled peppers and mushrooms, and are topped off with a fistful of fries and then slathered in gravy. It’s the siren song I can’t resist during my repeat visits. Sure, I try to branch out to one of their salads, but the Dude Cakes are always victorious. I’ve been sold on Vertical Diner

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The Dude Cakes Abide

maintains two locations, one in Central Ninth and the other at 368 E. 100 South. Throughout the 20 years that Brandt has been in business, his ability to adapt to change, build a strong community of local support and conceive of bonkers ways to incorporate tofu into diner food has cemented Vertical’s place as a staple of Utah’s food scene. Now that we’ve properly venerated Vertical Diner for its profound influence on local meatless and dairy-free dining, let’s get down to business. Rookies are going to want to hang out in the burger section of the menu for two reasons: One, burgers are universally accessible, and two, they’re named after celebrities—the Ian MacKaye ($10) is my personal favorite. It’s a patty made from lentils topped with grilled mac and “cheese,” served with lettuce, tomato and onions. It comes with a side of carrot sticks or tortilla chips, but I recommend springing three bucks more to get an order of the excellent house fries. This particular burger stands out because it’s a prime example of the decadence and restraint that Vertical Diner does so well. The mac and cheese is made with a silken tofu sauce that’s flavored with nutritional yeast—and it’s fantastic whether it’s on top of a burger or on its own. It was one of my wife’s goto cravings when she was pregnant, so I’ll always have a bit of nostalgia


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER

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A LA MAISON

@captainspringer

Indian Food Fair

Food festivals are one of the only things that can get me out of the air-conditioned cocoon. The first Indian Food Festival is shaping up to be one of the best in town. The integration of Indian food, music, dance and art is a rare mix of complementary aesthetics, and seeing it all come together in a vibrant splash of marigolds and masala is something spectacular to behold. It’s an offshoot of the Downtown Yoga Festival, which has offered local yoga enthusiasts an opportunity to learn from some of Utah’s most accomplished instructors for 10 years. The yoga component runs from 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and the food fair goes on from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. It all happens at the Gallivan Center (239 S. Main) on Saturday, July 21. Tickets to the Indian Food Fair are free, and more information can be found at indianfoodfair.com. Tickets to the yoga fest are $34.99 and can be purchased at downtownyogafest.com.

Gather Opens in Cedar City

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

Much like a wandering desperado who arrives in a small frontier town with tales of mythic adventure, chef Jeff Crosland recently made an impression on students at a Southern Utah University community cooking class. Crosland heads a new restaurant called Gather (148 N. Kolob Terrace Road, Virgin) that has opened up on Kolob Mountain deep within the red rocks of Southern Utah. Although the tale of an off-the-grid chef showing off his ceviche skills for a bunch of SUU foodies and then disappearing into the moonlight has a romantic slant to it, Crosland is a flesh-and-blood graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Portland. He currently owns the Spotted Dog and Parallel 88 in Springdale, and Gather is his newest endeavor, preparing seasonal food with woodfired stoves and Dutch ovens. As the place is quite literally off the grid, Gather has yet to establish any online presence, and I had to call Crosland directly to get an address. If you’re in Southern Utah and need an adventure, give Gather a try—and then tell the rest of us how to get there.

1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

Go back in time with the Five Alls. Make your reservation now! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM

Thu: 6-9:30pm | Fri/Sat: 5:30-9:30 1458 South Foothill Drive

Pie and Beer Day Cooking Class

SLC’S newest sushi lounge

Looking for a way to get into the Pioneer—er, Pie and Beer—Day spirit? Then Harmons has you covered. For those looking to up their pie and beer palate, the Bangerter Crossing location (125 E. 13800 South, Draper, 801617-0111, harmonsgrocery.com) is hosting a pie-andbeer-themed cooking class. Join chef Hanna Maag as she walks attendees through the nuances of pie-making and a sampling of local beers. Armed with these skills, attendees will be much better prepared for the onslaught of P&B festivities come July 24. The class takes place on Friday, July 20 from 6:30-8:30 p.m., with $65 tickets available at harmonsgrocery.com/classes.

488 E 100 S 801.359.2092

Quote of the Week: “Indian food is a luxury on tour.” –Mahesh Bhupathi

hamachislc.com

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived

Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

NOW SERVING SCONES! BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER Local products • Local flavor JULY 20TH

guy benson

JULY 21ST

chris orrock

DRAPER 1194 East Draper Parkway 801-572-5279

HOLLADAY 1919 East Murray-Holladay Road 801-849-1004

SOUTH JORDAN 10555 South Redwood Road 801-948-4706

100% gluten-free

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

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paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

-Cincinnati Enquirer

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4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

JULY 19, 2018 | 33

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

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Save a Dollar. Feed a Family.


Unique additives make for an exciting beer variety. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

F

or the longest time, options were pretty narrow when it came to the types of fruit used in fruited beers. It seemed like raspberry and apricot were the primary selections, with blueberry sliding in at a close third. There’s nothing wrong with these fruits, of course; their flavors are very complimentary in beers, which is why they’re used so often. But we beer-loving humans crave diversity in our fermented grain obsession, and will go to extreme measures to make sure we achieve ultimate flavor satisfaction. This week, I looked to a couple of local beers that utilize less common fruits to keep your tongue and mind sharp and happy. Uinta Crimson Tart: It pours a pinkhued golden/orange color with two fingers

MIKE RIEDEL

Strange Fruits

of fairly dense and fluffy light pink head. The aroma is full of pomegranate, lemon, lime, white grape and wheat crackers, with a great balance and complexity of fruity/ acidic yeast. The taste begins with tart pomegranate, but soon transitions into other fruity notes like white grape, lemon, lime and a hint of green apple. Notes of straw and hay begin to build as lacto funk tartness emerges, adding a bit of earthiness mid-palate. Wheat from the base beer emerges in the end, adding a hint of malty sweetness. The finish has a good amount of fruity/lactic sourness and lingering tangy berry flavors. There’s a great complexity of malt/sourness—fairly puckering, but with no lingering astringency. The 8 percent alcohol is noticeable, but far from warming. Overall: This is a great fruited Berliner weisse, featuring all-around good complexity and a solid balance of fruity/acidic yeast, pomegranate and a moderate amount of malt flavors. It’s very smooth, crisp and refreshing, despite the high lactic acidity. 2 Row Orange Mango Sour: This brandnew offering from 2 Row Brewing pours a brilliantly clear golden-orange color that takes on more of an orange hue when held to the light. It has a slim white head that dies down to a thin ring that fades away. The nose starts off with a higher amount of sweetness, with the orange aspects taking the lead. It’s somewhat reminiscent of marmalade, with some doughy bread notes

underneath. As you let the aromas settle in, sweet mango becomes more apparent, rounding out the fruity bouquet. Once splashed on the tongue, you’re met with higher amounts of medium orange sweetness that smacks the palate with as much intensity as the aroma. The mango, however, proves to be more assertive, as it soon takes over the more pithy flavors from the citrus. This is all followed by a high level of medium tartness. It finishes with some lingering tartness along with a Lemon Heads-esque candy taste—not too acidic and slightly crisp.

Overall: This beer has nice drinkability, with good warm-weather benefits and a pleasant melange of fruit. The 6.4 percent alcohol adds zip, but is far from boozy. If you like tart fruit, you’ll like this. Not all fruit beers work for everyone. I love strawberries, but have rarely found a strawberry beer that’s worth a damn. Do yourselves a favor and seek out some of the state’s odd fruited beers. See which ones work best for your palate. You might be surprised by the beer/fruit combo that puts you in your happy place. As always, cheers! CW

34 | JULY 19, 2018

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BEER NERD

Mon - Thur: 11:00am - 9:30pm Fri - Sat: 11:00am - 10:30pm Sun: 12:00 Noon - 9:00pm 3370 State Street #8, South Salt Lake, UT 801-466-8888 | Full liquor license SAKURAHIBACHISLC.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

First

Nomad Eatery

Chef/owner Justin Soelberg calls his airport-convenient eatery a “fast-casual diner,” but banish any preconceived notions you have about fast food. Sandwiches and pizzas are the mainstays, and they’re uniformly excellent. The simple Margherita features a rustic dough base, light tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella, basil, extra-virgin olive oil and Grana Padano cheese. The fried mortadella sandwich is astonishingly satisfying: fried mortadella on a Kaiser-style bun with American cheese, French dressing, shredded lettuce, zucchini pickle and a side of tasty salt-and-vinegar chips. Enjoy the smoked turkey sandwich, which also includes zippy black bean hummus, Fritos, Monterey Jack cheese, pickled red onion and bacon aioli on a wheat roll. 2110 W. North Temple, 801-938-9629, nomad-eatery.com

NOW OPEN! WEST VALLEY 2927 SOUTH 5600 WEST (801) 890-0415

In Utah! Organic & home made ingredients prepared fresh daily Vegan & gluten free options and classic pizzas available Order online currypizzautah.com SOUTHERN UTAH 125 NORTH STATE RD. 24 BICKNELL, UT 84715

Guru’s Café

One of the oldest restaurants in Salt Lake City, Ruth’s opened in 1949 in a downtown trolley car that Ruth herself moved up Emigration Canyon. Erik and Tracy Nelson now run the place, and you’ll find contemporary dishes like Erik’s raspberry chicken alongside classics such as liver and onions or tender, braised pot roast. Breakfast is served into late afternoon, so you can order the famous “Mile-High biscuits” with country gravy for a late lunch. In warm weather, the sprawling patio is the place to be, as the restaurant also offers live music from local artists. 4160 E. Emigration Canyon Road, 801-582-5807, ruthsdiner.com

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Ruth’s Diner

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Whether stopping in for breakfast, lunch or dinner, fresh is something you can always expect at this bright Provo cafe. Indulge in a breakfast quesadilla or the creamcheese-stuffed Philly French Toast, or try the cinnamon mango oatmeal for a lighter start. Cold or hot sandwiches, soups, tacos, pizzas and pastas are not to be missed later in the day, and there are plenty of vegetarian options for the meat-averse. Guru’s “to each their own” philosophy is focused on enlightenment, and it’s easy to achieve with their plentiful menu items. 45 E. Center St., Provo, 801-375-4878, guruscafe.com

JULY 19, 2018 | 35

The menu here is set up in classic Italian style, with soups and salads, antipasti, pastas and secondi (meat and fish/ seafood dishes), plus a small but adequate wine list. The memorable gnocchi al granchio showcases the chef’s light-and-airy gnocchi in a silky pink tomato-cream sauce with lump crab meat. The pasta is made in-house, and even the bread served with the restaurant’s own brand of EVOO and balsamic is house-baked. Tagliata alla rucola is a large serving of grilled, sliced New York steak with nothing more than an olive oil and lemon dressing to enhance the flavor of the meat, accompanied by arugula and grape tomatoes topped with shaved Parmesan, and is extraordinary in its simplicity. 5468 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-290-2913, celesteristorante.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

Celeste Ristorante


A sample of our critic’s reviews

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

3

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | JULY 19, 2018

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

$

MARGARIT AS!

1

Victor’s Tires & Restaurant

CO TUA ESDAYS!

$ *OnlTy at downt-owclosn e 3pm location |

123 E 200 S 801-355-0343 Salt Lake City

1891 Fort Union Blvd 885 E 3900 S 801-942-1333 801-269-1177 Cottonwood Heights Murray

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm & Fri-Sat 11am-10pm | www.MyCancunCafe.com

What was once a simple operation serving chips and salsa to those waiting for some new rubber has become a Salt Lake institution. The huevos con salchichas ($7.99) definitely hits a lot of my breakfast bases—hot scrambled eggs tossed with salty processed meat—but the addition of rice, beans and two housemade tortillas brought the whole enterprise into breakfast burrito territory. Victor’s famed tamales come in several varieties ($1.99 each), even veering into desserts with strawberry or pineapple-filled options. I’ve grown quite fond of the pork with an angry-looking red salsa that packs just the right balance of flavor and heat. For sandwich aficionados, the torta Cubana ($8.99) adheres to the traditional foundation of a Cubano—shredded carnitas, sliced ham and melted Swiss cheese—but exchanges sliced pickle for pickled jalapeño, along with lettuce, tomato, avocado and a dose of crema for an extra level of tang. Not only will I be inventing reasons for the mechanics at Victor’s to inspect my tires just to secure a plate of tamales while I wait, but the place is warm and inviting even if your wheels are in good shape. Reviewed June 28. 1406 S. 700 West, 801-978-9595, victorstires.net

BREAKFAST and LUNCH

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REVIEW BITES

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

served

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801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com


CINEMA

FILM FEST

Worth a ‘Damn’

BY SCOTT RENSHAW, CADEN MARK GARDNER, CRAIG D. LINDSEY AND SAMANTHA PUC comments@cityweekly.net

T

Paul Rudd and Steve Coogan in Ideal Home.

| CITY WEEKLY |

JULY 19, 2018 | 37

of gay Syrians. Toprak finds compelling material in Husein’s double-life—remaining closeted to his parents, even being married with a young daughter—and the fear of violence that drove him from his home. We also see, through Husein and other secondary stories, the challenges of being unwanted anywhere, whether it’s because of nationality or because of sexual orientation, as anxious nations refuse people entry or asylum. It’s a narrative that puts a face on the way that going to a new country can be a matter of life or death. (SR) Sisterhood: The Macau-Hong Kong drama from Tracy Choi follows a woman named Sei as she returns to her hometown—15 years after she left because of a massive falling-out with her best friend (and potential life partner) Ling—upon hearing that Ling has passed away. In the search for Ling’s son, whom Sei helped raise when he was a baby, she’s forced to confront memories of her past, the heartbreak she’s been nursing and the fragile nature of her own decisions. Sisterhood is a heartbreaking story of platonic bonds, mutually repressed romantic feelings and the importance of found family. It is a movie about women, for women, especially those who are familiar with the deep and aching desire to be honest about their emotions but can’t (or won’t) for fear of damaging relationships. Bring tissues; you’ll need them. (SP) The Wild Boys (Les Garçons Sauvages): This visually lush feature debut from French director Bertrand Mandico recalls Kenneth Anger, Pink Narcissus, Cocteau and Guy Maddin in its high-culture meets low-culture, with cinematography oscillating between black-and-white and a drugged out rainbow palette. The story follows a group of five rebellious, sexually violent French schoolboys who go on formative cruise that brings them to a supernatural island, where a mysterious liquid causes bizarre things to befall this gang of five. This is a possible “your mileage may vary” situation, a pastiche that dips its toes in classical and transgressive sexual imagery while winking and provoking its audience. Some of it is in fact imagery that has been subverted and poked fun at before (and more originally) in previous queer films, but the brash petulance from Mandico and his androgynous cast—crucially, cisgender women playing these schoolboys—feels like a fun and fascinating reminder of queer cinema as enfant terrible. (CMG) CW

Christian holy men speak out against them, condemning their existence and leading the charge on getting others to do the same. (Craig D. Lindsey) Man Made: This documentary gives us a glimpse of trans men who prepare to compete in Trans FitCon, an Atlanta-based, bodybuilding competition. I say “glimpse” because it’s more about the struggles and hardships these guys have faced (and are still facing) as men who were once women. Director T. Cooper (also a trans man) focuses on a select few, including a Twin Cities rapper who gets a double mastectomy before the competition, a professional bodybuilder from Cleveland who trains for the con after a local bodybuilding competition bars him from competing and an Arizona fitness nut who is in the process of transitioning, something that could make him lose his lesbian girlfriend. While these subjects have harrowing, heartbreaking stories to tell, the individual journeys they take to show how much they’ve worked on being healthy and happy makes Man Made one hopeful, inspiring odyssey. (CDL) The Misandrists: Director Bruce LaBruce immerses audiences in the world of the Female Liberation Army, a radical separatist lesbian group living in Ger(wo)many in the late 1990s. Their mission: to end the patriarchy. Their propaganda: lesbian porn. This darkly comedic film follows one member of the FLA as she helps an injured man take shelter in the basement of FLA headquarters, contravening a strict “No Men” policy—but hers isn’t the only secret threatening to dismantle the FLA from the inside. As these women work together toward their common cause, they’re forced to reckon with their own transphobia, their place within a capitalist society and the prejudices of their leadership. LaBruce instills sharp social commentary into this sexual romp, calling out the many and varied forms of violence against women and shining a light on gender absolutism and the danger of trans-exclusionary radical feminists. It is a must-see, especially for those seeking to dismantle systems of transmisogyny within the patriarchy. (Samantha Puc) Mr. Gay Syria: Director Ayşe Toprak’s documentary explores the unique dynamics of being gay in a repressive culture in a way that also underlines hard truths about the way we think of immigrants and refugees. The focus is on Husein Sabat, a Syrian refugee living in Istanbul, who becomes the expatriate representative in the Mr. Gay World pageant, partly to draw attention to the unique plight

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ber Country) detail the town’s history and connections to the U.S. Evangelical movement, as well as to reactionary figures like Anita Bryant. However, this is a joyfully vibrant affair (narrated by charismatic trans artist Justin Vivian Bond), juxtaposing a drag performer serving up church lady realness with congregants performing The Great Passion Play, recognizing the camp glory in both performances. For every shot of a loud anti-LBGTQ bigot, there enters a confrontational townsperson defending themselves, their brothers and their sisters. Eureka Springs might be a modest town, but it’s a hotbed of love, warmth and care, whether in church pews or a gay bar. (Caden Mark Gardner) Ideal Home: There’s a minimum threshold of comedic enjoyment you’re going to get out of anything starring Steve Coogan and Paul Rudd, but it’s a shame they’re propping up a plot that already seems quaint and dated. Coogan plays Erasmus Brumble, a cooking-and-lifestyle TV show host whose contentious relationship with his producer/boyfriend Paul (Rudd) is complicated by the arrival of the grandson (Jack Gore) Erasmus didn’t know he had, in need of a home after his dad is jailed. Coogan’s in his wheelhouse playing a self-absorbed minor celebrity, stealing a bit of the jokey thunder while Rudd plays a non-straight straight man amiably. But their relationship with their unexpected child too rarely feels like more than a setup for the well-intentioned notion that “see, gay parents can be good parents, too.” The closing-credits shots of same-sex-parented families only emphasizes that this is a nice idea served in an easily digestible wrapper. (SR) Leitis in Waiting: We go to the Republic of Tonga for a tropical doc that introduces us to Pacific Islanders who identify as transgender. Actually, the name for transgender women around these parts are leitis (as in “ladies”). While they have been mostly accepted in Tongan culture as servants of the royal family—they also have their own raucous beauty competition, known as the Miss Galaxy Pageant—they’re also viewed by the general public as freaks and abominations. Directors Dean Hamer and Joe Wilson (along with producer Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, a Hawaiian trans woman who was the subject of her own documentary, Kumu Hina, in 2014) plant their always-sympathetic cameras in front of the resilient, optimistic trans women who keep their heads held high, even when so-called

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

his weekend marks the Utah Film Center’s annual Damn These Heels LGBTQ Film Festival. Here are capsule reviews of several of the feature films available for viewing ahead of the event. 1985: The words “gay” and “AIDS” aren’t publicly spoken, but their significance hangs heavy over this restrained drama from writer/ director Yen Tan. Adrian Lester (Cory Michael Smith), a 20-something man, travels from his new home in New York to his family home in Fort Worth, Texas, to spend Christmas 1985 with his conservative Christian parents (Michael Chiklis and Virginia Madsen) and younger brother, who don’t know he’s gay. As easy as it might have been to turn this into a melodrama full of shouting and recriminations, Tan opts for a kind of mournful silence through black-and-white cinematography and authentically awkward conversations. The tone and performances might have benefited from slightly more energy, but there’s still so much that’s communicated through one long two-shot of a father and son who barely know how to talk to one another. (Scott Renshaw) Close-Knit: The narrative arc feels familiar, but writer/director Naoko Ogigami builds enough grace notes into it that the emotional connections come together. Rin Kakihara plays Tomo, an 11-year-old girl whose single mother takes off with a boyfriend, leaving Tomo to stay with her uncle Makio (Kenta Kiritani) and Makio’s live-in girlfriend, a trans woman named Rinko (Tôma Ikuta). Ogigami makes Rinko a bit too much of a saintly character—she works as a hospice nurse on top of her surrogate mothering of Tomo—and there’s not much doubt about where the specific turns of the story will lead. But individual character moments are gentle and heartfelt, as Ogigami explores a variety of different mother-child relationships and how those mothers live out their responsibilities. Tomo and Rinko communicating via cups and a string might be old-fashioned, but at least it’s communicating. (SR) The Gospel of Eureka: Surrounded by the Ozarks is Eureka Springs, Ark., a place with an unlikely thriving LGBTQ scene and an evangelical church community that, more shockingly, has made inroads with that queer community to fight bigotry and campaign against a local anti-trans “bathroom bill” up for a vote in 2017. Co-directors Donal Mosher and Michael Palmieri (Octo-

BRAINSTORM MEDIA

A preview of several features from this year’s Damn These Heels LGBTQ Film Festival.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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38 | JULY 19, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK

Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net THE EQUALIZER 2 [not yet reviewed] Robert McCall (Denzel Washington) does more bad-ass shit to people who mess with the innocent. Opens July 20 at theaters valleywide. (R) MAMMA MIA: HERE WE GO AGAIN! [not yet reviewed] Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) is now expecting a baby of her own, but seriously, are they just going to be using the same ABBA songs again or what? Opens July 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS BBB There are stories so engrossing that it almost doesn’t matter how a filmmaker chooses to tell them, but the story itself is clearly the star here. Director Tim Wardle explores the initially feel-good tale of separated-at-birth adoptee triplets Bobby Shafran, Eddy Galland and David Kellman, who discover one another’s existence when they’re 19 years old. But then the tale takes a dark turn, as it becomes clear that the brothers were deliberately separated as part of a “nature vs. nurture” sociological experiment. It’s obvious early on that there will be uncomfortable components to the narrative, as one of the brothers never appears in presentday interviews, and Wardle effectively layers on the complexity beyond the triplets’ 1980s mini-celebrity. And to Wardle’s credit, he allows much of that complexity to unfold without obvious judgment, even as it’s clear that the hidden experiment could have resulted in some real damage. Do we see what we want to see when asking how much of who we are is innate, and how much is learned? This is one wild way to explore the question. Opens July 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Laboratory and Samurai Jack—has now churned out three CURRENT RELEASES installments of a premise that was tired at the outset. This time,

UNFRIENDED: DARK WEB BB.5 There’s no connection to 2015’s Unfriended, except that they adhere to the same format—unfolding in real time entirely on someone’s computer screen via their Skype sessions, Facebook chats and so forth. This time, it’s a young man named Matias (Colin Woodell) having game night on Skype with his friends while also contending with the fact that his new laptop formerly belonged to a creator of snuff films who wants it back NOW. The unseen villain—part of the internet’s black market and one of those movie hackers who can make computers do anything—knows where all of Matias’ friends are IRL, will kill them if they log off, yada yada. Writer-director Stephen Susco depicts computer interfaces and usage accurately (which is surprisingly rare), and everyone in the cast is committed to the high tension of the scenario. We’re meant to be freaked out by the horrific things trafficked on the “dark web,” but we never take the movie seriously enough to be truly disturbed by it. It’s fun to go along with the bit, though. Opens July 20 at theaters valleywide. (R) —Eric D. Snider

SPECIAL SCREENINGS DAMN THESE HEELS LGBTQ FILM FESTIVAL See preview on p. 37. At Rose Wagner Center, July 20-22. (NR) IDIOCRACY At Tower Theatre, July 20-21, 11 p.m. & July 22, noon. (R) LOVING VINCENT At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, July 25, 7 p.m. (PG-13)

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP BBB There’s a blissful relief in remembering that a super-hero story can be small, personal and not burdened with the fate of all existence. In this story set before Avengers: Infinity War, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) helps Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) and Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) rescue Hope’s mother, the original Wasp, from the Quantum Realm. Two antagonists also seek the Quantum Realm-visiting technology, complicating the narrative more than necessary, but director Peyton Reed keeps the focus on the humor in this action-comedy, including using Rudd much more effectively than the original did. His charm ends up overshadowing Lilly, who’s stuck with the angst that weighed Rudd down in the first movie. Everything clicks better when the emphasis is on wit, craziness and knowing it’s not the end of the world as we know it, and they feel fine. (PG-13)—SR THE FIRST PURGE BBB The Purge series has a simple premise: A fascistic American government makes all crime legal for 12 continuous hours once a year. It’s also a small miracle, in that the dumb original has been followed by better movies that increasingly paint Purge Night as class war. This prequel finds the government paying Staten Islanders to participate in “the experiment;” when it results in deaths, the government sends in militias. Drug dealer Dmitri (thoughtfully played by Y’lan Noel) sits out The Purge until it becomes clear the government is using the experiment as an excuse to kill welfare recipients. There’s some sloppy filmmaking, but once the action gets rolling, it rolls, man, with effective jumpscares, fierce action and costume design that leaves no doubt as to who would hunt the poor for pleasure. Wherever this franchise heads next, I’m in. (R)—David Riedel HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION BB Genndy Tartakovsky—the innovative animator behind Dexter’s

THE POST At Main Library, July 25, 2 p.m. (PG-13)

Dracula (Adam Sandler) and his monster pals take a vacation cruise, unaware that it has been orchestrated by the descendent of monster-hunter Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan). There’s also a romantic interest (Kathryn Hahn) for Dracula, and Tartakovsky and his co-writers keep the pace almost relentlessly moving, with the loose-limbed animation style at least offering fun things to look at. There’s just nothing funny happening here, no innovative spin on classic monster tropes and supporting characters that remain complete blanks. The idea of a silly, likeable vampire does all the heavy lifting, taking 97 minutes to provide all the laughs of a commercial for Count Chocula cereal. (PG)—SR

LEAVE NO TRACE BBBB Writer/director Debra Granik offers a fascinating example of taking source material—Peter Rock’s novel My Abandonment— and giving it a beautiful re-interpretation. Tom (Thomasin McKenzie), an adolescent girl, lives an itinerant life with her single father (Ben Foster), a military veteran, in the Oregon woods. When the two are discovered, they’re thrust reluctantly back into civilization. Granik refuses to turn unfeeling bureaucracy into the villain of this story, allowing the focus to remain on that central relationship. McKenzie and Foster are both wonderful, conveying the depth of connection forged by the circumstances that have them depending almost entirely on one another. In the third act, however, Granik diverges radically from Rock’s novel, finding something almost heartbreakingly graceful about the tension between not feeling part of this world, and wanting a world that you can feel a part of. (PG)—SR

SKYSCRAPER BB.5 If you think Skyscraper is nothing but a bald-faced ripoff of Die Hard, you’re mistaken; it is also a bald-faced ripoff of Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, The Towering Inferno, The Lady from Shanghai, etc. Dwayne Johnson plays Will Sawyer, an ex-FBI

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MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET agent-turned-private security consultant who has to rescue his family from saboteurs at Hong Kong’s soon-to-open “world’s tallest building.” It’s a welcome touch to make the amputee Sawyer an action hero with a disability, and Johnson remains a star with physical presence and sheer likeability. The movie simply adds nothing to the scenario of “lone underdog vs. a slew of gunmen,” delivering a bunch of set pieces that remind you of similar scenes done better in other movies. A blockbuster summer action movie shouldn’t make you think, “That bit was more tension-filled when I saw it in Finding Nemo.” (PG-13)—SR

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SORRY TO BOTHER YOU BB.5 Writer/director Boots Riley serves up an explosion of racial and social satire that’s sporadically hilarious and maybe just too thematically ambitious for its own good. Lakeith Stanfield stars as Cassius “Cash” Green, a financially strapped man who takes a telemarketing gig and discovers that he’s great at it—once he masters talking to customers in a “white voice.” That’s only one of the buttons Riley pushes as he tackles predatory capitalism, militarized police and more. There are bursts of visual creativity everywhere you look, and charismatic performances by Stanfield, Tessa Thompson and Armie Hammer. Riley simply has his eye on so many targets that several punches don’t have a chance to land, or navigate tonal shifts between amused and angry. But if you want a movie that swings its half horse/half man junk for all to see, this one’s for you. (R)—SR

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JULY 19, 2018 | 39


NICK McGREGOR

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40 | JULY 19, 2018

MUSIC

All There Is to Offer One year soaking up Salt Lake City’s seam-bursting local music scene. BY NICK McGREGOR music@cityweekly.net @mcgregornick

T

hursday, July 19, marks exactly one year since I arrived in Salt Lake City. In that time, I’ve seen well north of 100 touring bands, and tons of well-known locals at more than 20 rad venues. But a recent performance at Water Witch stands as the most revelatory experience yet: an unnamed trio of hellcats blazing through an instrumental set of rockabilly and jump blues while crammed into a corner of the tiny bar for what co-owner Matt Pfohl and bartending staple Michael Wright raved was the venue’s first crack at live music. Even as Cole Maxwell laid down hot licks on his Gretsch, Shane Kiel gave his upright bass a proper thumping, and a drummer whose name I regrettably didn’t get went to town on a scorching set of originals, standards and wicked reinterpretations of candy-coated gems like “Mr. Sandman,” everyone in the bar laughed about the fact that the band had no name. Maxwell and Kiel perform “rockabillia and Western exotica” as The Blushing Violets, while Kiel is a longtime member of garage punk rippers Los YaYaz. And although I didn’t catch up with the drummer, the sight of his creepy Bruegelesque bass drum head painting triggered a memory of seeing him play a show last October at Piper Down, when Los YaYaz, Weird Stew and Jacob T. Skeen opened up a greasy and dirty rockabilly bill. It’s exactly this kind of lightning strike that exemplifies Salt Lake City’s seam-bursting scene. The band might not go by a reliable name yet—hell, they might never even appear again—but I can try to track them down at any number of cozy bars hosting live music without promoting it to the high heavens. In this big city that (in my opinion) gets too much grief for being bland and vanilla, you can pick your creative poison and dig in, befriending the main movers and shakers as you bounce from show to show

Cole Maxwell and Shane Kiel at Water Witch. and accumulate experiences, or operating on the margins as you breeze from one concert to the next. I’ve seen ample evidence of that in my 12 months here. Stumbling on VHS Vic and Jeremy Devine’s project Cool Banana, I’m intrigued at the junk-store esoterica possibilities. Seeing electronic seeker Belle Jewel live makes it feel inevitable that she’ll soon be opening for Grimes and conquering the festival market. Even though local blues master Tony Holiday and his band The Velvetones might be moving to Memphis later this fall, protégés like Ol’ Fashion Depot and standbys like Synderville Electric Band are primed to carry on the searing tradition. As for the hip-hop—holy hell, Utah. No one told me such an entrenched scene existed here, or that, on any given night, I can relive my early ’90s mixtape dreams sampling everything from G Funk-inspired gangsta rap to grimy, lyrically sharp East Coast bangers. Talk about another scene overflowing with talent: established acts like Rhyme Time and Numbs, rising stars like Zac Ivie and Burnell Washburn, up-and-comers like James the Mormon and XavierTheRapper. The best part about all of this is that I know I’m only starting to scratch the surface. Hundreds more artists are right around the corner—some happily operating in relative obscurity, some driven to achieve more widespread fame. Some I’ll stumble upon the way I did at Water Witch last week, lucking into an unannounced evening of cocktail-fueled intensity that sets my searching brain into overdrive (Mr. Drummer, I apologize for not catching your name, and I’d like to make amends next time I see you). Some will come to my attention through more established channels: open-source advertising on social media or opening for national touring artists. Some will come through sheer serendipity, like when you overhear the barista at the coffee shop talking about his new beat-driven project (here’s looking at you, Gibson Bracken of The Gontiks). I’m only one year in, but I’m already obsessed with Salt Lake City’s musical variety, and intrigued at what I’ll come across in the future. I know in Utah terms, that means I’m still a newcomer, so go easy on me. But I’m here for the long haul and committed to navigating the local music slipstreams with you. CW


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JULY 19, 2018 | 41


LIVE

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, HOWARD HARDEE, NICK McGREGOR & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 7/19

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

JJ Grey & Mofro’s come swamp-rock roots are legit. Born and raised in Jacksonville, Fla., Grey and longtime bandmate Darryl Hance met while working as air-conditioning techs before the burgeoning jam band circuit warmed up to their Southern-fried roots rock. The band’s first two albums—2001’s Blackwater and 2004’s Lochloosa—were directly influenced by the lakes, rivers and creeks the pair grew up near. Famed blues label Alligator Records released the band’s next few records, which are also deeply rooted in home with themes like Country Ghetto, Orange Blossoms and Georgia Warhorse, a nickname for a particularly tough North Florida cricket. Ol’ Glory, JJ Grey & Mofro’s most recent full-length album, embraced the band’s diverse roots: funk, gospel and even a more heaping helping of Skynyrd-esque Southern rock. It took more than a decade, but they’ve matured into seasoned veterans, earning acclaim from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, song placements on House of Cards and near-universal praise for their hard-charging live show, which mixes the electricity of Muddy Waters, the Memphis soul of Stax and the skronk of Parliament Funkadelic. Back home, JJ Grey still follows the rhythms of the land, tending the former chicken farm founded by his grandparents that now boasts a recording studio, a gym and a 50-strong stand of pecan trees. In other words, JJ Grey is as authentic as it gets, entering a state of blissful ecstasy when he and his band hit their deep-groove peak. (Nick McGregor) The Depot, 8 p.m., 13 N. 400 West, $30 presale; $35 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

Exmortus, The Absence, Hatchet, ToxicDose, Legion

“You ever get the feeling L.A.’s dead?” Chances are if you follow underground punk rock, you know where this cringe-worthy question comes from: an infamous 1984 interview between Henry Rollins and a local rockabilly youth. (Oh, what we wouldn’t give to hear the grandiloquent Rollins’ answer today!) But seriously, let’s answer that question: Is L.A. dead? On the contrary, Los Angeles’ music will never die. War thrashers Exmortus are a testament to that, bringing brutality to the metal community for more than 16 years. Exmortus call themselves “neoclassical shredders,” but thanks to a bunch of white dudes wielding tiki torches, neo-anything gets a bad rap. However, these four dudes are reclaiming their mantle—one could say the band’s founder and guitarist/ vocalist, Jadran “Conan” Gonzalez (who

JAY SIMON

JJ Grey & Mofro

looks like a young Tom Araya from certain angles under the stage lights), was destined to keep the City of Angels’ metal scene alive. Growing up, Gonzalez was surrounded by musicians: his father and uncle were in a death metal band, and his grandparents also played guitar and sang tunes to the aspiring metalhead. In 2008, Exmortus released their first LP, In Hatred’s Flame, when Gonzalez was just 18. Now, with three more albums under their war belts, Exmortus has returned this summer with their latest album The Sound of Steel, joining up with tourmates Hatchet and The Absense and locals ToxicDose and Legion SLC to ring in the occasion. (Rachelle Fernandez) Club X, 445 S. 400 West, 8 p.m., $15 presale; $18 day of show, 21+, facebook.com/clubxslc

FRIDAY 7/20

Moon Darling, Dwellers, Crook and the Bluff, Lord Vox

When it comes to ’60s-inspired rock ’n’ roll, the offerings in today’s music world are endless. But there’s something special about Seattle’s Moon Darling. Perhaps it’s the injection of synth-pop into the classic

JJ Grey rock template, or frontman Michael Julian Escobar’s towering frame, which calls to mind Robert Plant or Brian May. Perhaps it’s drummer Michelle Nuño lighting fireworks in the back, or bass player Jack Jay and keyboardist Matthew Buckner keeping the groove going on the sides. It could be the backlit nature of Moon Darling’s music, road trip vibes dominating 2016 album Dreams and more ambitious overtones evident on new EP By the Light of the Moon. As venerable Seattle rock journalist Dave Segal said, “Moon Darling tweaks your nostalgia ganglia” with a “fluid, controlled strain of psych rock.” It’s hard to understand in writing, but live, there’s a sense of singularity that wafts from Moon Darling. Catch them here with local bands Dwellers, Crook and the Bluff and Lord Vox. (NM) The Loading Dock, 445 S. 400 West, 9 p.m., $10, 21+, theloadingdockslc.com

Moon Darling

ANDREW INAMAKA

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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GRAB A BITE

TONIGHT

SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! THURSDAY:

TWIST JAZZ JAM on the patio @ 7:00 DUSTY GROOVES dj collective ALL VINYL NIGHT @ 10:00 FRIDAY: SATURDAY: Will Baxter Band on the patio @ 6:00 pm.

DJ Sneaky Long @ 9:00 pm.

DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY: Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,700

MONDAY:

Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

TUESDAY:

CLOSED. Enjoy the Holiday!

WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

PATIO IS OPEN!

WWW.TWISTSLC.COM • 11:00AM - 1:00AM

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM-10PM JULY 18

WISEBIRD AT 7PM ON THE PATIO STAGE TEJON STREET CORNER THIEVES W/ PIXIE AND THE PARTY GRASS BOYS

AT 10PM

JULY 19

TOURING ARTISTS STILLHOUSE JUNKIES 7PM

JULY 20

LOS HELLCAMINOS 6PM FUNKY FRIDAY WITH DJ GODINA 10PM

JULY 22

STONEFED AT 3PM SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES JAM WITH NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST 7PM

JULY 23

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

JULY 24

MATTHEW AND THE HOPE 7PM TOURING ARTISTS THE SQUARSHERS AT 10PM

JULY 21

DJ CHASEONE2 10PM

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

JULY 19, 2018 | 43

AT THE SLC TWILIGHT CONCERT AUG. 16TH, PLUS A $500 CASH PRIZE!

*Dine-In Only

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8 DJs WILL COMPETE TO OPEN FOR

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 DOORS 8PM, SHOW 9PM | $10 TICKETS AT SMITHSTIX.COM

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7.18 MEANDER CAT

7.19 WISEBIRD

7.20 STONEFED

7.21 STONEFED

MARY KEATING-BRUTON

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LIVE

SATURDAY 7/21

James McMurtry

James McMurtry, Bonnie Whitmore

Given the fact that he’s the offspring of acclaimed novelist Larry McMurtry, singer/ songwriter James McMurtry comes by his narrative abilities quite naturally. However, his dad did more than simply instill in young James a talent for storytelling. He also bought him his first guitar at the age of 7, which his mother then taught him to play. McMurtry learned the rest by observation, and eventually finished as a finalist at the Kerrville Folk Festival’s songwriting competition, the launching ground for many a budding career. He later caught the attention of John Mellencamp, who subsequently agreed to produce McMurtry’s debut album. That, in turn, led to his contribution to the soundtrack for the film Falling from Grace, which also features songs by John Prine, Joe Ely and Dwight Yoakam. That’s distinguished company, but for the bulk of the past 25 years, McMurtry’s been releasing albums on his own, sharing rugged and resilient songs flush with defiance and determination. In 2005, McMurtry took a sharp political turn on Childish Things, combining blue-collar

Flasher

7.23 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

7.25 DYLAN ROE

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JEN DESSINGER

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SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

anthems with an insurgent stance. Still, he hasn’t been all that prolific of late—it’s been three years since his last full-length album, Complicated Game, which came a full six years after the previous one. Let’s hope he returns to writing soon; in these troubled times, his insight is valued more than ever. (Lee Zimmerman) The Commonwealth Room, 195 Commonwealth Ave., 7 p.m., $30, 21+, thecommonwealthroom.com

TUESDAY 7/24 Flasher

A boom of protest music is underway in response to the increasingly intense dumpster fire of American politics, with artists as diverse as Fiona Apple and Run the Jewels speaking out to fist-pumping effect. By no coincidence, punk is as vital as it’s ever been. Case in point: Sister Polygon, a record label run by the members of the post-punk band Priests, is carrying on the long tradition of grassroots protest-punk coming out of Washington, D.C. The associated trio Flasher—featuring guitarist Taylor Mulitz (also the bassist in Priests), bassist Daniel Saperstein and drummer Emma Baker—makes moody punk for the modern counterculture. Musically, the band shifts in a blink from shimmering shoegaze to overdriven grunge. Flasher earned early acclaim for its 2016 self-titled debut EP, and have since delivered a steady stream of tunes full of surprising tempo changes and inventive three-part vocal harmonies that led up to the debut full-length Constant Image. A 10-song collection riddled with highlights like the stutter-stepping “Sun Come and Golden,” Constant Image also includes “Material,” which makes a bleak statement on everyday reality for 9-to-5 types who live for nights and weekends: “Laughter in this century/ Is a misery afterglow.” But the band proves they’re no strangers to having fun on “Skim Milk,” a straightforward punk banger with airy vocal hooks that will likely win over fans of Sonic Youth. Talk about fist-pumping indeed. (Howard Hardee) Kilby Court, 741 Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $10, all ages, kilbycourt.com


d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

2PM

HIGHLAND

save the date!

WYOMING DOWNS FUN BUS! JULY 28 DETAILS AT THE BAR

Thursdays

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG $2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

saturdays SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS

KARAOKE Mondays

WINGS 75¢ALL DAY

Wednesdays

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

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POLARIS RZR STEREO PACKAGE

PMX-2 STEREO AND FRONT SPEAKER KIT FOR SELECT POLARIS® RZR® MODELS. KIT INCLUDES:

99

699

$

LABOR SOLD SEPARATELY

• CAN AM MX3

10AM TO 7PM

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 7/26/18

JULY 19, 2018 | 45

KITS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR WE WILL NOT BE BEAT ON • YAMAHA YXZ PRICE ON ROCKFORD FOSGATE • POLARIS RANGER • POLARIS GENERAL SIDE BY SIDE STAGE KITS HOURS

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NO DRILLING OR CUTTING REQUIRED DIRECT CONNECT WIRING HARNESSES FOR RZR MODELS STEREO KITS BOLT TO FACTORY ATTACHMENT POINTS SYSTEM IS ELEMENT READY TO WITHSTAND HARSH OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENT SPEAKER & SUB ENCLOSURES INTEGRATE WITHOUT LOSING PASSENGER/CARGO SPACE PMX-2: COMPACT DIGITAL MEDIA RECEIVER W/ 2.7” COLOR DISPLAY RFRZ-PMX2DK: INSTALLATION KIT FOR DASH RFRZ-FSE: RZR 6.5” FRONT SPEAKER ENCLOSURE (PAIR) RM1652B: 6.5” SPEAKER BLACK (PAIR) RFRZ-PMXWH1: RZR PMX POWER & SPEAKER HARNESS CONSUMER SAVINGS ON KIT PRICE $79.96 1 YEAR STANDARD WARRANTY

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BREAKING BINGO $500 POT-8PM


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PINKY’S CABARET

CONCERTS & CLUBS

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

GOOD FOOD GOOD FUN LINDSEY BYRNES

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

MONDAY 7/23

Paramore, Foster the People, Jay Som

It would be easy to attribute Paramore’s international success to lead singer Hayley Williams. Modern-day guitar god John Mayer called her “the great orange hope,” a description that alluded not only to her boldly-tinted hair, but also to the fact that Williams strikes such a commanding presence, drawing comparisons to Avril Lavigne and Kelly Clarkson at one extreme and Debbie Harry, Siouxsie Sioux and Gwen Stefani on the other. With various members exiting the band early on, Williams has helped foster the essential edge and imagery needed to cultivate a popular appeal, notching countless film, video game, MTV and late-night TV credits. Over the course of 14 years and five albums, the band has cultivated a playful pop approach that incorporates elements of new wave, punk and synth. Not surprisingly, they’ve been compared to any number of other equally successful upstarts: Panic! at the Disco, Blink-182, No Doubt and, yes, the other band on the bill, Foster the People. Anyone longing for a band to love would be hard-pressed to find one more perfect than Paramore. (Lee Zimmerman) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, 6:30 p.m., $35- $79.50, all ages, usana-amp.com

THURSDAY 7/19 LIVE MUSIC

Castlecomer + Brother. + Hello Vertigo (Kilby Court) Eminent Sol + The Vistanauts + Rare Fracture (Velour) Exmortus + The Absence + Hatchet + ToxicDose + Legion (Club X) see p. 42 Gene Sartain (The Gallivan Center) Ghostowne (DeJoria Center) Jackson Browne (Red Butte Garden) JJ Grey + Mofro (The Depot) see p. 42 Kitty Kat Fan Club + Debbie Downers + Karl Ricky + Human Toy (The Underground) Mountain Boogaloo (O.P. Rockwell) Nick Garn (The Yes Hell) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Shecock & The Rock Princess + Magda Vega + Galagher (Urban Lounge) Slvthhammer (The Beehive) Sun Divide (The Royal) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) Wisebird (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House)

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Dave & JD (Tavernacle) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Breathe Carolina (Sky)

FRIDAY 7/20 LIVE MUSIC

801 Green Tee (The Beehive) Alternator (The Ice Haüs) Band on the Moon (The Spur) BD Howes Band (The Gallivan Center) Blazin’ Aces (Outlaw Saloon) Colt.46 (The Westerner) Forever in Your Mind + Dana Vaughns (Kilby Court) Haystak + K.A.O.T.I.C. + Nevaeh + SloDown + MoveMent (The Royal) Machine Guns N Roses + Dirt Cheap (Metro Music Hall) Matt Calder + Lounge 40 (Lake Effect) Mokie (The Commonwealth Room) Moon Darling + Dwellers + Crook and the Bluff + Lord Vox (The Loading Dock) see p. 42 Nate Robinson (Snowbird) Neon Kross + Killer Couture + Tragic

Black (The Batcave Club) Red Desert Ramblers (Woodenshoe Park) Red Shot Pony (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Retro Futura Tour (Red Butte Garden) Rick Springfield (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Shannon Runyon (Legends at Park City Mountain) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Tayler Lacey (The Harp & Hound) Two Faces West (Brewskis) The Village People (Sandy Amphitheater) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) Will Baxter Band (The Ruin) Wisebird (The Yes Hell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ ChaseOne2 (Lake Effect) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Mi Cielo w/ Miguel Mixx (Sky) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)


SATURDAY 7/21 FRIDAY, JULY 20TH

LIVE MUSIC

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 7/18

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 7/19 Reggae at the Royal

$

Vocal Reasoning Sun Divide

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 7/20

Haystak

K.A.O.T.I.C. • Nevaeh Slo-Down • MoveMent saturday 7/21

Live Music

Bone • Brute Kiss

Tuesday 7/10

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

7/28

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig)

SATURDAY, JULY 21ST

BIG RED BAND

WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

Open from 10am -2am 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4 24 2 S o u th S t a te S t re e t S LC , U T 8 4107

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com

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Embrace the Struggle Veronica Blue

MORGAN WHITNEY

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Live Music

Andy Frasco + Andrew Cole (Snowbird) Arrival: The Music of ABBA (Sandy Amphitheater) Blazin’ Aces (Outlaw Saloon) Carrie Myers (The Harp & Hound) Citizen + Oso Oso + Teenage Wrist + Queen of Jeans (Kilby Court) Colt.46 (The Westerner) Embrace The Struggle + Veronica Blue + Bone + Brute Kiss (The Royal) The Fab Folk + Chapter 3 (Miner’s Plaza) Fat Candice + Dustin Morris (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Finn + A Dough (The Complex) Five Finger Death Punch + Breaking Benjamin + N0thing More + Bad Wolves (Usana Amphitheater) Hotel Le Motel + Homo Leviticus + Sad State of Society (The Ice Haüs) Indubious + Burnell Washburn + Zac Ivie + The Dirt Nap + Brodyizm (Urban Lounge) James McMurtry + Bonnie Whitmore (The Commonwealth Room) see p. 44 Kevyn Dern (Snowbird) Kina Grannis + Imaginary Future (In the Venue) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Mountain Country + Jim Fish (Garage on Beck) Polyrhythmics (Canyons Village) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Tad Calcara & New Swing Band (Holladay City Hall Park) Tony Holiday Band (Johnny’s on Second) UVLUV (The Beehive) Victoria Bailey (The Yes Hell) Will Baxter Band + Joshy Soul & the Cool (Lake Effect) Yung Bae + Thoroughbred + Serge (Soundwell) Zion Riot (Brewskis)

8/1

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

JULY 19, 2018 | 47

one drop w/ Funk & Gonzo

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royal bliss w/ october rage penrose


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48 | JULY 19, 2018

HANDLEBAR

COURTESY HANDLEBAR

BAR FLY

DJ Soul Pause (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ DJ Crooked (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

SUNDAY 7/22 LIVE MUSIC

Brooke Macintosh (Lake Effect) Bruce Music + Lumberjack Fabulous (Legends art Park City Mountain) Eldren + Le Voir + Ugly Boys (Urban Lounge) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Scott Klismith + Free Peoples (Park Silly Sunday Market) Wolf + Bear + Good Call (Kilby Court) You Topple Over (Snowbird)

MONDAY 7/23

Before making my maiden voyage to new Marmalade hotspot HandleBar, I hadn’t ventured north of the Utah State Capitol. But boy, have I been missing out. Between the funky, far-flung architecture, the natural cohesion incubated by being the city’s narrowest neighborhood and now the newly opened HandleBar, I’m hooked—even though I have to hoof it three miles to get there. Vintage bikes and chain chandeliers hang from HandleBar’s ceiling, while plywood paneling shares wall space with old bike parts and four big, bright TVs. Matte black metal piping adds a steampunk touch, but the bathroom hall is all hipster irony, featuring famed, framed moustaches: Dali, Rollie, Selleck, Eckersley, the Rons (Burgundy and Swanson), Roosevelt. Outside on the sprawling, smoker-friendly porch, Mount Ensign looms to the left while the Capitol dome rises to the right, appropriately fronted by HandleBar’s casquette-adorned sign. Food trucks post up on most nights, while a bare area behind the bar holds plenty of promise— depending, of course, on what happens when the three-story apartments under construction right next door are finished. “I love this neighborhood, but I could never afford it,” revealed my bartender, who wore a Rick James nametag and said she lived in Millcreek. We traded neighborhood revitalization war stories gleaned from time spent living in Texas (her, Houston; me, Austin) while gazing at the decrepit brick buildings that will eventually be transformed into Marmalade Courtyards. “There’s a waiting list a mile long for those!” Rick ranted. Relaying the fact that I lucked into my current digs from afar (bless you, Craigslist), she leveled me with a shocked smile. “Damn! Can I rub your head? You’re a lucky man.” Finishing my beer and heading home through Marmalade’s back streets, I couldn’t have agreed more. (Nick McGregor) 751 N. 300 West, 801-953-0588, handlebarslc.com

LIVE MUSIC

Abolitionist + All Systems Fail + Deep Romance (The Beehive) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Chris Blue (Eccles Center) Hobo Johnson & The Lovemakers + Ashe (The Complex) The Ophelias + The Lavender Hunnies (Kilby Court) Paramore + Foster the People + Jay Som (Usana Amphitheater) see p. 46 Sarah DeGraw (Lake Effect) String Chix (The Gallivan Center) Us The Duo + Justin Nozuka (The Depot) The Weirdos + Egrets on Ergot + Brain Bagz (Urban Lounge)

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TUESDAY 7/24 LIVE MUSIC

Earth Groans + Far From + Elysium (The Loading Dock) Flasher (Kilby Court) see p. 44 Perspective, a Lovely Hand to Hold + Follie + Not So Friendlies + Emma Park (The Underground) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Scott Klismith (The Spur)

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Celtics 12. Actress MacDowell 13. Breather 18. Pottery need 22. ____ event (regardless) 23. Get chummy (with) 24. Witticism 25. Not electives: Abbr. 27. The “Y” of TTYL 30. Fruit drink 32. Inc. relative 34. Popular nail polish brand 35. Animated series whose episodes include “Encyclopedia Griffin” and “The Giggity Wife” 36. Barnyard brayers 37. Chinese menu possessive 39. Architect Piano who co-designed Paris’ Pompidou Center 40. Grey tea 41. OMG, like, the greatest pal 46. Treated badly 47. Walk shakily 49. 1970s singer ____ Dee

51. War on terror target Al ____ 52. Milk container 53. Using Facebook Chat, briefly 54. One who might create a big splash 56. Dick Cheney’s wife 57. Stoker who created Dracula 58. Govt. guidelines 61. “<<” button: Abbr. 62. “____ pasa?” 63. Barnes & Noble’s stock symbol, aptly

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

1. “I should ____ lucky” 5. D.C. baseballers 10. Late-night host before Carson 14. Autobahn sights 15. Allergy season sound 16. Shoppers’ headache 17. Scones or biscuits, e.g. 19. “No ifs, ____ or buts” 20. “____ oui!” 21. Breaking off a relationship 23. Knitter’s stitch 24. Head of a hive 25. A lot of Top 40 music 26. Sch. where Spike Lee earned his M.F.A 28. Evidence in paternity suits 29. Mandela player in a 2013 biopic 31. Alaskan export 33. 0%, in the dairy aisle 38. Serious heart surgery 42. Mall sweepstakes prize, maybe 43. Half-____ (coffee order) 44. “____ Excited” (Pointer Sisters hit) 45. Rebellious Turner 48. He’s memorialized with MLK at Indianapolis’ Landmark for Peace Memorial 50. Plural ending 51. Good practice for the show “It’s Academic” 55. Troubles 57. Disparage 58. Grey Goose competitor 59. Quick, in trade names 60. Person who calls the first play ... or this puzzle’s theme 64. Mideast’s Gulf of ____ 65. Hunted for morays 66. Greenland’s capital 67. Actress Helgenberger of “CSI” 68. Brees, Bledsoe and Barrymore 69. Hawks have sharp ones 1. Kind of sauce, for short 2. National bird of Australia 3. Luxury resort amenity 4. Word before nod or buzz 5. Slaps the cuffs on 6. From l. to r. 7. What’s exited in Brexit 8. Given for a time 9. Soaking wet 10. Fallback strategy 11. All-Star Danny who played for the 1980s

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52 | JULY 19, 2018

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Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Self-described skeptics sometimes say to me, “How can any intelligent person believe in astrology? You must be suffering from a brain dysfunction if you imagine that the movements of planets can reveal any useful clues about our lives.” If the “skeptic” is truly open-minded, as an authentic skeptic should be, I offer a minilecture to correct his misunderstandings. If he’s not (which is the usual case), I say that I don’t need to “believe” in astrology; I use astrology because it works. For instance, I have a working hypothesis that Cancerians like myself enjoy better-than-average insight and luck with money every year from late July through the month of August. It’s irrelevant whether there’s a “scientific” theory to explain why this might be. I simply undertake efforts to improve my financial situation at this time and I’m often successful. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are some of the fine gifts you’re eligible for and even likely to receive during the next four weeks: a more constructive and fluid relationship with obsession; a panoramic look at what lies below the tip of the metaphorical iceberg; a tear-jerking joyride that cracks open your sleeping sense of wonder; erasure of at least 20 percent of your self-doubt; vivid demonstrations of the excitement available from slowing down and taking your sweet time; and a surprising and useful truth delivered to your soul by your body.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You will never find an advertisement for Nike or Apple within the sacred vessel of this horoscope column. But you might come across plugs for soul-nourishing commodities like creative freedom, psychosexual bliss, and playful generosity. Like everyone else, I’m a salesperson—though I believe that the wares I peddle are unambiguously good for you. In this spirit, I invite you to hone your own sales pitch. It’s an excellent time to interest people in the fine products and ideas and services that you have to offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Would you do me a favor, please? Would you do your friends and loved ones and the whole world a favor? Don’t pretend you’re less powerful and beautiful than you are. Don’t downplay or neglect the magic you have at your disposal. Don’t act as if your unique genius is nothing special. OK? Are you willing to grant us these small indulgences? Your specific talents, perspectives and gifts are indispensable right now. The rest of us need you to be bold and brazen about expressing them.

JULY 19, 2018 | 53

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reader asked Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle, “How does one become more sensual?” I’ll ask you to meditate on the same question. Why? Because it’s a good time to enrich and deepen your sensuality. For inspiration, here are some ideas that blend my words with Cardelle’s: “Laugh easily and freely. Tune in to the rhythm of your holy animal body as you walk. Sing songs that remind you why you’re here on earth. Give yourself the luxury of reading books that thrill your imagination and fill you with fresh questions. Eat food with your fingers. Allow sweet melancholy to snake through you. Listen innocently to people, being warmhearted and slyly wild. Soak up colors with your eager eyes. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s what author Franz Kafka wrote in his diary on Aug. 2, Whisper grateful prayers to the sun as you exult in its gifts.” 1914: “Germany has declared war on Russia. I went swimming in the afternoon.” We could possibly interpret his nonchalance SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If people aren’t laughing at your goals, your goals are too small.” about world events to be a sign of callous self-absorption. But So says bodybuilder Kai Greene. I don’t know if I would personally I recommend that you cultivate a similar attitude in the coming make such a brazen declaration, but I do think it’s worth consider- weeks. In accordance with astrological omens, you have the ing—especially for you right now. You’re entering into the Big right and the need to shelter yourself from the vulgar insanity of Bold Vision time of your astrological cycle. It’s a phase when politics and the pathological mediocrity of mainstream culture. you’ll be wise to boost the intensity of your hopes for yourself, So feel free to spend extra time focusing on your own welland get closer to knowing the ultimate form of what you want, being. (P.S.: Kafka’s biographer says swimming served this role and be daring enough to imagine the most sublime possible out- for him. It enabled him to access deep unconscious reserves of comes for your future. If you do all that with the proper chutzpah, pleasurable power that renewed his spirit.) some people might indeed laugh at your audacity. That’s OK! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Am I delusional to advise a perky, talkative Gemini like yourself SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This mini-chapter in your epic life story is symbolically ruled to enhance your communication skills? How dare I even hint that by the fluttering flights of butterflies, the whirring hum of you’re not quite perfect at a skill you were obviously born to hummingbird wings, the soft cool light of fireflies, and the excel at? But that’s exactly what I’m here to convey. The coming dawn dances of seahorses. To take maximum advantage of the weeks will be a favorable time to take inventory of how you could blessings life will tease you with in the coming weeks, I suggest more fully develop your natural ability to exchange information. you align yourself with phenomena like those. You will tend to be You’ll be in robust alignment with cosmic rhythms if you take alert and receptive in just the right ways if you cultivate a love of action to refine the way you express your own messages and receive and respond to other people’s messages. fragile marvels, subtle beauty and amazing grace.

| COMMUNITY |

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are magic.” Whenever that quote appears on the internet, it’s falsely attributed to painter Frida Kahlo. In fact, it was originally composed by poet Marty McConnell. In any case, I’ll recommend that you heed it in the coming weeks. You really do need to focus on associating with allies who see the mysterious and lyrical best in you. I will also suggest that you get inspired by a line that Frida Kahlo actually wrote: “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit.” (If you don’t know what a bourbon biscuit is, I’ll tell you: chocolate buttercream stuffed between two thin rectangular chocolate biscuits.)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): During the last three months of 2018, I suspect you will dismantle or outgrow a foundation. Why? So as to prepare the way for building or finding a new foundation in 2019. From next January onward, I predict you will re-imagine the meaning of home. You’ll grow fresh roots and come to novel conclusions about the influences that enable you to feel secure and stable. The reason I’m revealing these clues ahead of time is because now is a good time to get a foreshadowing of how to proceed. You can glean insights on where to begin your work.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I swear the astrological omens are telling me to tell you that you have license to make the following requests: 1. People from your past who say they’d like to be part of your future have to prove their earnestness by forgiving your debts to them and asking your forgiveness for their debts to you. 2. People who are pushing for you to be influenced by them must agree to be influenced by you. 3. People who want to deepen their collaborations with you must promise to deepen their commitment to wrestling with their own darkness. 4. People who say they care for you must prove their love in a small but meaningful way.


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Poets Corner Ill hold back my whole life till the day i die

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Let’s Go Downtown

Since 2011, the Downtown Alliance has put together comprehensive looks at the city’s economy by reviewing employment trends, retail, development, cultural impact and activities, hospitality, housing and more. If you live out in the ’burbs or, say, in Moab, this kind of info might not mean a hill of beans to you, but to many folks, this is crucial intel. Why? Did you seen those electric scooters downtown? They can be rented by the minute like GreenBikes (once Bird and the city hash out some final details). There are no docking stations—just an app that tells you where one was left by the last rider. They are picked up at night, charged and placed downtown again. Bird temporarily pulled the scooters from operation while it works out rules for operating downtown. Why did the company choose Salt Lake City as a market for its scooter product? And how did they figure out where to place the scooters? Info from Downtown Alliance helps business of all sorts make good decisions. The 2017-18 report estimates that 77,850 people work downtown, with 3,250 in retail jobs, 7,750 in restaurant jobs and 65,000 in office jobs. Geographically, downtown isn’t very big so most people working downtown leave after work. The report found that the No. 1 reason people avoid visiting downtown is traffic. Oy vey. Have you driven in San Francisco or Portland? Our traffic pales in comparison to so many other cities! My clients relocating here say time and time again that one of the reasons they want to move here is because commuting to and from work is “nothing” compared to where they’re from. Downtown Alliance reports from the past few years show that downtown retail sales keep climbing ($865 million in 2018) and that 64 conventions brought in 243,000 visitors who spent $226 million. The Eccles Theater has enticed folks to visit downtown, too. The survey found that during the past six months, on average, people came eight times to dine, five times to shop, four times for entertainment and two times for religious activities. I hope that as more people visit downtown this year for reasons other than work that they ride Trax or FrontRunner more often. The report notes that 33,000 parking spaces are available, but there are so many reasons to stop driving that polluting car! (OK, so I’m on the UTA board). To read these free reports, go to downtownslc.org. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Want to Get Away? Many citizens of the world are weary of the war and strife that seem to be consuming the news, and about 200,000 of them have already signed up to put it all in the rear-view mirror by becoming citizens of Asgardia. This coming-soon colony on the moon is led by Igor Ashurbeyli, a Russian engineer, computer scientist and businessman who was inaugurated as its leader on June 25 in Vienna. Asgardia’s parliament plans to set up “space arks” with artificial gravity in the next 10 to 15 years, where its projected 150 million citizens can live permanently, Reuters reports, and Ashurbeyli hopes settlement on the moon will be complete within 25 years. Asgardia is named after Asgard, a “world in the sky” in Norse mythology. Its leaders hope to attract a population from among the “most creative” in humanity, perhaps using “IQ tests,” according to Ashurbeyli. Best of all: For the time being, becoming a citizen online is free.

WEIRD

Ewwwwww! Susan Allan of Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, was driving with her son on May 9, enjoying the beautiful weather with the sunroof open, when they were suddenly hit with a cold material that smelled to them like feces mixed with chlorine. “Like a clean poop smell if that’s possible,” Allan told Vice. “My son threw up, and we had so much in our faces. Both of us, our faces were covered in poop.” Apparently, poop is falling from the sky all over Canada; Transport Canada has received 18 such reports this year. But the government has not issued an explanation for the phenomenon. Allan thinks it is related to airplanes flying overhead and the Canadian government is covering it up. But Transport Canada pooh-poohed her theory and has declined to comment further.

Litigious Society In Norman’s Bay, East Sussex, England, Nigel and Sheila Jacklin are studiously keeping their eyes down after being threatened with prosecution if they look at their neighbors’ house—an adjoining property bought five years ago by Dr. Stephane Duckett and Norinne Betjemann. The Jacklins, 26-year residents of the beachfront community, had repeatedly complained to authorities about noisy builders, verbal abuse and light pollution as Duckett and Betjemann turned a former workshop into a weekend retreat. In June, The Sun reported that after police were called into the dispute, the Rother District Council sent the Jacklins a “community protection warning” that defines an “exclusion zone” around Duckett and Betjemann’s home, forcing the Jacklins to take a roundabout route to the beach. Nigel Jacklin said: “We can’t walk to and from the beach or through the village without fear of being prosecuted.” The Jacklins plan to fight the order.

Perspective An 82-year-old Japanese man who has lived as a naked “hermit” on a deserted island near Taiwan since 1989 has been forced to return to Japan. Masafumi Nagasaki made his way to Sotobanari Island 29 years ago and told Reuters in 2012 that he wished to die there. “Finding a place to die is an important thing to do,” Nagasaki said, “and I’ve decided here is the place for me.” Earlier reports indicated that he at one time had a wife and two children, and he ran a hostess club in Niigata, Japan. “In civilization people treated me like an idiot and made me feel like one. On this island I don’t feel like that,” he said. Nagasaki explained that at first he wore clothes on the island, but a typhoon destroyed his belongings. Alvaro Cerezo, who documents the stories of island castaways, told News.com/au that in April, authorities removed Nagasaki from the island and placed him in government housing in Ishigaki, Japan, because he was ill and weak. “They took him back to civilization and that’s it,” Cerezo said. “They won’t allow him to return.”

n In Devon, England, on June 30, a couple who had just exchanged vows at the Furrough Cross Church gathered their wedding party at Tessier Gardens next door to take pictures. But a sunbathing woman who was squarely in the frame of the wedding photos refused to move from her towel. So the party just posed around her. The groom’s son approached the woman and asked her to move, but she “pretended to be asleep,” he told Metro News. Later she did move but left her belongings in the same spot. “It was bloody rude and disrespectful,” claimed Natalie Ming, a relative of the groom.

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SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM COMING AT THE END OF THE MONTH: UNIVERSITY OF UTAH AREA TUDOR WITH SHE SHED OR POTENTIAL ART STUDIO AND HUGE PRIVATE LOT, JUST UNDER $500,000 DOWNTOWN ! Virtually next door to city hall and across from a TRAX station and Dunkin’ Donuts and the main library in a modern building that’s pet friendly. Hot tub, gym in building, W/D in unit, small terrace. One bedroom, one full bath but really good sized rooms. Controlled access parking and building entry. MLS 1532720 $275,000 JUST LISTED DAKOTA LOFT across from Gateway with movies, pubs, Dave and Busters and a TRAX station. East facing unit, not just one big open room but a dedicated bedroom, double closet, master bath with walk-in shower, Bosch W/D and a second room often used as a guest bedrm or more likely a home office. MLS 1538157 $289,900 SUGAR HOUSE 1426 E. PARKWAY AVE With almost 2000 sq. ft on the main floor and a basement with high ceilings that could be used as a possible mo-in-law apartment. All the charm of the 1920’s but modernized for today’s living. 4 BR on main w/ 2 BA, 1 half bath in bsmt. MLS 1530900

Bright Idea “ARE YOU BLIND IT 25 MPH” is Ron Ward’s in-your-face (and grammatically lacking) attempt to slow down drivers along his street in Grand Rapids, Mich. Ward has been making signs for years, neighbor Patrick Schmidt told FOX 17 in June. Ward claims, “By the time (drivers) hit this here driveway, they’re doing at least 50-55 miles an hour.” He just wants people to follow the Richmond Street speed limit. “Slow down, the whole neighborhood’s got kids,” he said. The City of Grand Rapids, however, has no specific plans for speed monitoring on the street. Wrong Place, Wrong Time Early on June 26, a man who had been sleeping on the South Miami Avenue bridge over the Miami River got a rude awakening as the drawbridge started to raise to allow a boat to pass underneath. Witness Khadijah Andrews had seen the man as she was walking to an early yoga class, she told WSVN TV, and she looked for him when the bridge began rising. Fortunately, he woke up after sliding down a ways and was able to hold on until the bridge was lowered. Andrews said the unnamed man walked away with no apparent injuries: “You think you’re about to watch a man lose his life. It’s just terrifying. I never want to see that again.”

Babs De Lay

Julie “Bella” De Lay

COOL AND GROOVY LOFT NEXT TO A BREW PUB ! True loft of almost 1500 sq. ft with two huge white marble baths behind two barn doors and a massive open space to design around for one or two bedrooms. Over 252 new insulated windows with solar coating and solar shades. MLS 1523094 $524,900

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JULY 19, 2018 | 55

Weird Food Minor league baseball teams come up with some wacky promotional ideas, and “Sugar Rush Night” at the Erie (Pennsylvania) SeaWolves game on June 23 didn’t disappoint. WNEP TV noted that one highlight was the cotton candy hot dog: a wiener nestled in a cloud of cotton candy, then sprinkled with Nerds

Recurring Theme: Airport Nudity Travelers aboard a Delta Air Lines flight that had just landed at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta on June 26 were startled when a nearly naked man ran up to their plane and jumped onto a wing, then attempted to open an emergency exit. Jhyrin Jones, 19, had scaled a fence topped with razor wire to reach the runway; just minutes before, he had jumped on some parked cars at a nearby construction site and threatened to “kill y’all, I’m going to blow this place up, trust nobody, you better believe me,” according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. A police report indicated Jones “appeared to be under the influence of narcotics.” He was charged with criminal trespass and public indecency, among other things.

FIREFIGHTERS

| COMMUNITY |

Weird Science Montgomery, Ala., resident Kayla Rahn, 30, had been trying for months to lose weight, but instead experienced dramatic weight gain and pain in her stomach. She became out of breath just taking a short walk. Finally, in May, Rahn’s mother took her to the emergency room at Jackson Hospital, where doctors discovered a growth attached to her ovary and removed what turned out to be a 50-pound, benign cyst, reported WSFA 12 News. The cyst resembled a large watermelon in size. “This is one of the largest I have ever seen,” Dr. Gregory Jones told reporters. “We are very excited things went well for her.”

candies. Brave SeaWolves fans could top off the meal with a cotton candy ball: ice cream covered with sprinkles and enclosed in cotton candy. Maybe the sugar rush was too much for the players; they lost 5-3 to the Altoona (Pennsylvania) Curve.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Oh, Fudge KCCI TV in Des Moines, Iowa, reported on June 27 the loss of a tractor-trailer load of chocolate when the truck caught fire near Dexter, Iowa. The trailer, full of chocolate from Hershey, Pa., was westbound when it experienced brake problems that caused it to ignite. The driver pulled off and was able to detach the trailer from the cab before it caught fire. No injuries were reported, except to the chocolate, which was a total loss.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

56 | JULY 19, 2018

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City Weekly July 19, 2018  

Holy Spirits 2018- A-Z Cocktail Guide

City Weekly July 19, 2018  

Holy Spirits 2018- A-Z Cocktail Guide