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M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 4 N 0. 5 1

Summer

Brace yourself for an epic-ish film season.

By David Riedel


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LET’S ALL GO TO THE LOBBY

You’re about to get some serious mileage from that MoviePass your mom got you for Christmas ... our annual Summer Movie Preview is here!

Farmington, Utah June 8-9, 2018 Legacy Events Center 151 South 1100 West • Farmington, UT 84025 First Show of the Tri-State Mustang Show Series!!

6 Wild Horses • 6 Wild Burros 33 Trained Halter-gentled Horses All starting at $125! June 8 20th ANNUAL UTAH WILD HORSE & BURRO FESTIVAL Wild Horse & Burro Show: 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. Untrained Wild Horse & Burro Adoption: 10 a.m. Extreme Trail Challenge: 6 p.m. June 9 TIP Challenge Freestyle: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Trained Halter-Started Adoption: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Wild Horse & Burro Show: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m. Facebook: utahwildhorseandburrofestival More information: 435-743-3128 or lreid@blm.gov

Cover illustration by Craig Winzer craigwinzer.com

17

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 14 NEWS 22 A&E 31 DINE 38 CINEMA 40 MUSIC 52 COMMUNITY

DAVID RIEDEL

Cover story, p. 17 It’s easy to call the film critic jaded, but deep inside, that kid who fell in love with movies still lives. “I’m most excited about BlacKkKlansman,” the Spoilerpiece Theatre podcaster says, “because it’s Spike Lee presumably firing on all cylinders.”

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BOOKS ´ EVENTS ´ CLUBS

SOAP BOX

OGDEN’S BOOKSTORE Supporting authors from COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY “shithole” countries

News, May 3, “The Bears Ears Sideshow” Damn. Thanks, Governor!

JOHNATHAN LANCE TUERO

bookedon25th.com 801-394-4891

147 Historic 25th Street Ogden, UT

Via Facebook Utah’s elected officials work for whomever has the most money, and in Utah’s case, it is the LDS church. I guess the prophets told them shrinking Bears Ears is the thing to do.

@LABOUSKIE Via Twitter

What a bunch of shit!! It’s our mountain, not yours.

@JUDYCLEVERLY1 Via Twitter

Restaurant review, May 3, Little World Chinese Love this place.

VICTOR SOIFUA Via Facebook Hell yeah! Always my go-to.

BOBBI PADGETT Via Facebook Little World!

@SUNRAZE

Via Instagram

Blog post, May 2, “Hatch Foundation announces partnership with U and new South Temple location”

That looks nice. Does it have a solid foundation or does it rotate based on wind direction?

@BFELTOVICH Via Twitter

[Sen. Orrin Hatch is] another old, decaying white male thinking and talking about nothing but himself while living off taxpayers’ dollars.

MIKE SCHMAUCH Via Facebook

Take Mittins away, too!

MARY ANN MERRELL CROFTS Via Facebook

@SLCWEEKLY

I am zero percent excited about anything that involves him. I’m not a super political person; I don’t have one designated party I subscribe to or support, but rather opinions on individual issues. That being said, Hatch has never done anything that has made me exhale with relief nor applaud. The only thing he is true and consistent in, is his commitment to being a career politician.

C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

M AY 3 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 4

N0. 49

BRITTNEY HEMINGWAY Via Facebook

A foundation to honor political corruption. Nice.

LYNN BAKER

Tanner Lenart interprets

Via Facebook

Toon In

So glad to see Keith Knight’s cartoon (Th)ink back this week. Jen Sorensen’s is also great. I’d like a different alternative cartoon than Red Meat, but hey, different strokes for different folks. Really miss them when these cartoons are missing.

TOM MEYER, Millcreek

Social media post, May 9, Complete the following: Now that the LDS church has ended their centuryold partnership with the Boy Scouts of America, they should team up with ___________ .

The 21st Century for starters.

REGIE THOMPSON Via Facebook

Every other intelligent person who will now join because they are no longer affiliated with the church.

BETHANY MOSIER CASSIL Via Facebook

LIAR PECU R L IQ U O L AW S so the rest of us don’t have to. BY KELAN LYONS

So Mormons can’t do Lamanite … sorry, “Native American” things in the Scouts anymore? This breaks my heart.

CORBAN ANDERSON Via Facebook

God forbid the gays and women join and try to make a better person out of themselves. It’s all part of the lifelong indoctrination churches push to keep the tithe dollars rolling in. Jesus flipped money changers tables in the temple, but for a couple billion a year, we’ll rewrite that part.

PETER MUSCARELLO Via Facebook

master made them go to church on a Sunday spent at camp, or be sent home from Camp Steiner in 1982. Boy, did that jackass have some explaining to do when three sets of parents showed up to get their sons.

REGIE THOMPSON Via Facebook

Bad for the LDS kids. [They’ll] never learn about other cultures, ethnic groups or experience anything except what is church-approved. Then go to school and feel like they are perfect, then turn into bullies and intolerant, sarcastic know-nothings about the real world.

Maybe non-LDS kids will feel welcome in the Scouts. That would be a great thing.

MARILYN DUNCAN HARTLEY

Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

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CLINTON REID

Yep. We had several non-LDS boys in our troop but every one of them quit when the Scout-


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OPINION

On Patriotic Correctness “Just two days and a wake-up” in soldier-speak. Since 1950, the third Saturday in May has been designated to honor those who serve in uniform and for educating the public about the military. I wonder if there are Armed Forces Day (AFD) events in Utah this weekend, the home state of many active- and reserve-component military units? I hope so. No doubt the residents of Fayetteville, Ark., and Killeen, Texas, are honoring their next-door neighbors at Fort Bragg and Fort Hood—a pancake breakfast, perhaps? A family day in the park? Freebies from local businesses? On the other hand, educating Utahns about the military is like teaching kids about sex—a good idea in concept but a neglected one in practice. That said, I hadn’t given much thought to AFD myself until I read “The Warrior at the Mall,” an op-ed in The New York Times. The byline was Phil Klay, a self-described “veteran of a war that doesn’t end, in a country that doesn’t pay attention.” Klay snagged me with his line, “We’re at war while America is at the mall.” He first heard the ironic catchphrase as a Marine lieutenant in Afghanistan in the 2000s. It was inspired by a speech President George W. Bush gave a few days after the 9/11 attacks in which he suggested a trip to Disney World as a personal, counterterrorist tactic: “Take your families and enjoy life, the way we want it to be enjoyed,” he said. The provenance of the catchphrase is likely traceable to a dirty, disgruntled GI in the desert, nursing

BY JOHN RASMUSON a canteen of warm water, a Hershey bar and a pack of Marlboros just like his predecessors in Vietnam 50 years before. Soldier-speak: “The wind in Vietnam doesn’t blow, it sucks.” Klay’s essay is an unexpected AFD lesson for those who take the time to read it. Not only does it steer clear of such worn-out platitudes as “Thanks for your service,” it introduces the inattentive public to a “fraudulent form of American patriotism” Klay dubs “patriotic correctness (PC).” Klay’s PC describes a mindset “where ‘soldiers’ are sacred, the work of actual soldiering is ignored, and the pageantry of military worship sucks energy away from the obligations of citizenship.” Chief among those obligations is to be informed and engaged when military matters are discussed. However, PC does not suffer critics gladly, Klay writes. The PC tendency is to equate criticism of unwinnable wars with disrespect for the soldiers who fight them. “Fubar” in soldier-speak: Fucked up beyond all recognition. “The Warrior at the Mall” brought 624 comments to the newspaper. One, from Gold Star father Robert Sommer, read: “My wife and I were hard-wired into the wars, and it was often disorienting to realize not only how little others were affected by them, but also that many were not even aware of them in all but the vaguest way.” I can think of only two reasons why most Americans are unaware of the fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. First, journalists aren’t filing stories daily from the battlefield as they did in previous wars. Second, not many people have skin in the game: America’s longest wars have been fought by less than 1 percent of the population—16 times less than the percentage during Vietnam. In the late 1960s, everyone had a friend or relative in Vietnam, and our collective disapproval eventually brought the war to an end. Today’s disengaged citizenry makes war easy to start and hard to stop. Since the end of the draft in 1973, there have been more than 140 military deployments, according to the Congressional Research

Service. Between 1945 and 1973, with conscription the order of the day, there were 19. It is ironic that ending the draft in 1973 might have had the unintended effect of fraying the connection between soldiers and civilians. James Fallows, national correspondent of The Atlantic, has written about the “reverent but disengaged attitude toward the military—we love the troops, but we’d rather not think about them—[which] has become so familiar that we assume it is the American norm.” “Snafu” in soldier-speak: Situation normal, all fucked up. That somebody else’s son or daughter does the fighting is the norm. For the vast majority of Americans, the long wars levy no tax, require no sacrifice, preclude no mall outings. The underlying unfairness does not go unnoticed: Klay’s essay describes veterans who harbor ill feelings for those who have chosen not to join the military. My driver license has VETERAN printed on it. It occasionally earns me a “Thanks for your service” from a well-intentioned clerk. I am always unsettled by it chiefly because as a draftee, my soldiering days were involuntary. Other veterans react similarly but for different reasons. “Please Don’t Thank Me for My Service” headlined a story in The New York Times in 2015. The story by Matt Richtel cited Afghanistan and Iraq veterans’ comments about what they called a “thank you for your service phenomenon.” Among the abrasive adjectives they used were “shallow,” “disconnected” and “reflexive.” Tim O’Brien added “patriotic gloss.” Richtel quotes O’Brien, the author of several acclaimed books about the Vietnam War, suggesting that the thank-you’s deflect attention from the real issue, the legitimacy of the war itself. The approaching weekend is a good time for taking stock of your own patriotic correctness. To let the opportunity pass is to relegate this year’s AFD to just another Saturday in May. In soldier-speak: “Same old shit, different day.” CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

UTE PROTEST AND SPIRITUAL WALK

Grand Opening John’s Place

Celebration of life and Tree Plating for John James Delaney III MS Thursday May 24th, 2018 | 7:00 pm 125 East 4800 South, Murray UT Brick Drive

OneWorldCommunity.com

With all the talk of nuclear holocaust, we rarely think of the issues right here in Utah. Let’s talk uranium mills—like those around the Grand Canyon and specifically one that sits just a few miles east of the for-now Bears Ears National Monument. It’s owned by Canadian Energy Fuel Resources. Of course, the San Juan cabal wants the license renewed over the objections from the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and White Mesa residents who are mostly tribal members. Join the White Mesa Ute Community Protest and Spiritual Walk, highlighting the contamination and diseases that accompany the mill’s operation. White Mesa Ute Recreation Center, 1400 U.S. Highway 191, Blanding, 435678-2118, Saturday, May 19, 11 a.m.3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2wtdWME.

John’s Tree Planting

EQUALITY CELEBRATION

Funerals weddings Birthdays make someone ’ s day

Art l a r o Fl

The

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

Summer’s a great time to head south, and an even better time to advocate for the voiceless. Equality Utah is hosting a family friendly Equality Celebration to bring together members of the LGBTQ community, their families and friends. Everyone is welcome to this opportunity to dialogue and better understand each other’s concerns and successes. There’s an open reception, dinner and a show— think the swinging ’60s, as well. So dress for the occasion in your most creative costume. 317 S. Donlee Drive, St. George, 801-355-3479, Saturday, May 19, 6-9 p.m., $100, bit.ly/2ry5ruG.

WRITING FORUM

If you can’t yell it from the mountaintops, you can put pen to paper and tell it like it is. The Sierra Club is holding a writing circle to help you send letters to the editor. “Come with a passion to write, an issue to address [or open to suggestions] and an enthusiasm to write with the support of a knowledgeable group,” organizers say. There will be a robust discussion of current issues and individual help in writing, with fact sheets and refreshments. It’s important to let people know what you care about, and the Writing Party to Protect Utah’s Life Outside! is a good place to start. 423 W. 800 South, Ste. A103, 801-560-4251, Wednesday, May 23, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2KUi5Mr.

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HITS&MISSES

GET YOUR KITTY FIX

BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Ballot Madness

For a while, everyone was worried about election fraud. Dear God, those illegal aliens were being bused into cities to vote in droves! Of course, that was untrue. Now you have to wonder what’s behind the efforts to derail the four ballot initiatives in Utah. Apparently, certain people don’t want citizens to exercise their right to vote, and it’s not because of undocumented immigrants. It’s because “the people” aren’t smart enough. First, let’s get this straight. Signing a ballot initiative petition is not voting—it’s allowing a measure to get on the ballot so you can vote. And yeah, you can change your vote in the meantime. You can study the issues. Instead, we’re getting hyperbole and fear-mongering so you don’t have to worry your pretty little head about these matters. The Deseret News calls the medical marijuana petition a false choice, and warns “against pursuing an emotional rush to pass a reckless initiative.” What are they smoking?

In a Divot

Let’s take a moment here to warn the golfers of the world that, like the newspaper industry, you are going down. Well, not quite, but it’s time to start thinking about your future—unless you live in Mar-aLago. The Salt Lake City Council is— again—trying to figure out how to pay for public golf courses or even if it should. The city would have to subsidize the courses big time, and that’s not likely to happen. Meanwhile, Rep. Chris Stewart came to the aid of Wingpointe near the airport with a bill to remove fair market value from the FA A’s leasing requirement. Really? It’s that important? The Deseret News thinks it is. Closings outpaced openings in the past decade, according to the National Post, and that’s because millennials are rethinking their pastimes. If golf courses are to survive, there needs to be some innovative thinking.

Coal vs. Washington

Good on Washington state for standing up for itself. But watch out as coal-loving states like Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Kansas, South Dakota and Nebraska whine their way into the hearts of a dying business. They argue that Washington is violating the Interstate Commerce Clause by denying permits to let coal pass through its ports. You know, it’s the environment, stupid! But Washington is up against some formidable opponents, including the Farm Bureau and, of course, Trump. Meanwhile, “Energy” Secretary Rick Perry is looking at shoring up coal and nuclear with a decades-old law, according to The Hill. And the feds gave Utah’s biggest coal producer a $19-million royalty discount. Get your gas masks ready and never mind states’ rights.

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STRAIGHT DOPE Coca Craze

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All lucrative plants are grown in multiple locations, as far as I know. So why is coca only cultivated in South America? —Pardel Lux

Thinking about that retirement nest egg, Pardel? Buying a hillside in Sonoma County and getting into the biz? Legal niceties notwithstanding, it could probably be done— coca’s well adapted to its native environment, but with a sufficiently green thumb you could grow it in a variety of climes. As to why you don’t see it much beyond South America in practice, well, you’re looking at the usual historical contingencies: colonialism, drug panics, international conventions, world wars, yada yada. Let’s start with the socio-botanical angle. Hailing from the genus Erythroxylum, coca’s indigenous to the Andes, where for millennia people have been cultivating a few species whose leaves they chew as a stimulant. Anthropologists have theorized that chewing coca might offset adverse effects of highaltitude life, helping the body retain heat and use energy more effectively under exertion. And for most of history there wasn’t any overwhelming incentive for the practice to spread downhill: as an intoxicant, coca leaf packs no more punch than a strong cup of coffee. Spanish colonists in South America paid it little mind, being understandably focused on things like gold and silver. Thus, it wasn’t until the late 1800s that coca really showed up on the world’s radar, once German chemists managed to isolate and purify its active ingredient, the alkaloid cocaine. Western doctors used it topically as an anesthetic, but saw serious potential in its stimulant properties when ingested. Sigmund Freud, a big fan to say the least, touted it as a potential cure for ailments from depression to asthma. Its tendency to induce feelings of exhilaration and euphoria didn’t make it any less popular. Unregulated cocaine quickly found its way into legit pharmaceutical practice and dodgy patent medicines alike (not to mention one extremely well-known soft drink). By 1900, the United States was importing something like 1,000 tons of coca a year from Peru, the world’s major supplier until other countries got hip. The Dutch soon become dominant players, growing coca in the colonial East Indies and processing it back in Amsterdam. The Japanese, meanwhile, started plantations on what’s now Taiwan. At this point it looked like the plant was on the verge of breaking out globally. What happened? Ultimately, it was the U.S.—the “prime mover” in the changing fortunes of cocaine, according to drug-trade historian Paul Gootenberg—which in the early 20th century began an international drive for cocaine prohibition. By this time, addiction problems among both therapeutic and recreational users had become impossible to ignore. But our about-face on coke was complicated: valid public-health concerns intermingled with a good old American moral freak-out (remember, we prohibited alcohol around then too).

SLUG SIGNORINO

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The result? “In one generation,” Gootenberg writes, the view of cocaine in Western medical circles went “from a possible modern panacea to an unscientific ‘mania.’” The U.S. restricted the drug at home and leaned on other nations to crack down. It took a while, but we got our way. The Dutch weren’t thrilled about dismantling their state-run coke works, but in the interest of international amity, they eased off the throttle. The final blow to legitimate global coke production was World War II, which scrambled national industries, finished imperial Japan, and cemented the U.S. as a global superpower. Per Gootenberg, the year 1945 “marked the complete shutdown of any autonomous cocaine networks that had persisted before the war.” The German and Japanese pharmaceutical infrastructure lay in ruins, and U.S. occupying forces were in position to implement America’s anti-drug stance. Coca cultivation had effectively been driven back where it started: the Andes. Needless to say, America didn’t stop flexing its muscle there. Turning an eye to our southern neighbors, the U.S. pushed hardline coca-eradication policies throughout the hemisphere; in 1961, a U.N. narcotics agreement pledged to wipe out even the traditional chewing of coca leaf within 25 years. Irony fans will note that this same 25-year period happens to be when America made itself into an enormous customer base for South American coke. And, of course, this morass of conflicting incentives—zero tolerance on one hand, massive demand on the other—meant we spent the latter half of the 20th century playing cocaine whack-a-mole in Latin America: zapping facilities only to send them deeper into the jungle, further into the mountains, over a porous border, etc. So despite appearances, Pardel, coca cultivation is in fact on the move. A few years ago, a plantation was discovered in the state of Chiapas, in southern Mexico—as far as anyone knows, the first of its kind that far north. “My only question is why it took so long,” one drugpolicy expert told Vice News. Chiapas, after all, has “cheap labor, remote land, and good climate. Add corruption, crushing poverty and poor infrastructure for other types of commerce and you’ve got a perfect storm.” When you put it that way, we should start seeing U.S. coca in no time. n

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NEWS

‘Depressing and Difficult’

Many find their experience in Utah’s immigration court to be a desolate one. BY KELAN LYONS klyons@cityweekly.net @kelan_lyons

A

slain ex-partner and countless alleged threats from a Mexican drug cartel brought Wendy Vanessa Chacon Dominguez to the Salt Lake City immigration court one morning in early May. “I believe that as soon as we get back to my family, we will all be killed,” Dominguez told immigration judge Christopher M. Greer through a Spanish interpreter, black headphones placed just above her big hoop earrings, helping her understand what attorneys and the judge were saying about her and her 10-year-old son’s applications for asylum. Dominguez said she thinks the cartel is responsible for the death of her uncle, who had been caring for her home last year while she was in the U.S. “He was murdered very violently,” Dominguez testified. “The way he died, he was tortured,” she told the judge. “And I believe it was because of trying to get information about us.” Dominguez said she’d been threatened multiple times by a police commander while she was a municipal government

employee in Chihuahua, Mexico, between 2007 and 2010, a “planned job,” she later learned, arranged by her ex-partner so that she could skim tax money and give it to the cartel. Dominguez’s former paramour had been killed four months before she started her job; she testified that she learned shortly after his death that he had been “involved in the business of narco trafficking.” “These people told me that even though he was dead, the business had to continue,” she said, testifying that, despite the threats, she never gave the cartel members any cash. In 2015, she fled to the United States. “By then, we were very, very scared,” Dominguez said. The cartel would tell her they were watching her children—she has three, two of whom were born in the U.S., her attorney said—and knew which schools they attended, and that she wasn’t “complying with a decision that would be favorable to them.” After a 25-minute recess, Greer denied Dominguez and her son’s asylum applications. He noted that neither she nor her children were harmed “over a period of many years,” despite the repeated threats. He also rejected other applications that would have allowed Dominguez to stay in the U.S., including one based on her fear of being tortured should she return to Mexico. Greer cited a report that says Mexico punishes perpetrators of extrajudicial killings, though he acknowledged its high rates of violence. “General conditions of civil unrest,” he said, “do not provide a basis for relief.” One of three judges in the only court of its kind in Utah—located in West Valley City—Greer and his colleagues also hear cases from Montana and Idaho via a video feed, meaning they consider the cases of immigrants who reside in three different

states. The judges—each of whom was appointed during the Bush, Obama and Trump administrations—preside over immigrants’ applications for asylum and cancellations of removal from the U.S., among other topics. The previous day, Greer presided over a master-calendar hearing, often one of the first appearances a respondent makes in court, in which judges tell them their rights—to have an attorney proffered at no expense to the government; to present evidence in favor of their case; to analyze evidence presented against them; and to appeal the judge’s’ ruling—and take pleadings and applications for relief from deportation. That day, Greer heard from more than a dozen people who had been served notices to appear in court by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), alleging that they had violated U.S. immigration law. Most had attorneys sitting beside them, but a few were appearing for the first time and hadn’t yet hired a lawyer. Luis Carrillo, a 22-year-old Dreamer who came to the U.S. from Mexico in 1998 and doesn’t speak much Spanish, told Greer that he hadn’t yet hired an attorney. “I’m trying to save money so I can look for one,” Carrillo said. Greer rescheduled him for another master-calendar hearing at the end of June, warning him that “the time to find an attorney is not unlimited.” The deportation machine publicly championed by President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions—a “law and order” administration that is instituting a quota system that requires judges to clear 700 cases annually and have fewer than 15 percent of their decisions overturned on appeals and that just recently floated criminally prosecuting people who

illegally enter the country—is not nearly as well-oiled and fast-moving as their public statements imply. As of Sept. 30, 2016, there were 2,030 pending cases in the Salt Lake City immigration court, a roughly 45 percent increase since 2013, according to a statistics yearbook maintained by the U.S. Department of Justice. More recent official data remains hard to come by, but the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, or TRAC, at Syracuse University, a nonpartisan database referenced by multiple Utah attorneys City Weekly interviewed for this story, notes there are 2,698 pending cases through March in the 2018 fiscal year, a 6 percent increase from the 2017 fiscal year. (This is a smaller backlog than the 3,791 pending cases in Nevada and 11,680 in Colorado.) Respondents in this court wait, on average, 508 days for their cases to be completed, from the time they’re served their notices to appear until a judge issues a ruling, but this does not include waiting on appeals, which, depending on the case, can take more than a year. Jonathan Z. Paz, Dominguez’s attorney, says he expects his client’s appeal to take about two years. “She’s in limbo. She can’t get a work permit, she can just be here,” Paz says, describing his client’s life as she waits for another ruling on her and her son’s asylum application. “Someone else has to support her here for those two years.” “With the Trump administration, everything has, you would say either doubled or tripled in time, in terms of processing applications,” immigration attorney Jared S. Lawrence says, suggesting the “extreme vetting” favored by the president is increasing the time it takes for cases to be completed.


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According to TRAC, some 541 cases were filed in the Salt Lake City immigration court in its 2018 fiscal year through March, 87 percent of which involved respondents from Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. The court’s three judges are projected to complete 1,794 cases this fiscal year, a 52 percent increase from FY17. All this is happening outside the watchful eyes of Utah journalists; multiple attorneys told City Weekly they rarely, if ever, see any media presence inside the federal building’s three courtrooms. According to Lawrence, the Department of Homeland Security no longer has a contract with any jail in Utah besides in Cache County, where bed space is very limited, so most detained cases are sent to Denver, New Orleans or Las Vegas. Carl Rusnok, DHS spokesman, wrote in an email to City Weekly that, “ICE has limited detention capacity in the immediate vicinity in Utah, which requires our ICE deportation officers to focus our resources appropriately.” Because those detainees are sent elsewhere, Lawrence says, “cases that sometimes would be delayed a year or two years are being adjudicated within just a few months because they don’t have to focus on the detained clients.” Attorneys say things have changed since the Trump administration took office. “There have been major changes under this administration, that’s for sure,” Leonor Perretta, immigration attorney and liaison between the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) and the American Immigration Lawyers Association, says, noting that prosecutorial discretion seems to be “gone completely” because attorneys representing DHS seem to now have “very little discretion to do anything.” “[DHS counsel] have no choice. They have to prosecute everyone who comes through their doors. It’s causing an even worse backload,” immigration attorney Jonathan Bachison says. Rusnok wrote in an email to City Weekly that “ICE officers continue to possess and exercise prosecutorial discretion.” Despite that, as Perretta says, “not a single thing that has happened [since Trump took office] has positively affected immigrants.” Adam Crayk, immigration attorney, says the relationships between judges, DHS counsel and respondents’ attorneys in the local court are strong. “For the most part, it goes pretty well,” he says. “We actually have a pretty good working system here.” DHS counsel and the court administrator declined to speak on the record with City Weekly, referring questions to DHS or EOIR spokespeople. “That’s a Trump administration thing,” Perretta says of their tight lips. A spokeswoman for EOIR wrote in an email that “immigration judges do not give interviews.” The themes of Dominguez and Carrillo’s stories—violence, fear, desperation and patience, as they wait for strangers to decide where they and their families will live—are commonplace in the Salt Lake City immigration court. “This is one of the most depressing and difficult courts that exist,” Crayk says. “There is nothing like this court.” CW


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Summer

By David Riedel | comments@cityweekly.net |

MAY 17, 2018 | 17

Bad movies come and go so quickly now you actually have to work to find them—or watch them three months later on Hulu. “But wait,” you say. “The Boy Next Door was actually pretty successful, wasn’t it?” The Boy Next Door is the ninthmost-successful erotic thriller of all time, according to Box Office Mojo. Sliver is eighth. So just what is success, really? (Though TBND has one

imaginatively titled Book Club), then the world has gone topsy-turvy, people. It used to be the olds only popped up after September. Now they’re here before Memorial Day. (Aside: I sat through the end credits of the Melissa McCarthy vehicle Life of the Party waiting for a postcredits sequence. THAT’S WHAT MARVEL HAS DONE TO ME.) So fasten your seatbelts. It’s not necessarily going to be a bumpy night, but I have axes to grind, I swear with aplomb, and I’ve heard readers can get really bent out of shape about that shit. God, movies suck. (Just kidding! I love my job!) Oh, and a bunch of these premiered at Sundance. The dates in parentheses refer to the day you can plunk down money and see it in an air-conditioned, stadium-seated multiplex or a nice, homey arthouse theater.

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My point: NOTHING IS SACRED. NOTHING IS TRUE. ALL IS PERMITTED. Maybe it’s just me, but I miss the days when you could see crummy revisionist westerns in April (Bad Girls), and dopey erotic thrillers in the dead of winter (Final Analysis; J. Lo’s The Boy Next Door). These movies are so wretched, you were almost guaranteed an empty theater—and therefore a limited amount of derision from your family and friends.

of those so-bad-it’s-good vibes that I’d happily shout about it from the rooftops.) But back to the gripe at hand. The days of queuing up for hours in the hot sun to see Jaws during opening weekend are long gone, but there’s something unsatisfying about buying tickets online weeks in advance and something even less satisfying about watching big-ass movies at home. (One benefit: pausing for bathroom breaks.) And now that Marvel has exploded another aspect of filmgoing—just when movies are supposed to be released, damn it—I’ve determined the summer movie no longer exists. After all, if a giant purple bodybuilder with a chin that looks like it was smashed with a pastry blender can snuff out half the universe’s populace in April (the aforementioned Avengers: Infinity War), and a bunch of olds can start a book club in May (the

T

here’s an old Vulcan proverb. “Only Nixon could go to China.” By extrapolation, only Marvel could destroy the summer blockbuster as we know it. No longer content to wait until the traditional summer movie season to put out their shit-blows-up-and-grosses-tons-o’dough spectaculars, Marvel released Black Panther in February. And it was the biggest February opener ever. Then Marvel went ahead and put out the biggest opener ever in April with Avengers: Infinity War. That’s right. This year Marvel has gone the goddamn distance. (And in between, Steven Spielberg rolled out that masturbatory dung heap Ready Player One.)

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Explosions! Undeserving sequels! Bro-dancing with dinosaurs! Brace yourself for an epic-ish film season.

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Upgrade This nasty little thriller comes from Leigh Whannell, the guy who wrote the one tolerable Saw movie (Saw … but also many of the others) and the morefun-than-they-should-be Insidious series. Here, a man left quadriplegic after a carjacking gets a chip implanted in his spine that helps him regain control of his limbs so that he may take revenge on his assailants. This movie is nasty as hell—and a lot of fun. (June 1) Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom All these years later and I’ve managed to get through my professional life having seen only the original Jurassic Park. That was during the 20th anniversary rerelease and someone paid me to watch it. Unless someone pays me to watch this, I won’t be witness to Chris Pratt doing his bro-dance with the dinosaurs. Just ugh. Why did I even include this in the summer preview? Oh, for the hate mail. (June 22) Ant-Man and the Wasp Call me crazy, but I dig that this sequel to the surprisingly fun Ant-Man seems to be taking a “How do I live with these powers?” approach to Ant-Man’s life. Sure, it’s been done before (see: Superman), but Paul Rudd can do a lot with a little, and Evangeline Lilly is The Wasp. Plus: Laurence Fishburne! I’m putting this on the “go see!” list. (July 6) Skyscraper Cross-reference this with THE ROCK IS GETTING LAZY. Seriously, when I saw the poster for this movie, which features Dwayne Johnson hanging from a burning building, I thought it was for Rampage. Then I remembered Rampage has been out for a month. So Skyscraper here should really have a subtitle: “When The Rock decided he could coast on his considerable charm.” Building inspector Rock is framed for a crime he didn’t commit and has to prove his innocence. (I just realized how redundant “he didn’t commit” is but, inspired by The Rock’s laziness, I’m editing nothing.) (July 13) Mile 22 The last time Marky Mark and director Peter Berg teamed up we got Patriots Day. You know, that celebration of Boston-area law enforcement in which said law enforcement stands on the sidelines while hero cop Tommy Saunders (Mark Mark) singlehandedly finds the Tsarnaev brothers after the Boston Marathon bombing. All of Berg and Marky’s previous pairings suck, so don’t expect this one to be different. I don’t know what Mile 22 is about and I don’t care. But I swear I’ll keep an open mind at the critics’ screening. (Aug. 3)

Hereditary When I first heard about Hereditary I was reminded of The Twilight Zone episode “Long Distance Call” in which a little boy can speak to his dead grandmother through a toy phone. Naturally, she tries to kill him (out of love!). Then I saw the Hereditary trailer and its creepy family makes the long distance grandma seem as threatening as eiderdown. Hereditary really does seem like it might be scarier than The Exorcist, and that’s saying something. (June 8)

The Meg I’ve never been a big fan of shark movies or Jason Statham movies, but then I saw Statham in Homefront and thought, “Yeah, OK.” Odd movie to decide ya like a guy, but my newfound appreciation for the former champion diver is in full swing, and if anyone can bash a shark to death (other than a dolphin), it’s Statham. Just kidding! This giant shark movie looks really dumb. (Aug. 10)

Kin Aliens, ray guns, and unpaid debts. Seems like a novel take on the ol’ ne’er-do-well family member who brings everyone into the fight of his/her life. Unfortunately, the leads are Zoë Kravitz, who has been in precisely one good movie (Mad Max: Fury Road), and Dennis Quaid, who has never been good in a movie. I don’t have high hopes. Oh, and James Franco is the bad guy. Yeesh. (Aug. 31)

ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS

Solo: A Star Wars Story I’ve paid so little attention to Solo: A Star Wars Story I didn’t know until this week Ron Howard directed it. Now I plan on paying even less attention. Despite being more of a Star Trek person, I don’t harbor ill will about the recent Star Wars universe successes. I do wish all those fanboys butthurt over The Last Jedi being full of strong women would STFU. Maybe Solo will accomplish that. Word to the wise: Han Solo portrayer Alden Ehrenreich is not the same person as MR. Baby Driver Ansel Elgort. (May 25)

20TH CENTURY FOX

Deadpool 2 It only took 18 years for tha studios to figure out Ryan Reynolds’ strength was smarm (Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place premiered in 1998, smarm aplenty), and now Marvel is running with it at Mach 2. I’m guessing it’s Reynolds’ Canadian affability that kept him in tha game until Deadpool. I mean, look at this pre-Deadpool string of flops: The In-Laws, Blade: Trinity, Waiting …, Smokin’ Aces, Just Friends, Green Lantern, and that ain’t even the half of it. I guess pretty people really do lead lives of privilege. (May 18)

MOVIES IN WHICH SHIT DOESN’T BLOW UP BUT PEOPLE DIE

Replicas Scientist Keanu Reeves (!!) clones his dead wife and children. Think of it as Pet Sematary sans Pets and with science instead of an ol’ Native American burial ground. But watch the trailer and you might be as convinced as I am of this movie’s potential to scare the crap out of you. (BTW, I can’t wait for Bill & Ted 3.) (Aug. 17)

MOVIES THAT ARE SUPPOSED TO BE FUNNY BUT PROBABLY AREN’T Tag Jeremy Renner, Ed Helms and Jon Hamm are lifelong friends engaged in a lifelong game of tag. Yes, it sounds stupid. Really stupid. But the trailer is funny … until it dips into the midlife crisis explanation for the game. How about we just play tag without all the feels, sit back, and watch these guys punch each other in the dick. OK? OK. (June 15)

Action Point Johnny Knoxville stars in a scripted movie about a guy who runs an amusement park without rules or safety measures in order to save it from closing. Apparently the stunts are real (this is a Knoxville movie, after all). It looks funny-ish, but it also resembles 80s-era save-our-business/park/ball field movies, and it’s probably a 40-minute idea padded out to 90. Plus, Johnny Knoxville is really starting to look like Vince Vaughn, which is just strange. (June 1)

HA?

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MOVIES IN WHICH SHIT BLOWS UP AND/OR A LOT OF PEOPLE DIE

The Spy Who Dumped Me Uninspired James Bond parody that opens the trailer aside (note: cross-reference this movie with the UNINSPIRED MOVIES AND OR/SEQUELS SPUN OFF FROM UNINSPIRED MOVIES category), there are some larfs watching likeable Mila Kunis and even more likeable Kate McKinnon making yuks as they deal with

the fallout from Kunis’ relationship with a CIA operative (Justin Theroux). I’m willing to wager it’s funnier than anything Martin Short made in his heyday. (I just picked Martin Short’s name from a hat, but his movie track record is crap, after all.) (Aug. 3) The Happytime Murders Described as a “neo-noir puppet comedy”—I swear I’m not making that up—this movie directed by Brian Henson (Jim’s son) stars Melissa McCarthy as a detective hunting a serial killer. Yes, in this scenario, puppets coexist with humans. That was always the Muppets’ bag (the coexisting, not the killing), so I guess it’s not such an out-there idea. This movie has been in development since roughly forever, for what it’s worth, but that’s usually a bad sign. (Aug. 17)


MOVIES THAT ARE SUPPOSED TO BE CREEPY BUT PROBABLY AREN’T

Slender Man So it has come to this: Movies based on memes. I guess that wouldn’t piss me off so much—there is a short-lived Sh*t My Dad Says TV show, speaking of memes—if it didn’t look like the cinematographer had ripped off all of Sam Raimi’s outdoor shots from The Evil Dead. (Plus, the Slender Man himself resembles the creature in that recent silly Blair Witch sequel.) One character says, “He gets in your head. Like a virus.” BECAUSE MEMES ARE VIRAL, GET IT? Barf. I’m totes gonna see it. (Aug. 24)

Mary Shelley The story of Mary Shelley while writing Frankenstein has been fictionalized before (Gothic, which you can skip), but this take has a decidedly feminist bent, which is as timely as ever. Unfortunately, Mary Shelley is getting truly rotten reviews, which is a bummer, as Elle Fanning (who plays Mary) has been doing some good work of late (see also: The Neon Demon, The Beguiled). FWIW, this movie is rated PG-13 for sexuality and thematic elements including drug abuse, so don’t forget your pearls so they’re available for clutching! (May 25)

THE ORCHARD

American Animals “Can I just say how dumb this entire thing is?” one character asks. Four bored—and dumb—20-somethings decide to steal the most valuable book in the United States. What could possibly go wrong? Everything, I guess, because this is one of those true-story movies, so they must have been real-life caught. These dolts counted among their favorite films Reservoir Dogs, so I guess they forgot everyone in that heist movie ends up dead. Creepy Barry Keoghan from the Klling of a Sacred Deer is one of the amateur thieves. (June 1)

MAY 17, 2018 | 19

Boundaries No, it’s not Kodachrome! It’s Boundaries! Standing in for Ed Harris: Christopher Plummer. Standing in for Jason Sudeikis: Vera Farmiga. Road trips are taken, weed is smoked, lessons are learned. Farmiga and Plummer are great actors, and Bobby Canavale is in this, too. Maybe it’ll be fun. (June 22)

MOVIES ABOUT PEOPLE WHO DO DUMB SHIT BECAUSE THEY’RE DUMB

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MOVIES ABOUT PEOPLE WHO BROOD

On Chesil Beach Oh, it’s so hard to be upper class! And it’s a tribulation to fall in love with a poor! Here’s an idea: Stop adapting Ian McEwan stories. If I’ve learned one thing from movies of his books, it’s that the books are significantly better. (See also: Enduring Love, Atonement, The Comfort of Strangers, First Love Last Rites) However, as a bona fide Saoirse Ronan fan, I will sit through this film and try to enjoy it. (May 18)

Searching Two of my favorite actors ever, John Cho and—Will & Grace notwithstanding—Debra Messing, star in this super tense flick about a father’s search for his missing 15-year-old daughter. The deeper he searches, the more he realizes she was leading a secret life online. Parents, take a Xanax before you watch. (Aug. 3)

Dog Days More dogs, more butt-sniffing jokes. But the cast in this flick—Eva Longoria, Nina Dobrev, Vanessa Hudgens, Thomas Lennon, Adam Pally, Ryan Hansen, Tone Bell, Ron Cephas Jones and Finn Wolfhard (the best part of It) is top notch. Underappreciated comic actor Ken Marino (The State, Burning Love) directs, and the trailer made me smile. Maybe this won’t be so bad. For reals. (Aug. 10)

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SCREEN GEMS

Show Dogs Will Arnett is a detective and Ludacris is Max, his talking canine partner. Give the producers credit for having Arnett be the live action guy; he’s usually relegated to V.O. work in crap like this. I don’t mean crap. I mean it’s probably a wonderful family-friendly joyride. Wait, the dog says, “I’m good at taking a bite outta crime” in the trailer? Good God, that’s awful. At least your kids are probably too young to know which canine crime fighter that line steals from/pays homage to. Of course, my kid is almost old enough for movies like this. Pray for me. (May 18)

Adrift Shailene Woodley leaves behind her Y.A. roots and swims into an adult movie about a couple that decides to sail around the world … and into a Category 5 hurricane! Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water, don’t ever go back in the fucking water. I’m a sucker for romances and people trapped at sea, so I’m down. I’ll be renting Dead Calm and All is Lost while I wait. (June 1)

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FAMILY MOVIES THAT ARE PROBABLY CLOYING AND STUPID

MOVIES ABOUT PEOPLE AND/OR CHILDREN IN PERIL

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MOVIES FOR OLDS

Book Club There’s a title each year your grandmother can’t wait to see. In 2017 it was Victoria & Abdul. This year it’s Book Club, starring Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen (she’s old now? That makes me old, too), Diane Keaton and Worst-MainstreamActress-Ever Candice Bergen (male counterpart not appearing in this film: Dennis Quaid). Anyway, the ladies read Fifty Shades of Grey and decide to jump-start their sex lives. One of them chooses Craig T. Nelson, who I’m pretty sure is the anti-Viagra, but what do I know? I’m only in my early 40s. Don’t go to a matinee showing unless you want to come out smelling like Polident and hard candy. (May 18)

STX FIILMS

MOVIES ABOUT WRITERS WHO ARE LESS COMPELLING THAN THE BOOKS THEY WRITE


The First Purge Ah, The Purge franchise. A series based on a decent idea—a totalitarian regime is voted into office and lets its citizens commit any crime during a 12-hour period one night a year—that did fuck-all with it. The first movie is limp and predictable with bad guys who aren’t scary. The second doesn’t know what it’s trying to do and I skipped the third. The First Purge is a prequel to the first film, and if you’ve been playing along at home you know prequels are rarely a good idea. But Marisa Tomei is in this one, which piques my curiosity. But not that much. (July 4, ya dig!) The Equalizer 2 In the overlong but not-bad original (“original” is relative because it’s based on a TV series from the ’80s), Denzel Washington was a retired killing machine who became an unretired killing machine. This time around, the baddies smite his old boss/friend Melissa Leo. I’m guessing blood will be shed, and a lot of it. Director Antoine Fuqua returns, too. Hopefully it’s shorter than the 132-minute first film, tho. (July 20) Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again! What could be worse than ABBA getting back together? How about a sequel to that shit movie Mamma Mia! based on ABBA songs, in which Pierce Brosnan sings. I DIDN’T LIKE ABBA IN 1980 AND I DON’T LIKE THEM NOW. Hopefully that pier the cast is standing on in the poster collapses and they all drown before they can make a third. (July 20) Mission: Impossible-Fallout The only fallout from this series is that it’s making Americans dumber. I don’t know about you, but I got bored with this series after the silent Langley break-in because all the action scenes thereafter are the same: Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) climbs a mountain, shows biceps; Ethan Hunt scales a wall, show biceps; Ethan Hunt jumps from something impossibly high, somehow still shows biceps. I get it, Tom. You’re cut. But have you ever noticed how many of these movies begin with Hunt making a huge mistake? Great spy work, pal. No wonder your bosses are always trying to kill you. (July 27)

BLEECKER STREET

The Hustle In keeping with the Ocean’s tradition, The Hustle is a remake of a bad movie. That’s right! The appeal of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, itself a remake of Bedtime Story (with Marlon Brando), has always been lost on me, but it has one funny sequence, and it includes the line, “Don’t take the cork off the fork.” Maybe The Hustle has a snowball’s chance in hell of being watchable; it stars Rebel Wilson so it probably won’t be boring. It will, however, almost certainly feature what’s vogue in comedy right now, which is saying out loud over and over precisely what’s happening to you. (June 29)

Papillon You know, it’s been so long since I saw the original Papillon with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman that I don’t remember whether it’s any good. Of course, I still keep my money in my ass, so it must have left a mark on me. Maybe this remake can do the same? (Aug. 24)

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Ocean’s 8 I don’t know whether anyone remembers this, but Ocean’s 11, the Frank Sinatra original, is bad. Like, really bad. People remember it fondly because the entire Rat Pack is in it. So then it spawned a crummy remake and two better-butstill-crummy sequels. And now we have Ocean’s 8, a movie no one asked for in a franchise no one cared was dead. At least the women—that’s right, women!— in this one are played by people we love, including Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Sarah Paulson and Rihanna. Their heist: Break into the Met in NYC. Good luck, ladies. (June 8)

Superfly I can’t imagine anyone could remake Superfly in the vein of the original, but hey, why not give it a shot? The teaser trailer reveals next to nothing, except that there’s a lot shootin’ and drivin’. I hope this doesn’t fall into the way-too-serious remake camp that killed Total Recall and Robocop. As always, Michael K. Williams looks like the best thing in this movie. (June 15)

DOCUMENTARIES ABOUT IT-REMINDS-ME-OFREAL PEOPLE THAT ARE JOHN-WICK ACTUALLY COMPELLING!

Hotel Artemis For all the things that look cool about it—Sterling K. Brown in a leading role, Dave Bautista and SoWon’t You Be My Neighbor? fia Boutella in supporting roles, things blowing up No jokes or complaining here. I’ll see any docu(cross-reference this flick with MOVIES IN WHICH mentary about Fred Rogers, a man who believed SHIT BLOWS UP AND/OR A LOT OF PEOPLE every child deserves love. I believe that, too. Once DIE)—there are things that look decidedly unapyou hit 18, though, go fuck yourself. (June 22) pealing. To wit: Jodie Foster’s accent and Charlie Day, whom I find unwelcome in anything. Writer/ Director Drew Pearce has a Mission: Impossible under his belt, so that’s worth two demerits, but Brown takes one of them away. (June 8)

ANIMATED MOVIES I DON’T CARE ABOUT BUT YOU MIGHT

The Incredibles 2 Pixar either hits with sequels (Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3) or it misses so completely you can’t believe it’s the same studio (the Cars franchise, Monsters University). Granted, Cars isn’t good. The sequels were crash grabs. But The Incredibles was incredible and writer/director Brad Bird returns. (June 15) Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Hotel Transylvania: Barf. Hotel Transylvania 2: Double barf. Hotel Transylvania 3? Triple barf! (Cross-reference this with UNINSPIRED MOVIES AND OR/SEQUELS SPUN OFF FROM UNINSPIRED MOVIES.) (July 13)

DISNEY/PIXAR

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20 | MAY 17, 2018

UNINSPIRED REMAKES OF CLASSICS AND/OR CULT CLASSICS

UNINSPIRED MOVIES AND/OR SEQUELS SPUN OFF FROM UNINSPIRED MOVIES


SEQUELS TO MOVIES THAT WERE ONLY SO-SO

A24

Sicario: Day of the Soldado After the opening explosion—which you saw coming, right?—Sicario was kind of a drag, though Benicio Del Toro did some of his best menacing in it. Good thing he returns for the sequel. So does screenwriter Taylor Sheridan. OG lead Emily Blunt does not return, however. (June 29)

Y.A. MOVIES THAT PROBABLY AIN’T SHIT

The Darkest Minds Take X-Men, make them teens, add a plague, stir and voila! In just moments you have The Darkest Minds! Eh. (Aug. 3)

MOVIES I DON’T HAVE MOVIES ABOUT ADULT AND/ MOVIES THAT THE CAPACITY TO OR EARLY 20s AND/OR TEEN ARE STILL UNDERSTAND AND/OR AND/OR PRE-TEEN ANGST TRYING TO MAKE JUDGE PRE-RELEASE JOEL KINNAMAN A STAR

How to Talk to Girls at Parties Elle Fanning is an alien trying to experience what it’s like to be human and some English people you’ve never heard of (and Nicole Kidman) are punks, presumably in the late ’70s/early ’80s. I have no idea what it’s about but the trailer looks absurd, and not it a good way. It’ll probably be a huge cult hit. (May 18)

Well, that’s everything I can squeeze into the word count, gang. If they invite me back in 2019, I promise I’ll be cheerier. I’ll just double up on the Wellbutrin. See you at the multiplex! CW

MAY 17, 2018 | 21

The Miseducation of Cameron Post The story of an orphaned teen discovering she’s gay and then being sent to a conversion camp sounds like the opposite of a good time at the movies. But considering LGBTQ folks still live in fear that someone might shoot them or beat them or throw them in a basement or not let them serve in the U.S. armed forces because of who they are, The Miseducation of Cameron Post seems pretty relevant. (Aug. 3)

Juliet, Naked You make one good Nick Hornby movie (High Fidelity) and then we have to suffer through three terrible Nick Hornby movies (About a Boy, Fever Pitch, A Long Way Down). Which will this be? With a cast including Rose Byrne, Ethan Hawke and Chris O’Dowd, it could be good. With subject matter that will undoubtedly focus on at least one man in a state of arrested development, it could be crap. (Aug. 17)

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BlacKkKlansman As I write this, Spike Lee’s latest is showing at the Cannes Film Festival. And if the title doesn’t give it away for you, here’s the gist: A black police detective infiltrates a Colorado chapter of the Ku Klux Klan and eventually becomes its leader. This is a true story, by the way. (Aug. 10)

NICK HORNBY ADAPTATION THAT WON’T BE AS GOOD AS THE BOOK, MOVIES ABOUT CRUELTY TO ASSUMING THE BOOK WAS GOOD IN CHILDREN THE FIRST PLACE

Blindspotting The trailer for Blindspotting does a number on you: It looks like a wacky comedy about semiprofessional movers, and then it turns deadly serious when a cop shoots an unarmed black man in the back right in front of main character Collin (star Daveed Diggs). It’s timely and looks compelling. Diggs wrote the screenplay with costar Rafael Casal. (July 20)

Damsel Those zany Zellner brothers pony up a wacky western, starring Robert Pattinson and Mia Wasikowska, neither of whom is known for wackiness. However, most of Pattinson’s post-Twilight output has been solid and Wasikowska scored some yuks in Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive. This is probably worth seeing. (June 22)

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot Joaquin Phoenix reteams with his To Die For director Gus Van Sant in this biopic of John Callahan, an artist and alt-weekly cartoonist left a quadriplegic after a car crash when he was 21. This movie looks like the kind of thing that will be either great or terrible with no in-between (like a lot of Van Sant’s movies), but it gets bonus points for making Jonah Hill look kinda hot. (July 13)

Christopher Robin Never mind that Christopher Robin ditched Pooh at the end of The House on Pooh Corner and that the adult Christopher Robin resented his father A.A. Milne for appropriating his name and childhood; the Disney folks own Pooh and there’s money to make! (Maybe the fluff that Pooh’s stuffed with needs an infusion of cash.) I don’t think good or bad products in the form of film and television can ruin anyone’s childhood retroactively, but this just seems … soulless. (Aug. 3)

MOVIES SHOT IN UTAH

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Sorry to Bother You Lakeith Stanfield is telemarketer Cassius Green, who, acting on a tip from co-worker Danny Glover, uses a “white voice” to pitch products to prospective clients. And boom, he’s a raging success. Exactly what goes on besides that in Sorry to Bother You is difficult to discern from the trailer, but it seems promising. The alwayswonderful Tessa Thompson co-stars. (July 6)

Hot Summer Nights Timothée Chalamet, the Oscar-nominated kid from Call Me By Your Name, plays a young guy who goes to Cape Cod (yay!) for the summer and starts selling weed (cannabis, dope, herb, tea [but not herb tea], ganja, mary jane, Acapulco gold, wacky tobacky, doobies, Panama red, spliffs). He falls in love with Maika Monroe (from It Follows!). I wrote all those synonyms for marijuana because this movie interests me less than synonyms for marijuana. Bonus points if the similarly titled Van Hagar-era Van Halen tune shows up on the soundtrack. (July 27)

Three Seconds Another year, another crime/ mafia movie starring Joel Kinnaman. You loved him in The Killing, but apparently in nothing else (based on his track record). If you want to see a good Kinnaman crime movie, try Snabba Cash/Easy Money. (Aug. 17)

Gotti No more mobster/gangster movies, please please pleeeeeeeease. After Goodfellas it’s been all downhill. That includes The Departed. And I know John Travolta was supposed to be great in The People vs. O.J. Simpson, but I’m waiting for his second career death knell to begin. (June 15)

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Under the Silver Lake Andrew Garfield and Elvis Presley’s granddaughter star in writer/director David Robert Mitchell’s follow-up to the super creepy It Follows. Under the Silver Lake looks more like an acid trip than a movie, and Garfield seems up to the wacky task. Loses points for its prominent use of the Violent Femmes, but I’m still queuing up. (June 22)

Eighth Grade Did eighth grade suck for you? It sucked for me. My family moved from Indiana (yucky) mid-first semester to Wisconsin (yuckier) and I had one friend after the cool new kid smell wore off me. Apparently writer-director Bo Burnham had similar feelings (if not similar experiences), because word is this movie captures perfectly how middle school can suck. Elsie Fisher’s performance in the lead is getting major huzzahs. (July 13)

MOVIES I’LL NEVER HAVE INTEREST IN


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The Grand Theatre: Monty Python’s Spamalot The U.K. equivalent of America’s acid-tinged comedy pranksters like Firesign Theater and Cheech & Chong, Monty Python possessed a flare for absurdity that found them tossing barbs at everything from the sanctity of religion to the quirks of British upper-crust existence. In film, television and recording, their particular brand of nonsense won them worldwide recognition and a mass of fanatic followers. Monty Python’s Spamalot draws from the troupe’s legacy of music, madness and mayhem. Spawned from the 1975 feature film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the stage version went on to win three Tony Awards in 2005 and several Drama Desk Awards following its bow on Broadway. The show boasts the same wacky characters and silly setups that made the original parody of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table so successful: knights who say “ni,” ferocious killer rabbits, a vengeful warrior who loses his limbs but refuses to concede, infuriating Frenchmen and all of the other obstacles the clueless knights encounter in their search for the Holy Grail. “Whether you are a fan of Monty Python or Broadway shows, or both, this musical has something for everybody,” director James Rocha Allan says. “I think audiences will be surprised at how fresh and relevant Monty Python’s work still is.” Naturally, Allan gives a nod to this particular production. “This show is packed with brilliant local actors,” he says. “I’m very proud of what we’ve accomplished.” (Lee Zimmerman) Monty Python’s Spamalot @ The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through June 9, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $17-$23, grandtheatrecompany.com

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

THURSDAY 5/17

National Choreographic Festival It’s expected that ballet companies from around the country would perform in places like New York City; coming to Utah to be a part of Ballet West’s National Choreographic Festival is surprising and impressive. It really goes to show that artistic director Adam Sklute has created something special. This year marks the second annual incarnation of this spring dance festival, spanning two weekends with each evening featuring three works— two by guest companies and one by Ballet West. The two weekends have different programs (different companies and new choreography), so it’s really worth seeing both, if you can. The lineup includes The Washington Ballet (choreography by Gemma Bond), Richmond Ballet (Katarzyna Skarpetowska), Charlotte Ballet (Robyn Mineko Williams), Cincinnati Ballet (resident choreographer Jennifer Archibald) and Ballet West (Natalie Weir and Africa Guzman). It might not be immediately apparent, but there’s something special going on with this lineup: All of the choreographers are women (and all four of the guest companies have female artistic directors). It’s very intentional, something that Sklute has been planning for some years now. At a moment in our country’s history when women are standing up for themselves, a festival that highlights their important work in ballet couldn’t be more timely. It’s forward thinking like this that is helping the National Choreographic Festival—next year to be an international festival—meet and perhaps even exceed Sklute’s best dreams of it one day becoming for dance what Utah’s Sundance is for film. (Katherine Pioli) National Choreographic Festival @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, May 17-19, May 24-26, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m., $49.50, artsaltlake.org

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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, MAY 17-23, 2018

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SATURDAY 5/19

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A pop of color and a beautiful design on a concrete wall can sometimes elicit a greater emotional impact than a meticulously curated gallery space. The Utah Arts Alliance (UAA) and South Salt Lake Arts Council (SSLAC) look to bring more of this vibrant public art to Salt Lake City through the first Mural Fest. The brainchild of Derek Dyer, founder and executive director of UAA and board member of SSLA, the festival boasts a long-term goal of commissioning 10 murals annually over the next decade, resulting in 100 new free, public art pieces. According to Lesly Allen, director of SSLAC, 13 artists created 11 murals this year around Commonwealth Avenue, an area chosen for industrial buildings that provide the perfect canvas for large-scale art and its lively artistic and entrepreneurial spirit. Dyer envisions these murals as only the beginning of the festival’s impact. “We’re sort of hoping that we kind of create this culture of creative expression where businesses will start commissioning artists to do their own murals,” Dyer says. “It’ll just be what you do if you’re in that part of town.” For now, the public is invited to a Mural Fest celebration, featuring a beer garden, art vendors, kids’ activities and a 7 p.m. performance by Pixie and the Partygrass Boys. Murals are located within a four-block radius of the Art Factory, with artists present to discuss their work. The murals will be categorized and added to a map for self-guided tours as part of UAA’s push to increase public art locally. (Kylee Ehmann) Mural Fest @ The Art Factory, 193 W. 2100 South and 150 W. Commonwealth Ave. (2150 South), 801-464-6757, May 19, 5-10 p.m., free, sslarts.org

“Eventually, all things merge into one. And a river runs through it.” So writes Norman Maclean in his semi-autobiographical novel A River Runs Through It—and that sentiment would seem familiar to Salt Lake City author, playwright, journalist and professor Jeff Metcalf. Metcalf’s life story is marked by trips to the river to fly-fish, just like the protagonists in Maclean’s stories. But Metcalf’s narrative is also marked by a battle with prostate cancer. Diagnosed, medicated and told multiple times that his life was fast approaching its end, Metcalf has taken advantage of what time remains to him. This passon has taken on the form of teaching multiple classes at the University of Utah, crafting and performing in the one-man play A Slight Discomfort and publishing essay collections like Requiem for the Living: A Memoir and, most recently, Back Cast: Fly-Fishing and Other Such Matters. It is evident in all of Metcalf’s work that he has an eye for detailed storytelling. This sensibility is especially clear in his position as director of the University of Utah program Humanities in Focus, which pairs adult learners from the community with University of Utah honors students to craft unique, real and issueoriented documentaries. In Back Cast, Metcalf focuses his stories on the streams where he does so much—with fly-fishing just one component among many. Using streams and fly-fishing less as a look on the past, as is the case in Maclean’s novel, Metcalf’s essay collection is situated in the here and now, making meaning out of the everyday and the commonplace. (Casey Koldewyn) Jeff Metcalf: Back Cast: Fly Fishing and Other Such Matters @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

Mural Fest

Jeff Metcalf: Back Cast


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MAY 17, 2018 | 23


New Traditions

Living Traditions Festival’s new director keeps a beloved cultural showcase rolling. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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egan Risbon recalls at least one thing very specifically from her first visit to a Living Traditions Festival, back when she was a college student. “I remember I bought a bonsai tree,” she says with a laugh, “and it died. But it was my own fault.” Risbon is much more connected now to the “living” part of the Living Traditions Festival. The Vernal native—who spent two years as director of the Utah Pride Festival—began her position in January 2018 as arts events production manager for the Salt Lake Arts Council, which includes overseeing the celebration of cultural crafts, performance and food that launched in 1986 and now regularly kicks off Salt Lake City’s summer festival season. The festival has become a well-oiled machine, with seasonal staff providing a foundation of familiarity with operations and state folklorist Adrienne Decker working year-round to identify the craft artists invited to participate. “It’s been very easy for me to come in and go, ‘OK, for this first year, let’s do this the same way,’” Risbon says, “‘and we’ll look at the process and maybe make some changes for 2019.’” That doesn’t mean a 2018 Living Traditions Festival is going to be identical to a 2017’s or earlier fests. Every year finds more groups interested in participating, and Utah itself continues to change in terms of ethnic groups with enough of a community presence to warrant inclusion. Risbon says she works closely with entities like the Department of Workforce Services and its refugee coordinator to identify new immigrant populations in the state. These connections have led to new participants like a Sudanese craft artist who is one of the “lost boys,” or a Hmong woman who learned her embroidery skills while growing up in a refugee camp. The Living Traditions program is also looking to expand into a year-round endeavor, including the Mondays in the Park concert series at the Chase Home in Liberty Park, and a planned concert celebration at the Grand Theatre in the fall. “When I started,” Risbon says, “part of my plan was to do more events around the city. Our strategic plan identifies a need for more events, and Living Traditions fits very well into what we want to do.”

DAVID VOGEL

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FESTIVAL

For the moment, however, the focus remains on the 2018 festival, which includes as many as 150 performers representing more than 90 different cultural and ethnic groups. That number might seem overwhelming, but one of the important goals of Living Traditions is to provide an educational opportunity for attendees who might not necessarily understand the cultural distinctions between peoples that can be grouped into a larger category. “In the Polynesian community,” Risbon says, “we have a Tongan dance group and a Samoan dance group, and they’re very different. People might think, ‘Oh, it’s the same,’ but the outfits are different, the dances are different, the drumming is different.” That educational component extends to a program that invites more than 1,500 school children from around the Wasatch Front to the festival on Friday, May 17, before it opens to the general public. “[The students] get to talk to the different craft artists, see different performances,” Risbon says. “[The artists] really get down on their level, to explain what this means to them, and how they learned this. “We have a lot of opportunities for people not just to see these performances,” she adds, “but to come and talk to these artists, and find out why this is important to them. They’re there not to sell or make money, but to show their work, and to have questions asked of them, so there isn’t this divide, or this misappropriation of cultures.” Risbon jokes about how people she speaks to from other places are surprised

Ballet Folklórico performs at 2016 Living Traditions Festival.

to learn there’s a multi-cultural festival of this kind in Utah, but the relative dominance of white European ancestry in the state is part of what makes it so important, especially to someone like Risbon who remembers the impression Living Traditions made when she first attended as a college student. “I grew up in Vernal, which is even more white and secluded,” she says. “There wasn’t a lot of diversity in my community. When I moved out here for school, [Living Traditions] became something me and my friends did every year.” The director of the festival might be new to the position, but she realizes that this long-running event can continue to make a similar impression on others, while showcasing cultural art forms that have lasted much longer. “These traditions have existed for so many years and been passed down for a reason,” Risbon says. “These are the ways we communicate, the ways we show who we are and what we stand for.” CW

LIVING TRADITIONS FESTIVAL

Washington Square and Library Square 200 East and 400 South Friday, May 18, 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, May 19, noon-10 p.m. Sunday, May 20, noon-7 p.m. Free livingtraditionsfestival.com


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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Utah artists Karen Kurka Jensen (her “A Walk in the Park” is pictured), Cara Schwindt and Jodi Steen express their love of the state’s natural beauty through watercolor, textiles and acrylic paints, respectively, in Our Sacred Landscapes at Rio Gallery (300 S. Rio Grande St., heritage.utah.gov), May 18-July 6, with an artist reception on Friday, May 18, 6-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

COMEDY & IMPROV

Adam Cayton-Holland Wiseguys Gateway, 194 S. 400 West, May 18, 8 p.m.; May 19,

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Great Salt Lake Bird Festival Davis County Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, May 17-21, greatsaltlakebirdfest.com Living Traditions Festival Washington Square, 451 S. State, May 18-20, times vary, livingtraditionsfestival.com (see p. 24) Mural Fest The Art Factory, 193 W. 2100 South and 150 W. Commonwealth Ave. (2150 South), 801-464-6757, May 19, 5-10 p.m., sslarts.org (see p. 22)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Alyce Carrier: Celebration of the Hand Temporary Museum of Permanent Change, 300 South between 200 West and West Temple, through June 17, museumofchange.org April Showers, May Flowers Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, through May 31, hornefineart.com

MAY 17, 2018 | 25

Utah Symphony: All-Star Evening Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, May 22, 7 p.m., utahsymphony.org Armed Forces Day Concert Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, May 19, 4:30 p.m., thegallivancenter.com

SPECIAL EVENTS

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Craig Childs: Atlas of a Lost World The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 17, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Hilary Zaid: Paper is White Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, May 17, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jeff Metcalf: Back Cast: Fly Fishing and Other Such Matters The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 22) Last Cowboys: A Pioneer Family in the New West The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

National Choreographic Festival Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, May 17-19, May 24-26, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 22) Performing Dance Center: The Lion King Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, May 23-24, 6 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Repertory Dance Theatre Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, May 18-19, 8 p.m., parkcityshows.com Silhouette Dance Studio: Believe, Dream, Become Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, May 19, 2:30 & 6:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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DANCE

LITERATURE

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Die Fledermaus Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through May 20, times vary, arttix.artsaltlake.org The Full Monty The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through May 19, dates and times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Mamma Mia! Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through May 26, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org Monty Python’s Spamalot The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through June 9, times and dates vary, grandtheatrecompany.com (see p. 22) The Music Man Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through June 9, dates and times vary, hct.org Next Fall An Other Theater Co., Provo Towne Centre, 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through May 26, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com Sense & Sensibility Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through June 2, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org

7:30 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Jeff Dye Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park, May 18-19, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., May 18-19, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Stand and Deliver: An Stand-up Inspired Improv Show Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, May 22, 9 p.m., crowdsourcedlive.com


Carol Bold Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, through May 20, redbuttegarden.org Chapman Library 100th Birthday Historical Photo Exhibit Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through June 28, slcpl.org Charles Keeling Lassiter Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, May 18-June 22, bdac.org Claudia Sisemore: ‘70s Color Field Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, May 18-June 8, opening reception, May 18, 6-9 p.m., phillips-gallery.com David Estes: People, Places, Things Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 2, slcpl.org Ditchbank: Paintings and Ceramics Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 15, times vary, slcpl.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Glass Art Guild Show Pioneer Memorial Theatre Loge Gallery, 300 S. 1400 East, through May 28, pioneertheatre.org In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 18, slcpl.org Jena Schmidt: A Part of Everything A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through June 1, reception May 18, 6-8 p.m., agalleryonline.com Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Laura Sharp Wilson: Small Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through July 6, heritage.utah.gov

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LEGO City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Lenka Konopasek and Sarah Bown Roberts Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through June 8, saltlakearts.org Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Mara Elana Macaroni Gallery, 244 S. 500 West, Ste. 107, through May 31, macaronigallery.com Our Sacred Landscape Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., May-18-July 6, opening reception, May 18, 6-9 p.m., heritage.utah.gov (see p. 25) Out Loud: Mostly Human UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 14, utahmoca.org Patricia Nosanchuk: Art in Ink, Healing Works Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 17, slcpl.org Piecing Together Mental Illness Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 20, slcpl.org Play On! Chase Home Museum of Utah Folk Arts, 1150 S. Constitution Drive, Liberty Park, through June 29, heritage.utah.gov Star Wars / Heroes and Villains Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through June 3, urbanartsgallery.org Teresa Jordan Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, May 18-June 8, opening reception, May 18, 6-9 p.m., phillips-gallery.com Vignette Downtown Artist Collective, 268 E. 100 South, May 18, 6-9 p.m., downtownartistcollective.org Zachary Proctor & Michael Workman David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, 801-5338245, through May 18, davidericson-fineart.com

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

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AT A GLANCE

Open: M-F, 11:30 a.m. until pies sell out Best bet: The chicken not-quite pot pie Can’t miss: The rotating menu of collaborative pies

MAY 17, 2018 | 31

“conscious entrepreneurism,” and it extends to the back of the house as well. The Dispensary strives to be a zero-landfill restaurant, which means napkins are made of sustainable hemp, plastic utensils are anathema and all end-of-day food waste is donated to feed local livestock. Essentially, The Dispensary is a restaurant with a mission—one that its patrons help propagate. Paying a little

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In a lot of ways, it’s already successful. I don’t know of any other restaurant that has diners contribute to an ongoing wall collage or play word games on a wall-mounted Scrabble board. Nor do I know of a place that encourages patrons to embrace the communal nature of the dining room and engage with the other customers by telling a joke or singing a song. It’s all part of what Heiblim calls

ost successful restaurants spend years trying to perfect the marriage of atmosphere and menu. Indeed, it’s the places that nail this combo that become favored destinations. After making a few visits to newly minted The Dispensary (54 W. 1700 South, dispensethelove.com), it’s easy to see that creating a completely unique atmosphere is at the top of their priority list. Owned and operated by Dave Heiblim, the mastermind behind Este Pizza and Este Deli, The Dispensary strives to create a dining experience unlike any other.

what will ultimately draw people to the cozy space. Diners who dig the idea of a business that is taking great pains to be thoughtful about its socioeconomic and cultural impact on its community will enjoy their experience, and I’m also guessing they’ll like the fact that they can get Mamachari kombucha out of the restaurant’s soda fountain. The menu still has a bit of ground to cover before it can round out the space’s unique culture, however. Altruism aside, I’m still a bit stunned that my wife and I could drop 40 bucks on an early dinner for two and still find ourselves hungry on the way home. Despite a few growing pains—the place has only been open for a few weeks and it’s working toward a fairly ambitious set of goals—it’ll definitely be worth keeping an eye on The Dispensary. It has atmosphere in spades, and I fully expect that its interpretation of community-conscious eateries found in a bygone age will keep it up and running while it irons out its menu bumps. CW

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Find “conscious entrepreneurism” and a pot-pie-filled menu at The Dispensary.

I could argue semantics all day, but it shouldn’t matter what we call them if the flavor is on point, right? My wife and I tried the turkey ragout, the chicken paprikash and the collaborative pie, which was a sweet-meets-spicy mixture of tomatoes, meat and chickpeas made with help from the folks at Finca. They all tasted fine, but, considering the fact that ragout and paprikash are typically big on flavor, each pie had a surprisingly muted profile. While I’m glad to support a sustainable and community-centered establishment, I have to admit that the portion sizes are a bit small considering the asking price—which I’m sure comes as the result of being choosy about ingredients. To quote one staffer: “We don’t sell cheap food, we serve good food.” The Dispensary’s menu of sides and desserts offers some interesting complements to the main menu. The taro root chips ($4.50) are fried to order, and they’re light, crisp and earthy. The dessert hand pie ($3.50) was barely big enough to be considered a filled cookie. Again, good because it was filled with sweet cherries and wrapped with buttery pastry, but it made for little more than a mouthful. Based on my experience, marriage between The Dispensary’s culinary mission and its atmosphere is

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Pie High

bit more than average for lunch contributes to a wealth of great causes, and diners who are looking for a way to give back to their community will feel right at home. However, divorcing the food from The Dispensary’s mission makes for a more mixed experience. Pot pies are The Dispensary’s prime prescription, and they serve ’em up like the old-timey pharmacies for which the restaurant is named. Diners order at one window, pick them up at a second and deliver their dirties to a third, which happens to be right next to a cookie jar to reward this good behavior. The daily stable of pies—chicken, veggie and a seasonal special—run $12 a pop, and they’re also collaborating with other local restaurants for a unique pie that runs $15. When I hear someone say they’re serving pot pies, I expect just that—a buttery pie crust stuffed with savory fillings and baked to perfection. Pies here depart from that tradition, filling ramekins with stewed meat and veggies that are topped with either a bit of puff pastry from local bakery Fillings and Emulsions or a cracker made of cricket flour—yes, ground up insects, and, yep, it tastes like you would expect ground crickets to taste. I’ve had pot pies prepared this way before, but I can’t help but feel a little crestfallen when the plates arrive for pickup.


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32 | MAY 17, 2018

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There are few words in the English language that are sweeter than “all you can eat pizza.” In fact, the only phrase that even comes close is “free and independent journalism.” Leave it to the folks here at Salt Lake City Weekly to find a proper avenue to combine both concepts. Join us at The Gateway (25 N. Rio Grande St.) on Friday, May 18 from 6-10 p.m. for a gathering of more than 50 pizza slingers as they compete for the audience’s affection. The $10 dollar admission not only contributes to Press Backers—whose funding for local journalism helps keep your favorite alt-weekly up and running—it also secures you an evening of unlimited slices from some of Utah’s finest pizza joints and an opportunity to openly mock City Weekly editor Enrique Limón for his lactose intolerance. Tickets are available at utahpizzaparty.com.

Square Kitchen Opens

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 01-466-3 2 7 3 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

Utah’s food scene has one more ally in its corner with the launch of Square Kitchen (751 W. 800 South, squarekitchenslc.com), a Salt Lake-based restaurant incubator, which allows current and potential restaurateurs to experiment with culinary ideas before releasing them on a large scale. During its grand opening, Mayor Jackie Biskupski met with founders Ana Valdemoros and Tham Soekotjo to officially christen the new space. Square Kitchen received grant money from the city as well as a loan from the sustainability department, and its presence in Salt Lake is sure to stimulate the growth of new food-related businesses. The locale offers cooking and prep space, cold and dry storage, event space as well as marketing and legal services for its members.

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Nerd Swap Meet

Spring cleaning can be a difficult time for those who accumulate geeky collectibles. The existential crises that face us when we try and decide whether or not a certain action figure has become culturally obsolete can last for days. Luckily, Sunday, May 20, heralds the Big Shiny Robot Nerd Swap Meet at Bohemian Brewery and Grill (94 E. Fort Union Blvd., 801-566-5474, bohemianbrewery.com). A mighty assembly of likeminded individuals can not only give your treasured keepsakes a good home, but also offer something new to take their place. Since swapping on an empty stomach is not recommended, Bohemian Brewery is open for business during the event, which lasts from 2-7 p.m.

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Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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2110 w. No. Temple

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O D H E AV E N FO ManADN sen & Restauran s e t a G EGR c i el erm t

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MAY 17, 2018 | 33

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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34 | MAY 17, 2018

Do The Time Warp Revisiting classic and influential Utah beers. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

don’t want to date myself, but I’ve been nerding out on beer in Salt Lake City for a long damned time. Some of my earliest craft-beer memories involve getting growlers at Uinta’s original 1700 South brewery, and experimenting with some Beehive Lager at Squatters. Those flavors are still fresh in my mind all these years later because of the impact they had on my newly emerging quest for taste on top of buzz. A few of those classic palate-shaping beers are still around, and their popularity and influence is as strong as ever. Here are two beers that have stood the test of time. Uinta Cutthroat: This is probably one of the more influential beers to ever enter my life; it was pretty much a staple for me during the 1990s and early 2000s. I don’t

get back to it very often, but when I do, it’s like a time machine on every first sip. The clear, ruby-amber color is enough to get my salivary glands firing, along with its pillowy cap of foam that rarely fades away. The aroma is somewhat earthy and malty, but does have an unmistakable piney/ spicy bite from the cascade hops. It has pretty close to an equal balance of caramelized grains, roasted malts, citrus and spicy hops, yeast bread and fruit esters. The transition from nose to tongue is fairly seamless, starting with a moderate dose of hop with plenty of balancing grains. Cutthroat’s more prominent notes include floral/citrus hops, pine, medium crystal malt, toasted cereal grain, yeast and some pear. Overall: There’s something wonderfully natural about this beer. If you’re familiar with this ale in its purest form, it’ll transport you back to the time you first tried it. It’s a classic example of harmony and depth in a small 4 percent ABV package. This beer was groundbreaking 25 years ago, and it’s still a solid option any time of the year. Squatters Provo Girl: When the world’s spotlight shone upon Utah in months leading up to the 2002 Winter Olympics, we had a casualty in our corporate branding world when the makers of Germany’s St. Pauli Girl didn’t find the humor in Squatters’ play on the name of their St. Provo Girl Pilsner. Through all of the rebrandings and attempts to mothball this

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

beer, Provo Girl has managed to weather it all, and continues to be the Little Beer That Could. It pours a clear, golden straw color that is light on carbonation and features a thin, white, frothy head. The aroma is typical of the style, with grassy hops and a grainy malt coming through right away, while being backed up by a light and sweet caramel note that balances out the hops. The flavor starts with a good dose of caramel and cracker, with a nice punch of bread dough backing it up. The maltiness transitions into the bitter realm with grassy hops. As this 4 percent lager sits on the tongue, the bitterness slowly

intensifies, creating a dry lingering feel that drives up its drinkability. Overall: This beer has always had a great presence on the palate. Its snappy, crisp and refreshing flavor combo is simple and familiar in a landscape dominated by identical macro lagers. I’ll go out of my way to say that Provo Girl’s finish is without a doubt the best part of the beer. There are reasons that these beers are still here after all these years. They appeal to the old-school palates and manage to draw in new converts based solely on drinkability and great Utah craftsmanship. As always, cheers! CW

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n c e8 i S 96 1

Communal

Here, farm-fresh and in-season cuisine using locally sourced and produced ingredients fills the menu. It’s best to go as a group, as the dishes are served family-style—hence the restaurant’s name. Entrées like roasted chicken, Utah trout and grilled hangar steak are prepared in a no-nonsense, simple but sensational style. We’re darn jealous of you, Provo. 102 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-373-8000, communalrestaurant.com

Eva

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Rawtopia

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Mon - Sat 7am - 11pm Sun 8am - 10pm 469 East 300 South | 801•521•6567

Here, the motto is “Fresh. Fast. Friendly.” That’s exactly what you’ll get at this SLC sandwich stop, which serves up hot and steamy creations, including their signature A Wreck sandwich, with salami, roast beef, turkey, ham and Swiss cheese. Aside from delicious sandwiches, they also dish up fresh Mediterranean salad (grilled chicken, chickpeas, red peppers and feta) as well as savory soups and hearty chili. Multiple locations, potbelly.com

MAY 17, 2018 | 35

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Potbelly Sandwich Shop

hamachislc.com

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& WINE!

488 E 100 S 801.359.2092

ER SERVING BE

Now open in Millcreek’s Olympus Hills Shopping Center, Rawtopia has brought along its staple favorites from its original Sugar House menu as well as a few new additions. Chef and owner Omar Abou-Ismail’s passion for raw and vegan cuisine has led him to create innovative dishes for an underserved Salt Lake City market. The seaweed roll with crushed macadamia nuts replacing rice, packed with veggies and served with a sumptuous almond-curry dipping sauce is a must-try, as is the dairy- and processed sugar-free berry cheesecake. 3961 S. Wasatch Blvd., 801-486-0332, rawtopia.com

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EEK IT’S ALL GR

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

it alian v i lla geslc.com

5370 S 900 E 801.266.4182

Although the plates are small, the flavors are of giant proportions at Eva in downtown Salt Lake City. The tapas-style restaurant, started by Chef Charlie Perry and named after his grandmother Eva Coombs, fuses together cooking techniques and tastes from all around the world. With inspiration from Mediterranean, Southern comfort and new American cuisine, we’re not quite sure what type of restaurant Eva is—we just know it’s good. All of the bread is baked fresh daily from Eva’s Bakery just down the street. 317 S. Main, 801-359-8447, evaslc.com


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MAY 18TH

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MAY 19TH

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Karim Bakery

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

At first glance, it’s an unassuming Mediterranean market with a compact bakery and dining space attached, but once you try their transcendent take on traditional flavors, it’s easy to feel right at home. The menu includes a wide range of traditional Mediterranean and Middle Eastern items. Blankets of crisp phyllo dough keep crushed nuts and honey cozy within Karim’s famous baklava ($1.50 for walnut; $2 for pistachio); buttery maamoul cookies (85 cents) break open to reveal dense, luxurious fillings made from either chopped dates or pistachios; and the coconut-soaked basbousa cake (pictured above; $1.50 a slice) is almost pudding-like. Recently, Karim started to offer more savory items like safeeha ($2), a housemade flatbread topped with finely ground beef, lamb and chopped tomatoes—a bit like pizza’s healthier cousin. I’m currently obsessed with the shawarma ($2), a simply prepared pastry filled with beautifully seasoned lamb sliced gyro-style; it’s a perfect little pocket of surprisingly intense flavors. In true Mediterranean style, Karim Bakery isn’t about taking a deep dive into the sugary end of the dessert pool, which is one of the reasons it’s such an important part of our baking ecosystem. Reviewed April 19. 2575 S. State, 801-645-4533, karimbakery.com

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER “50 Best Cheesy Dishes”

36 | MAY 17, 2018

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FILM REVIEW

Mock Trials

Deadpool 2 and the perils of satirizing the thing you want to be. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

H

ow does parody work, when what the parody really wants is to be the thing it’s making fun of? That was the weird dynamic on display in 2016’s surprise hit Deadpool, and just as prominent in the new follow-up, Deadpool 2. For all of its winking, fourth-wall-breaking, selfaware gags about superhero movies— including star Ryan Reynolds’ own illfated turn in Green Lantern—Deadpool also was a superhero movie, sometimes more successful when embracing genre formula than when exploiting its R rating and making jokes about how it was above the formula. It was akin to the way nerdy high-school kids might roll their eyes at the party the cool clique is throwing, but would totally go if they were invited. Deadpool 2 is, as sequels are wont to be, more of the same only more so. Our titular nigh-indestructible mercenary anti-hero Wade Wilson/Deadpool (Reynolds) has been dispatching bad guys around the world, until a personal tragedy sets him on a collision course with an angry young mutant named Russell (Hunt for the Wilderpeople’s Julian Dennison). And there’s someone else who’s interested in meeting Russell: a timetraveling warrior called Cable (Josh Brolin). Well, not so much “meeting” as “killing.” Cable has his reasons, of course, for wanting Russell dead, which involve his own personal tragedy, and it’s repeatedly disorienting every time Deadpool 2 tries to pretend as though anything that’s going on here matters on an emotional level. Deadpool takes it as his personal mission to help Russell and somehow save him from giving in to his anger—directed at the director (Eddie Marsan) of a cruel program that serves as the mutant equivalent of anti-gay aversion therapy, I guess—so there’s some kind of redemption angle for the wise-ass protagonist. The script keeps occasionally making us try to care about

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the fate of these characters, then laughing at us for being foolish enough to give a shit. There’s a lot of laughing at a lot of stuff in Deadpool 2, and just like with the original, your mileage will vary depending on how much of that stuff you find actually funny. It’s a movie that wallows in making sure you’re clear about its movie-ness, which includes copious references to other movies—The Terminator, James Bond opening credits sequences, Say Anything, Basic Instinct, Green Lantern yet again—and self-deprecating allusions to its peripheral role in the wider X-Men universe. Reynolds gets a screenwriting co-credit along with original Deadpool scribes Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, and you can bet that plenty of his character’s riffs are his own creations. Sometimes, those jokes are genuinely clever, and fired out at such high volume that some of them are bound to land; sometimes, they give off the same “check out what a taboobusting rascal I am” vibe as Ricky Gervais smirking through a standup routine. Mostly, though, it’s a superhero movie, no matter how much it protests to the contrary or gives its violence all the consequence of an R-rated Road Runner vs. Wile E.Coyote cartoon. Directing duties have been passed from Tim Miller to David Leitch—or, as the opening credits put it, “One of the Guys Who Killed John Wick’s Dog”—so it’s noteworthy that the résumé priority was action chops, rather than a background in comedy. And there are plenty of action set pieces here,

Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds, center) and X-Force in Deadpool 2

from a shootout in a high-security mutant prison, to an assault on a convoy to rescue Russell, to a final battle involving Colossus (Stefan Kapičić) and a well-known villain from the X-Men universe. It’s a nice twist that Deadpool 2 finds a way to subvert the superhero sequel formula of adding to the cast of characters—like the super-lucky Domino (Zazie Beetz) and other members of Deadpool’s X-Force crew—but it’s not subverting so hard that it won’t reap the benefits of being part of the Marvel Comicscrazy cinematic world. Deadpool 2 features a mid-credits sequence that’s plenty of fun in its gleeful mockery of … well, too many things to name. Maybe it’s a sly poke at the way we’ve all been trained now to wait through the credits of superhero movies. Or maybe it’s another way the Deadpool movies want to match their popularity and get audiences clamoring for another chapter. That’s the tricky part of a collection of jokes that feel like equal parts satire and ingratiation. CW

DEADPOOL 2

BB.5 Ryan Reynolds Josh Brolin Julian Dennison R

TRY THESE X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) Hugh Jackman Liev Schreiber PG-13

John Wick (2014) Keanu Reeves Michael Nyqvist R

Deadpool (2016) Ryan Reynolds Morena Baccarin R

Atomic Blonde (2017) Charlize Theron James McAvoy R


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BOOK CLUB [not yet reviewed] Four old friends make a naughty selection for their monthly book club. Opens May 18 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) DEADPOOL 2 BB5.5 See review on p. 38. Opens May 18 at theaters valleywide. (R)

POPE FRANCIS: A MAN OF HIS WORD [not yet reviewed] Director Wim Wenders profiles the pontiff. Opens May 18 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS FINAL PORTRAIT At Park City Film Series, May 18-19, 8 p.m. & May 20, 6 p.m. (R) MAURIZIO CATTELAN: BE RIGHT BACK At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, May 23, 7 p.m. (NR) SPEEDY At Edison Street Events, May 17-18, 7:30 p.m. (NR) SUMMER IN THE FOREST At Main Library, May 22, 7 p.m. (NR)

WONDER At Main Library, May 23, 2 p.m. (PG) THE WOUND At Main Library, May 17, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR BB.5 Ever since his post-credits cameo in 2012’s first Avengers feature, Thanos (Josh Brolin) has been the harbinger of doom just waiting for his moment in the spotlight, and this culmination of the 10-year-in-the-making Marvel Cinematic Universe pits dozens of superheroes against the alien who seeks ultimate power through the Infinity Stones. Those are big stakes, and this massive crossover provides opportunities for unique character interactions, and occasionally for individual characters to flash the personality we’ve gotten to know. It feels less like a movie in its own right, and more like the 2.5 hour non-stop finale of a 40-hour-long experiment. Even the moments that are supposed to pack emotional punch— not everyone is still standing when the credits roll—can’t fully work when we know other movies are still coming. There’s dead, and then there’s comic-book dead. (PG-13)—SR BREAKING IN BB Shaun (Gabrielle Union) arrives at the Wisconsin farm of her estranged, recently deceased father to ready it for sale, the same night that bad guys break in to find the $4 million that shady Pops hid somewhere in the house. The compound’s state of the art security system magically works when the screenplay demands it, and mostly keeps Shaun locked out of the house while the criminals are locked in with the kids. But there are times, all too conveniently, when the security system lets Shaun in. Or back out. Breaking In’s few effective moments—a fight

scene between Shaun and one of the crooks; a showdown on the lawn with all the crooks and Shaun—are undercut by the dumber moments, and plot points cribbed from Die Hard, Under Siege and Panic Room.  Union deserves better. (PG-13)—DR LIFE OF THE PARTY BBB Respect to Melissa McCarthy and husband/director/co-writer Ben Falcone for crafting a story that gives many funny women a chance to show off comedic chops. McCarthy plays Deanna, a middle-aged mom who is dumped by her husband (Matt Walsh), then decides to go back for her degree to the same college where her daughter (Molly Gordon) is a senior. The gags are mostly built around sweet-natured Deanna in girls-gone-wild scenarios, but the real pleasure is the opportunities given to McCarthy’s costars: Maya Rudolph, Heidi Gardner, Gillian Jacobs and more. Most of the setups are exactly what you suspect they might be, and McCarthy’s big physical-comedy set piece is built around a lack of confidence in Deanna that’s not evident anywhere else. If it’s just a collection of appealing comic performances, there are far worse ways to spend 105 minutes. (PG-13)—SR TULLY BBB.5 Screenwriter Diablo Cody—reunited with Juno and Young Adult director Jason Reitman—tells the story of Marlo (Charlize Theron), a harried suburban New York mother of three who accepts an offer from her wealthy brother (Mark Duplass) to pay for a night nanny, named Tully (Mackenzie Davis). Cody and Reitman set the stage brilliantly in a montage in which life after the birth of baby Mia becomes a numbing repetition that makes Marlo think only about all the ways she’s failing. Theron’s terrific performance explores Marlo’s tug of war between finding the stable family life she never had for herself, and losing the edgy youngster she once was. After more than a decade of writing movies, Cody has mastered the art of showing us that avoiding being a grown-up ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. (R)—SR

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MAY 17, 2018 | 39

DEADPOOL 2 ON BOTH SCREENS

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DISOBEDIENCE BBBB The English-language debut by Chilean filmmaker Sebastián Lelio (A Fantastic Woman) puts its characters through difficult (to say the least) paces. It focuses on lapsed orthodox Jew and New Yorker-bychoice Ronit (a sublime Rachel Weisz), who returns to London for her father’s funeral. Ronit and her father hadn’t spoken in years, and when she arrives at the home of her old friend (and her father’s disciple) Dovid Kuperman (Alessandro Nivola) and his wife Esti (Rachel McAdams, superb), it’s clear Ronit is at best unexpected. As Ronit, Dovid, and Esti spend more time together, it becomes clear why. The narrative resembles a love triangle, but it’s considerably more complicated. Lelio and co-screenwriter Rebecca Lenkiewicz make the characters zig just when you think they’re going to zag, which saves Disobedience from lapsing into treacle or bathos, and Lelio’s direction makes you feel the weight of the world each of these characters— especially Esti—carries. The result is heart-wrenching, but rewarding. Opens May 18 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—David Riedel

RBG BBB If your ideas about Ruth Bader Ginsburg tend toward those expressed on conservative talk radio clips played here—e.g. “She’s an absolute disgrace to the Supreme Court”—this mostly hagiographic profile isn’t likely to change your mind. It’s a soup-to-nuts primer on the 84-year-old associate justice, tracing her life from childhood in 1930s Brooklyn, to being one of the few women at Harvard Law School in the 1950s, to her work on landmark genderequality cases before the Supreme Court as an attorney. It’s all dutifully and respectfully presented in exactly the way you might predict from a CNN documentary, right down to the cello music for the underscore and the stock-footage images of 1970s women’s rights protests. Still, there are insightful moments throughout, whether it’s a look at how she responds to her own status as a pop-culture icon, her friendship with the late Justice Antonin Scalia, or her relationship with her late husband, Marty. If her introverted nature keeps her from revealing much of herself to the camera, there’s plenty in her words as a jurist to convey the passion that drives her. Opens May 18 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)—Scott Renshaw


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 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 5/16

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 5/17 Reggae at the Royal

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amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 5/18

ginger and the gents w/ penrose citizen soldier • legends fade saturday 5/19

Live Music

wayne hoskins band ugly valley boys w/ the johhny utahs Tuesday 5/22

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon 5/25 6/2 6/8

tomorrow's bad seeds salt lake metal fest hemlock

the royal's 5 year anniversary party with royal bliss  Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

6/9

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

At $8,000, Ryan Thorell’s hand-crafted guitars have a dedicated following. BY JACKSON WILDE comments@cityweekly.net @bonafideduder

F

or the past half hour, Ryan Thorell has been gently rasping the spruce top of his creation with a razor blade in his Logan workshop. The blade has bent and twisted, little by little, to fit the form of his fingers. With each pass, flecks of wood accumulate on the paint-splattered workbench. “I like to approach each guitar individually,” the craftsman says, “and approach it from my perspective as it evolves throughout the years.” Thorell is constructing a 15-inch archtop acoustic guitar for a customer in San Francisco. The instrument is made from wood sourced from three continents—North America, Europe and Africa—and Thorell’s last name is elegantly inlaid in cursive on the headstock. He says the client wanted a guitar that mirrored his traditional musical leanings, but with a modern touch. While the shape of the guitar is time-honored, the outside is edged with Central American bocote wood, its grain subtly resembling leopard spots. For all the embellishments, however, at the end of the day the guitar-maker’s goal is simplicity and playability. “My guitars have become more spartan,” Thorell says, “and more about the instrument and its ability to perform as a tool for the musician.” Thorell has been slowly but surely building a reputation as one of the nation’s best luthiers. “He’s the real deal,” says Bob Bakert, a music industry veteran of 30 years currently working for Eastman Guitars. “He’s like a world-class guy hanging out in Logan, Utah, and he’s so damn young.” Thorell, 38, looks like a woodworker should look—sporting laced work boots and blue jeans. In his shop sit half-a-dozen guitars he’s either building or repairing. By his own estimate, he only produces between 12-20 handmade instruments a year. “I think having an approach that allows you to be productive and fly next to the ground has allowed me to really stay as a one-man shop,” he says. The career he’s built as a luthier’s luthier in an unassuming town is taking a turn. Last year, Thorell’s most popular guitar model—the instrument he designed for his friend and famed jazz guitarist Frank Vignola—was carved and assembled by Eastman Guitars. The collaboration marked the first time one of his designs was picked up by a mainstream manufacturer. He says the move represents validation in a complicated market. “I’ve gotten quite a bit of new business,” Thorell says. “It’s amazing how many people don’t know who you are regardless of how much exposure you think you’ve already had—it’s such a small niche of the market.” Thorell built his first guitar in 1993 at the age of 13, an angular electric guitar reflecting his musical interests at the time—namely, Metallica. He says he knew every riff from Metallica’s guitarist, Kirk Hammett. When he discovered jazz, he began appreciating the instrument in a more earnest fashion. Motivated by the music of Eddie Lang, Wes Montgomery and George Benson, Thorell says he began practicing eight hours a day. Once jazz guitar playing enveloped Thorell, he began studying at Arizona State University at the age of 16 with Vignola. Vignola left Arizona State the following year, and subsequently lost contact with his Utah-based student.

JACKSON WILDE

4760 S 900 E, SLC

Logan’s Luthier

MUSIC

Ryan Thorell working inside his Logan workshop. After several woodworking apprenticeships, Thorell began building guitars professionally in 2003. Nearly 10 years after their initial meeting, Vignola says the guitar manufacturer he endorsed was dropping all its endorsers. The news led to a handful of luthiers sending their instruments to Vignola hoping for an endorsement, but none truly made an impression—except one. He agreed to give that guitar a shot—unaware that its creator was his former student. “I played that guitar every day since he sent it to me,” Vignola says. Thorell continued to craft guitars and a reputation. And the players who own his guitars—and even some who don’t—rave about them. “Everyone who has played my guitar—from George Benson to Tommy Emmanuel—just fell in love with it and played it for hours,” Vignola says. Bakert says after meeting Vignola at a seminar and seeing his custom Thorell guitar, he was sold. He now owns three. “I picked it up and played it and said, ‘I’ve got to own one of these,’ and I immediately called Ryan and ordered one,” he recalls. He then pitched Thorell’s design to Eastman Guitars, which spawned the project between Vignola, Thorell and the manufacturer. Purchasing a handmade guitar from Thorell ordinarily would cost between $8,000-$15,000, a price only a dedicated few are willing or able to spend. However, the Thorell-designed Frank Vignola Signature Model from Eastman Guitars will be offered at $2,995—a price that hopefully will put his work in the hands of more musicians. “This is a big deal for Ryan, and I’m so very happy for him,” Vignola says. “It’s a very difficult market to be able to sell an $8,000 guitar to people.” The collaboration between artist, luthier and manufacturer is something of a rarity, according to Bakert and Vignola. For a manufacturer to produce a guitar in such a fashion exemplifies dedication to producing fine instruments. “We did it because we think it’s a really cool guitar, and we think we’re a really cool company,” Bakert says, “and we think Frank is a cool guy and Ryan deserves some love here.” Once the production is completed, Vignola says he will retire the original guitar Thorell built and play the Eastman model exclusively. Vignola says he has been gathering signatures on the original guitar from musicians he appreciates—creating his own collectible. “It becomes irreplaceable,” Vignola says. “It’s like a ’59 Les Paul—you just can’t do that again.” In Vignola’s view, Thorell’s mix of attention to detail, cooperativeness and overall good nature makes him worthy of high praise. “He would do anything for anybody,” Vignola says. “That’s why I really wish him the most success, because he really deserves it.” CW


Meet the contestants

Aphrodeity

Rose Manchester

Earnest Cooper

Salsa Celia Cruz

Jafabulous

Eva Chanel Stephens

Marrlo Suzzanne

Delta Rae Dixon

Andromeda Corinthia

9

Judges:

G e t Yo ur

TICKE

TS

Gia Bianca Stephens

Rocky Mountain National Showgirl, Miss Gay Central States America, Miss Gay Utah

Paul Duane

The Cross Dressing Mormon Anarchist

THURSDAY, MAY 31ST

DOORS 9PM SHOW 10PM | 615 W 100 S | +21

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$10 In Advance $15 At The Door

Roary Hollace

2017 Miss City Weekly

Enrique Limรณn

Editor of City Weekly

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Weekend!

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MAY 17, 2018 | 41

VODKA


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LIVE

BY LEE ZIMMERMAN, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, ROBBY POFFENBERGER & HOWARD HARDEE

FRIDAY 5/18

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

Like Dead Kennedys and Marilyn Manson, The Brian Jonestown Massacre boasts a moniker that’s intended for shock value alone, at the expense of appealing to any mainstream audience. Still, the mashup of the blond-maned Rolling Stone and the mass suicide instigated by Jim Jones at his cult’s retreat in Guyana more or less reflects the skewered perspective at the heart of this San Francisco-based indie collective’s mantra since their founding some 25 years ago. Never ones to opt for predictability, Anton Newcombe and company have veered from dream pop and goth to minimalist folk, garage and experimentation, all the while keeping a ’60s aesthetic intact. As evidence of the latter, consider that they count Who Killed Sgt. Pepper (2010) and Their Satanic Majesties’ Second Request (1996) among their most prominent record releases. Then again, their 1996 epic Thank God for Mental Illness could explain their weird ways best. It’s little wonder, then, that despite 13 albums and a 2004 documentary, they still exist on the fringes of the indie establishment. That overt eccentricity makes it a challenge for casual observers to get an easy handle on their otherwise obtuse approach. Their new album, Something Else, is due June 1, and ought to provide the means for a quick connection. Or one could opt to simply catch them in concert. (Lee Zimmerman) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m. $22 presale; $25 day of show, metromusichall.com

Tycho

ESTER SEGARRA

The Brian Jonestown Massacre, Alpine Decline

SATURDAY 5/19

Obituary

Tycho, Emmit Fenn

Tycho is Scott Hansen’s solo project, but he fills out the sound with a full band in a live setting and incorporates audiovisual elements to create a dazzling overall experience. The project is known for chilled-out, downtempo and atmospheric soundscapes and a string of excellent soft-electronic albums: Dive (2011), Awake (2014) and Epoch (2016). Dive, especially, is considered a genre classic. Hansen started making demos for the album in 2004—well before he made music for a living—and slowly chipped away at the project for several years, working on the side as he pursued a career in graphic design. Now a professional musician, Hansen’s identity is very much that of an electronic artist, but his inclination to work with warm, lo-fi textures draws more from classic rock ’n’ roll. In Hansen’s world, everything sounds as if it went through a tape machine. And he employs plenty of tricks, like switching the traditional roles of guitar and synthesizer: All of the guitar sounds are sampled and replayed for a robotic effect, whereas he

LAUREN CREW

42 | MAY 17, 2018

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plays the synths live and loose (and often out of tune). For those who want subtlety when they put on headphones, Tycho is pure ear candy. (Howard Hardee) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $29.50, depotslc.com

Obituary, Pallbearer, Skeletonwitch, Dust Bolt

Every extreme music connoisseur has a mosh-pit story, whether it was getting dropped while crowd-surfing, drowning in a sea of people during a good ol’-fashioned wall of death—or ever-so-gently receiving a bloody nose during a 2016 Obituary show. But while the occasional enthusiasm-generated injury takes place at live music shows, there very well could possibly be (as Obituary notes) 10,000 Ways To Die (Relapse, 2017) anywhere you go. It’s been 30 years since Tampa earned the title of “death metal capital of the world,” and Obituary was among the founding fathers of said capital with their taste for the speediness of thrash and darkness of death metal, which allowed them to rise with fellow brothers in arms Iced Earth and Six Feet Under. And this was during a time when Tampa venues were refusing to let local death and thrash bands play for fear of crowds moshing and destroying their clubs. But even with the strict moshing rules and national touring bands bringing their own openers, audiences were still drawn to the thrash-death attitude of Obituary. It was that attitude that birthed 1989’s Slowly We Rot, which gave head-banging adrenaline moshers a respected place in the extrememusic scene. With the release of their 2017 self-titled album, the band hasn’t lost their momentum in the pit. (Rachelle Fernandez) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 6 p.m., $22 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com


WE HAVE THE OFFICIAL WATCH PARTY THIS WEEKEND WITH R S L AT STATE SUE LOCATION MAY 30 @ 7:30 VS HOUSTON

HIGHLAND live music

FRIDAY, MAY 18

TH

FRI SAT

THE ELDERS

UNDER THE COVERS

MON & THURS

TUES

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

GEEKS WHO DRINK AT 8PM

PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

THE BLACK DONNELLY’S FROM DUBLIN W/ THE DUNMORE LASSES SATURDAY, MAY 19TH

KARAOKE

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 7PM $1500 POT SUNDAY BRUNCH UNTIL 2:00

THURS

TUESDAY, MAY 22ND

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

MURPHY AND THE GIANT

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WED ORPHANS CABARET W/ HOOFLESS & TYCOON

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MAY 17, 2018 | 43

kitchen open until midnight

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

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HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

TUES

HECTIC HOBO W/ WELL OKAY

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1000 POT

WED

2014

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STATE live music

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THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!!


LIVE

Patio Season is here! RYAN RUSSELL

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SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

TUESDAY 5/22

Pedro the Lion, David Dondero 5.17 THE MOVES COLLECTIVE

5.18 MEANDER CAT & THE BIG DROPS

5.19 WILL BAXTER BAND

5.21 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

5.23 LORIN WALKER MADSEN

5.25 & 26 STONEFED

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

David Bazan is the brains behind Pedro the Lion, an indie-rock band formed in 1995 that’s best known for its downtempo, sad-bastard songs and concept albums such as Winners Never Quit (2000) and Control (2002). Those records tackled macro-issues like American consumerism and religion, and more personal stuff like modern marriage. The band split amicably in 2006 and went their separate ways, and Bazan has been playing mostly as a solo musician since, though he occasionally assembled session players to fill out the live sound. Last year, however, he decided he’d had enough of gigging alone and reformed Pedro the Lion to tour extensively around the U.S. Lately, he’s been holed up in his studio outside of Seattle, writing and recording the band’s muchanticipated new album, the tentatively titled Phoenix, which will be the first part of an epic five-album series paying homage to each of the cities he’s lived in. Bazan is still working on the narrative arc that will tie everything together, but has divulged it will expand beyond his own walk down memory lane; the story will reference his personal experiences only as a jumpingoff point. And he won’t get too specific, because he recognizes that nostalgia for childhood—and hometowns left behind— is universal. Sad bastard, indeed. (HH) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $20, theurbanloungeslc.com

Pedro the Lion

WEDNESDAY 5/23

Sum 41, Seaway, Super Whatevr

I know exactly one person who loves the last few Sum 41 records. He’s 52 years old, employed by the area’s predominant religion and spends his days pouring over census records. He listens to fast-paced pop punk on his daily bus ride home. He’s also my father. When he heard Sum 41 is touring their platinum 2003 album Does This Look Infected?, he was disappointed. What about songs from 2011’s Screaming Bloody Murder? After all—and Dad wanted to make sure I point this out—it netted them a Grammy nomination. Dad rejects the idea that these anniversary tours are the only way artists who wrote simple music for teenagers back in the day can fill concert halls today, but it might be true. And maybe Sum 41 has good reason to chase 2003. They’ve had a rough go of it since then. In 2010, frontman Deryck Whibley was severely beaten outside a bar and hospitalized. He almost died in 2015 when his alcoholism caused his kidney and liver to shut down. Yes, Infected is from a simpler time, when a band like Sum 41 could have crossover hits. The shouted verses and earworm chorus of hit single “Still Waiting” are essential representations of the genre. Opener “The Hell Song” has the band’s best guitar riff—though Dad would probably disagree. (Robby Poffenberger) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $25 presale; $30 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com


AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00

DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,250 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

PATIO IS OPEN! 32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

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MAY 17, 2018 | 45

DINNER & SHOW ONLY AT


TUESDAY 5/22

DAVID MCCLISTER

Poison, Cheap Trick, Pop Evil

CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 5/17

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Cheap Trick could be considered the Rodney Dangerfields of rock ’n’ roll. A sometimes cartoonish-looking collective, they didn’t get their due for a very long time—even after more than four decades of relentlessly recording, a live regimen that adds up to more than 5,000 concerts and their status as godfathers to an entire power-pop genre. Even after finally gaining admission into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016—with an emphasis on that word finally—there was controversy to contend with, given that original drummer Bun E. Carlos had been replaced by guitarist Rick Nielsen’s son, Daxx. Nevertheless, the band’s devotion to the classic sounds of another age—The Beatles, The Move, The Who and the like—makes them as vital as ever, as their 2016 release Bang Zoom Crazy... Hello, the group’s first new studio music in nearly seven years, makes confidently clear. Of course, music and mayhem aren’t their sole domain. Pairing them on a summer tour with Poison might seem an unlikely combination, but suffice it to say Poison’s hard rock revelry and garish glam designs make them brothers in arms—and similar in their charms—when it comes to sharing that certain volume and vitality. Mommy’s all right, daddy’s all right, and there’s no cause to surrender just yet. (Lee Zimmerman) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 Upper Ridge Road, West Valley City, 7 p.m. $25-$99.50 usana-amp.com

LIVE MUSIC

CRAFT COCKTAILS - WINE - BEER

PATIO SEASON IS HERE! 80’S NEW WAVE NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY 7PM-11PM W/ DJ BIRDMAN (RAFFLE PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS) FEATURING ONE OF EAST SIDE SALT LAKE’S BEST PATIOS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

SATURDAY, MAY 19

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM $850

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Bad Donkey (The Yes Hell) Bill Currington + Locash (The Union Event Center) Latin Thursdays w/ Latin Roots (LiquidJoe’s) Lorin Walker Madsen + Mythic Valley (Rye) Michael Wall (Sugar Space Arts Warehouse) Mountain Boogaloo (Gallivan Center) The Moves Collective (Hog Wallow Pub) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Sammy Brue + The Helio Sequence + Arvos (The Gateway) TV Girl + Wished Bone (Kilby Court) Tyrone Wells + Gabe Dixon (The State Room) Phantom Feature + Tiny Boats + This is Decibel + Indigo Waves (The Loading Dock)

WEDNESDAYS

Sepia Ria + Mome Wrath (Velour) Sympathy Pain + Hoofless + R. Candall Lark (Urban Lounge) Vocal Reasoning + Sayloo + I-Ternal + Roots (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos feat. Drew & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Dada Life (Sky)

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


KIITOS BREWING

KARAOKE

FRIDAY 5/18 LIVE MUSIC

Ruby Force + Whitney Lusk + Early Successional + Mia Hicken (Kilby Court) San Luis + Chyno (Infinity Event Center) Silver Strike (The Spur) Wild Country (The Westerner)

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY 5/19

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Juggy + DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) TGIF At Sky feat. DJ Dynamiq (Sky) Top 40 All-Request (Area 51)

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael (The Bayou) Bonanza Town (Lake Effect) Changing Lanes Experience (Prohibition) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Crazy Wolf (Pat’s BBQ) Derek Harman (Harp & Hound) Elastic Jazz Quintet (Avant Groove) Fictionist + Pinguin Mofex + Kambree (Velour) Jerry Joseph w/ The Jackmormons + Homo Leviticus (Garage on Beck) Joyner Lucas + ELI (The Complex) Live Trio (The Red Door) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

A.M. Bump (The Bayou) The Aces + Madge (Velour) Badfeather + Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (The Depot) Black Donnelly’s (Piper Down) Boys Ranch (Pat’s BBQ) The Brian Jonestown Massacre + Alpine Decline (Metro Music Hall) see p. 42

Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Darklord (Brewskis) Elastic Jazz Quintet (Avant Groove) Ginger & The Gents + Penrose + Citizen Soldier + Legends Fade (The Royal) Hamilton Cantonwine & Clark (Feldman’s Deli) Hectic Hobo + Well Okay (The Ice Haüs) Jerry Joseph w/ The Jackmormons + Planet No Planet (Garage on Beck) Joshy Soul (Lake Effect) MC Eneeone + The Outsiders + STC + Malev Da Shinobi + Dusk + Black Lion + Heavenly Soulja + Calhoon Popadopolis + DJ Fresh(ness) + DJ Mike Skilz (Urban Lounge) Mean Red Spider (The Yes Hell) Meander Cat + The Big Drops (Hog Wallow Pub) Metal Gods (Liquid Joe’s) Michelle Moonshine + Marny Proudfit (Funk ’n’ Dive) Natural Causes (Club 90)

Sunday doesn’t always look like a ghost town in Salt Lake City; maybe it will after the .05 BAC officially goes into effect. But for now, my crowd—the 30-somethings—is still making its way out to breweries, pubs and bars on the Sabbath. Sundays are for beer, which is why I saved today for Kiitos Brewing. I roll into the empty parking lot thinking I might be pretty lonely, until I glance at the full bike rack. A couple of those bikes belong to Jeff and Juliann, “two nerds in a pod”—as Jeff says—hailing from Anchorage, Alaska. Juliann is a couple exams away from becoming an architect; Jeff is a civil engineer. Without missing a beat, I ask Juliann what her dream project would be. “I really like bars and restaurants,” she says. “They are what fascinate me the most. Just the science behind how you can control people’s moods.” Jeff laughs: “Controlling people?” But she’s right: There’s a science behind the layout of bars, even in Kiitos, with its wood ceilings and oldfashioned beer barrels arranged around the tap room at what seems to be just the right place for a patron to set their blonde ale down for a quick game of Elvira pinball, or vintage Pac Man. Harry Belafonte plays in the background—not too loud to drown out a conversation, but just loud enough to hear “Jump In The Line.” (Rachelle Fernandez) 608 W. 700 South, kiitosbrewing.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Johnny Irish (The Union Tavern) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ’n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

| CITY WEEKLY |

MAY 17, 2018 | 47


COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

2PM

HIGHLAND

weekly lineup Thursdays

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG $2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

saturdays SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

| CITY WEEKLY |

48 | MAY 17, 2018

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS

KARAOKE Mondays

WINGS 75¢ALL DAY

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO $500 POT-8PM

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

Lost Asylum + Limitless (Newpark Town Center) Luis Miguel (Usana Amphitheatre) Metal Dogs (Brewskis) Murphy & The Giant (Piper Down) Natural Causes (Club 90) New Holland + Sales & Co. + Giants in the Oak Tree + Lilac (Kilby Court) Obituary + Pallbearer + Skeletonwitch + Dust Bolt (Metro Music Hall) see p. 42 Orphans Cabaret + Hoofless + Tycoon Machete (The Ice Haüs) Raven Black + Hail Sagan + Aboleth + Dipped in Whiskey (The Loading Dock) Seven Second Memory + Az-Iz + Loss of Existence + Hanover Fiist + False Witness + A Silver Tongued Devils (Johnny’s on Second) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Storm Harbor Point + Glacier Veins + Breakfast In Silence + Patio (The Underground) Take Two (The Union Tavern) Tycho + Emmit Fenn (The Depot) see p. 42 Walter Lanza (Feldman’s Deli) The Wayne Hoskins Band + Ugly Valley Boys + The Johnny Utahs (The Royal) Wild Country (The Westerner) The Will Baxter Band (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CONCERTS & CLUBS

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos Cocktail Party (Funk ’n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Mike (Tavernacle) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Ev (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80’s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Matty Mo (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

POLARIS RZR STEREO PACKAGE

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KARAOKE

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10AM TO 7PM

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

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MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

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MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 5/24/18

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 5/20 LIVE MUSIC

The Eagles (Vivint Arena) Jerry Joseph w/ The Jackmormons + Patrick Kenny Duo + Steve Haines (Garage on Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE


PINKY’S CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MENU Live Entertainment Good Food • Good Fun\ All NHL Playoff Games

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

Sunday Night Blues Jam w/ Nick Greco & Blues on First (Gracie’s)

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

KARAOKE

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 5/21

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Crypt Trip + Cloud Catcher + Sleeping Tigers (Urban Lounge) DOA + MDC + Racist Kramer (Metro Music Hall) John Clayton The Next Generation (Jazz SLC)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

LIVE MUSIC

03Greedo + Ray Vicks (Kilby Court) Alicia Stockman (The Spur) Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness + Allen Stone + Zac Clark + Bob Oxblood of Jack’s Mannequin (The Depot) Creek + Detour + Greenmont + Follie (The Underground) Dave McCormick (Piper Down) Las Rosas + Lovely Noughts + Say Hey (Metro Music Hall)

DANCE MUSIC ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY

MONDAYS 7:30PM TUESDAYS 9PM $4 JAMESON TRIVIA WITH $5 SHOT & BEER BREAKING BINGO THE TRIVIA FACTORY DAILY

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

MUSIC EDITOR WANTED!

Email résumé and two clips of feature-length music writing to scottr@cityweekly.net. No phone calls, please.

MAY 17, 2018 | 49

INTERESTED?

| CITY WEEKLY |

Knowledge of Utah’s music scene—including Salt Lake City, Provo and Ogden—preferred. Flexible hours with most work possible off-site, and one day a week in the Weekly offices.

City Weekly is looking for a part-time Music Editor to coordinate and write copy for our website and print edition music sections. The candidate should have the ability to coordinate a long-range schedule of assignments with freelance contributors, provide editing feedback and guidance to freelancers and write 1000-1500 words weekly of clean, entertaining copy.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

TUESDAY 5/22

KARAOKE THAT DOESN’T SUCK EVERY THURSDAY W/ MIKEY DANGER

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Monday Night Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & The JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | MAY 17, 2018

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com FRIDAY, MAY 18TH

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BLACK SMOKE GYPSY WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

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VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-

478-4310, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker

Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday PROHIBITION 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, everything from live music to karaoke to burlesque THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 SWITCH 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-5132955, house and techno events TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs


SHOTS OF SUMMER CONCERTS & CLUBS BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

s Rio Grande Concert outh 400 W. 100 S / facebook.com ay shopthegatew

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

MGMT (The Union Event Center) Pedro The Lion + David Dondero (Urban Lounge) see p. 44 Poison + Cheap Trick + Pop Evil (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 46

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Big Band Dance Night (Gallivan Center) Blue Jam (The Yes Hell) Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s)

KARAOKE Heather O’Fee, Brynn Karas, Dristie & Riley Onyon

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ KJ Johnny Irish (Club 90) Powerball Karaoke (The Union Tavern)

LIVE Music thursday, may 17

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, may 18

TERENCE HANSEN TRIO saturday, may 19

90’S PUB CRAWL - DJ LATU

LIVE MUSIC

Cait Quaranto, Dresden Chamberlain

Marily Velasquez, Sofia Torres

sunday, june 3 PRINCESS KENNEDY’S ROOFTOP BLOCKPARTY

Weeknights monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Mikaela Shafer, Daniel Overstreet

Emma, Sam Smith, Nikki Boehmer

Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. JD & Arian (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Rick Gerber Request Line (The Cabin) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Every sunday

$

5.99 lunch special

Josh Marty

$

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

MAY 17, 2018 | 51

Helio Sequence

MONDAY - FRIDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

Great food

ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Brent Cobb & Them + Savannah Conley (The State Room) Brook Mackintosh (The Union Tavern) Brother Sister Duo (The Spur) Elastic Jazz Quintet (Avant Groove) Kimbra + Son Lux (Metro Music Hall) La Luz + Savila (Kilby Court) Lorin Walker Madsen (Hog Wallow Pub) Red Wanting Blue + Liz Brasher (Rye) Sum 41 + Seaway + Super Whatevr (The Complex) see p. 44 Wolf Parade + Japandroids + Adrian Teacher & The Subs (Urban Lounge)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

WEDNESDAY 5/23


© 2017

MA AND PA

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Shuts (up) 2. Peace in the Middle East 3. One of the Trumps 4. Upset 5. ____-Defamation League 6. Suffix with convert or corrupt 7. London’s ____ Coward Theater 8. Curved high-back bench 9. Container for serving wine 10. Hybrid music genre of the 2010s 11. ____ and cranny 12. Math calculation 13. Kind of port for a flash drive

54. Really chewed out 58. Spotify selections 59. Relative of a ferret 60. Forerunners of smartphones, for short 61. Is under the weather 62. Give up 63. Give up 64. 1995 Eazy-E hit “Just ____ Let U Know” 65. Hit the slopes 66. Fruit drink brand with a hyphenated name

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

14. Swell locale? 22. Kim, to Kourtney or Khloé 23. Digs 26. “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 27. Spanish “other” 28. Vegas casino developer Steve 30. Mathematician’s “Done!” 31. Call balls and strikes, informally 32. ____ Savahl (couture label) 33. Rock’s ____ Speedwagon 34. Play a role 37. Midtown Manhattan cultural attraction, for short 38. On ____ with (comparable to) 39. Em, to Dorothy 40. Cryptanalysis org. 41. Die spot 42. Clean Air Act org. 43. 1921 play that introduced the word “robot” 44. Lawyer: Abbr. 48. Customize for 49. Violates the rules 50. Photographer Goldin 51. English-speaking neighbor of Venezuela 52. Greenwich Village sch. 53. In a wicked way

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Start of four TV drama titles of the 2000s 4. Northern terminus of U.S. 1 9. Public record? 15. “Facilities,” informally 16. Email holder 17. Words that often follow “Eek!” 18. Pie ____ mode 19. Town at the N.J. end of the George Washington Bridge 20. iRobot vacuum 21. Title estate of an 1814 novel 24. Noted pseudonym in short story writing 25. Court star Nadal, informally 26. Drag away 29. Where Romeo and Juliet meet 35. One-named supermodel with a palindromic name 36. Iowa’s largest export 37. Small business ... or a way of describing 21-, 29-, 47- and 59-Across 45. Symphony, e.g. 46. “Hmm, how shall ____ this?” 47. George W. Bush’s Texas Rangers position, until 1994 55. Without this, Earth is just “eh” 56. Biblical twin 57. Fashion’s ____ Saint Laurent 59. Filipino boxer-turned-congressman 64. Improper attire at a fancy restaurant 67. Parting word that’s 80% vowels 68. Three after K 69. Like 70. Silents star Nita 71. Part of a KFC order 72. Wild Bill of Western lore 73. Positive quality 74. The ten in “first and ten”: Abbr.

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | MAY 17, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

Profitable Utah

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A chemist named Marcellus Gilmore Edson got a patent on peanut butter in 1894. A businessperson named George Bayle started selling peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, a genius named Julia David Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich. In 1922, another pioneer came up with a new process for producing peanut butter that made it taste better and last longer. In 1928, two trailblazers invented loaves of sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut-butterand-jelly sandwich to its full glory. According to my analysis, Taurus, you’re partway through your own process of generating a very practical marvel. I suspect you’re now at a phase equivalent to Julia David Chandler’s original recipe. Onward! Keep going! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the most popular brands of candy in North America is Milk Duds. They’re irregularly shaped globs of chocolate caramel. When they were first invented in 1926, the manufacturer’s plan was to make them perfect little spheres. But with the rather primitive technology available at that time, this proved impossible. The finished products were blobs, not globes. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested that the new confection’s name include “dud,” a word meaning “failure” or “flop.” Having sold well now for more than 90 years, Milk Duds have proved that success doesn’t necessarily require perfection. Who knows? Maybe their dud-ness has been an essential part of their charm. I suspect there’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future, Gemini.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The ancient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for his services. He made money by composing verses on demand. On one occasion, he was asked to write a stirring tribute to the victor of a mule race. He declined, declaring that his sensibilities were too fine to create art for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically boosted the proposed price. Soon thereafter, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “wind-swift steeds.” I offer the poet as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be more flexible than usual about what you’ll do to get the reward you’d like. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s the operative metaphor for you these days: You’re like a painter who has had a vision of an interesting work of art you could create—but who lacks some of the paint colors you would require to actualize this art. You might also need new types of brushes you haven’t used before. So here’s how I suggest you proceed: Be aggressive in tracking down the missing ingredients or tools that will enable you to accomplish your as-yet imaginary masterpiece.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Useful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way. But they probably won’t arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, accompanied by tinkling swells of celestial music. It’s more likely they’ll come barging in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my vision of your life in the coming weeks, you’re hunting for one breakthrough is in your imminent future. But this blessing the intimate power that you lost a while back. After many twists is more likely to resemble a wrestle in the mud than a dance on and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unim- a mountaintop. None of this should be a problem, however! I portant location, a place you have paid little attention to for a suggest you enjoy the rugged but interesting fun. long time. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): glows, your body language galvanizes. A vivid hope arises in your One of the saddest aspects of our lives as humans is the disparity imagination: how to make that once-lost, now-rediscovered between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, power come alive again and be of use to you in the present time. unwavering, and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, on the other hand, tends to be capricious and inconstant, often dependent on the fluctuations of mood and chemistry. Is there anything LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological dictionary says that the English slang word “cool” you could do about this crazy-making problem, Aquarius? Like meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” could you maybe arrange for your romantic experiences to be was first used by jazz musicians in the 1930s to signify “performing more thoroughly suffused with the primal power of uncondiwell without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was tional love? I think this is a realistic request, especially in the also popularized by the jazz community. It meant, “informed, aware, coming weeks. You will have exceptional potential to bring more up-to-date.” I’m bringing these words to your attention because I compassion and spiritual affection into your practice of intimacy. regard them as your words of power in the coming weeks. You can be and should be as hip, cool and groovy as you have been in a long time. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to dream up new rituals. The traditional observances and ceremonies VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope you will seek out influences that give you grinning power bequeathed to you by your family and culture might satisfy your over your worries. I hope you’ll be daring enough to risk a break- need for comfort and nostalgia, but not your need for renewal through in service to your most demanding dream. I hope you and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of paswill make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher sage designed not for who you once were but for the new person might understand you. I hope you will find out how to summon you’ve become. You might be delighted to discover how much more faith in yourself—a faith not rooted in lazy wishes but in a power they provide you to shape your life’s long-term cycles. rigorous self-assessment. Now here’s my prediction: You will Ready to conjure up a new ritual right now? Take a piece of paper and write down two fears that inhibit your drive to create fulfill at least one of my hopes, and probably more. a totally interesting kind of success for yourself. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink while chanting “I am a LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once performed for swashbuckling incinerator of fears!” England’s Queen Victoria. Since she possessed that bygone era’s equivalent of a backstage pass, she was able to converse ARIES (March 21-April 19): with him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, hav- According to my assessment of the astrological omens, your ing been impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” duty right now is to be a brave observer and fair-minded interPaderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant mediary and honest storyteller. Your people need you to help that he had labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the them do the right thing. They require your influence in order to queen attributed to him. According to my analysis of the astrologi- make good decisions. So if you encounter lazy communication, cal omens, you Libras are currently in an extended “drudge” phase dispel it with your clear and concise speech. If you find that foggy of your own. That’s a good thing! Take maximum advantage of this thinking has started to infect important discussions, inject your clear and concise insights. opportunity to slowly and surely improve your skills.

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915028, JUDGE ADAM T LOW. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $6,539.05. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


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MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC. d/b/a MI MEXICO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111.Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is file with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

Andrew G. Deiss Wesley D. Felix Attorneys for Plaintiff

54 | MAY 17, 2018

G

Provo Wins! JENNIE RICHAU, REALTOR

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH

URBAN L I V I N

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO MARIO TRUJILLO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111. Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is filed with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

Andrew G. Deiss Wesley D. Felix Attorneys for Plaintiff

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Utah makes the top of just about every list these days—best place to start a business, best state economy, lowest unemployment, etc. Provo is the seventh “Best City to be Young and Broke,” according to magnifymoney.com. The site asked 100 young folks ages 18-24 to rank the importance of 12 city features that factor into the quality of life for them. Then they weighted the answers according to which were the most important. Here are the survey’s priorities in order of highest to lowest: Median rent; price of goods compared with the national average; average commute times; unemployment rate for young people; statewide income tax rates; statewide sales tax; percentage of the young adult population who live in poverty by federal standards; percentage of the population between the ages of 18 and 24; percentage of young adults who have either completed or are pursuing a college degree; percentage of the population who uses public transportation; percentage of young adults who moved from another state or another country in the previous year; and my personal favorite: availability of cheap food, as expressed in the number of pizza parlors per 100,000 residents. So, the best cities to be young and broke are: 1. Madison, Wis., 2. Grand Rapids, Mich., 3. Dayton, Ohio, 4. Syracuse, N.Y., 5. Durham, N.C., 6. Des Moines, Iowa, 7. Provo, Utah, 8. Akron, Ohio, 9. Chattanooga, Tenn., 10. Lexington, Ky. Certainly there are many financial concerns when you’re young, like student loans, rising rents, establishing a career and starting a retirement account. Oddly, most of the winning states aren’t too far from the mighty Mississippi river. The survey found the highest proportions of young adults in Springfield, Mass., and our own little Provo. It also found most young adults living in poverty are in Madison, which also has the highest number of young people taking public transportation. The worst ranked cities were: 1. New York City, 2. Los Angeles, 3. Tampa, Fla., 4. Sacramento, Calif., 5. Fresno, Calif., 6. Stockton, Calif., 7. Santa Rosa, Calif., 8. Bakersfield, Calif., 9. Modesto, Calif. and 10. Riverside, Calif. As you can see, nine out of the 10 worst cities to live young and broke are in California. As a frequent visitor there, I can say mass transit sucks in all of those towns. But on the flip side, it’s great in the Big Apple—and there’s a pizza joint about every 30 feet. n

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Bold In the tiny Denver suburb of Castle Rock, Colo., the motto might be “If the house is rockin’, DO come knockin’!” Residents on Avery Way are in a tizzy about the Thunderstorm Play Palace, a 7,500-square-foot home where, neighbors told KDVR-TV, the owner invites swinging couples and singles to gather for wild sex parties. Invitees must make a “donation” ($70 for couples and single men, $20 for single women), and the parties include drinks, snacks and potluck dishes. “One had four crockpots,” said a neighbor, “showing up like they’re going to a Bunko party or something.” On the invitation, guests were asked to bring their own condoms and show respect for the “new furniture.” The host is a married father of three who feels harassed by the neighborhood, but he counters that he’s taken steps to be discreet, including installing soundproofing and making sure “there are no open areas.” But neighbors claim they hear “disturbing sounds” coming from the house. “You can hear people doing what they’re doing,” one resident told reporters. Castle Rock Police say the man is not breaking the law because he’s only taking donations, and the activities are confined to his home.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

chatter. “I look at everything that my daughters show me, but it never stung my curiosity to have (a phone),” she said.

WEIRD

Do Not Climb! The Black Panther isn’t feeling the love in South Korea lately. The Walt Disney Co. sent two statues of the superhero to Busan to celebrate Marvel Studios’ filming along Korea’s southern coast. But on March 17, according to The Korea Herald, a 32-yearold drunk man was arrested after he vandalized the statue in the Gwangbok-ro shopping district, and on April 21, the statue near Gwangalli Beach was toppled and part of its head broken off. An official from the Korea Film Council thought someone had probably tried to climb the statue, despite numerous off-limits signs.

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Look-alikes Dolores Leis, 64, of Nanton in Galicia, Spain, is a modest wife and potato farmer. But thanks to the internet, she has found fame as “Trump’s Galician sister.” The Associated Press reports that a journalist researching farming posted a photo of Leis at her farm on Instagram, and the striking resemblance between her and the U.S. president caught the attention of the web. “I say that it must be because of the color of the hair,” Leis told La Voz de Galicia on April 24. She added that she’s not overwhelmed by the sudden attention because, unlike her doppelganger, she doesn’t use a mobile phone and isn’t much interested in online

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What’s in a Name? A Planet Fitness customer in Saginaw Township, Mich., was alarmed April 15 to find a Wi-Fi network named “remote detonator” while searching for an available connection. The gym manager evacuated the building and called police, who brought in a bomb-sniffing dog and declared the facility safe after a three-hour shutdown. Saginaw Township Police Chief Donald Pussehl told MLive.com that people often choose odd names for their Wi-Fi networks, adding that one on his own street is called “FBI surveillance van.”

New World Order Jaywalkers, beware: The city of Daye, in Hubei province China, has installed water sprayers and an electronic screen at a crosswalk to stop people from crossing on a red light. Five pylons were placed along the road April 16, China Daily reported, three of which identify offenders using sensors and then spray them with water vapor. Other pylons “photograph people crossing against red lights,” explained Wan Xinqiang of the Daye public security bureau, and “a large electronic screen at the intersection will instantly display their photos. ... If the equipment works well, we will utilize it throughout the city.”

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n On April 4, a homeowner in the Longton area of Stoke-onTrent, England, returned home to discover a man bathing in his tub and enjoying a cup of Oxo (broth), according to the BBC. When police arrived, the 36-year-old naked man tried to flee but was caught and arrested. The homeowner complained: “He ate me crisps, had five rounds of corned beef and sauce, ate a jar of pickles, had two ice creams and a can of Coke.”

Crime Report In October 1981, Stephen Michael Paris escaped from the Jess Dunn Correctional Center in Muskogee, Okla., where he had been serving a nine-year sentence for drug possession and distribution. Using the name Stephen Chavez, Paris managed to evade authorities until April 12, when investigators tracked him down, thanks to his mother’s obituary, at an office in Houston where he was working. Now 58 years old, Paris was mentioned in his mother’s tribute, using his alias, the Associated Press reported, and after confirming his identity with fingerprints, the U.S. Marshals Service returned him to custody.

Babs De Lay

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n In the seaside village of Lytham St Annes, England, Douglas Cholmondley Travis, an 88-year-old member of the local Neighborhood Watch, was on patrol Oct. 10, 2017, when he and an 87-year-old watch colleague noticed a van turning into Lytham Park Cemetery. Regarding the vehicle as suspicious, they began taking pictures of it until Antony James, driver of the van, there only to visit family graves, grew angry and stopped, according to Metro News. James got out of his van to confront Travis, causing a panic, according to defense attorney Robert Castle, that resulted in James being knocked down by the Neighborhood Watch vehicle and Travis charged for reckless driving and assault. “This is all terribly sad,” Castle told Blackpool Magistrates Court in late April, as his client is “one of the eyes and ears of the police.” Travis was fined 40 pounds plus court costs.

Bathing News Evelyn Washington, 29, broke then crawled through a window in a Monroe, La., home on April 17, then settled into a warm bath with a bag of Cheetos and a large plate of food within reach on the toilet lid. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that when the homeowner returned from work around 5 p.m., she called police, who removed Washington to the Ouachita Correctional Center, where she told them “an unknown male told her to break into the victims’ residence.”

GRADUATES!

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Oops! Police officers in the German town of Neustadt were called April 25 to an apartment building after reports of screaming led neighbors to suspect domestic violence, the Daily Mail reported. Instead, they found a couple receiving instruction in the Japanese art of Shibari erotic bondage from the apartment’s tenant. (“Shibari” translates as “the beauty of tight binding.”) In a statement titled “Fifty Shades of Neustadt,” police reported the couple were “well and in a good mood,” even asking the officers if they’d like to join in, but they had to decline.

Misguided Greyhound Bus passengers were frustrated on April 19 after their trip to New York was delayed by mechanical trouble and navigational challenges. The ride started in Cleveland, where the scheduled departure time was 2:30 a.m., passengers told WEWS-TV, but the bus didn’t leave until 6 a.m. After crossing into Pennsylvania, the bus turned around, and the driver explained he was returning to Cleveland because of mechanical difficulties. However, the driver missed Cleveland and drove all the way to Toledo before realizing the mistake and heading back to Cleveland. “We were on this bus for seven hours just going in a circle,” said passenger Morgan Staley.

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City Weekly May 17, 2018  

Movie Review 2018

City Weekly May 17, 2018  

Movie Review 2018