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Adultery, Fraud and the “Great Tortilla Caper”

Inside the life of a Utah private eye. B y Ca r oly n Ca mpbe l l


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY “I ALWAYS FEEL LIKE SOMEBODY’S WATCHING ME”

–Private investigator Scott Fulmer’s targets (and ’80s synthpop star Rockwell) Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 25 DINE 30 CINEMA 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

CAROLYN CAMPBELL

Cover story, p. 13 From profiling phone sex operators to alien abductees, Campbell has covered a breadth of subjects for us since the days we were called Private Eye. Fittingly, she shadowed a detective for this week’s cover story. “He’s totally a pro,” she says of her subject. “He knows how to stay undercover and not let nosy neighbors blow his cover.”

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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

APRIL 26, 2018 | VOL. 34

N0. 48

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

Cover story, April 26, “What, Me Worry?

A must read. Independent papers are doing the investigative journalism and explaining-tothe-people that the mob-captured MSM is failing at. Dear Ryan Zinke: Kiss my ass. This land belongs to all of us.

@NINAANDTITO Via Twitter

They are just doing what Trump campaigned on.

DAVE CALDWELL Via Facebook Brilliant cover.

ROGER W. KNOX Via Facebook MAD magazine, an unrelated question: Is Alfred E. Neuman more of a shorthand for general stupidity or short sightedness?

@JKTOTHEG Via Twitter

News, April 26, “Puff, Puff, Pass?”

It’s not a “think” issue anymore. It’s more of how Utah can slow its availability and accessibility. The “Churchislature” can’t stop this train.

VINCENT SEBASTIAN GREEN Via Facebook

@SLCWEEKLY

To nitpick [the author’s] use of quotation marks as a way as to not respond to his overall point is kind of silly and closedminded, don’t you think? Fact of the matter is, he is right. There is no reason for medical marijuana to not already be legal given all the good it can do in ending suffering. And let me take this one step further. In a state where smoking cigarettes and partaking of alcohol is legal, what is the hang-up with recreational marijuana use? Why is this the rallying cry of those opposed to legalizing medical use? It strikes me as a very ignorant and uninformed stance to take.

DAVID HUNT

Via cityweekly.net FAKE NEWS.

MICHAEL JAMES STONE Via Facebook Have you guys just stopped thinking? Opinion is just that. If you disagree with the opinion, state your reason for opposition. Saying things like “fake news,” “no collusion” and “witch hunt” is just repeating rhetoric—and quite frankly makes you look, well, unintelligent.

IRIS NIELSEN Via Facebook

Understand where our drug laws came from. All of them were based in racism.

It is the escape for someone not being able to put together a valid argument for why they disagree with something.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Meanwhile, “upstanding citizens” are drinking gallons of Diet Coke and popping Xanax like M&M’s.

Silly Mormons. I sympathize. It’s much easier to do what you are told rather than decide for yourself. Just realize although it’s a bit more difficult, it’s much more liberating to think for yourself.

IRIS NIELSEN

DYLAN DEAN TAFT Via Facebook

Opinion, April 26, “Mormons and Pot”

When you use quotation marks, most readers assume that you are quoting something verbatim. And yet President Hinckley never called the Iraq war a “just war,” He said some wars are justified, but all are horrific. When you can’t get even the most basic facts right, it destroys your credibility for everything else you have to say.

DUSTIN CAMMACK Via cityweekly.net

CHRIS NIELSEN

@LABOUSKIE Via Twitter

For the most part, I think the guest opinion piece was wellargued. The only thing I think needs improvement is the wording around those who need medical marijuana. The author writes “There are thousands of Utahns for which medical marijuana is the difference between years of endless suffering or functional, happy lives.” The wording here concerns me,

How top Zinke aides are undermining protections for public lands and endangered species. By John Dougherty

because it’s very vague. Maybe there are thousands, but where is this number coming from? It seems arbitrary. What does “endless suffering” mean? It just sounds like propaganda. My response to the column is, this may all be true, but I am unconvinced by the wording. If the argument is that the Mormon church spews the “word of God” without research, then the side arguing against it should be better researched.

trying to figure out life.

Midvale

BRITTNEY HEMINGWAY

MANDY PERSHING,

Funny that if an old white dude in a suit who says he “talks directly to God” and can make 15 million people give him billions of dollars, but whenever I say I talk directly to God, all I hear is “Pete, you ate too many mushrooms” and “we have to get out of this AutoZone, people are starting to stare.”

PETER MUSCARELLO Via Facebook

Blog post, April 26, “Guv supports medical cannabis in principle, but he’s against November ballot initiative”

Good thing he only has one vote.

IRIS NIELSEN Via Facebook

Hmm … talk of not trusting the voter.

@MARGARETOFG Via Twitter

It’s painful to watch LDS legislators with no imagination

EDWIN FIRMAGE Via Facebook

He’s honest and consistent. Doesn’t put party before the citizens he serves and represents. He takes risks to do what’s right. He may go with the unpopular vote, but it’s because he is selfless and cares about the people and families of Utah. No … wait. I had that completely backwards. Never mind. Via Facebook Who or what is holding him back on easing the suffering of others? How can he look a little kid in the eye who is suffering from numerous convulsions or seizures a day, knowing he has the power to help them and still turn away?

DEBRA VASQUEZ Via Facebook

Well you can’t expect him to take a stand opposite the Church, duh.

@PLAYNITECRWLERS Via Twitter

The governor needs to pull his head out of the LDS church’s ass! Cannabis would solve the Mormon opioid and heroin epidemic in a holistic fashion.

STEVE BENCH Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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GUEST

OPINION

Keep Dreaming

When President Donald Trump announced he was ending DACA, the governmental program that gave immigrants like myself who came here as children the right to work, I worried that my world would come crashing down. Immediately, I agonized how I would pay my mortgage and car loan and support my wife and 5-year-old son if I were to lose my job as an information technology manager. Now, as the deadline for Congress to save DACA has come and gone, I feel as if I’m suspended in slow motion. My current authorization allows me to work until the fall of 2019. Then what? Although I’m lucky to be settled in a good job for now at a community service nonprofit, so many of Utah’s estimated 13,600 DACA recipients are in limbo. They worry if they should postpone college plans to work and save money while they still have the right. All of our lives are on hold while we wait for Congress to act. In the meantime, a federal court ordered that we could apply for a renewal of our protected status. The thing is, no one knows how long that’ll last. This lack of inertia is particularly frustrating because both Democrats and Republicans are in agreement about protecting Dreamers. Just last week, 50 chambers of commerce, including the Salt Lake Chamber, Sandy Area Chamber and the Utah Hispanic Chamber, signed an open letter to Congressional leadership calling for bipartisan legislation to protect Dreamers.

BY LEONEL NIETO

It’s a relief to know these business leaders recognize the important role we Dreamers play in keeping our workforce young and competitive, contributing to the tax base and creating jobs for all Americans. I was just 11 years old when my mother brought me and my two older brothers to Salt Lake City from Mexico in search of a better life. I fought hard to learn English in a new school where barely anyone spoke Spanish. I’m the first child in my family to graduate high school, and I worked as a restaurant cashier to put myself through college, first at Salt Lake Community College and later, at the University of Utah. Those who think we leech off the federal government should chew on this: In the Beehive State, more than 91 percent of Dreamers are employed and pay taxes, according to the coalition New American Economy. Nationally, the vast majority have graduated from high school and taken at least one college course. I’m proud that I’ve succeeded in achieving part of the American dream. I own a home, support my family and help out my mom, who works as a seamstress. I love my job at Holy Cross Ministries and do my part to keep the organization up and running so we can empower Utah’s poorest communities. But I can’t tell you how difficult it is to wake up every day with this sense of dread that nothing has been resolved. I call on Congress to protect our ability to raise our families and give back to our communities now. Please don’t lose this political momentum. Please don’t forget about us. CW

West Valley City-based Leonel Nieto is director of data and IT operations at Holy Cross Ministries. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


Ketamine for Depression The Ketamine Wellness Center of Salt Lake City recognizes that ketamine costs only pennies per treatment and should be available to every American. The average time between when someone gets depression and when they get treatment is ten years. One in seven kids is depressed and few are getting treatment. There has been a 30% increase in teen depression in the past 7 years. Where there is no scientific statistical evidence of medical usefulness for our most commonly used antidepressants, ketamine can claim major success in treating 70 to 80% of depressed patients who have failed all other medicines. In the February 15th issue of Nature, the world’s most respected science journal, there were 3 articles on ketamine’s role in treating depression, anxiety and PTSD; ketamine was, they said, “the miracle drug of psychiatry of the past half century.” 80 million Americans = one in four, suffer from depression, anxiety, PTSD or some combination of the three, and 60,000 of these horribly suffering people will commit suicide this year. Ketamine is the only drug known to humankind that will immediately reverse thoughts of suicide. Remember that all ketamine is the same, and that this drug is extremely safe; we give this medicine in the emergency room to six year olds to sew up their “owies.” If there had been one child hurt, we would not be using ketamine for this. The Ketamine Wellness Center of Salt Lake City is determined to remain as affordable as possible; we are currently maintaining prices that are less than half that of our closest competitor.

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BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Nutritional Non-value

OK, great. Let’s not feed those kids. You know, Food Stamps, that imperfect, lifesaving program that conservative groups like Freedom Works dream of shutting down. They say it’s open to abuse, looks like corporate welfare and has too few poor people subscribing to it. Now, we have the new Farm Bill, on its way to “strip billions in nutrition benefits from American families,” according to The Daily Yonder, a blog devoted to rural issues. In Utah, rural communities have long had an outsized influence in politics. Now, take this curious effort to cut food assistance to poor rural families. Why? Because poor people make bad choices, and everyone knows you lose your right to choose anything if you’re poor. SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, will expire Sept. 30. And rural communities, where usage is 30 percent higher than urban areas, will be the losers.

8 | MAY 10, 2018

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On Their Side

Funerals weddings Birthdays make someone ’ s day

Art l a r o Fl

The

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

People in poverty need someone on their side. Utahns Against Hunger is an organization working to help. Here’s what they’re finding about the Farm Bill: Some of the provisions would actually reduce state flexibility. It would cut food assistance to almost every type of SNAP participant and create a new bureaucracy to give—wait for it, a whopping $30 per person per month— for employment assistance. It would require SNAP recipients to verify their work requirement monthly or be sanctioned for a year. SNAP last year reached 82,922 Utah households and 206,621 individuals, and it keeps an average of 53,000 Utahns—8 million people nationwide—out of poverty. Reform might be necessary, but it looks more like punishment than change.

Ordinarily Exceptional

Sarah Sellers. She came in second in the Boston Marathon. That might be all you know about her. If you read the Deseret News, you’ll know how she maybe channeled the Mormon Doctrine and Covenants during her unexpectedly successful run. You’ll hear that her faith helped her when she fractured her foot at Weber State University. The Salt Lake Tribune gave her a thumbs-up, and talked a lot about her Weber State coach and her training. But Arizona Daily Star columnist Greg Hansen slaps you upside the head: “I prefer to think it was one of America’s most inspiring distance-running stories since Billy Mills won the 10,000 meters gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.” Why? Because unlike Desiree Linden, the No. 1 finisher, Sellers had no sponsors, trained by herself and isn’t a full-time runner who collects whiskies and tapestries like Linden. Hers is a story of a struggling, working woman—you know, ordinary and exceptional.

STRAIGHT DOPE Call 911

BY CECIL ADAMS

Every day I see ambulances, police cars, and fire trucks hauling ass down the road while masses of (mostly shitty) drivers scramble out of the way. Yet I’ve never seen an emergency vehicle crash or even bump into another vehicle, or a light pole, a parked car, etc. How often does it happen? —Jacquernagy, via the Straight Dope Message Board

Oh, often enough. In the early ’00s, when an uptick in cop-car fatalities lined up with a long-running decline in violent crime, it was looking like vehicle crashes had replaced getting shot as the leading cause of line-of-duty death for U.S. law enforcement. The trend has swung back since then, but whether or not you’re seeing these accidents, they’re definitely happening. It’s not just cops, of course. A 2012 analysis calculated that there are about 3,100 firetruck accidents each year, claiming about five firefighters’ lives. Vehicle crashes are also a big part of what makes firefighting the dangerous job it is, accounting for 20 to 25 percent of deaths (trailing only “stress and exertion” as a cause). A study from 2015, compiling 20 years of data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, estimated an annual average of 4,500 ambulance crashes, a third of which result in injury. The yearly death toll for these crashes is approximately 33, but only a quarter of these happen inside the ambulance—the balance is borne by people who have the misfortune of being in the vehicle’s way. One exacerbating factor here is choice of ride. Emergency vehicles, particularly fire trucks, are rollover-prone. Another is that the folks in them simply aren’t wearing their seat belts: the NHTSA crash data revealed that four in five rear-of-ambulance EMTs weren’t buckled up, nor were 22 percent of the drivers. And while nearly all the patients were secured in transit with at least the bare-minimum lateral belt, only a third were (in the words of EMS World magazine) “correctly restrained” using a shoulder belt as well. Perhaps a reason you haven’t witnessed these accidents yourself is that they tend to occur under specific conditions: often on rural roads, often at night. And with less fanfare than you might imagine: according to a study from Michigan of 13,000 crashes involving EVs over a five-year period, less than 30 percent of the vehicles were on an emergency run at the time—i.e., with flashers and sirens going. The others were tooling around on non-emergency business. Police-related crashes dwarfed fire and ambulance accidents in this study, both on emergency and non-emergency runs. As noted above, EV crashes don’t just involve the EV personnel—there’s the rest of us to consider, too. A scan of the headlines yields plenty of instances where civilians found themselves on the blunt end of an emergency vehicle: two children fatally struck last November by a Los Angeles

SLUG SIGNORINO

HITS&MISSES

sheriff’s car en route to a shooting site; a Fort Worth pedestrian killed the following day by a police cruiser that wasn’t on its way to a call at all; a 2016 incident on the New Jersey shore in which a police car traveling 100 MPH in a 35 zone, sans sirens or flashers, hit a woman crossing the street, who survived only to be subsequently grilled by officers about how much she’d had to drink that night. A note about this last one: the policeman behind the wheel later explained he’d been chasing down a vehicle which had been observed . . . speeding. This brings to mind a 2004 analysis in the journal Injury Prevention in which researchers sought to figure out how many motor vehicle crash deaths in the U.S. were specifically related to police pursuits. In a nine-year period the authors identified 2,654 crashes, involving 3,965 vehicles and resulting in 3,146 fatalities. That already seems a bit stiff, but get this: 1,088 of those fatalities—more than a quarter—were “not in the fleeing vehicle.” Forty were police officers, 102 were nonmotorists—pedestrians, bicyclists, et al—and 946 were “occupants of vehicles uninvolved in the police pursuit,” which is to say unlucky by-drivers. “Approximately 300 lives are lost each year in the United States from police pursuit related crashes and one third of these are among innocent people, not being pursued by police,” the authors conclude (they might be having some trouble with the presumption-of-innocence concept here, but we’ll move along), figuring that these fatalities account for 1 percent of all yearly motor-vehicle-related deaths— not enormous, but hardly insignificant. They also cite a previous finding that as many as half of police pursuits stem from mere traffic violations (as seen in that New Jersey episode above), rather than, say, felonies. The authors recommend further consideration of policies to (e.g.) limit police pursuit speed, or limit offenses for which pursuit is permissible. Of course this isn’t the only front on which it’s lately been suggested that cops might try to effect a less-lethal outcome; I wouldn’t hold my breath. I would, however, be sure to look both ways when crossing. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

ENERGY SUMMIT

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There’s been a lot of news about our energy future—how it’s at risk and how it’s adversely affecting our health. Now, you can hear what you can do to create a “renewable and regenerative future.” This event just happens to be around the time of the Governor’s Energy Summit, and you can guess what the governor thinks about the whole mess. You can go to that for between $109-$229, or to The People’s Energy Summit for free. “In contrast to the annual Governor’s Energy Summit that primarily focuses on advancing an all-of-the-above, businessas-usual approach to resource development, we will elevate the voices of protectors, youth, frontline communities, laborers, gardeners, innovators in clean energy, public lands users and managers, and creative change makers,” organizers say. The City Library Plaza, 210 E. 400 South, Saturday, May 12, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., free, bit.ly/2HNVJdz.

One of a kind items at a one of a kind store

SCHOOL SAFETY LOBBYING

Interim session at the Legislature is starting up, and it’s a place where you can make a difference. Action Utah is starting a monthly series to discuss legislative issues, beginning with school safety in the wake of the Parkland shooting. You can take an Interim Session Tour of the State Capitol and attend some of the public committee meetings as you learn how to make an impact in person or at home. State Capitol, 350 N. State, Senate Building cafeteria, Wednesday, May 16, noon-1 p.m., free/space limited, bit.ly/2HQOsd0.

INLAND PORT ACTION

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10 | MAY 10, 2018

GET A DAMN HAIRCUT

Unique decorative items for home or office. Lower Level Center Court Trolley Square

The Legislature has decided that development is more important than environment, and certainly more important than local control. We’re talking about the Inland Port, which is not really a port in the sense of water unless you think of it as a businessman’s wet dream. Given the legislation that made this possible, the public at least has a chance to raise its voice against this monster transport and storage facility near the fragile Great Salt Lake. You can plead for more consideration, a zero-emission development and a change in statute by saying, “We support a clean inland port!” and signing this petition. bit.ly/2jsvVZZ.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

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NEWS

BUSINESS

Puppy Mayhem

West Jordan puppy store and Sandy ordinance offer glimpse inside the pet adoption world. BY RAY HOWZE rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

After facing opposition in Sandy, Lizzy hulet opened her new puppy store in West Jordan.

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MAY 10, 2018 | 11

having to spend hundreds of dollars in veterinarian bills because it was infected with parvovirus, a common disease that spreads easily among puppies. When she heard about Hulet’s store possibly opening in Sandy, she and dozens of others decided to attend the February meeting. Mortensen says she has “nothing against responsible and ethical” breeding, but worries about some of the dangers adopting from a store. “Honestly, I know people always say, ‘Well, they’re just against selling at all,’” Mortensen says. “But there is a huge difference between ethical and responsible breeding versus what Puppy Barn does.” According to the Daily Herald, city officials with American Fork would respond to complaints about the store, but came “back clean every time.” Mortensen says she was upset with her experience at Puppy Barn because there was little customer protection— the vet costs she incurred, for example—and she doesn’t want to see it happen to other families. Until then, animal advocates and city councils will be taking on the “adopt, don’t shop” campaign themselves. “The ordinance, we’re hoping, encourages people to support adopting from a shelter or rescue,” Shepherd says. “It’s not to shut down any stores, but a step in the right direction to make people aware they have to question where that puppy is coming from—it’s a buyer-beware world.” CW

“If a brick-and-mortar store is to open, they need to source their inventory—their animals—from a qualified rescue or a municipal county shelter,” he says about the ordinance. “So, it helps us by moving the animals we have in our care and custody out to points of contact—it’s a further means of networking for a shelter.” Last year, the shelter had a 99 percent save rate for dogs and a 93 percent save rate for cats, Williams says. They only had to euthanize one dog for ageand illness-related reasons. The brick-and-mortar adoption model, though, is one Williams says is a dying breed. “It seems like society wants more animal care and control and for us to provide them a higher level of service than they’ve experienced in the past,” he says. “The efforts of the city council help set that policy.” For some people like Sandy resident Wendy Mortensen, their experiences with previous pet stores have led them to be vocal advocates for the swelling adoption vs. purchase model. Mortensen is a member of the Facebook group “Puppy Barn Victims,” that has more than 2,000 followers. The Puppy Barn is a pet store that recently moved from American Fork to Saratoga Springs and has drawn similar criticism for its business model, according to reports in Provo’s Daily Herald. Mortensen says she adopted her puppy from there in 2015, but ended up

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there,” she says, referencing puppy mills. She also says she won’t take in puppies under 12 weeks of age—a time when their immune systems are still developing. But those on the other side—the Humane Society of Utah, Best Friends Animal Society and countless other adoption advocates—warn that because places such as Hulet’s can still operate in cities with lax regulations, they want to educate the public on “adopt, don’t shop.” “If you think of a Petco or PetSmart, they never sold [puppies] to make a profit,” Deann Shepherd, communications director with the Humane Society, tells City Weekly. “They always worked in a community … instead of profiting on pets and buying from puppy mills, they support shelters to adopt from their facilities.” Puppies inside Hulet’s store are listed at prices as high as $2,400 for a French Bulldog. While Hulet says she wouldn’t mind bringing pets in from a local shelter, she says shelters won’t bring them to stores that also have dogs from other sources. Hulet’s husband is from Ukraine and she says they have family that help bring puppies from that region as well. Ian Williams is the director of Animal Services in Sandy. During his tenure, the shelter has transitioned to a no-kill facility. He also advocates for better adoption practices such as outlined in the city’s latest ordinance.

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ips, yelps and barks ring out from within the small storefront in West Jordan. Inside is an overload of cuteness— puppies. French bulldogs, papillons, spaniels and other breeds hop about their pens vying for attention. Except there’s a little more to the pups than their cute eyes, ears and licks. The store—Puppy Matchmakers—is open for business but its opening didn’t come without a few hurdles in neighboring Sandy and a bout with the passionate animal-advocate community. And it ultimately led Sandy’s city council to pass a law last week banning the sale of dogs that didn’t come from a “city or county animal shelter or animal-control agency, a humane society or a non-profit animal-rescue organization,” according to the new ordinance. In West Jordan, though, Puppy Matchmakers’ owner Lizzy Hulet has found a place to do business that didn’t leave her “with a bad taste in my mouth.” That isn’t to say there still aren’t opponents of Hulet’s business model. “Adopt, don’t shop” advocates—like those that came to the Sandy Planning Commission meeting in February and turned Hulet away—vie for what they say are smarter adoption practices in a world that needs more regulation. “Their agenda is just to stamp out any stores that are going to sell puppies, going to sell kittens, anything like that,” Hulet says, standing outside her shop on a recent Friday afternoon. “Where I understand and sympathize with a lot of their concerns, it was really frustrating because they didn’t hear anything about how we’re different—and we’re very different.” By different, Hulet explains, she tries to visit with breeders and see the environment the puppy is coming from. “If it’s a huge multi-dog establishment, we’re not going to buy our puppies


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was determined to stay missing, Fulmer researched her past social media posts and employed facial recognition software. With his sociable manner and fresh-faced, everyman good looks, it’s easy to picture Fulmer blending in at any back-to-school night or neighborhood picnic. It also makes sense that his disarming persona and calm conversational manner would help him elicit information during investigations. In the runaway case, conversations with the subject’s friends and acquaintances helped him discover that the missing girl was living with a man in Brigham City. Fulmer also spoke with local informants who were often, “people who live on the fringe of society.” He learned that the man worked at a Brigham City restaurant. He conducted surveillance on the man’s house. For several days, he saw nothing. Then, on a rainy afternoon, the man and a passenger drove out of his garage and headed into town.

MAY 10, 2018 | 13

he girl didn’t want to be found. She quit using social media. A previous runaway, the 15-year-old threatened her family, saying she would claim abuse if they brought her home one more time. “The abuse threat wasn’t true—she just wanted to stick it to them,” says Scott Fulmer, principal and lead investigator at Fulmer, P.I., a Utah private detective agency. Speaking of the runaway, he recalls, “She was using drugs. Her family cared about her. They wanted to give her emotional support and put her in rehab.” Along with missing persons, Fulmer has spent 30 years investigating cheaters, frauds and crooks. “Usually, with a runaway, you flood the area with fliers and searches,” he says. Realizing that this girl

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Inside the life of a Utah private eye.

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Adultery, Fraud and the “Great Tortilla Caper”


SARAH ARNOFF

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“They ran a couple of errands, but it seemed like everywhere they went, there was a drive-thru.” He could see the driver, but not the passenger. Finally, when the pair stopped at a gas station, Fulmer shot a video showing that the girl had cut her hair and tried to change her appearance. “My next step was to call the authorities and have her picked up.” The runaway’s experience falls in the one-third of Fulmer’s cases that involve missing persons and infidelity situations. Another third includes workman’s compensation and disability fraud. The last third covers business issues such as trademark infringement. In chasing alleged cheaters, Fulmer says that when someone suspects a spouse of cheating to the point of hiring a private detective, the suspected cheater most often is, well, cheating. But not always. One Salt Lake woman suspected that her husband was having an affair during his lunch hour. She could never reach his cell phone during that time. “He worked at a manufacturing company,” says Fulmer, who surveilled the man several times during the noon hour. “Every time I watched during that time, he walked out to his car, rolled down the windows, turned off his phone and took a nap. There was no evidence that he was seeing anyone.” He adds, “Sometimes, a client’s suspicions turn out to be true. But at other times, it’s all in their head. Often, the truth isn’t known until they hire a private investigator.” He explains that proving an affair—and surveillance in general—doesn’t happen as smoothly as it does on TV. If a man wants to take his wife’s infidelity to court, their stories could easily conflict. “The husband might claim his wife has been seeing this guy for 13 months. She could say it was just that one time. I need to show video of successive areas and locations and times to prove that it is what it is.” He adds that, in infidelity cases, typically there is no smoking gun. “We’re often able to document a couple entering a hotel or kissing in a parked car. But it’s rare to actually film anyone having sex.” Yet, after days of trailing a man named Chase with no result, Fulmer followed him to an area behind a Lowe’s home improvement store. Fulmer was surprised when a redheaded woman drove up in a black Audi. Her long auburn hair was swept back into a ponytail and she wore black yoga pants that reached just below her knees. “She had a derriere so tight you could have bounced a quarter off it and put your eye

out,” Fulmer recalls. Chase climbed down out of his white Hummer and was leaning against his vehicle when the two began embracing. Fulmer was conducting surveillance at the eastern end of the building. He felt sure he couldn’t move closer without the couple suspecting his presence. But he got out his camera. “That’s when I got an eyeful,” he recalls. The woman, who turned out to be a yoga instructor, knelt down and unbuckled Chase’s belt. “You can guess what happened,” Fulmer says. “Right there in the parking lot behind Lowe’s close to the dumpster.” He knew his client would be heartbroken. “But she needed to know. She had to know.” Fulmer’s seen women cry. Men, too. He says it gets to him when the men cry. “Sometimes, I want to say, ‘Come on, buddy.’” One man from Kaysville who had been married for 25 years wanted Fulmer to meet with him right away at a hotel in Layton. The money for Fulmer’s retainer was sitting on a nightstand. The potential client said his wife was having an affair and wanted Fulmer to prove it. “I did some surveillance and did catch her having the affair.” But when Fulmer’s final video depicted the woman planting flowers in the home where she and the man had raised their children, somehow, this familiar domestic act gave the client pause. “When I said she was planting flowers, he said, ‘Never mind. I just can’t do this anymore. I don’t know what I’ve done to fail her.’” And that was that. He adds that an affair can affect not only a divorce, but could also weigh in on alimony and child custody. “In Utah, the only way you can stop paying alimony is to prove cohabitation,” the detective says. He recalls an instance where a woman had her lover’s garage door opener and would park in his garage. Fulmer knew from the many times that she came and went from the man’s carport, “That she wasn’t there just to redo the draperies; she was obviously comfortable there. I have to prove that the couple is living in what the court would see as a spouse-like relationship.” He admits that his work takes time—and requires money. He offers a free consultation to potential clients. Before taking on an infidelity case, he asks lots of questions, such as, “What is her schedule? When did things change? Are there any kind of medical issues?” Once he decides to take on a case, he usually charges a $2,000 retainer up front. His hourly rate is $85. “When you go to a doctor, do you want the cheapest one, or the one on the


“That’s when I got an eyeful,”

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fulmer recalls. The woman, who turned out to be a yoga instructor, knelt down and unbuckled Chase’s belt. “You can guess what happened,” he says. “Right there In the parking lot behind Lowe’s, Close to the dumpster.” He knew his client would be heartbroken, “But she needed to know. She had to know.”

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MAY 10, 2018 | 15

staff of Boston General Hospital, if you can afford him?” If someone says they just have $500, he will say, “We can do that. But I’m not sure if it will give you peace of mind or not. What if that is the one time when she isn’t with him?” Real-life cases take much more time than those of TV P.I.s, who, Fulmer says, are never portrayed as sweating or sitting hungry in the car. And during surveillance, if it’s raining, “you have to be able to film and drive without killing yourself.” In his new book, Confessions of A Private Eye: My Thirty Years Investigating Cheaters, Frauds, Missing Persons and Crooks, Fulmer recounts how, in his early surveillance days, “I made just about every possible mistake in the book. I lost my subject constantly. Someone called the police because I set up a stationary surveillance position that seemed out of place. Once, as I moved from the front seat to the back seat, I accidentally hit the car horn with my rear end. Neighbors walked out to the car and asked if they could help me. One even brought me a cold drink, saying it was much too hot to be out there doing whatever I was doing.” Yet as time passed, his tools—which now include all kinds of apps, a video camera about the size of a key fob, a covert camera, a GPS tracker and a PDF converter—and his skills improved. He now knows that if he follows someone into a restaurant, he can’t let the hostess seat him just anywhere. He looks for the people he is surveilling, then tells the waitress, “I’d like to sit over there.” He pays his restaurant bill at the beginning, when he orders his food, asking, “How about if I pay now?” That way, as soon as the subject leaves, Fulmer is free to go, too, without losing any time. He has owned his own firm since 2006 and began by working for other firms when he lived in Texas. He’s seen P.I.s from all walks of life, “a local DJ, a drama teacher, a housewife.” To be a private detective, he says, it helps to be a self-starter, to have a natural curiosity and a rapport with people. “It also takes a lot of patience to sit in a car for eight hours. You are by yourself on surveillance, but then you have to get out of the car and talk to people.” It helps to be good at keeping secrets. “Some people are so verbose they tell everything that’s going on,” he says. “You need to write and communicate well and have a good bladder.” Fulmer eats a good breakfast in the morning—sometimes hitting a breakfast buffet— and takes along lots of water, nuts and fruits during surveillance. “I rarely get bored. My mind is always going 100 miles an hour. I can’t crack open a book, but I can listen to talk radio and audio books.” It’s important to have superior powers of observation, he says. “On a workman’s comp case, if you’re at the subject’s house and his grass is overgrown, you know he’s probably going to mow his lawn. If there is Quikrete, a project is probably going to happen.” Fulmer’s powers of observation truly came in handy on a case he calls “the great tortilla caper.” This wasn’t a case of a missing person. It was a case of missing tortillas—thousands of dollars worth. Along with the tortillas, tacos, bottles of salsa and jalapenos kept disappearing, too. “I’m talking about $20,000 of missing product,” Fulmer says. Caliente Sabroso Foods is a major wholesale distributor of Mexican food products to restaurants and grocery stores throughout the southwestern United States. The Estrada family began producing pork tamales and fresh flour tortillas in the kitchen of their home. They initially sold them to friends, neighbors and co-workers. The business soon took off and eventually grew into a multi-million dollar business offering more than 30 types of products. Fulmer met Rocky Sepulveda, a senior facility manager, at one of their food production plants. Sepulveda figured that the company was losing about two pallets of product a week—some $3,000 worth. “It was such a small amount that it had gone unnoticed for several weeks until it was finally recognized as an irregularity in a normal monthly audit,” Fulmer recalls. By then, the company had already lost an estimated $10,000 worth of Mexican food. The amount was small compared to the millions Caliente Sabroso made each year. “But it also meant somebody was stealing from the company. And Rocky wanted to put a stop to it,” Fulmer says. Walking through the warehouse, the private eye noticed outdated security cameras and major dead spots that the cameras could not observe. He saw that the warehouse didn’t have an alarm system and their key control procedures were problematic. “Given the size and resources of the company, this surprised me,” Fulmer says. He concluded that the thefts were most likely an inside job. “Someone had probably made an extra key and was returning after hours to load up on product,” he says. Positioning himself in an empty building across the alley from the Caliente Sabroso warehouse, Fulmer conducted surveillance on random evenings for a week or two without success. Then, shortly before midnight, on a foggy evening in late November, a lone male figure suddenly walked through the fog in Fulmer’s direction. “He walked quietly toward the warehouse, ascended the stairs next to the main loading dock and then came to a stop at the warehouse door. “He then turned and looked right at me. I think


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my heart skipped a beat,” Fulmer says. But the man couldn’t see him in the dark of night. Fulmer watched the man remove a set of keys from his pocket. Then the private detective grabbed his cell phone and contacted another investigator who was stationed inside the warehouse. That man shot videos of the thief slithering around and hugging the walls to avoid the security cameras. From the empty building, Fulmer suddenly saw a U-Haul truck pull up behind the loading dock. The first thief opened the door for the one driving the truck. Fulmer watched as the two men loaded two full pallets of Mexican food products into the back of the truck with ease. The two thieves used the same modus operandi the following Wednesday. And on the Wednesday after that, they tried it again. But this time, the company was ready. The bandits were busted mid-thievery by detectives and police officers who jumped out with guns drawn. He was right about his inside job hunch. “Both bandits were current employees. One was even a shift manager who had an extra key,” Fulmer says. He was also right in guessing that the two men were selling the supplies to local mom-and-pop restaurants for pennies on the dollar. Fulmer has studied human behavior such as the power of habits and body language. He says he can watch two people walking down the street and tell which is the dominant one in the relationship. He says that understanding the power of habits has helped in his surveillance work. “About 45 percent of what we do is based on habit. People often take the same route home from work every day. I always shave the same side of my face first and always put my left leg in a pair of pants first.” Having worked and lived in other states, he says that Utah is most often “typical small town U.S.A. I have to be careful in smaller cities, like Heber or Midway. Some people want to know why you are there.” A positive aspect to being a detective in Utah is that, “People are very kind, nice and trustworthy. It’s kind of a down side that when I’m driving around, I see 5 year olds walking down the street by themselves.” In a fraud case where an insurance company hired Fulmer, a mother and daughter were hit by a utility truck. The utility company was paying their medical bills and wanted to settle the claim. But the mother claimed that she and her daughter had suffered severe and possibly permanent injuries. “She called the claims adjuster weekly. She wanted more money. She wanted a car. She wanted a different doctor,” Fulmer says.

He began investigating and discovered that information a neighbor of the mother and daughter had passed along to the insurance company was correct. Their injuries were minor. The daughter turned out to be the star of the high school volleyball team. One night, Fulmer attended one of her games. “She crouched down and then sprang up quickly, extending her arms and using her fingertips to set the ball for one of her teammates. Best of all, she absolutely slammed, and, by that, I mean viciously clobbered the opposing team with several brutal spikes,” he says. Each spike was accompanied by a high-pitched blood curdling grunt that reminded Fulmer of his days spent in bayonet training in the Army. “Every time she did this, the crowd went nuts. The girl was talented. And I got it all on video.” If the girl was talented, her mom was her greatest cheerleader. “Every time the daughter did something amazing, which was regularly, her mom literally jumped up and down,” he says. “She would also yell and wave her arms high above her head. She would then begin clapping and turn to face the audience as if to say, ‘That’s my daughter!’” Due to the video evidence he collected, the pair didn’t receive the huge financial windfall they were anticipating. In fact, they were forced to settle their claim and received a significantly smaller monetary settlement more in line with their actual injuries. Fulmer adds that insurance-fraud situations like theirs cost the American public approximately $80 billion a year. “And we wonder why insurance rates are so high,” he says. Fulmer does what he does because he has a desire to solve mysteries and to help people find closure and peace of mind. “In many ways, I’m still that blond haired little boy disappearing behind the library book shelves to revel in the stories of mysteries solved,” he says. “I’ve been fortunate enough to make a living at what I love to do.“ His wife, Valerie, is also a licensed P.I. who often handles reports and administrative details of the firm. It’s been a good life. Yet there are times when he feels strained. Fulmer sees the worst of humanity when people lie, cheat and commit fraud, assault and abuse. “I grow weary of trying to come up with last-minute practical solutions to other people’s desperate problems,” he says. “The ongoing stress of handling multiple investigations and the unrealistic expectations of clients can be emotionally exhausting,” he continues. So, does he have an exit strategy from this business? “That’s easy. Death.” he says. “I can’t imagine doing anything else. I’ll keep doing this as long as I can.” CW


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Felipe Esparza

Gangs, God and cocaine: These are just a few tales from Felipe Esparza’s world. His storytelling and deep baritone voice immediately separated him from other contestants on NBC’s 2010 season of Last Comic Standing. One Showtime special—They’re Not Gonna Laugh at You—and seven years later, Esparza wasn’t going to wait on anyone to hand him his next opportunity. Instead, he and his wife put up their own money and shot Translate This live at the San Jose Improv. “I didn’t know where it was going to go,” Esparza told podcast host and fellow comedian Bill Burr last fall. “I hope it goes to Netflix— somewhere.” But it was HBO that admired Esparza’s style, so the network ended up buying the special. Born in Sinaloa, Mexico, but raised in East Los Angeles, Esparza has become something of a hero in his old Boyle Heights neighborhood, donating to Homeboy Industries, a support program for former gang members. “My neighborhood was in the housing projects,” he told Burr. “I was selling crack on my first day; within one hour, I got robbed.” Since then, Esparza has completely changed his life, but still has a tough side to him, calling out those who refer to him an “overnight success” during a December 2017 appearance on LATV’s The Zoo: “Wow man—how long did I sleep?” Esparza curates a “smile now, cry later” genre of comedy, forged over decades of performing at improvs and nightclubs, and has proven he’s got something not only for Latino audiences, but for everyone. (Rachelle Fernandez) Felipe Esparza @ Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, May 10, 7:30 p.m.; May 11-12, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

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Actor Dan Sharkey didn’t always have a positive attitude toward Mamma Mia!, the lively musical inspired by the songs of ABBA— though it’s understandable why. Sharkey (pictured above right) auditioned for a role in the original Broadway cast, and when he didn’t land it, he “wrote it off after that,” he recalls. Then, around five years ago, his 80-year-old mother wanted to see the show in Las Vegas. “I was watching her watch the show, and saw how much fun she was having,” Sharkey says. “I think that’s when I started forgiving the show. It can be really silly, yet also really poignant.” That poignant story weaves the Swedish super-group’s pop hits into the tale of a young woman who, on the eve of her wedding, tries to learn the identity of her biological father, and contacts the three men from her mother’s journals who could be the guy (Sharkey plays one of the paternal prospects). The fact that it works as more than a “jukebox musical,” Sharkey attributes to its sense of optimism. “We tend to be in a dark time politically,” Sharkey says. “I think it’s important to go be able to go to the theater, and come out with a sense of hope.” It also offers a unique energy for the actor, who self-deprecatingly describes himself as “kind of a big guy, a bald older man. This is a chance to do something totally different. I’m dancing a lot, which is pretty hilarious. … It’s usually, ‘You stand over there until we’re done dancing, and then you come back.’” (Scott Renshaw) Pioneer Theatre Co.: Mamma Mia! @ Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, May 11-26, dates and times vary, $42-$69, pioneertheatre.org

Hannibal Buress is a very funny fellow, a man prone to share everyday insights from a candid and unassuming point of view. His multitude of credits span several standup specials, a role on Comedy Central’s Broad City, his stint as co-host of Adult Swim’s The Eric Andre Show, his gigs writing for Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock, his big-screen appearances in the films Daddy’s Home (also starring Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg), Baywatch and Spider-Man: Homecoming, and his voiceovers in the animated features The Secret Life of Pets and The Angry Birds Movie. That’s an impressive résumé, and it might explain why his current national stand-up tour is selling so well. Recently, however, the public has also been revisiting the headlines Buress made in 2014 when, during a performance at a Philadelphia nightclub, he publicly called Bill Cosby a rapist while deriding him for his preachy image. At the time, those allegations had rarely been publicly acknowledged. “People think I’m making it up,” Buress had begun. “Bill Cosby has a lot of rape allegations ... When you leave here, Google ‘Bill Cosby rape.’” While Buress merely repeated what many people secretly suspected, it gave Cosby’s accusers the ammunition they needed, and ultimately led the man once touted as America’s favorite father to a very public disgrace. There’s more to Google now. Two weeks ago, Cosby was convicted of accosting three women and sentenced to prison. Buress, who once insisted he never expected his comments to go viral, has declined to comment. However, in fanning the flames, he proved that comedy is sometimes serious business. (Lee Zimmerman) Hannibal Buress @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, May 12, doors 7 p.m., $34.50, thecomplexslc.com

Pioneer Theatre Co.: Mamma Mia!

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SATURDAY 5/12

Tracy Aviary Urban Bird Festival From our country’s mascot to everyone’s favorite big yellow Muppet, birds have a central place in our culture—but since they’re usually soaring over our heads, it can sometimes be hard to appreciate them. Hosted by the Tracy Aviary, the Urban Bird Festival brings the community together to celebrate our feathered friends and meet them up close and in person with crafts, tours and demonstrations to engage and inspire all ages. The festival was founded in 2007 according to Julie Roehner, the aviary’s marketing and events coordinator. “The goal of the festival is to interest and educate non-birders about birds and their environments,” Roehner says, “in hopes they will become engaged and take the next step in their connection with nature.” The festival schedule is packed with activities aimed at educating the public on local birds and how best to coexist with them. The opening day includes a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Expedition Kea exhibit, which is home to not only kea, but other Australian and African birds as well. And like many of Tracy Aviary’s projects, visitors won’t be the only ones to enjoy the benefits. Kea are the world’s only Alpine parrots, and are listed as vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Natures’ Red List. “With decreasing populations caused by human conflict and habitat loss,” Roehner says, “Tracy Aviary, in partnership with the association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan, is starting an innovative breeding program where young kea will mingle to find their soulmates.” So come support some important bird lovin’. (David Miller) Urban Bird Festival @ Tracy Aviary, 859 E. 1300 South, May 12-13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., $7.95-$11.95, tracyaviary.org


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The Rest of the Story

True Stories tries to break journalistic storytelling out from behind the computer. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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etween changing business models and attacks by politicians, journalism in the 21st century is nobody’s idea of a smooth ride. Sometimes it requires a shift in thinking to see where it can go—even if that means re-imagining journalism as something that takes place on a stage, in front of an audience. This week marks the launch of True Stories, a first-time local showcase that attempts to turn journalistic storytelling into a multimedia event during a live stage show. Participants, including Salt Lake Tribune cartoonist Pat Bagley, Tribune staff writer Jennifer Dobner, radio producer/ podcaster Andrea Smardon and investigative reporter Andrew Becker are scheduled to present original stories, sometimes accompanied by images, video, live music or even animation. True Stories is the brainchild of photographer Kim Raff and KUER 90.1 FM writer/ producer Erik Neumann, who met for the first time in 2017 when Neumann was newly relocated to Utah from Northern California. Neumann had been familiar with a regular event in the Bay Area called Pop-Up Magazine, and felt there was an opportunity to present a similar kind of event in Salt Lake City. “The idea of Pop-Up Magazine is not our current sense of what a ‘pop-up’ event is,” Neumann says, “but more like a magazine that comes to life in front of you. It’s more dynamic, I think, and I found it really inspiring.” After an initial conversation in which the two discussed the possibility for a similar local event. Raff began the process of applying for a grant, and when they received the funding, she jokingly recalls thinking, “Well, now we have no choice. We’re doing it.” While Neumann was able to get KUER to sponsor the event, Raff began using her contacts in the local journalism community to ask people if they were interested in participating. Ultimately, only one person that they approached said no. “We’re working with people willing to challenge themselves,” says Raff, who is also one of the presenters, as is Neumann. “It does take some convincing. This is way outside my comfort zone [as a photographer]. I could say, ‘I’m doing it, so you should do it, too.’” “I think it is a really vulnerable experience for people who usually just sit in a

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room and work on their computer,” Neumann says. “That vulnerability can be really powerful for an audience, when you’re not seeing professional entertainers. It’s a unique group of people to be in that venue.” For Raff herself, she’s finding the experience to be a unique challenge. “Writing is not something that comes naturally to me,” she says, “so it’s interesting the process of preparing the script for my story. … To me, it’s like taking storytelling to a whole other place. I’m getting to write and employ plenty of elements of multimedia in a way you couldn’t in a magazine.” That sense of being able to expand the conventional boundaries of journalistic storytelling is a huge part of True Stories’ mission. Neumann notes that for most professional journalists, thinking about new ways of telling stories—incorporating social media or video—has practically become a job requirement. “Everyone in journalism is doing all sorts of mediums now,” he says, “whether we like it or not. This show is conducive to that merging of mediums.” “This is what journalism needs to be now,” Raff adds. “There’s that definition of insanity, about doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result, and journalism is stuck in that holding pattern.” Beyond the unique storytelling methods, there’s also a hope that bringing these journalists out into the public eye makes them more than anonymous parts of a me-

Kim Raff and Erik Neumann

dia machine. “We have all these podcasts like Serial where you hear the reporter going through their process,” Neumann says, “so there’s an appetite in the general public to see how it works. … At its best, the audience is probably having a connection with the person up there, and that comes from the contributor really being passionate about the story they’re telling, and wanting to share it with people.” While there have been plenty of challenging logistics behind launching a firsttime event—from finding the venue to coordinating all of the technical requirements for the evening—both Raff and Neumann express hope that this won’t be a one-timeonly situation. “I already have a rough list of people I’d want to ask for the next one,” Raff says with a laugh. “You don’t know if it will happen again. I think it’s just this crazy experiment we’re trying. We need to look at each other as allies, and think of ways we can help to make the community of journalism in Salt Lake City thrive.” CW

TRUE STORIES

The State Room 638 S. State Tuesday, May 15, 7:30 p.m. $20 21+ kuer.org


PERFORMANCE

2787, through May 13, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org

THEATER

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

moreESSENTIALS

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COMEDY & IMPROV

Felipe Esparza Wiseguys West Jordan 3763 W. Center Park Drive, May 10-12, times vary, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18) Frank Caliendo Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, May 10, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Sarah Tiana Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, May 11-12, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Hannibal Buress The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, May 12, 7 p.m., thecomplexslc.com (see p. 18) Julie Goldman/Belinda Carroll Club 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, May 11, 7 p.m., 21+, club.50westslc.com Rodney Norman Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., May 11-12, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Gary Bergera: Confessions of a Mormon Historian The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 10, 7 p.m. Maximilian Werner: The Bone Pile: Essays on Nature and Culture The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 12, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jessica Day George: The Rose Legacy The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, May 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

Artist Zachary Proctor reflects on historical moments—and the people and faces connected to them—in paintings at David Ericson Fine Art (418 S. 200 West, 801-533-8245, davidericson-fineart.com) through May 18, part of a joint exhibition with Michael Workman.

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Camelot CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through May 12, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., centerpointtheatre.com Cheerleaders vs Aliens Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, May 10-12, 7 p.m., parkcityshows.com Die Fledermaus Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, May 12-20, times vary, arttix.artsaltlake.org The Full Monty The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through May 19, dates and times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Fun Home Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through May 13, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Hamilton Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2797, through May 16, broadway-at-the-eccles.com Mamma Mia! Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, May 11-26, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 18) The Music Man Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through June 9, dates and times vary, hct.org Next Fall An Other Theater Co., Provo Towne Centre, 1200 Towne Centre Blvd., Provo, through May 26, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., anothertheatercompany.com Sense & Sensibility Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through June 2, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org What We’re Up Against Rose Wagner Center Studio Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-

American West Symphony: Carmina Burana Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 8575 S. 700 East, Sandy, May 12, 7:30 p.m., americanwestsymphony.com

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MAY 10, 2018 | 21


moreESSENTIALS Rhonda Gilliland: Cooked to Death: Lying On a Plate Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, May 15, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jo Schaffer: Stanley & Hazel Provo City Library, 550 N. University Ave., 801-484-9100, May 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Brian McClellan and Tyler Whitesides The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, May 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Woodland Fairy Festival Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, 801-566-8903, through June 23, gardnervillage.com Draper City Arts & Crafts Festival Draper Park, 12500 S. 1300 East, Draper, May 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., draper.ut.us Urban Bird Festival Tracy Aviary, 859 E. 1300 South, May 12-13, 10 am.-3 p.m., tracyaviary.org (see p. 18)

TALKS & LECTURES

True Stories The State Room, 638 S. State, May 15, 7:30 p.m., thestateroom.com (see p. 20)

VISUAL ART

22 | MAY 10, 2018

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GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Farmington, Utah June 8-9, 2018 Legacy Events Center 151 South 1100 West • Farmington, UT 84025 First Show of the Tri-State Mustang Show Series!!

6 Wild Horses • 6 Wild Burros 33 Trained Halter-gentled Horses All starting at $125! June 8 20th ANNUAL UTAH WILD HORSE & BURRO FESTIVAL Wild Horse & Burro Show: 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. Untrained Wild Horse & Burro Adoption: 10 a.m. Extreme Trail Challenge: 6 p.m. June 9 TIP Challenge Freestyle: 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Trained Halter-Started Adoption: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Wild Horse & Burro Show: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m. Facebook: utahwildhorseandburrofestival More information: 435-743-3128 or lreid@blm.gov

April Showers, May Flowers Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, through May 31, hornefineart.com Blue Nude Migration Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through May 12, slcpl.org Carol Bold Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through May 20, redbuttegarden.org Chapman Library 100th Birthday Historical Photo Exhibit Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through June 28, slcpl.org Connie Borup Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through May 11, phillips-gallery.com David Estes: People, Places, Things Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 2, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 26, utahmoca.org Ditchbank: Paintings and Ceramics Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 15, times vary, slcpl.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 13, utahmoca.org

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Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Familiar Flora: Four Visual Responses to Living With Plants Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through May 11, visualarts.utah.gov Glass Art Guild Show Pioneer Memorial Theatre Loge Gallery, 300 S. 1400 East, May 11-28, pioneertheatre.org In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 18, slcpl.org James W. Stewart: NIGHT and DAY Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through May 12, slcpl.org Jena Schmidt: A Part of Everything A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through June 1, agalleryonline.com Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Laura Sharp Wilson: Small Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, May 11-July 6, heritage.utah.gov LEGO City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Lenka Konopasek and Sarah Bown Roberts Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through June 8, saltlakearts.org Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Mara Elana Macaroni Gallery, 244 S. 500 West, Ste. 107, through May 31, macaronigallery.com Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 12, utahmoca.org Morgaine Fehlauer: Rituals God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through May 11, godhatesrobots.com Patricia Nosanchuk: Art in Ink, Healing Works Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 17, slcpl.org Piecing Together Mental Illness Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 20, slcpl.org Play On! Chase Home Museum of Utah Folk Arts, 1150 S. Constitution Drive, Liberty Park, through June 29, heritage.utah.gov Star Wars / Heroes and Villains Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through June 3, urbanartsgallery.org Zachary Proctor & Michael Workman David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, 801-5338245, through May 18, davidericson-fineart.com (see p. 21)


PEERY’S EGYPTIAN THEATER • OGDEN • MAY 17TH @ 8:00PM

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Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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JOSH SCHEUERMAN

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

S

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight Sunday, 3 p.m.-10 p.m. Best bet: Pizza and pasta combo Can’t miss: Chicken Parmesan

MAY 10, 2018 | 25

power, the Italian Village draws a pretty huge crowd of Murray and Midvale locals who no doubt like the place because of its straightforward menu, reasonable prices and ample parking. It also has the feel of a dining establishment that loves its community— owner Shay Bloomquist takes the time to respond to each and every Yelp and Facebook

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Discussing the restaurant’s role in my parents’ early years led to the familial revelation that pizza at the Italian Village was the last thing my mom ate before going into labor with all three of my older brothers. “Not you, though,” she says, “You are my Astro Burger baby.” Even on a Sunday night the place is packed. Based on its location and its staying

ince Mother’s Day is this week, I decided to invite my mom to visit Italian Village (5370 S. 900 East, 801-266-4182, italianvillageslc.com) with me for this article. I thought we’d order up some pasta, critique the place together and have a few laughs—which we did, of course. However, when I booked this pre-Mother’s Day get together, I was unaware that this very same Italian Village was a spot frequented by my parents when they were first married. “We would have a few Cokes, eat pizza, and it was divine,” she says.

The side of chicken Parmesan was the dark horse of the evening—it’s a surprisingly tender and juicy piece of breaded and fried chicken buried in a hearty mixture of marinara sauce and a few inches of melted cheese. They sprinkle a little paprika on the top, which imparts a smoky tang that ties all the flavors together nicely. If you plan on venturing off the pizza side of the menu, this is where I’d suggest you start. A few Cokes and pizzas dispatched, Mom and I start to wind down a bit. We box up what’s left of our pizza for my dad—“He’ll like the bit of nostalgia,” Mom says. Despite a few menu missteps, eating at Italian Village with my mom and learning about the role it played in my parents’ first years of marriage was a fantastic bonding experience. I suppose being able to wax nostalgic with the woman who brought me into the world transcends a few offkilter pasta dishes. CW

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Experiencing Italian Village with Mom.

appear to have been cooked with the pizza—they tasted fresh, and it’s pretty clear that they’ve been sprinkled on top after the pizza came out of the oven. The crust is tasty as hell. It has a bit of char from the oven, and it’s slightly thinner than average, which gives it a pleasantly chewy consistency. Overall, Italian Village’s pizza game is solid. They’re not the best pie joint in town, but great for families looking for the shared experience that gathering around a few gigantic pies at a local restaurant can offer. Things get a little trickier with the pasta. I like a lasagna that comes served like a slice of layer cake—I want to see a cross-section of meat, cheese, noodles and sauce in a five-inch tall slice that wobbles ever so slightly as it’s brought to the table. The lasagna at Italian Village comes served in a searing hot ramekin, drowned in soupy tomato sauce and topped with a dollop of cottage cheese. I have nothing against any of these things on principle; but the presentation factor was a bit muted. Flavor-wise, the lasagna delivers. It’s meaty and cheesy, though perhaps a bit over-salted—I think my mom’s lasagna might edge it out. “You’re full of it,” she replies to my opining. “But that’s nice of you to say.”

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That’s Amore!

review that comes along. According to my mom, the place has always had a laid back, family-friendly kind of vibe. Since pizza with pepperoni, mushrooms and black olives was the pie that officially kick-started my lineage, it made sense to start with a few pizza combos. Mom got pizza and spaghetti with meat sauce ($10.59) and I got pizza and lasagna ($10.79), with a side of chicken Parmesan ($4.99). While we waited for our food to arrive, Mom and I talked about the lay of the land; apparently a lot has changed since the restaurant opened in 1968. The booth at which we sat had been retrofitted with high partitions that attempted a sense of quasiintimacy. Along with these furniture changes, the floors and light fixtures also seemed redone, making the whole space look as if it was built within the past five years or so. The pizza combos are a great way to sample what Italian Village has to offer. Although the restaurant has bigger pizza sizes, the 8-inch pie with a skillet of lasagna or plate of spaghetti is a great way to carbo-load. “It still tastes the way I remember,” Mom says. “It’s the crust that always gets me.” I have to agree with my mom here. The veggie toppings don’t


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26 | MAY 10, 2018

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

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Restaurants around Salt Lake are offering special brunch and dinner menus in honor of Mother’s Day. Café Niche’s (779 E. 300 South, 801-433-3380, caffeniche.com) brunch buffet from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. includes cheddar-jalapeño biscuits and sausage gravy and cinnamon maple French toast bread pudding. Oasis Café (151 S. 500 East, 801-322-0404, oasiscafeslc.com) serves brunch in their courtyard patio from 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m, which features a prime rib carving station and a chocolate fountain. For dinner, Current Fish & Oyster (279 E. 300 South, 801-3263474, currentfishandoyster.com) has rolled out a few specials including a three-course prime rib dinner, which can be followed with a dessert of yuzu posset or flourless chocolate torte. Call ahead for pricing and reservations—you wouldn’t want your mom to think you don’t love her or something.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

A LA MAISON by

Frida Re-Brands

According to a recent post on their Instagram account, Frida Bistro has undergone some new—and very delicious-looking changes. On May 2, Frida became Rico Cocina y Tequila Bar (545 W. 700 South, 801983-6692), which is shaping up to be a more casual dining experience. The post also mentions that owner Jorge Fierro hopes to incorporate more of the food produced at the Rico Foods facility directly behind the restaurant, potentially increasing the culinary value of both establishments. While Frida Bistro will be missed, it’s exciting to see what Fierro has in store with the new space. Based on his reputation for creativity and knack for community involvement, it’s a safe bet that Rico Cocina y Tequila Bar will be something special.

Spring Pairing Dinner at Silver Fork Lodge

Big Cottonwood Canyon is lovely this time of year, and Silver Fork Lodge (11332 Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, 801-533-9977, silverforklodge.com) is one of the finest ways to enjoy the picturesque scenery we have in our backyard. As a spring kickoff, Silver Fork hosts a food-and-wine pairing on May 10, starting at 6:30 p.m. The five-course meal is accompanied by wines chosen by Mike Szchesney from Young’s Market, who is on hand to discuss the seasonal libations complementing dishes like panzanella salad and raspberry chicken. Admission is $60 per person or $36 sans wine.

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived 1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

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A Visit to Funky Town

Two different Belgians offer a change of pace. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

E

to show up. The same estery Belgian yeast punch appears a little more pronounced on the tongue than it does in the aroma. Up next, the dark fruit notes become more assertive, adding fig, raisin and plum to an already sugary malt base. The finish follows with more sweetness; there’s hardly any bitterness, with more caramel coming through as a little bit of warming booze adds contrast. Overall: I thought this was a pretty nice example of the style. Quads aren’t for everyone, since they’re generally pretty sweet and boozy, and rely quite a bit on the malts

and yeast to provide balance—which, if not done correctly, can result in a cloying mess. The whopping 13 percent ABV (believe it or not) is pretty well hidden for such a highoctane beer. It disappeared from my glass much quicker than I anticipated. These are just two of the many Belgian style options available from local breweries. If you ever find yourselves in a beer rut, consider looking at Saisons, dubbles, tripels, quads and others for a fresh perspective on what an Old-World beer can be. As always, cheers! CW

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

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O D H E AV E N FO N A M R E s G German Delicate sen & Restaurant

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very region of the world has beers that are unique to it. We’re very familiar with German lagers and English ales, but I think the world’s most unique-tasting beers come from Belgium. These beers have a style all their own, which comes down to the yeast. In general, the palates are described as funky, full of flavors that are reminiscent of clove, dough and bubblegum. This week, I found two new Utah beers that couldn’t be more different from each other, yet still scream, “I am Belgian!” Proper Black and Blue Skittlebrau: This beer pours a somewhat hazy fuchsia color, with a loosely foamy cap of froth on top. The aroma is a nice medley of musty dark berries with some earthy yeastiness.

The taste is pretty laid-back, with raspberry, blackberry and a minor mineral bite. The berries are far from sweet; fermentation has zapped a good deal of sugar, while keeping the fruity essence. Muddled funk (a great band name, by the way) and straight-up estery yeasty notes round out the palate, putting a nice big Belgian bow on this seasonal gift. The finish has a light flavor of earthy hops, which impart a little bitterness that doesn’t linger at all. Overall: This is a fairly enjoyable, complex and fruity version of the Saison beer style. It’s easy to drink with a berry flavor and aroma that are assertive yet complimentary to the base Saison. This 4 percent ABV beer is limited and won’t be available forever; everyone around me kept asking, “What’s in your glass”? That should give you an idea of Black and Blue’s trending status. Shades of Pale Cerberus: It pours a ruby red color with nice crimson highlights when the sun shines through it. The head has a bit of eggshell color to it, which fades to a pocky ring around the glass. The nose starts off with a higher amount of sweetness, with the Belgian yeast being the first to show up as it conveys a typical estery Belgian yeast aroma. Dark fruit notes add a nice mix of raisins combined with bubblegum, caramel malts and a little bit of noticeable alcohol. The taste seems to be pretty similar to the aroma, and it starts off with a lower level of sweetness as the yeast remains the first

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

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DRAPER 1194 East Draper Parkway (801) 571-3449

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REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

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Soho Food Park

The brainchild of Holladay residents Shelly and Mark Olson is the blessed antithesis of the garden-variety food truck roundup. The Olsons provide a spacious location, picnic tables, power and, perhaps the most important aspect, they curate each truck. During Soho’s three years, the Olsons have become experts in identifying a good truck. If a vehicle has been invited to join the park roster, it’s been evaluated and approved by some industry insiders. This year’s lineup brings back some regulars, along with a few new additions. World’s Best Corn Dogs  from Kaysville joins the roster; Park City’s Freshies Lobster Co. will be slinging Maine lobster rolls; Suzy Thai and Fiore Pizza will also be on hand to serve up some delicious curry and wood-fired pizza, respectively. The park is ideal for those who have been burned by a lackluster food-truck roundup, but still dig the idea of sampling a wide variety of mobile cuisine. The park is open from Thursday to Saturday, 5 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Reviewed April 12. 4747 S. Holladay Blvd., facebook.com/sohofoodpark


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RESTAURANT

Consider yourself lucky to live in a city where the french-fry experience has been elevated to that of a true indulgence. Not content to let fries be a greasy sidekick to a waffle or sandwich, Belgians long ago began finessing their potato presentation, from selecting and cooking spuds to serving them in paper cones to the addition of sauces and condiments, all of which have helped the humble fry make the leap to an exalted frite. The crisp golden frites at Bruges Waffles & Frites are cooked to perfection and served with housemade dipping sauces including mayonnaise, aioli, greens, lemon pepper dill, fry sauce, curry, the Zensation, Brasil, Zango, Andalouse, Samurai and Afterburner. In other words, they’re a star attraction. Multiple locations, brugeswaffles.com

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Go

Want to win friends and influence people? Just hit the drive-thru at Banbury Cross, order a dozen of the day’s freshest doughnuts and bring ’em to the office. A promotion, salary bump or corner office will soon be yours. That’s because, since 1986, Utahns have found the pastel yellow boxes filled with Banbury’s scrumptious raised and cake doughnuts simply irresistible. Ditto with their old-fashioneds, maple and chocolate bars, cinnamon crumb, strawberry frosted, cinnamon rolls, muffins, orange rolls and apple fritters. People who bring in these sinful delights to share with co-workers are just plain popular—beloved, even. 705 S. 700 East, 801-537-1433, facebook.com/banburycrossdonuts

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Mazza offers an assortment of Middle Eastern cuisine such as lamb and rice dolaa, musakhan, shawarma and kebabs, delectable baked kafta, maghmoor and much more. Owner Ali Sabbah takes pride in keeping his restaurants authentic, so the food and service is always top-notch. It wouldn’t be complete without the sizable wine list, with bottles from Lebanon, Morocco and Greece. 912 E. 900 South, 801-521-4572; 1515 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9259, mazzacafe.com


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Marvel Team-Up

Your favorite MCU actors in their non-comic-book collaborations.

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BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

f Avengers: Infinity War has shown us anything, it’s that the Marvel Cinematic Universe is … big. Like, really big. Dozens of characters fill its narrative, to say nothing of those who were part of earlier films in the series. At this point, if you’re a working actor who hasn’t landed a role in one of these movies, it might be time to ask your agent what’s up. Of course, one of the fun parts of such an expansive universe is noticing other films where some of these actors have crossed paths, either prior to their comic-book casting or subsequently. Here’s a far-fromcomplete look at some of the other stories where members of the MCU family shared the screen, often in fairly unexpected ways. The Horse Whisperer (1998): Long before Black Widow helped Captain America take down the covert HYDRA agent Alexander Pierce who had infiltrated S.H.I.E.L.D. in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Scarlett Johansson had a very different encounter with Robert Redford. A 13-year-old Johansson had her break-out film role as Grace, a girl who loses her leg in a horse-riding accident, then travels with her mother (Kristin Scott Thomas) from New York to Montana to find a trainer (Redford) who might be able to help Grace’s horse recover from the trauma.

Zodiac (2007): Marvel heroes have taken on a lot of bad guys, but here’s the story of a creepy villain who couldn’t even be captured by Hulk and Iron Man together. The fact-based story of the 1960s California serial killer casts Robert Downey Jr. as San Francisco Chronicle reporter Paul Avery,

who investigates the crimes with the help of cartoonist Robert Graysmith, while San Francisco police Det. Dave Toschi (Mark Ruffalo) leads the official investigation. The Hurt Locker (2008): The Iraq Warset drama won six Oscars, but also turned into an early collaboration between eventual costume-clad heroes. Jeremy “Hawkeye” Renner starred as Staff Sgt. William James, part of an Army bomb-disposal squad that also includes Sgt. JT Sanborn (Anthony “Falcon” Mackie). Also starring as Staff Sgt. James’ wife: Evangeline “The Wasp” Lilly. War Horse (2011): A pair of MCU stars fought against world-threatening evil in a different context in Steven Spielberg’s episodic adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s novel. In the early stages of World War I, a boy’s beloved horse becomes part of the British army cavalry, where he’s ridden by Capt. Nicholls (Tom “Loki” Hiddleston). Riding alongside Capt. Nicholls as commanding officer during their charge on a German camp: Maj. Stewart (Benedict “Doctor Strange” Cumberbatch). Rush (2013): Thor might have been M.I.A. during Captain America: Civil War, but that doesn’t mean Chris Hemsworth never went toe-to-toe with Civil War’s primary antagonist. In this fact-based story of 1970s Formula 1 auto racing, Hemsworth plays cocky Englishman James Hunt, who develops a rivalry with Austrian driver Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl, Civil War’s Zemo). Oldboy (2013): One of the more improbable gatherings of MCU alums is also one of the most jam-packed with them. Director Spike Lee’s remake of the Korean thriller of the same name involves a man (Josh “Thanos” Brolin) who is kidnapped and held in captivity for years before finally being released and trying to find out the story behind his imprisonment. Among those he encounters in his quest for vengeance: a nurse with whom he becomes romantically involved (Elizabeth “Scarlet Witch” Olsen), a possible conspirator in his capture (Samuel L. “Nick Fury” Jackson), and the mysterious bodyguard of his tormentor (Pom “Mantis” Klementieff). Infinitely Polar Bear (2014): If you

War Horse (2011)

think Bruce Banner and Natasha Romanoff made for an odd couple, maybe the greenskinned pairing of Hulk and Gamora would make more sense. In this independent drama from writer/director Maya Forbes, Mark Ruffalo plays a troubled bipolar man trying to reconcile with his kids and estranged wife (Zoe Saldana). In the Heart of the Sea (2015): Clearly Moby-Dick was a scary creature, because the great white whale managed to thwart a boat with a pair of Avengers as part of the crew. Framed by the story of author Herman Melville speaking to the lone survivor of a whaling ship disaster, it mostly follows that surviving crewman as a teenager (Tom “Spider-man” Holland), where his first mate is veteran whaler Owen Chase (Chris “Thor” Hemsworth).

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CINEMA

FOLLOW US ON

Wind River (2017): So you want to see Avengers fighting crime side-by-side, but in their civilian clothes? Here you go: Jeremy Renner plays a Fish and Wildlife Service tracker who investigates the murder of a young woman on a Wyoming Indian reservation, along with an FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen). And depending on whether you consider the Netflix TV shows part of the universe, Jon “The Punisher” Bernthal turns up as the boyfriend of the deceased. CW


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK

Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BREAKING IN [not yet reviewed] A mother (Gabrielle Union) fights back against a home invasion. Opens May 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

REVENGE BBB The rape-revenge sub-genre has many entries, and everything about this one (including the title) sounds derivative until you get to the credits. How many movies on this topic were written and directed by women? This cool, synth-scored empowerment anthem from French first-timer Coralie Fargeat turns the exploitation model on its head by delivering more male nudity than female, by not showing the rape graphically and by making the rapist a pitiful coward, all without skimping on the blood, pain and satisfying kickassery. Italian beauty Matilda Lutz stars as Jen, mistress to douchey business-stud Richard (Kevin Janssens), who has brought her to his isolated desert home for a rendezvous before his hunting buddies show up. They arrive early, however, and one of them (Vincent Colombe) assaults her while the other guy (Guillaume Bouchède) does nothing to intervene. Jen subsequently suffers a grievous, supposedly mortal injury—this we’re shown graphically—whereupon she turns the tables and the hunters become the hunted. Lutz isn’t much of an actress, and the bulk of the dialogue being in English (a foreign language for everyone in the cast) gives the movie a faint whiff of Euro-cheese. But Fargeat deftly sets up the men as pathetic pigs and lets us revel in Jen’s righteous triumph over them. Opens May 11 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Eric D. Snider

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALL THE QUEEN’S HORSES At Main Library, May 15, 7 p.m. (NR) FINDING YOUR FEET At Park City Film Series, May 11-12, 8 p.m. & May 13, 6 p.m. (PG-13)

tion of the 10-year-in-the-making Marvel Cinematic Universe pits dozens of superheroes against the alien who seeks ultimate power through the Infinity Stones. Those are big stakes, and this massive cross-over provides opportunities for unique character interactions, and occasionally for individual characters to flash the personality we’ve gotten to know. It feels less like a movie in its own right, and more like the 2-½ hour non-stop finale of a 40-hour-long experiment. Even the moments that are supposed to pack emotional punch—not everyone is still standing when the credits roll—can’t fully work when we know other movies are still coming. There’s dead, and then there’s comic-book dead. (PG-13)—SR GRACE JONES: BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI BBB Director Sophie Fiennes’ documentary profile of the actor/ singer/model includes exactly zero archival footage, nor a single reference to A View to a Kill, yet still makes it clear why Jones is fascinating as she approaches her 70th birthday. Most of that fascination comes in the form of concert sequences, which showcase the ferocious, theatrical stage presence of a bustier-clad Jones. It’s a bit less interesting watching her in her daily off-stage life, whether it involves visiting family in Jamaica, reminiscing about growing up with an abusive step-grandfather, or bringing a no-shit-taken attitude to her professional dealings. Fiennes at times steps in with inventive visual style, but mostly makes it evident that no matter what you know about the previous 40 years of Grace Jones’ life, she still deserves to be an icon. (NR)—SR LEAN ON PETE BBB.5 “A boy and his dog” stories don’t have to be about dogs, and writer/director Andrew Haigh’s adaptation of Willy Vlautin’s novel makes the crucial relationship one between 16-year-old Charley (Charlie Plummer) and a 5-year-old quarterhorse owned by a small-time trainer (Steve Buscemi). Haigh provides a compelling foundation in the world of penny-ante horse racing, but that milieu changes when Charley’s single father is incapacitated, and Charley takes to the road with the horse. Nearly the entire final hour depends on Plummer’s performance, so it’s fortunate

that the young actor conveys both toughness and a longing for stability. What emerges through Charley’s episodic wanderings is a tale of what happens when those responsible for taking care of someone—or something—aren’t up to the task. The narrative takes unexpected turns, but at the center there’s a simple quest for connection. (R)—SR OVERBOARD BB Any remake of the 1987 Goldie Hawn/Kurt Russell gaslighting comedy Overboard would have to reverse the genders; a guy tricking a rich amnesiac woman into believing she’s his wife feels cruel and misogynistic. The cheap-looking remake is more palatable, but sluggish. Harried single mom Kate (Anna Faris) is stiffed on a job by arrogant billionaire Leonardo (Eugenio Derbez), so after he falls off his yacht and loses his memory, Kate convinces him they’re married. The gender dynamic is more comfortable this way, and Derbez’ belligerence makes his suffering more entertaining than Hawn’s comic haughtiness was, though it’s no fun watching Anna Faris be mean, even to someone who deserves it. When we get to the part where they’re nice to each other, it merely confirms that Faris and Derbez have no chemistry—not comedically, not romantically, barely even biologically. (PG-13)—EDS TULLY BBB.5 Screenwriter Diablo Cody—reunited with Juno and Young Adult director Jason Reitman—tells the story of Marlo (Charlize Theron), a harried suburban New York mother of three who accepts an offer from her wealthy brother (Mark Duplass) to pay for a night nanny, named Tully (Mackenzie Davis). Cody and Reitman set the stage brilliantly in a montage in which life after the birth of baby Mia becomes a numbing repetition that makes Marlo think only about all the ways she’s failing. Theron’s terrific performance explores Marlo’s tug of war between finding the stable family life she never had for herself, and losing the edgy youngster she once was. After more than a decade of writing movies, Cody has mastered the art of showing us that avoiding being a grown-up ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. (R)—SR

MUNE: GUARDIAN OF THE MOON At Main Library, May 12, 11 a.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR BB.5 Ever since his post-credits cameo in 2012’s first Avengers  feature, Thanos (Josh Brolin) has been the harbinger of doom just waiting for his moment in the spotlight, and this culmina-

AVENGERS

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THE JUDGE BBB Kholoud Al-Faqih is the first female judge, appointed in 2009, in the Shari’a courts of Palestine. “Shari’a” might have taken on ominous overtones, but in Palestine, this is simply the family court, dealing with divorce, child custody and the like. In a society in which women are not recognized as equals under the law—certainly not in the civil and criminal courts—Al-Faqih is an absolute pioneer. She brings her woman’s perspective to her cases, and her appreciation of the woman’s side of reality that, as American documentary filmmaker Erika Cohn shows, some men are clearly blind to. Cohn’s portrait is a delight, as is her subject, who is as fiery and as passionate as any Western feminist; Al-Faqih clearly takes enormous pride and even great humor in embracing the most liberal interpretations of the Koran possible. Al-Faqih is an immensely fascinating character, a woman who smashes stereotypes just by going about her day, and her story is essential viewing, depicting an Islamic society where the same conversation between tradition and change that is occurring in the West is also happening. Spoiler: Progress is winning. Opens May 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson

LIFE OF THE PARTY [not yet reviewed] A middle-aged, recently separated mom (Melissa McCarthy) goes back to college with her daughter. Opens May 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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THE ENDLESS BB.5 Genre fare often gets thematically ambitious, but this is a case of trying on too many different ideas for any of them to really pack a punch—or for the genre elements to make much sense. Co-directors Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead also star as Justin and Aaron, a pair of brothers who fled an apocalyptic cult called Camp Arcadia 10 years earlier; now, Aaron wants to go back for some emotional closure. Benson (who also scripted) and Moorhead set an appropriately ominous tone at Camp Arcadia, full of strange behavior and unexplained phenomena. Then they start digging into a variety of different heavy topics: the lack of control that comes with believing in a higher power; unresolved sibling conflicts; the sense of despair that can come with feeling like you’re caught in unbreakable patterns. Any one of those on its own would have offered plenty to chew on, and might still have allowed more space to understand the complexities of the supernatural elements that eventually emerge. The sparks of weirdness can’t quite give shape to a movie that’s too overflowing with question marks. Opens May 11 at Tower Theatre. (NR)— Scott Renshaw

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MUSIC

JASON QUIGLEY

CONCERT PREVIEW

Bow Flex

Portland Cello Project gives a new sound to familiar hits. BY HOWARD HARDEE comments@cityweekly.net

D

ouglas Jenkins finds fans of classical music in the oddest places. Once, he took the stage with the Portland Cello Project after midnight in a bar in Fargo, N.D., and jumped into Manuel de Falla’s high-energy “Ritual Fire Dance,” which includes a section that calls for the cellists to hit their strings with the wooden backside of their bows. To everyone’s surprise, that prompted a woman in the audience to shout, “Woohoo! Col legno!” “It was one of the most surreal experiences of playing with this group, to have a really drunk person who knew the Italian term for the bowing technique we were using, and also thought it would be funny to scream it while she was dancing in the front row,” Jenkins says. “We talked to her after the show, and of course she turned out to be a violinist.” Jenkins is the ensemble’s musical director and one of nine performing cellists. He says one of the group’s guiding principles is to take the cello to strange new places: bars, nightclubs, dance parties, or really wherever strikes their fancy. The ensemble originally got together for a one-off show at Portland’s Douglas Fir Lounge in 2006, but slowly evolved into a touring group featuring a rotating cast of cellists and classically trained woodwind, brass and percussion accompanists. Over the years, they’ve built a repertoire of more than 1,000 songs, including pop hits such as Taylor Swift’s “Shake it Off.” For listeners who tend to write off radio hits, hearing a classical interpretation of a song like “Shake it Off” can be enlightening. Lifting the melody from the overproduced, homogeneous-sounding track and recontextualizing it with classical instrumentation brings out the beauty of the music, Jenkins says: “You get to that point where you’re overlooking something that, at its basis, is a great song. It’s written really well and it’s unique; it’s popular for a reason.” Speaking ahead of the Portland Cello Project’s Thursday, May 10, show at The State Room featuring world-class improvisational cellist Skip VonKuske, Jenkins says he booked Salt Lake City as the tour kick-off because of the warm reception the ensemble has received here in the past. “Maybe it’s the venue, or maybe it’s the city, but it’s always a party,” he says. The versatility of the cello allows the group to cover sounds as high of those as a violin and as low as an electric bass guitar.

Portland Cello Project “What drew me to the cello is the range,” he says. “It’s the same as a human singing voice, from the low to the high. I can’t sing, so I need something else to make those sounds for me. It’s a human sound—and I think that’s what makes it so universally accepted— but it also has more textures than a human voice can create.” Transforming rock and pop songs into classical arrangements can be challenging. He’s found that many radio hits rely almost entirely on sonic textures rather than a harmonic progression. And he’s had some misfires, songs that just didn’t work, like 50 Cent’s “In Da Club.” “Sometimes, the entire work is built around just one weird sound,” Jenkins says. “And from a technical standpoint, certain intervals are tricky for us to make work. Like, guitars are tuned to fourths and cellos are tuned to fifths, so some guitar melodies and riffs—I always think of “Sweet Child o’ Mine” by Guns N’ Roses— are extremely difficult to pull off on the cello. I’m not saying it can’t be done, but you have to find ways to work around that.” One of Portland Cello Project’s most-viewed videos on YouTube is a haunting rendition of Radiohead’s “Karma Police.” For years, Jenkins had purposefully avoided Radiohead because he didn’t know how to approach songs which are, in his opinion, perfectly arranged to begin with. “It was a little intimidating to pull them out of that context,” he says. “There’s such a big responsibility when you tackle something that’s so well composed. But after five years, we tried it, and it became something we really meditated on, and it’s evolved with us. I rewrite the arrangements based on what the players are doing around me and when they think up new parts.” Jenkins acknowledges that Portland Cello Project has a quirky shtick, but that doesn’t prevent the group from delivering artistically substantial performances. “Having a mass of cellos on stage is a gimmick in itself,” he says. “But my philosophy from the beginning has been to make sure everything is quality. We wouldn’t still exist if we were just a gimmicky group that made funny pop music covers. We’re trying to make it a true experience for every show. We put so much energy into it.” CW

PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT

The State Room 638 S. State Thursday, May 10 8 p.m. $25 thestateroom.com


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Young Dubliners

BY RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, HOWARD HARDEE AND LEE ZIMMERMAN

GRYWNN VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

Who would’ve thought a group of dudes from South Carolina would form one of the most well-known death metal bands in underground music. Created in 1993 by Karl Sanders, Nile sings about death and Egyptian mythology, pummeling blast beats and growling howls of spells and ancient Middle Eastern warfare; they could make anyone enjoy history with their latest release, What Should Not Be Unearthed (Nuclear Blast, 2015). Nile teams up with Soulfly for their nationwide 2018 tour—a fitting way to share the 20th anniversary marking both bands’ first full-length albums. On the subject of history, some metal heads compare Max Cavalera’s bitter 1996 exit from Sepultura—the legendary thrash metal band created by Max and his brother Igor—to that of an ancient Biblical story. For Max, creating Soulfly became the answer after his departure. Soulfly’s 1998 self-titled debut album was a conduit for Max to release his anger and pain from losing a loved one to a car accident. In the early stages, Soulfly dabbled in a sound on the edge of nu-metal blended with Brazilian influences. However, their 2013 record, Savages (Nuclear Blast), kept the Soulfly sound while adding punkthemed drums and thrash-like riffs. Also on the bill are Dezecration, DiseNgaged and Incrypted. P.S., The Cavalera brothers have since reunited; all is well in the metal kingdom. (Rachelle Fernandez) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 6 p.m., $25, 21+, metromusichall.com

CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 5/12 Young Dubliners, Swagger

At this point in their three decade-long career, the Young Dubliners are more like stoic veterans than the new blood their handle implies. Nevertheless, distinguishing themselves from a more traditional Gaelic band like the original Dubliners works well, especially given the mix of rowdy rambunctious attitude and absolute insurgence that defines their notion of Celtic rock ‘n’ roll. Like Black 47, Scythian, The Pogues and select others, they tap into Old Country tradition, but retain few actual cultural connections. Still, authenticity isn’t of prime importance given that a Young Dubliners concert encourages everyone to take a celebratory stance, one which favors dancing, stomping about and generally

Soulfly’s Max Cavalera indulging in overall abandon. And although the vintage trappings harken back to the Emerald Isles—especially with their use of fiddle, mandolin and bodhrán—there’s universal appeal found in all their upbeat exhilaration. A listen to any one of their 10 albums offers evidence of that infectious attitude, but it’s only through witnessing a live performance that the Young Dubliners’ demonstrative demeanor becomes fully clear. There’s no need to consume a pint for full appreciation; even teetotallers will likely be tempted to indulge in both the music and the mayhem that follows. (Lee Zimmerman) Commonwealth Room, 195 W. Commonwealth Ave., 9 p.m., $25, thecommonwealthroom.com

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Bronx-bred rapper/enigma Kool Keith is often recognized as one of hip-hop’s goofiest and most eccentric personalities. He came up in the late 1980s as a member of the Ultramagnetic MCs, a group known for complex polysyllabic rhymes in the era of simple party rap. (Fun fact: The Ultramagnetic MCs’ song “Give the Drummer Some” includes Kool Keith’s lyrics, “Change my pitch up/ Smack my bitch up,” which was sampled by British rave group The Prodigy for their 1997 single “Smack My Bitch Up.”) On his 1996 debut solo album, Dr. Octagonecologyst, Kool Keith adopted the persona of the time-traveling surgeon Dr. Octagon, who pretends to be a gynecologist in order to sexually assault his patients and nurses. Yeah, he’s very clearly alone in his own orbit. “Now my helmet’s on, you can’t tell me I’m not in space,” he raps in “Earth People.” The whole album is full of the sort of juvenile humor, non sequiturs and freeassociation wordplay that eventually broke into the mainstream via Eminem’s Slim Shady. At the time, Dr. Octagonecologyst helped reinvigorate underground rap, and Kool Keith has since proved himself to be one of hip-hop’s most enduring legacy acts—albeit one who somehow remains criminally underrated despite his prolific output of more than 50 (!) albums. On his current tour, he’s supporting yet another Dr. Octagon effort, Moosebumps: An Exploration Into Modern Day Horripilation. Because why not? (Howard Hardee) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, theurbanloungeslc.com

Nikki Lane

WEDNESDAY 5/16 Nikki Lane, Carl Anderson

Nikki Lane has rightfully won comparisons to country icons such as Wanda Jackson, Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette—true chanteuses whose music was brewed from a mixture of personal pain and clear conviction. It has to do with more than simply her sound, though the sonic references clearly ring true. Little more than three albums and seven years into a career that’s garnered critical acclaim even at the outset, Lane—a high school dropout—finds her muse through her own tangled perspective. That can be attributed to her battles with heartache and heartbreak, especially the tragedy she witnessed when two of her bandmates were stricken with serious illnesses. One survived while one died, but Lane’s absolute perseverance and determined attitude continues to win her raves from both fans and critics alike. Indeed, Lane has a voice that rings with the wisdom and the weariness of the ages, betraying an attitude and aptitude befitting any artist who’s ever aspired to be a country queen. Like Neko Case, Whitney Rose and Charlie Faye, Lane is a young artist with a vintage view, unafraid to tap tradition and give it contemporary context. She’s yet to peak, but she’s in her prime—a perfect time to witness a star on the rise. (LZ) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m. $18 presale; $20 day of show, theurbanloungeslc.com


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NEW MENU ITEMS NOW AVAILABLE

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ting star at

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326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MAY 10, 2018 | 37

DINNER & SHOW ONLY AT


TUESDAY 5/15

CONCERTS & CLUBS

BRIAN SLATER

Making Movies, Alex Cuba

THURSDAY 5/10

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38 | MAY 10, 2018

Kansas City-based Making Movies is not afraid to blend politics and art. In fact, the two pairs of brothers comprising the band— Enrique and Diego Chi, and Juan-Carlos and Andres Chaurand— have realized how deeply those areas are naturally interwoven. Some of this comes from working on and then releasing their most recent album, 2017’s I Am Another You. It mixes sounds including—as the band describes on its website—“psychedelia, experimental rock, son cubano, cumbia and various rhythms descended from Yoruba music, an African tradition that slaves carried to the New World as part of religious rites that evolved into [Afro-Cuban religious tradition] Santería.” Initially, the album’s theme of transcending borders seemed purely metaphorical, a way to imagine a social ideal. That changed with the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Enrique Chi, founder, singer and guitarist, says on their website, “The ideas that were coming into play had nothing to do with politics, they were just interesting to me. But at the end of the day I realized, we are political. When you’re talking about social ideals, you’re talking about political ideals.” Tuesday’s show, featuring music from I Am Another You—in addition to its companion EP, You Are Another Me—is part of a “Carnaval The Tour” concert experience that’s an extension of Making Movies Carnaval, the music and arts festival the band launched in 2014. Alex Cuba opens. (Casey Koldewyn) Kilby Court, 741 S. Kilby Court, 7 p.m., $10 presale; $14 day of show, kilbycourt.com

LIVE MUSIC

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SATURDAY, MAY 12

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM $850

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Alicia Stockman (Lake Effect) Continental Connection + DJ Bubbz + DJ Napo + Sahara Dawn (Urban Lounge) Eva Ayllon (Infinity Event Center) Froggy Fresh w/ House of Lewis (Velour) Joshua Cook & The Key of Now (Hog Wallow Pub) Joshy Soul (Rye) Latin Thursdays feat. Sing Licencia (Liquid Joe’s) Nick Garn (The Yes Hell) No Sun + I Was Afraid + Headcold + Quiet (The Underground) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Sugar Space Arts Warehouse) Portland Cello Project (The State Room) see p. 32 Reggae at the Royal feat. Mas & Makisi

WEDNESDAYS

(The Royal) Saba + Joseph Chilliams + Jean Deaux (Kilby Court) Westminster Jazz Ensemble (Gallivan Center)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Electric Therapy w/ DJ Bruja + Naylixa + Shane Sorvari + Karnazion + Eric Brando (Alleged) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Guest (Garage on Beck) The New Wave 80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51)

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Therapy Thursdays w/ Wolfgang Gartner (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 5/11 LIVE MUSIC

(Area 51) Retro Riot Dance Party w/ DJ Jason Lowe (The Royal) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

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MAY 10, 2018 | 39

PHOTO

5/25

ginger and the gents tomorrow's bad seeds salt lake metal fest hemlock

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90’s Night w/ DJ Velvet Jones + Jarvicious (Alleged) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ

at the Royal

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

CABARET

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 5/10 Reggae

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

PINKY’S

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Antoine Dufour + Luca Stricagnoli + Nick Johnson (Velour) Clesh + DJ Baze (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Dirt First Takeover + Hecka + Mr. Vandal + Ottr + YBL (Urban Lounge) Duxplosion (Chakra Lounge) Erasole James + DJ Baloo + Ivie + DJ Mixter Mike + Negrodomus + Cannibal J (The Ice Haüs) Fox Bros. Band (The Westerner) Ghost of Venice + 88 Palms (Avant Groove) Glass Eye (The Bayou) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) Jeff Lawrence (Piper Down Pub) Jeremiah & The Red Eyes (Hog Wallow Pub) Live Trio (The Red Door) Marmalade Chill + Matt Calder (Lake Effect) Michelle Moonshine (The Yes Hell) Murphy & The Giant (Johnny’s on Second) Pockit (Feldman’s Deli) The Reverend & The Revelry (Harp & Hound) Sammy J + Bo Napoleon + Lea Love + Big Body Cisco (The Royal) Sariah + Sparrows + Tigerwine + Sleeping Tigers (The Underground) Sister Brother (Pat’s BBQ) Six Feet In The Pine + The Backyard Revival (The State Room) Snyderville Electric Band (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tribe of I (Snowbird) Urban Pulse (Club 90) Young Dubliners + Swagger (Commonwealth Room) see p. 34

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 5/9

SATURDAY 5/12

1.21 Gigawatts (Brewskis) Barbaloot Suitz + Mountains of Mirrors + Uvluv + Keyvin VanDyke (Funk ‘n’ Dive) BBx (Piper Down Pub) Blue Zen (Pat’s BBQ) Brisk (Downstairs) Brother Chunky Band (The Ice Haüs) Carter Reeves + Abhi The Nomad (Velour) Crook & The Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) Dead Trauma Horse (Liquid Joe’s) Deli Man w/ Clark Clements (Feldman’s Deli) Dustin Christensen + Joshua C. Johnson (Pale Horse Sound) Fox Bros. Band (The Westerner) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) John Flanders (The Bayou) King Strang & The Stranglers Show (Avant Groove) The Last Revel + Michelle Moonshine (The State Room) Mark Chaney (The Yes Hell) Metal Dogs (The Spur) Nile + Soulfly + Dezecration +DiseNgaged + Incrypted (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Pianos Become The Teeth + The World Is A Beautiful Place And I Am No Longer Afraid To Die + Queen of Jeans (Kilby Court) Red Bennies Anthology + Starmy + Monarchs (Urban Lounge) Reverberation (The Beehive) Take Two (The Ruin) Urban Pulse (Club 90) The Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Mi Cielo w/ Smiley Miami (Sky) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney

4760 S 900 E, SLC

KARAOKE


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40 | MAY 10, 2018

WATER WITCH

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ Jerzy (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

Patrick Ryan (The Spur) TBD (Snowbird)

KARAOKE

Slay SLC feat. DJ M*SC + MC Tia Aiono + MC Michael Elliott (Metro Music Hall)

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke (The Union Tavern) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 5/13 LIVE MUSIC

Cullen Omori + The Gloomies (Kilby Court) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Khalid (Maverick Center) Kool Keith + Zac Ivie + DJ Juggy (Urban Lounge) see p. 36 Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Moth Closet (The Beehive) Ozomatli (Soundwell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 5/14 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) TesseracT + Plini + Astronoid (The Complex) Violet Temper + Gastonmustdie + Hoofless + Lord British (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO

Going to any bar alone makes me feel creepy, especially when I show up on a Sunday night. Water Witch is having a tiki torch shindig when I arrive, and, luckily, I’m not alone for long. The flames from the torches light up a familiar face on the patio—a fellow artist, whom I had met at an Industry Supporting Industry event. “Rachelle’s a motherfucker,” he tells a group of friends as he introduces me. “She’s hip in the real sense of, a real person, a real woman.” All right, enough about me. Having no real social skills when it comes to receiving a compliment, I dart to the question of what makes Water Witch hip. “It depends on who’s here, but one of the owners is Scott. Scott is, like, a hardcore rum guy,” he says. “You could be like, ‘I want a crescent moon, I want it to be outside of sugar, rummy, lively.’ You’ll get a drink that’s like, goddamn.” Through all the fine liquor talk, I realize how unaccustomed to the mixology culture I was. “The way you write words, and how you are able to formulate a composition,” my friend says, “that’s how he is with a drink.” The scene at Water Witch is a collective of artists and musicians going back and forth over their “goddamn”-inspiring drinks, about the perfect tone or color that captures a moment in time, or the perfect song that embodies how they feel. This particular moment in time calls for Dolly Parton. (Rachelle Fernandez) 163 W. 900 South, waterwitchbar.com

LOUNGE

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 5/15 LIVE MUSIC

Bag ‘O Tricks (Prohibition) Bill & Diane (Piper Down Pub) Blues Jam (The Yes Hell) Changing Lanes Motown Hits (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Dead Metro + The Breaking Pattern +

City Ghost + Karl Ricky (The Underground) Great Good Fine Ok + Smallpools + Half the Animal (The Complex) Joey Bada$$ + Buddy + Boogie + Chuck Strangers (The Complex) Making Movies + Alex Cuba (Kilby Court) see p. 38 Ol Fashion Depot + The Arvos + Lovely Noughts (Urban Lounge) Peter Hook & The Light (Metro Music Hall) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Scott Klismith (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Locals Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ KJ Johnny Irish (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 5/16 LIVE MUSIC

Backtrack + Mizery + Regulate + Hangman (The Beehive) Che Zuro (The Yes Hell) Ealdor Bealu + Westwave + Lord Vox + Slick Velveteens (Metro Music Hall) Flat Moon Theory + Reverberation (Kilby Court) Impurities + Ophidan + Untamed Engine (The Loading Dock) Michelle Moonshine (Hog Wallow Pub) Nikki Lane + Carl Anderson (Urban Lounge) see p. 36 Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Rick Gerber Request Line (The Cabin) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

5.6 @ URBAN FLEA MARKET

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Areaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Powerball Karaoke (The Union Tavern) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

FRIDAY, MAY 7TH

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BONEPILE

SUNDAY, MAY 8TH

MOOSE KNUCKLE & TRAIN WRECK

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

Open from 10am -2am 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

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UTAH UTAH PIZZA PARTY MAY 18, 2018 PIZZA 6:00PM - 10:00PM PARTY AT THE GATEWAY

MAY 10, 2018 | 41

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

MAY 10, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

Trial Litigation Advocacy Criminal Defense Government Relations

RIO GRANDE CONCERT SERIES

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE

UPCOMING EVENTS

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WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE


SHOTS OF SUMMER

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We sell tickets!

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LIVE Music

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thursday, may 10

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, may 11

MYTHIC VALLEY

Dick N’ Dixies S. Markell McCubbin, Mary Martin, 00 Michelle Guttenplan, Libbi Malmborg 479 East 3 m/dick-n-dixies

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25 thur, 5/10 | the state room

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saturday, may 12

DJ LATU sunday, may 13

Mother's Day Brunch 10am - 2pm

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| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | MAY 10, 2018

upcoming shows

$

Madeline Bowman, John Thelen

18 wed, 5/16 | urban lounge

Weeknights

ruby force

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

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10 fri, 5/18 | kilby court

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20 mon, 5/21 | metro music hall

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO

xxx Russell Rayner, Fong Shu, Josh McGlamery

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MAY 10, 2018 | 43

Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday PROHIBITION 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, everything from live music to karaoke to burlesque THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 SWITCH 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-5132955, house and techno events TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

478-4310, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SEND RESUMÉ TO: SSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-


© 2017

SIDE EYE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Go against 2. Arthur who was king of the court? 3. Parade spoiler 4. Pen name 5. Market value of a company’s assets divided by their replacement cost 6. Soccer superstar Messi 7. Andrews and Edwards, for two: Abbr. 8. Modern, to Mahler 9. ____ number 10. Right-angle shape 11. Like some freely available software

53. Agitated, after “in” 54. Bicker (with) 55. “Is your name Google? Because you have everything I’m searching for,” e.g. 56. Types 57. Like the French sky 58. Latin 101 verb 60. Signs off on 61. “Am ____ your way?”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

12. Fluctuate wildly 13. Meat-and-vegetables dish 18. ____ power 19. Search (through) 23. Sculptor/collagist Jean 24. Carnival Cruise stop 25. “Dig in!” 26. Co-Nobelist with Yitzhak and Shimon 27. 1977 cult film directed by David Lynch 28. “Wait, let me explain ...” 29. Hillary Clinton ____ Rodham 30. Part of LGBTQ 31. Drew in books 32. Like many a campfire story 37. Dips below the horizon 38. Needing salt, maybe 39. Road offense, for short 43. ATM deposits: Abbr. 45. Day worker 46. Possible hitch to getting hitched 47. “____ to differ” 48. Infant bottle topper 51. Former Connecticut governor Jodi 52. All those in favor

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Good grilling? 6. Renaissance Faire weapon 11. Kvetchers’ cries 14. TWA competitor 15. #1 Beatles hit “____ Fine” 16. Bad thing to go to 17. Direct hit in a Midwestern city? 20. Actor Jeong of “The Hangover” 21. Strands in December? 22. “____ pronounce you husband and wife” 23. Suffix with high numbers 24. Hypotheticals 25. What you see when Mick Jagger says “Oh, puh-leeze!”? 33. Advocate for the 50-and-over crowd 34. More than a snack 35. Dubai’s home: Abbr. 36. Org. that offers Precheck enrollment 37. Scornful glance ... or this puzzle’s theme 40. Time off, in mil. slang 41. Sue Grafton’s “____ for Undertow” 42. Quito’s land: Abbr. 43. 301, on a cornerstone 44. How a person with conjunctivitis hopes to look? 49. High-____ monitor 50. Slugger’s stat 51. Chicago mayor Emanuel 53. Out 56. “May ____ frank?” 59. Striking-looking multivitamins? 62. “Glee” star ____ Michele 63. Actor Reeves 64. Takes a shine to 65. Subtext of Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” 66. ____ throat 67. Come after

SUDOKU

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Born under the sign of Taurus, Edmund Wilson was a renowned 20th-century author and critic who wrote more than 30 books. He also served as editor for Vanity Fair and The New Republic, and influenced the work of at least seven major American novelists. When he was growing up, he spent most of his free time reading books: 16 hours a day during summer vacations. His parents, worried about his obsessive passion, bought him a baseball uniform, hoping to encourage him to diversify his interests. His response was to wear the uniform while reading books 16 hours a day. I trust you will be equally dedicated to your own holy cause or noble pursuit in the coming weeks, Taurus. You have cosmic clearance to be single-minded about doing what you love. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s possible you could pass for normal in the next three weeks; you might be able to fool a lot of people into thinking you’re an average, ordinary contributor to the dull routine. But it will be far healthier for your relationship with yourself if you don’t do such a thing. It will also be a gift to your less daring associates, who in my opinion would benefit from having to engage with your creative agitation and fertile chaos. So my advice is to reveal yourself as an imperfect work-in-progress who’s experimenting with novel approaches to the game of life. Recognize your rough and raw features as potential building blocks for future achievements.

STUDENTS ARE WELCOME.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Love everyone twice as much and twice as purely as you ever have before. Your mental health requires it! Your future dreams demand it! And please especially intensify your love for people you allegedly already love but sometimes don’t treat as well as you could because you take them for granted. Keep this Bible verse in mind, as well: “Don’t neglect to show kindness to strangers; for, in this way, some, without knowing it, have had angels as their guests.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): After meditating on your astrological aspects for an hour, I dozed off. As I napped, I had a dream in which an androgynous angel came to me and said, “Please inform your Sagittarius readers that they should be callipygian in the next two weeks.” Taken back, my dreaming self said to the angel, “You mean ‘callipygian’ as in ‘having beautiful buttocks’?” “Yes, sir,” the angel replied. “Bootylicious. Bumtastic. Rumpalicious.” I was puzzled. “You mean like in a metaphorical way?” I asked. “You mean Sagittarians should somehow cultivate the symbolic equivalent of having beautiful buttocks?” “Yes,” the angel said. “Sagittarians should be elegantly well-grounded. Flaunt their exquisite foundation. Get to the bottom of things with flair. Be sexy badasses as they focus on the basics.” “OK!” I said. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now is a favorable time to discuss in elegant detail the semisecret things that are rarely or never talked about. It’s also a perfect moment to bring deep feelings and brave tenderness into situations that have been suffering from half-truths and pretense. Be aggressively sensitive, my dear Capricorn. Take a bold stand in behalf of compassionate candor. And as you go about these holy tasks, be entertaining as well as profound. The cosmos has authorized you to be a winsome agent of change.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): These days, your friends and allies and loved ones want even more from you than they usually do. They crave more of your attention, more of your approval, more of your feedback. And that’s not all. Your friends and allies and loved ones also hope you will give more love to yourself. They will be excited and they will feel blessed if you express an even bigger, brighter version of your big, bright soul. They will draw inspiration from your PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): efforts to push harder and stronger to fulfill your purpose here “My whole life is messed up with people falling in love with me,” said Piscean poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. She spoke the truth. on Planet Earth. She inspired a lot of adoration, and it stirred up more chaos than she was capable of managing. Luckily, you will have fewer problems VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of the advantages you get from reading my horoscopes is with the attention coming your way, Pisces. I bet you’ll be skilled at that I offer confidential information about the gods’ caprices gathering the benefits and you’ll be unflummoxed by the pitfalls. and leanings. For example, I can tell you that Saturn—also But you’ll still have to work hard at these tasks. Here’s some help. known as Father Time—is now willing to allot you a more luxu- Tip No. 1: Stay in close touch with how you really feel about the rious relationship with time than usual, on one condition: that people who express their interest in you. Tip No. 2: Don’t accept you don’t squander the gift on trivial pursuits. So I encourage gifts with strings attached. Tip No. 3: Just because you’re honored you to be discerning and disciplined about nourishing your soul’s or flattered that someone finds you attractive doesn’t mean you craving for interesting freedom. If you demonstrate to Saturn should unquestioningly blend your energies with them. how constructively you can use his blessing, he’ll be inclined to ARIES (March 21-April 19): provide more dispensations in the future. The Torah is a primary sacred text of the Jewish religion. It consists of exactly 304,805 letters. When specially trained scribes LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Vincent van Gogh’s painting The Starry Night hangs on a wall in make handwritten copies for ritual purposes, they must not New York’s Museum of Modern Art. He created it in 1889 while make a single error in their transcription. The work might take as living in a French asylum. Around that same time, 129 years ago, long as 18 months. Your attention to detail in the coming weeks a sheepherder in Wyoming created a sourdough starter that is doesn’t have to be quite so painstaking, Aries, but I hope you’ll still fresh today. A cook named Lucille Clarke Dumbrill regularly make a strenuous effort to be as diligent as you can possibly be.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, Salvador Dali shows three clocks that seem to be partially liquefied, as if in the process of melting. His biographer Meredith EtheringtonSmith speculated that he was inspired to create this surrealistic scene when he saw a slab of warm Camembert cheese melting on a dinner table. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Aquarius. Be alert for creative inspiration that strikes you in the midst of seemingly mundane circumstances.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Paradise is scattered over the whole earth,” wrote the scientific poet Novalis, “and that is why it has become so unrecognizable.” Luckily for you, Cancerian, quite a few fragments of paradise are gathering in your vicinity. It’ll be like a big happy reunion of tiny miracles all coalescing to create a substantial dose of sublimity. Will you be ready to deal with this much radiance? Will you be receptive to so much relaxing freedom? I hope and pray you won’t make a cowardly retreat into the trendy cynicism that so many people mistake for intelligence. (Because in that case, paradise might remain invisible.) Here’s my judicious advice: Be insistent on pleasure! Be voracious for joy! Be focused on the quest for beautiful truths!

pulls this frothy mass of yeast out of her refrigerator and uses it to make pancakes. In the coming weeks, Libra, I’d love to see you be equally resourceful in drawing on an old resource. The past will have offerings that could benefit your future.


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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915249, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ANDREW FARLEY, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO ANDREW FARLEY: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,959.77. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915028, JUDGE ADAM T LOW. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $6,539.05. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO MARIO TRUJILLO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111. Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is filed with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

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George Metos George@UBCUtah.com THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC. d/b/a MI MEXICO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111.Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is file with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

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Andrew G. Deiss Wesley D. Felix Attorneys for Plaintiff

I just returned from helping my stepmom relocate to Florida. Although it’s not the “hot” season yet, at 80 degrees and 64 percent humidity, it’s too hot and humid for me to live there. Not only is it a damp feeling all the time, there are palmetto bugs (Florida cockroaches) as big as a kid’s fist and those damnable dinosaurage alligators and crocodiles. Too much moisture can cause many problems for a renter or homeowner. Seeing a leak through the ceiling of your living room or a pipe full of sewage break in your basement is an obvious sign of too much moisture. But the sneaky drips you can’t see will rot your foundation and destroy your support beams. Florida has mold problems, and lots of them. Yet, in dry-as-a-bone Utah, we’ve got mold issues, too. There are a bazillion types of mold on our planet. There’s mold right now in your living space—it’s just as common as dust and dirt. When I meet people who live in moist environments, I can easily tell where they’re from because the smell of mold on their clothes is stronger than those of high-desert residents. “Oh, you’re from Portland—or Seattle!” Anytime you have organic material and moisture, you’re going to have mold. Mold spores in the air can cause asthma attacks in some people, and it can effect our pets’ health, too. Luckily, Utah doesn’t have many occurrences of dangerous black mold like in the southern part of the U.S. What you often see here in showers is mildew, which is surface fungi that’s gray, white or yellow and can turn black over time. Mold is more fuzzy or slimy looking and there are more than 10,000 types that can live inside your home (according to the Centers for Disease Control). Black mold is the worst kind because it produces toxic compounds that can give you and your pets really bad health problems like sinus infections, asthma, fatigue and depression. You might not know you have mold if you haven’t been in your basement for a while. It took us three months to figure out a pipe had broken inside a wall and a small leak started and spread slowly inside the wall and down to the floor. We had to tear out all the Sheetrock to fix the pipes. If you suspect you have mold, call a plumber ASAP. It can spread fast or slow depending on the water source and, trust me, it’s expensive to repair when it goes unchecked—not to mention the toll it can take on your health. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner Ill hold back my whole life till the day i die

and in that moment Ill learn to fly Ill spread my wings above the garden gate filter out all the fear and hate Ill do all the things I was too scared to do Ill do them right, I’ll do them true and in that moment of Deaths last kiss Ill live the life that in life I missed

-Able Caine Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Irony At Pennsylvania State University, the Outing Club, founded in 1920, provided students with outdoor recreation opportunities such as hiking and camping. But no more. Penn State has announced that after this semester, the university will no longer allow the club to organize student-led trips because it is too dangerous out in the wilderness, according to the offices of Student Affairs and Risk Management. Two other outdoorsy clubs, the Nittany Grotto Caving Club and the Nittany Divers Scuba Club, have also been restricted from club activities outdoors. Michael Lacey, president of the Caving Club, told the Centre Daily Times: “Penn State’s just been clamping down really hard on the nature of activities” since the Jerry Sandusky scandal. University spokeswoman Lisa Powers said Penn State will offer school-sponsored outdoors trips, but students noted the cost will be much higher.

WEIRD

Unclear on the Concept In a perhaps unintentional bid for the worst criminal disguise of 2018, Kerry Hammond Jr., 22, broke into a GameStop store in St. Marys, Ga., at 1:19 a.m. on April 13, where he was captured on camera wearing a clear plastic wrapper (of the sort that holds bundles of bottled water) over his head. Even with the plastic “mask,” WJXT reported, Hammond’s face is clearly visible in surveillance video, and St. Marys police quickly identified him and captured him on April 17. Hammond already had two active felony warrants for his arrest for burglary and second-degree criminal damage to property.

n United Press International reports that in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, the mayor has employed a clever way to keep his

Oops The Washington State Department of Transportation had to issue a mea culpa on the afternoon of April 17 after an electronic highway sign displayed the message “U SUCK” above Interstate 5 near Jovita. WSDOT called the sign “an inappropriate message” that appeared due to a training error and was “clearly a mistake,” according to KCPQ TV.

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Bad Attitude Timothy Hill, 67, of Grassington, North Yorkshire, England, having installed a laser jammer in his Range Rover, thought he was outsmarting law enforcement speed cameras. In fact, he was so sure of his scheme that he repeatedly raised his middle finger to the cameras—sometimes casually, sometimes aggressively—as he passed. What he didn’t realize was that the laser jammer, rather than hiding his identity, was only blocking police from determining his speed, so when they tracked him down, he was charged not with speeding, but with perverting the course of justice. “If you want to attract our attention, repeatedly gesturing at police camera vans with your middle finger while you’re driving a distinctive car fitted with a laser jammer is an excellent way to do it,” Traffic Constable Andrew Forth told Metro News. Hill pleaded guilty on April 23, and was sentenced to eight months in jail and prohibited from driving for a year. Least Competent Criminal Kiana Wallace, 24, was sentenced to 18 months in prison in Belmont County, Ohio, on April 23 following her guilty plea for tampering with evidence. On probation after a drug possession sentence in 2017, Wallace failed a drug urine test when the “borrowed” sample she used tested positive for drugs. “Let me get this straight,” Judge Frank Fregiato said in court, according to WTOV-TV. “To avoid the positive test with your own urine, you used someone else’s urine, which turned out to be positive also. That’s bizarre.” Inexplicable On April 23, police officers in Warren, Mich., responded to a home for a welfare check on 68-year-old George Curtis, whose relatives had become concerned because they hadn’t heard from him. Curtis was, indeed, dead. In fact, WJBK-TV reported, he had been deceased for months, maybe even a year. Also in the home: his girlfriend, who had continued living there with his decaying body, which was laid out in a bed. Police transported the unnamed woman to a hospital for a mental evaluation and are awaiting a report on cause of death from the medical examiner. n Meanwhile, on the South Side of Chicago, police responded to reports of an elderly woman pushing a dead body around the Chatham neighborhood in a shopping cart on April 21, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Officers took the woman to a hospital for a mental evaluation and launched an investigation into the female body, whose age and identity had not been determined at press time.

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Bright Ideas Resorting to a low-tech, but possibly offensive strategy, Largo, Fla., detectives visited a dead man at Sylvan Abbey Funeral Home in Clearwater and attempted to use his finger to unlock his smartphone. Linus F. Phillip, 30, was shot and killed by Largo police March 23 after he tried to drive away from an officer wanting to search him. As part of their investigation, police said they needed to access and preserve data on Phillip’s phone. Legal experts generally agreed the detectives had not broken any laws, but Phillip’s girlfriend, Victoria Armstrong, 28, was less forgiving: “Nobody even calling us ... to let us know detectives were coming there at all is very disturbing,” she told the Tampa Bay Times. “I’m very skeptical of all funeral homes now.”

Entrepreneurial Spirit Over the last two years, Cameron County employee Gilberto Escamilla, 53, of Brownsville, Texas, has been accepting shipments of fajitas worth a total of $1.2 million at the Darrell B. Hester Juvenile Detention Center in Brownsville. The only trouble is, the inmates there aren’t served fajitas. Escamilla had been ordering the meat from Labatt Food Service in Harlingen and intercepting it to resell. “It started small and got bigger and out of control,” Escamilla told the court, according to The Brownsville Herald. On April 20, he was sentenced to 50 years in prison after pleading guilty to theft by a public servant.

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Fun-suckers In Oslo, according to Reuters, tradition calls for recent high school graduates to participate in “Russ,” a several-weeks-long party that includes drinking, nudity and public sex, sometimes resulting in fatal car crashes. So this year, the Public Roads Administration issued a statement on April 18 headlined “No to sex on roundabouts,” warning that students should refrain from running naked and having sex on bridges and roundabouts, because such behavior gives drivers “too much of a surprise.” Terje Moe Gustavsen, head of the administration, said: “Everyone understands that being in and around roundabouts is a traffic hazard. It might not be so dangerous for someone to be without clothes on the bridge, but drivers can ... completely forget that they are driving.”

finger on the pulse of the city. When he goes out, he wears a fake beard so he’ll blend in and not be recognized as the capital city’s leader. Mayor Albek Ibraimov told Fergana, a Russian news agency: “I dress in old clothes ... take off my tie and I go and look, and see how things actually are.”

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives and...

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Techno-Weird In Tokyo, women who have qualms about living alone might soon have a new security option. “Man on the Curtain” is a prototype smartphone app that connects to a projector and throws a moving shadow of a man onto a closed window curtain. The shadow man can be doing any of several different activities, such as boxing, karate, vacuuming, playing guitar or getting dressed. Keiichi Nakamura, advertising manager of Leopalace21 Corp., an apartment management company where the idea originated, told Reuters that eventually his company would like to “commercialize it once we add variety, such as releasing a new video every day.”

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City Weekly May 10, 2018  

Adultery, Fraud and the "Great Tortilla Caper"

City Weekly May 10, 2018  

Adultery, Fraud and the "Great Tortilla Caper"