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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY BENEATH THE SURFACE

Cleanup of the historic contamination on the state’s inland port site should be possible, but it won’t be easy—or come cheap. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

14

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 18 A&E 24 DINE 31 CINEMA 34 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

EMMA PENROD

Cover story, p. 14 The independent science writer and author has covered water regulation and policy for nearly a decade. Along with working on several investigative projects, she’s currently on the hunt for an air freshener that’ll make her house smell like afternoon thunderstorms in the high desert all the time.

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SLC welcomes more than 100 newly naturalized immigrants. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Group gathers monthly to protest U.S. war involvement.

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BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

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Cover story, June 28, “Herding Cats”

THESE PEOPLE VOTED

WILD WEST CAT FANCIERS

It’s a great place to be. Put your anger aside for a bit and enjoy the ride.

A huge thank you to Scott Renshaw for the fantastic coverage of the Cat Fanciers 2018 Rocky Mountain Roundup cat show! Via Twitter Where do I enter?

@HELLOQUAN Via Instagram

Must be scary to live in your effed up version of reality.

Via Facebook

MIKE STAPLEY Via Facebook

Hits & Misses, June 28, “Stranger Danger”

I remember when City Weekly used to have in-depth investigative pieces of importance.

City Weekly and Kathy Biele: Love you guys, but I don’t think “You might think that those illegal immigrant children have it bad, but listen to the ideas for Utah school children,” is an accurate comparison or a funny joke.

Via cityweekly.net

Via Twitter

As a breeder of show quality cats, I think that this piece is very in depth. I guess the level of importance that you place on the piece depends on who you are. To the more than 5,000 registered members of The International Cat Association, I would say this article was extremely important!

Dine June 28, “Tamales, Tortas and Tires”

Subtitle should be: “A typical weekend for a feminist.”

CRAIG SCHROERLUCKE Via Facebook

DAVID CORDYCEPS

K.C. FRALICK

One of my favorite places! Inspectors from Health Department told me about it many years ago.

TERRI LEDDING Via Facebook

Opinion, June 28, “American Terrorist”

Online news post, June 30, “Make American Presidents Impeachable Again”

CONNIE PIÑA

K.S. VALENTI

LYNZCEY R. KLEIN Via cityweekly.net

So true!

You mean like Willy Clinton?

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

[Author Michael S.] Robinson reminds me of Chomsky: “the Republican party is the most dangerous organization in human history.” He talks like a socialist propagandist.

Clinton was impeached just not removed from office.

A.G. FOSTER

Via cityweekly.net

IRIS NIELSEN Via Facebook

Every president since and including LBJ should have been impeached.

TOM YORK

What color is the sky in the world of deranged leftists? I can only imagine what will come after the losses in November.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Asking if the president has violated the laws of impeachment

MIKE STAPLEY

The epitome of liberal filth!

BOB ERICKSON Via Facebook

makes somebody liberal filth? Sounds like a patriot to me.

PETER MUSCARELLO Via Facebook

And yet we ignore the fact that up to 75 percent of these children at the border are parentless and are highly vulnerable to human trafficking. But, hey, there’s no good vs. evil dynamic in that.

Online news post, June 30, Thousands gather at the MATT MORRIS Capitol to protest Trump’s Via Facebook immigration policies Online news post, Did you say thousands? Looks July 6, More than 100 more like hundreds. Those kids are not in custody they are free immigrants and refugees to leave whenever they want. are naturalized Those kids have never had it so good in their entire lives— clean warm beds, good food and school. Some of their parents have been deported and left the kids behind because they now have a better life. You left-wing lunatics need to go home and take care of your own kids and all their problems.

Welcome.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

KERRY KNOWLES

Fathers have been fighting for years to see their children or shared custody. Guess it’s better to be an illegal. Children need both parents.

DAVID BATES Via Facebook

DEBRA VASQUEZ Via Facebook Since Trump, Utah has become one of the Top 5 states to slow immigration applications. Put that in your baptismal font and soak in it.

CURTIS MACE DAVIES

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, CASEY KOLDEWYN, EMMA PENROD, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

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PRIVATE EY

Terrible Terry

Many years ago, we ran an advertisement that people talked about for years. No one on our current staff would remember it—and some of them weren’t even born—but perhaps there is a reader or three out there that just might. The only way I can think to date it now, is that it ran in this paper before we moved our office from Midvale to downtown Salt Lake City. We were called the Private Eye at the time and published every two weeks. Our office was inside a former bar on Midvale’s Historic Main Street—one desk, a homemade layout table, a beat up couch, no hangings on the walls, and nothing else inside the long building except the smell of cigarettes, spilled beer and urine. Our rent was $100 a month. We had it made. One day, a young lady named Chrissie Klapakis walked in and said she was doing marketing for a guy named Terry Nish who was importing a new beverage, Mainstay Vodka, to Utah. She’d seen our paper around town, wasn’t disgusted by it, and wanted to buy some ads. She asked who to talk to. I served as publisher, editor, distribution driver, salesperson and production manager, so that person was me. I took her ideas, got some art rounded up and made a spec ad for her. I thought it was a beaut. Terry thought otherwise. Next thing I know, he’s at the office basically letting me know I was clueless. Terry had a knack for not only sizing people up—he did not suffer fools—and he matched that ability with the willingness to speak his mind. He was a pretty intimidating guy. He had me start over. Then do it again and again. As he was one of the few people in town willing to spend a buck with us, I

B Y J O H N S A LT A S

didn’t quarrel and did all I could to get it right. Eventually, the ad met his expectations—no easy task in the days when newspaper layouts were done without computers, when cut-and-paste actually required a knife for the cutting and hot wax for the pasting. We ran the ad. Then another. And another, only bigger. Pretty soon, he was buying the entire back page. The ad got everyone’s attention. As a liquor importer and distributor in Utah, Terry faced more than his share of barriers at every bureaucratic state level. One of those frustrations was how small his return was for every bottle of Mainstay sold. He wanted to tell the state and its Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to bugger off. He explained how it all worked out great for everyone but him despite taking all the risk. He was especially ticked at how much tax he had to pay on his product. I gave him an idea he liked and we went to work. I built a rudimentary martini glass with my trusty X-acto knife and some one-point black tape. It was basically a triangle turned upside down with a line coming down. That led to a smaller triangle facing right side up. It was a really crappy martini glass. I then got some grayscale screen and cut that in to make it look like there was something in the glass. I took the 2D glassware to the copier and made enough copies to account for the number of ounces in a fifth-sized bottle of Mainstay—25 crappy looking martini glasses. I pasted them onto a layout board with the glasses forming a graph and telling the story. I don’t remember the story exactly, but it went something like this: The first two ounces poured paid for manufacturing the vodka. Another three paid for the bottle, the labels and packaging; four more martinis paid for the shipping from South Africa; and two paid for storage. So, less than half the ounces in an entire bottle paid for the product and

@johnsaltas

getting it here. Another martini paid sundry fees and licenses. That’s when the real drunks and racketeers took their swigs. More than 12 martini glasses represented what Terry paid in state and federal taxes. When all was said and done, he had barely more than an ounce comprising his “profit”—but that was before he paid his own local sales staff or other employees like Klapakis. It wasn’t a pretty ad, but it was effective. It was easy to see how much money the state was making off entrepreneurs like Terry on the entire liquor chain. Did Utah change and say sorry? No, but club owners and drinkers took notice and a decade of taking a saber to the controllers of the local liquor industry began. Utah was strong-arming the liquor industry no less than Al Capone did in Chicago. So long as the state got a cut, it let you live. That’s not how Terry lived, though. He was a real deal, no-bullshit man’s man. He wanted to put a sharp stick in Utah’s eye, and he did for years. When I learned the other night that he’d died, the first thing I thought of was how he never took any guff. He taught me more with that ad about “standing up to the man” than most journalists I ever met. He was fearless. He was a land speed world-record-holding, death defying driver—making him equally calculating and meticulous. Terry changed the stars of this newspaper. He was a connector and in the prehistoric days of branding, produced Private Eye logo-emblazoned shot glasses and Frisbee discs for us. He also built our first newsracks—200 of them to be exact—at cost. They were bright, flaming red before the city cared to force us to paint them black. Terry also helped pave the way for what is now a burgeoning Utah liquor distilling industry. He changed those stars, too. We were good friends. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT

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IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

REFUGEE WELCOMING PROGRAM

We know what President Donald Trump thinks of refugees, but Salt Lake City and, in fact, Utah as a whole, have a different idea. Since the Vietnam War, the state has played host to more than 60,000 refugees. The city has partnered with the Utah Refugee Services Office to create an AmeriCorps program called Know Your Neighbor, teaching community volunteers to “promote empowerment, integration and the formation of strong friendships,” according to the organization’s website. Learn about the program’s history and how you can connect with this diverse and vibrant population to build bridges to goodwill and better understanding. Salt Lake City and County Building, 451 S. State, 801-535-7697, Thursday, July 12, 68 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Kt5waD.

PUBLIC SAFETY TOWN HALL

Oh, those pesky students are coming back! You know, the ones who don’t want to die in a school shooting. Join March for Our Lives National, including Emma Gonzales, David Hogg, Jaclyn Corin and Cameron Kasky, for a panel discussion with local gun reform leaders. It’s about coming up with workable solutions to the growing gun violence in our nation. We know that some ideas revolve around arming teachers or building walls around schools. Talk to the students and survivors at March For Our Lives Student Town Hall: #RoadToChange, where you might hear of better and more effective ways forward. Megaplex Theatres, 3761 W. Parkway Plaza Drive, South Jordan, Saturday, July 14, 6-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2IUiTiu.

BALLOT PALOOZA

Citizens must be frustrated—or mad. Why else would we see three (maybe four) initiatives coming up on the November ballot? What do they mean for Utah, and what will happen if they pass? These questions and more will be answered at Capitol Club: The Inside Scoop on Utah’s Ballot Initiatives by a panel of experts on each of the initiatives, as well as the director of elections for the Lieutenant Governor’s Office. If you’re worried that once passed, these important voter initiatives will be scrapped, you will need to come and ask. You’ll hear from Rylee Curtis of Better Boundaries, Rich McKeown of Count My Vote, Connor Boyack of Utah Patients Coalition, and Jeff Wright and Blake Moore of Utah Decides Healthcare. Salt Lake Chamber, 175 E. 400 South, Ste. 600, 801-3643631, Thursday, July 19, 8-9 a.m., $20/ breakfast, bit.ly/2KwJU0N.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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Once again, the “enemy of the people” has come to the rescue. Or at least, the people now know who the real enemy is. Through a Freedom of Information Act request, Politico found a trove of emails—not Hillary’s—that point to some interesting synergies between Gov. Gary Herbert, Republican lawmakers and the now-ironic Environmental “Protection Agency.” The emails were about the air and its increasing toxicity, which doesn’t appear to worry the EPA. Pollution was creeping over tribal lands in the Uinta Basin, but lobbyists were persuading the governor and GOP legislators that oil-and-gas production was more important than lung capacity. KUER 90.1 FM called out the governor for nearly identical language to that of the oil-and-gas lobbyists. Regulations are such a burden in a state whose motto is business first, second and always.

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Predictably, the Deseret News has embarked upon a series of articles about religious freedom in the United States. Google religious freedom just to see the questions people ask about it. The most recent article calculates the numbers of religious-freedom bills around the country, and includes contraception and LGBTQ rights. If these are religious considerations, they should be just that—and not the subject of laws that somehow presume the United States is a Christian nation. The Smithsonian bares the lie: “From the earliest arrival of Europeans on America’s shores, religion has often been a cudgel, used to discriminate, suppress and even kill the foreign, the ‘heretic’ and the ‘unbeliever.’” Maybe it would be better if we just didn’t patronize bigots or made the damned cake. But in America, religion isn’t personal; it’s a cudgel.

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You know how Utah loves its growth—babies, jobs, companies, buildings. “For growth to be good, it must be guided by great leaders who represent our shared values,” wrote Natalie Gochnour, ever the state’s optimist-apologist, in the Deseret News. As rents and housing prices skyrocket, cities continue building just about everywhere. A recent Salt Lake TribuneHinckley Institute of Politics poll showed 49 percent believe the construction is a positive, which seems good until you look at the historical data. Back in 1991, 85 percent of Utah voters loved the growth scenario. Gochnour thinks Utahns are feeling a sense of loss, and need to get over it. She loves all the summits and meetings about our future. It’s a lot of talk with an occasional line drive. But the talk needs to morph into an environmental plan where people can see hope instead of high-rises.


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This Is the End, My Friend T

his week’s Straight Dope marks the last appearance of the column as the Teeming Millions have known it for the past 45 years. Why the change, and why now? With the planned sale of the Chicago Reader, the folks at Sun-Times Media, which will continue to own the Straight Dope, are rethinking the once-a-week deep dive (sorta) on a single topic (usually) in question-andanswer format. It’s possible a successor to the Straight Dope will emerge, possibly with daily online content. But no decision has been made, and my role, if any, has not been determined. In the meantime, I’m thinking about publishing another Straight Dope book—it’s been nigh on 20 years since the last one. However that works out, the Straight Dope legacy will remain intact. The Straight Dope archive—some 3,400 columns, most written by me, the balance by the Straight Dope Science Advisory Board, my online auxiliary—will remain accessible at straightdope.com. The Straight Dope homepage will continue to be updated with recycled classics. The Straight Dope Message Board (SDMB), the online community that has grown up around the column, will remain open for business. Those who have read the Straight Dope only in print might know of the Straight Dope Message Board chiefly as the source of occasional questions in the Straight Dope column. In fact, in many ways the SDMB has become the heart and soul of the enterprise. Its members are an exceptionally lively and devoted group. In a business where “stickiness” means you can get someone to spend 10 minutes on your site, we’ve had people who’ve spent hours every day for years. Most members of the community never meet in real life, but many do: Dopefests have been held around the world. Meeting a future life partner through The Straight Dope has long since ceased to be a novelty. The SDMB is a raucous, wildly entertaining house party that has kept users coming back for 22 years—“like caramelcovered crack,” as one user once put it. People participate not out of civic duty, but because it’s fun. Part of what makes it fun is the arguments, which anyone can start on any subject. The SDMB offers a soapbox and an audience that routinely numbers in the thousands and occasionally in the

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

COOLEST SUMMER ADVENTURES!

STRAIGHT DOPE

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One of Utah’s

millions. How many minds are changed as a result of these freewheeling symposia I have no idea. But surely there’s value in having to defend your views in open debate, and in having cherished beliefs challenged. The chastening thing for me as a journalist was to realize how little my participation was needed to keep the conversation going once it began. The Straight Dope got people in the door and has continued to set the tone; fighting ignorance has long been the site’s mantra. But the community at an early stage took on a life of its own. That’s not to say it just happened. Two elements were key. The first was that we had rules. The initial one was simple: don’t be a jerk. Jerkitude lacking specificity, this was soon elaborated on, but the basic idea persisted: you could venture any opinion you cared to provided you remained civil. The second critical element was the SDMB moderators—the staff—whose job was to enforce the rules and keep the peace. They’re volunteers, who get only a coffee mug for their trouble. Many have kept at it for years, which continues to astonish me. Clearly the job has its rewards; the SDMB is an enduring community and they’re pillars in it. Without them it would be a different and in my opinion much worse place. I owe a debt to them I can never pay. Of such people are communities made. Notwithstanding newspaper comment sections, Twitter, Facebook, and so on, no online arena comparable to the SDMB has emerged for the clash of ideas of the sort we’ve tried to encourage— no forum where ordinary people with fundamental disagreements can duke it out provided they remain civil. I thought, and still think, providing a home for such debates is a critical role for us in the news media. The SDMB is a model in that respect. I acknowledge it hasn’t caught on widely so far. One can only hope. I can’t say I have no regrets; there are things I might have done differently. But I’m grateful for the opportunity—and grateful that the Straight Dope community will live on. Regards, Cecil. You can still reach out to Adams via straightdope.com or for you nostalgic types, write Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


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STEVEN VARGO

Breaking Chains, Building Links Orem’s Colonial Heritage Festival expands understanding of whose history is worth knowing. BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

you overcompensate,” he says. “People have this notion that slaves were beaten all the time. Would you beat your car for not working? “They’re telling history as it was,” Martin says of the festival, its organizers and the almost 150 people who portrayed Colonialists. “You learn so much when you get the facts from someone who is not trying to spin history.” Lee wasn’t the only addition this year: Ngoma y’Africa, a Provo-based acting troupe, performed a short play on July 3 and 4 that depicted the agonizing decision a family of slaves had to make when fathers and sons were offered their freedom—but only theirs, not their wives’ and mothers’—in exchange for fighting for the British. Onstage,

D

an Shippey couldn’t bring himself to ask Patrick Martin to play the William “Billy” Lee to his George Washington in this year’s Colonial Heritage Festival in Orem. “I can’t imagine asking a friend to portray your servant, your slave,” Shippey says of requesting a man he’s known for 18 years to act as the slave Washington purchased from a rich Virginia widow. But Lee—who accompanied Washington for 20 years, through the Revolutionary War, and helped evolve the Founding Father’s perspective on slavery—is not a well-known figure in most Americans’ recounting of their country’s early history. “How often do you see Washington pictured along with Billy Lee? You don’t,” Shippey says. “Billy Lee, we don’t hear that name. And largely because it’s uncomfortable.” Martin, who is African-American, spared his friend the discomfort, asking Shippey if he’d like to expand Washington’s role to include interactions with Lee. For the first time in the festival’s 12-year history, Martin played Lee last week, often appearing by Washington’s side during the three days of colonial history role-playing. Daniel Pugmire, festival co-chair who also played the town’s scribe, says organizers had been wrestling about how to incorporate slaves’ perspectives at the educational event. “It’s something people don’t talk about.” Martin, passionate about historical accuracy, generally cautions against reenactors viewing slavery through 21stcentury eyes. “Sometimes, in the tendency to be inclusive,

Yvonne Baraketse, head of the Ngoma y’Africa Cultural Center, first moved to the U.S. in 2004 after surviving the Rwandan genocide a decade earlier. “I really hope they get to realize how lucky they are to be in a country that is free, that is peaceful, and that they realize people had to fight for that freedom,” Baraketse says of the crowds who witnessed the performance. “I’ve been through a war myself; I know the turmoil of oppressing others because they’re different.” Baraketse says the troupe’s participation aligned well with Ngoma y’Africa’s goal of educating communities on African heritage. Half the actors were born in Africa, while the other half were African-Americans, Baraketse points out, allowing for a range of perspectives. AfricanAmericans helped African-born actors understand America’s slavery history, while African-born actors explained the cultural context of songs and dances they performed at the play’s beginning and end. “That’s what made it beautiful,” Baraketse says of the strength born from the cast’s diversity. In addition to observing performances and casually chatting with long-dead historical figures returned to life, festival-goers participated in philosophical discussions with founding fathers as they hammered out the particulars of drafting the U.S. Constitution. On Day 2 of the festival, actors playing James Madison and Patrick Henry workshopped their ideas in front of a large crowd, asking how to set up a system of checks and balances to dilute presidential power and how to preserve the rights of individual Americans. Turning their attention STEVEN VARGO

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the kin argued over splitting up the family, sparring about whether the fighting-age men should risk their lives to wage war against the patriots in order to gain deliverance. “You can decide on your own, but you’re not taking my son,” a mother told an older man during the performance. “Freedom isn’t freedom if you’re lying dead on a battlefield.”


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making provisions for other slaves to be freed after his wife, Martha, died. Shippey says he hopes people who saw the Lee portrayal left understanding how integrated slavery was into people’s everyday lives. But he also hopes they, like Washington, saw Lee’s humanity and caught a glimpse of his impact on American history. “I wanted them to see this man who had given incredible service. And, even though he was an enslaved man, ended up being someone I would consider a founder,” Shippey says. Pugmire hopes to add Native American perspectives in coming years, to deepen the public’s knowledge of the country’s founding and show it wasn’t just a bunch of white men who shaped the U.S. into what it is today. “This country was not formed by one person, it was formed by many,” Pugmire says. “What built this country was the conglomerate; the melting pot.” People like Lee and the family played by the Ngoma y’Africa troupe are often lost to history and are considered small-time actors in the forming of American history. But that view, Shippey notes, is a mistake. “These are people who really contributed to building our world,” he says. CW

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to who should be allowed to have a voice in the political process, faux Madison and Henry mentioned that each slave’s voice should constitute three-fifths of a vote. A young white girl around 10 years old slid toward the edge of her seat and interjected loud enough that her voice carried above the crowd. “Slaves should count as a full vote,” she said. “They are people, too.” For a short time, 21st-century America collided with the perspectives of its founders before Madison and Henry said they’d take her viewpoint into consideration. Pugmire says organizers are pleased with the changes to this year’s celebration based on feedback they received. Broadening the range of performers allows participants to expand their understanding of whose history is worth knowing, beyond obvious figures like Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. Shippey, who has been studying and portraying Washington across the country for a decade, has long known of Lee’s close relationship with America’s first president. Washington inherited his first slave at age 11, Shippey says, but gradually came to see their humanity as he grew older, freeing Lee immediately upon his death and

Patrick Martin as William “Billy” Lee and Dan Shippey as George Washington


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Contamination cleanup on inland port site could be possible, but it won’t be easy—or cheap. By Emma Penrod | comments@cityweekly.net |

@emapen

number of reasons are emerging as to why development plans in Salt Lake’s Northwest Quadrant have rarely been realized. Not the least of which is what lies buried beneath the site. For nearly two decades, a piece of the planned inlandport site—a wedge of land on 7200 West just north of Interstate 80—served as a municipal landfill. The landfill closed in the late 1970s, but contaminants such as heavy metals and other volatile pollutants remain buried there, posing a pricey obstacle for any party planning to redevelop the property. A chunk of the landfill already has been reclaimed, but nearly 800 acres of buried waste remains. A plume of contaminated groundwater has collected within the old landfill’s basin and, according to state environmental regulators, has begun to leak onto an adjacent property to the west. And decades of studies conducted thus far suggest the possible presence of potent industrial chemicals—but haven’t located the source. Preparing the property for an inland port will be complicated, says Bill Rees,

who oversees voluntary cleanup programs for the state’s Division of Environmental Response and Remediation. State real estate managers have already budgeted nearly $150 million for the cleanup alone. “It’s different than your corner gas station,” Rees tells City Weekly. “An old landfill? There will be challenges.”

Arsenic and Old Waste

Salt Lake City opened what’s now known as the North Temple Landfill in the late 1950s. It closed in 1979, along with dozens of other landfills across the country that could not afford to implement new federal environmental controls, according to David Bird, who manages the North Temple Landfill and other contaminated sites for the Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation. After the landfill’s closure and up until the late ’90s, the Environmental Protection Agency considered designating the property as a Superfund site—a designation for a polluted location requiring long-term hazardous material cleanup. They conducted numerous environmental studies and identified dozens of pollutants,


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abandoned landfill in a neighborhood whose economics are going to change.” The cleanup technology exists—and has for some time. The real issue is cost— whether the demand for land is great enough to justify the large expense associated with removing the contaminated water and waste, or finding an appropriate method of developing around the site. For decades, the economics didn’t pan out. In the 1990s and early 2000s, Suburban Land Reserve, a subsidiary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, managed to develop 208 acres of the originally 1,000-acre landfill into a business park known as Bonneville Center. But they did so by digging up the waste on the easternmost edge of the North Temple site—the least-contaminated portion of the property—and re-interring it on the west side of the landfill. The remaining 800 or so acres have remained largely untouched ever since. A shooting range occupied one piece of the property for a few years. Between 2009 and 2013, waste from the construction of the downtown City Creek center was dumped in the southwest corner of the landfill property. This demolition material—concrete, brick, excavated soil, and so on—remains on the site, according to a report prepared for state regulators earlier this year.

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but ultimately concluded that the site wasn’t contaminated enough to warrant emergency action. Since then, additional studies have detected high levels of lead, arsenic, barium, various pesticides and petroleum compounds similar to gasoline and diesel fuels in groundwater on and near the site. The presence of heavy metals like lead and arsenic is of particular concern, says Denni Cawley, executive director of Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment. “If they move, they can be ingested or inhaled,” she says. “They can get into the water—these are ways it can enter our system.” Heavy metals are potent neurotoxins, Cawley explains. Exposure, especially at a young age, is associated with behavioral problems, brain damage, birth defects and cancer. The water definitely isn’t safe to drink. But it’s also naturally saline and therefore undrinkable, so Rees says he has a hard time seeing how the site, which is capped and covered with vegetation, poses an immediate public health risk. “I don’t see an eminent threat to the public,” he says. “ What I do see is an old,

A view of the city’s Northwest Quadrant from the Gillmor Audubon Sanctuary.


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“Nothing that we have said is memorialized or etched in stone,” outgoing House Speaker Greg Hughes said about the inland port during a joint news conference with Sen. Jim Dabakis on June 5. Hughes resigned from his Inland Port Authority board position three weeks later.

So when the property changed hands and came under the purview of the Utah School and Institutional Lands Administration, Rees sensed an opportunity: If SITLA found a way to develop the property, it might also provide the funds to finally clean it up. Similarly, Salt Lake City officials are hopeful the inland port will come with a silver lining for the North Temple Landfill. “It’s one of those old landfills where it could probably sit there forever if you weren’t trying to develop it,” Vicki Bennett, Salt Lake City’s sustainability director, says. “It wouldn’t have a really high risk, but now that they’re developing it, it is an opportunity to clean it up.”

Ring Around the Landfill

The exact boundaries of the inland port have yet to be determined, says Rodger Mitchell, an assistant director of real estate development for SITLA . But there’s a good chance that the port will overlap at least part of the old North Temple Landfill. Building the inland port is going to require space for at least 8,000 feet of straight, uninterrupted railroad track, Mitchell says. And, there are only so many places near Salt Lake where that’s still available. Fortunately, Mitchell says, landfill cleanups aren’t “rocket science.” Hundreds of landfills across the nation have been successfully redeveloped. SITLA has even cleaned up a few small 5-10 acre landfills in the past. “But nothing to this scale,” he concedes. The primary challenge of the North Temple Landfill, Mitchell and state regulators agree, is the groundwater contamination underneath it. The way the landfill was built has made it essentially a giant, clay-lined bathtub, Rees says. Water trickles into the site and pools at the bottom, allowing various pollutants to seep in and concentrate over time. “It’s a big swimming pool. The water just comes in and sits,” Mitchell says. “That’s the biggest challenge with that site.” And, despite being surrounding by a thick layer of clay, a report completed this past April confirmed that the contaminated groundwater has leaked out of the landfill’s western perimeter. It hasn’t gone very far, Rees notes, because there’s relatively little groundwater

movement in the area. But the landfill definitely is leaking, he says. Since the water won’t be used for drinking, the water-borne pollution isn’t the immediate problem. The trouble is what the water contains: volatile solvents and petroleum products. Those particular pollutants are prone to producing gasses that seep up through soils. When structures are built over contaminated plumes such as this one, he says, gasses can accumulate within buildings, potentially impacting human health. According to the April report documenting soil and water contamination on the property immediately west of the North Temple Landfill, soil-vapor monitoring found high levels of multiple harmful gasses were seeping out. At least five different chemicals exceeded limits associated with an increased risk of cancer. This will have to be dealt with, Rees says. But, there are ways around it. The state might avoid building any structure on top of the contaminated groundwater areas. Or it might install vapor barriers over the water to prevent the gasses from rising to the surface. But actually cleaning up all the trash and relocating it to another site? At this scale, according to Rees, that’s probably not possible. “Odds are something is going to remain on that site,” he says.

Easy Being Green?

Despite the size of the task, SITLA has ambitious cleanup plans. The Trust Lands Authority has been looking into a process that would allow the state to dig up the trash on site and then pump up the contaminated groundwater for treatment. The trash then would be buried beneath a waterproof cap to prevent water from leaching in and creating the same kind of contamination scenario in the future. The capped area then would be converted into a park with green-space paths for bicycles and walking. “If we can get the water cleaned up and put a protective barrier around [the landfill],” Mitchell says, “I think we can take care of one of the larger environmental problems that the city has.” The downside, he says, is that it’s going to be time consuming and costly to remove and treat the water. The current estimated budget is about $140 million, and Mitchell says the full cleanup could take 10-15 years. But these plans are preliminary. Before the state Division of Environmental


Northwest Quadrant development area Inland port built within this boundary Wetlands proposed for protection

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It wouldn’t have a really high risk, but now that they’re redeveloping it, it is an opportunity to clean it up.

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Response and Remediation will even begin to assess SITLA’s plan for cleaning up the site, the SITLA has to complete an adequate site characterization to Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment agrees with Salt Lake’s Sustainabildescribe the kinds of wastes and hazards present in the landfill. ity Department: Cleaning up the North Temple Landfill could be a boon for the That process is ongoing; SITLA has already spent about $1 million on characterenvironment, but only if it is executed properly. ization, Mitchell says, and they hope to have their remediation plan in the works There’s been a tendency, Cawley says, to discuss the inland-port site and the iswithin a year. sues surrounding it as if the property were an isolated island, surrounded by empty But even with a completed characterization of the site, once you start digging space. But it’s not. around in an old landfill, there’s always a distinct possibility “That is a vibrant community,” she says. “They have famiof coming across something unexpected. lies living there.” “That’s the challenge of the landfill,” Mitchell says. “ You If officials don’t take proper care, unearthing the landfill don’t know until you start digging it up.” could release the heavy metals known to be present, causThere are, of course, rumors about the wild kinds of waste ing “long-term consequences down the road, especially for that could be present in a landfill of this age. A common one children,” she says. is that radioactive waste from the state’s research universiThere is, according to the EPA , no level of exposure to ties might have been dumped there at one point. But if there lead that is considered safe for children. Even a pinch of were radiation on site, Rees and Mitchell agree, it would have lead-laden dust, Cawley points out, can have “serious conbeen detected by now. sequences for the IQ of a child.” More problematic, in Rees’ eyes, is the question of where This is especially important on Salt Lake’s west side, the groundwater contamination came from. It is theoretically which tends to be less affluent than the benches. In many possible that household waste such as oil-soaked rags or solcases, Cawley says, parents of children in these neighborvents caused the plume. The large amount of pollutants preshoods wouldn’t have the financial means to relocate their ent in the water, though, suggest an industry-related source. families if construction at the North Temple site created an But there’s no smoking gun. The multitude of tests and environmental hazard. —Vicki Bennett, samples conducted at the landfill so far have yet to turn up “It’s not something they can decide to stay away from,” Salt Lake City Sustainability Director anything like an industrial-size barrel of diesel or gasoline. she says. At the same time, Rees says, if there’s petroleum products Environmentally hazardous sites have the potential to and industrial cleaners showing up in the test samples it’s add to the vicious cycle that keeps so many Americans easy to assume that “something got in there.” trapped in poverty. Industrial sites are more likely to be developed in low-inSITLA is prepared to deal with unexpected finds. They already have a $10-milcome communities, and exposure to pollutants such as lead can cause permalion budget for contingencies. And because of the large amount of clay in the nent brain damage in the children who grow up there, decreasing their future soils surrounding the landfill, Mitchell says, anything they do find is likely to be earnings potential. an isolated problem. So it’s hard to tell, Cawley says, whether building an inland port on the North “That’s the probability,” he says. If industrial wastes show up, “that will Temple Landfill will be a net benefit or loss for residents in the immediate vicinity. be a million-dollar problem and we’ll just have to take care of it. ... If we find “It’s going to take a lot of funds,” she says. “It’s going to take a long time, and Kryptonite, we’ll have to deal with the Kryptonite.” if they don’t do it properly, then it’s better to leave it alone.” CW

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The exact location of the inland port hasn’t yet been decided, but it’d be located within the blue outlined area.


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The Sting & Honey Co.: Snow White Several years ago, Javen Tanner—artistic director of The Sting & Honey Co.—was working on a production of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale when it occurred to him that there was a connection between the play and the setup for many classic fairy tales. “A girl goes out, gets lost, goes through some big experience,” Tanner says. “I looked at Shakespeare’s romances and tragic comedies, and they all had this ‘lost daughter’ character. That piqued my interest.” Two years ago, that piqued interest resulted in Sting & Honey’s production of Sleeping Beauty’s Dream, but Tanner actually started first on an adaptation of Snow White, which he has since re-written. That adaptation was also influenced by the ancient Greek theatrical tradition of the “satyr play,” which connected the theatrical experience to its origins in Dionysian ritual. “In the history of the story of Snow White, we’re used to her being among dwarves,” Tanner says. “But it’s been told many ways—with dragons, with soldiers. I turn them into satyrs.” While the word “satyr” might typically be associated with a carnal element, Tanner emphasizes that this is in fact a show appropriate for all ages, with familiar components like the magic mirror and the dangerous, threatening evil woman (here an aunt rather than a stepmother). “The Dionysian ritual connects us to the wilder part of being human, unconstrained by rules,” Tanner says. “I definitely see Snow White’s experience as a coming of age. She has to find the strength to face evil.” (Scott Renshaw) The Sting & Honey Co.: Snow White @ Regent Street Black Box, 144 S. Regent St., 801-353-2787, July 13-28, Fridays, 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 & 7 p.m., $20, stingandhoney.org

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Starting out as an artist can be an isolating experience, one where it’s hard to imagine your dream ever becoming your livelihood. Eight years ago, Utah Arts Alliance launched a program designed to help burgeoning artists get their work out into the world. “I was hearing about artists in the community looking for opportunities to connect with other artists, or to connect their work with the public,” Utah Arts Alliance Executive Director Derek Dyer says. “I kept hearing this word ‘connect.’” That Connect idea was itself connected to a concept by UAA Programming Director Michael Christensen, which involved a gallery where visitors could vote on their favorite pieces. Now, on the second Friday of every month, local artists are invited to bring up to two pieces of their work, with no curator, for a chance to get votes during the evening event. The top five vote-getters then have their work exhibited in the gallery space until the next month’s event, and also become eligible for the year-end showcase of all winners with $4,000 in prize money for the final winners. Since the launch of Connect in 2010, Christensen estimates that around 1,200 artists have participated in this first-of-its kind program, including artists from underrepresented groups like veterans, LGBTQ, at-risk youth and more. “For some artists, this has changed the course of their career,” Dyer says. “They had never shown before, got voted on, within a week [the work] got sold, it gave them the confidence to know their work was good enough to sell, and now they’re full-time artists. It’s been pretty powerful.” (SR) Utah Arts Alliance: Connect @ Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St. (The Gateway), 801-230-0820, July 13, 7-9 p.m., utaharts.org

Comedian Doug Benson could be considered a show biz insider, courtesy of his starring role in Super High Me and frequent appearances on Comedy Central. He also enjoys serving up cinematic sarcasm on his popular podcast, titled, naturally enough, Doug Loves Movies. Benson does love movies, and now he’s inviting local audiences to witness the manifestation of that affection. While Benson’s deadpan, every-guy delivery might strike some as amateurish, the show’s featured segments give it an offbeat appeal. “The Leonard Maltin Game,” which follows the format of the old TV quiz show “Name That Tune,” finds him reading excerpts from the famed critic’s reviews while challenging guests to guess which film Maltin was critiquing. That tends to be tame in comparison to bits like “Not for Emetophobes,” “A-B-C-Deez Nuts,” “How Much Did This Shit Make?,” “Doing Lines with Mark Wahlberg,” “Whose Tagline Is It Anyway,” and “Now Buscemi Now You Don’t.” And let’s not forget his once popular sign-off: “As always, Willem Dafoe is a shithead.” (For the record, Benson doesn’t actually believe Dafoe is a shithead, but it did get people talking.) While Doug Loves Movies is clearly Benson’s crown jewel, his other off-beat credits include Getting High with Doug (or, Getting Doug with High when the weed is particularly potent), a talk show that finds him inviting guests to, well, get high with him. Or, one can opt for Comedy Central’s The High Court with Doug Benson, another on-air opportunity for Benson to, well, get high. There seems to be a pattern here, so expect Benson’s movie takes to come with a slightly blurry perspective. (Lee Zimmerman) Doug Loves Movies @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 14, 4:20 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

Culture is a marinade you can taste in foods throughout the world. It’s impossible to have one without the other, so it makes sense that festivals celebrating ancestors and the traditions they passed down regularly incorporate well-crafted meals shared by family and friends, both old and new. Kangi-e—or the Obon festival—is a Japanese celebration providing just that. Combining food, dance and remembrance of those who have died, the festival is an annual event taking place over the course of three days around the 15th day of the seventh month. It’s intended to honor those who have come before and appreciate the culture they helped create. While in most areas of Japan the event takes place in August—the seventh month based on the lunar calendar—in Tokyo and elsewhere it lands in July, as is the case at the SLC event hosted by the Salt Lake Buddhist Temple. All are invited to take part in this cultural celebration and join the Salt Lake Buddhist Temple’s community at their Obon Festival. The Temple has a long history in Utah: Starting with the arrival of Rev. Koyu Ichida from San Francisco in 1912, the Temple has grown from its smaller roots to a pillar of Japanese culture in Salt Lake City’s downtown. As in previous years, the 2018 festival features traditional Japanese foods, and though general admission is free, all proceeds from food purchases benefit the temple. Later in the evening, the Ogden Buddhist Temple puts on a resounding taiko drum performance, which is followed by traditional Japanese dancing. Come explore Japanese history in Salt Lake and taste a bit of culture for yourself. (Casey Koldewyn) Japanese Obon Festival @ Salt Lake Buddhist Temple, 211 W. 100 South, July 14, 1-10 p.m., free, slbuddhist.org

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More Than Words

Forms of non-verbal communication combine in A Tonal Caress. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

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n the video Louder Than Words by Korean filmmaker Yeoseop Yoon, a black man, his eyes wide, gazes upward. His hands, soft, fall at his sides. He stands in a darkened warehouse, illuminated by a single industrial light overhead. The light spreads in a small circle of white, showing the lines of wooden floorboards and steel beams like a box around him. When he begins to move, it is with a single arm swept upwards and a finger, pointing, as if to say: Now pay attention and think. His hands become a symphony of movement. They flutter, they grasp, they curl, they caress. His face creases. His mouth is taut, corners downturned. His eyes burn. This is Walter Kadiki. He is a poet—a deaf poet. He speaks with his hands, and sometimes—for the benefit of audience members who don’t understand sign language—translates his words into written English. Often, he performs his poetry, as he does in the video. Kadiki lives in Australia, and is a wellknown artist there. His first poems came to him around the age of nine, while growing up in England (his country of birth is Zimbabwe). It was in England that he was first encouraged to share his art and where he began performing for the Deaf community. In his new home, where he has resided since 2003, he performs his poetry regularly for both hearing and non-hearing

audiences, for film, at festivals and as a special guest for the 2005 Melbourne Deaf Olympics. But Louder Than Words, which launched last year on the website Nowness, brought him international attention. The video landed on the radar of Salt Lake City artist Gary Vlasic, who in turn shared it with his friends Nathan Webster and Charlotte Boye-Christensen of the SLC-based contemporary dance company Now-ID. An artistic connection sparked immediately, and this week—a little over a year after the video was released—Kadiki makes his debut American appearance in Salt Lake City for A Tonal Caress. Now-ID’s latest production combines the talents of Boye-Christensen as a choreographer, Vlasic as a creator of moving art installations and Kadiki as a performance poet. “His work resonated with me,” BoyeChristensen recalls. She has preferred to communicate non-verbally through dance since she was 9 years old. “He managed to express many of the same experiences and feelings I was having in that current moment—of a breakdown in communication and dialogue. There was a power in what Walter was doing. I understood everything even though I didn’t understand anything.” When Boye-Christensen first reached out to Kadiki, he didn’t have much faith that the project would become reality. In the wake of Louder Than Words’ release, he heard from many people, but with little real followthrough. But when the NowID team insisted on a Skype meeting, things started getting serious. With the help of sign language translators, discussions began on how to interweave the three performers’ work. Kadiki chose three poems for his contribution, including “Deaf Plague.” Created NATHAN WEBSTER

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Performance poet Walter Kadiki

from the perspective of the hearing community looking at the Deaf community, it is a deeply disturbing portrait of fear and judgment: “A poor little soul—unfortunate Imprisoned in the clutches of a deaf woman A tender mother’s love lacking Someone to sing that poor baby—A lullaby” “It’s the perspective of deafness as a bad or negative thing that needs to be fixed or cured,” Kadiki signs during a recent video interview. He explains the poem as a translator standing out of sight behind Kadiki’s computer speaks his words. “It’s a very strong emotional portraying,” he continues. “[There is a] tiredness of letting people know it’s OK, it does not need to be fixed.” “Sign language is a true language,” Kadiki adds. “It has a structure and grammar, just like English. At the performance, there will be an interpreter. They will use the English associated with the poetry. There is a lot of preparation involved to accurately translate my work. They can’t just interpret it during the performance. They, the interpreters, need to know that I will use this sign, and I need them to say it with this tonal inflection so that it reflects the intent and emotion.” For Boye-Christensen, not all of Kadiki’s words need to be translated. Part of the point of A Tonal Caress, she says, is learning to open ourselves to other forms of listening and comprehending. “Movement,” she says, “can connect people in ways that language can’t.” CW

NOW-ID: A TONAL CARESS

Utah Museum of Fine Art 410 Campus Center Drive 801-581-7332 July 12, 13, 14, 8 p.m., $20-35 July 13, pre-show dinner and artist meet-and-greet, 6 p.m., $150 now-id.com


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Erin Westenskow Berrett marks a transition from oil painting to mixed-media, utilizing cut paper to create collages (“Ken Sanders Rare Books” is pictured) in Reclaimed at Kimball Art Center (1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-649-8882, kimballartcenter.org) through Sept. 2.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Amazing Grace Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 4, dates and times vary, cachearts.org Annie Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, hct.org Big River Scera Center for the Arts, 745 S. State, Orem, through July 19, dates and times vary, scera.org Grassroots Shakespeare Castle Amphitheater, 1300 E. Center St., Provo, July 13-14, 7:30 p.m., grassrootsshakespeare.com Disney’s Newsies Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 1, dates and times vary, hct.org Hindsight various locations announced via email, downtown Salt Lake City, through July 28, Friday & Saturday, 6:30 p.m., hindsightslc.com Into the Woods Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 3, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Million Dollar Quartet Hafen Theater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org My Boy Pinocchio Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, hct.org Othello Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur 2018 Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 2, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Snow White Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, July 13-28, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) The Barber of Seville Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 3, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Foreigner Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, through Oct. 13, dates and times vary, bard.org Matilda: The Musical Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Oct. 18, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org

The Merchant of Venice Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, through Sept. 7, dates and times vary, bard.org The Merry Wives of Windsor Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, through Sept. 8, dates and times vary, bard.org The Phantom of the Opera Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through July 22, dates and times vary, broadway-at-the-eccles.com The Secret Garden Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, through Aug. 4, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org The Who’s Tommy Egyptian Theatre, 325 Main, Park City, through July 29, dates and times vary, parkcityshows.com You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Utah Theatre, 18 W. Center St., Logan, through Aug. 1, dates and times vary, utahfestival.org

DANCE

A Tonal Caress Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, July 12-14, 8:30 p.m., now-id.com (see p. 20) Salt Contemporary Dance: Pan American Fork Boat Harbor, 100 West, American Fork, July 18-21 & July 25-28, 7:30 p.m., saltdance.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

ABBA The Concert: A Tribute to ABBA with the Utah Symphony Deer Valley, 2250 S. Deer Valley Drive, July 13, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Aaron and Jessa Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, July 12, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Doug Loves Movies Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, July 14, 4:20 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18) Front Row Film Roast of Independence Day Brewvies Cinema Pub, 677 S. 200 West, July 14, 10 p.m., brewvies.com Keith Stubbs Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., July 13-14, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus and Guy Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, July 13-14, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Pablo Francisco Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, July 13-14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com


moreESSENTIALS

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jennifer Adams: Peter Pan: A Babylit Adventure Primer The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, July 14, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Terryl Givens: Finding Meaning in the Collapse of Transcendence Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, July 17, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Obon Festival Salt Lake Buddhist Temple, 211 W. 100 South, July 14, 1-10 p.m., slbuddhist.org (see p. 18)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Betta Inman Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through July 14, artatthemain.com Buster Graybill: Informalism UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 8, utahmoca.org Chase Westfall: Control UMOCA, 20 S. West

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

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RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

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FESTIVALS AND FAIRS

Temple, through Aug. 9, utahmoca.org Chiura Obata: An American Modern Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Sept. 2, umfa.utah.edu Connect Utah Arts Alliance, 137 S. Rio Grande, July 13, 7-9 p.m., utaharts.org (see p. 18) Erin Westenskow Berrett: Reclaimed Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through Sept. 2, kimballartcenter.com (see p. 22) Fuhst/Floating World Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through July 29, urbanartsgallery.org J. Vehar-Evanoff: Adrift Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through July 14, modernwestfineart.com Jim McGee: Crossing Paths Holladay City Hall, 4580 S. 2300 East, through Aug. 6, holladayarts.org Lauren K. Woodward: Movement, Balance and Refracted Light Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Aug. 18, slcpl.org Mark Santos: The Spirit of Dance Main Library, Lower Urban Room Gallery, 210 E. 400 South, through July 20, slcpl.org Out Loud: Mostly Human Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through July 14, utahmoca.org Plein Air Public Lands: Utah Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through July 13, accessart.org Postmodernposh Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., July 13-Aug. 31, heritage.utah.gov Read the Fine Print DRAW Inc. Gallery, 752 6th Ave., through July 18, drawinc.org Recent Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, July 13-Sept. 7, heritage.utah.gov Resilience: Art By Survivors of Sexual Assault/Abuse Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through July 13, accessart.org Sel Heidel 777: China Minoyki Art Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Aug. 30, slcpl.org The Spirit of Dance: Photographs by Mark Santos Main Library, Lower Urban Room Gallery, 210 E. 400 South, through July 20, slcpl.org Vanessa Romo: The Practice of Standing Still Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Aug. 3, saltlakearts.org Virginia Catherall: Wearable Landscapes Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Aug. 3, saltlakearts.org Watercolors by Kathleen Peterson Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through July 13, phillips-gallery.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1060 S. 900 West, Saturdays and Sundays through mid-October, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1 p.m.-3 p.m., slco.org Park City Farmers Market Silver King Resort, 1845 Empire Ave., Park City, Wednesdays through Oct. 25, parkcityfarmersmarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market Main Street, Park City, Sundays through Sept. 23, parksillysundaymarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, Wednesdays through September, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays through Oct. 17, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 28, slco.org/wheeler-farm.

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

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After 20 years in business, Curry in a Hurry is a Salt Lake institution. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, noon-9 p.m.; Sunday, noon-8 p.m. Best bet: The immersive half-and-half combo Can’t miss: The gubernatorial-endorsed curried potatoes

JULY 12, 2018 | 25

The Nisars (pictured) took the advice to heart, and soon after the festival debut, they opened Curry in a Hurry at its present location. It’s a cozy space—I’d be surprised if more than 25 people can fit in there at once— but it certainly possesses an undeniable charm. Polaroids of the Nisar family members with celebrities like Dave

| CITY WEEKLY |

The restaurant got its start after the Nisar family made waves at the 9th and 9th Street Festival two decades ago. Festival attendees were so impressed with Mona Nisar’s unique curry fusion— she grew up in Kenya, so her recipe incorporates a bit of regional African flair—that they encouraged the family to open their own restaurant.

and a sweet yogurt lassi to drink. It’s enough food to easily split among two or three diners, and it offers a truly immersive curry experience. One of the gripes I always have about dining out is that there aren’t a whole lot of options to get moderately healthy food with the same convenience as the fast-food pantheon. As fast, healthy food done right and done quick is one of Curry in a Hurry’s maxims, it’s definitely set itself up as an alternative to the burger joints and sandwich shops in the area. I can’t think of another Indian or Pakistani restaurant serving up curry that tastes this good this quickly, which is one of the most prominent reasons why Curry in a Hurry stands tall as one of Salt Lake’s finest curry stops. CW

W

hen you make it your business to get the skinny on Salt Lake’s food scene, it’s not long before you pay a visit to Curry in a Hurry (2020 S. State, 801-467-4137, ilovecurryinahurry.com). Owned and operated by the Nisar family since 1998, Curry in a Hurry was one of the pioneering Indian/Pakistani places in Salt Lake—and it’s still one of the best.

with a bit of curried potatoes. It’s all piled high on a pillow of rice and served with naan. The chicken is on the lighter side, and it’s tempting to compare it with the Indian staple tikka masala—but that’s still a bit of a stretch. The lamb korma is an excellent complement to the curried chicken. It has a darker, richer flavor profile, and the lamb is perfectly cooked. All of the meat used in the restaurant’s dishes is also prepared halal, or in accordance with Muslim tradition, which essentially means that diners aren’t getting any unnecessary preservatives or hormones with their meat-based meals. If meat isn’t your thing, Curry in a Hurry is also a great place to get vegan and gluten-free food—their rotating list of veggie curries doesn’t skimp on the flavor. While the half-and-half combo typically satisfies the average curry craving, don’t be afraid to expand your horizons with their Mega Combo ($16.99) or Colossal Combo ($24.99), both of which come with every curry on the menu—the Colossal even comes with a samosa, a piece of marinated tandoori chicken,

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JOHN TAYLOR

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Halal in the Family

Chappelle and Scott Wolf have been carefully arranged beneath the glass surface of the front counter, and a picture of former Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. that touts his love for the Nisar’s curried potatoes hangs proudly on a wall. As impressive as the gubernatorial endorsement is, my favorite piece of in-house wall art is a photo of Mona and her husband, Rana, that accompanies a list of reasons why the pair opened their family-run restaurant. Among them: They wanted a place that was fast—they don’t use the term “hurry” lightly—and nutritious, but also where they could spend time together as a family. Perhaps it’s the familial DNA existing deep within the eatery’s roots that makes sharing any of their dishes such a warm and pleasant experience. The menu offers only a handful of curries, which, when you consider the restaurant’s 20year timeline, means they’re just shy of perfection. My favorite dish is the half-and-half combo ($11.99) because it’s a hefty sampling of what the institution has to offer. You can’t go wrong with mixing the chicken curry and the lamb korma curry


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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Devour Patio Tour

Patio dining is definitely one of the few positive aspects of Utah’s rising summer temperatures. There’s nothing quite like a balmy summer night spent sampling some of Salt Lake’s finest food while listening to the sounds of our fair city. For those wanting to check out some of downtown’s best patios, look no further than Devour Utah’s Patio Tour. As a City Weekly sister publication, Devour is one of the area’s finest local foodie periodicals, so you can trust that organizers have chosen four of downtown’s most eclectic patio dining spots for attendees to visit by chartered bus. The event takes place on Sunday, July 15, from 1-6 p.m., and a spot on the bus is $50. Tickets can be purchased at devourutahstore.com.

Go back in time with the Five Alls. Make your reservation now! 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM

Thu: 6-9:30pm | Fri/Sat: 5:30-9:30 1458 South Foothill Drive

Cooking at Red Butte

Eating outside during warm summer nights is a pleasant experience, and the prospect of cooking outside is just as tantalizing. As part of Red Butte Garden’s Cooking in the Garden series, local chef Purnima Gandhi teaches a class on Indian cooking on Thursday, July 19, from 6-8 p.m. Set against the backdrop of Red Butte’s herb garden, Chef Gandhi demonstrates a few techniques while students follow suit—it’s a hands-on cooking environment, so attendees can practice some of their own cooking as the sun sets. Tickets are $55 per person, or $44 for garden members, and are available at redbuttegarden.org/indian-cuisine. Event-goers can also pick up a copy of Ghandi’s cookbook for $28.

A Proper Tasting

Beer aficionados seeking a bit of culinary culture will want to check out this tasting arranged by Trolley Square’s We Olive (602 E. 500 South, 801-4487489, weolive.com). The olive oil alchemists of We Olive hosts Jack Kern of Proper Brewing Co., a certified cicerone—which is like a less snooty wine sommelier but for beer. Kern walks diners through samplings of four beers, which the chefs at We Olive pair with their own creations, like beer-braised pork tacos and chocolate panna cotta. Not only is this event a great way for beer fans to expand their knowledge about their frothy beverage of choice, but it serves as a fine example of how seriously Utah takes its beer. The drinking commences on Monday, July 16, from 6:30-9:30 p.m., and tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite for $35. Quote of the Week: “Nothing ever tasted better than a cold beer on a beautiful afternoon with nothing to look forward to than more of the same.” —Hugh Hood Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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28 | JULY 12, 2018

Southern Scene

South Salt Lake continues to expand its craft beer offerings. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

E

ven if you’re just a casual beer nerd, you’ve probably noticed there’s been an influx of new breweries hitting the state, with the vast majority of them popping up in the capital city. And why not? Salt Lake City is the perfect place for home-spun beer. The population skews young, and young people prefer local establishments rather than chains. Other cities are taking notice of the craft-beer boom happening right now, and are keenly aware of the economic impacts associated with having locally made suds and spirits in their zip codes. One such city that’s opening its arms to craft beer is South Salt Lake. It was just a short three years ago that the South Salt Lake City Council instituted a cap of just

two breweries in the city limits. Thankfully a new, more forward-thinking attitude has taken root, allowing an unlimited degree of alcohol manufacturing, spurring growth. Two of South Salt Lake’s breweries are in full swing—and here are two of the latest beers to come out of the SSL. Shades of Pale Kveik 1: The beer pours a slightly hazy peach color with a fizzy eggshell-colored head that fades quickly to a thin edge layer. The aroma has some pine resin and citrus rind hops with a little bit of light fruit, most notably peach and apricot—an appealing nose, for sure. The first sip reveals exactly what the nose is advertising, though the hops take a back seat to the tartness here. I get a little caramel along with bready scone and then unripened apricot notes. There are also some grapefruit hints before the beer moves to a bit of a tart, slightly acidic finish. Overall: On a sourness scale of 1 to 10, I’d put this at about a 6. The flavors in this 6.5 percent beer don’t really linger much and it finishes pretty clean for a sour beer. Kveik 1—pronounced “ka-wike”—is the first of three beers featuring the unique Norwegian yeast strain that bears the same name. As soon as the others are released, I’ll discuss them here. Saltfire NZED Pilsner: This brand-new beer from Saltfire has a crystal clear, golden straw color topped with two fingers of foamy white head with pretty good retention. The

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

nose is quite aromatic, with a hop profile that ranges from spicy/peppery and herbal, to citrus-like kaffir lime and lemon peel. Notes of biscuit and grain also break out in those initial whiffs. The taste kicks off much like the aroma with a big wallop of hops: herbal, spicy, peppery, grassy, citrus, lemon peel and lime that is wonderfully bitter and round. Sweet, grainy malts come next, adding structure to the hop salad that precedes them, with doses of biscuit, cereal and caramel. The end has a lasting and grassy hop bitterness. It finishes crisp and bone dry. Overall: I thought this was a good brew, and a bolder example of the style. It features

pretty much all of the aspects I look for in a Pilsner, and while the flavors are bolder than most in this style, it still offers that nice balance I expect. At 5.4 percent ABV, it’s right in line with others of its style, which helps keep the bitterness from becoming astringent. A third South Salt Lake brewery is already in the planning stages, set to be located directly beneath the iconic water tower. The as-yet-unnamed brewery will feature the more popular neighborhoodfocused approach to craft brewing, and feature a wide array of both high- and lowpoint beers. As always, cheers! CW

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

100% gluten-free

Chedda Burger

Followers of Chef Nick Watts’ Chedda Truck, which he took to the streets of Salt Lake City in 2012, should be thrilled to know he’s expanded to full-blown restaurants. Watts’ fresh-ground, 100-percent natural Angus beef burgers are intended for the adventurous, with options like the Silly Round Eye (beef, pastrami, Swiss cheese, kimchi and fry sauce) or the Kill Me Softly (beef patty with blue cheese, bacon, arugula and cranberry sauce served on a Krispy Kreme doughnut). Those with more cautious palates will like the Old Faithful: a just-greasy-enough beef patty with classic cheddar cheese, caramelized onions, ripe tomato slices, green leaf lettuce and fry sauce. 26 E. 600 South, 801-906-8779; 1314 Foothill Drive, 385-227-8845, cheddaburger.co

paws on the patio approved! bring your doggies & have a fresh juice cocktail fri 11am-11pm, sat 10am-11pm, sun 10am-9pm | 275 S. 200 W. Salt Lake City | zestslc.com

Saffron Valley

Proper Burger Co.

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

JULY 12, 2018 | 29

Owner Ehsan Suhail makes his shawarma—often a combination of beef and lamb, cooked on a rotating vertical spit—from scratch, and the chicken shawarma in particular is tender, rich and juicy, served with housemade garlic-lemon sauce, tomato, lettuce and pickle slices. A favorite is the lamb koozi, a house specialty with chunks of lamb braised until almost falling off the bone, and served on basmati rice seasoned with raisins, toasted almonds and onions. 725 E. 3300 South, 801-803-9434, slcshawarmaking.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

Shawarma King

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

At this Avenues Proper spin-off, burgers and brews are in abundance. The basic Plain Jane—the starting point of most burgers here—has perfect flavor and texture, with brisket incorporated into the quarterpound beef patty blend. Variations are plentiful, including the Rising Sun (with kimchi, miso aioli, cilantro, fried egg, Sriracha and pickled cucumber) and the Hipster (featuring kale pesto, red onion jam, fresh herb cheese spread, garlic aioli and spinach). 865 S. Main, 801-906-8604, properburgerslc.com

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O D H E AV E N FO ManADN sen & Restauran s e t a G EGR c i l e erm t

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

There’s a sameness among many local Indian eateries, but Saffron Valley sets itself apart by serving a thali lunch, which treats customers to traditional multi-dish platters of roti, papadum, basmati rice, dal, dessert, chutney and various daily curry and veggie choices. Shrimp Karaikudi is plump, tender shrimp in a thinish (compared to standard curry) but delicious sauce made with roasted fennel, dried red chile peppers, cumin and curry spices. This dish isn’t one you’ll find on standard Indian restaurant menus, nor is laal maas, a hot-and-spicy lamb curry where the lamb is oh-so tender, braised with Kashmiri chiles, herbs and spices, onions and tomatoes. Saffron Valley is as atypical as it is superb. Multiple locations, saffronvalley.com


REVIEW BITES

DEREK CARLISLE

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Mahider Ethiopian

BREAKFAST and LUNCH served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

30 | JULY 12, 2018

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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There’s nary a fork to be found at Mahider, and that’s a really, really good thing. Ethiopian food eschews the use of utensils in favor of large portions of injera, a porous, pancake-like sourdough flatbread. Since the food is designed to be combined, pinched and dipped by hand, most offerings consist of several varieties of meat, veggies and legumes stewed or puréed with a distinct blend of spices. Their combination meals—like the beef-and-chicken ($11.99) and vegetarian ($9.99)—are a great way to try a little bit of everything, though you might be a bit dumbfounded at the size of the dishes in front of you. The plates are completely enveloped by a pizza-sized slab of injera, upon which the different offerings—like doro wot (a marinated chicken leg in a spicy stew) or siga wot (beef simmered in pungent berbere sauce)—are arranged like paints on an artist’s palette. Both the chicken and beef wot are smoky, spicy and unexpectedly comforting, and the experience of tearing off a piece of injera and scooping up bits of everything adds a tactile level of enjoyment to the entire event. Reviewed June 21. 1465 S. State, Ste. 7, 801-975-1111, mahiderethiopian.com

Prairie Schooner

694 East Union Square, SANDY

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com

Though it’s just off Washington Boulevard, it exudes a sense of seclusion and an aura of temporal displacement—like you’ve gone back to Lagoon’s Pioneer Village circa 1978. The faux-frontier atmosphere lends itself very well to serving up a traditional steakhouse menu. The Rustler Combo ($31.99) consists of a 10-ounce New York Strip and three big ol’ fried shrimp. My wife got the prime rib ($21.99) with a yam covered in butter and cinnamon sugar. As steaks go, mine was decent—well-seasoned and cooked medium-rare as requested. I did run into some tough bits along the way, and the horseradish sauce on the side was muted to the point of tasting like sour cream. The most surprising part of the evening was the three gigantic battered shrimp. Instead of crumby, panko-adjacent fry that clings to most shrimp renderings, here you end up with fried shrimp more akin to a corndog—a bit of food heaven by way of the state fair. It might not be the best steakhouse on the block, but you’d be hard-pressed to find another place where you can eat dinner inside a wagon, so it retains a peculiar charm. Reviewed June 14. 445 Park Blvd., Ogden, 801-392-2712, prairieschoonerrestaurant.com


CINEMA

FILM PREVIEW

Adversarial System

BLUE FOX ENTERTAINMENT

Church and State shapes the marriage-equality fight with unique heroes and villains. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

nizations, which were concerned that this was the wrong case, from the wrong state, for a federal challenge to same-sex marriage bans. “There came a point where Kate Kendall from [the National Center for Lesbian Rights] said to [Peggy Tomsic], ‘You’re ruining the national strategy … you guys should back out,’” Tuckett says. “There was a lot of pushback from other organizations saying, ‘Don’t do this.’” Ultimately, the focus came back to the title, Church and State, and the role of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in fighting against same-sex marriage in Utah and around the country. But even then, it wasn’t as simple as demonizing the church, which declined multiple requests to participate in the film. “The Church is this nebulous thing,” Tuckett says. “How do you put a face on an entire organization that is against a class of people? Every legislator, [Utah Attorney General] Sean Reyes, most of the A.G.’s office, in every faction, Mormonism was in the picture, fighting back … I think our full team was interested in letting a broader audience understand, ‘This is what they were up against.’” Yet Tuckett—herself a Utah-raised gay ex-Mormon—found to her surprise through the making of the film that she developed a greater understanding of where the church was coming from in its opposition. “Do I agree with it? No, I don’t,” she says. “But I do have a better understanding of where they’re coming from, and why they make

Mark Lawrence in Church and State the arguments they make. … I hope that a lot of people here, who think that they understand the Church, will come away thinking, ‘Wow, I never really thought about that, the fact that they are fighting years and years of persecution themselves.’ And when people are persecuted, they dig in and they fight back.” While it has taken longer than Tuckett hoped to secure the financing to complete the film, she believes there’s still a timeliness to the story as other civil-rights fights continue in America, and a lesson in this story’s improbable protagonist on taking on a fight—legal same-sex marriage in Utah?—that nobody believed could be won. “What Mark’s character in the film speaks to is, don’t sit on the sidelines,” Tuckett says. “Do something. Even when you don’t think that you’re going to be successful, you could potentially be the one who makes the difference.” CW

CHURCH AND STATE

Post-screening filmmaker panel discussion Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South Friday, July 13 7 p.m. saltlakefilmsociety.org

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Then, in December 2013, Judge Robert J. Shelby of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down Amendment 3, opening the door to same-sex marriage in Utah. Tuckett was then approached during the Sundance Film Festival in January 2014 by colleague Andrew James, who asked if she’d be interested in joining a team of four to work on a film about the case as it made its way through the appeals process. “I was like, ‘You don’t have any money, do you?’” she says. “And he was like, ‘Hell no.’ I said, ‘I don’t care, I’m in.’ I didn’t want to miss out twice on the same opportunity.” Tuckett—along with James, co-director Kendall Wilcox and local filmmaker Torben Bernhard—then began the process of working backward, getting to know Lawrence and how he pulled the pieces of Kitchen v. Herbert together. Along with attorney Tomsic, Lawrence becomes one of the key characters in Church and State—and a complicated one in that a rift ultimately developed between Lawrence and the other key players in the case over his outspoken manner. “For me, it was really important to tell Mark’s story,” Tuckett says, “because nobody knows who he is. If you go down the street and ask, ‘Who’s responsible for overturning Amendment 3,’ they’re going to say ‘Derek Kitchen.’” As for the villains of the piece, that’s even more complicated. At times in Church and State, you can see the legal team for Kitchen fighting against national gay-rights orga-

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documentary feature about the landmark Utah case that opened the door to marriage equality might seem to be a no-brainer when it comes to drama and a sense of consequence. But for the filmmakers behind Church and State, the challenge of shaping that story into a film came down to a question that defines most narratives: Who is the hero, and who is the villain? Superficially, that might seem like an obvious question, defined by the name of the lawsuit itself, Kitchen v. Herbert. Plaintiffs Derek Kitchen, Moudi Sbeity and four others—along with their attorneys, Peggy Tomsic and Jim Magleby—were on the right side of history; Gov. Gary Herbert and the government of Utah, defending the state’s Amendment 3 banning same-sex marriage, were the bad guys. Church and State, however, complicates that narrative by exploring behind-thescenes factors that shaped events before they ever got to a courtroom. Co-director Holly Tuckett almost wasn’t a part of that process—and indeed, she passed on a first opportunity to follow the story. Mark Lawrence—a local activist who began organizing the legal challenge to Amendment 3—approached Tuckett through one of her colleagues in spring 2013, wondering if she’d be interested in working on a documentary about their fight. “At the time, I was coming off of other projects, and really needing to crack down and do some paid work,” Tuckett says. “And … it’s Utah. Do we really think he’s going to be successful? I don’t want to spend the time, only for it not to be successful.”


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NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net CHURCH AND STATE BBB See feature on p. 31. Opens July 13 at Tower Theatre. (NR) HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION BB What the hell happened to Genndy Tartakovsky? The innovative animator behind Powerpuff Girls, Dexter’s Laboratory and Samurai Jack has now churned out three installments of a premise that was tired at the outset, filled with jokes barely worth an upturned corner of the mouth. This time, Dracula (Adam Sandler), his daughter (Selena Gomez) and monster pals take a vacation cruise, unaware that it has been orchestrated by the descendent of monster-hunter Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan). There’s also a romantic interest for Dracula in the ship’s captain (Kathryn Hahn), with a plot—such as it is—focusing on whether he can find true love again. Tartakovsky and his co-writers keep the pace almost relentlessly moving, and Tartakovsky’s looselimbed animation style at least offers things that are fun to look at. There’s just nothing actually funny happening here, no innovative spin on classic monster tropes and supporting characters that still manage to be complete blanks even after their third time around. The idea of a silly, likeable vampire is expected to do all the heavy lifting, taking 97 minutes to provide all the laughs of a commercial for Count Chocula cereal. Opens July 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw LEAVE NO TRACE BBBB Writer/director Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone) offers up a fascinating example of taking source material—in this case, Peter Rock’s novel My Abandonment—and giving it a beautiful re-interpretation. The core premise remains the same: Tom (Thomasin McKenzie), an adolescent girl, lives an itinerant, foraging life with her single father (Ben Foster), a military veteran, in the Oregon woods. When the two are discovered, they are thrust back into a civilization they’re not interested in joining. Granik refuses to turn unfeeling bureaucracy into the villain of this story—government officials and others who work with Tom and her dad are always trying to do the right thing—allowing the focus to remain on that central relationship. McKenzie and Foster are both wonderful, conveying the depth of connection forged by the circumstances that have them depending almost entirely on one another. It’s in the third act, however—where Granik diverges radically from Rock’s novel—where she finds something almost heartbreakingly graceful about the tension between not feeling part of this world, and wanting a world that you can feel a part of. Opens July 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—SR THE NIGHT EATS THE WORLD BBB Awkward: Sam (Anders Danielsen Lie) shows up at the Paris flat of his ex-girlfriend (Sigrid Bouaziz) to pick up his stuff, only to find a huge party from which he hides away in a back room. Even more awkward: He wakes up the next morning to find blood-spattered chaos, and Paris overrun with zombies. Director/co-screenwriter Dominique Rocher—adapting a novel by Pit Agarmen—bypasses horror-thriller action almost entirely, aside from a nifty idea suggesting the hive-like zombies are pacified by smoke just like bees. Mostly, it’s a story of trying to preserve humanity when it would be understandable to descend into sheer self-preservation—and at this moment in history, it’s almost heartbreaking watching Danielsen Lie

treat a dead body with respect, or develop something akin to a friendship with the walking-dead guy (Denis Lavant) trapped in his building’s elevator. Sam’s character might have been richer with more time spent on who he was before the apocalypse, and there’s not so much an ending here as a dead stop. There’s still a profound power in considering what it is that makes us better than shambling, unthinking beasts. Opens July 13 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

SKYSCRAPER [not yet reviewed] An FBI agent (Dwayne Johnson) attempts to rescue his family from a burning high-rise. Opens July 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SORRY TO BOTHER YOU BB.5 Writer/director Boots Riley serves up an explosion of racial and social satire that’s sprawling, sporadically hilarious and often just too thematically ambitious for its own good. Lakeith Stanfield stars as Cassius “Cash” Green, a financially strapped Oakland man who takes a telemarketing gig and discovers that he’s actually great at it—once he masters talking to his leads in a “white voice.” That’s only one of the buttons Riley pushes as he tackles predatory capitalism, voluntary indentured servitude, militarized police and a popular TV game show where you win money by letting someone beat the shit out of you. There are bursts of visual creativity everywhere you look—including a stop-motion segment that nods to the movie’s debt to Michel Gondry—and charismatic performances by Stanfield, Tessa Thompson and Armie Hammer as CEO of Cash’s employer. Riley simply has his eye on so many targets that many of them don’t have the opportunity to land, or manage the tonal shifts between amused and genuinely angry. But if you want a movie that swings its half horse/half man junk for all to see, this one’s for you. Opens July 13 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

YELLOW SUBMARINE [not reviewed] Re-release of the trippy 1968 animated fantasy musical featuring the music of the Beatles. Opens July 13 at Tower Theatre. (G)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BELIEVER At Red Butte Garden, July 18, 9 p.m. (NR) CLASSIC CARTOON SILENT SHORTS At Main Library, July 14, 3 p.m. (NR) THE LOVE WITCH At Tower Theatre, July 13-14, 11 p.m. & July 15, noon. (R) RODENTS OF UNUSUAL SIZE At Main Library, July 17, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP BBB There’s a blissful relief in remembering that a super-hero story can be small, personal and not burdened with the fate of all existence. In this story set before Avengers: Infinity War, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) helps Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) and Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) rescue Hope’s mother, the original Wasp, from the Quantum Realm. Two antagonists also seek the Quantum Realm-visiting technol-


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ogy, complicating the narrative more than necessary, but director Peyton Reed keeps the focus on the humor in this action-comedy, including using Rudd much more effectively than the original did. His charm ends up overshadowing Lilly, who’s stuck with the angst that weighed Rudd down in the first movie. Everything clicks better when the emphasis is on wit, craziness and knowing it’s not the end of the world as we know it, and they feel fine. (PG-13)—SR BOUNDARIES BB.5 Laura (Vera Farmiga) has to drive her estranged former–drug dealer father, Jack (Christopher Plummer), across three states to deposit him with her sister (Kristen Schaal); mildly wacky roadtrip shenanigans ensue. But the indignities to which writer-director Shana Feste subjects her characters in the name of family dramedy verge on the uncomfortable, particularly because she deploys them only because there’d be no story if she didn’t. Jack’s reliance on adult diapers is a focus of strained humor, but worse is the utter obliviousness Laura has to maintain about the drug dispensing that Jack— with the help of her teenage son—is up to on their travels. The cast is a delight, but we end up pitying them more than a lighthearted story about their inevitable reconciliation should demand. (R) —MaryAnn Johanson

SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO B.5 In this unpleasant sequel to the 2015 film that grappled with the morality of the drug war, there’s no more grappling—just swaggering, non-introspective federal agents who seem to enjoy killing. The objective is to defeat Mexican drug cartels by pitting them against each other, so shadowy black-ops agent Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) kidnaps a drug lord’s daughter and blames a rival cartel; when that gets screwed up, Graver and his semi-psychotic associate Alejandro (Benicio del Toro) do more questionable things to fix it. Emily Blunt served as the conscience of the first film, but she isn’t here, and no one takes her place. The fact that nobody questions anything or learns from mistakes might be a potent metaphor for American policy, but any self-reflection or nuance in Taylor Sheridan’s joyless screenplay has been flattened by blunt direction. (R)—Eric D. Snider

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WHITNEY BBBB The undisputed “Queen of Pop” from the late ’80s through the ’90s was dead by 2012, aged only 48, her body ravaged by years of substance abuse. British filmmaker Kevin Macdonald looks back at Whitney Houston’s life and work in this bio-doc with a keenly journalistic but hugely sympathetic eye, talking to family, friends and colleagues to paint a familiar portrait of fame, celebrity and demons, yet one that rarely features a woman of color at its center. Macdonald digs up potentially sensational tidbits about Houston’s childhood and secrets of her adult life that help explain why, as someone says sadly, “deep down she was a girl in pain.” Yet he handles them with grace and maintains dignity on behalf of his subject that, combined with a get-up-and-dance deployment of her music, might bring her a new generation of fans. (R)—MAJ

Is Hiring

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THE FIRST PURGE BBB The Purge series has a simple premise: A fascistic American government makes all crime legal for 12 continuous hours once a year. It’s also a small miracle the dumb original has been followed by better movies that increasingly paint Purge Night as class war. This prequel finds the government paying Staten Islanders to participate in “the experiment;” when it results in deaths, the government sends in militias. Drug dealer Dmitri (thoughtfully played by Y’lan Noel) sits out The Purge until it becomes clear the government is using the experiment as an excuse to kill welfare recipients. There’s some sloppy filmmaking, but once the action gets rolling, it rolls, man, with

effective jump-scares, fierce action and costume design that leaves no doubt as to who would hunt the poor for pleasure. Wherever this franchise heads next, I’m in. (R)—David Riedel

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t the beginning of July, the Ogden Twilight Concert Series notched some big firsts: the first time a show took place on a Friday, and the first time the lineup expanded outside its usual June time slot. It might not seem like a big deal, but this series only started in 2015, when realtor/local business owner Jared Allen and Ogden City Arts division manager Christy McBride joined forces. The first few years featured four or five shows on Thursdays in June, with ticket sales increasing each year. In 2016, the maximum sales were 4,000 tickets; in 2017, it was 7,500 tickets, with more presales in the first week than all of 2015 combined. In 2018, Ogden Twilight hosts 10 shows spread across June, July and August, with an expected total audience of about 60,000. “Ogden isn’t on the map yet with most major booking houses,” says Allen, who serves as principal broker at Restoration Realty and owns the nightclub Alleged and the graphic design firm Conveyer. “But there’s no question that Utah boxes well above its weight class in terms of live music. Each year that we build a stronger rapport, opening doors gets a little easier.” That statement is backed up by perhaps Ogden Twilight’s biggest show of the year: the triumvirate of Sylvan Esso, Unknown Mortal Orchestra and Shamir performing on July 17. The first 2018 show Ogden Twilight announced way back in December, it’s an indelibly cool lineup of indie tastemakers from different ends of the spectrum: North Carolina’s Sylvan Esso smashes all dance-party expectations with its joyously handmade electro-pop, while New Zealand’s Unknown Mortal Orchestra has incubated its own psychR&B dimension, and Philly’s Shamir has soundtracked his struggle with bipolar disorder via skittering indie rock and lo-fi folk. Looking at things from a purely business perspective, it’s a major coup for Utah: Sylvan Esso has already sold out a third of their summer shows, and the day after their Ogden Twilight stop, they’ll hit Red Rocks in Colorado. Those tickets run $50-$75, while here in Utah the same opportunity to see them costs $10-$15. “We’re very fortunate to have sponsors to make the series possible,” Allen says. “There’s just no way to make these shows work at these ticket prices without the generosity of local businesses and their willingness to step up and throw these parties for their community.” Allen credits the support of Will Sartain and Launce Saunders of S&S Presents for Ogden Twilight’s growth. “I contacted Will right at the start of Year One hoping to bring him onboard, but I wasn’t successful,” Allen says. “Nevertheless, he was still kind enough to give me pointers along the way. I’m a huge music junkie, but I didn’t know anything about the business at the start.” Allen says he made far fewer mistakes thanks to Sartain’s behind-the-scenes help in 2015 and 2016, with S&S’ history and credibility enabling Ogden Twilight’s big leap in 2017 and 2018. With four shows left this summer—Big Wild, Jai Wolf and Madge

SHERVIN LAINEZ

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Sylvan Esso’s Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn. on July 26; Broken Social Scene, In Tall Buildings and Joshua James on Aug. 2; Chromeo, STRFKR and Flash & Flare on Aug. 7; and CHVRCHES, Pale Waves and Tishmal on Aug. 9—Ogden Twilight still has a lot of road to run before its staff can really take a load off. But Allen says the gears are always turning—even into next year. “We already have dates held for 2019,” he says. “It’s really a year-round job to try to put together a solid and consistent lineup. We have to be creative and nimble to produce these shows in this location with our small budget.” But Allen says it’s worth it, citing the joy of loyal Ogden Twilight fans, the satisfaction his staff exudes after a well-run event and the cultural impact the series has had on Utah’s next generation of music fans. “We’ve been paid in happiness the last three years,” he says. “It’s really gratifying to see so many people singing along at the concert or sharing their photos on social media. I was taking my son to a soccer game in 2016 a few days after Peter, Bjorn & John played Ogden Twilight, and the other kids in the truck were whistling the tune for ‘Young Folks.’ These were 8-year-olds, mind you. That definitely made me smile.” CW

SYLVAN ESSO

w/ Unknown Mortal Orchestra and Shamir Ogden Amphitheater 343 E. 25th Street Tuesday, July 17, 5 p.m. $10 presale; $15 day of show; $50 VIP, all ages ogdentwilight.com


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disease, undergoing two emergency surgeries to relieve pain Scheidt later described to Noisey as “like being plugged into the light socket of all that is—a raw nerve ending of the universe.” Scheidt’s brush with death, subsequent months of recovery and fresh outlook on life directly inspired YOB’s new full-length, Our Raw Heart. Longtime fans needn’t worry about Scheidt’s new perspective resulting in a drastic shift in style, though. Our Raw Heart features all the usual YOB trademarks—crushingly heavy atmosphere; slow, driving guitar riffs; the intriguing mix of harsh and clean vocals—but infuses them with an optimistic, life-affirming tone largely absent from earlier material. YOB is hitting the road to support the album, bringing their intense, wall-of-sound live show to stages across North America. Accompanying them are fellow Oregonians Bell Witch—whose recent album Mirror Reaper appeared on best-of-2017 lists from Decibel, Loudwire and The Quietus, among others—along with local doom purveyors The Ditch and the Delta. (Nic Renshaw) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $14 presale; $16 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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and decidedly insurgent attitude. It’s a persona that also creates a certain air of unpredictability, as recently reflected in his strange alter ego, “Elmo Buzz,” a wannabe musician and apparent archrival. Buzz is the subject of Snider’s most recent LP, Eastside Bulldog, an album flush with relentless rock ‘n’ roll, playful parody and the latest turn in a career that’s careened from dwelling on so-called “agnostic hymns and stoner fables,” “peace queers” and devils to paying homage to Texas troubadour Jerry Jeff Walker. Strange stuff indeed, but there’s no denying the power of Snider’s songs and the satirical bent of his lyrics. The fact is, the Nashville rabble-rouser is rarely reticent when it comes to courting controversy—but he’s a hoot as well. A serious storyteller (as both his albums and concerts attest) and member of the ad hoc sometimes-supergroup Hard Working Americans, he’s adept at untangling even the most bizarre scenarios through imagination and invention. “My last record was written and recorded in one night for fun, as a tribute to garage rock,” Snider says. “I never thought it would come out. But then my trajectory has been more like a pinball or a sock in the dryer than any kind of focused attempt at achieving something.” (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., sold out at press time, 21+, thestateroom.com

Doom metal fans should consider themselves lucky that YOB is even still around. The Eugene, Ore.-based trio split in 2006, following a run of acclaimed albums that culminated in 2005’s The Unreal Never Lived. Fans rejoiced when the band re-formed in 2008, and again when they released the punishing The Great Cessation a year later. YOB continued touring and releasing albums semi-regularly until early 2017, when frontman and primary songwriter Mike Scheidt was nearly killed by a chronic intestinal

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Vermont native Grace Potter has covered a lot of ground since she started playing music in 2002 as a 19-year-old student at St. Lawrence University. Originally hailed as an early advocate of indie rock’s return to roots music, Potter and her backing band The Nocturnals injected blues, soul and folk into their slick sound. But big-tent ambitions didn’t sit well with the indie cognoscenti; neither did the band’s un-ironic love of classic covers like The Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter.” That sent Potter and company down a mainstream path, as 2007’s This Is Somewhere and 2012’s The Lion the Beast the Beat topped Billboard charts, Potter appeared on TV shows as benign as One Tree Hill and, in 2010, she earned a Grammy nomination for “You and Tequila,” a duet with country heartthrob Kenny Chesney. Collaborations with The Flaming Lips and Gov’t Mule, plus her creation of Burlington’s Grand Point North music festival, kept Potter honest, though. And her 2013 divorce from longtime Nocturnals bandmate Matt Burr and subsequent twoyear break yielded 2015’s powerful solo exercise Midnight, along with “Wild Child,” another country hit with Chesney. After welcoming her first child with new fiancé Eric Valentine in January, Potter has readjusted her touring to include more meaningful stops: a show with the National Symphony Orchestra Pops at the Kennedy Center in

Logic

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SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

Grace Potter

June to celebrate NASA’s 60th anniversary, the 8th Annual Grand Point North in September with Jackson Browne and, yes, Park City. “Grace is positively captivating onstage,” Park City Institute Executive Director Teri Orr says. “We’re thrilled to have her back—especially since we’re one of just a handful of dates she’s performing all summer.” (Nick McGregor) City Park, 1354 Park Ave., 6 p.m., $49 lawn; $89 reserved, tickets.parkcity.institute

TUESDAY 7/17 Logic, NF, Kyle

Most listeners likely know the rapper Logic from last year’s No. 1 single “1-800-2738255,” an anti-suicide song featuring Khalid and Alessia Cara. Calls to the number, which is the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, reportedly tripled after Logic performed the song at the Grammy Awards. Outside of that Macklemore-esque single, however, the Maryland-based MC is a beastly rapper with a fierce, punchline-packed delivery more suited to turn-up tunes than mental health PSAs. But he has an uneven history in that regard. Rather than simply knocking hard, Logic’s studio albums are often convoluted and overstuffed with meditations on race, religion and half-baked philosophies on universal oneness (see: last year’s Everybody). His high-profile mixtapes, however, tend to deliver the dope beats and tricky flows his fans really want (see: Bobby Tarantino II, which has the distinction of debuting at No. 1 on the Billboard charts back in March). He’s a rapper with absolutely insane freestyle skills—one of his go-to moves is solving a Rubik’s Cube while flowing off the top of his head—and a nimble, technically complex delivery that draws adoration from rap nerds everywhere. And that’s just it: Logic might be unequipped to tackle the day’s greatest social ills in the manner of Kendrick Lamar, but there’s no shame in that. If he sticks to making bangers, he could easily rise into the upper echelon of modern rappers. (Howard Hardee) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, 5:30 p.m., $25-$89.50, usana-amp.com


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WEDNESDAY 7/18

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JIM BELMONT

Jeff Beck, Paul Rodgers, Ann Wilson

It’s well-known that Mr. Beck is ranked among the greatest rock guitarists of our time. However, let’s not confuse this Beck with the effusive pop pundit who bears the same surname. This particular Beck also goes by “Jeff” and has, for more than 50 years, remained part of a holy triumvirate that includes colleagues and occasional collaborators Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. All three first gained legendary status in the ’60s with the seminal British blues band The Yardbirds, and like his two cohorts, Beck went on to build a brilliant subsequent career—first at the helm of his namesake Jeff Beck Group, which initially included both Rod Stewart and future Rolling Stone Ron Wood, and later as an instinctive innovator with a fascination for blues, fusion, rock and rockabilly. Beck’s contributions to albums by Mick Jagger, Tina Turner, ZZ Top, Diana Ross and Cyndi Lauper affirm his star-studded pedigree, while this Arrowfest Stars Align Tour puts him in some stellar company as well. Even at age 74, Beck still retains his youthful demeanor, given his trademark rooster-cropped haircut, endless varieties of sleeveless shirts and scarves, allowing him to rock out in full sartorial splendor. Most importantly, Beck’s fretwork is as nimble as ever, ensuring his guitar god status remains secure. (Lee Zimmerman) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, 5:30 p.m., $29.50-$350, usana-amp.com


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Alicia Stockman (Silver Star Cafe) Arthur Leeland Trio (Park CIty Mountain) Church Tongue + Conveyer + Castaway + Freedom Before Dying (The Loading Dock) David Ramirez (Rye) Dellacoma + Tequila Mockingbyrd + Citizen Hypocrisy + Citizen Soldier (Liquid Joe’s) Hunny + Gleemer + Fringe + Sunsleeper (Kilby Court) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow) The Moves Collective (O.P. Rockwell) OKA Amnesia + Kole Galbraith + Official MTC + Future Coochie (Diabolical Records) Ol’ Fashion Depot (Garage on Beck) Pentatonix (Usana Amphitheatre) Quicksand + Glassjaw + Spotlights (The Complex) see p. 36 Reggae at the Royal: Lady Omega + Daverse (The Royal) Sad2 + Captain Daniels and the Sunnybrook Sailors + Rebel Rebel + Press Gang Union (The Beehive) Snyderville Electric Band (DeJoria Center) Static Replica + 90s Television + Beachmen (Urban Lounge) Todd Snider (The State Room) see p. 36 Tom Young Septet (The Gallivan Center) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

Dansie Band + RMZ (The Royal) Junction City Blues Band + Tony Holiday and the Velvetones (O.P. Rockwell) Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe + 7 Come 11 (Commonwealth Room) Keith Urban + Kelsea Ballerini (Usana Amphitheater) KISS Army (The Depot) L.O.L. (Club 90) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Nathan Spenser (The Harp & Hound) Old Death Whisper (Garage on Beck) PC Girl Cabaret (Downstairs) Punk-O-Rama (The Beehive) Rick Gerber (Park City Mountain) Riding Gravity + The Outcome + Version Two + Better Daze (Funk ’n’ Dive) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Silver Strike (The Spur) Sheryl Crow + Caitlyn Smith (Red Butte Garden) The Whining Pussys + Racist Kramer + LSDO (The Ice Haüs) YOB + Bell Witch + The Ditch and the Delta (Urban Lounge) see p. 36 You Knew Me When (Woodenshoe Park)

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JULY 12, 2018 | 41


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42 | JULY 12, 2018

CAMPFIRE LOUNGE

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Jaden Carlson + Judd Warrick (Snowbird) Joe Russo’s Almost Dead (The Depot) J.T. Hiskey (The Beehive) Kenzie Waldon (The Harp & Hound) Kill Frenzy (Soundwell) Kyle Flesch (Downstairs) L.O.L. (Club 90) Mark Owens (The Westerner) The Mystic + Dead, Be Joint + Allyson Kantana (Kilby Court) Mythic Valley (Hog Wallow) Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder with the Utah Symphony (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Sarah Shook & the Disarmers (O.P. Rockwell) Shannon Runyan (Miner’s Plaza) Silent Disco + Regular Ass Dude + Thoroughbred + Enderr (Urban Lounge) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The Stratmores (The Ice Haüs)

I often reflect on the small list of places that I technically “can’t” go to anymore. Like the time I was banned from Wal-Mart for my “aggressive” love for Blurays. Or the other time when I was asked to leave a steakhouse for falling asleep on the table, which they should’ve taken as a compliment. Campfire Lounge made this list of mine a few years ago, but not for any of the fun reasons above. My ex used to frequent this chill hipster pad, which sucks because I really missed the food. Aside from the awkward location (right in front of an AA Fellowship Hall), the popular fire pit bar is busy on any night of the week. As I stroll down 2100 South, a little cocker-poodle named Kkosmo immediately catches my eye. “He’s friendly,” Jeff says, offering me a place at the crowded bar. “Sit down!” Jeff is a fellow motorcycle rider and VP of Trolley Wing Co., venturing across the street to Campfire to chill out after a crazy work week. “I just took [Kkosmo] to Liberty Park past the drum circle,” Jeff says. “I used to live downtown, and I’m seeing all these kids, thinking, ‘I remember what that’s like.”’ We take a moment of silence for our lost youth. Keeping with the theme of the night, I ask Jeff if there are spots he doesn’t visit anymore to avoid his ex-lovers. “It goes both ways,” he says. “If I meet this girl and I start taking her to my spots, should I stop going to my spots if we split?” Absolutely not, Jeff—you go wherever you want. Because, hey, I’m here. (Rachelle Fernandez) Campfire Lounge, 837 E. 2100 South, campfirelounge.com

Strawberry Fields Band (Viridian Center) Thirty Seconds to Mars + Walk the Moon + K.Flay + Misterwives + Joywave + Welshly Arms (Usana Amphitheatre) Tom Bennett One Man Band (Miner’s Plaza)

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SUNDAY 7/15 LIVE MUSIC

Eric Johnson (The State Room) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Lost in Bourbon + The Pour + Teresa Eggertsen Cooke (Park City Mountain) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

MONDAY 7/16 LIVE MUSIC

TUESDAY 7/17 LIVE MUSIC

Bazzi (The Complex) Brit Floyd (Maverik Center) Caleb Gray (The Spur) Delta Phonic (The Yes Hell) He Is We + Whitney Lusk + Taylor Garner (Kilby Court) James V + NQQV + Forest Feathers + The BrightSlide (Metro Music Hall)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Logic + NF + Kyle (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 38 Lovely Noughts + Hard Times + Say Hey (Urban Lounge) Michael McDonald (Sandy Amphitheater) Sylvan Esso + Unknown Mortal Orchestra + Shamir (Ogden Amphitheater) see p. 34 Tad Calcara & New Deal Swing (The Gallivan Center) Taylor Phelan + Ryne Norman + Sammy Brue (The Loading Dock)

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Alicia Stockman (The Spur) Belmont + Rarity + Rejoin the Team + Detour + One-Car Garage (The Loading Dock) DiseNgaged + False Witness + Dipped in Whiskey + Suburban Hell Kill (The Beehive) Donny & Marie Osmond (Sandy Amphitheater) Flyt Plan (Deer Valley Amphitheater) Jeff Beck + Paul Rogers + Ann Wilson (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 40 Jesse McCartney + Just Seconds Apart

(The Complex) John Flanders Jazz Trio (Wilmington Plaza) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow) The Nods + Turquioz Noiz + GOOP + Mulng (Urban Lounge) Randy Rogers Band + Parker McCollum (Commonwealth Room) The Rebel Set + Secret Abilities + Jail City Rockers (Kilby Court) Scott Rogers (The Yes Hell) Smiling Souls (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Tejon Street Corner Thieves + Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (Soundwell) Teresa Eggertsen Cooke (Park City Library) Tim McGraw + Faith Hill (Vivint Arena)

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18. Fleischer and others 21. Dog doc 22. “It’s ____!” 23. Occupied 24. Keach who played Mike Hammer 25. Ichthyologist’s study 26. Doing a pirouette, say 27. Grievance 28. 2Pac’s “Dear ____” 31. It’s darker than cream 32. Toward the back of a boat 33. Where hurricanes originate 34. Crust, mantle or core, for the earth 35. Note just above C 36. Off in the distance 38. “Nothing’s broken” 39. Court psychologist’s ruling 43. Middle X or O 44. “Goodness!” 45. The second Mrs. Trump 46. 10 out of 10 47. ____ Rebellion (1786 uprising) 48. Body part often sculpted

49. Best Buy buy 50. Wayne Gretzky, for 10 seasons 54. Prefix with ware 55. “Can _____ now?” 56. “____ reading too much into this?” 57. Cacophony 58. “This ____ stickup!” 59. Penguins’ org. 60. Gadot of “Justice League”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

1. Mila of “That ‘70s Show” 6. Actress ____ Pinkett Smith 10. More than a sliver 14. Furious 15. Enthusiastic 16. Prefix with commute 17. Name of Justin Trudeau’s favorite Japanese restaurant? 19. Limerick, e.g. 20. “Star Wars” villain Kylo ____ 21. She’s on TV for a spell 22. Conclusion after a troublemaker can’t keep out of trouble? 28. “Praying” insect 29. Nothing but ____ 30. Glassfuls in restaurantes 31. Restrain, as one’s breath 33. Director of the final episode of “M*A*S*H” 37. Office pranks? 40. ____-deucey 41. Itty-bitty biter 42. Sanctuaries 43. Dress (up) 44. Like most Bluetooth headsets 45. What a cardiovascular surgeon doesn’t want to make? 51. ____ committee 52. Get-up-and-go 53. Caboose, for a train 54. Deceptive ... or a hint to this puzzle’s theme 61. Big name in chips 62. James who wrote “A Death in the Family” 63. Perfume named for Baryshnikov 64. “Oh, by the way ...” 65. Tolkien trilogy, to fans 66. Completely 1. Kardashian who married Kanye 2. New England state sch. 3. Hip-hop artist with the #1 album “Hip Hop Is Dead” 4. “Who am ____ judge?” 5. Jiffy 6. Singer Jackson 7. ____-garde 8. Accomplished 9. Abbr. on toothpaste tubes 10. Irish icon, for short 11. Téa of “Madam Secretary” 12. Coeur d’____, Idaho 13. “If you want to throw a fit, fine”

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ACROSS

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Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I pay tribute to your dizzying courage, you wise fool. I stage-whisper “Congratulations!” as you slip away from your hypnotic routine and wander out to the edge of mysterious joy. With a crazy grin of encouragement and my fist pressed against my chest, I salute your efforts to transcend your past. I praise and exalt you for demonstrating that freedom is never permanent but must be reclaimed and reinvented on a regular basis. I cheer you on as you avoid every temptation to repeat yourself, demean yourself and chain yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’m feeling a bit helpless as I watch you messing with that bad but good stuff that is so wrong but right for you. I am rendered equally inert as I observe you playing with the strong but weak stuff that’s interesting but probably irrelevant. I fidget and sigh as I monitor the classy but trashy influence that’s angling for your attention; and the supposedly fast-moving process that’s creeping along so slowly; and the seemingly obvious truth that would offer you a much better lesson if only you would see it for the chewy riddle that it is. What should I do about my predicament? Is there any way I can give you a boost? Maybe the best assistance I can offer is to describe to you what I see.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Emily Dickinson wrote 1,775 poems—an average of one every week for 34 years. I’d love to see you launch an enduring, deep-rooted project that will require similar amounts of stamina, persistence and dedication. Are you ready to expand your vision of what’s possible for you to accomplish? The current astrological omens suggest that the next two months will be an excellent time to commit yourself to a Great Work that you will give your best to for the rest of your long life!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Poet Emily Dickinson once revealed to a friend that there was only one commandment she ever obeyed: “Consider the Lilies.” Japanese novelist Natsume Soseki told his English-speaking students that the proper Japanese translation for “I love you” is Tsuki ga tottemo aoi naa, which literally means “The moon is so blue tonight.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Pisces, I’m advising you to be inspired by Dickinson and Soseki. More than any other time in 2018, your duty in the coming weeks is to be lyrical, sensual, aesthetic, imaginative and festively non-literal. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your key theme right now is growth. Let’s dig in and analyze its nuances. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It might stretch you too far too fast—beyond your capacity to integrate and use it. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn’t feel good to you. It might force you to transcend comforts that are making you stagnant, and that can be painful. 3. Some growth that’s good for you might meet resistance from people close to you; they might prefer you to remain just as you are, and might even experience your growth as a problem. 4. Some growth that isn’t particularly good for you might feel pretty good. For instance, you could enjoy working to improve a capacity or skill that is irrelevant to your long-term goals. 5. Some growth is good for you in some ways, and not so good in other ways. You have to decide if the trade-off is worth it. 6. Some growth is utterly healthy for you, feels pleasurable and inspires other people. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You can’t sing with someone else’s mouth, Taurus. You can’t sit down and settle into a commanding new power spot with someone else’s butt. Capiche? I also want to tell you that it’s best if you don’t try to dream with someone else’s heart, nor should you imagine you can fine-tune your relationship with yourself by pushing someone else to change. But here’s an odd fact: You can enhance your possibility for success by harnessing or borrowing or basking in other people’s luck. Especially in the coming weeks. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You wouldn’t attempt to cure a case of hiccups by repeatedly smacking your head against a wall, right? You wouldn’t use an anti-tank rocket launcher to eliminate the mosquito buzzing around your room, and you wouldn’t set your friend’s hair on fire as a punishment for arriving late to your rendezvous at the café. So don’t overreact to minor tweaks of fate, my dear Gemini. Don’t over-medicate tiny disturbances. Instead, regard the glitches as learning opportunities. Use them to cultivate more patience, expand your tolerance and strengthen your character.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): What’s the biggest lie in my life? There are several candidates. Here’s one: I pretend I’m nonchalant about one of my greatest failures; I act as if I’m not distressed by the fact that the music I’ve created has never received the listenership it should have. How about you, Sagittarius? What’s the biggest lie in your life? What’s most false or dishonest or evasive about you? Whatever it is, the immediate future will be a favorable time to transform your relationship with it. You now have extraordinary power to tell yourself liberating truths. Three weeks from now, you could be a more authentic version of yourself than you’ve ever been.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Lucky vibes are coalescing in your vicinity. Scouts and recruiters are hovering. Helpers, fairy godmothers and future playmates are growing restless waiting for you to ask them for favors. Therefore, I hereby authorize you to be imperious, regal and overflowing with self-respect. I encourage you to seize exactly what you want, not what you’re “supposed” to want. Or else be considerate, appropriate, modest and full of harmonious caution. CUT! CUT! Delete that “be considerate” sentence. The Libra part of me tricked me into saying it. And this is one time when people of the Libra persuasion are allowed to be free from the compulsion to balance and moderate. You have a mandate to be the show, not watch the show.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Reverse psychology” is when you convince people to do what you wish they would do by shrewdly suggesting that they do the opposite of what you wish they would do. “Reverse censorship” is when you write or speak the very words or ideas that you have been forbidden to express. “Reverse cynicism” is acting like it’s chic to express glee, positivity and enthusiasm. “Reverse egotism” is bragging about what you don’t have and can’t do. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to carry out all these reversals, as well as any other constructive or amusing reversals you can dream up.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Psychologist Paul Ekman has compiled an extensive atlas of how emotions are revealed in our faces. “Smiles are probably the most underrated facial expressions,” he has written, “much more complicated than most people realize. There are dozens of smiles, each differing in appearance and in the message expressed.” I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because your assignment in the coming weeks—should you choose to accept it—is to explore and experiment with your entire repertoire of smiles. I’m confident that life will conspire to help you carry out this task. More than at any time since your birthday in 2015, this is the season for unleashing your smiles.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now and then, you go through phases when you don’t know what you need until you stumble upon it. At times like those, you’re wise not to harbor fixed ideas about what you need or where to hunt for what you need. Metaphorically speaking, a holy grail might show up in a thrift store. An eccentric stranger might provide you with an accidental epiphany at a bus stop or a convenience store. Who knows? A crucial clue might even jump out at you from a spam email or a reality TV show. I suspect that the next two weeks might be one of those odd grace periods for you.

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WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

15 Minutes

Legend has it that the phrase “15 minutes of fame” originated with a comment by Andy Warhol at his 1968 exhibition at the Morderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden: “In the future, everyone will be worldfamous for 15 minutes.” There are plenty of Utah restaurants that have shared the quarter-hour spotlight. Among those featured on shows like Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives and Man v. Food Nation are: Aristo’s, known for classic Greek dishes like grilled octopus and lamb tacos; Blue Plate Diner in upper Sugar House, loved by all who want a big ol’ breakfast; The Burger Bar in Roy (“Home of the Big Ben”) that features buffalo and elk patties; Maxwell’s East Coast Eatery offering Italian-American food based on Steve Maxwell’s mom’s recipes; Moochie’s Meatballs & More for magnificent cheesesteak sandwiches; Oh Mai’s banh mi salads and sandwiches; Pat’s BBQ (I’m in the background of that episode trying to have lunch with a friend); Ruth’s Diner in Emigration Canyon; Asian-Texan fusion joint Sammy’s Bistro in Park City; Silver Star Café also in Park City; Bruges Waffles & Frites; Tin Roof Grill, Lone Star Taqueria; and, of course, probably Utah’s most famous restaurant, Red Iguana. Restaurants chosen to be on a program by a TV celebrity like Guy Fieri might get a “surreal boost in business,” reports restaurant-hosptiality.com. It’s called the “Guy Fieri Effect,” and food purveyors dream of being on his show. People reportedly will drive hours to eat at one of the featured eateries, and the reruns keep the momentum going, bringing in new fans every time a place reappears on TV. For us locals, seeing TV cameras set up at one of our favorite spots means a boom for the owners but doom for us. When Chef Adalberto Diaz Labrada, owner of a little SLC pastry shop called Fillings and Emulsions, competed on Best Baker in America, people across the country wanted his macarons. Local patrons had to start standing in line to place orders. Viet Pham, who just opened Pretty Bird, serving Nashville hot chicken, hasn’t had national Food Network celebs show up at his new joint, but his fame from being on Beat Bobby Flay and Iron Chef has people standing in line down the street for his chicken sandwiches. We’ve got plenty of famous folks and places in our fine state. Now everyone appears to want to move or visit here (75,000 people visited Zion on Memorial Day weekend!). Utah’s 15 minutes of fame aren’t up—they’re just beginning. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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To Absent Friends During the 2014 World Cup, five friends in Durango, Mexico, made a pact to travel to the 2018 tournament in Russia. They saved their money, bought a bus, painted it in Mexico’s colors and booked passage for themselves and the bus on a ship going to Spain, where The Daily Mail reported, the friends planned to drive the bus to Russia. But just before they boarded the ship in April, one of the five, Javier, told his friends his wife had put the kibosh on his trip. So the remaining four did the next best thing: They made a cardboard life-size cutout of Javier, looking grumpy and wearing a shirt that says, “My wife didn’t let me go,” and set off for Russia. The cardboard Javier has been very popular at the soccer venues, attracting female admirers, appearing on the big screen, crowd-surfing and being photographed with fellow football fans from all over the world.

WEIRD

Anger Management In North Port, Fla., a witness watched on June 17 as 75-year-old Helena Molnar beat an unnamed man with a water jug after he watered her plants. When he emptied the rest of the water in the jug on her plants, she went inside her house and returned with a different weapon, which the witness didn’t see but said “made a different sound” than the water jug. According to WWSB TV, North Port police arrived to find the victim soaking wet, with blood drops on his shirt. Molnar was charged with battery. Undignified Death Samen Kondorura was joined by dozens of male relatives mourning his mother’s death in North Toraja, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, on June 15, as they carried her coffin to a lakkean, a wooden stilt structure where dead bodies are stored during traditional funeral ceremonies. But as they hoisted the coffin up a bamboo ladder, The Jakarta Post reported, the ladder broke and the coffin fell, striking people in the crowd, including Kondorura himself, who suffered a severe head injury and died on the way to the hospital.

Awesome! On June 23, firefighters of Engine 642 of the Henrietta, N.Y., Fire District went the extra mile after responding to an accident in which the injured driver was a pizza delivery man, according to Fox News. “Once the patient was cared for and loaded into the ambulance, the crew decided to finish the delivery so the pizza

Oops! James J. Rynerson, 38, was being held in the Mesa County (Colorado) Jail in May after being charged with menacing, disorderly conduct and trespass. But on May 21, the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel reported, sheriff’s deputies at the jail released him, having mistaken him for Marvin March, 35, a different inmate. Jail staff gave Rynerson March’s belongings, and he wore March’s leather jacket as he signed March’s name to the release papers and left the facility. Rynerson’s wife was startled to see her husband in the garage at their home, and after he explained what happened, she convinced him to go back. She “personally drove him back to the Mesa County Detention Facility,” the report noted, and he was back in custody by 11 p.m., with new charges, including escape and forgery, added to his list. n A woman in Wenling, China, was so thrilled to be driving the Ferrari 458 she rented on June 21 that she recorded herself while waiting at a stoplight: “First time driving a Ferrari. This truly is the most amazing feeling.” But within minutes, reported The Daily Mail, she swerved out of control, striking a metal traffic barrier and a BMW X3, destroying the front end of the $660,000 Ferrari and deploying its airbags. Neither the driver nor her passenger was injured in the accident.

FIREFIGHTERS

Suspicions Confirmed Visitors crowding into a Vancouver, Canada, street festival on June 17 were invited—at $38 a pop—to try a new health craze: Hot Dog Water. The drink is marketed as a gluten-free, Keto diet-compatible, post-workout source of sodium and electrolytes, and every sleek bottle, which promises to help with weight loss, also contains a hot dog. It’s also a prank. Hot Dog Water CEO Douglas Bevans told Global News the product was dreamed up as a response to the “snake oil salesmen” of health marketing. In small print at the bottom of the sales sheet is this disclaimer: “Hot Dog Water in its absurdity hopes to encourage critical thinking related to product marketing and the significant role it can play in our purchasing choices.” Touché. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Recurring Themes In this week’s installment of foreign objects stuck in body cavities: Mr. Li of China’s Guangdong Province went to the doctor on June 15 at Pingshan Hospital in Shenzhen after feeling discomfort and pain in his ear. Using an otoscope scan, the doctor discovered a live cockroach burrowing into the 52-year-old man’s ear canal. “It’s still alive, still moving,” the doctor can be heard on video saying, according to The Daily Mail. She cut the roach into pieces to remove it and disinfected Li’s ear with alcohol in case it had laid eggs. News That Sounds Like a Movie When Juan Ramon Alfonso Penayo, 20, of Santa Teresa, Paraguay, failed to return after leaving his home June 14, his family assumed the worst. The town lies on the border with Brazil, reported the BBC, and is a hotbed of illegal drug activity. Police found a charred body three days later and called Penayo’s family, who, despite being unable to identify the remains, accepted that it must be him and proceeded with funeral arrangements. As they mourned over his casket during the wake, Penayo walked nonchalantly into the room. The body in the casket was returned to the morgue, and Penayo’s family celebrated his return.

Babs De Lay

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n To kick off an exhibition focused on the opioid crisis at his Stamford, Conn., art gallery on June 22, gallery owner Fernando Alvarez and artist Domenic Esposito placed an 800-pound, 11-foot-long steel sculpture of a bent and burned spoon in front of the headquarters of Purdue Pharma, makers of OxyContin. Purdue has been the subject of lawsuits alleging deceptive marketing and, therefore, responsibility for opioid addiction and overdose issues. “The spoon has always been an albatross for my family,” said Esposito, whose brother has struggled with drug addiction for 14 years. The Associated Press reported police arrested Alvarez for obstructing free passage and confiscated the spoon as evidence.

wouldn’t go to waste,” the fire department posted on its Facebook page. “If it’s not delivery it’s Di ... Fire dept?!”

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Art Makes a Statement At the Royal College of Art’s annual London fashion show in June, one graduate unveiled a unique approach to accessorizing garments: crystallized bodily fluids. Alice Potts displayed a pair of ballet shoes decorated with crystals formed from sweat, along with a fake fur adorned with urine crystals. Potts told Reuters the “more natural materials” could offer environmental benefits not possible with traditional plastics.

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City Weekly July 12, 2018  

Buried Hazards

City Weekly July 12, 2018  

Buried Hazards