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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

Tanner Lenart interprets

AR I L U PEC R O U Q I L L AW S so the rest of us don’t have to. BY KELAN LYONS

M AY 3 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 4

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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SHAKEN, STIRRED

Shake hands with Tanner Lenart, Utah’s liquor lawyer. Cover photo by Enrique Limón

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 NEWS 19 A&E 25 DINE 31 CINEMA 33 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

JONATHAN THOMPSON, News, p. 12

The investigative journalist is the author of River of Lost Souls, which details the science, politics and greed behind the 2015 Gold King Mine disaster. He currently resides in Bulgaria with his wife and two daughters, though true to his Western roots, still keeps tabs on issues of regional environmental impact.

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover story, April 19, “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: 47 ideas to reduce gun violence and save lives”

God, I love that picture. The pinnacle of human form protecting me from tyranny. Unless there’s a Black Bear Diner passport-holder special or a $0 down 0-percent APR deal on a used jet ski.

PETER MUSCARELLO Via Facebook

City Weekly has some great ideas, and a lot that are not well thought out. There are laws that enslave men. And laws that set them free. Which laws will you find yourself supporting?

NISHAN BEGLARIAN Via Facebook

I keep hearing about enslaving the U.S. population but for the mighty fat fucks (who couldn’t run for a quarter mile, without puking gravy). Enslaved by whom, mole men? The lizard people? Aliens? An army (The United States Army) made up of our next door neighbors? How many people were enslaved during the assault weapons ban of the 90s? 3 million? 5 million? It reminds me of the Bowling Green Massacre. The tragedy of that day will forever haunt us. I got rid of my AR-15 14 years ago; I’m very disappointed I have not been enslaved yet. I was looking forward to working to death in the spice mines on Kessel. Now, hand your gun to your toddler and walk away slowly.

@SLCWEEKLY

At least City Weekly has the guts to say publicly they’d like to see Australia-style gun control here. Many on the left support gun bans but won’t openly admit it. I wonder what other constitutional rights City Weekly feels are so open to neutering? The anti-gun left still depends on misinformation and a refusal to acknowledge that all violence is the same—regardless of how it is carried out—to deliver their message. No country that has effectively banned guns has seen a decrease in violence. In this country, any of us are more likely to be beaten to death than killed by any rifle, even the scary looking AR-15, yet that one type of gun dominates the discussion about violence. Here’s a thought: Perhaps the “solutions” for violence should be aimed at criminals and their behavior rather than at law-abiding Americans who own guns responsibly. Yes, the background check system needs repair; thousands of names that should be in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System aren’t there. Common ground place to start. In Florida, the government failed the shooter and his peers at every level. More gov’t isn’t the answer when trying to keep people safe.

MIKE STAPLEY Via Facebook

Idea No. 48: Publish before and after photographs of the victims with emphasis on the damage that a .223 caliber slug can do to the human body.

JOHN GOETTING Via Facebook

In this case, the extremely ugly.

They want a lot of guns because they don’t feel safe, but have a problem with teenagers who also don’t feel safe because of too much gun violence and want to change that.

Via Instagram

Via Facebook

Great list!

Total leftist BS!

Via Twitter

Via Twitter

Just one question: Which one of your Constitutional rights are you willing to surrender or have limited to a party of protesters?

News, April 19, “A Call to Arms”

CHARLES PLANTE Via Facebook

@JUJUHERNANDEZ

@STONE1ML

HUGH JONSON Sugar House

DEBRA VASQUEZ

@G9X19

A fairly accurate and descriptive account of the pro-Second Amendment rally at the Utah State Capitol, Given the fact that

C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

APRIL 19, 2018 | VOL. 34

N0. 47

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY

47 IDEAS TO REDUCE GUN VIOLENCE AND SAVE LIVES. BY WILSON CRISCIONE, MITCH RYALS, DANIEL WALTERS, QUINN WELSCH AND SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

Salt Lake City Weekly would normally be quite biased against a patriotic group of citizens such as this, including children. Rallying in favor of the Constitution and the Second Amendment [is] the law of the land. Thank you for being fair in your article.

BLAKE MYERS

Via cityweekly.net Don’t you think it would be better to vote out the current NRA puppets and put in some intelligent people?

LYNN BAKER

I love stories without happy endings. Act 2 of Rogue One is the only reason I don’t dismiss the movie entirely.

@JOSSWHEELIN Via Twitter

Excellent. I’ve been trying to scream this idea into the void, but so few people want to hear about it. They don’t consider the hero’s journey; to them it’s a quick satisfaction of a popculture snack, despite what they may tell themselves.

@SVENGALIPHANTOM Via Twitter

Via Facebook Gun control advocates … don’t listen to facts and just get emotional when you challenge their thinking. Good luck. I’ve tried hundreds of times.

My first viewing of TLJ, I walked out of the theatre a little bewildered. The second time, I thought, “This is a great movie.” The third time I thought, “This is also a great Star Wars story.”

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Via Twitter

DAVE CALDWELL

@GRUB00

A&E, April 19, “Failing Up” Blog post, April 27, Loved the piece! Yoda’s quote “Annual racism panel aims about failure being the greatto tackle the hard topics” est teacher and the one about we are what they grow beyond, were for me the two most inspirational messages to come out of The Last Jedi.

@T33JAY75 Via Twitter

Be your own hero. Fail yourself. Stop depending so much on others.

MICHAEL D. SHAGWELL Via Facebook

Is it that hard for white people to be normal human beings? WASHINGTON ALFRED GEORGE Via Facebook We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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6 | MAY 3, 2018

OPINION

Ending as Beginning

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, ‘Morning, boys, how’s the water?’ And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’” Of all the fish stories I have heard, I like this one most of all. It comes from the late writer David Foster Wallace’s famous graduation speech to the Kenyon College class of 2005. Of all the spider stories I have heard, the best comes from author and minister Robert Fulghum’s graduation speech at Syracuse University in 1998. In it, he sang “Itsy Bitsy Spider,” the children’s song about a small, but determined, spider flushed from a downspout by rainfall only to return when the storm passed. I always think of these two stories when yellow forsythia blossoms herald another graduation season. This week, at the University of Utah and Utah State, students will listen expectantly as the likes of Wallace and Fulgham explain how an ending can also be a beginning. Hence, the performative ritual of “commencement”—the doorway to the next phase of life. Utes will hear a commencement address from Ben Nemtin; Thierry Fischer will speak to the Aggies in Logan. Westminster College graduates will listen to Christine M. Durham next week, and Malcolm Mitchell is the commencement speaker at the Salt Lake Community College. A best-selling author, a symphony conductor, a prominent jurist, and a professional football player—each will offer wisdom to a receptive audience. Perhaps their words will be as memorable as those of Wallace and Fulghum.

I have never been a commencement speaker, but I imagine it is hard to preside over a rite of passage in which the participants wear medieval robes. Nevertheless, I think I could write a passable speech because like a three-chord pop song, the commencement genre tends to be a set piece. It begins with an anecdote—a “didactic little parable-ish story,” Wallace called it—and mine would be humorous to set the tone. (Tone is an important consideration at this bittersweet moment in young adults’ lives.) The speech would be high-minded but light-handed. It would be just self-referential enough to elicit nodding recognition in the audience that the ground being plowed has been plowed before. My speech would be short, free of academic jargon, and conclude with the obligatory call to action, such as: Lead authentic lives. Read newspapers and magazines. Combat complacency. Or (credit the late academic Joseph Campbell) follow your bliss. To persevere in the face of setback is Fulghum’s call to action. Keep climbing back up the downspout, ideally a little wiser, after each flood, he said. “Check the clouds or look for better ways to hang on the drainpipe. We might even have a Plan B just in case we get knocked down yet another time. But we all do it again. We climb back up the drain pipes of life over and over again.” Wallace worried that the young fish weren’t attuned to what was going on around them. The late novelist urged “attention, awareness and discipline, and effort and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways.” He concluded that “the real value of a real education, which has almost nothing to do with knowledge, and everything to do with simple awareness; awareness of what is so real and essential, so hidden in plain sight all around us, all the time, that we have to keep reminding ourselves: This is water.” In my imaginary speech, I would urge the audience to swim free of the online whirlpool, but my introductory story would recall food guru Michael Pollan’s 2008 visit

BY JOHN RASMUSON

to the Land of Fry Sauce and Funeral Potatoes. More than 2,000 people packed Abravanel Hall to hear him disparage “edible food-like substances” and “anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” It was my introduction to Pollan’s now-famous axiom, “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” Segue to journalists Jeff Stibel and Farhad Manjoo, neither of whom is a foodie. They write about digital technology for USA Today and The New York Times, respectively. Both have recently quit social media and overcome an “addiction to news” cold turkey, turning to newspapers and magazines instead. “It has been life changing,” wrote Manjoo. “Turning off the buzzing, breaking-news machine I carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on speed dial.” His experience is instructive for those who have come of age shackled to a smartphone, a seductive machine that streams kaleidoscopic information with fire-hose intensity 24 hours a day. Like Wallace’s myopic fish, the phoneaddicted lack awareness. They don’t notice that prolonged screen time contributes to loss of empathy, erosion of conversation skills—even depression. That they are targeted with specious news is a separate issue but more worrisome. “Smartphones and social networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap,” wrote Manjoo. Stibel agreed: “By the end of a news cycle, you can’t help but feel overwhelmed by meaningless dribble.” Think of Stibel and Manjoo as older, water-wise fish. Follow their good example. Take your foot off the accelerator. Test the water. Read newspapers and magazines. Manjoo puts it succinctly, “the way Michael Pollan boiled down nutrition advice: Get news, not too quickly, avoid social.” CW

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CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

MIGRANT MOMS DINNER

This community dinner kicks off a week of action in solidarity with all the migrant and undocumented mothers in Salt Lake. “We believe that our mothers are central to the way that we survive, and that separating a family is an inhumane and unjust act. Our mothers sustain us, feed us and nourish us,” say organizers of A Mother’s Day for Migrant Mothers: Community Dinner Kickoff. On Jan. 30, the First Unitarian Church took in Vicky Chavez and her two daughters to shelter them from deportation. As an added protection measure, attendees must have a community or organizational friend to vouch for them. This is the beginning of an effort to help these families win their cases. First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City, 569 S. 1300 East, 801582-8687, Sunday, May 6, 6-9 p.m., free/$10 donation, tickets required, bit.ly/2r46WAH.

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If you don’t care for the lake, who will? Apparently, it won’t be the state, which has managed to site a new prison and now an Inland Port near the fragile ecosystem that defines Utah and the West. Find out about the wetlands and our water quality goals at the 2018 Great Salt Lake Issues Forum. There will be discussions about migratory birds, water and politics, the Bear River Compact, and “Strategies to Maintain or Increase the Lake’s Elevation” in homage to former Gov. Norm Bangerter’s ill-fated lake pumps. There is so much to know and learn about the Great Salt Lake—one of the wonders of the world whose future is at risk from unwise decision-making and greed. Register now. Fort Douglas Officers Club, 150 S. Fort Douglas Blvd., 801-587-1005, Wednesday, May 9-Friday, May 11, $75-$110, bit.ly/2r3f XK3.

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VOTER REGISTRATION TRAINING

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GET A DAMN HAIRCUT

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It’s hard to believe that any eligible citizen is not yet registered to vote—especially since the 2016 election. Still, there are many of you who, for whatever reason, think their vote is worthless. It’s not. Many elections are won by a few votes, or very small percentages. And yes, voting is not only a privilege, but a civic responsibility. That said, join Salt Lake Indivisible in Voter Registration Training, the first step to reclaiming our democracy in the November midterm elections. Salt Lake City Marmalade Library, Conference Room, 280 W. 500 North, 1-855-725-VOTE ext. 505, Saturday, May 12, 12:30-2 p.m., free, bit.ly/2I7HxgM.

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By Jim Burton - Rocky Mountain Raceways them are technicians. A lot of them are in the automotive field. (The hope) is that we would do two things: 1. Perhaps hire some of them as technicians; 2. Many of them are working at shops, whether it be a Midas Muffler shop or a Goodyear shop, and we could sell them parts.” And so the decision to buy the land, tear down Bonneville Raceway and develop Rocky Mountain Raceways was made and there was no looking back. As RMR began to take shape, the pulse rates of racers and fans around the state began to, well, race. The track officially opened in 1997, with excitement and high expectations for a banked 3/8 mile oval track and and beautiful NHRA quality 1/4 drag strip. For the most part the track has pretty much stayed the same with only a few changes. In 2009 RMR opened a beautiful, thrilling new motocross track. Today, the MX track remains a huge attraction for dirt bike enthusiast around the state, and it’s a huge draw for RMR. “It’s been a great 21-22 years, and it has accomplished most of our objectives” Young said. “It is a very tough thing to make money, as far as a business goes. We didn’t know that (going in). A couple obstacles we face in Utah is you have four months to make your money. You’ve got May, June, July and August, and sometimes a little bit of April and a little bit in September.”

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Young also mentioned something everyone associated with RMR knows all too well: Weather. For an outside venue, running in the spring, summer and a little bit of fall, the weather can wreck an event or two. “ You lose big events and it’s tough to capture those back,” Young said. But when it came to racer participation and fans coming to watch the races, RMR thrived. Outside of the occasional rainout, RMR’s stands were filled, and car counts were always high. Skogard, who lives within a few miles of RMR, is clearly saddened to see RMR going away. For most racers on the drag and oval side, there are a few options available. There’s the Boise and Twin Falls areas in Idaho, and Las Vegas. Asked for his post-RMR plans, Skougard said he’ll spend more time with his mother (‘She’s my No. 1 fan’)” he said. As for racing, he’ll have to decide between Vegas and Boise. Once he figures that out, he’ll move his operation there. The day Skougard sifted through hundreds of old pictures, he seemed to get lost in the memories. “It warms your heat to see this stuff, and remember some of the stuff we all went through,” he said.

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mixed with both pride and sadness. He’s understandably proud of his personal accomplishments, but he’s equally sad to see the track go away. Young Sr. said he’d like to see RMR’s final season have “a good big bang going out.” But before moving ahead, let’s give a respectful nod to the past. To the famed Bonneville Salt Flats (1930s-70s), then to RMR’s predecessor, Bonneville Raceway, which began operation in 1968. Bonneville Raceway had a nice run, but by the late 1980s and mid 1990s it had fallen into disrepair and was in need of a significant makeover. That’s when the Young family stepped in to buy the property and upgrade the facility. Spencer Young Sr. said the decision to sink millions into a renovation project — a beautification project, actually — was not taken lightly. However, once it was made there was no turning back. “There were no second thoughts,” Young said. “My brother (Seldon) and I talked about it, it sounded like a fun business.” Young detailed five specific objectives going into developing Rocky Mountain Raceways. “No. 1. As a legitimate business to make a profit. No. 2. To build on the legacy of racing in Utah. Utah does have a rich history of racing; the fairgrounds, Bonneville and the Salt Flats. There’s a nice history of racing and we wanted to build on that. “No. 3. We wanted to expand our circle of influence. Most of our dealerships were in Northern Utah; north or Kaysville. People in Salt Lake or West Valley really didn’t know who we are, so we thought it would expand our circle of influence, hopefully we could earn some business that way, as far as the dealerships. “No. 4. We felt that the racing industry paralleled the automotive industry, and at the time NASCAR was the fastest growing sport in the country, above any other sport. They were really on an upward curve. “No. 5 We also thought, a side benefit might be getting to know these racers. A lot of them are ‘gear heads.’ A lot of

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The June 1997 edition, the premier edition, of “Rocky Mountain Race Review,” contains a photo of Spencer Young Sr. holding a roll of blueprints, and grinning from ear to ear. The headline reads: “King of the Road, Young revives motorsports in Utah.” Today, more than 20 years later, that particular magazine may actually be considered a collectors item, if not an artifact. And that headline got it right. Led by Young Sr., the Young Automotive Group, YAG did indeed revive racing in Utah. In buying the old Bonneville Raceway and building what became Rocky Mountain Raceways, YAG changed the look, feel and substance of racing in Utah. It also changed the lives of many fans, racers and their families. Although good-faith efforts were made to keep the venerable facility open beyond 2018, it ultimately became necessary for RMR to close its doors at the end of this season. In the wake of the news about the track’s pending closure, and the farewell season at hand, YAG has opted to keep a positive mental attitude. “I think this year we’re trying to make it the biggest, most historic year ever,” said Young Sr. Plans are in place to help enrich the RMR experience, whether it’s more money being paid to the racers, or fun and games for the fans in the stands. Indeed, the track will be gone later this year, but it will not be forgotten. There’s just no way a venue like RMR will ever be forgotten. Because it possess a rich and colorful history — complete with equally colorful racers (not to mention their families) — the motocross park, the Young Kia Drag Strip and the America First Credit Union Super Oval will live in stories passed on from generation to generation. Motorcycle racer Tim Skougard recently got a blast from the past as he rifled through a stack of old pictures taken at RMR, the racetrack he’s been visiting since 1998. Skougard smiled as the memories washed over him. “This is cool” he said. “This is nostalgia at its finest.” Skouogard is like all the other racers and fans. His nostalgic feelings are

MAY 3, 2018 | 9


BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Skilled Deflection

The buzz about Donald Trump’s strategy is his skill at deflection. But we should talk about the Utah Transit Authority, or even The Salt Lake Tribune. A recent frontpage story detailed how Babs De Lay—how dare she—complained about noise from TRAX screeching around a corner near her home. Yeah, she’d complained for a long time. Then she was made a board member of the esteemed and embattled UTA, and voila, they started oiling the tracks and slowing down. You know, someone leaked this information to the Trib, which dutifully followed the document trail. OK, run the story, but this is not front-page news. And how great is it that UTA is addressing a problem? Remember disgraced board member Terry Diehl, who was indicted for hiding up to $1 million from the IRS? And, hey, at least KSL Channel 5 saw fit to hail Frontrunner as it moves to better service and electrification.

10 | MAY 3, 2018

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Bears Ears bull’s-eye

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The Native Americans got it right, in essence asking that everyone think before they act. Utah’s Diné Bikéyah leaders are asking a United Nations body to stop the expedited management process for the cute little puzzle pieces that once were Bears Ears National Monument, according to a Deseret News report. Why? Because there is no plan. They want to protect “cultural, social, sacred and environmental resources” as the flurry of news has increased interest in the area and consequently, looting. A Salt Lake Tribune commentary by geologist Brian Jones points out that Bear Ears now has a bull’s-eye on it, and people don’t realize that the feds, by law, can actually protect the area. “The people are here and there’s no plan,” he says. That’s because it’s all about politics, not protection.

Dissident Love

Why do Utahns love our dissidents? Not the Hare Krishna types, but the guntoting zealots who flip off the federal government and stand firm in their right to run over anything in their way. The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that militia leader and Utahn William Keebler tried to detonate an explosive at the BLM’s Mount Trumbull complex near the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument. We know about the militia. They’re the ones the Second Amendment allows to go off half-cocked. They’re the ones who rode their ATVs defiantly through Recapture Canyon and took hostage the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge because it’s their right. And they’re the ones who nominated Phil Lyman of Recapture fame to be a GOP cadidate for state representative. It’s enough to give you whiplash if you believe in the rule of law, but then love to hate it.

STRAIGHT DOPE Going Viral

BY CECIL ADAMS

Since each can cause microcephaly, is there any correlation between Zika [which everyone seems to fear] and toxoplasmosis [which most seem to have forgotten]? —Maja Ramirez Are Zika and toxoplasmosis related? Biologically speaking, that one’s easy: no. In seeing them as similar, are you nonetheless onto something? Nice work, Maja—the medical world sees it the same way. Zika needs little introduction, as you suggest, having vaulted into public awareness a few years ago following scary outbreaks in South America. It’s a mosquito-borne virus, kin to yellow fever and dengue. Toxoplasmosis is another, possibly weirder story: Linked to schizophrenia, it’s caused by a parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, that lives in cats and spreads via their feces. As discussed here in 2006, one theory is that T. gondii evolved to cause rodents to hallucinate and behave irrationally, increasing their likelihood of being caught by cats and thus the parasite’s likelihood of reproduction. So although infection with Zika or toxoplasmosis during early pregnancy can each indeed result in microcephaly—an unusually small head or brain in the developing fetus—that doesn’t make them any more related than two random diseases that might cause blindness. But since the early ’70s, doctors have grouped toxoplasmosis with a few hardto-distinguish but otherwise unrelated in-utero infections that share some grim traits: they might cause only mild illness (or none at all) in the pregnant mother but severe problems in the fetus, and treating the mother prenatally doesn’t usually improve the outcome for the child. This original group of pathogens—toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex—was given the acronym TORCH; the O later came to stand for “other” infections that might present similarly, notably syphilis. Use of TORCH as a diagnostic tool varies from region to region. U.S. medical societies don’t recommend full prenatal screening; doctors typically check pregnant patients for rubella antibodies, but even if they’re not there, it’s too dangerous to administer a live-virus vaccine with a fetus in the picture—all you can do is keep an eye out for symptoms in the baby once it’s born, and vaccinate the mom later so it’s not an issue again. Most often, infants are tested for the TORCH agents if they display certain telltale indicators: microcephaly is the most dire, but the list also includes hearing loss, cataracts, jaundice and others. In the worst cases, of course, there might be little to be done for the newborn, but the screening’s valuable in any event. Doctors need to establish whether congenital issues are the result of heredity, meaning there’s a high risk of recurrence in the mother’s future pregnancies, or if an infection was the cause instead. Also, as clinicians will tell you, generally parents just want to understand what happened to their baby. TORCH

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screening can’t always help with the problems of a particular infant, but from a public health standpoint it’s important to know what caused the problem so we can prevent it from afflicting future children. And in the last few years, doctors have come to recognize Zika as the newest member of the TORCH group. The virus was first identified in Uganda in 1947, and for decades wasn’t thought to be a big deal: Only 20 percent of those infected experienced symptoms, and these were things like fever and achy joints—nothing too heinous. This view prevailed until a series of outbreaks in the 2000s caught everyone’s attention—particularly in Brazil, where an explosion of Zika infections beginning in 2013 coincided with a terrifying 20-fold increase in fetal microcephaly. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control concluded that Zika was a cause of microcephaly and other severe brain defects. The story of rubella, seemingly the best analogue to Zika among the TORCH group, is a pretty close match: it wasn’t considered dangerous for about 50 years after its discovery, until it began to be linked with congenital defects in the 1940s. In the American rubella epidemic of 1964-65, an estimated 50,000 pregnant women were among the 12.5 million new cases, and the result was a tragedy: 20,000 babies with serious birth defects, thousands more dead in infancy or during pregnancy. By 1969, we’d found vaccines and started administering them to children; now annual U.S. cases are in the single digits. Rubella, says the author of one 2017 paper on Zika, “can be viewed as a model for a TORCH virus that has been controlled through the widespread development of an efficacious vaccine.” Again, you can’t vaccinate already-pregnant women against rubella without endangering the fetus; to beat the disease, we had to vaccinate the whole population. Presumably that’s how a Zika vaccine would work, too. Of course, we don’t have a Zika vaccine yet—and, in the U.S. at least, neither have we acquired any natural immunity via exposure. As of the mid-1960s epidemic, rubella had been kicking around long enough that most American women had developed antibodies; things could have been a lot worse. Zika, by contrast, hasn’t really shown up here at all thus far. Vaccine researchers are on the case, needless to say, but the clock’s ticking. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


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NEWS

PUBLIC LANDS

The Bears Ears Sideshow

Newly released documents show that locals had little voice in national monument decisions. BY JONATHAN THOMPSON comments@cityweekly.net @jonnypeace

1. The shrinkage of Bears Ears hurt Utah schools more than it helped.

Hatch has argued that the monument took needed cash from Utah school children because it “captured” more than 100,000 acres of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands (SITLA), which are leased out or sold to help fund schools. But SITLA itself has never outright opposed the monument designation. Why? Because with designation came the promise of a lucrative land exchange with the feds. When the monument was designated, SITLA officials said they were “disappointed” in the way it was done, but went on to ask Obama “to promptly address the issue by making Utah’s school children whole through an exchange of comparable lands.” In fact, some six months before Obama designated the monument, SITLA already had the details of a swap in mind. The state would give up the land within the proposed monument, most of which had only marginal potential for development, and in exchange would receive oil- and gas-rich federal land, much of it in other counties. A decade earlier, after the designation of Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, a similar swap proved quite profitable, according to an email in the document dump from SITLA Associate Director John Andrews. Andrews wrote that the exchange netted SITLA $135.2 million in mineral leases alone, plus $50 million in cash from the federal government as part of the deal. Adding in investment earnings and other lease revenues, Andrews concluded that a total haul of $500 million from the exchange would be a “conservative guesstimate.” So, when Trump set out to shrink the monument, SITLA asked only that a sliver of the monument’s southeast corner be removed so as to keep a block of land near Bluff, Utah, in SITLA hands. A representative from Hatch’s office sent a map showing this change and a message to Interior:

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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ast month, Sen. Orrin Hatch said of former President Barack Obama and the newly designated Bears Ears National Monument: “In making this unilateral decision, our former president either failed to heed the concerns of San Juan County residents, or ignored them completely.” If Hatch were an honest man, he would say exactly the same about President Donald Trump’s drastic shrinkage of the monument late last year. Documents recently released by the Department of Interior show that when drawing the new boundaries, Trump and his Interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, ignored not only the pleas of five Native American tribal nations, but also proposals from local county commissioners and the state of Utah. That’s just one of the takeaways from a trove of documents regarding the Trump administration’s multi-monument review that the Interior Department coughed up to The New York Times. Here are the top eight nuggets so far from the tens of thousands of documents:

A protester outside the Salt Palace Convention Center gives a warm welcome to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke during his Feb. 9 visit. “The new boundary depicted on the map would resolve all known mineral conflicts for SITLA within the Bears Ears.” In the end, Zinke granted this part of SITLA’s wish. Unfortunately for the state’s school children, he did a lot more than that, cutting most of the state lands out of the monument, thus shutting down any hopes for a large-scale land exchange. That leaves the state holding on to more than 80,000 acres of isolated parcels that are unlikely to generate much revenue.

2. Zinke ignored local county commissioners.

Trump ordered the monument review amid claims that local voices had been steamrolled by Obama’s unilateral designation. So when, in March 2017, the San Juan County Commission sent maps to Interior showing their proposed boundaries, they might have expected that it would influence Zinke’s recommended boundaries. It did not. The commission’s proposed boundaries would have covered 422,600 acres across Cedar Mesa. Cut by spectacular canyons and with a high density of archaeological resources, Cedar Mesa was at the heart of Obama’s Bears Ears designation. Under the commissioners’ plans, the eastern boundary would have been Comb Wash, leaving out the sandstone wave known as Comb Ridge, as well as a motorized route up Arch Canyon. Zinke’s boundaries contain only half as much land. They leave Cedar Mesa out entirely, unlike the county commissioners’ plans, but they include as part of the monument Comb Ridge and Arch Canyon. It’s almost as if the new boundaries were drawn in defiance of the county commission’s proposal. So much for local voices.

3. The voice of Energy Fuels, the most active uranium company in the Bears Ears region, appears to have been heard.

Representatives of the Canadian company met with Obama administration officials during the lead-up to designation, and the administration ultimately excluded Energy Fuels’ Daneros uranium mine from the monument. However, the company lamented the fact that seven miles of the mine’s one access road still fell within the boundaries, and that its White Mesa mill property abutted the eastern monument boundary. Energy Fuels lobbyists, including former U.S. Rep. Mary

Bono, R-Calif., met with Trump administration officials in July 2017, and the company’s official comment on the monument review stated: “There are also many other known uranium and vanadium deposits located within the newly created [Bears Ears National Monument] that could provide valuable energy and mineral resources in the future. … EFR respectfully requests that DOI reduce the size of the [Bears Ears National Monument] to only those specific resource areas or sites, if any, deemed to need additional protection beyond what is already available to Federal land management agencies.” Trump’s shrinkage removed the entire White Canyon uranium district and other known deposits from the monument.

4. The new boundaries correlate closely with known oil, gas, uranium and potash deposits.

During his review last year, Zinke specifically asked for information on mineral extraction potential within the monuments. Uranium mining has long been dormant in the Bears Ears monument due to low prices, and only three of the 250 oil and gas wells drilled within the monument have yielded significant quantities of oil or gas. Nevertheless, industry has nominated some 63,657 acres within the national monument for oil and gas leases since 2014. With the new boundaries drawn to exclude even areas with only marginal potential for oil, gas or uranium, those leases could now go forward.

5. At Grand Staircase-Escalante, the new boundaries are mostly about coal.

When the monument was designated, Andalex, a Swiss company, was looking to mine a 23,800-acre swath of the Kaiparowits Plateau, which contains one of the biggest coal deposits in the United States. Clinton’s monument designation didn’t kill those plans, though it did make access and transportation to the deposits more difficult, so the feds used $19 million from the Land and Water Conservation Funds to buy out Andalex’s leases. Now, some 11 billion or more tons of coal are once again accessible. Also freed up with Trump’s monument shrinkage: Up to 10.5 trillion cubic feet of coalbed methane and 550 million barrels of oil from tar sands.


6. Visitation at Bears Ears area ratcheted up during debate.

Since there are no monument headquarters, the best indicator is the number of visitors at Kane Gulch Ranger Station on Cedar Mesa, which nearly doubled between 2013 and 2017. Visits per year: 2013: 3,484 2014: 3,730 2015: 4,344 2016: 4,844 2017: 6,535 The jump in visitation in 2017 will be used by both anti- and pro-monument advocates. The former will argue that extra visitors mean extra impacts, the latter that more visitors add up to greater economic benefits for neighboring communities.

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7. Grazing at Grand StaircaseEscalate not significantly impacted.

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There were 77,400 active AUMs, or Animal Unit Months, the bureaucrat’s way of counting livestock on public lands, when the monument was designated in 1996. As of 2017, the number had only slightly dropped to 76,957 active AUMs. “Although grazing use levels have varied considerably from year to year due to factors like drought,” an Interior staff report says, “no reductions in permitted livestock grazing use have been made as a result of the Monument designation.” Claims to the contrary have long been used to argue for the monument’s reduction.

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And they often went out of their way to accommodate them. In fact, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell’s deputy chief of staff, Nicole Buffa, became quite chummy with Fred Ferguson, the chief of staff for former Rep. Jason Chaffetz, and Cody Stewart, policy director for Gov. Gary Herbert. After Jewell’s visit to southeastern Utah, Buffa wrote to Ferguson, Stewart and others: “I’m looking forward to many more conversations about Utah with each of you, but in far less pretty places.” As the debate on the ground heated up, Ferguson wrote to Buffa: “I grow more and more frustrated by the day regarding the situation in San Juan County. You and I … have been thrust into this umpire-type-role where we are supposed to determine which group is most sincere, most legit, and most deserving of ‘winning.’ We’re witnessing a race to the bottom by all involved as the monument threat heats up and groups are positioning themselves for success. My ultimate thoughts are to do nothing and force all of these players to work together and resolve these issues amongst themselves in the new year when there isn’t an arbitrary deadline driving action.” Buffa responded: “We can’t get bogged down by the sideshows, and that is what some of this is.” CW

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8. Obama’s staffers were in constant contact with Utah congressional staffers for months.


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By Kelan Lyons | klyons@cityweekly.net |

anner Lenart has two words to describe Utah’s alcohol laws: “in flux.” The self-described “liquor lawyer,” an attorney for the firm Christensen & Jensen, says there’s often confusion among restaurateurs, bartenders and patrons about the laws passed during Utah’s short 45-day annual legislative session, when those laws go into effect—generally a few months later—and what laws are actually on the books, given they can change from year to year.

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ing year, when prospective patrons still had to fill out applications and buy memberships in order to get into bars. “It’s all relative,” Lenart says of how the state’s alcohol laws have changed since she started practicing. Speaking as a “social drinker who likes to drink local,” Lenart says there are more manufacturers and craft cocktail bars now, and less underage drinking, but then there’s the impending DUI law that’ll lower Utah’s allowed

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“Changes—that’s why I have a job: a lot of people are confused about what’s going on,” Lenart says, sitting at a downtown coffee shop. Then there’s the perception that “we’re a little bit backwards when it comes to liquor laws,” in the words of the Salt Lake Area Restaurant Association’s executive director Michele Corigliano. Lenart moved to Salt Lake City in 2007 and started law school at the University of Utah the follow-

blood alcohol concentration to .05, the lowest threshold in the country. “I’m against distracted drivers, but I think there’s so many different ways we can allocate our resources,” she says, suggesting lawmakers look at distractions like texting while driving. “I’m just baffled by some of the things,” Lenart says. Take 2017’s falling of the Zion Curtain—partitions that restaurants had to put up so patrons wouldn’t see their drinks being made, shielding impressionable children’s eyes from the horrors of mixology—and the compromise of the Zion DMZ, where minors are prohibited from sitting within a certain space from a restaurant’s bar area. “I just don’t understand. No one has been able to explain to me, why 10 feet? Like, what does that do? What is it about having a child sit this close, and not this [far,]” Lenart says, trailing off. “There’s some things, I’m at a loss, and I don’t understand.” Still, curtains, moats, head-scratcher sign requirements and the rest of the lot are what keep her and a handful of other liquor law specialists in business in this Mormon-centric state.

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@kelan_lyons | Photos by Enrique LimÓn

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Attorney Tanner Lenart interprets Utah’s peculiar liquor laws so the rest of us don’t have to.


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“I like being able to sort of speak the same language as my clients ... I’ve been on that side of the counter.” —Tanner Lenart

A LIQUOR LAW STAR IS BORN

Before becoming a licensed attorney, Lenart tended bar in New Zealand and England, paving the way for her future law career. That experience helps her interpret bar owners’ concerns to legislators and commissioners for the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, some of whom don’t drink. “I like being able to sort of speak the same language as my clients and understand what’s going on,” she says. “It’s been a long time, but I’ve been on that side of the counter.” “I’m trying to educate clients, I’m trying to educate people who are trying to come in [to do business in Utah], I’m also sometimes educating policy stakeholders, people who don’t drink, maybe, but have great influence on the laws,” she says about interpreting often-dated statutes for thirsty Utahns who just want a few beers with their meals. “I don’t want to sound condescending at all.” Not initially planning on specializing in liquor law after graduating from the U, Lenart had been working for another firm after law school that assigned her to help with the liquor applications for a franchise client planning to open locations in the Beehive State. “When you have a franchise client like that come into the state, they can’t do the same things that they’ve done in all the other states that they’ve been in,” she says about the homegrown hurdles. Enjoying the work, Lenart reached out to the franchise once she established herself at her current firm, and offered to keep working on their “liquor law side of the things.” Later, Lenart lent her voice to local business owners, helping them with everything from liquor applications to violations to complying with advertising rules, among other options. “I like it because of the variety,” she says of liquor lawyering. “At the end of the day, I’m helping people with their business, as opposed to a lot of the other legal work,” like car wrecks and unforeseen tragedies she calls “sad.” “I’m helping people get to places that I want to go to at the end of the day,” she beams. “Tanner just really gets it,” Sean Neves, co-owner of the Central 9th bar Water Witch, says. “She’s just a really sharp gal. And is just passionate about food and beverage.” Neves

serves with Lenart on SLARA’s board, and he’s the president of the Utah chapter of the U.S. Bartenders’ Guild, of which Lenart is also a member. Lenart estimates she’s helped about a dozen establishments get up and running in the past year, whether through transferring an existing liquor license or getting a new one. Then there are the follow-up questions about what is or isn’t allowed under the existing laws. “I probably get a question or two a week,” Lenart says. Lenart says the perception of the state’s liquor laws seem to have a “dampening effect” when she talks with clients at national conferences who are thinking about expanding into Utah. But then she explains how “otherwise businessfriendly this state is,” which often softens the blow. “I would put it at more of a speed bump than a roadblock,” she says. Asked what she primarily would change in Utah’s liquor laws if given a chance, Lenart says she’d “love to see some massive changes,” like privatization of liquor sales. “That’s the pie in the sky. Certainly not grounded in reality.” Boozesoaked dreams aside, Lenart says she works collaboratively with industry members, DABC and its commissioners, not from a place of opposition. “I get a lot more work done working well with others,” Lenart says. “Sometimes there’s a bit of befuddlement, where I just don’t understand some rationales. Because sometimes it comes back to feelings, which you can’t always talk rationally about.” That, she adds, can lead to “some tough legislation, which is, I think, why some of the laws are oddly worded at times.” That befuddlement can go both ways, Lenart says, as when some people don’t understand “why anybody would want to have a drink ever. I’ve heard that, not from legislators, but from other people in the legal community.” Even so, she remains persistent. “You’re forever rolling the rock up the hill,” she says. While she’s early in her career, the 38-year-old says she hopes to eventually be known as the “Utah Liquor Lawyer,” an “advocate for bars and restaurants” who “[helps] people get back to business.”

A SIGN WORTH 1,000 WORDS

Lenart’s Twitter feed is a source of free pointers for the state’s restaurateurs, bar owners and patrons, offering snippets of information on licensing deadlines, placement of servers’ ID badges and advertisement requirements. “Nothing specific for anybody,” Lenart says. Except on April 5, when she asked restaurateurs to donate their dumbfounding paper signs labeling them bars or restaurants. That’s because in March, Gov. Gary Herbert signed House Bill 456, allowing restaurants to take down those signs on May 8. The pesky 8.5-by-11-inch signs are tough to miss: Locales have been required to display them for the past year in a “conspicuous place at the entrance to the licensed premises,” per 2017’s House Bill 442, designed to tell patrons how the business is licensed. Restaurateurs haven’t been the signs’ biggest fans. “They think it’s absolutely absurd, which it is,” says the restaurant association’s Corigliano, expressing the views of the 847 licensed restaurants in Salt Lake County. “It was just dumb,” Takashi’s Tamara Gibo says. Establishments licensed as restaurants need to make sure 70 percent of their sales are food, but displaying a sign labeling an establishment as a restaurant doesn’t mean that place doesn’t serve booze. The jury is still out whether the notices have been effective. Esther Imotan, operating owner of Pallet, for example, says there have been at least four occasions where she’s seen guests walk into her restaurant, glance at the sign, turn around and leave. “I could very clearly tell the sign confused them,” she says. When she’d ask the guests why they’d left, they’d tell her they wanted to have drinks with their dinner. So, Imotan would have to explain: “We are a restaurant, primarily.” She says dealing with the signs, and their accompanying confusion, has been burdensome. “Having to explain that can get a little exhausting and tedious, but we understand that is what we had to do,” Imotan says. “We honestly could not be more excited [to take down the signs]. It’ll be one less thing that we have to overly explain to people.” Ryan Lowder, chef and owner of the Copper Kitchen, Copper


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ONE OF FEW

Restaurateurs and bar owners can’t take down their signs until May 8, which means Lenart won’t know for a while how many

signs she and Bateman will get. She says she expects to ask around in a few weeks when she’s out with members of her firm—“We’re lawyers: we lunch,” she says—but she figures it’ll take a while. An exhibit at Nox Contemporary Gallery is planned for fall, giving Bateman and Lenart time to collect the signs and figure out the direction the artistic endeavor will take. “I know it’s not going to happen in one day,” Lenart says. Lenart’s role in collecting the signs is similar to the liaison role she feels she occupies in her personal and professional lives: Not quite a member of the hospitality industry, not quite a politician or employee of a governmental agency, Lenart says she feels like she exists in this “kind of in-between place.” In the sign-collecting, similar to her day job, Lenart’s role is to be aware of changes in law and explain it to members of the industry so they can comply. With the signs and the upcoming exhibition, Lenart and Bateman are taking on another responsibility: gathering cultural artifacts and analyzing what they might mean for the future of Utah’s liquor laws. The signs were short-lived, Lenart says of the yearlong requirement, “so unreasonable it didn’t seem to accomplish anything,” referring specifically to lowering instances of underage drinking or drinking and driving, “two things everybody agrees should not happen.” “My hope is that for other [more burdensome] laws that may be in effect for longer, maybe they’re gonna be gone sometime,” she says. “A visual will show, ‘Hey, we do change.’” After being photographed by City Weekly on a Friday morning at downtown’s Junior’s Tavern, Lenart approaches owner and barkeep, Greg Arata, among the first of many bar owners and restaurateurs she’ll talk to in the coming weeks, and asks him if she can have his sign after May 8. Sure, Arata tells her, he would have just thrown it out anyway. The sign wasn’t as annoying to him as the membership passes were, so he’s fine turning his over. Lenart passes Arata her card, telling him she’s the sole liquor lawyer of the 26 in her firm. “I want you to never have to call me,” she says. But, just in case he needs Lenart’s expertise at some point in the future, Arata saves her card. “There’s a lot of lawyers in this town, but only a few liquor lawyers,” she tells him. CW

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TRASH INTO TREASURE

Establishments licensed as bars can trash their signs, too, but have to switch them out for another that says the premise is a bar and no one under 21 is allowed. “We’re totally fine with warnings about responsible consumption—things like that,” Neves says. Bars must also have food available, but—unlike restaurants—don’t have to make sure patrons consuming alcohol have an intent to dine. SLARA’s Corigliano says she thinks restaurateurs could technically keep their signs up if they wanted, but she says she can “guarantee not one single person will.” “I think people will burn them,” she says. With the Year of the Sign almost over, the question now turns to what restaurateurs will do with the contentious piece of paper that’s served as the bane of their collective existence for the past 12 months. Their plans don’t vary much: “Probably shred it,” Gibo says. “Burn them. Throw them away,” Lowder says, thinking of another option: “See how far it can fly.” “Probably have a little burning séance,” Imotan says. “The art piece sounds really fun and interesting, I just like to burn things.” Which brings us back to Lenart’s April 5th tweet. In it, she asked bars and restaurants to donate their signs for an art project she’s working on with Adam Bateman, a Salt Lake City-based artist who has exhibited all over the world and who is a friend of Lenart’s husband, Joshua, a professor at the U. Bateman says he’s interested in the project because he thinks the signs are “extremely unique visual objects that communicate

a lot of depth of cultural meaning about what’s going on in Utah.” “I see a number of opportunities of the ways to display these things or present these things, but we have to acquire them first, and that’s the first step: to acquire them authentically,” he says. If he and Lenart can collect a good number of them, Bateman says, “they have the potential—through repetition—to become visually significant.” But until they know how many signs they collect, he adds, it’s “impossible” to know what the installation will look like. “Figuring out how many of these things we get will push in one direction or another,” he says. Bateman calls the signs “cultural symbols,” but he doesn’t think what they represent is easily communicable. True to the “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” adage, the artist sees in the letter-size sheets “a lot more depth to it than simply the binary, adversarial relationship between the left and the right here in Utah.” Bateman says the words on the signs represent the government’s interest. But the treatment—the typeface, the placement—represents the restaurateurs’, since they would have had them framed if they’d loved the signs. “They’re sending a message to the government,” he says. Caught in the middle, he adds, are the patrons, who go to the restaurants and have the “cultural experience” of seeing the smattering of these two interests. Of the service industry folk City Weekly interviewed for this story, only Neves says he is planning on donating his sign to Lenart’s art project. The rest seemed intent on obliterating them, or at least throwing them away. “I hope instead of burning them, they’ll participate in this project,” Bateman says. “If [only] five people send us their things, it’s probably not going to materialize.” Still, he’s sympathetic to the cathartic properties of destroying a physical source of frustration: Maybe they’ll have a bonfire afterwards. “We can burn the art, and burn the signs,” Bateman says.

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Common and Copper Onion, is also happy the signs are coming down, since it’s “ridiculous they were there in the first place.” “It creates first impressions for a diner who walks in and goes, ‘What does this mean?’” Lowder says, validating the feeling that Utah is “a strange place.” “The signs did nothing but make us look stupid, as a market,” Water Witch’s Neves says. “It was a solution to a problem that didn’t exist.” “I think everybody sort of understood what a bar was, except for the Legislature,” he adds.


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ESSENTIALS

Utah Symphony: Strauss’ Don Quixote and Zarathustra

Jay Leno

CASSIDY DUHON

NOVA Chamber Music 40th Anniversary Finale

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Usually, when an arts organization changes leadership, the transfer of power occurs behind the scenes. For the NOVA Chamber Music Series, the passing of the baton will be quite literal, and you can be part of the audience. As part of the program closing NOVA’s 40th anniversary season, outgoing artistic director Jason Hardink leads things off with pieces including Messiaen’s Trois Mélodies and Lutoslawski’s Bucolics. But the finale— Schubert’s Octet—is led by Madeline Adkins (pictured), who takes over in the newly defined role of music director, while Hardink will work in a consultant capacity as artistic advisor to ensure continuity. The program also includes the announcement of the 2018-19 season. According to NOVA Executive Director Kristin Rector, the restructured music director position— freed from many administrative responsibilities, and with only a year-to-year appointment—offers unique opportunities for creativity. “Knowing that it’s just one year,” Rector says, “it could be really attractive to somebody who might not consider [the role] otherwise. She gets to have an outlet for maybe a particular composer, maybe a particular musician that she wants to provide an opportunity to play on a particular piece. That’s a very exciting opportunity for a creative person, without the burden of the logistics of it.” It wasn’t even necessary to rearrange schedules to make Adkins—who is also the Utah Symphony concertmaster—available for this show. As it happens, she was already on the program announced a year ago by Hardink. “It just turned out to be this meant-to-be kind of situation,” Rector says. (SR) NOVA Chamber Music 40th Anniversary Finale @ Libby Gardner Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, May 6, 3 p.m., $18-$20, novaslc.org

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They say that nice guys finish last. Jay Leno is considered by many as one of the nicest guys in showbiz, but there are two sides to that axiom. A successful stand-up comedian, he was the designated heir apparent to succeed Johnny Carson as host of the Tonight Show after Carson’s retirement. Although he landed the job, he had to compete for it publicly, first against David Letterman, and later, Conan O’Brien, creating some very bad blood in the process. Even after getting the gig, he continued to work relentlessly, ending his day by writing the next night’s monologue and doing stand-up on the weekends while living only off those earnings. The late James Brown aside, he was indeed the hardest working man in show business. So, how did the brass at NBC reward him? They tried moving him to primetime with an hour-long variety show that aired five nights a week. When that hare-brained idea proved a failure, they brought him back to late night post-midnight, weakened by the network’s lack of confidence and felled by lower ratings. Eventually, he was fired, a humiliation Leno took with his characteristic grace and good nature. He rebounded by repaying his dues: taking on a semi-regular role on the ABC sitcom Last Man Standing; launching Jay Leno’s Garage, a show based around his love of collecting cars; and going back to his roots in stand-up. Given the fortune he amassed while at NBC, Leno could have easily retired, but he still does more than 100 live shows a year. An Everyman of sorts, he’s a class act, and a very funny one at that. (Lee Zimmerman) Jay Leno @ Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, May 5, 8 p.m., $60$85, tuacahn.org

SUNDAY 5/6

Director Stanley Kubrick made it one of his filmmaking hallmarks to take existing pieces of music, and use them in such a way that they became inextricably linked to his movies: Vera Lynn’s “We’ll Meet Again” over the apocalyptic finale of Dr. Strangelove; “Singin’ in the Rain” accompanying a brutal assault in A Clockwork Orange; “Dies Irae” for the ominous opening credits of The Shining. But no example has become as iconic as the triumphal “Sunrise” from Richard Strauss’ 1896 work Also Sprach Zarathustra, heightening the grandeur of human evolution in 2001: A Space Odyssey. It was a fitting choice for reasons beyond its sound, as the inspiration for the piece was Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophical novel Also Sprach Zarathustra, which addressed humanity attempting to transcend itself toward becoming the “Übermensch.” “Man is something that shall be overcome,” Nietzsche writes, and it’s hard not to imagine 2001’s Starchild climax and thinking Nietzsche would have nodded in approval. Utah Symphony’s program of Strauss works concludes with Zarathustra, but the composer was inspired by less overtly heroic characters as well. The symphony also performs Strauss’ Don Quixote, based on the story of Cervantes’ legendary knight errant. The 45-minute piece turns the cello (Utah Symphony’s principal cellist Rainer Eudeikis) and viola (principal violist Brant Bayless) into the representations of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, in a manner akin to the character-based instruments of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf. Tilting at windmills offers a slightly more comic musical sensibility than the booming fanfare that now represents a classic film about a journey beyond the infinite. (SR) Utah Symphony: Strauss’ Don Quixote and Zarathustra @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, May 4-5, 7:30 p.m., $15-$83, utahsymphony.org

SATURDAY 5/5

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Utah has become something of a national capital of nerddom, whether it be through recordbreaking ticket sales for fantasy movies at local theaters, national polls about nerdy affinities or the breakout success of the local pop-culture convention. That makes this weekend something of a special holiday for fans of imaginative stories, with Friday’s Star Wars celebration “May the Fourth Be With You,” and Saturday’s annual Free Comic Book Day. The Salt Lake County Library System invites Star Wars fans to two days of events at the Viridian Center, beginning with a screening of the documentary The People vs. George Lucas on Thursday, May 3 at 7 p.m. Then on Friday, put on your favorite thematically appropriate costume and join fellow enthusiasts (18 and over) at an ersatz Mos Eisley cantina for costume contests, trivia competition, games and refreshments. At Urban Arts Gallery, check out the annual display of fan art in the exhibition Star Wars: Heroes and Villains. Enjoy watching (or participating in) cosplay contests during the May 4 reception, with locals bringing their own special interpretations of beloved (or hissable) characters. On Saturday, it’s time for local comic-book purveyors like Black Cat, Dr. Volts, Nerd Store and more—and the industry at large—to thank fans for their support by offering limited-edition free comic books featuring the Avengers, DC Super Hero Girls, Pokémon and more. It’s an all-weekend nerd party, and you’re invited. (Scott Renshaw) May the Fourth Be With You @ Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, May 4, 7-10 p.m., free but ticket reservation required, viridiancenter.org Star Wars: Heroes and Villains reception @ Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., May 4, noon-9 p.m., free, urbanartsgallery.org Free Comic Book Day @ various locations, freecomicbookday.com

FRIDAY 5/4

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Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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shots turn dance into a sport. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

P

artner dancing is one of those dying pastimes. Be honest: Do you know the difference between a waltz and a polka? Yet audiences have been hooked on Dancing with the Stars for 26 seasons and counting, and the popularity and star power surrounding the show’s fleet-footed performers has been enough to launch steady professional careers. Fans of the show are likely familiary with the names Peta Murgatroyd and brothers Maksim and Valentin Chmerkovskiy. After all, each of these three dancers has won the show’s top award, the Mirrorball Trophy (Murgatroyd has taken it home twice, a rare accomplishment). For everyone else, the trio’s new stage production Maks, Val & Peta Live On Tour: Confidential—which visits Salt Lake City on May 9—might be the first introduction to these dancers. And what an introduction it is. Some would call what Murgatroyd and the Chmerkovskiys do for a living soupedup ballroom dancing. But there’s an actual word for it: DanceSport. On paper, the two sound almost the same. In each, two dancers, arm in arm, swing and turn each other around a floor. In DanceSport, as in traditional ballroom, dancers follow basic formulaic steps: the fox trot, the Viennese waltz, the tango, the cha-cha, the rumba, the jive. But while ballroom dancing is oldschool Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, DanceSport is fast, flashy, sweaty, sexy fun. It’s Vegas Strip ballroom dancing—and some consider it a serious sport. The World DanceSport Federation doesn’t talk about dancers; it talks about athletes. These performers, the federation says in a description on its website, “demonstrate a perfect synthesis between their technique, artistic skills and athleticism. Physical conditioning, hard work, stern discipline, mental training and, above all, imagination are the prerequisites for athletes to achieve excellence.” Watch any of the star dancers’ performances online, and you’ll see what the federation means. This kind of dance is so athletic that for the past 10 years, the organization has been lobbying the International Olympic Committee to recognize it. Skateboarding and sport climbing made the cut for the 2020 games in Tokyo, but the fast-paced dance form didn’t make the grade. Someday, that might change, allowing it to join physical brands of

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artistry like synchronized swimming, ice dancing and rhythmic gymnastics. Many top DanceSport performers begin training intensively as children. Murgatroyd started ballet training at age 4; Maksim Chmerkovskiy began dancing when he was 6. When the Chmerkovskiy family emigrated from Ukraine to the United States in 1994, Maks and his father opened a competitive dance studio in New Jersey, and started training World Dance champions. Valentin was one of the studio’s best pupils—he won 15 U.S. National Championships and two World Dance Championships. For the past decade, the brothers have been regulars on DWTS—Maks also has a long list of Broadway and Vegas performances under his belt—and in 2016, the brothers took their first independent family production, Maks & Val Live On Tour: Our Way, across the country. The tour was a roughly autobiographical dance spectacular, following the brothers’ lives from Ukraine to stardom. Interviews with the brothers and Murgatroyd—now Maks’ wife, who joins the cast—have been limited (City Weekly was unable to secure an interview with any of the stars at press time). The Chmerkovkiys and Murgatroyd are joined by So You Think You Can Dance Season 14 finalists Chris “Kiki” Nyemchek and Koine “Koko” Iwasaki. Entertainment TV shows, when covering the dancers, dig mostly for inside scoops on this famous family; folks seem especially interested in Murgatroyd and Maksim’s son, who is now just over

Peta Murgatroyd and Maks Chmerkovskiy perform in Maks, Val & Peta Live on Tour: Confidential

a year old and travels with the couple on the tour bus. Details on the performance, however, are sparse. There are 28 dance routines in the two-hour show, which, similar to the brothers’ production, is somewhat autobiographical and includes a dance in which the men cradle a baby and swing around a stroller. For the most part, Confidential offers the kind of spectacle that Dancing with the Stars fans, or audiences used to any big flashy production, expect. There are plenty of women in heels and skimpy beaded dresses being spun around by men in dark suits. There are flips and kicks à la Vegas showgirls, as well as slower moments to vary the tempo. And there is definitely world-class, super athletic dancing—the kind that we might watch some day at the Olympics. CW

MAKS, VAL & PETA LIVE ON TOUR: CONFIDENTIAL

Eccles Theatre 131 S. Main 385-468-1010 May 9, 7:30 p.m. $26-$300 artsaltlake.org


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Artist Jena Schmidt represents landscape forms of geometric abstractions (“Your Nature #1” is pictured) in A Part of Everything at A Gallery (1321 S. 2100 East, agalleryonline.com), May 4-June 1.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Camelot CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through May 12, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., centerpointtheatre.com The Christians Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-917-4969, through May 6, times and dates vary, goodcotheatre.com The Full Monty The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, May 4-19, dates and times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Fun Home Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through May 13, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Hamilton Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2797, through May 16, broadway-at-the-eccles.com The Music Man Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through June 9, dates and times vary, hct.org Red Bike Rose Wagner Center Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, through May 5, dates and times vary, pygmalionproductions.org Sense & Sensibility Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through June 2, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Shades of Burlesque Spring Spectacular Shades of Pale Brewry, 154 W. Utopia Ave., May 5, 9 p.m. Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org What We’re Up Against Rose Wagner Center Studio Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, through May 13, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org

DANCE

Maks, Val & Peta Live on Tour: Confidential Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, May 9, 7:30 p.m., live-at-the-eccles.com (see p. 20)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

NOVA Chamber Music 40th Anniversary Finale Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, May 6, 3 p.m., novaslc.org (see p. 19) Utah Chamber Artists: Let’s Dance Libby

Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, May 7, 7:30 p.m., utahchamberartists.org Utah Symphony: Strauss’ Don Quixote and Zarathustra Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, May 4-5, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org (see p. 19)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Andrew Sleighter Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., May 4-5, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Bengt Washburn Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, May 4-5, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Danny Bevins & Kris Shaw Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, May 4-5, 8 p.m., parkcityshows.com Jay Leno Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, May 5, 8 p.m., tuacahn.org (see p. 19) Jimmy Pardo Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, May 4-5, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jeff Metcalf: Back Cast: Memoirs of Fly Fishing Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, May 4, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jenna Evans Welch: Love & Luck The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, May 8, 6 p.m., kingsenglish.com Lezlie Evans: Daddies Do Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, May 8, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Rachel Hawkins: Royals Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, May 3, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Dragon Lights SLC Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through May 6, dragonlightsslc.com Thanksgiving Point Tulip Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-7682300, through May 5, Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org


moreESSENTIALS

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Woodland Fairy Festival Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, 801-566-8903, through June 23, gardnervillage.com Gypsy Wisdom Psychic Fair Crone’s Hollow, 3834 S. Main, May 5, noon-6 p.m., croneshollow.com May the Fourth Be With You Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, May 4, 7-10 p.m., viridiancenter.org (see p. 19) Mommy and Me Fairy Tea Party Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, West Jordan, 801-566-8903, through May 12, Saturdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m., gardnervillage.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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Alyce Carrier: Celebration of the Hand Temporary Museum of Permanent Change, 300 South between 200 West and West Temple, through June 17, museumofchange.org April Showers, May Flowers Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, through May 31, hornefineart.com Blue Nude Migration Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through May 12, slcpl.org Carol Bold Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through May 20, redbuttegarden.org Chapman Library 100th Birthday Historical Photo Exhibit Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through June 28, opening reception May 5, 4-5 p.m., slcpl.org Connie Borup Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through May 11, phillips-gallery.com David Estes: People, Places, Things Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 2, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 26, utahmoca.org Ditchbank: Paintings and Ceramics Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 15, times vary, slcpl.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 13, utahmoca.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Familiar Flora: Four Visual Responses to Living With Plants Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through May 11, visualarts.utah.gov Fionna Phillips: Stigma Defaced Art Access

Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through May 9, accessart.org Florescentia: Works by Emily Fox King Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through May 4, visualarts.utah.gov Gavan Nelson: River Inside Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 18, slcpl.org James W. Stewart: NIGHT and DAY Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through May 12, slcpl.org Jena Schmidt: A Part of Everything A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, May 4-June 1, agalleryonline.com (see p. 22) Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu LEGO City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Lenka Konopasek and Sarah Bown Roberts Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through June 8, saltlakearts.org Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Mara Elana Macaroni Gallery, 244 S. 500 West Ste. 107, through May 31, macaronigallery.com May the Fourth Be With You: Star Wars Day Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, May 4, 4-7 p.m., slcpl.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 12, utahmoca.org Morgaine Fehlauer: Rituals God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through May 11, godhatesrobots.com Patricia Nosanchuk: Art in Ink, Healing Works Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 17, slcpl.org Piecing Together Mental Illness Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through May 20, slcpl.org Play On! Chase Home Museum of Utah Folk Arts, 1150 S. Constitution Drive, Liberty Park, through June 29, heritage.utah.gov River Inside: Photographs by Gavan Nelson Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org Star Wars / Heroes and Villains Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through June 3, urbanartsgallery.org (see p. 19)

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MAY 3, 2018 | 23

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State Street’s Little World packs a flavorful punch.

for a gastronomic adventure. Since I began my experience at Little World with a lunch special, let’s start there. Lunch combos come in two variations, seemingly reward-

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Sunday 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Best bet: The plump and crispy potstickers Can’t miss: The shrimp balls and tofu hot pot

MAY 3, 2018 | 25

Sure, the familiar lineup of General Tso’s Chicken and ham fried rice is ready to stand at attention, but those willing to dig a little deeper into Little World’s menu are in

| CITY WEEKLY |

W

hen considering the sheer breadth of Chinese cuisine, it’s easy to feel a little short-changed at most takeout joints. I like sweet-and-sour chicken just as much as the next guy, but every so often I want to veer off the beaten path and try something different. When I popped in to Little World Chinese Restaurant (1356 S. State, 801-467-5213, littleworldslc.com) for a quick lunch, I was a bit dumbfounded to find a menu that contained hundreds of dishes, some of which were completely unknown to me.

which, despite a few unsure bets, was largely successful. I’m a little torn between what I liked more: the shrimp balls and tofu hot pot, or the squid in black bean sauce—surprising, since I was expecting the roast duck to take the fish cake. The shrimp balls and tofu come served in a sizzling broth that adds some tasty saltiness, and the cross hatching on the cuts of squid makes the meat look like flowers from some exotic locale. In the end, I would get either dish on a repeat visit—though the shrimp balls might have edged out the squid. While it’s true that Little World isn’t the most glamorous spot to share a meal, the vast menu, reasonable prices and huge portions make it stand out. It’s definitely the kind of place that can act like a gateway between familiar dishes and ones that entice diners to venture off the conventional path for something unexpectedly delicious. CW

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

and salty soy or fish sauce. However, the blend of flavors here struck me as more thoughtful and dare I say … elevated. They’re not yanking your chain when they say a dish is spicy, either. By the end of my meal, my mouth was pleasantly torched. Feeling as though I had just scratched the surface of what Little World has to offer, I returned later with a friend. Our goal: Order stuff we wouldn’t normally try in a Chinese restaurant. I went with the roast duck on rice ($9.99) and the squid with black bean sauce ($10.99). My buddy opted for the roasted pork lo mein ($8.50, pictured) and the shrimp balls with tofu hot pot ($13.50). First, we kicked the whole thing off with an order of potstickers ($6.26). I’ve developed a modest addiction to potstickers throughout my gastronomic travels, and I have to say the ones here are among the best. Much like pizza, potstickers tend to be good no matter what, but these little beasts are something special. They’re roughly the size of a fist, packed full of seasoned pork and cabbage and are absolutely wonderful. As appetizers, they appropriately set the stage for the meal to come,

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ENRIQUE LIIMÓN

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Big Flavors in Little China

ing those who want something different with a hell of a lot more food. For $5.56, you can get your basics—chicken chow mein, beef with broccoli, orange chicken and the like, all of which come with one appetizer. The $6.26 menu offers a bit more variety, along with all of the appetizer options and the soup of the day. Here you can find fare like beef with oyster sauce and Peking spare ribs. I went for shrimp with garlic sauce because it was one of the spicier options—and I was hoping a little garlic breath would curb any social interactions I might encounter during the rest of the afternoon. When they brought out my order, I thought there had been some mistake. There’s no way I ordered this much food for just six bucks. But sure enough, there were my plump and pink shrimp, served with roasted veggies and slathered in garlicky brown sauce with red pepper flakes. In addition to the main dish, the plate contained a hefty scoop of ham fried rice, an egg roll, a piece of fried shrimp and a fried wonton. The flavors here evoke those one would expect of a Chinese food place in the American mainland—tangy garlic, sharp ginger


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FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER

A LA MAISON

@captainspringer

Dining

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Gourmandise’s New Location

The chocolate ganache and raspberry brownies from Gourmandise have long been a part of my gastronomic DNA, and I’m as pleased as a petit four that the French pastry shop has expanded its operation. As of April 20, Gourmandise To Go (1000 S. Main, 801-419-0412, gourmandisethebakery.com) is open for business. Like the name implies, Gourmandise To Go offers a smattering of the bakery’s greatest hits—hot and cold sandwiches, a full roster of cookies and a generous selection of their famous cakes—and packages them up for quick, boxed meals. For those in less of a hurry, the space also has a dine-in area where you can watch the bakers work their magic through thick-paned windows—though they don’t appreciate it when you lick the glass while they’re baking.

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived 1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

Kolache Fest

My love for Hruska’s Kolaches (2030 S. 900 East, 385-309-4379, hruskaskolaches.com) has been welldocumented in the pages of City Weekly, and I highly anticipate their annual Kolache Fest on Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to noon. For a paltry entrance fee of $5, Hruska’s offers to the public its entire roster of sweet and savory kolaches—they’re like dinner rolls stuffed with tasty fillings such as scrambled eggs, sausage or fruit and cream cheese. The Sugar House bakery features around 30 types of kolaches, and attendees can feel free to bring their own non-alcoholic drinks.

Central Ninth Street Fare

If you’ve yet to experience the bustling, effortlessly cool vibe that Central Ninth has begun to develop, then it’s time to throw yourself into the deep end of the pool. Local First Utah has partnered with KRCL 90.9 FM to create Spring Fare at Central Ninth, a celebration of the local businesses that have helped the community thrive. The event unites restaurants and businesses like Laziz Kitchen, Meditrina, Jade Market, Water Witch and Proper Brewing, offering guests a sampling of their various foods and drinks. In addition to providing an evening of great food and entertainment, the event functions as a benefit for KRCL. The Spring Fare kicks off on Sunday, May 6 from 1-5 p.m. at 165 W. 900 South. Tickets for this all-ages event are $25 and are available through 24tix.com.

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28 | MAY 3, 2018

To Helles and Back A tale of two Bohemian brews. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

here aren’t many markets in the U.S. that can boast breweries specializing in lagered beers, but Salt Lake City is lucky enough to have one of them. Since 2001, Midvale’s Bohemian Brewery has been committed to bringing thirsty Utahns classic European-style lagers without fail. This month, the boys and girls at Boho have packaged two wonderfully different beers that require your attention. Cottonwood Common: This American beer style with German roots was born in the San Francisco area during the late 1800s. What makes it unusual is that it’s made with cool-fermenting lager yeast, used at warm ale temperatures. This was mostly done out of necessity, due to lack of refrigeration. The result is a toasty and fruity beer

that’s highly drinkable. Bohemian’s variation on the style is a clear orange/amber color, with a single finger of fairly dense and fluffy off-white head. There’s a damned nice aroma with spiced greens, pine needles and a complex perfume of fruity yeast along with bready malt notes. The flavor follows with malty hints of toasted biscuit, dried fruit and light caramel, then fresh, herbal hops with pronounced bitterness. As the hops settle on the tongue, lingering notes of orange peel, pepper, pine and light toffee emerge. The end has a nice salad of herbal/ floral/grassy earthiness that works well with the light 4 percent ABV, while the finish features a spicy/piney bite that doesn’t linger too long. Overall: This is an excellent hoppy California Common style. The all-around complexity and balance of citrus/earthy hops, paired with fruity yeast and moderate bready malt flavors, creates a very smooth, crisp and easy-to-drink beer. Helles Bock: The Germans have many beers designed to fit the seasons, and late spring is Helles Bock time. This lager is generally much lighter in color than traditional bocks. The hop profile is also greatly increased, along with its higher alcohol content. Bohemian’s interpretation has a sunny yellow color with a plentiful supply of pillowy white lather on top; this certainly looks like a sturdy lager. Just one whiff zaps me into my lederhosen, as the raw innocence of

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

pale malts, the lightly toasted cereal and the vague, fruity yeast esters are all emblematic of the style. It’s a wonderful aromatic trip. The taste is no slouch, either; wave after wave of honey-smacked golden malts wash over the tongue, combined with a bright citric bite that spreads bitterness and a light spiciness out across the palate. It has a nice toasted bready backbone, with just a light splash of butter thrown in, giving the malt profile a bit of a buttered biscuit feel at times. The finish is very dry, with lingering pith, but even the back end of this feels pretty tight. The carbonation is a bit tame, which makes this sit on the palate a bit too much.

Overall: While nearly identical to many European Pilsner styles, this bock narrowly exceeds what one might expect from those. It features just enough malt and ester-like flavors to keep me coming back. The 6.9 percent ABV is hidden nicely, and rarely shows its face with strong alcohol flavor. Bohemian’s brewers don’t care about frills—they care about drinkability, and these beers definitely excel in that department. Whether you like your beers toasty and light or malty and slick, these two very different offerings deliver the goods on many fronts. Both are available right now at Bohemian Brewery. As always, prost! CW

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The Five Alls

Initial research revealed a peculiar air surrounding The Five Alls: It’s only open during dinner hours three days a week; they only serve five-course meals; and its has been painstakingly stylized as an Old English pub. Yes, it’s just barely toeing the line between cheesy and tasteful, and yes, the waitresses wear corsets, but there’s an endearing sincerity going on here. Meals consist of five courses, with a choice of entrée. The menu is a tad on the pricier side, so come ready to drop a good $40-$50 per person—but with a few exceptions, the food is worth the price. The chef recommendations are all great bets, chief among them the filet Oscar ($51), topped with the glorious combination of king crab, asparagus and béarnaise. Despite its stigma as a culinary cliché, the chicken Kiev ($30) made good use of its buttery stuffing—its crisp exterior yields to some truly tender and juicy chicken. Service was a little slower than it should have been, but despite a few minor issues, The Five Alls is likely to appeal to anyone with a drop of anglophilic blood. Reviewed April 5. 1458 S. Foothill Drive, 801-582-1400, fivealls.com

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FILM REVIEW

Mother Inferior

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Tully captures the anxieties of leaving youthful irresponsibility behind.

KLY

WEE C L S @

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

FOCUS FEATURES

I

Charlize Theron in Tully the person whose daughter sees her postpartum belly and asks with concern, “Mom, what’s wrong with your body?” Those who still associate Cody primarily with Juno might be surprised that there’s little overt jokiness to Tully, though there are bracing, caustically funny bits like Marlo melting down in a meeting with the school principal over concerns about her son’s “quirky” behavior, and maybe an easy shot at Marlo’s nouveau-riche sister-in-law serving the kids truffle mac & cheese. The character study remains the focal point, along with the relationship between Marlo and Tully, leading up to surprisingly emotional moments of self-awareness. Some of the gimmicky plot machinations might feel unnecessary, but they prove to be an effective way of giving shape to Marlo secondguessing her life choices. After more than a decade of writing movies, Cody has mastered the art of showing us that avoiding being a grown-up ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. CW

TULLY

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BBB.5 Charlize Theron Mackenzie Davis Ron Livingston R

TRY THESE Juno (2007) Ellen Page Michael Cera

Young Adult (2011) Charlize Theron Patton Oswalt R

Ricki and the Flash (2015) Meryl Streep Rick Springfield PG-13

MAY 3, 2018 | 31

The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) Annabella Sciorra Rebecca De Mornay R

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themselves in horrifying ways. Cody and Reitman slide in a different direction, though insecurities are still a huge part of the equation. They set the stage brilliantly in a montage in which Marlo’s life after the birth of baby Mia becomes a numbing repetition of middle-of-the-night diaper changes, breast pumping, midday naps grabbed whenever possible, and somehow in all of that taking care of the other two children—including a non-neurotypical 5-year-old whose behavior at times pushes her to the edge—while her husband Drew (Ron Livingston) deals with work responsibilities after a recent promotion, but also kind of hides away at night to play video games. Marlo can barely keep her head above water, and all she can think about are the ways she’s failing. Those emotions are tied up in the history Cody gives to Marlo, and the way Theron portrays Marlo’s struggles with that history. Tully reveals Marlo having grown up in a dysfunctional family, and addresses her young adulthood as a bisexual living a vital life in a pre-gentrified Brooklyn neighborhood, including a long-time relationship with a woman. There’s a terrific snippet of dialogue as Marlo describes to Tully the stability she found in her marriage to Drew—“I rode every horse on the merry-go-round … Drew was the bench”— and Tully plays out as a tug-of-war between the grounded, predictable family life Marlo didn’t have for herself but wants for her children, and facing down having become

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t makes a certain obvious sense that Diablo Cody has become American cinema’s foremost chronicler of women who can’t quite come to terms with being grown-ups. After all, she started her career with a splash as the screenwriter of Juno, which leaned heavy on hip quips in its tale of a high-school girl’s unplanned pregnancy, then moved on to teen horror with Jennifer’s Body. But rather than wallowing in arrested adolescence, Cody has graduated in most of her subsequent projects to looking with a hard eye at the inability to confront no longer having every option open to you—like the writer trying to re-capture a high-school romance in Young Adult, or the musician who left her family behind to be a rock-and-roller in Ricki and the Flash. In Tully—reuniting Cody with her Young Adult director (Jason Reitman) and star (Charlize Theron)—she creates yet another protagonist wrestling with the realization that she’s not the girl she used to be. Theron plays Marlo, a suburban New York mother of two with a third one on the way and a fragile grasp on managing all of her maternal responsibilities. Her wealthy brother (Mark Duplass) gives a unique baby gift by offering to pay for a night nanny to help her out, but Marlo resists—until a string of rough nights with the newborn leads her to make the call. And soon thereafter arrives Tully (Mackenzie Davis), an energetic young woman who tends to the infant in the middle of the night, and becomes a friend and confidant to Marlo. There’s a variation on this premise that becomes exactly the kind of Hand That Rocks The Cradle-esque psychological thriller Marlo first fears when she considers bringing on a nanny—a story about a woman’s insecurities manifesting


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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32 | MAY 3, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net GRACE JONES: BLOODLIGHT AND BAMI BBB Most profile documentaries hold your hand to make sure you’re aware of why their subjects warrant a documentary; director Sophie Fiennes has a different approach in mind for Grace Jones. This profile of the actor/singer/model includes exactly zero archival footage, nor a single reference to A View to a Kill, yet still makes it clear why Jones is fascinating as she approaches her 70th birthday. Most of that fascination comes in the form of concert sequences, which showcase the ferocious, theatrical stage presence of a bustier-clad Jones, including a mesmerizing performance of “Love Is the Drug” accentuated by laser light refracting off of her mirrored bowler hat. It’s a bit less interesting watching her in her daily off-stage life, whether it involves visiting family in Jamaica, reminiscing about growing up with an abusive step-grandfather, or bringing a no-shit-taken attitude to her professional dealings. Fiennes at times steps in with inventive visual style—turning a nightclub visit into a rage of white noise— but mostly makes it evident that no matter what you know about the previous 40 years of Grace Jones’ life, she still deserves to be an icon. Opens May 4 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw ISMAEL’S GHOSTS BBB There are no literal hauntings in this wry, lyrical but often plodding drama from director Arnaud Desplechin, only metaphorical ones. Freewheeling French filmmaker Ismael Vuillard (Mathieu Amalric) is in the process of simultaneously shooting and rewriting a new movie when he and his girlfriend, Sylvia (Charlotte Gainsbourg), are visited by Carlotta (a wideeyed Marion Cotillard), Ismael’s presumed-dead wife who

vanished 21 years ago. Carlotta’s return causes upheaval, but it’s only one factor in Ismael’s perturbation. He’s struggling to finish his movie, a spy thriller based on the adventures of his own brother (Louis Garrel), who refuses to cooperate; he’s plagued by nightmares; and he remains a friend and confidant to Carlotta’s father, an acclaimed director (László Szabó) who never got over his daughter’s disappearance. One senses that this handsomely shot, well-acted film is personal, and familiarity with Desplechin’s previous work might make it more vivid: Amalric played a musician named Ismael Vuillard in Kings and Queen, and the spy brother has the same last name as a character (played by Amalric) in two of Desplechin’s other films. Without that context, this film about absence feels like it’s missing something. Opens May 4 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider ITZHAK BB.5 If you want to hear a lot of beautiful music, you’ve come to the right place; if you want to learn a lot about violinist Itzhak Perlman, maybe not so much. Director Alison Chernick combines contemporary fly-on-the-wall moments with archival footage and interviews for something that’s less a profile of the musician than a series of snapshots—some amusing, a few enlightening, but not much that sticks. There are hints that Perlman’s gifts were underestimated as a child because people focused on his disability—being left unable to walk unassisted due to childhood polio—and conversations indicating the joy he takes not just in performing music but in teaching and talking about it. He seems to be a decent, happily married fellow, so it’s lovely any time you see that prodigious artistic ability doesn’t mean being a horrible person. It simply feels like a superficial portrait of so immense a talent, even if it’s fun watching Perlman chat over a glass of wine with Alan Alda about their respective artistic process, or add a violin solo to the beginning of “We Didn’t Start the Fire” at a Billy Joel concert. Opens May 4 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR

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OVERBOARD [not yet reviewed] When a millionaire (Eugenio Derbez) winds up with amnesia, a mistreated employee (Anna Faris) pretends to be his wife. Opens May 4 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) TULLY BBB.5 See review on p. 31. Opens May 4 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CLAIRE’S CAMERA At Park City Film Series, May 4-5, 8 p.m. & May 6, 6 p.m. (NR) MINDING THE GAP At Rose Wagner Center, May 9, 7 p.m. (NR) THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US At Main Library, May 9, 2 p.m. (PG-13) NISE: THE HEART OF MADNESS At Main Library, May 8, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR BB.5 Ever since his post-credits cameo in 2012’s first Avengers feature, Thanos (Josh Brolin) has been the harbinger of doom just waiting for his moment in the spotlight, and this culmination of the 10-year-in-the-making Marvel Cinematic Universe pits dozens of superheroes against the alien who seeks ultimate power through the Infinity Stones. Those are big stakes, and this massive cross-over provides opportunities for unique character interactions, and occasionally for individual characters to flash the personality we’ve gotten to know. It feels less like a movie in its own right, and more like the 2-1/2 hour non-stop finale of a 40-hour-long experiment. Even the moments that are supposed to pack emotional punch—not everyone is still standing when the credits roll—can’t fully work when we know other movies are still coming. There’s dead, and then there’s comic-book dead. (PG-13)—SR I FEEL PRETTY BBB High-concept comedy almost always lives or dies based on the central performance. Amy Schumer plays Renee Bennett, a

woman whose discontent with her physical appearance vanishes after she awakens from a knock on the head convinced that the woman in the mirror is now drop-dead gorgeous. There’s an inevitability to the narrative arc—real beauty was inside you the whole time, etc.—and the script at times feels thin on actual jokes. But Schumer nails both sides of her work as Renee, including early glances at herself conveying an almost heartbreaking self-loathing, and she’s aided by a terrific supporting cast including Michelle Williams and Aidy Bryant. While there might be nothing earth-shaking in the empowerment message, Schumer gives her all to conveying that nothing is more attractive than confidence, whether it’s rational or irrational. (PG-13)—SR

LEAN ON PETE BBB.5 “A boy and his dog” stories don’t have to be about dogs, and writer/director Andrew Haigh’s adaptation of Willy Vlautin’s novel makes the crucial relationship one between 16-year-old Charley (Charlie Plummer) and a 5-year-old quarterhorse owned by a small-time trainer (Steve Buscemi). Haigh provides a compelling foundation in the world of penny-ante horse racing, but that milieu changes when Charley’s single father is incapacitated, and Charley takes to the road with the horse. Nearly the entire final hour depends on Plummer’s performance, so it’s fortunate that the young actor conveys both toughness and a longing for stability. What emerges through Charley’s episodic wanderings is a tale of what happens when those responsible for taking care of someone—or something—aren’t up to the task. The narrative takes unexpected turns, but at the center there’s a simple quest for connection. (R)—SR

YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE BBBB It takes a full 20 minutes of writer/director Lynne Ramsay’s film for it to be clear whether Joe (Joaquin Phoenix) is a hero or a villain, and there’s a thin line between them in his work as a brutal freelance investigator tracking down missing and exploited children, including applying his trusty ball-peen hammer to those prostituting the runaway daughter (Ekaterina Samsonov) of a New York state senator. Phoenix delivers a stellar internalized performance, but the real star here is Ramsay’s direction, bringing intensity and efficiency to a story where an assault on a brothel for underage girls plays out through grainy security camera footage, and Joe’s lifetime of trauma emerges in brief, jarring flashbacks. It’s a tale of monsters created by their past, trying to focus their monstrous wrath on those who have it coming. (R)—SR

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It’s All (Not) Relative

MUSIC

Provo’s Renshaw: An accidental band, accidentally discovered. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

MEGAN MATHESON

B

Jarom Hansen, Cayson Renshaw, Mitch Romney and Michael VanWagoner of Renshaw

| CITY WEEKLY |

MAY 3, 2018 | 33

w/ Michael Barrow & the Tourists, Nate Hardyman Friday, May 4, 8 p.m. Velour 135 N. University Ave., Provo 801-818-2263 $8 All ages velourlive.com

RENSHAW

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band, because it was just going to be [Rector] and another guy, an acoustic thing.” While the band Renshaw didn’t end up opening for Rector, their practice time didn’t go to waste. They applied for and played at the aforementioned battle of the bands at Velour in June 2017, and have played a few gigs since. Being full-time students, however, has limited the time available for the band to play and record together. “It is hard, especially being in school,” Renshaw says, “but we are hoping to really kind of hunker down and get some stuff out this summer.” Renshaw is proud of applying his faith to his music, and his upbeat messages have given him an opportunity to record songs for the LDS church’s annual themed albums for their Especially for Youth program. “We feel like the music we’re putting out is good,” Renshaw says. “Not only sounds good, but hopefully can do some good. … [Music] for me is hopefully a way I can connect with people and somehow impact their lives for the better. And there are cases every once in a while where I’ll hear from someone that some music we did influenced them, and it’s really cool to hear.” Cayson Renshaw can’t say whether there’s a long-term future for the band Renshaw beyond college, and the members are fine with just letting it be what it is at the moment. “We have discussed a little bit about how it’s difficult for me to draw a line between my personal projects and the band’s music,” Renshaw says, “because most of the stuff we play is music that I’ve written. But they obviously play a huge part in it all. I think it’s different for me than it is for them, perhaps.” After all, it is his name on the band. And for the record: It doesn’t appear that there’s any relation—just the kind of coincidence that can lead to some good music. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

efore talking about music, it was necessary to ask the only truly important question: “So, are we related?” Cayson Renshaw laughs, but he already knows that’s the reason his band—called Renshaw—caught my attention. It’s a curiosity to find other people with your not-particularly-common name, let alone to find that someone has decided it was not particularly common enough to make it the name of a band. “The funny thing was, it wasn’t my idea to name the band Renshaw,” says Renshaw, the principal singer/songwriter. “When we planned to do this battle of the bands, one of the guys threw out Renshaw, and I was like, ‘If you really want to.’ Sometimes someone will find out I’m in a band, and they’ll ask what the band’s name is, and I’ll say ‘Renshaw.’ Either they don’t know what that is, or they know it’s my last name, and I might get an ‘Oh …’ I do have this little bit of fear, I guess, that people think I want all the credit.” While perhaps evoking “named after the band leader” rock acts like Van Halen and Bon Jovi, or family groups like Hansen and Haim, Renshaw is neither. A quartet of BYU students—Renshaw, keyboardist Jarom Hansen, drummer Mitch Romney and bassist Michael VanWagoner—Renshaw plays a wholesome brand of acoustic pop, combining their own songs like the wistful romantic ballad “All My Life” with beautifully harmonized covers like Fleetwood Mac’s “Landslide” showcased in a recent YouTube upload. From Renshaw’s description of his own childhood interests, it’s surprising that he’s involved with music at all, let alone leading a band. Like many kids in Utah, he was dutifully brought to piano lessons by his mother; also like many kids in Utah, he hated it. “I was more interested in playing baseball and soccer,” Renshaw says. “Then I would just kind of sing for fun, nothing special. And my parents were like, ‘Hey, he’s kind of good.’” That family interest in his musical ability led to another opportunity he was not too enthusiastic about: Joining his sister for a high school a cappella performance when she was a senior and he was a freshman. “I would say I was forced into it,” Renshaw says, “but I ended up really enjoying it.” Around that same time, he started playing guitar, and soon thereafter began writing his own songs. While he might have been a reluctant musician initially, the creative side appealed to him. “I tend to over-think life,” he says. “Writing music has always been a way for me to express what I’m thinking, because I have a hard time expressing myself in any other way.” In the same way that Renshaw himself is perhaps an improbable musician, the band Renshaw probably never should have existed, since its creation was based on a misunderstanding. In spring 2017, Cayson Renshaw was invited to open for musician Ben Rector when Rector was scheduled to perform at BYU. “I thought they would want me to have a band with me there,” Renshaw says, “so I rounded these guys up and started jamming with them once or twice a week. But they didn’t actually want me to have a


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LIVE

BY LEE ZIMMERMAN & HOWARD HARDEE

THURSDAY 5/3

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

Most would argue that The Beatles initiated what would later be termed “power pop.” The bands that followed in their wake—Badfinger, the Raspberries, Nazz, the Shoes, etc.—helped fine tune it as a genre, one distinguished by radio-ready melodies, instantly engaging hooks, high harmonies and a playful approach that all but assures instant accessibility. Lately though, that style has given way to the highgloss sounds of today’s current sensations— Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars, Florence and the Machine, Cardi B and pretty much anyone who appears as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live. While Jukebox the Ghost could still be considered relative upstarts in the pop sweepstakes, their effusive sound—as evidenced by their recently released fifth album Off To The Races and its bouncy piano-driven lead single, “Everybody’s Lonely”—shows that flash and finesse can, in fact, go hand in hand. Taking their name from a word borrowed from the lyric of a Captain Beefheart song and one referencing a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, these three college buddies found success almost immediately. Following on the heels of their independent debut, they reaped instant critical kudos, and launched a nonstop touring schedule that quickly qualified them as one of the hardest-working bands in the biz. There’s nothing the least bit spooky about that. (Lee Zimmerman) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 7 p.m. $18 presale, $20 day of show, metromusichall.com

X Ambassadors

SHERVIN LAINEZ

Jukebox the Ghost, The Greeting Committee

FRIDAY 5/4

X Ambassadors, Jacob Banks, SHAED

X Ambassadors occupies a pop-forward, radio-friendly space on the rock spectrum, and is best known for its infectiously catchy hit “Renegades.” The group formed in 2009, and spent several years performing in New York bars and clubs gaining little traction, often playing to practically no one. Their big break came when an acoustic version of the equally catchy “Unconsolable” caught the attention of Imagine Dragons frontman Dan Reynolds, who urged record label Interscope to sign the band. X Ambassadors is made up of a pair of brothers—frontman Sam Harris and keyboardist/backup vocalist Casey Harris—the latter of whom was born blind due to SeniorLoken syndrome, a rare condition that affects vision and kidneys. (Prior to the band’s success, he used his highly sensitive ear to make a living as a piano tuner.) Anyone who’s seen

Jukebox the Ghost the band play live can attest that blindness doesn’t hold Casey back whatsoever. He’s extremely familiar with the tactile knobs on his synthesizers, and it helps that the band’s sets are meticulously planned out, with only a handful of unstructured and improvisational sections. As has become the norm on the music festival circuit, X Ambassadors plays along with a metronome and pre-recorded tracks during live shows. Each member tries to generate as much noise as possible—Casey often plays two keyboards simultaneously, for instance—but some 20 percent the group’s live sound is pre-recorded. While that might offend rock purists, it’s worth remembering that X Ambassadors is very much a pop band. (Howard Hardee) The Depot, 13 N. 400 West, 6:30 p.m., $34 presale, $36 day of show, depotslc.com

CATIE LAFFOON

34 | MAY 3, 2018

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HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

w/ DJ Soul Pause

SUNDAY:

KARAOKE

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1400 POT

THURS

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,150

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

STATE live music

2PM

HIGHLAND

20 1 7

2013

Thursdays

$3 FIREBALLS-

Mondays 75¢ WINGS ALL DAY

SAT

2014

saturdays

SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

SUN &

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

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EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

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MAY 3, 2018 | 35

Wednesdays

WED

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

9PM

BREAKING BINGO $3000 POT-8PM

MEXICAN BEER, TEQUILA, TACOS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $900 POT

TUES

Tuesdays KARAOKE

FEATURING DJ BAD HAIR DAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE

FAT CANDICE

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG-$2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

Fridays

FRI

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d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

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THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!!

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!


5.3 BROTHER CHUNKY

5.5 THE POUR

5.4 MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU BASH WITH TRIGGERS & SLIPS

5.7 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

STEPHEN KYLE

Patio Season is here!

LIVE

MONDAY 5/7

The Fratellis

The Fratellis, Blood Red Shoes

Back in 2006, Scottish rock trio The Fratellis broke out in the U.K. with a few chart-topping singles off their debut album Costello Music— “Henrietta,” “Chelsea Dagger” and “Flathead.” At the time, most stateside listeners probably knew the songs from iPod commercials, or at least listened to them on an iPod. For anyone coming of age around that time, it was brilliant stuff. The music was as accessible as any of the garage-rock revivalists of the time, but also curiously different: Frontman Jon Fratelli’s mushy-mouthed enunciations and hooligan attitude gave them an entirely different vibe. The band’s streetlamp serenades and drunken shuffles made suburban American kids who’d never been overseas imagine ruminating over suds with a couple of close friends—er, mates— in a strange and dimly lit pub. But like most hard-drinking hooligans, The Fratellis didn’t age particularly well. Their sophomore album, Here We Stand, lacked the catchiness and rowdy spirit that made Costello Music so memorable, and their follow-up efforts never really lived up to their early promise as bleary-eyed guitar heroes. But now, wisely, they’ve gone in an

Justin Townes Earle

5.9 JOHN DAVIS

5.10 JOSHUA COOK & THE KEY OF NOW

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JOSHUA BLACK WILKINS

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36 | MAY 3, 2018

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

entirely different direction. On their recently released fifth studio album, In Your Own Sweet Time, Fratelli sings in falsetto, the band adopts a glossy electronic music aesthetic and rock instruments are pushed into the background. They’re almost unrecognizable as the band that made their fame with messy guitar jams, but it really works on songs like the bouncy, summertime banger “Stand Up Tragedy.” They sound clear-headed, concise and, well, sober. (HH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $18.50, thecomplexslc.com

TUESDAY 5/8

Justin Townes Earle, Blake Brown

Indeed, there’s something to be said for the age-old adage “like father, like son.” Consider Willie Nelson and his boys, or Hank Williams and Hank Jr. Then there’s Loudon and Rufus Wainwright, Richard and Teddy Thompson, Ringo Starr and Zak Starkey. The list of musicians who have followed in their fathers’ footsteps goes on and on. Of course, when it’s a matter of filling your father’s jeans— and inheriting his genes—certain habits are inevitably passed down. In the case of Justin Townes Earle, talent, tenacity and the struggle to stay sober were the gifts given him by his bad-boy dad, Steve Earle. It didn’t help the father/son relationship, but, happily, both men survived, and Justin’s career—like his father’s— flourished. More than simply being Steve’s kid, Justin boasts a recording catalog that has won raves from fans and critics alike. Happily, too, the two seem to have reconciled, as evidenced by Justin’s appearance on an episode of his dad’s HBO series Treme a few years back. Not that he’s riding his coattails—with a 2011 Americana Music Award for his song “Harlem River Blues,” extensive kudos for his album Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now, production credits on country legend Wanda Jackson’s Unfinished Business, and his debut at the Grand Ole Opry, Justin’s solo stardom has long been assured. He’s currently touring behind his 2017 release Kids in the Street. Blake Brown opens. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $37, thestateroomslc.com


FRIDAY, MAY 4TH

SATURDAY, MAY 5TH

MELODY AND THE BREAKUPS W/ LOLA RISING

THE NIGHT CAPS W/ MICHAEL DALLIN’S BAND, COOLABIBUS

WITH THE SLICK VELVETEENS

COSPLAY KARAOKE

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Saturday, May 5Th

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W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M Se Habla Español

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MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

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MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 5/10/18

kitchen open until midnight 7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 • OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS

MAY 3, 2018 | 37

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM

| CITY WEEKLY |

Double Din Touch Screen Entertainment System

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ting star at

Friday, May 4Th

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PIPERDOWNPUB.COM


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38 | MAY 3, 2018

TUESDAY 5/8

CONCERTS & CLUBS

RALPH_PH VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Hall & Oates,Train, Kandace Springs

THURSDAY 5/3 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

90s Television play The Strokes + Indigo Plateau as Interpol + Wicked Bears as Blink-182 (Urban Lounge) Angela Bingham Sextet (Gallivan Center) Book On Tape Worm + Brass Rook (Velour) Brother Chunky (Hog Wallow Pub) The Cabin Project + Human Toy + Emma Park + Strong Words (Kilby Court) Carter Winter + TBD (The State Room) The Eagles (Vivint Arena) Franks & Deans + HiFi Murder (Funk ‘n’ Dive) George Ezra + Noah Kahan (The Depot) Jukebox The Ghost + The Greeting Committee (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Noche Cubana feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Reggae At The Royal w/ Soltribe + Grassy Dread (The Royal) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) West Ghost + Gold Trash + Hey Yall Whats Up It’s Zach +Tonight Is (The Underground) YFN Lucci + Ray Ray (The Complex)

SATURDAY, MAY 5

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. South & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Audien (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ’n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 5/4 LIVE MUSIC

Abraskadabra + Show Me Island + The Makeways + Scheming Thieves

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM $800

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Are you a Hall or are you an Oates? Daryl Hall has always been the voice of the pop duo—literally and figuratively. Even now, five decades into their career, he’s the spokesman for the two. John Oates still prefers to stand off to the side, having a good time but clearly focused on the music. He isn’t the heart of the party, but he always shows up—I feel a Buzzfeed personality quiz coming on. The quintessential pop duo has had a prolific run, but their legacy seemed uncertain until a few years ago. Now, they’re Rock Hall of Fame inductees with stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Why are they just now cashing in on their decades of prolific work? You could chalk it up to their song “You Make My Dreams” becoming a feel-good anthem, or pop culture references like that charming scene in 2009’s (500) Days of Summer, or maybe we have a greater sense of cultural poptimism—after all, no one in their time made soulful pop music better than Hall & Oates. Whatever the reason, we’re happy Hall & Oates are finally getting their due. Their sets are pretty tight these days—expect around 14 songs—but are strictly the hits. After Train plays a few anthems of their own, expect a joyous set of the classics, including “Maneater,” “Sara Smile” and “Rich Girl”. (Robby Poffenberger) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., all ages, $42-$126, vivintarena.com

(Kilby Court) Alice Glass w/ Zola Jesus + Pictureplane (The State Room) Alicia Stockman (Feldman’s Deli) Bonanza Town (The Spur) Channel Z (Club 90) Dan Weldon (Snowbird) Escher Case + Barlow + Bird Watcher + Lightsaber Battle (Funk ’n’ Dive) Grendel + Ghostfeeder + Peter Turns Pirate + Binary Synthetica (Metro Music Hall) Hide + Choir Boy + Hoofless + Fossil Arms (Diabolical Records) Machine Guns & Roses + Iron Priest (The Royal) Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Melody & The Breakups + Lola Rising (Piper Down) Michael Barrow & The Tourists + Renshaw + Nate Hardyman (Velour) see p. 33 Nine-Tease Cabaret Show (Urban Lounge) No Manana (Brewskis) Omegus The Starfather + Troubled Minds + Noise Ordinance + TSTSATSG (The Underground) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys

(The Yes Hell) Southbound (The Westerner) The Stratmores + The Slick Velveteens (The Ice Haüs) TECH N9NE + Krizz Kaliko + Just Juice + Joey Cool + King Iso (The Complex) Triggers & Slips (Hog Wallow Pub) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) X Ambassadors + Jacob Banks + SHAED (The Depot) see p. 34

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Crazy (Sky) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ JPan (Downstairs) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos(Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) House DJ (Prohibition) New Wave 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

SUPPORT 5FORTHEFIGHT ON 5/5 WITH JOHNNY’S. DONATION BUCKET ALL DAY

FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


SATURDAY, MAY 5TH

CINCO DE MAYO PARTY W/

FRIDAY, MAY 4TH

AZ-IZ

MOOSE KNUCKLE OUTSIDE INFINITY SUNDAY, MAY 6TH

BIKER APPRECIATION DAY

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

Open from 10am -2am 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

4 24 2 S o u th S t a te S t re e t S LC , U T 8 4107

NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

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ferbrachelaw.com

DANCE MUSIC ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY

MONDAYS 7:30PM TUESDAYS 9PM $4 JAMESON TRIVIA WITH $5 SHOT & BEER BREAKING BINGO THE TRIVIA FACTORY DAILY

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

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NEW MENU ITEMS NOW AVAILABLE

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CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

KARAOKE THAT DOESN’T SUCK EVERY THURSDAY W/ MIKEY DANGER

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326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MAY 3, 2018 | 39

DINNER & SHOW ONLY AT


CROW & THE PITCHER

LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

BAR FLY

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 5/5

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | MAY 3, 2018

Preening its feathers and marking its first year of flight in downtown Murray is Crow & the Pitcher. The name’s based on an Aesop fable in which a parched crow comes upon a half-full pitcher, but his beak isn’t long enough to reach the water. In a flash of brilliance, the desperate bird adds pebbles one at a time to raise the level—and voilá! “It’s also a commentary on the misconception that it’s hard to get a real drink in Utah,” laughs Casi Holmgren, a New Jersey transplant who with partner (business and otherwise) Shaun Mayer opened the watering hole—er, pitcher—in April 2017. Crow & the Pitcher remains a work-in-progress, with stylish-butcushy high-back booths added just a few weeks ago. Wooden floors, paneling, exposed brick and table accents impart warmth, while crow-themed memorabilia abounds. The place is airy yet intimate—and, depending on the time of day, can be frisky, too. The just-up-the-street Desert Star Theater after-show crowd of thespians and patrons is eclectic and exuberant. They run a killer kitchen, too, with the Reuben egg rolls ($9) a can’t-miss offering. In sum, it’s a place to check out, my fine-feathered friends. (Lance Gudmundsen) Crow & the Pitcher, 4883 S. State, Murray, 801590-9187, thecrowslc.com

LIVE MUSIC

CRAFT COCKTAILS - WINE - BEER

PATIO SEASON IS OPEN! FEATURING ONE OF EAST SIDE SALT LAKE’S BEST PATIOS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

American Hitmen + Late Night Savior + Betty Hayes Everything (The Royal) Bonanza Town (Lake Effect) Channel Z (Club 90) Chris Cutz (Downstairs) Cory Mon (Harp & Hound) Fuji & Morgan Heritage + Maoli & Nomad (Soundwell) Ghostowne (Snowbird) Leeway NYC + Rhythm of Fear (The Beehive) Less Than Jake + Direct Hit (The Depot) Live Trio (The Red Door) Michelle Moonshine (The Yes Hell)

Milk + Cartel Chameleon + The Whore of ‘94 + Xaina + Eva Chanel Stephens (Metro Music Hall) Natural Causes (The Union Tavern) Nightcaps + Michael Dallin’s Band + Coolabibus (Piper Down) Pacificana + Vann Moon + The Sardines (Velour) The Pour (Hog Wallow Pub) The Proper Way (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Sepiatonic (The Common Wealth Room) Shuffle (The Spur) Six Feet In The Pine (Johnny’s on Second) Southbound (The Westerner) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) Zoso The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) House DJ (Prohibition) Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Karma (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ DJ Kevin (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 5/6 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

MONDAY 5/7 LIVE MUSIC

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & The JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin) Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle)

Local Lounge (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ KJ Johnny Irish (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 5/9 LIVE MUSIC

John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Maks Val & Peta (Eccles Theatre SLC) P!nk (Vivint Arena) Pseudogod + Hellfire Deathcult + Abysmal Lord + Disannulleth (Urban Lounge) Shannon Runyan (The Spur) Slow Caves + Say Hey + The Boys Ranch (Kilby Court) Sol + The Ditch & The Delta (Metro Music Hall) Taylor & The Train Robbers (Garage on Beck)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Open Mic (Velour) Rick Gerber Request Line (The Cabin) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down) Areaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke (The Royal) Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

MAY 3, 2018 | 41

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| CITY WEEKLY |

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Hall & Oates + Train + Kandice Springs (Vivint Arena) see p. 38 Justin Townes Earle + Blake Brown (The State Room) see p. 36 KEMF SLC + Spo + Alyxandri Jupiter + Sarah Little Drum + Waterloo Rats (Urban Lounge) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Russell Dickerson (The Complex) You Knew Me When (Piper Down) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) The Fratellis + Blood Red Shoes (The Complex) see p. 36 Hayley Kirkland & Michael Tobian Quintet (Covey Center) Hovvdy & Half Waif + Giants In The Oak Tree (Kilby Court) Jacob T. Skeen + Tom Bennett (ABG’s) Oceano + Buried Above Ground + Echo Muse (The Loading Dock) Thunder Sak + The Revolving Doors + The Midnight Babies (Urban Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 5/8

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Buffalo v. Train (Garage on Beck) K.Flay + Donna Missal (The Complex) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Martian Cult + David Moon + Ani Christ + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge) Nate Robinson Trio (Snowbird) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Steven Wilson + Ninet Tayeb (The Depot)

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | MAY 3, 2018

NIGHT LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

LIVE Music

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 5/2

thursday, may 3

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY

Urban Lounge

karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, may 4 JAZZ GAME WATCH PARTY @ 8:30 MURPHY AND THE GIANT FOLLOWS

Matt, Eric and Stephanie Baxter, Jess Cruz

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 5/3 Reggae at the Royal

241 S 500 E / facebook.com SLC e UrbanLoung

$

soltribe grassy dread

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 5/4

Live Music

saturday, may 5

CINCO DE DRINKO PARTY GIVEAWAYS ALL DAY ROOF TOP PATIO PARTY 3-8PM DJ JARVICIOUS 3PM DJ LATU DOWNSTAIRS 8PM

machine gunes & roses iron priest saturday 5/5

3rd annual ken " rubber ducky" derby

Stephanie, Helen, Katie

benefitting utah firefighters emerald society

3:30 rubber

ducky river race for charity kentucky derby viewing to follow

sunday, may 6

CINCO HANG OVER BRUNCH 10AM-2PM catch all utah jazz games at the pig

kentucky bourbon | food & drink specials

Live Music

nfl and nba playoffs!

Weeknights

Scooter, Twigs

Doug Martsch, Built To Spill

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

late night savior I betty hates everything

Great food

Tuesday 5/8

5.99 lunch special

coming soon

$

MONDAY - FRIDAY

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

5/11 5/12 5/25

Nick Lammay, Ernie Gentry

retro riot dance party sammy j tomorrow's bad seeds

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL


PINKY’S CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MENU BEST

GARLIC BURGER FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK\ \RIBEYE SPECIAL $8 ON FRIDAY'S

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

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MAY 3, 2018 | 43

Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC

VODKA

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Sponsored by:

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A weekly video series highlighting the BEST things to do in SLC. ...............................


© 2018

WAR ON DRUGS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Get the ball rolling? 2. Noteworthy moments in history 3. One who celebrates Pi Day every March 14, perhaps 4. Novelist Clancy 5. Fictional character whose dying words are

41. Cleansing solution 45. Multitude 46. Bulletin board stickers 47. Like some organs 48. Bakery purchase 49. 1996 film that becomes the title of a Best Picture winner when its first letter is removed 51. Body part with cinco dedos 52. Word above a shop’s door handle 53. Rarity in un desierto 54. Functions 56. Angkor ____ (Cambodian landmark) 57. Kelly Clarkson’s record label

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

“God bless Captain Vere!” 6. Soothing flora 7. Do a sheepdog’s job 8. Dummkopf 9. Shiny coat provider 10. This place “without ‘art’ is just ‘eh’” 11. Link with 12. It was launched by Ford in 1957 on “E-Day” 14. “I’m not doing business with you!” 17. Newspaper fig. 21. Mother-of-pearl 22. Household item also known as a scatter cushion 23. New Deal program FDR created in 1935 for the unemployed 24. Musical whose cast will tell you its title is an anagram of “cast” 25. Latin 101 verb 26. ____ beneficiary 30. Test for coll. seniors 31. Hosomaki or futomaki, at a Japanese restaurant 32. Eurasia’s ____ Mountains 33. “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” original castmember ____ Leakes 34. Group of two 36. Actress Watts of “Birdman” 40. FedEx truck driver’s assignment: Abbr.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. “Get ____!” 5. ____ Men (group with the 2000 hit “Who Let the Dogs Out”) 9. Lavish celebration 13. It calls itself “Milk’s Favorite Cookie” 14. Frasier’s brother on “Frasier” 15. Installed, as brick 16. Red, orange and yellow, e.g. 18. Mineralogists’ study 19. Narc’s find 20. Hung around doing nothing much 21. Opposite of giorno 22. Long baskets, in hoops lingo 23. Artist who did his first commissioned portrait, “Ethel Scull 36 Times,” in 1963 24. Game show that airs in Quebec as “Taxi Payant” 27. Narc’s find 28. Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “El ____ en los tiempos del colera” 29. Schleps 35. It might grab some food before a flight 37. “____ Hill” (1996 platinum R&B album) 38. Tito Puente’s nickname 39. Julie Hagerty plays one in “Airplane!” 42. Collector’s suffix 43. Narc’s find 44. Bothered 46. Kid’s reward following the completion of homework, perhaps 49. Pilfer 50. Garlic-flavored mayonnaise of Provence 51. Sharapova or Shriver 52. Gasol who was the NBA’s Rookie of the Year in 2002 55. ____-Alt-Delete 56. What Richard Nixon famously declared in 1971 ... and something you can spot in three places in this puzzle’s grid 58. Batman : Robin :: Green Hornet : ____ 59. It may be obtuse 60. Crossword ____ 61. Multitude 62. Utility belt item 63. “Sad to say ...”

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): These days you have an enhanced ability to arouse the appreciation and generosity of your allies, friends and loved ones. The magnetic influence you’re emanating could even start to evoke the interest and inquiries of mere acquaintances and random strangers. Be discerning about how you wield that potent stuff! On the other hand, don’t be shy about using it to attract all the benefits it can bring you. It’s OK to be a bit greedier for goodies than usual as long as you’re also a bit more compassionate than usual. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I bet that a healing influence will arrive from an unexpected direction and begin to work its subtle but intense magic before anyone realizes what’s happening. I predict that the bridge you’re building will lead to a place that’s less flashy but more useful than you imagined. And I’m guessing that although you might initially feel jumbled by unforeseen outcomes, those outcomes will ultimately be redemptive. Hooray for lucky flukes and weird switcheroos!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Mayflies are aquatic insects with short life spans. Many species live less than 24 hours, even though the eggs they lay might take three years to hatch. I suspect this might be somewhat of an apt metaphor for your future, Scorpio. A transitory or short-duration experience could leave a legacy that will ripen for a long time before it hatches. But that’s where the metaphor breaks down. When your legacy has fully ripened—when it becomes available as a living presence —I bet it will last a long time.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): I hate rampant consumerism almost as much as I hate hatred, so I don’t offer the following advice lightly: Buy an experience that could help liberate you from the suffering you’ve had trouble outgrowing. Or buy a toy that can thaw the frozen joy that’s trapped within your out-of-date sadness. Or buy a connection that might inspire you to express a desire you need help in expressing. Or buy an influence that will motivate you to shed a belief or theory that has been cramping your lust for life. Or all of the above! (And if buying these things isn’t possible, consider renting.)

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Every so often, a painter has to destroy painting,” 20th-century abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning said. “Cézanne did it. Picasso did it with Cubism. Then Pollock did it. He busted our idea of a picture all to hell.” In de Kooning’s view, these “destructive” artists performed a noble service. They demolished entrenched ideas about the nature of painting, thus liberating their colleagues and descendants from stale constraints. Judging from the current astrological omens, Libra, I surmise the near future will be a good time for you to wreak creative destruction in your own field or sphere. What progress and breakthroughs might be possible when you dismantle comfortable limitations?

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When a critic at Rolling Stone magazine reviewed The Beatles’ Abbey Road in 1969, he said some of the songs were “so heavily overproduced that they are hard to listen to.” He added, “Surely they must have enough talent and intelligence to do better than this.” Years later, however, Rolling Stone altered its opinion, naming Abbey Road the 14th best album of all time. I suspect, Sagittarius, that you’re in a phase with metaphorical CANCER (June 21-July 22): resemblances to the earlier assessment. But I’m reasonably Born under the astrological sign of Cancer, Franz Kafka is regard- sure that this will ultimately evolve into being more like the ed as one of the 20th century’s major literary talents. Alas, he later valuation—and it won’t take years. made little money from his writing. Among the day jobs he did to earn a living were stints as a bureaucrat at insurance companies. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): His superiors there praised his efforts. “Superb administrative According to my analysis of the astrological omens, love should talent,” they said about him. Let’s use this as a take-off point to be in full bloom. You should be awash in worthy influences that meditate on your destiny, Cancerian. Are you good at skills you’re animate your beautiful passion. So how about it? Are you swoonnot passionate about? Are you admired and acknowledged for ing and twirling and uncoiling? Are you overflowing with a lush having qualities that aren’t of central importance to you? If so, longing to celebrate the miracle of being alive? If your answer is the coming weeks and months will be a favorable time to explore yes, congratulations. May your natural intoxication levels conthis apparent discrepancy. I believe you will have the power to get tinue to rise. But if my description doesn’t match your current closer to doing more of what you love to do. experience, you might be out of sync with cosmic rhythms. And if that’s the case, please take emergency measures. Escape to a LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): sanctuary where you can shed your worries and inhibitions and If you really wanted to, you could probably break the world record maybe even your clothes. Get drunk on undulating music as you for most words typed per minute with the nose (103 characters in dance yourself into a dreamy love revelry. 47 seconds). I bet you could also shatter a host of other marks, as well, like eating the most hot chiles in two minutes, or weaving the AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): biggest garland using defunct iPhones, or dancing the longest on “Life never gives you anything that’s all bad or all good.” So a tabletop while listening to a continuous loop of Nirvana’s song proclaimed the smartest Aquarian six-year-old girl I know as “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” But I hope you won’t waste your soaring we kicked a big orange ball around a playground. I agreed with capacity for excellence on meaningless stunts like those. I’d rather her! “Twenty years from now,” I told her, “I’m going to remind see you break your own personal records for accomplishments like you that you told me this heartful truth.” I didn’t tell her the effective communications, high-quality community-building, and corollary that I’d add to her axiom, but I’ll share it with you: smart career moves. If anything or anyone or seems to be all bad or all good, you’re probably not seeing the big picture. There are exceptions, VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): however! For example, I bet you will soon experience or are Isaac Newton (1643-1727) was among history’s three most influ- already experiencing a graceful stroke of fate that’s very close ential scientists. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) has been described to being all good. as the central figure in modern philosophy. Henry James (18431916) is regarded as one of the greatest novelists in English litera- PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): ture. John Ruskin (1819-1900) was a prominent art critic and social “Enodation” is an old, nearly obsolete English word that refers thinker. What did these four men have in common? They never had to the act of untying a knot or solving a knotty problem. sex with anyone. They were virgins when they died. I view this fact “Enodous” means “free of knots.” Let’s make these your with alarm. What does it mean that Western culture is so influenced celebratory words of power for the month of May, Pisces. by the ideas of men who lacked this fundamental initiation? With Speak them out loud every now and then. Invoke them as holy that as our context, I make this assertion: If you hope to make good chants and potent prayers leading you to discover the precise decisions in the coming weeks, you must draw on the wisdom you magic that will untangle the kinks and snarls you most need have gained from being sexually entwined with other humans. to untangle.

ON W US M O L L FO TAGRA INS


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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915028, JUDGE ADAM T LOW. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO FAIMALOMAALATAUA MULIAGA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $6,539.05. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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George Metos George@UBCUtah.com THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO MARIO TRUJILLO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111. Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is filed with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

Andrew G. Deiss Wesley D. Felix Attorneys for Plaintiff

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF SALT LAKE COUNTY STATE OF UTAH MT & VS MANAGEMENT, INC., a Utah corporation, V. SERGIO SANCHEZ, an individual, Plaintiffs, vs. EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC., a Utah corporation, d/b/a MI MEXICO, and MARIO TRUJILLO, an individual, Defendants.

SUMMONS Civil No. 170908039 Judge James Gardner

THE STATE OF UTAH TO EL NUEVO MI MEXICO, INC. d/b/a MI MEXICO: You are summoned and required to answer the attached Complaint within 21 days after service of this summons, you must file your written, signed answer with the Clerk of the above entitled Court at 450 S. State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111.Within that 21 days you must also mail or deliver a copy of your answer to Plaintiff’s attorney, Andrew G. Deiss, Deiss Law PC, 10 West 100 South, Suite 425, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint is file with the Court. RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this 3rd day of April, 2018. Deiss Law PC /s/ Andrew Deiss.

Andrew G. Deiss Wesley D. Felix Attorneys for Plaintiff

46 | MAY 3, 2018

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915249, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ANDREW FARLEY, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO ANDREW FARLEY: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $8,959.77. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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Imagine you’ve just won the lottery in beautiful downtown Malad, Idaho. Your dreams of owning the perfect home can now be a reality, so you throw down $500,000 for a sweet bungalow on a decent-sized lot somewhere along the Wasatch Front. After looking at all the fancy people and stuff on goop.com and getting an In Goop Health convention ticket, you are ready to remodel and achieve mental clarity in your home space. Developers are already onto you, young Jedi. Like yoga? Your new home can have not just a meditation room, but bolts in the ceiling to secure your silks to hang upsidedown in serenity—or get 50 shades closer to kink. You might consider relocating to the rolling hills of Chattahoochee, Ga., and buying a million-dollar manse in a planned development called Serenbe. Or get your Lulu Lemons on the waiting list for a $4-million eco-sensitive home at the Amrit Ocean Resort in Riviera Beach, Fla. These are both examples of “new urbanism” community living. Think Daybreak only with guys sporting man-buns and smelling of Tom Ford’s $350 eau de parfum, and women reeking of essential oils. This ain’t the Young Living Essential Oil crowd looking for affordable mindfulness. This is a whole new trend of people who want to live in neighborhoods where yoga classes are at all hours of the day and night and landscaping is just plain peaceful—and privileged. Amrit towers is being developed by an Indian-born real estate entrepreneur who decided he needed to find harmony and balance in his life. What better way to find inner peace than to erect residential living that focuses on “the five pillars of wellness: nutrition, fitness, mindfulness, sleep and relaxation.” The amenities aren’t just extra storage and a bike rack, but personalized interior features like vitamin C-infused showers, heat reflexology floors and “dawn simulation” that gently increases the amount of light entering your bedroom at a set time. It appears you can finally achieve nirvana simply with a large bankroll of bitcoin. If you are a wannabe East-meets-Westerner, try remodeling your sweet bungalow with nontoxic paints and materials, formaldehyde-free floors, doors and windows, and choose soothing interior colors. Work this summer on landscaping your own mediation garden and make sure to leave room for a permanent massage table instead of that corn hole game you only play during the Super Bowl. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Wait, What? In Dorking, England, Chris Hepworth and his partner, Tanisha Prince, both of London, dove across the finish line in one minute and 37 seconds, setting a course record and capturing the coveted U.K. Wife Carrying championship on April 8. Any adult couple can compete in the contest—married or not and regardless of gender—which consists of one team member carrying the other, most using the “Estonian carry,” with the “wife” upside-down, her legs over her partner’s shoulders and gripping him around the waist from behind. About 40 pairs competed over the quarter-mile course strewn with hay bales and mud, Reuters reported. Hepworth and Prince plan to move on to the world finals in Finland. “I think a Finnish guy wins it every year,” Hepworth noted, “so it’ll be good to go there and take them down.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

the building in the early 2000s, heard stories of a monkey escaping into an air conditioning duct, where it might have met its fate in the form of an exhaust fan. In fact, the mummy does show an injury to the abdomen. “We continue to find pieces of history in the Dayton’s project as we redevelop the building,” Cailin Rogers, a spokeswoman for the redevelopment team, told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

WEIRD

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Do Not Eat 1. An unnamed Chinese man “accidentally” swallowed a plastic and metal lighter 20 years ago. 2. He neglected to seek medical attention until recently, when he began experiencing stomach pains and other symptoms we’d rather not detail here. 3. In early April, using a camera inserted in the man’s body to locate the lighter, doctors at Dujiangyan Medical Center in Chengdu City, Sichuan Province, performed not one, but two surgeries to extract the item. The Global Times reported that the lighter had been severely corroded by gastric juices. My Weird Obsession You might have read that the company that makes Necco Wafers announced in March that it would have to shut down in May unless a buyer was found. Since then, crazed Necco fans have been stockpiling candy. “Necco Wafers are up 150 percent,” candystore.com reported in a blog post. “A clear signal of panicbuying.” Katie Samuels, 23, of Florida tried to strike a deal with candystore.com, a wholesaler. “I offered to trade my 2003 Honda Accord for all of their stock,” Samuels told the Boston Globe. “I don’t have much right now, so I was like, ‘I’ve got this car, and I want all that candy,’ so maybe they would consider it.” Candystore didn’t accept her offer, but Samuels did buy 48 rolls of candy using her credit card. Oops Officials in the city of Vordingborg, Denmark, planned the demolition of a 174-foot-tall silo months ahead of the event, but as onlookers cheered the explosion on April 6, the tower toppled in the wrong direction, landing on a waterfront library and music school. No injuries were reported, according to The Guardian, and the library interior, while covered with dust, sustained no serious damage. Picky, Picky In Manchester, England, 75-year-old Peter Vipham of Rawtenstall, Lancashire, was shocked on April 11 when he was approached in the city center by two women who identified themselves as law enforcement. The officers told Vipham, a retired shoemaker, that he had been filmed littering when a small crumb of the pork pie he had been eating fell to the ground, and he flicked another crumb off his coat. Vipham offered to pick up the crumbs, but told Metro News he was not given the opportunity to view the video footage, and he refused to pay the fine. “If I had dropped litter I would pay the (50 pound) fine, but I would never drop litter. I am against litter 100 percent. I hate it,” Vipham declared. A Manchester city council spokesperson said the city would review the evidence and contact Vipham to discuss his case. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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The Hypnotic Power of Special Sauce McDonald’s drive-thrus are a chill place to be, if three recent events are any indication. On March 17, police officers called to a McDonald’s restaurant in Okeechobee, Fla., found Derril James Geller of West Palm Beach had passed out in his car while waiting in line. Geller was arrested for driving on a suspended license (a crime for which he had been charged three previous times). But that’s just the tip of the ice cream cone: The Okeechobee News reported that in January, an Okeechobee woman was charged with DUI after passing out at a different area McDonald’s drivethru, and in December, a Texas man also received a DUI for nodding off in the line at that same McDonald’s. Ewwwww! Workers renovating the old Dayton’s department store in downtown Minneapolis came across an unusual find in early April: the mummified remains of a monkey. The store apparently had a pet department in the 1960s, and The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal reported that Steven Laboe, who worked in

Julie “Bella” De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

The Continuing Crisis Richland Carrousel Park in Mansfield, Ohio, a family-oriented destination, just wanted to provide a seasonal attraction for kids who wanted to pose for a picture with the Easter Bunny. But Ladonna Hughett, 54, had other things in mind on March 24 when she plopped into the bunny’s lap, grabbed him in inappropriate ways and made lewd comments, reported Fox 8 Cleveland. She then moved on to ride a horse on the carousel, also in ways witnesses described as lewd. “As soon as you think you hear all,” said Mansfield Assistant Police Chief Keith Porch, “I’ve never heard of somebody performing those types of acts on the Easter Bunny.” Hughett was arrested for public drunkenness and is no longer welcome at the amusement park.

DOG OWNERS

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What’s in a Name? In Ohio in 2004, 6-year-old Alex Malarkey spent two months in a coma after a car accident, awaking as a quadriplegic and telling his family he had visited heaven, seeing angels and meeting Jesus. Alex and his dad, Kevin Malarkey, co-wrote a best-selling book in 2010, “The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven,” but in 2015, Alex admitted he had made up the story to get attention. “I did not die. I did not go to heaven,” Alex told The Guardian. In a recent effort to set the record straight, Alex filed a complaint April 9 in DuPage County, Ill., against the book’s publisher, Tyndale House, alleging that “any reasonable person would have realized that it was highly unlikely that the content of the book was true.” The Washington Post reported that while Kevin Malarkey is not a party to the suit—which cites several Illinois statutes regarding the right to privacy, defamation and financial exploitation of a person with a disability, among others—it does allege that Alex’s dad concocted and sold the story to Tyndale. The younger Malarkey did not receive any royalties from the sales of the book.

n At Bull City Burger and Brewery in Durham, N.C., April is Exotic Meat Month! This year, according to WTVD, the restaurant offered a tarantula challenge. Customers were invited to enter their name in a raffle, and if chosen could claim a $30 tarantula burger, which included a pasture-raised beef patty, gruyere cheese, spicy chili sauce—and an oven-roasted zebra tarantula. Those who finished the burger received a commemorative “tarantula challenge” T-shirt.

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City Weekly May 3, 2018  

Her Best Shot

City Weekly May 3, 2018  

Her Best Shot