Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

SALT LAKE'S FOOD SCENE IS

APRIL 12, 2018 | VOL. 34

N0. 46

UNBELIEVABLE DINING GUIDE 2018


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | APRIL 12, 2018

CWCONTENTS

COVER STORY

INCONCEIVABLE!

Our yearly look at SLC’s most out-ofthis-world dishes. Cover illustration by Kimball Mortensen dribbble.com/kimball

17

CONTRIBUTOR AMANDA ROCK

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 12 A&E 41 CINEMA 43 MUSIC 53 COMMUNITY

Dining Guide, p. 25 Administrative assistant by day/gastronomic badass by night, Rock is ecstatic with the proliferation of meatless eateries. “I can buy good vegan cheese at my local Smith’s and devour a vegan cheeseburger at my neighborhood bar,” she boasts. “It’s all I’ve ever wanted, really.”

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

THEATER

Fun Home finds emotion in thoughts left unfinished. facebook.com/slcweekly

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

UPCOMING

Our biggest City Guide is cooking! Look for it in racks soon.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

ENTER TO WIN Screening passes to Beirut. More info on p. 41 and at cityweekly.net/freestuff.


AMP & SEXY SUB ENCLOSURE PACKAGES

i0" sub

i2" sub SAVE

SAVE

$150

$150

CUSTOM CARPETED BOX

∙ 500 Watt mono amp ∙ 10" sub w/ bass enclosure

$29999 List Price: $449

00

CUSTOM CARPETED BOX

∙ 500 Watt Mono Amp ∙ 12" Sub W/ Bass Enclosure

W/ BUILT-IN DVD

$150

THESE UNITS

NEW MODEL

$19999 MTG 10” List Price: $350 00

$32999

HAVE BUILT IN

M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF CREDIT CARD

HDMI/MHL PORT (HEADPHONES SOLD SEPARATELY)

PROGRESSIVE LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

90 MTG 13”

$42999

DAY PAYMENT

OPTION

List Price: 79.99

• 4 OHM SINGLE VOICE COIL • 300 WATTS RMS

List Price: 120.00

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

| CITY WEEKLY |

EACH $49.99

12" SUB-WOOFERS $20 .99 • TIGHT AND ACCURATE BASS EACH $99 • 600 PEAK POWER

SAVE

10” SUBWOOFER OR 12" PRIME SERIES

• 4 OHM SINGLE VOICE COIL • STAMPED STEEL FRAME • 300 WATTS PEAK • 150 WATTS RMS

CREDIT NEEDED

soundwarehouse.com/ financing

SAVE

$30

NO

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ROOF MOUNT DROP DOWN MONITORS ALL HAVE INTERCHANGEABLE TRIM RINGS AND COVERS THAT MATCH YOUR INTERIORS COLOR! AUDIO / VIDEO OUTPUT / USB DUAL AUDIO / VIDEO INPUTS SD CARD SLOT/ HDML-MHL DUAL CHANNEL IR / TRANSMITTER

List Price: $46900

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SHALE • PEWTER • BLACK

SAVE

$31999

HOURS

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 4/19/18

APRIL 12, 2018 | 3

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | APRIL 12, 2018

Grand Opening Weekend John’s Place Juice bar & The Apothecary, nature farmacy 125 East 4800 South, Murray UT

Brick Drive

OneWorldCommunity.com The Studio

Community Fair

Thursday May 24, 2018 | 7pm

Silent candle light vigil for all passed loved ones

@SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T M A R C H 2 9 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 4 4

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, March 29, “Who’s Missing?”

Daily Yoga 6pm | $10 133 East 4800 South

John’s Tree Planting

SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Saturday May 26, 2018 10am - 10pm Vendors, Food, Side Walk Chalk Art, Music, Silent Disco, DRUM CIRCLE!

We want to thank [author] Sarah Arnoff for her work with the Native community, for coming to our meetings consistently and for featuring our campaign and stories. It is because of work like hers that we gain more opportunity in speaking to these truths from a higher position of strength. It is not often the non-Indigenous community takes the time to listen to us, and when they do, we experience a sense of healing.

@MMIWHOISMISSING Via Instagram

Good article. An eye-opener with regard to jurisdictional issue!

C.J. SOUTHWORTH Via Facebook

No$úun lóoviq—thank City Weekly! We you.

you,

@ALEXISMUNOADYER Via Instagram

News, March 29, “Land of the Leased”

Perhaps a reporter could ask Mark Maryboy, the activist designated by City Weekly to speak for the tribes, to explain the “devastating to the human

population in general” part. He seems to mostly get a free ride. One of the parcels along the San Juan River, abuts (or is even part of) is the massive General Aneth field. The area has been drilled extensively since the 1930s. The Navajo Nation Oil and Gas Company—which is wholly owned by the Navajo Nation—has been drilling the Aneth field since it began operations in the 1990s and is a primary source of revenue for them. It pumped $46.9 million into tribal coffers in 2013, for example. It’s funded scholarships for Navajo kids to the tune of $1.4 million since 2003. How is this devastating? Does Maryboy speak for NNOGC? Or its owners, the Navajo Nation? Just a glance at the Utah Geological Survey’s map of oil and gas fields shows southeastern Utah has been drilled. A lot. What’s interesting, is the absence of activity inside what used to be Bears Ears National Monument. Nothing there. Is all of this an attempt to shut down an industry that provides good-paying jobs in one of the poorest counties in the country?

BILL KESHLEAR

Via cityweekly.net

How one local Native Americanled activist group is giving a voice to their missing and murdered Indigenous sisters.

Beer Nerd, March 29, “None the ‘Weiser”

This is the best pilsner I have ever had. Bud Light doesn’t even compare.

LARRY CAMARILLO Via Facebook

California Scheming

In my view, the state of California is guilty of sedition against the United States to

A weekly video : PRESENTS

WHO'S MISSING?

series highlighting

the BEST things

to do in SLC. ............................... Sponsored by:

Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC

By Sarah Arnoff rival that of Southern states that instigated the Civil War. Jerry Brown is the democrat Jefferson Davis incarnate, exploiting more low-cost, loyal, imported laborers. Sincerely,

MICHAEL W. JARVIS Salt Lake City

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


Declutter Day friday, april 27th, 2018

FREE TO THE PUBLIC, NO BUSINESSES PLEASE for a complete list of items accepted at the free public event log on: www.commerce.utah.gov/declutter

SHRED DOCUMENTS SAFELY

RECYcLE OLD ELECTRONICS rain or shine!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FREE TO IC THE PUBL

DONATE USED CLOTHING

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

9:00 am to 6:00 PM • 500 S. 1600 E. Guardsman Way ( University Parking Lot )

| CITY WEEKLY |

The Utah Department of Commerce in partnership with the Salt Lake City Police Department will collect old pharmaceuticals, vitamins, and other pills at Declutter Day april 27th, 2018. Find out what drugs can be disposed at www.commerce.utah.gov/declutter

APRIL 12, 2018 | 5


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | APRIL 12, 2018

OPINION Safety First

Students affiliated with the March for Our Lives movement refuse have their message ignored. Now if only the adults in opposition, and politicians in charge of policy, would stop pushing their own agenda long enough to hear what these teens are saying—or even bother to show up— they might actually learn something. During the MFOL town hall held April 7 at the Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building, students read questions to cardboard cutouts of Sen. Orrin Hatch and Reps. John Curtis, Chris Stewart, Mia Love and Rob Bishop. During the metaphorical airing of grievances one message rang loud and clear: Our kids are tired of feeling unsafe. From stranger drills to lockdown drills to the truly horrific active-shooter drills, today’s high school students have spent a good deal of their school years having the shit scared out of them. The first time my 5-year-old daughter recounted her experience during a stranger drill, it took everything I had not to burst into tears as her sweet, tiny voice described sitting along the whiteboard of her darkened kindergarten classroom in complete silence so “the bad guy” could not find them. Before that moment, I did not fully realize the level of defeat we as a society had committed ourselves to. If the phrase “actions speak louder than words” holds any merit, the day we decided to have 4 and 5 year olds hide in silence

is the day we all agree to live in a nation more reflective of Orwellian oppression than freedom. As high school students from Herriman to South Davis spoke, the attack on their sense of safety became ever apparent. Not only had the adults in their life taken away their ability to feel safe in school, we’d made them feel this level of violence was their burden to bear. Repeatedly, students conveyed the fear they carry on a daily basis for their own lives and the lives of their siblings, friends, parents and teachers. If the adults opposed to gun reform spent less time trying to discredit our kids and more time listening, they might realize these teens are far from the crazy zealots some paint them to be. If you are over the age of 25, it is unlikely you ever sat in a dark classroom watching tears roll down the cheeks of a classmate huddled next to you. In your formative years, you did not see news snippets of deranged shooters killing dozens of students, mall shoppers or concert goers. These teens have, and given their life experiences, it’s perfectly logical for them to fear the object that has oppressed their sense of safety for as long as they can remember. As far as I’m concerned, mocking them for it is a real dick move. If guns had invaded our sense of safety throughout our entire childhood, we would also consider the proposed solution of more guns as nothing more than a sick joke. Not to mention our recent acceptance of the “eye for an eye” mentality—which is at the foundation of the “good guy with a gun” argument—has not always been such an easy

BY ASPEN PERRY

sell. Granted, it’s been a few years, but if memory serves, I don’t recall this concept being nearly as popular when Malcolm X was preaching it. Nor do I recall reading about the time our government offered to purchase firearms for members of the Black Panther party when they began to open-carry in an effort to protect private citizens. Yet, here we are decades later with a fraction of our population more willing to buy guns than textbooks. If the goal was to have our kids fear the dangerous consequences of unchecked mental illness, then we should have allocated funding toward easier access to mental health care. If the goal was to have our kids defend constitutional amendments, then we should have second guessed taking away their sense of safety in a classroom before they were taught how to read. If we wanted students to take accountability for their behavior, then we should have modeled accountability for our own. The way I see it, opponents of common-sense gun laws have a choice: They can continue to belittle kids across the nation for having the audacity to request a sense of security, or they can take accountability for their role in preparing our youth to arrive at this exact conclusion. The conversation is far from over. Opponents and politicians would be wise to start showing up to the conversation prepared to listen. CW

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring author and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, DARBY DOYLE, KYLEE EHMANN, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, CASEY KOLDEWYN, ASPEN PERRY, KATHERINE PIOLI, MIKE RIEDEL, AMANDA ROCK, PAUL ROSENBERG, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

®

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

APRIL 12, 2018 | 7

All Contents © 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

Business/Office Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales MIKEY SALTAS

Circulation Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Sales Director of Advertising,Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, ALEX MARKHAM, MIEKA SAWATZKI, JEREMIAH SMITH

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Editorial Interns RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, SAMANTHA HERZOG

Marketing Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMANTHA HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Editorial Assistant RAY HOWZE Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER


HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

High and Dry

This week, it’s all about the governor—what bills he signed, what he didn’t, and how he still seems kind of clueless. The Deseret News ran a poll showing that 77 percent of Utahns support medical marijuana. There’s an initiative out there to put the issue on the ballot. Not to be undone by overwhelming public opinion, Gov. Herbert put on his dissenter’s hat and said, oh no, the initiative goes too far and could lead to (pause for emphasis) recreational pot. This latest opinion aligns with what he said at a 2016 news conference: “I’m not interested in having Dr. Feelgood out there say ‘Yeah, yeah. Qué pasa? You know, here’s your doobie for the day and you’ll feel better.’” Does it make you cringe to hear a grown man in a suit use the word “doobie?”

Open your heart & home to a child in need.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Believe What You Want

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

One of a kind items at a one of a kind store

It could be enough that Herbert and the Legislature totally miss the point of medical marijuana. Legislators, surely thinking they were totally rad and progressive, approved medical cannabis for people dying within six months. We thought medical marijuana is about easing chronic pain, even epilepsy—not calculating your final days. But Utah conservatives are stuck on the tired insistence that there’s just not enough research out there. And they really, really believe that you can get high, or want to get high, taking medical cannabis. It’s interesting that testimonials turn their heads in cases like home schooling or free-range parenting, a concept that spoke to the governor as he signed that into law. But no amount of pain and suffering can sway them to approve the “weed.”

Power to the People

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | APRIL 12, 2018

Interested in being a Foster Parent ?

Unique decorative items for home or office. Lower Level Center Court Trolley Square

Speaking of public opinion, this is the year. There are six ballot initiatives heading for an April 16 deadline. The Keep My Voice anti-candidate-signature-gathering initiative probably doesn’t have a chance, but the others do. And Gov. Herbert got chills just thinking about the inland port bill—money, business, trucks. Not so much the public and Salt Lake City, whose municipal authority was staunched. Environmentalists were apoplectic because the “port” threatens the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. But so does the state prison. Still, Herbert signed it into law even though it’s “not yet perfect,” according to KUTV 2 News. And now he’s going to call a special session to “fix” the legislation. The public spoke loud and clear with the initiatives and against the inland port, and they might just keep up that pressure. Some day, their representatives will listen.

801-747-3556 345 e. 4500 s., Murray #260

www.starlightprogram.org

Funerals weddings Birthdays make someone ’ s day

Art l a r o Fl

The

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com


CITIZEN REV LT IN A WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

GOOD NEIGHBOR TRAINING

GET YOUR KITTY FIX

With all the fear-mongering in the nation, you might want to get to know the people who live nearby. It’s a whole lot better than holding your concealed weapon tightly and closing your doors to the world. At the Know Your Neighbor Volunteer Orientation, you can learn more about the refugee experience in Utah. Utah has usually been a welcoming community, especially since the mid-1970s and the end of the Vietnam War. “Residents have welcomed an estimated 60,000-plus refugees from more than 20 countries. … the state of Utah receives an additional 1,100 refugees from around the world annually,” organizers say. Salt Lake City and County Building, 451 S. State, 801-5357931, Thursday, April 12, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2IZOznT.

ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY DISCUSSION

GET A DAMN HAIRCUT

352 MAIN ST. UNIT D, PARK CITY, UTAH #BARBARIC 435•714•0967

APRIL 12, 2018 | 9

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

| CITY WEEKLY |

—KATHARINE BIELE

Don’t want to pay to dispose of your electronics? Well, it’s that time of year again when the University of Utah opens its bins to residential detritus at U Recycle Day. What do they take? Documents for shredding, desktop and laptop computers, monitors, TVs, DVD and VCR players, stereos, phones, printers and copy machines, cameras, cords and AC adapters, small home appliances, skis and snowboards, DVDs and CDs, plastic disc cases, ink and toner cartridges, as well as donations of non-perishable food items. Rice Eccles Stadium, 451 S. 1400 East, 801-585-9352, Thursday, April 19, 8 a.m.-noon, free, bit.ly/2uqk4Eh

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

RECYCLE DAY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

NEW CAFE HOURS OPEN AT 7AM TUES-SAT 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

There must have been a time when the environment wasn’t on the top of our endangered list. Have “Americans … lost a sense of place and history because of their increased mobility?” And “why is it that communities in Utah, which are grounded in place and history, do not often share the environmental concerns that typically result from a strong belonging to the land?” Those are questions examined in Environmental Strategies, a lecture by Brigham Young University professor of humanities George Handley. This isn’t just Utah’s problem, either. It’s what Handley calls global environmental degradation. He is also reading from his memoir Home Waters and novel American Fork. Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801328-2586, Thursday, April 19, 6:30-8 p.m., free, wellerbookworks.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | APRIL 12, 2018

This is about the use of talcum powder and the risk for ovarian cancer. If there is in fact a link between the two, since it’s regularly used on babies, wouldn’t there be an increased number of females contracting cancer at a younger age? —H. Gearhart

You’ve found a rare bird indeed, H.: A question about the whole talcum-powderand-cancer debate for which there’s an actual answer. If talc is related to ovarian cancer at all, which is still a big if, the disease doesn’t result from use in infancy, for the simple reason that when babies are exposed to it, it’s for only a short time—the diaper years. The alleged cancer association, on the other hand, pertains to long-term use, over decades and decades, by adult women looking to keep things clean and dry. That was the setup in one recent highprofile lawsuit against the company that’s taken most of the anti-talc heat, Johnson & Johnson. The plaintiff, a medical receptionist from Los Angeles named Eva Echeverria, started using J&J baby powder on her genital area daily once she began menstruating, around 1965, and kept at it until 2016, some nine years after she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Thousands of women have filed similar lawsuits, and a number have won in court; what made Echeverria’s suit special was that last summer a jury awarded her a massive $417 million judgment. The justice system has spoken, right? Well, the story keeps going. But let’s pause and freshen up everyone’s memory. Talcum powder comes from talc, a mineral comprising mostly magnesium, silicon and oxygen. In its natural state, talc can contain a little asbestos, too, though commercial talc products have been free of that carcinogen since the 1970s. Still, the asbestos angle means there are actually two routes by which it’s been suspected that talc causes cancer. The first involves talc miners, who according to a 1995 study were more likely than the general population to suffer both lung cancer and non-cancer lung diseases, leading the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to claim tentatively that talc exposure might be “linked” to illness. This isn’t completely settled, either—other researchers implicate the miners’ smoking habits, and working underground increases your exposure to radon, itself a source of lung cancer. But the major controversy is about ovarian cancer, where inhaling talc (or asbestos) isn’t the issue. Here the theory is that when sprinkled on the perineal area, talc particles move up the genitourinary tract and lodge themselves in the ovaries, where subsequent inflammation leads over time to cancer. Concerns along these lines have been around for nearly 50 years; I fielded a question on the topic back in 1990. Some doctors continue to insist there must be a connec-

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Talc-ulating Risk

tion, but information gathered in a few big studies since 2000 has tended to point the the other way. The most substantial recent data comes from a 2014 paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, which followed more than 60,000 postmenopausal women for about 12 years. A little more than half the subjects reported using talcum powder; researchers weren’t able to establish that it made a difference one way or another vis-a-vis incidence of ovarian cancer. Still, the American Cancer Society continues to hedge its bets, acknowledging there’s always a chance; the International Agency for Research on Cancer says the genital application of talc is “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” More work is needed, but of course it’s not like you can run a controlled trial where you expose various cohorts to a substance you think might cause cancer and see who gets it.  So what we’re looking at is disturbing anecdotal information piled up over decades, but no preponderance of evidence to back it up. That’s a messy status quo, and helps explain what’s happened in the Echeverria case. The jurors heard enough to assess record damages for a talc-cancer suit, but the judge, Maren Nelson, concluded they didn’t get it. In October she overturned their verdict, ruling that (among other problems) Echeverria had failed to establish “specific causation” between her baby powder use and her cancer. To argue that talc “more probably than not” causes ovarian cancer, Nelson wrote, Echeverria’s key expert (her doctor) had to demonstrate that women who used it had a 50 percent greater incidence risk than women who didn’t, and the risk numbers in the studies submitted as evidence couldn’t meet that standard. (Grimly enough, Echeverria lived to hear the jury’s verdict, but not Nelson’s subsequent ruling.) The proceedings also saw some Big Tobacco-esque intrigue over internal Johnson & Johnson memos alleged to reveal the company’s knowledge that their product was harmful—but their language, the judge found, didn’t say what Echeverria said it did. The initial read on Nelson’s ruling is that it’s great news for J&J, given that she’s also presiding over some 800 other talc lawsuits against the company in California. Anyone following the talc-cancer issue should keep their powder dry, though; we won’t see the end of this one anytime soon. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Suite 300, Chicago 60607.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Photo Credit: Nina Tekwani

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

G E T C AS H F O R YO U R C LOTH E S PI BS E XC H A N G E .COM

APRIL 12, 2018 | 11

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | APRIL 12, 2018

ESSENTIALS

THURSDAY 4/12

Whose Live Anyway? Whose Live Anyway? borrows its title from the popular improv comedy series Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and for good reason. This traveling troupe of actors and comedians knows how to provide 90 minutes of pure hilarity where no one knows what will happen next. Three of the four members of the ensemble—Ryan Stiles, Greg Proops and Jeff B. Davis—are veterans of the TV show, and all four, including Joel Murray, are seasoned at spontaneity while taking their cues from audience suggestions. They create sketches, songs and contests that are entirely unrehearsed, relying only on their improv skills to procure the possibilities. Proops (pictured above, far right) mentions a show they performed in Pennsylvania, where they brought up an 8-year-old boy to provide sound effects: “Someone said, ‘The police are coming,’ and he let out a piercing shriek that only an eight year old can emit and shattered everyone’s eardrums. The audience gasped and all four of us hit the deck at once.” He also shares a story about bringing a couple onstage for a sketch called “First Date,” based on two audience members’ early dating experience. “The guy revealed he wanted to marry his girlfriend,” Proops says. “So we asked him to propose onstage, and he did. The crowd went bonkers. Thank goodness she said yes, or it might have become the saddest moment in comedy history.” Maybe you had to be there. But by the very nature of improvisation, it only happens once. (Lee Zimmerman) Whose Live Anyway? @ Ellen Eccles Theater, 43 S. Main, Logan, April 12, 7:30 p.m. $39-$58; Kingsbury Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, April 13, 7:30 p.m., $38.50-$57.50 tickets.utah.edu

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, APRIL 12-18, 2018

KEITH BROFSKY

JERRY CRAWFORD VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

SHARON KAIN

MORGAN GROBE

the

THURSDAY 4/12

FRIDAY 4/13

WEDNESDAY 4/18

Sometimes the old doesn’t have to be replaced by the new; there is strength in forging alliances across generational waves. So suggests Repertory Dance Theatre’s upcoming performance, Current. “I call these people the young dancemakers,” RDT’s Executive/Artistic Director Linda C. Smith says. “They are really looking at this time, this place, this culture, our dreams, our hopes, our aspirations, our challenges … they’re making statements about who we are today.” These dance-makers include the four choreographers whose work is featured in Current. Three are former RDT dancers, while the fourth was the 2017 winner of RDT’s Regalia choreographer competition. “It doesn’t matter how old they are,” Smith says, “but they represent a new wave of dance-makers that say something about this generation.” While what they say varies, the theme of connection remains strong in each piece throughout Current’s lineup. “This is a lovely combination of works that have a lot of variety,” Smith says. “It’s exciting to see this new wave of choreographic energy that’s taking over the world.” One of RDT’s eight original founders when it formed in 1966, Smith carries on a legacy herself. Clearly, she is making room for it to continue, without losing the vibrancy that brought the company to this point. Smith knows the value of these new artists, and the value of art itself. “Every generation has these artists that define and help us understand who we are,” she says. (Casey Koldewyn) Repertory Dance Theatre: Current @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801534-1000, April 12-14, 7:30 p.m., $15-$35, rdtutah.org

He might not have been the first African American comedian to achieve prominence—as he followed in the footsteps of, among others, Redd Foxx and Richard Pryor—but Sinbad (real name David Adkins) was among the earliest to make a mark in mainstream comedy. Where others were unafraid to get down and dirty, Sinbad eschewed vulgarity and focused instead on making people laugh at their own foibles. His unlikely stage name—which he supposedly chose out of respect for Sinbad the Sailor—has topped many a marquee in the years since and made him an indelible presence in comedy clubs, his own HBO and Comedy Central specials and network sitcoms. Films soon followed, and his role in the popular comedy Jingle All the Way found him competing with Arnold Schwarzenegger for silliest screen antics. His work has earned him a NAACP Image Award and a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor. Always the good guy, he also authored a book boldly titled Sinbad’s Guide to Life: Because I Know Everything. Apparently he does: Aside from his comedy career, he bills himself as a Master of Technology when serving as celebrity emcee for private corporate events sponsored by Intel, Apple and Microsoft. “If you’re not happy before you’re successful, you’re going to be miserable when you do become successful, because all your problems just get magnified,” Sinbad’s IMDB profile quotes. Given his success and apparent satisfaction with life—including being married to the same woman for 30 years—why not take him at his word? (Lee Zimmerman) Sinbad @ Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, April 12, 7 p.m.; April 13-14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25, wiseguyscomedy.com

There are authors who tend to stay in a comfortable groove with their protagonists, writing characters who are more or less like them. Then there’s Jonathan Evison, who has built stories around a young man with muscular dystrophy (The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving), a 78-year-old widow (This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!), and for his latest, Lawn Boy, a 20-something half-Mexican-American still living with his mother. “I want to be a more expansive person at the end of each novel,” Evison says by phone from his home in Washington state. “I’m the guy on the bus looking around; I find people, try to imagine what their home life is like, what they do for a living.” For Lawn Boy’s Mike Muñoz, what he does for a living, and does very well, is landscaping— at least until he’s fired from his job when he refuses to literally pick up crap. He spends the rest of the book struggling to get his financial head above water, dealing with situations like how to remove a painful tooth when you’ve got no money and no insurance. The book explores the lives of people like Mike with humor and compassion, wrestling with how you get ahead when you can barely stop falling behind. “We need to re-define [the American Dream] from this cookie-cutter, postwar idea,” Evison says. “Race and class can thwart opportunities, and even expectations. … You have to take more risks than ever to make the American dream happen. It took me until I was 39 years old. And I’m a white guy.” (Scott Renshaw) Jonathan Evison: Lawn Boy @ The Printed Garden, 9445 S. Union Square Ste. A, Sandy, 385-695-2042, April 18, 7 p.m., theprintedgarden.com

Repertory Dance Theatre: Current

Sinbad

Jonathan Evison: Lawn Boy


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

APRIL 12, 2018 | 13


STORE

★★★★★

No Holds Bard

Choreographer David Bintley experiments with classic plays in The Shakespeare Suite. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

L

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

ooking at the full scope of David Bintley’s ballet career, one would be forgiven for pegging him as a true classicist. From the Royal Ballet School, where he trained as a young man, to the Birmingham Royal Ballet (BRB), where he began as a company member and choreographer and where he still serves today as the company’s director (he will be retiring next season), Bintley’s career has taken him to two of the three most important ballet companies in the United Kingdom. And many have written of how Bintley’s work, which maintains the highest technical and artistic standards, has championed and advanced the English style of ballet—encouraging supple, flexible torsos and a stylistic nuance that sought balance and purity of line over extreme virtuosity. But Bintley has a penchant for coloring outside the lines, creating ballets that don’t fit neatly into the classical repertoire. The Shakespeare Suite (1999) is one such ballet. And Ballet West is now one of the very few companies outside of the Birmingham Royal Ballet to perform it. The selections for Ballet West’s spring season often stand apart from the more traditional mid-season offerings, like the perennial Nutcracker and classic story ballets like Swan Lake and Cinderella. Spring is for things that are fresh, lively and often contemporary. This year, as Ballet West’s Artistic Director Adam Sklute told KUED in a recent interview, “The whole program is about my three favorite works that were off the beaten path.” Also hand-picked by Sklute for this program is Jiŗí Kylián’s Return to a Strange Land (1974), a somber work created after the sudden death of Kylián’s mentor, John Cranko, who also had been a dancer and choreographer for The Royal Ballet. The second piece, 1958’s Summerspace, is an ambitious attempt at a highly experimental work by the seminal modern dance choreographer Merce Cunningham. During the making of this piece, Cunningham, graphic artist Robert Rauschenberg and composer Morton Feldman all worked entirely independently to produce the dance, music and costuming, bringing the three elements together for the first time during its stage premiere. These two lead into The Shakespeare Suite, composed of seven vignettes, each lasting less than three minutes. It’s a popculture-inspired interpretation of some of

BEAU PEARSON

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | APRIL 12, 2018

A&E

DANCE

Shakespeare’s most popular plays: Macbeth, Richard III, Hamlet, Othello, The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Romeo & Juliet. In addition to the highenergy theatrical antics coming out in these pieces, the costuming—sunglasses, punk hairdos, power suits and Chuck Taylor shoes—signals an unusual sense of flair. That flair and vivacity continues through the music. Bintley, whose amateurmusician father was particularly fond of playing jazz, often uses the strains of American roots music as the soundtrack to his work. That tendency goes back to one of his earliest pieces, the abstract and spirited one-act ballet Take Five (1978), named after and set to Dave Brubeck’s famous jazz score of the same name. The Shakespeare Suite is one of these jazz ballets, performed to a Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn score. Bintley’s jazz pieces were surprisingly well received in Britain, so in an attempt to win over American audiences during the Birmingham Royal Ballet’s New York City debut in 2000, Bintley put together a special “Jazz Triple” showcase, expecting Yanks to embrace something set to jazz. The showcase featured his own Nutcracker Sweeties, set to music by Ellington, and The Shakespeare Suite alongside George Balanchine’s Slaughter on 10th Avenue (created for the Broadway musical On Your Toes). The Times raved about Balanchine while picking apart Bintley’s Suite, calling it “bland business.” One wonders if those New York critics 18 years ago just weren’t ready for real contemporary ballet. A recent revival of the Suite by the BRB earned the company

First Soloist Allison DeBona and Principal Artist Rex Tilton in The Shakespeare Suite.

an entirely different kind of appraisal. The online arts review Seeing Dance noted, “The Shakespeare Suite is Bintley letting his hair down; and what fun it is, too.” A review in London Dance called the work “witty, quirky, visually appealing” and praised the use of vignettes that touch on several of the Bard’s stories, saying, “It certainly covers several of his best-loved dysfunctional pairings.” Not to be outdone, the London Times wrote, “Bintley is singlehandedly updating the British choreographic tradition.” David Bintley has had a 42-year career with the Birmingham Royal Ballet and in that time he has choreographed 10 full-length and 12 one-act ballets, from light-hearted, crowd-pleasers to others that struggle with complex emotions (such as The Dance House, a one-act ballet that meditates on the effects of the AIDS crisis in the ballet world). Of all Bintley’s ballets, however, The Shakespeare Suite is the one that director Sklute wants to show local audiences. These riskier works might not be classical, but that doesn’t mean they can’t become classics. CW

BALLET WEST: THE SHAKESPEARE SUITE

Capitol Theatre 50 W. 200 South 801-355-2787 April 13-21, 7:30 p.m.; April 21, 2 p.m. $15-$87 artsaltlake.org


PERFORMANCE THEATER

Canciones de Amor Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, April 14, 7 p.m., flamencodellago.com RDT: Current Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through April 14, 7:30 p.m., rdtutah.org (see p. 12) Ring Around the Rose: Samba Fogo Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, April 14, 11 a.m., artsaltlake.org SALT in Concert Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, April 18-20, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org The Shakespeare Suite Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, April 13-21, dates and times vary, balletwest.org (see. p 14)

moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Faure Piano Trio Libby Gardner Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, April 12, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu NOVA Chamber Music Series: Bach and New Horizons Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 Presidents Circle, April 15, 3 p.m., novaslc.org Utah Symphony: Whole Lotta Shakin’ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, April 13-14, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Craig Bielik Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., April 13-14, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Front Row Film Roast: Final Destination Brewvies, 677 S. 200 West, April 13, 10 p.m., frontrowfilmroast.com Joe Machi Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, April 13-14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Stand and Deliver: A Stand-up Inspired Improv Show Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, April 17, 8 p.m., sugarspace.com Sinbad Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, April 12, 7 p.m.; April 13-14, 7 & 9:30

Utah native Patricia Nosanchuk exhibits works in indelible ink inspired by principles of physical and mental restoration in Healing Works at Salt Lake City Main Library Special Collections (210 E. 400 South, slcpl.org), through May 17. p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 12) Whose Live Anyway Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, April 13, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 12)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Bill Humbert: Employee 5.0: Secrets of a Successful Job Search Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Sq., April 16, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Chris Green, Elize Paschen, & Valerie Wallace The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East,

April 14 , 4 p.m., kingsenglish.com David Campt: The White Ally Toolkit Workbook Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, April 13, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jonathan Evison: Lawn Boy The Printed Garden, 9445 S. Union Square Ste. A, Sandy, April 18, 7 p.m., theprintedgarden.com (see p. 12) Kevin Holdsworth and Susanna Barlow Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, April 12, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Obert Skye: Wizard for Hire The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, April 13, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Cabaret SLCC Black Box Theatre, 1575 S. State, through April 14, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., slcc.edu The Christians Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-917-4969, April 13-May 6, times and dates vary, goodcotheatre.com Class of ‘94 Val A. Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, through April 14, dates and times vary, weber.edu Disney’s The Little Mermaid Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 500 North, Orem, through April 14, dates and times vary, halecenter.org Etiquette Desert Edge Brewery, Trolley Square; Watchtower Cafe, 1588 S. State, through April 15, dates and times vary, sackerson.org Fun Home Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through May 13, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Hamilton Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2797, through May 16, broadway-at-the-eccles.com Jump Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, through April 15, 2, 4 & 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org The Memory of Water Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, through April 14, dates and times vary, halecenter.org Our Country’s Good Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7100, through April 15, times and dates vary, theatre.utah.edu Tuck Everlasting Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through May 31, dates and times vary, hct.org Twelfth Night Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through April 14, times vary, pioneertheatre.org

DANCE

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

APRIL 12, 2018 | 15


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | APRIL 12, 2018

moreESSENTIALS Tacey M. Atsitty: Rain Scald The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, April 12, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com William Victor Smith: Textual Studies of the Doctrine and Covenants Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, April 14, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Dragon Lights SLC Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through May 6, dragonlightsslc.com Grid Zine Fest Publik Coffee Roasters Event Space, 975 S. West Temple, April 14, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., gridzinefest.org Salt Lake City Mini Maker Faire Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, April 14, noon-6 p.m., slcmakerfaire.com Woodland Fairy Festival Gardner Village, 1100 W. 7800 South, 801-566-8903, April 14-June 23, times vary, gardnervillage.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Islam Between Love and Hate Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, April 14, 2 p.m., slcpl.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Banyan Fierer: Seeing Unseen Art Access II Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through April 13, accessart.org Coppice: An Art Exhibition Downtown Artist Collective, 284 W. 400 North, April 13, 7-9 p.m., downtownartistcollective.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 26, utahmoca.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 13, utahmoca.org Ellen Marie Lewis: Visions Seldom All They

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Seem Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through April 20, slcpl.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Familiar Flora: Four Visual Responses to Living With Plants Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through May 11, visualarts.utah.gov Florescentia: Works by Emily Fox King Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through May 4, visualarts.utah.gov In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 18, times vary, slcpl.org Intermountain Society of Artists Spring Show Visual Art Institute, 2901 S. Highland Drive, through April 29, visualartinstitute.org James W. Stewart: NIGHT and DAY Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, April 16-May 12, slcpl.org Mandelman & Ribak Exhibition Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Marcia Walke Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, through April 22, redbuttegarden.org McGarren Flack: Vulnerability Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through April 13, accessart.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through May 12, utahmoca.org Patricia Nosanchuk: Healing Works Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through May 17, slcpl.org (see p. 15) River Inside: Photographs by Gavan Nelson Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through May 9, slcpl.org Sugar-Coated Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through April 14, saltlakearts.org Thomas B. Szalay: Images from Timeless Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 31, slcpl.org Todd Powelson: The Thunder, Perfect Mind Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., through April 21 Tom Howard / Simone Simonian Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through April 13, phillips-gallery.com


SALT LAKE'S FOOD SCENE IS

F

UNBELIEVABLE

ry sauce so tangy, you’ll want to bathe in it. Onion rings so crispy, they’ll make you consider swearing off french fries for good. Locally made barbecue that forces even a persnickety Texan to sing its praises. They all sound like tall tales, but they’re not. When it came to assembling a sampler plate of some of the best representatives of Salt Lake City’s culinary landscape, City Weekly contributors jumped at the opportunity. The question was: Where to start? Influenced by its healthy immigrant influx and informed by tradition and comfort, SLC’s food scene is continuously expanding—and ever delectable.

DINING GUIDE 2018

In this guide, you’ll find everything from a roundup of restaurants that have opened and flourished over the past year to a spotlight on an outside the brick-and-mortar mobile food park and catering options sure to transform your next office meeting from drab to fab. Added to the mix are vegan eateries that force you to leave your bland expectations at the door and desserts that are spicing up last courses throughout the land. Far from mythical, each entrée, snack and drink featured in our pages is quite real and made with love right here on the Wasatch Front. Hopefully, our descriptions and first-hand sighting (and tasting) accounts are enough to inspire you to go on a delicious expedition to find them.

—Enrique Limón, editor

DINING GUIDE 2018

APRIL 12, 2018 | 17


Rookies of the Year

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Many great restaurants have popped up in the past 365-ish days—here are some standouts.

18 | APRIL 12, 2018

DINING GUIDE 2018

Boltcutter

By Alex Springer

D

uring my time as City Weekly’s food dude, I’m quickly learning that the local food scene has set the bar pretty high for newcomers. Utah diners have come to expect newbies to be welloiled machines by the time they first open their doors. Given the fact that new restaurants tend to need some time to develop their sea legs, I’ve been impressed with the number of eateries that, despite being only open for around a year, have hit the ground running. Here are a few new kids on the block who are poised to start dominating Utah’s food sphere.

Boltcutter

As a guy who grew up on burritos that were little more than meat-and-cheese delivery systems, it was quite a shock to my system when I found some plantbased Mexican food that presses all the right buttons. The team at Boltcutter has developed meatless versions of classic burrito and taco fillings like carne asada, barbacoa and fried fish. Where some plant-based eateries feel an obligation to make their meatless “meat” taste like the original, Boltcutter lets the natural flavor of jackfruit, tempeh and seitan meld with their house blend of seasonings to create something new, yet bracingly familiar. For a maiden voyage, consider trying the delectable tacos al pastor ($8), the sin carne burrito ($8) and the nachos ($10). 57 E. Gallivan Ave., bit.ly/2GLpiQ y

Laziz Kitchen

With its solid menu of Middle Eastern cuisine and preternatural intuition regarding the way food can knit a community together, Laziz Kitchen has established itself as a warm and welcoming spot since its opening day. Its location within the Central Ninth neighborhood that contains a slew of other local and community-focused businesses only serves to cement its presence as one of the city’s most hospitable restaurants. The ever-changing stew menu, which comes in both vegan and non-vegan varieties, is always a good bet, as are the fried cauliflower florets ($8) and life-affirming shakshouka ($14). 912 S. Jefferson St., 801-441-1228, lazizkitchen.com

MakanMakan

At first glance, it might be easy to dismiss MakanMakan as yet another Asian-inspired joint in a market that already has a lot of Asianinspired joints. While MakanMakan’s foundation is indeed steeped in regional noodle soup and curry, it pulls menu items from all over the Eastern continent. Diners can sample cuisine from Indonesia and Malaysia, which are two criminally underrepresented cultures in the vast universe of Asian cuisine. Start the meal off with an order of roti canai ($4.75), a tasty pan-fried flatbread, and some martabak telor ($6.95), which is essentially a crisp crêpe stuffed with meat and scrambled eggs. I hesitate to offer any guidance with the entrée section since it’s so fun to explore, but for those in need of a tiny push in the right direction, both the spicy laksa noodle soup ($10.55) and the meaty, goat-filled curry gulai kambing ($11.25) are great places to start. 33 E. 11400 South, Sandy, 801-251-0967, makanmakansandy.com


DINING GUIDE 2018

801.468.1492 ยง 1492 S. STATE STREET | PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

VOTED BEST VEGAN BURGER

APRIL 12, 2018 | 19

7 EAST 4800 S. (1 BLOCK WEST OF STATE ST.) MURRAY 801-266-2127 โ€ข OPEN 11AM WEEKDAYS - 10 AM WEEKENDS


Putting the IT in ITalian 1968

20 | APRIL 12, 2018

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

DINING GUIDE 2018

SINCE

Pretty Bird

Pizza Nono

When American wood-fired pizza joints became less gimmicky and started to take the art of rustic pizza making more seriously, pizza lovers all over the country heaved a well-earned sigh of relief. Pizza Nono has doubled down by creating a space where passionate pizza fans can gather for authentic, wood-fired pies without buttoning up the atmosphere too much. The interior evokes a casual-but-hip setting, and the giant communal table dominating the space makes diners remember why pizza was invented in the first place—to unite all walks of life in warm, cheesy harmony. For simple perfection, go for the margherita ($10); for a bit of spice, gravitate toward the sausage pepper ($13). 925 E. 900 South, 385-444-3530, pizzanono-slc.com

Pretty Bird

Never have I Instagram-stalked a restaurant’s progress as much as I did Pretty Bird’s. The hype behind this place alone was pure social media fodder: Extremely talented—dare I say, celebrity—chef Viet Pham leaves the sommeliers and white tablecloths of his fine-dining past behind to open a Nashville-inspired hot-chicken joint. I had the opportunity to visit on Day 1, and the place was up and running as if it had been in its Regent Street digs for years. Nary a condiment was misplaced, and the fried chicken was just shy of revelatory. Their sparse menu offers fried chicken quarters and sandwiches, which can be ordered in four degrees of spicy, but the fried chicken sandwich ($10.50) with the acidic bite of pickles and slaw is my current obsession. 146 S. Regent St., facebook.com/prettybirdchicken

Seasons Plant Based Bistro

i ta l i an v illage s lc. com 5370 S. 900 E. 8 0 1 . 2 6 6 . 4 1 8 2

M O N - T H U 11 a-1 1 p FRI-SAT 1 1 a-1 2 a SUN 3p-10p

French and Italian cuisine earned their reputation by truly exploring the depths of how butter, cream and dairy can enhance the flavors of pretty much everything they touch. What makes Seasons so spectacular is that it captures all of this rich decadence without using a modicum of dairy. I have yet to figure out exactly how these warlocks have managed such a feat, but when food tastes this good, it doesn’t really matter. This is a place that, according to the world of classic culinary technique, should not be able to exist. Yet, it does—and does so very well. The crudité board ($13) is an excellent starter to either the gnocchi alla vodka ($15) or the short-rib ($16), both of which are meditative studies in umami goodness. 1370 S. State, 385-267-1922, seasonsslc.com


DINING GUIDE 2018

APRIL 12, 2018 | 21


1.

Here’s where your favorite team of editorial misfits finds food and drink solace.

JOHN TAYLOR

B

etween creative highs and demanding deadlines, the scrappy staff at City Weekly has a main stress-reliever that bonds us together: eating and drinking our worries away. There’s only so much the downstairs Afghani market can supply (though we are extremely thankful for its existence), so often times we find ourselves venturing out for that reallyhits-the-sweet-spot dish. In a pinch, here are some of our staff’s favorites:

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

By CW Staff

4.

6.

1. Chicken mole negro burrito at Taco Taco ($8.75) Stickers depicting a luchador drop-kicking Donald Trump against his “big, beautiful wall” are enough to get folks through the door, but it’s Taco Taco’s menu that seals the deal. Here you’ll find tasty variations of the classics—tacos, burritos and quesadillas—but it’s the house mole negro burrito that takes the (tres leches) cake. This bad boy will take care of your grumble and leave you ready to rumble. Never mind a baby’s arm; stuffed with rice beans and mole-soaked chicken, this burro is thicker than most newborns. 208 E. 500 South, 801-428-2704, tacotacoslc.com 2. The Saltas at Whiskey Street ($12) You know you’ve made it when a local watering hole names a drink after you. Enter The Saltas. Sweet and packing a punch, this Knob Creek, Lillet, Amaro Averna and honey simple syrup concoction on Whiskey Street’s seasonal menu is summer breeze embodied. The question is: Just which Saltas is it named after? Mikey, the younger of the brood claims it was for him, in celebration of his 21st birthday. “This will be contentious—it was legit named after me,” Pete, the eldest, says. The jury is still out. Perhaps it’s an ode to OG and City Weekly big kahuna John? We simple sippers may never know. My money, however, is on matriarch Paula as the man of any Greek house might be the head, but the woman is the neck—and she can turn the head any way she wants. 323 S. Main, 801-433-1371, whiskeystreet.com

Scott Renshaw, A&E editor

Mihami Vice at Even Stevens ($9.25) I’ve always been a sucker for a great Cubano sandwich, with its irresistible combination of succulent roast pork and smoky ham, so I’m disappointed in myself that it took until only recently to discover Even Stevens’ splendid version. The clever name (and its play on the ingredients,

the recipe’s origin in the South Florida Cuban expat community and its sinful flavors) notwithstanding, this is a fairly traditional incarnation, adding melted Swiss cheese, pickle spears and mustard to the hoagie-wrapped pork and ham. But it’s still a delicious mix, adding that acidic pickle snap and creamy cheese to the flavorful meats so that the whole overflowing concoction ends up dribbling down your chin. And the fact that every Even Stevens sandwich purchase means a donation to a worthy cause makes it feel like more of a virtue than a vice. Multiple locations, evenstevens.com 3. Wasatch Brewery Apricot Hefeweizen As a guy who has reached a certain age, I’m far more likely to enjoy an adult beverage from the comfort of my living room armchair than I am in a public place. That means I appreciate something I can pick up in a local grocery store, where I might even be tempted to try something off the beaten path. That’s how I discovered Wasatch’s apricot hefeweizen, a sweet fruit-bomb of a wheat beer that smells like a walk through an apricot orchard. It also doesn’t pack a big alcohol punch. That way, I don’t have to feel guilty about opening up a second, or on special occasions, even a third. After all, I don’t have to worry about driving home. wasatchbeers.com

Ray Howze, editorial assistant

Chicken Curry Koko Kitchen ($6.25-$9.45) Koko Kitchen has a great selection of sushi and other Asian dishes, but its not-so-secret favorite selection for me is the curry. Served over rice, the housemade curry comes with your choice of vegetables, chicken, tofu, beef or tonkatsu, and is a go-to when I visit. When I first stopped by, I thought I’d be interested in their teriyaki bowls, soups or donburi, but the curry has stuck with me. The chicken is served tender and covered in a savory and wellspiced curry. Mix it with the rice and the dish gives other curries

DEREK CARLISLE

Enrique Limón, editor

SARAH ARNOFF

DINING GUIDE 2018

22 | APRIL 12, 2018

Edit Eats

8.

a run for their money. Don’t be afraid to venture out and order something else from the handwritten whiteboard menu, but feel confident you won’t go wrong with the curry. 702 S. 300 East, 801-364-4888 Moonless Night at Quarters ($9) New downtown Salt Lake City bar Quarters is all about nostalgia, nerdiness and gaming culture. But it also hasn’t forgotten about the drinks. The hip, boozy menu themed after various games like Crash Bandicoot and Hulk includes a few other specialties such as my new favorite, Moonless Night. I first ordered this drink because I enjoy a Fernet and cola just about anytime and when I saw this drink includes it—as well as rye, sugar, lime and oatmeal stout—I had to give it a try. Unlike the somewhat fizzy Fernet and cola, this version with the oatmeal stout makes for a smooth cocktail with a bit of tang from the lime and rye. Sometimes, a slight change from a classic is all you need. 5 E. 400 South, quartersslc.com

Sarah Arnoff, Dining Guide copy editor

4. Brunch at Block Restaurant Yes, Sunday brunch exists south of Salt Lake County. I’ve found that an excellent place to take my Utah County-residing parents is Provo’s new Block Restaurant to indulge in chef Adam Cold’s delectable yet reasonably priced dishes. Starting with the perfectly shareable fig tapenade ($12) gets our bellies in gear with its three crostinis heaped with a fig purée and balsamic reduction mix, goat cheese and toasted walnuts. The heartier-thanit-looks avocado Benedict ($14) is two poached eggs resting on a throne of avocados and toasted English muffins smothered in hollandaise, and served with seasoned potato wedges on the side. It leaves me brunched out every time. 3330 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-885-7558, blockrestaurantgroup.com


7.

Godzilla. At 6-plus inches high, it’s arguably the Everest of Wasatch Front eateries. Between the buttery brioche bun slices are—get this—bacon, pork shoulder, pastrami, corned beef, a wagyu beef patty, cheddar and provolone cheeses, plus red onions, pickle, mixed greens and aioli. Oh, it’s served with a side of sauerkraut or fries. How does it taste? Substantially sumptuous. Better yet, ask me tomorrow when I relish the contents of my take-out box at lunch—and dinner. 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127, icehausbar.com

3.

JOHN TAYLOR

SARAH ARNOFF

5.

2.

5. Manmosa at Block Restaurant ($10) Another reason to head south for brunch? There’s alcohol. Well, there is at Block. Their menu of craft cocktails includes a traditional mimosa, but head for the Manmosa for a refreshing twist on the brunch-friendly sipper. Coming in a number of flavors including orange and hibiscus, the Manmosa adds a shot of Sugar House vodka to the mix of juice and Champagne. It’s a delicious (and somewhat dangerous) way to wash down your latemorning meal. 3330 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-885-7558, blockrestaurantgroup.com

Darby Doyle, drinks writer extraordinaire

Woodland Sold Fashion at Firewood on Main ($14) ACT 1, SCENE 1, FADE IN: A cozy, intimate bar on a dark and stormy night. ACTION: A couple sits in silence, clearly irritated with each other, at a low table flanked by deep leather chairs downstairs from the bustling Main Street level in the romantically low-lit bar. SERVER: “Good evening. What can I get you from the bar?” WOMAN: “I’d like the Woodland, please.” MAN: “Same for me, thanks.” SERVER: “Excellent. The raw sugar is smoked over cherry wood, giving it a nice subtle depth.” The server delivers their drinks a few minutes later with a smile. WOMAN: “Wow. This is lovely. Good hit from the Buffalo Trace bourbon, nice aromatic fragrance from orange bitters. I’m liking this Luxardo, too.” MAN: Nods. “Every old fashioned should be served with big-ass ice rock.” He moves his chair closer to hers so that their arms are now touching from shoulder to wrist. She interlocks her fingers with his. With their free hands they continue to sip their drinks, and smile with obvious satisfaction. 306 Main, Park City, 435-252-9900, firewoodonmain.com

Lance Gudmundsen, proofreader Kolossal Burger at Ice Haüs ($13) I’m a literalist—and usually don’t eat when a joint has a frontdoor sign proclaiming: “This premises is licensed as a bar.” I drink instead. So when the assignment came down to pick a favorite bar food, I cornered avuncular Ice Haüs chef Paul Zissi, a fourth-generation hospitality industry veteran. “Well, if you’re really hungry, I’d say the Kolossal Burger ($13). We use every meat we carry here—except bratwurst.” Having just proofread this dining guide on an empty stomach, I was really hungry, so I took the plunge. Zissi hadn’t exaggerated. The Kolossal Burger is huge—a gastronomic

8. Waffle Monster at Bruges Waffles & Frites ($9) I’ve always loved a good monster and it turns out dessert monsters are no exception. We’ve all got an inner craving creature, and The Waffle Monster from Bruges Waffles & Frites is sure to satisfy even the most insidious of munchie mutants. It’s is a light Liege-style Belgian waffle with an adorably monstrous face of crispy Speculoos cookie spread, tangy strawberries and satisfying vanilla bean ice cream that can be just as satisfyingly substituted with creme fraîche. Bruges also offers a diverse blend of zesty dipping sauces, mayos and aioli, so I recommend adding a side of their Belgianstyle fries, or frites, to fully entertain your sweet-and-salty hunger spectrum. Who knew that a little piece of Belgium in Utah would be home to the friendliest little troll around? Multiple locations, brugeswaffles.com Lime Pilsner at Uinta Brewing Co. ($4) My favorite adult beverage activity is sampling new releases and seasonal blends from local breweries, and since April was just named Craft Beer Month by Mayor Jackie Biskupski in honor of our successful Utah beer brewers, what could be a better focus? At the top of my Utah craft-breweries list is Uinta Brewing Co., producers of last year’s zinger of a lime Pilsner. With its fruity bite and drinkable freshness, this verified piece of summer has kept me smiling all year long. The lager carries a tart citrus crispness while still keeping the malty center of the Pilsner present. Uinta just added a mango version to their lineup for the season and I can’t wait to try the tropical twist on this already lively Venn diagram of flavor profiles. 1722 S. Fremont Drive, 801-467-0228, uintabrewing.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 23

6. Elotes de la calle at Alamexo Cantina ($3.95) With just one bite, this dish brought my taste buds right back to my years of living in southern Arizona and New Mexico. We’d buy smoky ears of corn fresh off the grill at grocery store parking lots, soccer matches and pretty much every festival. Hell, I even bought elotes from an enterprising guy who set up his cart right on I-10 between Deming and Las Cruces when we were stuck in traffic for over two hours. The Mexican street corn’s husk was supposed to work as both a handle and to catch all its drippy goodness of queso fresco, mayo and lime juice, but it’d invariably ooze down from the cob. Ever tried to lick your own elbow? Not pretty. Fortunately for our fellow diners at Alamexo Cantina, Chef Matthew Lake’s version hits all the same sweet, smoky and savory buttons, but with more approachable (and dignified) offthe-cob eating. Served with a generous mix of lime aioli, queso fresco and a nice hit of chile molido this side is a must-order. Elbow lickin’ optional. 1059 E. 900 South, 801-658-5859, alamexocantina.com

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

DEREK CARLISLE

Samantha Herzog, editorial intern

DINING GUIDE 2018

7. Vodka tonic at anywhere A simple vodka and tonic with a squeeze of lime. It’s served most any where— except places where the tonic spigot is clogged or a frazzle-assed barkeep substitutes soda for the tonic water or (worse yet) gin for the vodka. This libation is more healthy than a Vitamix veggie smoothie because: The tonic water contains quinine, an age-old prophylactic against malaria. And the lime is rich in vitamin C, a sure-fire cure for scurvy, the scourge of 18th century sailors. Finally, the vodka (and I prefer Tito’s) banishes one of mankind’s oldest afflictions: inhibition.


DINING GUIDE 2018

24 | APRIL 12, 2018

KING

BUFFET Now hiring call or come in for more information

Dine-In or Take-Out

Over 200 Items

CHINESE SEAFOOD • GRILL & SUSHI TWO LOCATIONS 5668 S. Redwood Rd. Taylorsville, Utah 84123 801-969-6666

123 S. State Orem, Utah 84058 801-969-6666

Hours: M-Thurs 11am-9:30pm, Fri & Sat 11am-10pm, Sunday 11am-9pm

Lunch Buffet: $8.95 Adults, $4.95 Kids, Mon-Fri 11am-3:30pm Dinner Buffet: $12.95 Adults, $7.75 Kids, Mon-Fri 3:30pm-9:30pm Saturday, Sunday & Holidays $12.95 All Day Take-Out: Lunch $4.75/lb Dinner $6.25/lb


Crave-worthy Catering

These six mobile caterers are guaranteed to spice up your next drab office meeting.

By Amanda Rock

B

eing a secretary is not a bad gig; I get weekends off and the first pick of office supplies. I’m also tasked with ordering catering for meetings, which—as an also intrepid food writer—is a welcome assignment. The result? On my watch, there are no humdrum boxed lunches or depressing buffets. The following caterers have earned a permanent place in my Rolodex by providing excellent customer service and serving delicious, fresh fare at a reasonable price. Go ahead and give ’em a go next time you’re looking to spice up an office gathering.

Urban Pioneer Foods

Zao Asian Café

If you’re looking to bring something fresh to the conference room table, look no further than Zao. You can choose between rice bowls or tacos, then select two protein options (chicken, steak, meatballs or Thai-spiced tofu). Each buffet comes also comes with flavorful additions like pickled carrots and daikon, wok-seared veggies, ginger-doused scallions, toasted peanuts, crunchy onions and cilantro. Rest assured that everyone will construct a good, healthy meal to their liking. Each ingredient is neatly labeled for vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. The best part? This meal can hang out in the heating pans for three hours, so you don’t have to stress out about a meeting running late and food getting cold. There’s a $100 minimum and it costs $10 per person with a reasonable delivery fee. Multiple locations, zaoasiancafe.com

Even Stevens Sandwiches

Everyone likes sandwiches and everyone likes being nice. Ordering from Even Stevens takes care of both and is always

a hit, whether your guests are vegetarian, vegan or gluten-free eaters. Or even if they like a good, old-fashioned meaty sandwich like the Do Gouda, made with shaved New York steak and smoked Gouda. With each sandwich purchased, one is donated to a local nonprofit. They provide you with a card, proclaiming the number of sandwiches donated with each order, so you can feel good while you’re eating good food. Besides stellar sandwiches, Even Stevens offers cravable salads and sides—like fresh vegetable platters, cheesy mac and cheese and delicious cookies. Good stuff all around. Multiple locations, evenstevens.com

Red Iguana

When you can order catering from one of Salt Lake City’s most popular restaurants, why wouldn’t you? Red Iguana offers a vast menu of possibilities, but I’ve found the Numero Uno Chicken Fajitas, served with refried beans, Spanish rice, chips, housemade salsa and topped with pico de gallo and fresh guacamole is an inexpensive way to feed a diverse crowd. Those who avoid meat and/or dairy simply leave it off the plate, assembling a tasty and filling meal around the rice and beans, both made without animal products. Gluten-free folks, meanwhile, can opt for warm corn tortillas instead of their floury counterpart. This is easily one of the most requested meals from my co-workers. The price point is $12.60 per person and delivery is offered on orders of $150 or more with an 18

percent service fee. Portions are generous and there are plenty of leftovers to take home. 801-300-4214, rediguana.com

Treats and Trends

Instead of buying groceries and stressing out about assembling meat and cheese platters in the break room, I just call on Treats and Trends to cater meeting snacks. They’re highly creative and come up with delicious options to keep people engaged in the meeting. I’ve mostly ordered gorgeous cheese platters, with fruit, crackers and nice array of cheeses. T&T also caters full meals for all sorts of events. Judging by the quality of the snacks I’ve ordered and the presentation, Treats and Trends can work magic on a budget. 801-410-3682, treatsandtrendscatering.com

Kneaders Bakery & Café

Skip the pastries and crappy bagels from Costco, unless you hate your co-workers. My morning meeting go-to is the continental breakfast from Kneaders Bakery & Café. For $124.99, you will wake up 25 people and make them happy with delectable pastries (I always snag a chocolate croissant for myself), a beautiful fresh fruit platter and freshly squeezed orange juice and coffee. Kneaders is also a solid choice for lunch with options ranging from sandwiches made with freshly made bread, soups and crisp salads. You can even order online. Multiple locations, kneaders.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 25

When you spot your favorite caterer at the farmers market shopping for ingredients, you know she’s legit. Over the past few years, ordering from Urban Pioneer has elevated my status at the office as someone who really knows good food. Sure, I take the credit but it’s really Brooke Woffinden, owner and chef of Urban Pioneer, who is brilliant. (But also, I am brilliant by association for ordering from her.) Instead of perusing a menu, I simply email Woffinden, tell her how much I can spend and who I’m feeding, and she sends back wonderful menus to choose from—all made with seasonal and local ingredients. Her

attention to detail and commitment to buying local makes Urban Pioneer unique. Looking for the royal treatment at home? She also offers take-and-bake meals from her retail spot two days a week. Sign up for her email list to see what’s cooking. 389 W. 1700 South, 801-598-7702, urbanpioneerfoods.com

DINING GUIDE 2018

SALLY HUMMINGS

Even Stevens


A trio of local bakers reveal their favorite comfort foods—and where you can go try ’em.

SugarHouse Barbecue

DEREK CARLISLE

DINING GUIDE 2018

26 | APRIL 12, 2018

Texan-Approved Barbecue, Perfection in a Bowl and Crack Nachos

By Alex Springer

T

hose of us who savor the doughy delights provided by professional bakers seldom take the time to think about all the hard work that goes into producing some of SLC’s finest pastries, cakes and other baked goods. Notwithstanding the sheer physical strength required to beat dough into submission; the mental discipline that it takes to resist simply eating everything that comes out of the oven is equally worthy of respect. While creamy éclairs, buttery cookies and thick wedges of chocolate cake come to mind when many of us think of the term “comfort food,” bakers who are around sugary treats all day tend to pursue more savory options. With that in mind, I met with some of Salt Lake’s finest bakers and pastry chefs to discuss their go-to lunch and dinner spots.

Elisa Barber of The Baking Hive

One thing we tend to forget about professional bakers is that many of them have also trained as culinary chefs. Such is the case with Elisa Barber of The Baking Hive. Before opening her Holladay bake shop, she studied at the Ballymaloe Cookery School in the Irish village of Shanagarry. “I trained in pastry and savory cooking,” she says. “I knew my passion was with

pastry and baking, but you don’t know until you try something else.” In an effort to truly discover her culinary destiny, Barber moved to London where she split her time between working as a line cook in the Michelin star-rated Petersham Nurseries Café and whipping up pastries at the legendary London bakery Konditor & Cook. After earning her MBA at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, Barber decided to pack her bags and bring her expertise home. “I actually had a visa to stay in Scotland and open The Baking Hive there, but I felt strongly that I should come back home,” she says. “I love my community, my family and friends are here, and it would be a shame to create this thing from my heart and not be able to share it with them.” When Barber wraps up a hard day’s work baking luscious cakes and bars or teaching a group of local kids how to properly ice a cake, there are a few places near and far that serve up her preferred brand of comfort. “I love Chunga’s [180 S. 900 West, 801-9531840, chungasmexican.com]—their al pastor nachos are like crack,” she says. “I also love Layla Grill [4751 S. Holladay Blvd., 801-272-9111, laylagrill.com] because I’m in that area. My favorite is their lamb meatballs when they’re on the menu.” Though she’s always passionate about baking and running one of the warmest and most inviting bakeries in town, working with sugar and spice makes savory food taste all the more satisfying. “Being around sweet stuff all day makes you crave that salty, cheesy decadent

kind of food,” Barber admits. “Indulgent savory food rejuvenates me, especially after working so hard all day. I feel like I deserve it.”

Romina Rasmussen of Les Madeleines

Arguably one of the pioneers of Utah’s now flourishing baking scene, Romina Rasmussen’s Les Madeleines has been in business since 2003. Rasmussen was one of the first pastry chefs to replicate the now-ubiquitous kouign amann in the United States—and this was three years before Food & Wine Magazine named the buttery miracle Pastry of the Year. Rasmussen’s love of baking blossomed when she first started to share her tasty talents with friends and coworkers. “I think I enjoy sharing stuff that I make with others more than eating it myself,” she says. Regardless of where she worked or lived, she always found herself baking something delicious and sharing it with coworkers and neighbors. She embraced the fact that owning and operating a pastry shop was her ideal vocation, and Les Madeleines was the result. On the occasions when Rasmussen is in need of a culinary recharge, there’s only one place that she trusts. “I’m a creature of habit, so I always go to The Copper Onion [111 E. 300 South, 801-3553282, thecopperonion.com] to get their stroganoff,” she says. “There’s the pasta, the little kick from the crème fraiche and then the mushrooms are nice and meaty. My mouth is actually watering right now—it’s perfection in a bowl.”

Cory Hruska of Hruska’s Kolaches

When Texas siblings Cory, Ross and Devin Hruska moved to the Beehive State, they discovered a land that was curiously devoid of kolaches. “We grew up eating kolaches down in Houston,” Cory says. “Originally, they’re a Czech pastry, but in Texas they took that idea and started stuffing the bread with breakfast food and other savory items.” Armed with a recipe passed down from their grandmother, the Hruskas got to work mixing dough and taking names. They opened their first location in Provo in 2014, and expanded their operation to Sugar House a few years later. As Hruska’s does a damned fine job of making all the sausage, pulled pork and brisket that they subsequently stuff into buttery pastry dough in-house, it’s a safe bet to trust Cory’s judgment when it comes to lunch spots. “My gotos are Even Stevens [multiple locations, evenstevens.com] for the pot roast dip, and SugarHouse Barbeque [880 E. 2100 South, 801-463-4800, sugarhousebbq.com] for their smoked chicken wings,” he says. Cory is also a fan of Eva [317 S. Main, 801-359-8447, evaslc.com], whose experimental menu approach is enough to keep diners on their toes. “I like Eva’s because they try to do something different,” he says. “They embrace the fact that they’re experimenting so much, and they love hearing critiques; it’s like a constant work in progress.” If you’ve never tried a kolache before, you’re in luck—Hruska’s annual Kolache Fest is scheduled to take place Saturday, May 5 at their Sugar House location.


WEEKEND BRUNCH SATURDAY & SUNDAY 11AM - 3PM

& FINE TEQUILA

4670 HOLLADAY VILLAGE PLAZA (2300 EAST) 801-676-9706

DOWNTOWN 149 EAST 200 SOUTH 385-259-0940

FASHION PLACE MALL 6154 FASHION BLVD #2 801-266-2487

APRIL 12, 2018 | 27

UNIVERSITY 1615 S. FOOTHILL DRIVE 385-259-0712

DINING GUIDE 2018

Fancy Tacos


Salt Lake City: Your Vegan Destination Leave your bland food expectations at the door at these six eateries.

28 | APRIL 12, 2018

NIKI CHAN

DINING GUIDE 2018

Veggie House

By Amanda Rock

S

alt Lake is known as a veganfriendly city, but now we’re a full-on vegan destination. There’s been a boom of vegan restaurants opening this past year (check out Alex Springer’s take on Boltcutter and Seasons Plant-Based Bistro on pages 18 and 19), and it seems that everyone—vegans and omnivores alike—has been digging the animalfriendly fare.

Cinnaholic

Salt Lake City has been blessed with its own Cinnaholic. This national chain is famous for over-the-top gourmet cinnamon rolls that just happen to be vegan. Here, you can choose from a staggering amount of frosting flavors and delectable toppings like fresh fruit, marshmallows and cookie dough. I was a certified Cinnaholic after my first bite of a warm cinnamon roll with lemon frosting topped with

juicy, tart raspberries. See what flavor combinations you can come up with, or order from the menu. 358 S. 700 East, Ste. D, 385-415-2744, cinnaholic.com

Veggie House

Veggie House will blow your mind. The menu is the definition of diverse—with everything from stir frys to pad thai you can mix and match with soy-based chicken, beef, shrimp and/or tofu for protein. You could probably eat at Veggie House once a day for a year and never eat the same dish twice. Whether you’re craving something light and healthy, like pho, or you’re in the mood for deep fried “chicken” in sticky, sweet orange sauce—you’ll leave satisfied. Besides having excellent food, Veggie House is quick, inexpensive and has friendly customer service, to boot. 52 E. 1700 South, 801-282-8686, veggiehouseut.com

Lil Lotus

A casual eatery with a fun menu, Lil Lotus is a perfect spot for an inexpensive meal. Serving crowd-pleasing dishes

like late-night Navajo tacos made with either chickpea chorizo or barbecue jackfruit and Southwest green chile mac and cheese, Lil Lotus appeals to every palate. Grownups eat for $9.95 and vegan-minded kiddos get to choose from a pared-down menu costing only $5.95. 2223 S. Highland Drive, 801-906-0637, lil-lotus.business.site

Vegan Bowl

West Jordan got a little cooler this year with the opening of Vegan Bowl, its first vegan restaurant. A spinoff of North Salt Lake’s famous All Chay, they offer mouthwatering Vietnamese fare at a reasonable price. You gotta try the spring rolls, the pho and anything with their fried shrimp. Trust me when I say it’s realistically shrimpy. 8672 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-692-7237, facebook.com/vietnameseveganbowl

The Pie Pizzeria

The Pie Pizzeria is the oldest, most beloved pizza place in town. So why are they on this list? They’ve updated their already

awesome animal-friendly menu. You can build your own pie with tasty options like shredded seitan chick’n, vegan fennel sausage and ground “beef,” or order a specialty pie like the vegan chicken ranch. Make sure to also order some toothsome meatless buffalo wings and pull-a-parts loaded with dairy-free cheese, dipped in pizza sauce, dairy-free ranch or both. Multiple locations, thepie.com

Vegan Agenda

Utah’s first vegan convenience store/ deli opened in the location that housed Frisch Compassionate Eatery and Cakewalk Vegan Baking Co. Since the owners of each business still run the place, you’ll find a pastry case full of goodies baked by Cakewalk, and favorites from Frisch like tubs of eggless and tuno salad, freshly made soups, frozen handmade burritos and bags of their popular vegan jerky. They also have vegan soft serve. Think of it as a welcoming one-stop vegan shop that might change your perception on what’s for dinner. 145 E. 1300 South, facebook.com/veganagendaslc


DINING GUIDE 2018

APRIL 12, 2018 | 29


Curation, Not Chaos

sustain yourself!

In its third season, Soho Food Park sets a high bar for food-truck excellence.

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 01-466-3 2 7 3 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m.

iver All Night Lo l e D ng We

JOHN TAYLOR

DINING GUIDE 2018

30 | APRIL 12, 2018

coffee, crepes & a mic

By Alex Springer

M Expires 04/22/2018

Expires 04/22/2018

Expires 04/22/2018

Expires 04/22/2018

Find locations and order online at BigDaddysPizza.com

y first food-truck roundup devolved into one of the most miserable nights of my life. The small parking lot became a vast tangle of people as the lines at each truck chaotically meshed into one another. A variety of food was available—but each queue was so enormous that I had to commit to visiting just one truck. For the 90 minutes I spent enduring the blacktop-amplified summer heat and inhaling generator exhaust while waiting for a burger, I couldn’t help but feel like a chump. Here I was, waiting 1½ hours for a dish that I could have gotten two blocks away—inside a building with air conditioning, no less—because it was coming to me from a grill on wheels. While this experience was enough to turn me off of the whole food-truck roundup craze, it wasn’t long after that I discovered the Soho Food Park (4747 Holladay Blvd., facebook.com/sohofoodpark). The brainchild of Holladay residents Shelly and Mark Olson, the park is the blessed antithesis of the garden-variety food truck roundup. The Olsons provide a spacious location, picnic tables, power and, perhaps the most important aspect, they curate each truck. “We try to be the filter so you don’t pick a bad truck when you come to the park,” Mark says. “We make sure the trucks are all clean

and fresh, and it’s something that we continually work on.” During Soho’s three years, the Olsons have become experts in identifying a good truck. If a vehicle has been invited to join the park roster, it’s been evaluated and approved by some industry insiders. “We have enough core trucks, so we’re much more selective about who [can] fit in to our rotation,” Shelly says. “We need a truck that cares a lot,” Mark adds. “You’ve got to have a truck operator with some soul and passion for what they’re doing.” This year’s lineup brings back some regulars, along with a few new additions. World’s Best Corn Dogs is joining the roster, commuting all the way from Kaysville to bring park attendees, well, the planet’s best corn dogs. Park City’s Freshies Lobster Co. will be slinging Maine lobster rolls. Suzy Thai and Fiore Pizza will also be on hand to serve up some delicious curry and wood-fired pizza, respectively. “We want people to come here and not have to pick just one kind of food for dinner,” Shelly says. “We have six spots, and we need to make sure they’re uniquely different.” The park is ideal for those who have been burned by a lackluster food-truck roundup, but still dig the idea of sampling a wide variety of mobile cuisine. The park is open from Thursday to Saturday, 5 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Check out their Facebook page for a full, tasty lineup.


UTAH’S BEST BURGER 2014

2015

DINING GUIDE 2018

135 W. 1300 S. | 801.487.4418

APRIL 12, 2018 | 31

LUCKY13SLC.COM


DINING GUIDE 2018

32 | APRIL 12, 2018

Buy one entree

get one

free! monday - friday only

equal or lesser value w/ this ad expires 04.30.18

54 w. 1700 s. M-F 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM


Ultimate Side Showdown Fries vs. onion rings edition.

LIS KC AR RE DE

By Amanda Rock

D

o you want fries with that? Maybe you don’t. Maybe you just want onion rings. I visited six local burger chains, did all the dirty work and ranked some of SLC’s best fried sides to help you decide.

Apollo Burger

“That’s it?!” the voice on the other end of the speaker asks accusingly. “Yes, one order of fries and an order of onion rings,” I reply. What? Like that’s weird? The smell is intoxicating as I rush home to share with my husband. If I was judging by quantity alone, Crown Burger would be the clear winner. I’ve never seen so many onion rings and french fries in an order. With a thin, light batter coating a thin strip of onion, these rings are pretty typical. The fries are just fine, too. My husband and I declared this a tie—both are adequate, but neither really stands out. Next time, maybe I’ll order the fried mushrooms or sweet potato fries. Multiple locations, crown-burgers.com

Hires Big H

The hand-cut fries are delectable, but the housemade Golden Onion Rings are even better. Hand dipped and deep fried to a golden hue, these onion rings are thick and ultra crispy, accented by a tender slice of fresh onion. With that first crunch, you can tell what’s up. You can even get these first-class onion rings on your burger, which I highly suggest. Multiple locations, hiresbigh.com

Arctic Circle

Long, spindly, salty, with crisp edges and pleasantly soggy middles: That’s how I like my fast-food fries. Also, in 1950, Arctic Circle freaking invented fry sauce—that ubiquitous tangy concoction Utah is famous for. I didn’t try the rings, because I am committed to these french fries, dipped in the original fry sauce. These are the fries I grew up eating and I will defend them until I die. Don’t @ me. Multiple locations, acburger.com

Iceberg Drive Inn

Through my delicious and important research, Iceberg Drive Inn offers the best tasting fries and onion rings. But, oh man, their onion rings are a revelation. First of all, they are gigantic at about an inch wide. There’s no stingy strip of onion here: You get a fat slice of fresh onion, hand breaded and deep fried. I relished folding them in half, dipping them in fry sauce (that Iceberg totally did not invent) and cramming them into my mouth. Four onion rings come in an order, but they are perfection. Do not pass them up. Multiple locations, icebergdriveinn.com

East Coast Subs

The obvious answer, of course, is to order both fries and onion rings. And you can do exactly that at Murray’s East Coast Subs. Order Frings, a clever combination of fries and onion rings, and your heart will sing. (Feel free to use that as a slogan, East Coast Subs). No hard decisions are necessary here, plus “Frings” is fun to say. 6056 S. State, Murray, 801-262-7827, eastcoastsubsmurray.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 33

Apollo Burger fries are consistently fresh and delicious, and my go-to when I’m having a bad day. The duality of the fried, crunchy exterior with fluffy potato-y insides is delightful. Is it only the Apollo Burger near my work that has life-changing french fries? To find out for yourself, visit the location at 148 N. Redwood Road. Their onion rings are pretty decent, too. Multiple locations, apolloburgers.com

Crown Burgers

DINING GUIDE 2018

LE

Hires Big H


DINING GUIDE 2018

34 | APRIL 12, 2018

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

SLC’S newest sushi lounge

488 E 100 S 801.359.2092 hamachislc.com


Off the Eaten Path

Indulge your spirit of adventure with these innovative desserts.

Last Course

DINING GUIDE 2018

W Snow Cream at Shirokuma

COURTESY LAST COURSE

By Alex Springer e end this guide with something sweet. From cruffins, to Japaneseinspired ice cream-stuffed crêpes, these five eateries are sure to fill your sugar cravings in inventive ways.

Though they will always be delicious, the Cronut trend is little more than a novel memory. That hasn’t deterred the folks at Fillings and Emulsions from trying to meld doughnuts with other pastries, however. Their most recent foray into the field of fried dough is called a cruffin, which, exactly as it sounds, is a glorious union between a doughnut and a muffin. These crispy, sugar-coated pastries come stuffed with several types of filling depending on the day, but the dulce de leche remains the undisputed ruler of the cruffin empire. The outer layer inevitably gives way to the thick dulce de leche filling, creating a truly caramelicious bit of pastry. 1475 S. Main, 385-229-4228, fillingsandemulsions.com

Japanese Crêpes at Doki Doki

While Doki Doki is one of Salt Lake’s finest purveyors of rolled ice cream, the thing that puts them on the map is their use of Japanese-style crêpes. Served slightly thicker than their French counterparts, they make for a chewier alternative to the traditional ice cream cone. Not sure where to begin? DD has a few excellent pre-constructed options—the Pink Blush is a strawberry cheesecake rockstar—but I suggest trying out their roulette system. This lets you cede control of your order to the behind-thecounter experts, who’ll whip up something creative for you off the top of their head. It’s the perfect out if you can’t decide which of their delicious crêpe/ice cream combos to sink your teeth into. 249 E. 400 South, 385-229-4339, facebook.com/dokidessert

Cookie Dough Cannolis at Dough Co.

Sometimes, an idea is so revolutionary that it causes us to wonder why someone didn’t think of it earlier. Such is the case for Dough Co. in Sugar House. Think of an ice cream shop. Now, replace the ice cream with gobs of multi-flavored cookie dough. That, my friends, is Dough Co. The idea of scooping up gooey chunks of red velvet, chocolate chip and salted caramel pretzel cookie dough is innovative on its own, but Dough Co. doesn’t stop there. They’ve perfected a cannoli filled with cookie dough icing, thus bringing true harmony to the dessert universe. 2121 S. McClelland St., Ste. 105, 385-258-3111, dessertwithoutrules.com

Bananas Foster Taco at Last Course

Ever since I first tried a Choco Taco, I thought it was a shame that more places didn’t do dessert tacos. Perhaps this was why I made a beeline to Last Course when I learned that they had combined bananas foster with cinnamon sugar-coated shells to create their Foster’s Banana Taco. Like any taco joint worth its stripes, Last Course serves these indulgent, caramel-coated tacos three at a time. Instead of savory condiments, the tacos come with a giant scoop of vanilla ice cream. As fun as these are to pick up and eat by hand, I recommend breaking the shell into smaller pieces and mixing them with the smooth ice cream and cooked bananas. Multiple Locations, lastcourse.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 35

While the snow cream at Shirokuma shares the spiral, ribbonlike presentation of the rolled ice cream trend sweeping the state, the similarities end right there. Snow cream is a bit like the frozen equivalent of cotton candy—the smooth texture of the icy treat melts as soon as it makes contact with your tongue, imparting the subtle flavors of chocolate, honeydew, matcha or taro as it disappears. Snow cream is available solo or with a wide variety of rarely used toppings like Pocky sticks, sweet red beans and lychee. If that’s still not gangster enough for you, the whole thing can be wrapped inside one of their housemade bubble waffles, creating a dessert that looks like a tasty neon space alien. 2843 S. 5600 West, Ste. 120, 801-251-0134, shirokumaslc.com

Cruffins at Fillings and Emulsions


BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

“50 Best Cheesy Dishes” Local Products • Local Input • Local Taste DRAPER 1194 East Draper Parkway (801) 571-3449

SUN-TUES 8AM-3PM

HOLLADAY 1919 East Murray-Holladay Road (385) 695-2464

WASATCHGRIND.COM

SOUTH JORDAN 10555 South Redwood Road (801) 826-3447

WED-SAT 8AM-8PM

SAM VAULTER

- Food Network

Award Winning Donuts

Chef Hog’s Café Opens

After catering a few events at the Tuacahn Center for the Arts in picturesque Ivins, Utah, with his Chef Hog’s food truck, Jeff Germain has opened a brickand-mortar café inside the Tuacahn gift gallery (1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3352, chefhog.com). Chef Hog’s specializes in barbecue and quickly gained a following among event attendees, and the new digs promise to take advantage of the amphitheatre’s beautiful location against the area’s red rock bluffs. The café is open from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. with occasional evening hours throughout the season.

COURTESY OF HELLO KITTY HERSELF

DINING GUIDE 2018

36 | APRIL 12, 2018

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

FOOD MATTERS

Hello Kitty Café Truck Stops in SLC

Since 2014, the Hello Kitty Café Truck has been touring the country, delivering limited-edition collectibles, cookies, cakes and, yes, a shit-ton of rainbows. On Saturday, April 14, the colorful truck makes a Salt Lake stop at Fashion Place Mall (6191 S. State) from 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. In addition to the collectibles, patrons can indulge in giant cookies, pocket pies, petit fours and macarons. Fans of the large-headed feline and her wide selection of glittery backpacks can meet up, share a cookie or two, and check out this year’s new merch.

Food Truck League Assembles

Now that the weather has started to warm up, foodtruck season is upon us. Utah’s Food Truck League is already in the process of arranging roundups throughout the state, and currently sends trucks to Oquirrh Lake on Thursday nights and Petersen’s Farm on Fridas. The league also stages roundups at downtown locations like The Gateway and the Gallivan Center. Those interested in arranging for a local food truck to cater an event can contact the league. Check out thefoodtruckleague.com for an online schedule of events, as well as a locator for trucks within its network. Food Quote of the Week: “Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration. The rest of us just get up and go to work.” –Stephen King Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


authentic

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

Mexican Food

celebrating 20 years

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

APR 13TH

steve basset group

APR 14TH

paul fritzler w/ pat & Roy

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

FAPRPEETIZEEhRase Not

d v a li o f f e r r othe 30/18 4/ Exp.

20 1 7

165 S. West Temple • SLC

801-533-8900

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

255 Main St • Park City

435-649-3097

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

1

$

3

DINING GUIDE 2018

Purc es W i t h2 E n t r e any of w it h

$

MARGARIT AS!

TACO

YS! TUatESdoDwA ntown

*Only

location

1891 Fort Union Blvd 801-942-1333 Cottonwood Heights

885 E 3900 S 801-269-1177 Murray

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm & Fri-Sat 11am-10pm | www.MyCancunCafe.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 37

123 E 200 S 801-355-0343 Salt Lake City


DINING GUIDE 2018

38 | APRIL 12, 2018

April Is for Beer Lovers Two cities; one month of celebrating craft beer. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

S

ince you’re already reading this, I probably don’t have to tell you that the craft beer scene in Utah is on pace to become one of the state’s larger economic success stories. Over the past few years, breweries and distilleries have become viable and legitimate players in Utah’s ever-evolving social and economic structure. During the 2000s, Utah saw only five new breweries emerge: Bohemian, Park City Brewing Co. (not to be confused with Park City Brewery), Tracks, Zion Canyon and Roosters’ Layton Brewpub. Only Roosters, Bohemian and Zion Canyon remain; the others closed up shop or were absorbed by other breweries. This decade has seen a comparative explosion of new breweries, with 16 independent brewhouses opening since 2010. And those don’t

include four that are still scheduled to debut in 2018, with yet another four in 2019. With all of this craft-beer growth, Utah cities are taking notice, using the momentum to attract new residents and tourists as they look to fuel economic development. Most prominent are Salt Lake City and Ogden. At the beginning of the month, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski and Ogden Mayor Mike Caldwell officially declared April Craft Beer Month. The goal is to draw attention to the growing craft-beer movement in Utah with a month of celebration and show the support for the industry. The Utah Brewers Guild’s newly appointed Executive Director Cassie Slattery, who was present at the declaration signing, echoed the city’s two goals. “The Utah Brewers Guild is thrilled Mayor Biskupski is choosing to honor the significant and growing positive impact the craft beer industry has on our community,” she said. Slattery’s new role at the Utah Brewers Guild is to help build community awareness for Utah craft-beer business though events and fundraisers, as well as to give Utah’s beer industry a voice on Utah’s Capitol Hill. Utah Brewers Guild’s president Rio Connelly—who is also the co-owner of Proper Brewing Co., Proper Burger and the Avenues Proper Brewpub— shared his appreciation for the cities’ acknowledgement as well. “I can say

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

that we in the Salt Lake City brewing community are honored that Mayor Biskupski is recognizing the support and impact our industry has on our community,” Connelly said. An active member of Utah’s beer community, wearing many hats in and outside of the brewhouse, he says recognitions like this help bolster and expand craft beer’s quality and availability: “We are growing and becoming more numerous thanks to the support of our fellow citizens. These ongoing relationships will continue to contribute to making Salt Lake City an amazing place to live.” Numerous events in both cities mark the inaugural Craft Beer Month, including: April 20, 2018: The annual Fluid Art event co-sponsored by the Utah Brewers Guild and the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art.

SLC Deputy Director of Economic Development Ben Kolendar, Utah Brewers Guild Executive Director Casey Slattery and Proper Brewing co-owner Rio Connelly.

More information at umoca.org/fluid-art/ April 28: Tour de Brewtah through Salt Lake City and surrounding communities. More information at tourdebrewtah.com Later in April: Launch of the Utah Ale Trail website, developed by Third Sun Productions. And if that’s not enough for you, beginning Monday, May 4, Utahns will get even more craft-beer related events as Utah’s brewers celebrate American Craft Beer Week, featuring events throughout the entire state. I’ll get you that schedule as soon as it becomes available. As always, cheers! CW

1624 South 1100 East Breakfast and Lunch Open from 7:30am to 2:30pm daily

Contemporary Japanese Dining

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Go

Greek

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567

Red Iguana

The owners of Red Iguana—the Cardenas family— have been in the restaurant business for more than 50 years. Following humble beginnings (the first iteration opened with a dining area that could seat just 18 guests), the restaurant has grown a national following for serving some of the finest Mexican fare in America—it’s been featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, The New York Times and countless pictures and signatures of celebrities adorn its colorful walls. For authentic Mexican fare, turn to dishes like Red Iguana’s signature cochinita pibil, papadzules and puntas de filete a la Norteña (sirloin with bacon). Multiple locations, rediguana.com

2110 w. No. Temple

nomad-eatery.com

801.938.9629

O D H E AV E N FO ManADN sen & Restauran s e t a G EGR c i l e erm t

Takashi

Owner and chef Takashi Gibo’s eclectic and everchanging list of sushi rolls and dishes traditional to his native Japan makes one wonder if sushi is appropriate for all three meals of the day. For the mild palate, try the crunch ebi roll with shrimp tempura, and for the adventurous, order a round of citrusy mussel shooters with a quail egg yolk. There’s no such thing as a bad meal at Takashi. 18 W. Market St., 801-519-9595

HSL

Salt Lake City’s HSL is the latest offering from partners Melissa Gray and Meagan Nash, the same proprietors behind Handle in Park City. The concept behind HSL—which has since burst onto the robust downtown dining scene—is to incorporate locally grown and produced food into a dining experience second to none. Choose from savory options like steelhead trout, a beef cheek burger and grilled flap steak. 418 E. 200 South, 801-539-9999, hslrestaurant.com

A LA MAISON by

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

LAYTON’S BEST INDIAN DINING EXPERIENCE VOTED

BEST

INDIAN

5 TIME BEST IN STATE WINNER

DINING GUIDE 2018

THE OTHER PLACE

FAST CASUAL DINING

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

BRING IN THIS AD FOR BUY ONE ENTREE

GET THE SECOND ONE FREE With the purchase of two drinks. Not good with any other offer Not good with the lunch special

Monday through Friday 11:00 AM-10:00 PM Saturday 12:00 PM-10:00 PM Closed Sunday

1617 S 900 E | 801-259-5843

1664 Woodland Park Dr. Layton, Utah 801-614-0107 | tasteofindiautah.com

APRIL 12, 2018 | 39

The unique & authentic french experience has arrived


DINING GUIDE 2018

40 | APRIL 12, 2018

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Banbury Cross

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

REVIEW BITES

Banbury Cross has been making doughnuts for hungry Utahns for more than 30 years, and it’s the foundation of local doughnut culture. They’ve perfected the crisp-to-chewy ratio—their doughnuts manage to retain a fluffy, but not too fluffy, inner texture contained by a paper-thin outer layer of crispness. Their crullers, old-fashioneds, apple fritters and yes, oh yes, maple bars have filled local bellies since 1986, and brought a smile to faces of countless kids, adults and even curmudgeonly journalists. Seriously, drop one of their pastel-yellow-hued boxes inside our office, and watch the sweet carnage ensue. It’s like Shark Week, only with sprinkles. Rumor around the newsroom has it that the maple bars have healing powers. For serious doughnut reflection, all roads lead to Banbury Cross. Reviewed March 15. 705 S. 700 East, 801-537-1433, facebook.com/banburycrossdonuts


FILM REVIEW

An American Tale

CINEMA

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER @CITYWEEKLY

Middle East conflict becomes just the backdrop for a Yank’s redemption in Beirut.

BLEECKER STREET FILMS

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

Rosamund Pike, Jon Hamm and Dean Norris in Beirut tempt to allow us inside the world of 1982 Lebanon, despite the ready-made set-up of the history between Mason and Karim. There’s one terrifically surreal moment, as Mason wanders through bombed-out streets and spots a couple having their wedding portrait taken amidst the rubble; he’s incredulous at the sight, not seeming to understand that for these people, there’s no other choice but to live their lives where they are. That scene, however, is too rare an exception amidst all the spy games. Beirut closes with a coda of archival news footage covering events subsequent to those portrayed in the film: Israel’s invasion of Lebanon; the terrorist attack on the U.S. Marine barracks; etc. It feels like an attempt to add complexity to the ending of the primary narrative, which, despite a faint whiff of “forget it Jake, it’s Chinatown” moral ambiguity, allows Mason his moment to feel like maybe he’s put his past behind him. The waving American flag at the end might be meant as somehow ironic, but it’s also a reminder of the perspective this story is really all about. CW

BEIRUT

| CITY WEEKLY |

BB Jon Hamm Rosamund Pike Mark Pellegrino R

TRY THESE Lebanon (2009) Yoav Donat Itay Tiran R

The Bourne Legacy (2012) Jeremy Renner Rachel Weisz PG-13

War Dogs (2016) Jonah Hill Miles Teller R

APRIL 12, 2018 | 41

Transsiberian (2008) Woody Harrelson Emily Mortimer R

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

schmoozer we see in the prologue to the hardened soul of 1982. There’s a familiar writerly quality to the character of Mason, though, as screenwriter Tony Gilroy turns him into one of those guys who’s practically a superhero in his field as long as he’s sober. His every hunch is perfect, every prediction followed in sequence by someone saying he’s crazy, then immediately by the thing he predicted actually happening. Gilroy has written four Bourne series screenplays, so maybe it’s grown tougher for him to write heroes who aren’t hyper-competent while also being—to use an actual line from this screenplay—“damaged goods.” Ultimately, however, this is meant to be a story about an operation with complex geopolitical ramifications, emphasis on “complex.” Gilroy doesn’t ease back on details, laying out the precarious state of post-civil war Lebanon, reasons the P.L.O. might be willing to bargain, the objectives of Israeli intelligence, turf battles between the C.I.A. and N.S.C. over who’s running things and a few other sub-plots shoehorned into the narrative just to make sure there’s never a dull moment. And there isn’t, to be fair, as director Brad Anderson (Transsiberian) builds enough tension into the back-and-forth negotiations that we’re not simply getting a lesson about the political history of the region. But providing backdrop feels like the justification for telling this story at all: “It’s OK that the grief of a white American is front and center, because that’s what’s allowing us to explore the grief of an entire nation.” There’s simply never enough at-

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t’s not that there’s no place for movies about the Middle East from an American perspective—but if that’s the route you intend to take, you’d better think it through really carefully. As one character in Beirut notes, this is a place steeped in 20 centuries of religious, ethnic and tribal conflict, inflamed during the most recent two centuries by industrialized Western nations pursuing their own interests. We all understand that it’s not easy to get an American movie financed without a white face front-and-center on the poster, but if you’re telling what amounts to a Yank’s loss-of-innocence or redemption story, maybe it’s worth wondering if there’s something off-putting about using oud music and orange-filtered shots of desert cities as an exotic backdrop. Beirut opens such a story in 1972, as American diplomat Mason Skiles (Jon Hamm) is informed that Karim, the 13-year-old Palestinian refugee taken in by him and his wife, Nadia (Leila Bekhti), has a brother connected to a terrorist group—a brother who takes back Karim in a raid at the Skiles’ residence, during which Nadia is killed. Ten years later, Mason is an alcoholic working in Boston as a private consultant moderating labor disputes when he’s summoned back to Beirut for a sensitive operation. A local CIA chief (Mark Pellegrino)—and old friend of Mason’s— has been kidnapped, and the kidnappers have asked for Mason specifically to help facilitate the negotiations. It’s hardly a spoiler to reveal that the now-grown Karim (Idir Chender) is involved in the kidnapping, forcing Mason to confront the demons from his past. Hamm’s performance is perfectly solid; he makes a convincing transition from the easy-going


CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net BEIRUT BB See review on p. 41. Opens April 11 at theaters valleywide. (R) BORG VS. MCENROE BBB.5 Summer 1980. Tennis rock star Björn Borg (Sverrir Gudnason) seeks his fifth Wimbledon title; notorious, hot-headed John McEnroe (Shia LaBeouf) seeks his first. Their preparations— Borg’s involve almost OCD-ish rituals, McEnroe’s a lot of partying—are intercut with childhood flashbacks and the paths that led them to their showdown. Perhaps it’s not unexpected that this Swedish/Danish/Finnish coproduction focuses more on the Swede than the American, though that’s where the surprising bit of the story is. While their public personas lead one Wimbledon announcer to dub them “Ice-Borg and Superbrat,” we see that Borg struggled mightily with his own anger, cursing refs and throwing tantrums just as McEnroe does, until he learned to control his emotions. Sports movies are never just about sports, and this uncommonly elegant and unexpectedly moving one is not just about tennis, but about how two very different men cope—or don’t—with their rage. Opens April 13 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FINDING YOUR FEET BBB.5 When snooty Sandra (Imelda Staunton) discovers that her husband is cheating on her, she flees her English countryside manor to the cozy, cramped London flat of her free-spirited, longestranged sister Bif (Celia Imrie). Sandra seems pretty horrible and rude at first as she bursts her way into Bif’s life, and precisely as we’re about to grumble, “Who the hell do you think you are?”, Bif herself does. The story settles into a tart, ultimately lifeaffirming dramedy that’s slightly edgier and far less predictable than it probably has any right to be. Director Richard Loncraine guides Staunton and Imrie in shaping the surface clichés of both characters into complex, warm portraits of women struggling with ensuring that they’re making the most of the years they have left, even if they decide they want different things out of them; screenwriters Nick Moorcroft and Meg Leonard deserve credit, too. Uplifting yet never sappy, and with a cast including Timothy

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | APRIL 12, 2018

NEW THIS WEEK

Spall and Joanna Lumley, this is an unexpected treat. Opens April 13 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—MAJ FOXTROT BBB.5 It’s virtually impossible to imagine from the first 20 minutes of writer/director Samuel Maoz’ drama where it will ultimately go—which makes it uniquely thrilling. The story opens with a visit from Israeli Army officers to the home of Michael (Lior Ashkenazi) and Daphna Feldman (Sarah Adler), informing them that their son, Jonathan, has been killed in action. The first act seems to be a compelling study of unexpressed male grief, pivoting on the military rabbi’s comment to Michael that he has to support his wife because “after all, we’re men.” Then, there’s a shift, including a new focus on Checkpoint Foxtrot where Jonathan (Yonatan Shiray) is stationed. Suddenly this story of grief becomes a story of guilt, as Maoz often employs a God’s-eye-view camera perspective to emphasize a sense of characters being judged from on high. Then it shifts again, adding additional force to both of those key thematic ideas. If Maoz gets a little cutesy with literalizing the title of his movie, he earns some leeway with a mix of bold visuals and even bolder storytelling. Opens April 13 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw RAMPAGE [not yet reviewed] Genetic experiments set monstrous animals loose on the world. Opens April 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) TRUTH OR DARE [not yet reviewed] The naughty game gets a twist when someone starts enforcing it with death sentences. Opens April 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALPHAGO At Main Library, April 10, 7 p.m. (NR) THE BREADWINNER At Main Library, April 7, 11 a.m. (PG-13) A FANTASTIC WOMAN At Park City Film Series, April 6-7, 8 p.m. & April 8, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES BLOCKERS BB.5 Three parents (Leslie Mann, John Cena and Ike Barinholtz) discover that their three daughters all plan to lose their virginity on prom night, so they set out to thwart the deflowerings. If the premise seems grotesquely retrograde, the script manages to tap-dance around this idea in a way that makes the parents’ machinations sympathetic—though the comic timing of Cena, Mann and newcomer Geraldine Viswanathan also helps make

them funny. Yet while many of the jokes land, they land in the middle of a story that keeps reminding you it’s about both coming-of-age and coming-of-middle age. There’s no need to apologize for, e.g. a punch line built on a beer enema, like old-timey sex films pretended to be “educational” about marital relations. I’ll take my ass beer with no chaser, thanks. (R)—SR

ISLE OF DOGS BBB.5 Twenty years in the future in a fictional Japanese city, all dogs have been exiled to Trash Island after outbreaks of “dog flu” and “snout fever.” Then 12-year-old Atari (Koyu Rankin) sneaks onto the island to try to find his dog, Spots, assisted by proud stray Chief (Bryan Cranston) and his pals. Wes Anderson’s stop-motion tale is delightful and utterly original, managing to pull off the rare feat of being both funny and sad. But has Anderson engaged in unseemly appropriation of Japanese culture? Aside from one human character who has a tinge of “white savior” about her, this looks and feels like an affectionate homage to Japanese pop culture, from anime to monster movies. Is it OK to enjoy exoticism, as long as you don’t mistake it for true appreciation or understanding? (PG-13)—MAJ

A QUIET PLACE BBB Director/co-writer/star John Krasinski has a crackling suspense thriller going—until he faces The Monster Problem. In a nearfuture where Earth has been overrun by deadly aliens who hunt solely by sound, a family—dad (Krasinski), mom (Emily Blunt) and two kids (Millicent Simmonds and Noah Jupe)—tries to survive by staying ever-silent. The filmmakers efficiently throw us into a post-apocalyptic scenario, capturing the details needed for survival. The set pieces are expertly staged and hauntingly shot, with a great narrative ticking clock in preparations for the pregnant mother to deliver a certain-to-cry baby. But eventually Krasinski feels obliged to focus on the creatures themselves, and a story built on relationships and ominous anticipation becomes all about weird-looking CGI creatures. The quiet place is more compelling than the freaky beast place. (PG-13)—SR

TREK: THE MOVIE BB In this strictly-for-the-faithful dramedy, teenagers and adult chaperones from a Utah LDS stake undertake a three-day simulated pioneer handcart journey—“Mormon cosplay,” as one character notes. The focus is on a doubting Thomas—literally, his name is Tom (Austin R. Grant)—as he wrestles with his crisis of faith, but director Alan Peterson and the screenwriters include a dozen subplots, from broadly comic stuff like a junk food-addicted kid, to a diabetic trekker whose condition is a Chekhovian low-blood-sugar gun waiting to go off. It all eventually gets real really fast, as genuine crisis emerges, with the accompanying, obligatory solemn prayer as the dramatic peak. Engaging performances keep things moving along, but the jump between tones is bumpier than the mountain trails these kids are hiking. (PG)—SR

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: APRIL 13TH - APRIL 19TH

APRIL 19TH

BLOCKERS

READY PLAYER ONE

SUPER TROOPERS 1 & 2 DOUBLE FEATURE STARTING AT 4:20

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Local musicians dish on the grub that puts the bomp in their bomp-bah-bomp-bah-bomp. BY RANDY HARWARD comments@cityweekly.net

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, April 13

TALIA KEYS saturday, April 14

DJ LATU

Weeknights monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food 5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY $

12 sunday funday brunch

| CITY WEEKLY |

$

$3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

APRIL 12, 2018 | 43

rootscafeslc.com). It’s a small nook above the city where, in the summer, my lady and I could bring our dogs so they might sit under our table as we enjoy huevos rancheros ($9.75) with the eggs over medium and veggie sausage, exceptionally good cups of joe ($2.25$4.75) and fresh-squeezed orange juice ($3-$4.50). Before a gig, if I’m alone, I’ll open my notebook, take in the atmosphere and let it inspire the day. 5. Sonnei (sonnei.bandcamp.com): I tend to need a lot of athome time to charge myself up before a gig, but afterwards I love to swing by Proper Burger (865 S. Main, properburgerslc.com) for their Bollywood vegan burger ($7.49) and a Lake Effect beer ($5), which pairs elegantly with some chili fries ($5.49) if I’m feeling emotional. I’m also a sucker for the bright green interior accents. Vegan stuff, bright colors and open fairly late. These are a few of my favorite things. 6. Reaper the Storyteller (reaperthestoryteller.net): This is me trying to leave the Vegan Bowl (8672 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, bit.ly/2uN45jH) in West Jordan and not making it to the car. Vegan Bowl has great service, a clean comfortable environment, and the food will make you wanna come back and try everything, which I’m currently working towards lol. The banh mi Vietnamese teriyaki chicken sandwich ($6.50) is definitely one of my many favorites and this place is way too close to my job, lol. Whether you’re vegan or not, this is the spot. 7. Anna Wilson (Troubadour 77, troubadour77.com): My favorite restaurant before a gig is Takashi (18 W. Market St., bit.ly/2v0QDDA). The torched Saikyo Miso sablefish ($11) is so fresh and amazing! It’s a great meal before you have to sing, because it’s nice and light. Now, after the gig it’s Valter’s (173 W. 300 South, valtersosteria.com), hands down. Love hanging out with Valter, especially when he just starts bringing you food from the back kitchen and spoils you with amazing Italian goodness! 8. Jeremy Cardenas (Thunderfist, facebook.com/ thunderfistslc): My usual go-to is the Pie Hole (344 S. State, pieholeutah.com). I love to grab a couple of vegan slices ($2.69) and a delightful Mexican Coke ($2). Great New York-style thin crust, and there are usually some interesting folks hanging around that place. Love it. The morning after a show, I enjoy brunch with friends at The Garage on Beck (1199 Beck St., garageonbeck. com). Mimosas ($4), shots of whiskey ($4-$8) and the Garage Eggs Benedict ($10) are my absolute favorites! The benny is served on white toast, with funeral potatoes and an awesome hollandaise sauce. This place serves the perfect Sunday-morning hangover cure. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

M

ost musicians don’t make piles of money—but that doesn’t mean they have to live on ramen and dumpster bagels. When City Weekly polled some local bards on their preand post-gig prandial proclivities, we discovered an array of cuisine charges their creative juices. Their preferred rock-it fuel consists of anything from burgers to vegan fare, steaks to sushi, pizza to fine Italian cuisine. 1. Nick Passey (solo, Folk Hogan, nickpassey.com): One of my favorite spots to eat around town is Zest (275 S. 200 West, zestslc.com). Before I head out on tour, I go to Zest to get their deviled avocados ($8). It is the only food that I miss when I’m on road for a few days. It’s four avocado halves with their housemade turmeric-carrot hummus topped with paprika, and the plate is drizzled with a cashew-based sauce. It’s on their appetizer menu, so if you have a big appetite, also try the veggie pizza. 2. Concise Kilgore (concisekilgore.com): The majority of the shows I do are at The Urban Lounge, so I would probably say Rye (239 S. 500 East, ryeslc.com), which is next door. I really don’t eat after a show; it’s usually before—but I don’t have a pre-show ritual. I kinda like how open [Rye’s layout] is, and I like sitting at the bar. When I do eat, I usually get a Rye Burger with sweet potato waffle fries ($14). It’s basically a cheeseburger with jalapeños, caramelized onions and avocado crème. 3. Gabino Ramirez (Leyenda Oculta, bit.ly/2uPLiUR): One of the best parts about Sizzler (3429 S. Redwood Road, bit.ly/2Jkgtee) is the ribeye steak ($15.99-$18.99) and the salad bar ($10.99) can’t be compared to any other food bar. I also enjoy that the West Valley location serves beer. Steak and beer together—you can’t go wrong on that. And then to top things off, the service is very friendly. Especially the general manager, Frank Unzueta. Great guy! Great atmosphere! 4. Rick Gerber (Badfeather, rickgerbermusicology.com): On many mornings, and often before I head off to a gig, I find myself time and again at Roots Café (3474 S. 2300 East,

thursday, April 12

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Rock-It Fuel

LIVE Music


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

FRIDAY 4/13

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

They’re one of heavy metal’s biggest and most influential acts, but Judas Priest shows a folk influence in taking their name from a Bob Dylan tune (“The Ballad of Frankie Lee and Judas Priest”) and covering Joan Baez’ “Diamonds and Rust” (coincidentally a song about Dylan) on their third album, Sin After Sin (1977). Priest’s sound evolved slowly and steadily from psychedelic blues rock on their 1974 debut Rocka Rolla, becoming heavier with every new album—especially after Tim “Ripper” Owens replaced longtime singer Rob Halford in 1996. This continued when Halford returned in 2003, shedding his Harleyriding leather daddy image for something more epically demonic. The band’s latest album, Firepower (Epic), is produced by Tom Allom (who helmed 1988’s Ram It Down) and Andy Sneap (producer/engineer for dozens of metal bands, including Megadeth, Obituary and Napalm Death), and maintains Priest’s signature darkness and gravity. That aesthetic suits Priest as much as their ’80s arena rock era that saw them leading raised-fist sing-alongs to “You’ve Got Another Thing Coming” and “Turbo Lover,” the louder material is a surprisingly good fit with the hits. Fans might be disappointed that guitarist Glenn Tipton is sitting out most of the tour due to Parkinson’s disease—but Sneap, formerly of the bands Sabbat and Hell, is proving a capable substitute in his stead. (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $46-$72, all ages, vivintarena.com

The Residents

If they had any kind of conventional pop-music molecule in their bodies,

RALPH ARVESEN VIA FLICKR

Judas Priest

The Residents’ patented eyeball helmet headwear would be known the world over. If they were some kind of nouveau-metal genre, Faygo-swilling Juggalos might be sporting the giant orbs instead of makeup. But then, the Louisiana-based band’s distorted take on the pop repertoire is an acquired taste, and their experimental pieces frame them as obscure listening. Their Ralph Records label made releases by musical freaks like Snakefinger and Renaldo and the Loaf possible. Still, The Residents are better known for their visual impact than for how they sound. That’s a pity, because they’ve done a lot to push the limits and boundaries of what might, by some stretch of the imagination, be considered popular music. Popular in a textbook sense: Their album Stars & Hank Forever (Ralph Records, 1986) featured covers of Hank Williams and John Philip Sousa. They are to music what outsider artists have been to visual art. Their most recent release, The Ghost of Hope (Ralph, 2017), is based on a historical narrative about train wrecks. Any live performance is bound to be an indescribably strange theatrical spectacle. (Brian Staker) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $30, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

The Residents

Judas Priest

MONDAY 4/16 Clownvis Presley

You might recall this circus peanut of a rockabilly singer from “We Need a Gimmick” (City Weekly, Feb. 15, 2018), which featured a bunch of weird bands. If not from there, then you might have seen him on a competition reality show that we won’t name because yuck (although CP definitely provided yuks). Anyway, in the Clownvis Presley blurb, I call him, “… a little bit clown, a little bit king of rock ’n’ roll and a little bit Bible historian on ‘Jesus Christ Eatin’ on a Chicken Wing,’ where he schools the world on how Jesus is ‘my lord and my savior/ watch him savor the flavor.’” I went on to encourage readers to check out “Wing,” a hilarious and incisive satire of religion and religious iconography. Or maybe it’s just a funny novelty song, like Clownvis’ other tunes: “Barack O’s Tacos,” “Don’t Be a Bitch (Or You Won’t Get Stuff for Christmas)” and “Dancing with the Wolfman (In a Non-Gay Way).” And now I urge you to go see him perform at Rye, ’cause if he’s half as crazy live as he is in his YouTube videos, it’s gonna be a good time. (RH) Rye, 239 S. 500 East, 6 p.m., $12, sartainandsaunders.com

Clownvis Presley

SEAN BARRETT

GREAT THE KABUKICHO

44 | APRIL 12, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


4/20 PARTIES

AT THE SUE

HIGHLAND 6TH ANNUAL WITH HERBAN EMPIRE STATE UNDECLARED MILLIONAIRE GREEN DRINKS, SWAG GIVEAWAYS

HIGHLAND live music

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00

MURPHY AND THE GIANT

FRI SAT

THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY:

TONY HOLIDAY AND THE VELVETONES

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $2,000 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

MON & THURS

TUESDAY:

THURS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1200 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

PATIO IS OPEN!

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

STARTS @ 7PM

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

SAVE

$50

• FULL HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO RESOLUTION • PARKING MODE • 2.0" LCD SCREEN • 3.5-METER CAR CHARGER POWER CABLE

$14999

1080p HD Video at 27.5 FPS

2013

2014

List Price: $20000

(Frames per Second)

WED

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $650 POT

SUN &

KARAOKE

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES INCLUDES HD & HDR VIDEO RECORDING IN A COMPACT DESIGN WITH A 8GB MEMORY CARD.

SAVE

$200

List Price: $35000

10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 4/19/18

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

APRIL 12, 2018 | 45

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

THE ELDERS

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

$14999

*Some cars may require additional parts and labor

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

WED

PARTY W/ DJ BAD HAIR DAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

FRIDAY THE 13TH

FRI SAT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DASH CAMERA

20 1 7

STATE live music

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!!

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!


LIVE

MARISA GESUALDI

Patio Season is here! The Breeders

4.12 MORGAN SNOW

4.13 SIX FEET IN THE PINE

4.14 MAGPIE

4.16 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

4.18 PROPER WAY

4.19 MEANDER CAT

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

Kim Deal and Tanya Donelly each had critically lauded bands when they founded the Breeders in 1989. But the Pixies and Throwing Muses, as significant as they were to early indie rock (then called alternative rock), didn’t have quite the same effect as this combo featuring Deal and her twin sister Kelley. The Breeders occupies its own unique niche; not quite the rarified atmosphere of Donelly’s Muses or the Frank Black demagoguery of Deal’s Pixies. There’s something like the comfort of an old sweatshirt in The Breeders’ music. Throughout a career spanning three decades on and off, the ladies of The Breeders have shown that women can hold their own in a hard-edged musical genre. All Nerve (4AD, 2018) might only

Lincoln Durham

JAY TREVINO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

46 | APRIL 12, 2018

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

The Breeders

be their fifth release, but it’s already being touted as one of the best albums of the year. Nothing could match the groundswell of their first two albums, Pod (1990) and Last Splash (1993), with hits “Cannonball” and “Divine Hammer,” but this show features the Last Splash lineup (no Donnelly), and they are bound to play some of those great tunes, as well as their new ones. Is it their last splash? Don’t bet on it. (Brian Staker) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m. (doors), $23 presale (plus fees), 21+, thecomplexslc.com

TUESDAY 4/17

Lincoln Durham, Ghost Wolves, Dealin’ in Dirt

What with the likes of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, Scott H. Biram, Amigo the Devil and a slew of similar acts out there serving up SouthernGothic musical gumbo around the world, you’ve got to wonder if there’s a saturation point on the horizon. It’s artists like Lincoln Durham that allay such a concern. The SoGoth punk-blues-gospel musician and songwriter has proven himself a worthy contributor to the dark country genre. He wields a mighty fiddle (and banjo and guitar), obviously reads a lot (reading is, after all, fundamental, but he seems to prefer literature to pulp), which makes his songs a pleasure to analyze. Also, he clearly digs the dark stuff—I’d bet cash that he has everything Nick Cave and Tom Waits have ever put out. And here’s wagering that plenty of us are pickin’ up every Durham release, including his fourth and latest, And Into Heaven Came the Night. (RH) The Loading Dock, 445 S. 400 West, 6:30 p.m., $12 presale; $14 day of show, all ages, loadingdockslc.com


GRAB A BITE

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

2PM

TONIGHT

HIGHLAND

Thursdays

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS-

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG-$2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

KARAOKE

Mondays 75¢ WINGS ALL DAY

saturdays

SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

Tuesdays KARAOKE

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! EVERY TUESDAY

BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM

9PM

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO $3000 POT-8PM

APRIL 11

THE NATE ROBINSON TRIO AT 10PM

APRIL 12

TOURING ARTISTS “HENHOUSE PROWLERS” 7PM

WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT April 11th Reuscher Haart Piesporter Gold Riesling, Mosel, Germany. April 18th Coquille Blanc White Table Wine, Paso Robles. THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

$3 pints $3 whiskeys MONDAYS Blues night

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

APRIL 13 APRIL 14

| | | | | | | | | | | |

*Dine-In Only

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

7:30-10:30 PM 6-9PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 6-9PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 8-12AM 7:30-10:30 PM 6-9PM 7:30-10:30 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

APRIL 12, 2018 | 47

APRIL 15 APRIL 16 APRIL 17 APRIL 18

THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC

DHCC PROJECT SCOTT FOSTER DJ CHASEONE2 JOSHY SOUL & THE COOL DJ CHASEONE2 “RABBIT HOLE” BRI CAUZ MARMALADE CHILL DJ MR. RAMIREZ “RABBIT HOLE” DJ DOLPH & CO. “RABBIT HOLE” BLUES ON FIRST RYLEE MCDONALD REEDER, DENSON, LAWRENCE TRIO

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.

| CITY WEEKLY |

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY APRIL 11 APRIL 12

APRIL 14

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM CHASEONE2 10PM

...

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

APRIL 16

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM TOURING ARTISTS “SUNDAE & MR. GOESSL” 10PM

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

APRIL 13

LOUNGE40

APRIL 15

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM-3PM SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES JAM WITH NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST 7PM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

48 | APRIL 12, 2018

WEDNESDAY 4/18

CONCERTS & CLUBS

BETH ELLIOTT

Kiefer Sutherland, Rick Brantley

THURSDAY 4/12 LIVE MUSIC

Bassmint Pros + J.O.B. + Freemind Movement (Metro Music Hall) The Bee + Deception (Metro Music Hall) Brian Fallon & The Howling Weather + Ruston Kelly (Urban Lounge) Jazz Small Group (Fine Arts West) Jazz Voices (Gallivan Center) Justin Timberlake (Vivint Arena) Latin Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Lo Moon + Kraus (The State Room) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow) Nicky Romero (Park City Live) Reggae At The Royal (The Royal) Scott Foster (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Mike (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door)

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

BLISS WITCH & MY FRIEND ZERO

Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Martin Solveig (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 4/13 LIVE MUSIC

Berlin Breaks + Citizen Soldier + The Family Gallows (The Royal) Blue Divide (The Spur) Bradley Palermo + Ghost In The Willow + Well Okay + CDSBS (The Beehive) Brisk (Downstairs) Dan Weldon (Snowbird) Danger Alley (Brewskis) Double Helix (The Bayou) Downfall (Liquid Joe’s) Ginger & The Gents (The Barbary Coast) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon)

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM $650

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

Wasn’t this dude just here? Indeed, actor/musician Kiefer Sutherland performed at The Urban Lounge about 11 months ago. It could easily have been the first and last time that happened. As we’ve become conditioned to with so called “actor bands,” the music is generally not that great, and such a creative tangent typically results in said thespian returning to his main thing. Not so with Sutherland, who wrote on Facebook last month, “I couldn’t have imagined the depth with which I have fallen in love with touring. To have the opportunity to convey intimate, personal stories to an audience, for me, has proven to be priceless.” A lifelong musician and longtime record label owner—he and his good buddy, singer-songwriter-producer Jude Cole, operate Ironworks Music (Rocco Deluca, Billy Boy on Poison, Lifehouse)—Sutherland has been waiting to drop his debut album for some time. Down in a Hole straddles the fence between country and classic rock, and it’s surprised a lot of us critics who (for better and for worse) are accustomed to dismissing “actor bands” out of hand. That’s possibly because of Cole’s co-writes, but also because Sutherland judiciously didn’t blow his musical wad at the height of his fame. Live, expect the show to smoke—partly because of Sutherland’s whole smoldering thing, and partly because his touring band features guitarist Michael Gurley (dada) as musical director. (Randy Harward) Park City Live, 427 Main, 8 p.m. (doors), $25-$40, 21+, parkcitylive.net

Hylian + Allies Always Lie + No Company + Galagher + Memories Lost (The Complex) JJ Lawrence Group (The Yes Hell) Joshy Soul & The Cool (Lake Effect) Judas Priest (Vivint Arena) see p. 44 Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels (Egyptian Theatre) The Mix (Avant Groove) The Motion Coaster + Mimi Knowles + DJ Sam Cannon (Velour) The Nude Part + Yak & The Sherpas (Kilby Court) Orphan Cabaret & The Voodoo Darlings Burlesque (Prohibition) The Pour + Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (The State Room) The Residents (Urban Lounge) see p. 44 Street Corner Boogie (Pat’s BBQ) Telesomniac + The Cold Year (The Ice Haüs) Timeless (Club 90) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Hog Wallow) Wild Country (The Westerner Club)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin)

WEDNESDAYS

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Felli Fel (Sky) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) New Wave ’80s w/DJ Courtney (Area 51) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Metro Music Hall)

SATURDAY 4/14 LIVE MUSIC

8Six + De Vera + L.I.F.T. + Sisu + N9X + Van Gala (The Loading Dock) Berner (The Depot) Black Tiger Sex Machine + Kai Wachi + Sullivan King + Lektrique (The Complex) Blockhead + DJ Juggy (Urban Lounge)

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY

9PM - NO COVER JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET (Kilby Court) Rage Against The Supremes (The Spur) Roadie + Ben Reneer + Holly Arballo (Velour) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Timeless (Club 90) Vindata & Electric Mantis (Elevate) Wild Country (The Westerner Club)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Gothic + Industrial + Dark 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Juggy (Sky) Top 40+ EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 4/11

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 4/12 Reggae at the Royal

newborn slaves i-ternal roots

$

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 4/13

KARAOKE

Live Music

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

Berlin Breaks

Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

Citizen Soldier, and The Family Gallows saturday 4/14

LSDO (CD Release Party) LHAW, Jeff Dillion and the Revivals

Tuesday 4/17

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

coming soon 4/20

with Ginger & The Gents 4/21 kash'd Out 5/12 5/25

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

sammy j

tomorrow's bad seeds

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

APRIL 12, 2018 | 49

Tunnel Vision, Seranation, Newborn Slaves

| CITY WEEKLY |

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

Live Music

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

The Blue Divide (Brewskis) Bri Cauz + Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Cloudship + Alternator + Lantern By Sea (Piper Down Pub) Dangus Kong (Pat’s BBQ) Eagle Twin + Green Druid + Motherkilljoy (Metro Music Hall) The English Beat (O.P. Rockwell) Folk Hogan (The Yes Hell) Head For The Hills (The State Room) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) Jerry Cochran & The Salt Flat Trio (The Ice Haüs) Live Trio (The Red Door) Lounge 40 w/ Angelica Pet-Me (Prohibition) Magpie (Hog Wallow MCKC + SPOBO + Breakfast In Silence (The Beehive) Michelle Moonshine (Harp & Hound) Michelle Moonshine & The Distillers (Johnny’s on Second) Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels (Egyptian Theatre) Mooseknuckle (The Barbary Coast) Mr. Lucky Blues (The Bayou) Proper Way (Snowbird) Psychotic Reaction + The Elders + Lube


RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

BAR FLY

PROUDLY

75+ BEERS AVAILABLE

CRAFT COCKTAILS - WINE - BEER

80’S NEW WAVE NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY 7PM-11PM W/ DJ BIRDMAN (RAFFLE PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS) FEATURING ONE OF EAST SIDE SALT LAKE’S BEST PATIOS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

“The things you own end up owning you.” That’s what Chuck Palahniuk wrote in the infamous Fight Club. And if there’s anyone who understands how mundane and tiresome the daily grind can be, it’s Bobby Boggs, whom I met at SandBar SLC, a massive indoor/outdoor beach volleyball beer bar. “The food’s good, Cory [the owner] is awesome,” says Boggs, a self-proclaimed loyal patron. “He did this right. He built this from the ground up.” Boggs isn’t your average barfly. Coach of Apex volleyball club, he traded in his office desk to coach full time. “I came from the corporate world, had a cubicle job,” he says. “I liked it—but I didn’t love it. Now I get to coach kids and have an impact on their lives.” SandBar has a fun ambience due to the tourney taking place a few courts over, and I can’t help but get into the laid-back vibe as reggae music plays over the sound system. As I make my way around the courts, I run into owner Cory Merrell. Inspired by what other beach-craving landlocked states did, he decided to give Utah an authentic beach experience. “There’s a sense of community here,” Merrell says. “There’s a lot of people that become best friends through the SandBar.” With student tuition, this might be the closest I can get to a beach on my budget, but after grabbing something cold to drink and digging my toes into the cool sand, I don’t have a care. (Rachelle Fernandez) SandBar SLC, 680 S. Redwood Road, North Salt Lake, 801-631-4160, sandbarslc.com

eliver All Night Lo D e ng W

serving locally produced beers & spirits

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | APRIL 12, 2018

SANDBAR SLC

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

Find additional coupons on page 30

ENTER TO WIN a TCL 55” Roku 4k Ultra HD Smart TV at cityweekly.net/freestuff

Expires 04/22/2018

Participating locations only. Order online at BigDaddysPizza.com


PINKY’S

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CABARET

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 4/15 LIVE MUSIC

Amigo The Devil (Rye) Andrew Sheppard Music (Garage on Beck) Goodnight, Texas + Brother Chunky + Columbia Jones (Kilby Court) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Scenic Byway + The Americants, Reaper The Storyteller (Urban Lounge) Talia Keys (Snowbird) Young Planetary + Till I Fall + Almost Amatuer + Sports Shorts (The Underground)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

LIVE MUSIC

MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM MONDAYS & THURSDAY

FREE FASHION SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

WEDNESDAY 4/18 Geographer + Joan + Strange Familia (Metro Music Hall) Kiefer Sutherland + Rick Brantley (Park City Live) see p. 48 Lany + The National Parks + Knox Fortune + Harry Hudson (The Great Saltair) Proper Way (Hog Wallow) Scott H. Biram +Jesse Dayton + Rod Melancon (Urban Lounge) Slow Bloom + Breakfast In Silence + Sariah + I Buried The Box (The Beehive) Tony Holiday (The Spur) Zigtebra + Conquer Monster + Drive45 (Kilby Court)

Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

SATURDAY, APRIL 14TH

MOOSE KNUCKLE

WE CARRY THE MLB PACKAGE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

Open from 10am -2am 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4 24 2 S o u th S t a te S t re e t S LC , U T 8 4107 NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

KARAOKE THAT DOESN’T SUCK EVERY THURSDAY W/ MIKEY DANGER

DANCE MUSIC ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY

MONDAYS 7:30PM TUESDAYS 9PM $4 JAMESON TRIVIA WITH $5 SHOT & BEER BREAKING BINGO THE TRIVIA FACTORY DAILY

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

APRIL 12, 2018 | 51

KARAOKE

GINGER & THE GENTS

| CITY WEEKLY |

Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. JD & Arian (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Youth Jam (Music Garage)

FRIDAY, APRIL 13TH

Cradle Of Filth + JINJER + Uncured (The Complex) John 5 & the Creatures (The Complex)

POOL TOURNAMENTS

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

LIVE MUSIC

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ KJ Johnny Irish (Club 90)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

TUESDAY 4/17

KARAOKE

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You)

FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK\ \RIBEYE SPECIAL $8 ON FRIDAY'S

Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

BEST

GARLIC BURGER

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

The Breeders (The Complex) see p. 46 Clownvis Presley (Rye) see p. 44 Far From + Echo Muse + Untamed Engine + Follie + Noise Ordinance + Almost Amatuer (The Loading Dock) Kate Nash + Miya Folick (The Depot) PJ Morton + Brik.Liam (The State Room) Rivals + Totem City + The Archives + Rejoin The Team (Kilby Court) Tad Calcara & New Deal Sing (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Tyler Childers + Lillie Mae (Urban Lounge) The Vistanaunts feat. Major Tom + TOSO + Shecock & The Rock Princess (Metro Music Hall)

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

MENU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MONDAY 4/16

Josiah Johnson + Chelsea Coleman + Aviva L. (Velour) Lincoln Durham + Ghost Wolves + Dealin’ In Dirt (The Loading Dock) see p. 46 Loma + Jess Williamson + Strong Words (Urban Lounge) Rick Gerber (Piper Down Pub) Rylee McDonald (Lake Effect) Scott Klismith (The Spur) Skinny The Kid + New Limbo + Fired Pilots (Kilby Court) Tony Holiday Blues (Prohibition)

CHECK OUT OUR NEW


© 2017

BRING 'EM HOME

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. They may be two-car or three-car 2. Better than average 3. Droid maker 4. Steinbeck’s “East of ____”

45. “Oh, one more thing,” at the bottom of a letter 46. Language from which the word “Mississippi” comes 47. Capri, e.g. 49. Ignoramus 50. “What awful news!” 53. Unfortunate first name of an NBA star considering he claimed to have slept with over 20,000 women 54. ____ tea 57. Tear 58. Virginia Woolf’s “____ Dalloway”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

5. ____ room 6. Church council 7. Mink who was the first Asian-American woman elected to Congress 8. “Reader, I married him” heroine 9. Punk offshoot 10. California racetrack city 11. Friend made on the first day of college, perhaps 12. Loosened, as a knot 13. “You’re not the only one!” 18. Cries of discovery 23. In “Casey at the Bat,” the “him” in “Kill him!” 25. Jackie of “Shanghai Noon” 26. Recipe amount 28. Hit series starring Ted Danson 29. Lions and tigers, but not bears 31. Snoozefest 32. Bug spray brand with an exclamation point in its name 34. For ____ 35. Predatory seabird 36. 6/13/1986, for Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen 37. Completely false 38. “Well done!,” in slang 41. Sonnet sections 42. Brief shower? 43. Gave a thumbs-up 44. Some sculptures

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Minecraft fan, e.g. 6. 1994 action film with the tag line “Get ready for rush hour” 11. Neighbor of Poland: Abbr. 14. Dwelling 15. “I deserve a pat on the back!” 16. Singer/artist with the website imaginepeace.com 17. What an expert at memorization possesses? 19. Like Advil: Abbr. 20. “The company for women” 21. Garden ____ 22. “Live from Death Row” author ____ Abu-Jamal 24. Neighbor of Poland: Abbr. 25. Wyoming city served by Yellowstone Regional Airport 26. British artist Hirst 27. Long times 29. Audi toe work? 30. Pico de gallo, e.g. 31. They’re often worn by performers with names like Dee Licious and Toni A. Ward 33. What a meteorologist might predict? 39. Animal sounds heard in “(How Much Is) That Doggie in the Window” 40. Chocolate-and-caramel Hershey candies 42. Something to hold when learning to walk? 47. How Union soldiers were dressed 48. Macedonia’s capital 49. Two capsules, say 51. Dict. fill 52. Ankle bones 53. “Bull Durham” actor Robert 54. Suffix with Dixie 55. Shtetl interjections 56. Classic antiwar cry ... or a message aimed at 17-, 29-, 33- and 42-Across 59. “Can’t Fight This Feeling” band ____ Speedwagon 60. Grammy-winning group named after a radio command 61. Charged 62. OB/GYNs, e.g. 63. “Coal Miner’s Daughter” director Michael 64. Inks

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | APRIL 12, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries statesman Thomas Jefferson was the third president of the United States. He wrote one of history’s most famous documents, the Declaration of Independence. He was an architect, violinist, inventor and linguist who spoke numerous languages, as well as a philosopher who was knowledgeable about mathematics, surveying and horticulture. But his most laudable success came in 1789, when he procured the French recipe for macaroni and cheese while living in France, and thereafter introduced the dish into American cuisine. Just kidding! I’m making this little joke in the hope that it will encourage you to keep people focused on your most important qualities, and not get distracted by less essential parts of you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your allies are always important, but in the coming weeks they will be even more so. I suspect they will be your salvation, your deliverance and your treasure. So why not treat them like angels or celebrities or celebrity angels? Buy them ice cream and concert tickets and fun surprises. Tell them secrets about their beauty that no one has ever expressed before. Listen to them in ways that will awaken their dormant potentials. I bet that what you receive in return will inspire you to be a better ally to yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will be able to find what you need in places that are seemingly devoid of what you need. You can locate the possible in the midst of what’s apparently impossible. I further surmise that you will summon a rebellious resourcefulness akin to that of Scorpio writer Albert Camus, who said, “In the midst of hate, I found there was, within me, an invincible love. In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile. In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm. No matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger— something better, pushing right back.”

Technical Project Manager needed w/Masters Degree or Foreign Equiv in IT or Comp Sci or Comp Engg & 1 yr exp in job offered or Bach’s deg or Foreign Equiv in IT or Comp Sci or Comp Engg & 5 yrs of progressive work exp as Tech’l Project Mgr or Tech’l Lead performing following job duties: Plan & coord applications using OOA&D, SDLC principles & Dsgn Patterns. Dsgn, dvlp & test Web, Mobile, Windows & Service Oriented applications using .Net technologies, JQuery & Angular. js. Dvlp & deploy web services, Microservices, Cloud services & client/server applications. Perform data modeling using SQL & Oracle database. Perform configuration using SVN, GIT & TFS. Perform integration & automation using MS Build, Jenkins, MS Deploy, Custom LARA tool & legacy systems. Job Locations: Draper, UT or client sites across the U.S. Must be available to travel & relocate to client sites for temporary projects. Mail res to: Innovecture LLC 473 Lana Ct., Draper, UT 84020

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| COMMUNITY |

APRIL 12, 2018 | 53

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the early 1990s, Australian electrical engineer John O’Sullivan toiled on a research project with a team of radio astronomers. Their goal was to find exploding mini-black holes in the distant voids of outer space. The quest failed. But in the process of doing their experiments, they developed technology that became a key component now used in Wi-Fi. Your digital devices work so well in part because his frustrating misadventure led to a happy accident. According to my reading of your astrological omens, Taurus, we might soon be able to make a SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1936, Herbert C. Brown graduated from the University of Chicago comparable conclusion about events in your life. with a bachelor’s degree in science. His girlfriend Sarah Baylen rewarded him with the gift of a $2 book about the elements boron and GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the fictional world created by DC Comics, the superhero silicon. Both he and she were quite poor; she couldn’t afford a more Superman has a secret identity as a modest journalist named expensive gift. Brown didn’t read the book for a while, but once he did, Clark Kent. Or is it the other way around? Does the modest he decided to make its subject the core of his own research project. journalist Clark Kent have a secret identity as the superhero Many years later, he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discoverSuperman? Only a few people realize the two of them are the ies about the role of boron in organic chemistry. And it all began with same. I suspect there is an equally small number of allies who that $2 book. I bring this story to your attention, Sagittarius, because know who you really are beneath your “disguises,” Gemini. But I foresee you, too, stumbling upon a modest beginning that eventually upcoming astrological omens suggest that could change. Are yields breakthrough results. you ready to reveal more about your true selves? Would you consider expanding the circle that is allowed to see and appreci- CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 20 B.C., Rome’s most famous poet was Quintus Horatius ate your full range and depth? Flaccus, known to us today as Horace. He prided himself on his meticulous craftsmanship, and advised other writers to be equally CANCER (June 21-July 22): Playwright Tennessee Williams once spent an evening trying scrupulous. Once you compose a poem, he declared, you should to coax a depressed friend out of his depression. It inspired him put it aside for nine years before deciding whether to publish to write a poem that began like this: “I want to infect you with it. That’s the best way to get proper perspective on its worth. the tremendous excitement of living, because I believe that you Personally, I think that’s too demanding, although I appreciate have the strength to bear it.” Now I address you with the same the power that can come from marshalling conscientiousness. And message, Cancerian. Judging from the astrological omens, I’m that brings me to a meditation on your current state, Capricorn. convinced you currently have more strength than ever before to From what I can tell, you might be at risk of being too risk-averse; bear the tremendous excitement of living. I hope this news will you could be on the verge of waiting too long and being too cauencourage you to potentize your ability to welcome and embrace tious. Please consider naming a not-too-distant release date. the interesting puzzles that will come your way in the weeks ahead. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Luckily, you have an inventive mind and an aptitude for experiLEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you finished dealing with spacious places and vast vistas and mentation. These will be key assets as you dream up creative expansive longings? I hope not. I hope you will continue to explore ways to do the hard work ahead of you. Your labors might not big bold blooming schemes and wild free booming dreams until at come naturally, but I bet you’ll be surprised at how engaging least April 25. In my astrological opinion, you have a sacred duty to they’ll become and how useful the rewards will be. Here’s a tip keep outstripping your previous efforts. You have a mandate to go on how to ensure you will cultivate the best possible attitude: further, deeper and braver as you break out of shrunken expecta- Assume that you now have the power to change stale patterns tions and push beyond comfortable limitations. The unknown is that have previously been resistant to change. still more inviting and fertile than you can imagine. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): May I suggest that you get a lesson in holy gluttony from a VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Between Dec. 5 and 9, 1952, London was beset with heavy fog Taurus? Or perhaps pick up some pointers in enlightened selfblended with thick smog. Visibility was low. Traffic slowed and interest from a Scorpio? New potential resources are available, events were postponed. In a few places, people couldn’t see their but you haven’t reeled them in with sufficient alacrity. Why? own feet. According to some reports, blind people, who had Why oh why oh why?! Maybe you should ask yourself whether a facility for moving around without the aid of sight, assisted you’re asking enough. Maybe you should give yourself permispedestrians in making their way through the streets. I sus- sion to beam with majestic self-confidence. Picture this: Your pect that a metaphorically comparable phenomenon may soon posture is regal, your voice is authoritative, your sovereignty is arise in your sphere, Virgo. Qualities that might customarily be radiant. You have identified precisely what it is you need and regarded as liabilities could at least temporarily become assets. want, and you have formulated a pragmatic plan to get it.

Software Engineer needed w/ Associate of Science deg or Foreign Equiv in Math or Comp Sci or Comp Engg & 3 yrs exp as S/ware Engr or Lead Analyst performing following job duties: Analyze dvlpmt phase using J2EE, OOA&D techniques, SDLC principles & s/ware dsgn patterns. Integrate multi-module applications using Jenkins. Integrate & deploy environments using ANT & Maven scripts. Build trouble ticketing applications using BMC Ready. Dvlp class diagrams, sequence & use case diagrams using UML Rational Rose. Prep tech’l specs & dsgn based on reqmts using Visio. Dvlp web applications using Java, J2EE, Spring FrameWork, RESTful, J2EE Patterns applications & deploy on WebSphere servers. Make sure code is up to par by using Sonar Qube & App scans for security issues. Integrate applications using ILOG Jrules & JBPM. Integrate Enterprise Integration Systems using Oracle & DB2. Triaging performance challenges. Mail res to: Innovecture LLC 473 Lana Ct., Draper, UT 84020 Job Locations: Draper, UT or client sites across the U.S. Must be available to travel & relocate to client sites for temporary projects.


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

54 | APRIL 12, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903897, JUDGE JAMES BLANCH. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO LARRY ROBINSON AND AISHA WELLS: You are each summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must each file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must each mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $17,038.02. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussena

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189903898, JUDGE MARK KOURIS. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JAMES EDWIN, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JAMES EDWIN: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $1,120.50. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

Business Systems Analyst needed w/ Bach’s deg or Foreign Equiv in Business Admin or Comp Sci or Comp Engg & 1 yr exp as Business Systems Analyst or S/ware Engr performing following job duties: Prep dsgn docs after performing Impact analysis. Convert Dsgn Docs to tech’l solutions. Perform Build activities using COBOL, XML, MQ’s, D/base Changes in IMS DB, DB2 SQL & VSAM. Perform component level testing using Endeavor & Expeditor as per workshop feasibility. Utilize data workshop tools ISPF, File AID Manager for DB2, IMS, File, QMF & SPUFI to extract & modify test data for module level validation & client reports. Perform D/base backup activities through DB2 BMC utilities, prep robust Jobs for execution purpose. Create SORT jobs to format data for business needs, Code SQL DB2 stored procedure in Native & COBOL to facilitate Midrange components to perform DB2 DML activities on backend data. Plan, dsgn & provide scalable solutions by taking application road map into consideration using Mainframes, Pega RPA, Pega PRPC & Hadoop technologies. Mail res to: Innovecture LLC 473 Lana Ct., Draper, UT 84020 Job Locations: Draper, UT or client sites across the U.S. Must be available to travel & relocate to client sites for temporary projects.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH DONALD E. SANCHEZ and MARGO SANCHEZ, Husband and Wife, Plaintiffs, Case No. CV 18-54 vs. RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN and JANE DOES I-X, AND ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO, TO WIT: The South Half of the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 44 North, Range 3 West, B.M., Benewah County, Idaho. Defendants. TO: RANDY SANCHEZ, ALVA JONES, DON SANCHEZ, LINDA BALL, JOSEPH SANCHEZ, LAURA NELSON, DAVID SANCHEZ, SABRA RICHINS, CRISTI MILLARD, TAMMY O’NEAL, TRACY BROWN, JENNY MORROW, HEATHER BROWN, SCOTT BROWN, GARY SANCHEZ AND DIANA MCKUNE heirs to the Estate of THEODORE A. SANCHEZ, and/or ELLEN J. SANCHEZ; and JOHN or JANE DOES I-X, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS OF REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF BENEWAH, STATE OF IDAHO. You have been sued by Donald E. and Margo Sanchez, the Plaintiffs, in the District Court in and for Benewah County, Idaho, Case No. CV 17-346. The nature of the claim against you is an Action to Quiet Title to real property. Any time after 21 days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response, in the proper form, including the Case No., and paid any required filing fee to the Clerk of the Court at 701 W. College Avenue, Ste. 203, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-3241, and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff ’s attorney at Lake City Law Group PLLC, 907 Main Avenue, St. Maries, Idaho 83861, (208) 245-9155.A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiffs. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter.

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Anderson’s Folly

Utah is known for its natural castles. We have the famous Castle Valley in Grand County where glorious desert vistas are found. Our stellar public lands (including Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Monument Valley) make me think you can’t find better castles anywhere. Those towers are part of a landscape created 300-plus million years ago by nature— not man. We Utahns make ice castles in Midway during the freezing months, create Castle of Chaos haunted house attractions around Halloween and build mega mansions all over the state. None of those can compare with Mother Nature’s beauty, but man tries. Over the ages, we have tried to outdo nature—and never succeed. Here is such a story: One of the least known man-made castles in Utah doesn’t exist anymore, but there’s a plaque that stands in its original footprint. In the late 1800s, Robert Anderson built a castle where visitors could climb up 54 feet and look out over the burgeoning Salt Lake City. He got granite from the same quarry the LDS temple was built from, and he designed it to look like a medieval tower you’d find in Scotland or England. An original Utah pioneer, he might have been inspired by Edinburgh or Balmoral Castle across the pond he saw when he was a child. His fairy tale fantasy was supposed to make him money, as he was charging people to climb up the three flights to enjoy the view. Sadly, this entrepreneur didn’t get rich. Everyone knows that if you go up to the top of the Avenues area or Capitol Hill, you can get stunning views for free. Anderson had to board up the tower for a time, but it was later reopened free to the public until it was torn down in 1932 due to neglect and vandalism. The only remnant of the tourist attraction is the plaque and a small monument made from the original granite. It’s worth a walk to Anderson’s monument on a clear, smog-free day. You can look directly across at the Capitol building and further to the Great Salt Lake, down into Memory Grove/City Creek Canyon, and south to the high rises downtown. The Anderson Tower Memorial sits next to the Tower Hill Condominiums just east of 303 A St. in Salt Lake City. n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915027, JUDGE ANN BOYDEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. PEGGY NOELANI TAHU, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO PEGGY NOELANI TAHU: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,554.01. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

We’ve got our ducks in a row!

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

LAYTON Lovely 2 & 3 bdrms. 1.5 bath townhomes! Swamp cooler, hook-ups, dishwasher, extra storage closet! $895-$995

MARMALADE Must Have 3 bdrm. 2 bath condo! Hook-ups, covered parking, central A/C, Balcony, Vaulted ceilings! $1145-$1195

HIGHLAND PARK SLC/LIBERTY

LIBERTY PARK

Private 1 bdrm. duplex! Washer Perfect 2 bdrm! Counter bar dryer included, shared covered dining, dishwasher, wall mounted patio, cute eclectic details! $795 A/C, track lighting! $795

MILLCREEK Kingsized 1 bdrm. w/ balcony! Extra storage, washer/dryer included, walk in closet, POOL! $765

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


S NEofW the

Public Service Announcement Police in Sheboygan, Wis., appealed to the public for help in late March tracking down a most unusual perpetrator. “Over the past year and a half,” the department posted on its Facebook page, “someone has been clogging the women’s toilet (at the Deland Community Center) with a 20-ounce soda bottle. This is very strange ... and gross.” The Sheboygan Press reported that the string of more than 25 incidents began in 2016. Joe Kerlin, the city’s parks and forestry superintendent, says the suspect is likely an adult male, based on security camera footage from outside the restroom. The city’s resulting plumbing bills have totaled between $2,000 and $3,000.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Carvalho, 27, and Ronildo Moreira de Araujo, 29, the two men forcibly tattooed Silva’s forehead with the words “I am a thief and an idiot.” The Daily Mail reported that Carvalho and Araujo were caught after filming themselves inking Silva’s forehead and sending the video to friends; both were sentenced to jail time. Silva is out on bail, awaiting trial for shoplifting.

WEIRD

Oops A man playing with a baseball on the roof of a parking structure in Honolulu on March 23 had to be rescued by firefighters after he fell into the space between two buildings and got stuck, KHON2 TV reported. Security guard Ray Rodrigues was dispatched to the roof to run the 55-year-old off, but found the man had fallen into a 7- to 9-inch-wide space between the cement walls. When pulling him out with a rope failed, firefighters resorted to using drills and saws to cut through the concrete to free him. He was taken to a hospital in serious condition.

n Ruan Rocha da Silva, 18, was caught in late March trying to steal five cans of deodorant from a supermarket in Sao Paulo, Brazil. His prominent tattoo might have given him away: A year ago, after Silva tried to steal a bike from Maycon Wesley

Selling homes for 5 years

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM DAKOTA LOFT live/work unit. Main floor office with living area up, 2 BA. Perfect for folks who want a commercial space in a groovy condo conversion at a TRAX station. Secure pkng and storage. NOW $359,900 amazing ! TOWER HILL Original developer’s own unit where he combined two for 2400 sq. ft, 3 BR and views from 3 directions of Memory Grove, the capitol building and the morning sun. Rare 2 car gated parking. $599,900

Dakota Loft PENTHOUSE top floor end unit, two

levels facing west, with huge patio, 1 car garage, and THREE BR, THREE BATH. Large master BR with en suite bath and fantastic soaking tub. Right on Planetarium TRAX station. Owner job change. $579,900 915 W. 300 South: absolute darling two story home! Open floor plan on main with upstairs is a large master BR and bath. And seller is tall! Updated, rented until May 31st and then it’s yours. Bamboo floors, update HVAC and water heater. On UTA bus line. $249,900 Updated Cape Cod: an amazing two story with large master up, 3 total bedrooms and 3 baths, designer kitchen and front picture windows that view the valley. A gardners dream of a back yard with terraced perinials and trees in front and back yards. $629,900

Anger Management Maghan LeGlue, 25, of Bridge City, La., shifted her rage into high gear on March 24 when she used her 2004 Ford Expedition to pin her 27-year-old boyfriend up against his Ford Crown Victoria, according to the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office. The Times-Picayune reported that the couple, who have three children together, had been arguing when LeGlue hit him, shattering his leg. Doctors performed emergency surgery on the victim. LeGlue was taken into custody and was held without bond.

Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 34 years in the Land of Zion

Weird Power In Didcot, England, known as the country’s “most normal town,” one resident creatively tried to change people’s perceptions with additions to road signs along local highway A4130. The prankster added destinations such as Narnia, Gotham City, Middle Earth, Emerald City and Neverland to roundabout signs, telling the BBC (on condition of anonymity): “To me there’s nowhere that is normal, there’s no such thing.” He said he’s been making “creative interventions” all over the country for about 20 years. The Oxfordshire County Council responded that while the additions were “amusing,” they’ll be removed as soon as the county’s potholes are fixed.

Overachiever It was lucky 13 for Hot Springs, Ark., resident Patricia Ann Clanton, 55, as she was charged with her 13th felony DWI on March 26. Garland County Sheriff’s Deputy Richard Garrett stopped to check on a Chevrolet Monte Carlo parked in the lot of Buddy Bean Lumber Co. around 1 a.m. on March 26, reported the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. An assisting officer noticed a strong smell of intoxicants and asked Clanton and her passenger to get out of the car. Clanton refused a field sobriety test but agreed to a Breathalyzer, which registered her blood alcohol level at more than twice the legal limit. Nevertheless, she entered an innocent plea in Garland County District Court. Since 1994, Clanton has been convicted of driving drunk in various Arkansas jurisdictions and served jail time.

Julie “Bella” De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY NMLS#243253 Loan officer

I

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180 9785 S. Monroe St. #200 Sandy, UT 84070

801-747-1206 Providing All Mortgage Loan Services

APRIL 12, 2018 | 55

Bright Ideas The Snell Family Park ficus tree, a sprawling giant that has shaded the park in Fort Myers, Fla., for more than a century, played the part of groom to several brides on March 24 as Karen Cooper and others tried to save it from being cut down. The News-Press reported that while its roots are on the park property, some of the limbs in the tree’s 8,000-square-foot canopy extend to an adjacent property that is for sale, and potential buyer Jeff Romer was concerned about his liability for the tree’s upkeep. In December, Fort Myers’ public works officials approved the removal of the tree, prompting protests from Cooper and others. She got the idea of marrying the tree from women in Mexico who have been protesting deforestation. “I thought, ‘Oh, we should marry the ficus tree’—kind of giggle, giggle.” A city spokeswoman said the city is moving ahead to save the newlywed tree, but Cooper is worried that the decision is not final. “If they cut down this tree, I’m going to be a widow.”

Babs De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

n A dairy truck driver lost his job in early March after being caught on a surveillance camera urinating near dairy cows in a barn at Tremblay Farm in Highgate, Vt. While no charges were filed, Monica Massey of the Dairy Farmers of America said the driver’s behavior was unacceptable. “We saw the videos. What we saw was deplorable,” Massey told WCAX TV. Darleen Tremblay said she was “shattered” by what she saw on the video. “I couldn’t move. I froze and I shook,” she added.

International Relations Italian chef Fabio Picchi has offered three American exchange students in Florence a four-hour cooking lesson after the women tried to cook pasta in a pot without water on March 18. The pasta burst into flames within minutes, and firefighters were summoned to put out the fire. “We thought it was cooked like that,” one of the students told La Nazione. “They will have lunch in our restaurant with two of my extraordinary cooks,” Picchi said. “I think this can be useful to them, but also to us. Understanding is always ... what is beautiful and necessary.”

Garden Gnomes

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Questionable Judgments Shoppers at the Miracle Mile Shopping Center in Monroeville, Pa., got more than they bargained for on April 8, 2017, as model Chelsea Guerra, 22, of Indiana Borough and photographer Michael Warnock, 64, of Point Breeze conducted a nude photo shoot around 11 a.m. According to the Pittsburgh TribuneReview, as Warnock took photos and families looked on, Guerra walked around and posed wearing only thigh-high black stockings and high-heeled shoes. In early March of this year, Guerra and Warnock pleaded guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct after other charges were dropped, and paid a $300 fine. “My nude modeling is honest work,” Guerra said, “and I use it mostly to fund my college career.”

Inexplicable Eastern Michigan University student Andrew (who didn’t give a last name), 22, wasn’t making any kind of statement or protesting any government action (or lack thereof) on March 12 when he filled a pothole in Trenton with a whole box of Lucky Charms and a gallon of milk. Andrew then lay on the road with a spoon and ate the cereal out of the pothole. “I don’t know where the inspiration came from, but when it hit me, I knew it was a good idea,” Andrew told MLive.com. “It tasted great. If I was blindfolded, I wouldn’t know if it was a pothole or a bowl.”

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives and...


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

56 | APRIL 12, 2018

The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

TOOTHACHE? WISDOM TEETH? Save time and money call 801.467.2255 or visit

WORDS IF U DON’T WANT TO PICK UP Your dog’s poop - - - I DO! $10/wk most yards Text 801.673.4372

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947 Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

GOT WORDS? 801-577-4944 sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

PULLMYTOOTH.

www.

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

com

3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

WE ARE HIRING HIRING KITCHEN HELPER, (hourly & salaried), LINE COOK, DISH WASHER $10-$15 PER HOUR; SERVERS $3-$5 PER HOUR PLUS TIPS. FULL AND PART TIME AVAILABLE!

Main Street Dental 801.467.2255 3195 s. main st.

3195 S. Main St #225 Salt Lake #225 salt lake, city

STUDENTS ARE WELCOME.

NEED A GARAGE, SHOP, STORAGE, OR RV BUILDING? FROM BASIC, TO CUSTOM SIZES & STYLE WE TEAR-OUT & REPLACE OLD BUILDINGS & DRIVEWAYS WE DO: Demolition Tree Removal New Driveways, Entrys & Decorative Patios Foundations, Monolithic Floors Attached Or Detached From Your Home WE DO PLANS & GET PERMITS FOR YOU NO “PRE-FAB”...”BUILT FROM SCRATCH...ON-SITE

THOUSANDS OF REFERENCES I OVER 2,000 IN SALT LAKE AREA

FREE ESTIMATES

801-842-3300

www.bonfirebuildingcorp.com

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

Sell Your Car Today .COM “TAKE YOUR SKIN OFF!”

W ith O ne P hOne C all

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

City Weekly April 12, 2018  

Salt Lake's Food Scene is Unbelievable Dining Guide 2018

City Weekly April 12, 2018  

Salt Lake's Food Scene is Unbelievable Dining Guide 2018